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Sample records for citicoline add-on therapy

  1. Lixisenatide as add-on therapy to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown DX

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dominique Xavier Brown, Emma Louise Butler, Marc Evans Diabetes Department, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UK Abstract: Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus do not achieve target glycosylated hemoglobin A1c levels despite optimally titrated basal insulin and satisfactory fasting plasma glucose levels. Current evidence suggests that HbA1c levels are dictated by both basal glucose and postprandial glucose levels. This has led to a consensus that postprandial glucose excursions contribute to poor glycemic control in these patients. Lixisenatide is a once-daily, prandial glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptor agonist with a four-fold affinity for the GLP-1 receptor compared with native GLP-1. Importantly, lixisenatide causes a significant delay in gastric emptying time, an important determinant of the once-daily dosing regimen. An exendin-4 mimetic with six lysine residues removed at the C-terminal, lixisenatide has pronounced postprandial glucose-lowering effects, making it a novel incretin agent for use in combination with optimally titrated basal insulin. Lixisenatide exerts profound effects on postprandial glucose through established mechanisms of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and glucagon suppression in combination with delayed gastric emptying. This review discusses the likely place that lixisenatide will occupy in clinical practice, given its profound effects on postprandial glucose and potential to reduce glycemic variability. Keywords: lixisenatide, add-on therapy, insulin, GLP-1 receptor agonist, postprandial glucose, pharmacodynamics

  2. Ritanserin as add-on medication to neuroleptic therapy for patients with chronic or subchronic schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Boer, JA; Vahlne, JO; Post, P; Heck, AH; Daubenton, F; Olbrich, R

    The effect of ritanserin, a potent 5HT(2A/2C) receptor antagonist, used as an add-on medication to neuroleptic treatmentin patients with schizophrenia, was compared with that of placebo, in an international, double-blind, parallel-group study. Previously established neuroleptic therapy was

  3. Studies with lucid dreaming as add-on therapy to Gestalt therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, B; Klösch, G; Saletu, B

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the present exploratory clinical study was to evaluate LD as an add-on therapy for treating nightmares. Thirty-two subjects having nightmares (ICD-10: F51.5) at least twice a week participated. Subjects were randomly assigned to group: A) Gestalt therapy group (= GTG), or B) Gestalt and lucid dreaming group therapy (= LDG). Each group lasted ten weeks. Participants kept a sleep/dream diary over the treatment. Examinations with respect to nightmare frequency and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were carried out at the beginning, after five and ten weeks and at a follow-up three months later. Concerning nightmare frequency, a significant reduction was found in both groups after the ten-week-study and at the follow-up (Wilcoxon test: P ≤ 0.05). Significant reduction in dream recall frequency could only be observed in the GTG (Wilcoxon test: P ≤ 0.05). For subjects having succeeded in learning lucid dreaming, reduction was sooner and higher. Sleep quality improved for both groups at the follow-up (P ≤ 0.05, Wilcoxon test). Only the LDG showed significant improvement at the end of therapy (P ≤ 0.05). Lucid dreaming, in combination with Gestalt therapy, is a potent technique to reduce nightmare frequency and improve the subjective quality of sleep. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Which thiazide to choose as add-on therapy for hypertension?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrios V

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vivencio Barrios,1 Carlos Escobar2 1Department of Cardiology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, 2Department of Cardiology, Hospital La Paz, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Combined therapy is required in the majority of patients with hypertension to achieve blood pressure (BP targets. Although different antihypertensive drugs can be combined, not all combinations are equally effective and safe. In this context, the combination of a renin angiotensin system inhibitor with a diuretic, usually a thiazide, particularly hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ or thiazide-like diuretics, such as chlorthalidone or indapamide, is recommended. However, not all diuretics are equal. Although HCTZ, chlorthalidone, and indapamide as add-on therapy effectively reduce BP levels, the majority of studies have obtained greater BP reductions with chlorthalidone or indapamide than with HCTZ. Moreover, there are data showing benefits with chlorthalidone or indapamide beyond BP. Thus, chlorthalidone seems to have pleiotropic effects beyond BP reduction. Moreover, compared with placebo, chlorthalidone has small effects on fasting glucose and total cholesterol, and compared with HCTZ, chlorthalidone achieves significantly lower total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Similarly, indapamide has demonstrated no negative impact on glucose or lipid metabolism. More importantly, although head-to-head clinical trials comparing the effects of indapamide or chlorthalidone with HCTZ are not available, indirect comparisons and post hoc analyses suggest that the use of chlorthalidone or indapamide is associated with a reduction in cardiovascular events. Despite this, the most frequent diuretic used in clinical practice as add-on therapy for hypertension is HCTZ. The purpose of this review is to update the published data on the efficacy and safety of HCTZ, chlorthalidone, and indapamide as add-on therapy in patients with hypertension. Keywords: blood pressure control, hydrochlorothiazide

  5. Theophylline as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy in acute ischaemic stroke (TEA-Stroke)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modrau, Boris; Hjort, Niels; Østergaard, Leif

    2016-01-01

    the collateral supply in acute ischaemic brain tissue and thus facilitate reperfusion despite proximal vessel occlusion. The primary study objective is to evaluate whether theophylline is safe and efficient in acute ischaemic stroke patients as an add-on to thrombolytic therapy.MethodsThe TEA-Stroke Trial...... models, clinical case series and randomized clinical trials are controversial. A Cochrane analysis from 2004 concluded that there was not enough evidence to assess whether theophylline is safe and improves outcomes in patients with acute ischaemic stroke. The TEA-Stroke Trial will clarify whether...

  6. Effects of pitavastatin add-on therapy on chronic kidney disease with albuminuria and dyslipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohsawa, Masato; Tamura, Kouichi; Wakui, Hiromichi; Kanaoka, Tomohiko; Azushima, Kengo; Uneda, Kazushi; Haku, Sona; Kobayashi, Ryu; Ohki, Kohji; Haruhara, Kotaro; Kinguchi, Sho; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Umemura, Satoshi

    2015-12-09

    In non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients with dyslipidemia, statin therapy is recommended to prevent cardiovascular complications. Dyslipidemia has been also shown to be an independent risk factor for the progression of CKD. However, it is still unclear whether statin therapy exerts an inhibitory effect on renal deterioration in CKD patients with dyslipidemia. The purpose of the present study was to examine possible therapeutic effects of statin add-on therapy on renal function as well as parameters of lipid and glucose metabolism, arterial stiffness and oxidative stress, in comparison to diet therapy, in CKD patients with dyslipidemia. This study was a randomized, open-label, and parallel-group trial consisted of a 12-months treatment period in non-dialysis CKD patients with alubuminuria and dyslipidemia. Twenty eight patients were randomly assigned either to receive diet counseling alone (diet therapy group) or diet counseling plus pitavastatin (diet-plus-statin therapy group), to achieve the LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) target of dyslipidemia.

  7. Effects of Vildagliptin Add-on Insulin Therapy on Nocturnal Glycemic Variations in Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Fei; Shen, Yun; Sun, Rui; Zhang, Dan-Feng; Jin, Xing; Zhai, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Su, Xiao-Fei; Wu, Jin-Dan; Ye, Lei; Ma, Jian-Hua

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether vildagliptin add-on insulin therapy improves glycemic variations in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (T2D) compared to patients with placebo therapy. This was a 24-week, single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Inadequately controlled T2D patients treated with insulin therapy were recruited between June 2012 and April 2013. The trial included a 2-week screening period and a 24-week randomized period. Subjects were randomly assigned to a vildagliptin add-on insulin therapy group (n = 17) or a matched placebo group (n = 16). Scheduled visits occurred at weeks 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) was performed before and at the endpoint of the study. A total of 33 subjects were admitted, with 1 patient withdrawing from the placebo group. After 24 weeks of therapy, HbA1c values were significantly reduced at the endpoint in the vildagliptin add-on group. CGM data showed that patients with vildagliptin add-on therapy had a significantly lower 24-h mean glucose concentration and mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE). At the endpoint of the study, patients in the vildagliptin add-on group had a significantly lower MAGE and standard deviation compared to the control patients during the nocturnal period (0000-0600). A severe hypoglycemic episode was not observed in either group. Vildagliptin add-on therapy to insulin has the ability to improve glycemic variations, especially during the nocturnal time period, in patients with uncontrolled T2D.

  8. Mozart K.448 acts as a potential add-on therapy in children with refractory epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Wei-Te; Wang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Hsiu-Lin; Wu, Hui-Chuan; Tsai, Chin-Lin; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Weng, Chia-Fen; Lee, Mei-Wen; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2011-03-01

    Mozart's Sonata for two pianos in D major, K.448 (Mozart K.448), has been shown to improve mental function, leading to what is known as the Mozart effect. Our previous work revealed that epileptiform discharges in children with epilepsy decreased during and immediately after listening to Mozart K.448. In this study, we evaluated the long-term effects of Mozart K.448 on children with refractory epilepsy. Eleven children with refractory epilepsy were enrolled. All of the patients were diagnosed as having had refractory epilepsy for more than 1 year (range =1 year to 6 years 4 months, mean =3 years 11 months) and had been receiving at least two antiepileptic drugs (AED). During the study period, they listened to Mozart K.448 once a day before bedtime for 6 months. Seizure frequencies were recorded 6 months before they started listening to this music and monthly during the study period. All of the patients remained on the same AEDs during the 6-month study period. Frequencies of seizures were compared before and after listening to Mozart K.448. Eight of eleven patients were seizure free (N=2) or had very good responses (N=6) after 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448. The remaining three (27.3%) showed minimal or no effect (effectiveness Mozart K.448 should be further studied as a potential add-on therapy in the treatment of children with refractory epilepsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Citicoline. Ferrer Internacional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, A V

    2001-12-01

    Citicoline was originally developed and launched by Ferrer for the treatment of stroke, and is now also being investigated for the potential treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the US, the compound is being developed by Interneuron for the treatment of stroke. A US launch had been rescheduled for 2002 although a decision on future US development of citicoline was intended to be made in conjunction with Takeda, Interneuron's US licensee. Takeda had decided not to pursue development by December 2000 and was in negotiations with Interneuron for another product candidate. Interneuron stated at this time that it would explore other partnership opportunities for citicoline. In 1993, Interneuron licensed exclusive marketing and manufacturing rights to citicoline in the US and Canada from Ferrer. By September 1997, a patent application had been filed worldwide by Interneuron for the use of citicoline in the reduction of cerebral infarct volume, and in September 1998, US-05801160 was issued for citicoline relating to the protection of brain tissue from cerebral infarction following ischemic stroke. In December 1999, US rights to the commercialization of citicoline were licensed to Takeda.

  10. Erythropoietin as an add-on treatment for cognitive side effects of electroconvulsive therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lejla Sjanic; Petersen, Jeff Zarp; Vinberg, Maj

    2018-01-01

    trial investigates (1) whether short-term add-on treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) can reduce the cognitive side -effects of ECT and (2) whether such effects are long-lasting. Further, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to explore the neural underpinnings...... cognitive benefits of EPO are investigated with structural and functional MRI after the final EPO/saline infusion. The primary outcome is change from baseline to after EPO treatment (3 days after eight ECT sessions) in a cognitive composite score spanning attention, psychomotor speed, and executive...... of covariance. Functional MRI data will be preprocessed and analyzed using the FMRIB Software Library....

  11. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauer, T; Sokoll, J; Cremers, F; Schmidt, R; Harmansa, R; Luzzara, M

    2008-01-01

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90 0 and 270 0 gantry angles. Compared to a 10 x 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 x 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In order to

  12. Characterization of an add-on multileaf collimator for electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauer, T; Sokoll, J; Cremers, F; Schmidt, R [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Harmansa, R [3D Line, Schwarzenbruck (Germany); Luzzara, M [3D Line, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: t.gauer@uke.uni-hamburg.de

    2008-02-21

    An add-on multileaf collimator for electrons (eMLC) has been developed that provides computer-controlled beam collimation and isocentric dose delivery. The design parameters result from the design study by Gauer et al (2006 Phys. Med. Biol. 51 5987-6003) and were configured such that a compact and light-weight eMLC with motorized leaves can be industrially manufactured and stably mounted on a conventional linear accelerator. In the present study, the efficiency of an initial computer-controlled prototype was examined according to the design goals and the performance of energy- and intensity-modulated treatment techniques. This study concentrates on the attachment and gantry stability as well as the dosimetric characteristics of central-axis and off-axis dose, field size dependence, collimator scatter, field abutment, radiation leakage and the setting of the accelerator jaws. To provide isocentric irradiation, the eMLC can be placed either 16 or 28 cm above the isocentre through interchangeable holders. The mechanical implementation of this feature results in a maximum field displacement of less than 0.6 mm at 90{sup 0} and 270{sup 0} gantry angles. Compared to a 10 x 10 cm applicator at 6-14 MeV, the beam penumbra of the eMLC at a 16 cm collimator-to-isocentre distance is 0.8-0.4 cm greater and the depth-dose curves show a larger build-up effect. Due to the loss in energy dependence of the therapeutic range and the much lower dose output at small beam sizes, a minimum beam size of 3 x 3 cm is necessary to avoid suboptimal dose delivery. Dose output and beam symmetry are not affected by collimator scatter when the central axis is blocked. As a consequence of the broader beam penumbra, uniform dose distributions were measured in the junction region of adjacent beams at perpendicular and oblique beam incidence. However, adjacent beams with a high difference in a beam energy of 6 to 14 MeV generate cold and hot spots of approximately 15% in the abutting region. In

  13. Antidiabetic Effects of Add-On Gynostemma pentaphyllum Extract Therapy with Sulfonylureas in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. T. T. Huyen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate the antidiabetic effect of the traditional Vietnamese herb Gynostemma pentaphyllum (GP together with sulfonylurea (SU in 25 drug-naïve type 2 diabetic patients. Methods. After 4-week treatment with gliclazide (SU, 30 mg daily, all patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups to add on GP extract or placebo extract, 6 g daily, during eight weeks. Results. After 4-week SU treatment, fasting plasma glucose (FPG and HbA1C decreased significantly (P<0.001. FPG was further reduced after add-on therapy with 2.9 ± 1.7 and 0.9 ± 0.6 mmol/L in the GP and placebo groups, respectively (P<0.001. Therapy with GP extract also reduced 30- and 120-minute oral glucose tolerance test postload values. HbA1C levels decreased approximately 2% units in the GP group compared to 0.7% unit in the placebo group (P<0.001. Conclusion. GP extract in addition to SU offers an alternative to addition of other oral medication to treat type 2 diabetic patients.

  14. THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF OXCARBAZEPINE AS ADD-ON THERAPY IN INTRACTABLE EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN

    OpenAIRE

    Azita TAVASSOLI; Mohammad GHOFRANI; Mohsen ROUZROKH; Eznollah AZARGASHB

    2010-01-01

    Objective1-3% of the population suffer from epilepsy. Up to 30% of them develop refractory epilepsy and their seizures occur more than once per month despite receiving at least 2 first line antiepileptic drugs. In  this group, more efficacious antiepileptics are needed. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Oxcarbazepine as an adjunction therapy in children with refractory epilepsy.Materials & MethodsFrom Feb 2004 until Sep 2006, 30 patients with refractory epilepsy...

  15. Treatment of traumatised refugees with basic body awareness therapy versus mixed physical activity as add-on treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordbrandt, Maja Sticker; Carlsson, Jessica; Lindberg, Laura Glahder

    2015-01-01

    . In clinical studies, physical activity has shown a positive effect on psychiatric illnesses such as depression and anxiety and for patients with chronic pain. However, scientific knowledge about physical activity as part of the treatment for traumatised refugees is very limited and no guidelines exist......-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. The first group only receives treatment as usual while the second and the third groups receive either Basic-Body Awareness Therapy or mixed physical activity as add-on treatments. Each physical activity is provided for an individual 1-hour consultation per week...... as well as quality of life, functional capacity, coping with pain, body awareness and physical fitness. DISCUSSION: This study will examine the effect of physical activity for traumatised refugees. This has not yet been done in a randomised controlled setting on such a large scale before. Hereby the study...

  16. [Memantine as add-on medication to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor therapy for Alzheimer dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussmann, R; Donix, M

    2017-01-01

    Currently available data indicate superior therapeutic effects of combination treatment for Alzheimer dementia with memantine and acetylcholine esterase inhibitors in certain clinical contexts. Out of five randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials two showed superior therapeutic effects in comparison to monotherapy with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors regarding various domains. Recently published meta-analyses and cost-benefit analyses also showed positive results. Recently published German guidelines for dementia treatment also take these new data into account and recommend combination treatment in patients with severe dementia on stable donepezil medication. This article gives an overview of current evidence for combination therapy.

  17. Bright light treatment as add-on therapy for depression in 28 adolescents: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhofer, Helmut; von Klitzing, Kai

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, a significant incidence of depression in the younger population has been observed. Bright light therapy, an effective therapeutic option for depressed adults, could also provide safe, economical, and effective rapid recovery in adolescents. The randomized trial included 28 inpatients (18 females and 10 males) between 14 and 17 years old with depressive complaints. The study was conducted between February and December of 2010 in Rodewisch, Germany. Half of the patients (n = 14) first received placebo (50 lux) 1 hour a day in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am for 1 week and then received bright light therapy (2,500 lux) for 1 week in the morning from 9:00 am to 10:00 am. The other half (n = 14) first received bright light therapy and then received placebo. Patients were encouraged to continue ongoing treatment (fluoxetine 20 mg/day and 2 sessions of psychotherapy/week) because there were no changes in medication/dosage and psychotherapy since 1 month before the 4-week study period. For assessment of depressive symptoms, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was administered 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, and on the day after and 1 week after bright light treatment. Saliva samples of melatonin and cortisol were collected at 8:00 am and 8:00 pm 1 week before and 1 day before placebo treatment, on the day between placebo and bright light treatment, on the day after bright light treatment, and 1 week after bright light treatment and were assayed for melatonin and cortisol to observe any change in circadian timing. The BDI scores improved significantly (P = .015). The assays of saliva showed significant differences between treatment and placebo for evening melatonin (P = .040). No significant adverse reactions were observed. Antidepressant response to bright light treatment in this age group was statistically superior to placebo. World Health Organization International Clinical

  18. Improvement of post-hypoxic action myoclonus with levetiracetam add-on therapy: A case report

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    Božić Ksenija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic post-anoxic myoclonus, also known as Lance-Adams syndrome, may develop following hypoxic brain injury, and is resistant to pharmacological therapy. Case report. The patient we presented developed post-anoxic action myoclonus with severe, completely incapacitating myoclonic jerks. Myoclonus did not respond to the treatment with commonly used agents, i.e. valproate and clonazepam alone or in combination. Improvement of the action myoclonus was observed only after adding levetiracetam. Conclusion. Although Lance-Adams syndrome may not be fully curable at this point, levetiracetam appears to be a promising agent that can significantly improve functional level and overall quality of life of patients with this disorder.

  19. Long-term efficacy and safety of vildagliptin add-on therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus with insulin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazawa, Ippei; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Notsu, Masakazu; Tanaka, Sayuri; Kiyohara, Nobuaki; Koike, Sayo; Yamane, Yuko; Tada, Yuko; Sasaki, Motofumi; Yamauchi, Mika; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu

    2017-01-01

    The use of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitors in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin may be beneficial. However, the long-term efficacy and safety of vildagliptin add-on therapy in these patients remains unclear. A total of 73 patients with type 2 diabetes treated with insulin were randomly assigned to receive either add-on therapy of vildagliptin (n=37) or conventional therapy without DPP-4 inhibitors (n=36) for glucose control. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels, dose and number of insulin injections, number of hypoglycemia episodes, and liver and renal function were monitored for 2years. The baseline characteristics of subjects, including age, dose of insulin injections, or HbA1c levels, did not differ between the two groups. In the vildagliptin group, HbA1c levels significantly decreased and the significance of HbA1c reduction was maintained for 24months (from 8.0±1.2% to 7.4±1.0%, pinsulin injections significantly reduced (-5.6units, p1, and -0.9 times, p1). However, these parameters were unchanged in the control group. The number of patients who experienced three or more episodes of hypoglycemia per year was significantly lower in the vildagliptin group (n=4) than in the control group (n=11) (odds ratio, 0.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.97; pinsulin treatment for 24months was well tolerated and led to sustained reductions in HbA1c, the dose and number of insulin injections, and the risk of hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ozone therapy as add-on treatment in fibromyalgia management by rectal insufflation: an open-label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Tallón, Javier; Menéndez-Cepero, Silvia; Vilchez, Juan S; Rodríguez-López, Carmen M; Calandre, Elena P

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of ozone therapy by rectal insufflation as add-on therapy in fibromyalgia management. Patients with fibromyalgia received 24 sessions of ozone therapy during a 12-week period. At each session, the administered dose of ozone was 8 mg (200 mL of gas, at a concentration of 40 μg/mL). Ozone sessions were given 5 days a week during the first 2 weeks, twice a week from weeks 3-6, and weekly from weeks 7-12. Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) was the main outcome measure, and was administered at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Secondary outcome measures, administered at baseline and at endpoint, were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Beck Depression Inventory, the State and Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the SF-12, the abbreviated form of the Short Form Health Survey. Emergent adverse reactions to treatment were recorded. FIQ total scores decreased significantly during the study period, with the decrease being observed in the first 4 weeks of the study. Significant improvement was also seen both in depression scores and in the Physical Summary Score of the SF-12. Transient meteorism after ozone therapy sessions was the most frequently reported side-effect. At the dose and number of sessions used in this study, ozone therapy by rectal insufflation seems to be beneficial for physical symptoms and depression of fibromyalgia.

  1. Mortality reduction among persons with type 2 diabetes: (-)-Epicatechin as add-on therapy to metformin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Moreno-Ulloa, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes has become a worldwide epidemic, and is growing at a rapid rate with drastic projections for developing countries. Mexico occupies the ninth place worldwide for type 2 diabetes prevalence, and in the foreseeable future, it is expected rise to the seventh place. Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in these patients. Although several drugs are approved for the treatment of type 2 diabetes that reduce factors associated with myocardial infarction, an excess risk of death is still present. In this regard, the American Diabetes Association recommends metformin (oral glucose lowering drug) as the first-line therapy in type 2 diabetic subjects, based on its amply confirmed positive metabolic effects; however, its capacity to reduce cardiovascular mortality in type 2 diabetic subjects is inconclusive. Thus, mortality reduction in these patients has been an elusive goal, and is therefore, imperative to evaluate new pharmacological interventions that may favorably impact mortality in these individuals. On the other hand, epidemiological studies have suggested that moderate consumption of cacao-derived products (i.e., chocolate and cocoa) may reduce the risk of diabetes, myocardial infarction, and cardiovascular disease-associated mortality. Moreover, interventional studies have also suggested that dark chocolate and cocoa consumption is vasculoprotective in normal and type 2 diabetic individuals. (-)-Epicatechin ((-)-EPI) is the main flavanol present in cacao, and suggested to be responsible for the beneficial effects observed after dark chocolate/cocoa consumption. Interestingly, in vivo studies have evidenced the capacity of (-)-EPI to reduce infarct size, and preserve cardiac mechanics in rodent models of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Nonetheless, long-term studies using (-)-EPI and evaluating its effects on mortality are lacking. Thus, based on their particular properties, it is valid to speculate that (-)-EPI and metformin in conjunction may

  2. Acupuncture and related therapies used as add-on or alternative to prokinetics for functional dyspepsia: overview of systematic reviews and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Robin S T; Chung, Vincent C H; Wong, Charlene H L; Wu, Justin C Y; Wong, Samuel Y S; Wu, Irene X Y

    2017-09-04

    Prokinetics for functional dyspepsia (FD) have relatively higher number needed to treat values. Acupuncture and related therapies could be used as add-on or alternative. An overview of systematic reviews (SRs) and network meta-analyses (NMA) were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of different acupuncture and related therapies. We conducted a comprehensive literature search for SRs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in eight international and Chinese databases. Data from eligible RCTs were extracted for random effect pairwise meta-analyses. NMA was used to explore the most effective treatment among acupuncture and related therapies used alone or as add-on to prokinetics, compared to prokinetics alone. From five SRs, 22 RCTs assessing various acupuncture and related therapies were included. No serious adverse events were reported. Two pairwise meta-analyses showed manual acupuncture has marginally stronger effect in alleviating global FD symptoms, compared to domperidone or itopride. Results from NMA showed combination of manual acupuncture and clebopride has the highest probability in alleviating patient reported global FD symptom. Combination of manual acupuncture and clebopride has the highest probability of being the most effective treatment for FD symptoms. Patients who are contraindicated for prokinetics may use manual acupuncture or moxibustion as alternative. Future confirmatory comparative effectiveness trials should compare clebopride add-on manual acupuncture with domperidone add-on manual acupuncture and moxibustion.

  3. Acupuncture and related therapies used as add-on or alternative to prokinetics for functional dyspepsia: overview of systematic reviews and network meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Robin S. T.; Chung, Vincent C. H.; Wong, Charlene H. L.; Wu, Justin C. Y.; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Wu, Irene X. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Prokinetics for functional dyspepsia (FD) have relatively higher number needed to treat values. Acupuncture and related therapies could be used as add-on or alternative. An overview of systematic reviews (SRs) and network meta-analyses (NMA) were performed to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of different acupuncture and related therapies. We conducted a comprehensive literature search for SRs of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in eight international and Chinese databases. Data from ...

  4. Effect of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy to sertraline in controlling suicidal ideation in patients with depression: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Prakash Sahoo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan have been gaining attention as promising alternative treatment for depressive illness. These agents are given as as add on treatment to conventional antidepressant drugs. The present study was carried out to evaluate efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids versus 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy in controlling suicidal ideation in depressive patients on sertraline.Methods: This was a prospective, open label, randomized, parallel group study conducted in department of Psychiatry. Ninety treatment naïve patients (18-65 years age were divided into 3 groups of 30 each. Group I: Sertraline, Group II: Sertraline plus omega-3 fatty acids, Group III: Sertraline plus 5-hydroxytryptophan. Suicidal ideations were assessed with Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation (BSI at weeks 0, 4 and 8. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (SPSS version 20.0. Post hoc analysis was done using Bonferroni test.Results: Baseline parameters in patients of all groups were comparable. Administration of sertraline resulted in reduction of Beck’s scale for suicidal ideation scores as compared to baseline. Addition of omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan also showed reduction in BSI scores. Effect of sertraline monotherapy was more as compared to omega-3 fatty acids or 5-hydroxytryptophan as add on therapy, which was statistically significant (p value < 0.05.Conclusion: Both omega-3 fatty acids and 5-hydroxytryptophan produce significant effect in controlling suicidal ideations in patients with depression.

  5. Use of asenapine as add-on therapy in the treatment of bipolar disorder: a comprehensive review and case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Cremaschi, Laura; Palazzo, Maria Carlotta; Spagnolin, Gregorio; Cattaneo, Alma; Grancini, Benedetta; Maggi, Matteo; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2014-09-01

    Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs), conducted in schizophrenic and bipolar patients, have documented the efficacy and tolerability of asenapine as monotherapy both for short- and long-term treatment. However, evidence on its augmentative use is more limited and related to the manic/mixed phase of bipolar disorder (BD). The present article reviews augmentative asenapine efficacy and safety/tolerability in the treatment of BD. It also includes some original cases of bipolar patients treated with add-on asenapine in the short- and long-term. To date, only a single RCT with manic/mixed patients with partial response to mood-stabilizer monotherapy supports the efficacy and safety/tolerability of augmentative asenapine to lithium/valproate, both in acute and long-term treatment. Additionally, two case reports confirm the overall effectiveness of augmentative asenapine to clozapine and valproate. Our case series, consisting of 4 bipolar patients treated with adjunctive asenapine to mood stabilizers and atypical antipsychotics - with treatment duration ranging from 1 to 14 months - provided clinical results that are consistent with literature data. Taken as a whole, available evidence seems to support the efficacy and safety of adjunctive asenapine in bipolar patients, though additional studies with active comparators are requested to confirm the current body of evidence.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of omalizumab add-on to standard-of-care therapy in patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma in a Brazilian healthcare setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Cibele; Lopes da Silva, Nilceia; Kumar, Praveen; Pathak, Purnima; Ong, Siew Hwa

    2017-08-01

    Omalizumab add-on to standard-of-care therapy has proven to be efficacious in severe asthma patients for whom exacerbations cannot be controlled otherwise. Moreover, evidence from different healthcare settings suggests reduced healthcare resource utilization with omalizumab. Based on these findings, this study aimed to assess the cost-effectiveness of the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy in patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma in a Brazilian healthcare setting. A previously published Markov model was adapted using Brazil-specific unit costs to compare the costs and outcomes of the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy vs standard-of-care therapy alone. Model inputs were largely based on the eXpeRience study. Costs and health outcomes were calculated for lifetime-years and were annually discounted at 5%. Both one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. An additional cost of R$280,400 for 5.20 additional quality-adjusted life-years was estimated with the addition of omalizumab to standard-of-care therapy, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of R$53,890. One-way sensitivity analysis indicated that discount rates, standard-of-care therapy exacerbation rates, and exacerbation-related mortality rates had the largest impact on incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Assumptions of lifetime treatment adherence and rate of future exacerbations, independent of previous events, might affect the findings. The lack of Brazilian patients in the eXpeRience study may affect the findings, although sample size and baseline characteristics suggest that the modeled population closely resembles Brazilian severe allergic asthma patients. Results indicate that omalizumab as an add-on therapy is more cost-effective than standard-of-care therapy alone for Brazilian patients with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma, based on the World Health Organization's cost-effectiveness threshold of up to 3-times the gross

  7. Cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents in patients with type 2 diabetes in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shuyan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Qiao, Qing; Gao, Weiguo; Wang, Jian; Dong, Hengjin

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the long-term cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily as add-on therapy to oral antidiabetic agents (OADs) for Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The Cardiff Diabetes Model was used to simulate disease progression and estimate the long-term effects of exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. Patient profiles and treatment effects required for the model were obtained from literature reviews (English and Chinese databases) and from a meta-analysis of 8 randomized controlled trials comparing exenatide twice daily with insulin glargine once daily add-on to OADs for T2DM in China. Medical expenditure data were collected from 639 patients with T2DM (aged ≥18 years) with and without complications incurred between January 1, 2014 and December 31, 2015 from claims databases in Shandong, China. Costs (2014 Chinese Yuan [¥]) and benefits were estimated, from the payers' perspective, over 40 years at a discount rate of 3%. A series of sensitivity analyses were performed. Patients on exenatide twice daily + OAD had a lower predicted incidence of most cardiovascular and hypoglycaemic events and lower total costs compared with those on insulin glargine once daily + OAD. A greater number of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; 1.94) at a cost saving of ¥117 706 gained was associated with exenatide twice daily vs insulin glargine once daily. (i.e. cost saving of ¥60 764/QALY) per patient. In Chinese patients with T2DM inadequately controlled by OADs, exenatide twice daily is a cost-effective add-on therapy alternative to insulin glargine once daily, and may address the problem of an excess of medical needs resulting from weight gain and hypoglycaemia in T2DM treatment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Add-On Therapy with Ertapenem in Infections with Multidrug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria: Pediatric Experience

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    Sevgen Tanır Basaranoglu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimal therapy for infections with carbapenem resistant GNB is not well established due to the weakness of data. Patients presenting with bloodstream infections caused by multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae were treated with a combination treatment. Optimal therapy for infections with carbapenem resistant Gram-negative bacteria is a serious problem in pediatric patients. We presented three cases who were successfully treated with addition of ertapenem to the combination treatment for bacteremia with multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Dual carbapenem treatment approach is a new approach for these infections and requires more data in children.

  9. Effects of add on PTH(1-84) substitution therapy in hypoparathyroidism: results from a double-blind randomised controlled study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sikjær, Tanja Tvistholm; Rejnmark, Lars; Mosekilde, Leif

    -phosphate levels within the physiological range. Compared with placebo, participants randomised to PTH (1-84) reduced their daily dose of calcium supplements by 68 % (pvitamin D dose by 53% (pneed of calcium supplements...... and 7 were not in need of active vitamin D. With the actual add on therapy there were no change in renal calcium excretion in response to treatment. Compared with placebo, bone mineral density (BMD) decreased significantly at the hip (-1.59 ± 0.57%), lumbar spine (-1.76 ± 1.03%) and whole body (-1...... bone packets. In conclusion, PTH substitution therapy is capable of maintaining normal p-calcium levels with a significantly reduced need for calcium supplements and active vitamin D. In contrast to the effect of PTH(1-84) treatment in patients with osteoporosis, causing an increase in BMD...

  10. Renal function preservation with pioglitazone or with basal insulin as an add-on therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Hung; Hwu, Der-Wei; Chang, Dao-Ming; An, Ling-Wang; Hsieh, Chang-Hsun; Lee, Yau-Jiunn

    2017-06-01

    Clinical outcome may differ owing to the distinct pharmacological characteristics of insulin sensitizers and insulin. This study was performed to compare the metabolic and renal function changes with add-on pioglitazone treatment versus basal insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in whom sulfonylurea and metformin regimens failed. Patients who were consecutively managed in the diabetes comprehensive program with add-on pioglitazone or detemir/glargine treatment for at least 2 years following sulfonylurea and metformin treatment failure were included. A total of 1002 patients were enrolled (pioglitazone: 559, detemir: 264, glargine: 179). After propensity score matching, there were 105 patients with matchable baseline characteristics in each group. After a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up, the pioglitazone group showed a greater HbA1c reduction than the detemir group and the glargine group. Despite patients in all three groups exhibiting significant body weight gain, those in the pioglitazone group and the glargine group showed greater body weight increases than the patients in the detemir group (2.1, 1.6 and 0.8 kg, respectively, p 1.79-3.88) and 3.13 (95% CI 2.01-4.87), respectively. Our study first showed that treatment with both pioglitazone and basal insulin improved glycemic control, while only pioglitazone treatment was observed to be advantageous in terms of preserving renal function when used as an add-on therapy for patients with type 2 DM in whom sulfonylurea and metformin regimens failed.

  11. Azithromycin add-on therapy in high-risk postendoscopic sinus surgery patients failing corticosteroid irrigations: A clinical practice audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniakas, Anastasios; Desrosiers, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) has a high potential for recurrence after endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS), despite a postoperative therapy of topical corticosteroid irrigations. Azithromycin (AZI) is a macrolide antibiotic with anti-inflammatory properties that may be of benefit in such steroid-unresponsive patients. Follow-up study was performed to (1) review the effectiveness of the management strategy of adding AZI in high-risk post-ESS patients failing standard management and (2) identify predictive factors for steroid nonresponsiveness. A retrospective audit of the postoperative evolution of all patients undergoing ESS for CRS in 2010 by a single surgeon was undertaken. Patients deemed at high risk of recurrence based on preoperative history and/or perioperative findings received nasal irrigation with 0.5 mg of budesonide (BUD) in 240 mL of saline twice daily after ESS. Patients showing signs of endoscopic recurrence at 4 months, despite BUD, had AZI at 250 mg three times a week added to their treatment regimen. A total of 57 high-risk patients underwent ESS during this period. At 4 months, 63.2% (36/57) had a favorable outcome solely with BUD. Twelve of the 21 nonresponders received AZI, with an additional 66.7% (8/12) subsequently showing a favorable response. Failure of BUD was associated with female gender (p = 0.048), having elevated alpha-1-antitrypsin levels (p = 0.037) and lower recovery rates of Staphylococcus aureus (p = 0.063). Although the AZI subgroup was too small for statistical analysis, female gender was more frequently associated with failure of both BUD and AZI, while IgE was not useful. A significant subgroup of high-risk patients showing disease recurrence after ESS despite topical corticosteroid therapy may respond to the addition of AZI as part of their therapy. These findings suggest that topical steroid-unresponsive CRS may represent a distinct entity and that alternate anti-inflammatory agents may be required for optimal management.

  12. Cost-Utility Analysis of Heberprot-P as an Add-on Therapy to Good Wound Care for Patients in Slovakia with Advanced Diabetic Foot Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Tesar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To explore whether Heberprot-P (an epidermal growth factor is a cost-effective option for the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcer as an add-on therapy to good wound care (GWC in Slovakia from the perspective of health care payers.Methods: A Markov model was constructed to compare the costs and effects of Heberprot-P plus GWC to those of GWC alone from the perspective of health care payers. The 52-week clinical trial period was extended to 5- and 10-year time horizons. Transition probabilities were calculated based on a previous clinical trial of Heberprot, utility values were derived from the scientific literature, and cost vectors were collected from the General Health Insurance Fund database in Slovakia. A one-way deterministic sensitivity analysis was employed to explore the influence of uncertainty for each input parameter on the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER.Results: Based on the ICER threshold of €30,030 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY recommended by the Slovak Ministry of Health, Heberprot-P therapy plus GWC is not a cost-effective alternative to GWC alone over a 10-year time horizon. The ICER increases if a longer time horizon is applied, as the incremental costs are similar, but the aggregated utility gain from avoided amputation is lower. Based on the sensitivity analysis, the utility multiplier for the health state “no ulcer after small amputation” had the most impact on the ICER; however, the model was robust to changes in all input parameters.Conclusions: Heberprot-P, as an add-on therapy to GWC in the treatment of advanced diabetic foot ulcer, is not a cost-effective alternative to GWC alone. However, if the unit cost of Heberprot-P were to be reduced to <€273, its ICER would be <€30,030.

  13. Effect of heart failure reversal treatment as add-on therapy in patients with chronic heart failure: A randomized, open-label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Rohit; Aklujkar, Abhijeet; Patil, Atul; Mandole, Rahul

    The present study was designed to evaluate effect of heart failure reversal therapy (HFRT) using herbal procedure (panchakarma) and allied therapies, as add-on to standard CHF treatment (SCT) in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients. This open-label, randomized study conducted in CHF patients (aged: 25-65 years, ejection fraction: 30-65%), had 3-phases: 1-week screening, 6-week treatment (randomized [1:1] to HFRT+SCT or SCT-alone) and follow-up (12-week). Twice weekly HFRT (60-75min) consisting of snehana (external oleation), swedana (passive heat therapy), hrudaydhara (concoction dripping treatment) and basti (enema) was administered. Primary endpoints included evaluation of change in metabolic equivalents of task (MET) and peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ) from baseline, at end of 6-week treatment and follow-up at week-18 (non-parametric rank ANCOVA analysis). Safety and quality of life (QoL) was assessed. Seventy CHF patients (n=35, each treatment-arm; mean [SD] age: 53.0 [8.6], 80% men) were enrolled in the study. All patients completed treatment phase. Add-on HFRT caused a significant increase in METs (least square mean difference [LSMD], 6-week: 1.536, p=0.0002; 18-week: -1.254, p=0.0089) and VO 2peak (LSMD, 6-week: -5.52, p=0.0002; 18-week: -4.517, p=0.0089) as compared with SCT-alone. Results were suggestive of improved functional capacity in patients with HFRT (QoL; Mean [SD] HFRT+SCT vs. SCT-alone; 6-week: -0.44 [0.34] vs. -0.06 [0.25], p<0.0001 and 18-week: -0.53 [0.35] vs. -0.29 [0.26], p=0.0013). Seven treatment-emergent adverse events (mild severity) were reported in HFRT-arm. Findings of this study highlight therapeutic efficacy of add-on HFRT vs. SCT-alone in CHF patients. The non-invasive HFRT showed no safety concerns. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Citicoline for ischemic stroke: ICTUS trial

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    Vladimir Anatolyevich Parfenov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives data available in the literature on the use of citicoline in an experimental model of ischemic stroke (IS and in randomized multicenter placebo-controlled trials. It analyzes the results of the ICTUS trial in which 2298 patients with IS who received randomly citicoline or placebo for 24 hours after the onset of symptoms (I000 mg intravenously every I2 hours during the first 3 days, then orally as one 500-mg tablet every 12 hours during 6 weeks. The results of the trial confirmed the safety of citicoline used in IS, but failed to show its significant advantage over placebo in reducing the degree of disability (global improvement 90 days later. However, to pool the results of the ICTUS trial with those of other randomized multicenter placebo-controlled studies demonstrates a significant decrease in the degree of disability in IS patients treated with citicoline.

  15. Metabolic and other effects of pioglitazone as an add-on therapy to metformin in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsamakis, Georgios; Lois, Kostas; Kumar, Sudhesh; Mastorakos, George

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a key pathogenic defect of the clustered metabolic disturbances seen in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Metformin is an insulin sensitizer acting in the liver and the peripheral tissues that ameliorates the metabolic and reproductive defects in PCOS. In addition, pioglitazone is an insulin sensitizer used in diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), improving insulin resistance (IR) in adipose tissue and muscles. In T2DM, these drugs are also used as a combined treatment due to their "add-on effect" on insulin resistance. Although the beneficial role of troglitazone (a member of the thiazolidinediones (TZDs) family) in PCOS has been shown in the past, currently only pioglitazone is available in the market. A few small randomized controlled trials have directly compared the effectiveness of pioglitazone in women with PCOS, while there are a limited number of small studies that support the beneficial metabolic add-on effect of pioglitazone on metformin-treated PCOS women as compared to metformin or pioglitazone monotherapy. These findings suggest a potentially promising role for combined pioglitazone/metformin treatment in the management of PCOS in metformin-resistant patients. In view of recent concerns regarding pioglitazone usage and its associated health risk, we aim to compare the pros and cons of each drug regarding their metabolic and other hormonal effects in women with PCOS and to explore the possible beneficial effect of combined therapy in certain cases, taking into consideration the teratogenic effect of pioglitazone. Finally, we discuss the need for a randomized controlled trial that will evaluate the metabolic and other hormonal effects of combined metformin/pioglitazone treatment in PCOS with selective treatment targets.

  16. Comparison of vildagliptin as an add-on therapy and sulfonylurea dose-increasing therapy in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes using metformin and sulfonylurea (VISUAL study): A randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, A Ram; Lee, Jeun; Ku, Eu Jeong; Hwangbo, Yul; Kim, Kyoung Min; Moon, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Hak Chul; Lim, Soo

    2015-07-01

    The aim of present study is to compare the efficacy and safety of adding vildagliptin with sulfonylurea dose-increasing as an active comparator in patients who had inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using metformin plus sulfonylurea in real clinical practice. Patients using metformin plus sulfonylurea were assigned to either vildagliptin add-on (50 mg twice a day, n=172) or sulfonylurea dose-increasing by 50% (n=172) treatment groups. The primary endpoint was a change in HbA(1c) after 24 weeks. The secondary endpoints were patients achieving HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) and changes in the fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial glucose (2pp), lipid profiles, and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Body weight and hypoglycemia were also investigated. The mean HbA(1c) at baseline was 8.6% (70 mmol/mol) in both groups. At week 24, the adjusted mean HbA(1c) levels decreased by -1.19% (-13.09 mmol/mol) with vildagliptin add-on and -0.46% (-5.06 mmol/mol) with sulfonylurea (Pvildagliptin add-on patients achieved HbA(1c)≤7.0% (53 mmol/mol) than did sulfonylurea patients (40.1% vs. 7.9%; Pvildagliptin add-on than with sulfonylurea (Pvildagliptin add-on group exhibited no clinically relevant weight gain and had a lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with the sulfonylurea group. Vildagliptin add-on therapy might be a suitable option for patients with T2DM that is controlled inadequately by metformin and sulfonylurea, based on its greater glucose control and better safety profile (ClinicalTrial.gov: NCT01099137). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Blood pressure control with amlodipine add-on therapy in patients with hypertension and diabetes: results of the Amlodipine Diabetic Hypertension Efficacy Response Evaluation Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloner, Robert A; Neutel, Joel; Roth, Eli M; Weiss, Robert; Weinberger, Myron H; Thakker, Kamlesh M; Schwartz, Brian; Shi, Harry; Gregg, Anne-Marie

    2008-11-01

    Attainment of blood pressure (BP) goals in patients with diabetes is critical both to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and to delay the progression of renal disease. While therapeutic guidelines advise initial therapy with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, monotherapy with these agents may not be sufficient to attain target BP. The ADHT (Amlodipine Diabetic Hypertension Efficacy Response Evaluation Trial) evaluated the efficacy and safety of adding amlodipine to the treatment regimen of patients with hypertension and diabetes who were already receiving either quinapril or losartan as monotherapy. ADHT was a double-blind, double-dummy, 22-week trial conducted in the US. After a washout period of 7-13 days, patients (aged 30-75 y) with hypertension and diabetes were randomized to receive quinapril 20 mg/day plus placebo or losartan 50 mg/day plus placebo for 4 weeks, titrated to 40 mg or 100 mg (if required), respectively, for an additional 4 weeks to achieve their BP goals (<130/80 mm Hg). At week 8, either amlodipine 5 mg/day or placebo was added for an additional 12 weeks, with titration to 10 mg at week 14 if the BP goal was not achieved. Efficacy of add-on therapy was evaluated in 411 patients (amlodipine 211, placebo 200). BP goal was reached by 27.5% of patients when amlodipine was added to quinapril or losartan monotherapy, compared with 12.5% when placebo was added (OR 2.73; 95% CI 1.61 to 4.64; p < 0.001). When added to quinapril or losartan monotherapy, amlodipine reduced BP by 8.1/5.4 mm Hg, compared with a 1.6/0.7 mm Hg decrease with add-on placebo (p < 0.001). Amlodipine, quinapril, and losartan were well tolerated. Amlodipine is safe and effective when added to quinapril or losartan monotherapy to help lower BP toward therapeutic targets in patients with hypertension and diabetes.

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs insulin glargine once daily (QD) as add-on therapy in Chinese patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled by oral therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jing; Gu, Shuyan; Shao, Hui; Dong, Hengjin; Zou, Dajin; Shi, Lizheng

    2015-01-01

    To estimate cost-effectiveness of exenatide twice daily (BID) vs insulin glargine once daily (QD) as add-on therapy in Chinese type 2 diabetes patients not well controlled by oral anti-diabetic (OAD) agents. The Cardiff model was populated with data synthesized from three head-to-head randomized clinical trials of up to 30 weeks in China comparing exenatide BID vs insulin glargine as add-on therapies to oral therapies in the Chinese population. The Cardiff model generated outputs including macrovascular and microvascular complications, diabetes-specific mortality, costs, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Cost and QALYs were estimated with a time horizon of 40 years at a discount rate of 3% from a societal perspective. Compared with insulin glargine plus OAD treatments, patients on exenatide BID plus OAD gained 1.88 QALYs, at an incremental cost saving of Chinese Renminbi (RMB) 114,593 (i.e., cost saving of RMB 61078/QALY). The cost-effectiveness results were robust to various sensitivity analyses including probabilistic sensitivity analysis. The variables with the most impact on incremental cost-effectiveness ratio included HbA1c level at baseline, health utilities decrement, and BMI at baseline. Compared with insulin glargine QD, exenatide BID as add-on therapy to OAD is a cost-effective treatment in Chinese patients inadequately controlled by OAD treatments.

  19. Add-on Therapy With the α-Blockers Tamsulosin and Naftopidil Improves Voiding Function by Enhancing Neuronal Activity in Prostatic Hyperplasia Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Il-Gyu; Hwang, Lakkyong; Jin, Jun-Jang; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Han, Jin Hee; Jeon, Jung Won; Cho, Sung Tae

    2018-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) impacts quality of life in men by causing lower urinary tract symptoms. α1-Adrenoceptor (α1-AR) blockers improve lower urinary tract symptoms. We investigated the efficacy of add-on therapy with α1-AR blockers on BPH rats. Rats in the drug-treated groups were orally administered each drug once a day for 30 days after orchiectomy. To induce BPH, rats were castrated and testosterone (20 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously once per day for 30 days. Cystometry was conducted to measure voiding contraction pressure and the interval contraction time, immunohistochemistry was performed to measure c-Fos and nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the neuronal voiding centers, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-diaphorase histochemistry was used to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression. Orchiectomy and testosterone injection decreased voiding contraction pressure and the interval contraction time, suggesting BPH symptoms. Voiding contraction pressure and the interval contraction time were greater in the group that received the combination treatment (tamsulosin with naftopidil) than in the tamsulosin monotherapy or naftopidil monotherapy groups. c-Fos, NGF, and NOS expression in the neuronal voiding centers was enhanced by BPH induction. c-Fos, NGF, and NOS expression was suppressed by the combination treatment (tamsulosin with naftopidil) to a greater extent than was the case for tamsulosin monotherapy or naftopidil monotherapy. Combination therapy of tamsulosin and naftopidil showed greater efficacy for the treatment of BPH than tamsulosin monotherapy or naftopidil monotherapy; therefore, combination therapy can be considered as a novel therapeutic method for BPH.

  20. Comparison of the Effects of Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion and Add-On Therapy with Sitagliptin in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify a new regimen to optimize treatment for patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes (T2DM by short-term continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII alone. Methods. 60 patients with newly diagnosed T2DM were randomized into two groups (n=30 each and treated for 2 weeks with CSII alone (CSII group or with CSII plus sitagliptin (CSII + Sig group. The glycemic variability of the patients was measured using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS for the last 72 hours. A standard meal test was performed before and after the interventions, and the levels of glycated albumin, fasting glucose, fasting C-peptide, postprandial 2 h blood glucose, and postprandial 2 h C-peptide were examined. Results. Compared with the CSII group, the indicators of glycemic variability, such as the mean amplitude of glycemic excursion (MAGE and the standard deviation of blood glucose (SDBG, were decreased significantly in the CSII + Sig group. The changes before and after treatment in the C-peptide reactivity index (ΔCPI and the secretory unit of islet in transplantation index (ΔSUIT indicated a significant improvement in the CSII + Sig group. Conclusions. Add-on therapy with sitagliptin may be an optimized treatment for patients with newly diagnosed T2DM compared with short-term CSII alone.

  1. CITICOLIN IN THE TREATMENT OF STROKE AND VASCULAR COGNITIVE DISORDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Anatol'evich Parfenov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Citicolin (ceraxon is used as a neuroprotector in the treatment of acute stroke and vascular cognitive disorders. Experimental animal studies have demonstrated that citicolin reduces the extent of cerebral infarct and increases the degree of functional recovery. A few clinical trials have provided evidence for the efficacy of intravenous or oral citicolin used within the first 24 hours of ischemic stroke or cerebral hemorrhage in recovery of neurological functions. Citicolin is effective in memory and behavioral disorders in elderly patients with chronic cerebrovascular diseases. The use of citicolin has been found to be safe in stroke and vascular cognitive disorders

  2. Short-Term Prognosis of Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Guillain-Barré Syndrome Is Worsened by Corticosteroids as an Add-On Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Zhang, Bing; Li, Chunrong; Shen, Donghui; Liu, Kangding; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been proven most effective in treating Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Corticosteroids as an add-on therapy have been prescribed in severe GBS cases. However, the efficacy of intravenous corticosteroids combined with IVIg in dealing with severe GBS remains unclear. We explored the therapeutic effects of different therapeutic regimens on the short-term prognosis of GBS patients, especially the severe cases.We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 527 adult patients with GBS who were prescribed to different treatments from 2003 to 2014. The therapeutic effect of a treatment was evaluated by the improvement of Hughes Functional Grading Scale (HFGS) and Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score.With comparable incidence of infectious complications (P > 0.05), more mechanically ventilated patients were found improvement after IVIg treatment than combination IVIg with intravenous corticosteroids (MRC: 97% vs. 72.4%, P bedridden patients without mechanical ventilation, incidence of infectious complications (P > 0.05) and ratio of patients who were improved after IVIg were insignificantly different from the combination therapy (MRC: 89.6% vs. 86.5%; HFGS: 69.6% vs. 61.5%; both P > 0.05), even if the intravenous corticosteroids were initiated within 7 days after onset (P > 0.05). In addition, supportive treatment was sufficient for patients who were able to walk with help (HFGS = 3) and mildly affected (HFGS  3), while corticosteroids are detrimental for short-term prognosis in mechanically ventilated patients when used in combination with IVIg. Further prospective and randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding.

  3. Short-Term Prognosis of Mechanically Ventilated Patients With Guillain–Barré Syndrome Is Worsened by Corticosteroids as an Add-On Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiujuan; Zhang, Bing; Li, Chunrong; Shen, Donghui; Liu, Kangding; Zhu, Jie; Zhang, Hong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) has been proven most effective in treating Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS). Corticosteroids as an add-on therapy have been prescribed in severe GBS cases. However, the efficacy of intravenous corticosteroids combined with IVIg in dealing with severe GBS remains unclear. We explored the therapeutic effects of different therapeutic regimens on the short-term prognosis of GBS patients, especially the severe cases. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 527 adult patients with GBS who were prescribed to different treatments from 2003 to 2014. The therapeutic effect of a treatment was evaluated by the improvement of Hughes Functional Grading Scale (HFGS) and Medical Research Council (MRC) sum score. With comparable incidence of infectious complications (P > 0.05), more mechanically ventilated patients were found improvement after IVIg treatment than combination IVIg with intravenous corticosteroids (MRC: 97% vs. 72.4%, P bedridden patients without mechanical ventilation, incidence of infectious complications (P > 0.05) and ratio of patients who were improved after IVIg were insignificantly different from the combination therapy (MRC: 89.6% vs. 86.5%; HFGS: 69.6% vs. 61.5%; both P > 0.05), even if the intravenous corticosteroids were initiated within 7 days after onset (P > 0.05). In addition, supportive treatment was sufficient for patients who were able to walk with help (HFGS = 3) and mildly affected (HFGS  3), while corticosteroids are detrimental for short-term prognosis in mechanically ventilated patients when used in combination with IVIg. Further prospective and randomized studies are warranted to validate this finding. PMID:26512609

  4. Simvastatin as add-on therapy to interferon β-1a for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (SIMCOMBIN study): a placebo-controlled randomised phase 4 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Lycke, Jan; Erälinna, Juha-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy.......Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective. We aimed to establish whether add-on of simvastatin, a statin with anti-inflammatory properties, improves this efficacy....

  5. Treatment of traumatised refugees with basic body awareness therapy versus mixed physical activity as add-on treatment: Study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbrandt, Maja Sticker; Carlsson, Jessica; Lindberg, Laura Glahder; Sandahl, Hinuga; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2015-10-22

    Treatment of traumatised refugees is one of the fields within psychiatry, which has received little scientific attention. Evidence based treatment and knowledge on the efficiency of the treatment for this complex patient group is therefore scarce. This leads to uncertainty as to which treatment should be offered and potentially lowers the quality of life for the patients. Chronic pain is very common among traumatised refugees and it is believed to maintain the mental symptoms of trauma. Hence, treating chronic pain is believed to be of high clinical value for this patient group. In clinical studies, physical activity has shown a positive effect on psychiatric illnesses such as depression and anxiety and for patients with chronic pain. However, scientific knowledge about physical activity as part of the treatment for traumatised refugees is very limited and no guidelines exist on this topic. This study will include approximately 310 patients, randomised into three groups. All three groups receive psychiatric treatment as usual for the duration of 6-7 months, consisting of consultations with a medical doctor including pharmacological treatment and manual-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. The first group only receives treatment as usual while the second and the third groups receive either Basic-Body Awareness Therapy or mixed physical activity as add-on treatments. Each physical activity is provided for an individual 1-hour consultation per week, for the duration of 20 weeks. The study is being conducted at the Competence Centre for Transcultural Psychiatry, Mental Health Centre Ballerup in the Capital Region of Denmark. The primary endpoint of the study is symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; the secondary endpoints are depression and anxiety as well as quality of life, functional capacity, coping with pain, body awareness and physical fitness. This study will examine the effect of physical activity for traumatised refugees. This has not yet been done in a

  6. Cost-consequence analysis of sitagliptin versus sulfonylureas as add-on therapy for the treatment of diabetic patients in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzoni V

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Valentina Lorenzoni,1 Fabio Baccetti,2 Stefano Genovese,3 Enrico Torre,4 Giuseppe Turchetti1 1Institute of Management, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Pisa, Italy; 2SD Diabetology, ASL Toscana Nordovest, Massa Carrara, Italy; 3Cardiovascular and Metabolic Department, IRCCS Multimedica Sesto San Giovanni, Milan, Italy; 4SSD Endocrinologia, Diabetologia e Malattie metaboliche, ASL 3 Genovese, Genoa, Italy Objective: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease related to a significant impact in both epidemiologic and economic terms. In Italy, around 3.6 million people are affected by diabetes and this number is expected to increase significantly in the next few years. As recommended by current national and international guidelines, metformin (Met is prescribed as first-line pharmacological treatment, and many pharmacological alternatives are available for patients uncontrolled with Met monotherapy. Despite the availability of many innovative oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs, such as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP4-i and its first-in-class sitagliptin (SITA, which entered the Italian market in the last 10 years, their usage is consistently lower than traditional drugs such as sulfonylureas (SUs. In fact, due to higher acquisition costs, the prescription of innovative OADs in Italy is restricted to specialist, resulting in a prominent usage of traditional OAD that can be prescribed also by general practitioners (GPs. A cost consequence analysis (CCA was performed in order to compare SITA with SU, as second-line therapy in add-on to Met, in terms of costs and related clinical events over 36 months.Methods: A CCA was conducted on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients uncontrolled with Met monotherapy, from both the Italian National Health Service (INHS and societal perspective. Therefore, both direct (drugs, self-monitoring, hypoglycemia, major cardiovascular events [MACEs], and switch to insulin and indirect costs

  7. Cost-consequence analysis of sitagliptin versus sulfonylureas as add-on therapy for the treatment of diabetic patients in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzoni, Valentina; Baccetti, Fabio; Genovese, Stefano; Torre, Enrico; Turchetti, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease related to a significant impact in both epidemiologic and economic terms. In Italy, around 3.6 million people are affected by diabetes and this number is expected to increase significantly in the next few years. As recommended by current national and international guidelines, metformin (Met) is prescribed as first-line pharmacological treatment, and many pharmacological alternatives are available for patients uncontrolled with Met monotherapy. Despite the availability of many innovative oral antidiabetic drugs (OADs), such as dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors (DPP4-i) and its first-in-class sitagliptin (SITA), which entered the Italian market in the last 10 years, their usage is consistently lower than traditional drugs such as sulfonylureas (SUs). In fact, due to higher acquisition costs, the prescription of innovative OADs in Italy is restricted to specialist, resulting in a prominent usage of traditional OAD that can be prescribed also by general practitioners (GPs). A cost consequence analysis (CCA) was performed in order to compare SITA with SU, as second-line therapy in add-on to Met, in terms of costs and related clinical events over 36 months. A CCA was conducted on a hypothetical cohort of 100,000 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients uncontrolled with Met monotherapy, from both the Italian National Health Service (INHS) and societal perspective. Therefore, both direct (drugs, self-monitoring, hypoglycemia, major cardiovascular events [MACEs], and switch to insulin) and indirect costs (expressed in terms of productivity losses) were evaluated. Clinical and economic data were collected through Italian national tariffs, literature, and experts' opinions. Three expert clinicians finally validated data inputs. To assess robustness of base case results, a one-way sensitivity analysis (OWSA) and a conservative scenario analysis - excluding MACEs - were carried out. In the base case analysis, the higher drug costs related

  8. A novel reflux inhibitor lesogaberan (AZD3355) as add-on treatment in patients with GORD with persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy: a randomised placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; Beaumont, Hanneke; Hatlebakk, Jan G.; Silberg, Debra G.; Björck, Karin; Karlsson, Maria; Denison, Hans

    2011-01-01

    o evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of add-on treatment with lesogaberan (AZD3355), a novel reflux inhibitor, in patients with persistent gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, parallel-group,

  9. The effects of citicoline on acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Early reopening of the occluded artery is, thus, important in ischemic stroke, and it has been calculated that 2 million neurons die every minute in an ischemic stroke if no effective therapy is given; therefore, "Time is Brain." In massive hemispheric infarction and edema, surgical decompression...... lowers the risk of death or severe disability defined as a modified Rankin Scale score greater than 4 in selected patients. The majority, around 80%-85% of all ischemic stroke victims, does not fulfill the criteria for revascularization therapy, and also for these patients, there is no effective acute...... therapy. Also there is no established effective acute treatment of spontaneous intracerebral bleeding. Therefore, an effective therapy applicable to all stroke victims is needed. The neuroprotective drug citicoline has been extensively studied in clinical trials with volunteers and more than 11...

  10. Erythropoietin as an add-on treatment for cognitive side effects of electroconvulsive therapy: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Lejla Sjanic; Petersen, Jeff Zarp; Vinberg, Maj; Hageman, Ida; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica

    2018-04-19

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for severe depression, but its use is impeded by its cognitive side effects. Novel treatments that can counteract these side effects may therefore improve current treatment strategies for depression. The present randomized trial investigates (1) whether short-term add-on treatment with erythropoietin (EPO) can reduce the cognitive side -effects of ECT and (2) whether such effects are long-lasting. Further, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) will be used to explore the neural underpinnings of such beneficial effects of EPO. Finally, the trial examines whether potential protective effects of EPO on cognition are accompanied by changes in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and neuroplasticity. The trial has a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group design. Patients with unipolar or bipolar disorder with current moderate to severe depression referred to ECT (N = 52) are randomized to receive four high-dose infusions of EPO (40,000 IU/ml) or placebo (saline). The first EPO/saline infusion is administered within 24 h before the first ECT. The following three infusions are administered at weekly intervals immediately after ECT sessions 1, 4, and 7. Cognition assessments are conducted at baseline, after the final EPO/saline infusion (3 days after eight ECT sessions), and at a 3 months follow-up after ECT treatment completion. The neuronal substrates for potential cognitive benefits of EPO are investigated with structural and functional MRI after the final EPO/saline infusion. The primary outcome is change from baseline to after EPO treatment (3 days after eight ECT sessions) in a cognitive composite score spanning attention, psychomotor speed, and executive functions. With a sample size of N = 52 (n = 26 per group), we have ≥ 80% power to detect a clinically relevant between-group difference in the primary outcome measure at an alpha

  11. Effectiveness of speech language therapy either alone or with add-on computer-based language therapy software (Malayalam version) for early post stroke aphasia: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesav, Praveen; Vrinda, S L; Sukumaran, Sajith; Sarma, P S; Sylaja, P N

    2017-09-15

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of professional based conventional speech language therapy (SLT) either alone (Group A/less intensive) or assisted by novel computer based local language software (Group B/more intensive) for rehabilitation in early post stroke aphasia. Comprehensive Stroke Care Center of a tertiary health care institute situated in South India, with the study design being prospective open randomised controlled trial with blinded endpoint evaluation. This study recruited 24 right handed first ever acute ischemic stroke patients above 15years of age affecting middle cerebral artery territory within 90days of stroke onset with baseline Western Aphasia Battery (WAB) Aphasia Quotient (AQ) score of aphasia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Citicoline in Neuroprotection and Neurorepair in Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo C. Román

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Advances in acute stroke therapy resulting from thrombolytic treatment, endovascular procedures, and stroke units have improved significantly stroke survival and prognosis; however, for the large majority of patients lacking access to advanced therapies stroke mortality and residual morbidity remain high and many patients become incapacitated by motor and cognitive deficits, with loss of independence in activities of daily living. Therefore, over the past several years, research has been directed to limit the brain lesions produced by acute ischemia (neuroprotection and to increase the recovery, plasticity and neuroregenerative processes that complement rehabilitation and enhance the possibility of recovery and return to normal functions (neurorepair. Citicoline has therapeutic effects at several stages of the ischemic cascade in acute ischemic stroke and has demonstrated efficiency in a multiplicity of animal models of acute stroke. Long-term treatment with citicoline is safe and effective, improving post-stroke cognitive decline and enhancing patients’ functional recovery. Prolonged citicoline administration at optimal doses has been demonstrated to be remarkably well tolerated and to enhance endogenous mechanisms of neurogenesis and neurorepair contributing to physical therapy and rehabilitation.

  13. "Effect of pranayama and meditation as an add-on therapy in rehabilitation of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome--a randomized control pilot study".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendhilkumar, Ragupathy; Gupta, Anupam; Nagarathna, Raghuram; Taly, Arun B

    2013-01-01

    To study the add-on effects of pranayama and meditation in rehabilitation of patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). This randomized control pilot study was conducted in neurological rehabilitation unit of university tertiary research hospital. Twenty-two GBS patients, who consented for the study and satisfied selection criteria, were randomly assigned to yoga and control groups. Ten patients in each group completed the study. The yoga group received 15 sessions in total over a period of 3 weeks (1 h/session), one session per day on 5 days per week that consisted of relaxation, Pranayama (breathing practices) and Guided meditation in addition to conventional rehabilitation therapeutics. The control group received usual rehabilitation care. All the patients were assessed using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Numeric pain rating scale, Hospital anxiety and Depression scale and Barthel index score. Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon's signed rank test were used for statistical analysis. Quality of sleep improved significantly with reduction of PSQI score in the yoga group (p = 0.04). There was reduction of pain scores, anxiety and depression in both the groups without statistical significance between groups (pain p > 0.05, anxiety p > 0.05 and depression p > 0.05). Overall functional status improved in both groups without significant difference (p > 0.05). Significant improvement was observed in quality of sleep with yogic relaxation, pranayama, and meditation in GBS patients.

  14. NORdic trial of oral Methylprednisolone as add-on therapy to Interferon beta-1a for treatment of relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis (NORMIMS study): a randomised, placebo-controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Mellgren, Svein Ivar; Svenningsson, Anders

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis with interferon beta is only partly effective, and new more effective and safe strategies are needed. Our aim was to assess the efficacy of oral methylprednisolone as an add-on therapy to subcutaneous interferon beta-1a to reduce...... was 0.22 for methylprednisolone compared with 0.59 for placebo (62% reduction, 95% CI 39-77%; pSleep disturbance and neurological and psychiatric symptoms were the most frequent adverse events recorded in the methylprednisolone group. Bone mineral density had not changed after 96 weeks......, these findings need to be corroborated in larger cohorts....

  15. Rapid response to methylphenidate as an add-on therapy to mirtazapine in the treatment of major depressive disorder in terminally ill cancer patients: a four-week, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chong Guan; Boks, Marco P M; Roes, Kit C B; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Sulaiman, Ahmad Hatim; Tan, Seng Beng; de Wit, Niek J

    2014-04-01

    This is a 4 week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study to examine the effects of methylphenidate as add-on therapy to mirtazapine compared to placebo for treatment of depression in terminally ill cancer patients. It involved 88 terminally ill cancer patients from University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. They were randomized and treated with either methylphenidate or placebo as add on to mirtazapine. The change in Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score from baseline to day 3 was analyzed by linear regression. Changes of MADRS and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) over 28 days were analyzed using mixed model repeated measures (MMRM). Secondary analysis of MADRS response rates, defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline score. A significantly larger reduction of Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) score in the methylphenidate group was observed from day 3 (B=4.14; 95% CI=1.83-6.45). Response rate (defined as 50% or more reduction from baseline MADRS score) in the methylphenidate treated group was superior from day 14. Improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) was greater in the methylphenidate treated group from day 3 until day 28. The drop-out rates were 52.3% in the methylphenidate group and 59.1% in the placebo group (relative risk=0.86, 95%CI=0.54-1.37) due to cancer progression. Nervous system adverse events were more common in methylphenidate treated subjects (20.5% vs 9.1%, p=0.13). In conclusions, methylphenidate as add on therapy to mirtazapine demonstrated an earlier antidepressant response in terminally ill cancer patients, although at an increased risk of the nervous system side effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  16. The efficacy of tramadol/acetaminophen combination tablets (Ultracet®) as add-on and maintenance therapy in knee osteoarthritis pain inadequately controlled by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Su; Choi, Jin-Jung; Kim, Wan-Uk; Min, June-Ki; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Chul-Soo

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficacy of tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg combination tablets (tramadol/APAP) with that of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as maintenance therapy following tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination therapy in knee osteoarthritis (OA) pain which was inadequately controlled by NSAIDs. Subjects with knee OA for over 1 year and moderate pain (numerical rating scale [NRS] ≥5) despite at least 4 weeks' NSAID therapy (meloxicam 7.5 mg or 15 mg qd or aceclofenac 100 mg bid) received tramadol/APAP add-on (combination with NSAID) for 4 weeks. Thereafter, subjects with significant pain improvement (NRS pain intensity (NRS), pain relief score, and subjects' and investigators' overall medication assessments. Of 143 subjects enrolled, 112 completed the 4-week tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination phase and 97 (67.8%) experienced significant pain improvement. Of the 97 subjects randomized, 36 in tramadol/APAP group and 47 in NSAID group completed the 8-week comparator study. On days 29 and 57, WOMAC scores and pain intensities did not increase in both groups compared to measurements immediately after the combination therapy. At these two time points, there were no significant differences in WOMAC scores, pain intensities, and other secondary measures between the two groups. Overall adverse event rates were similar in both groups. Tramadol/APAP add-on significantly improved knee OA pain which had been inadequately controlled by NSAIDs. In those subjects who showed favorable response to tramadol/APAP and NSAID combination therapy, both tramadol/APAP and NSAIDs were effective at maintaining the pain-reduced state and there was no significant difference in efficacy between tramadol/APAP and NSAIDs.

  17. Efficacy and safety comparison of add-on therapy with liraglutide, saxagliptin and vildagliptin, all in combination with current conventional oral hypoglycemic agents therapy in poorly controlled Chinese type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C-J; Yu, Q; Yu, P; Zhang, Q-M; Ding, M; Liu, X-J; Yu, D-M

    2014-09-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide, saxagliptin and vildagliptin to current therapy in Chinese type 2 diabetes subjects with poor glycemic control.A 24-week, randomized, open-label, parallel clinical trial was performed. A total 178 patients completed the trial who had been randomly assigned to add-on once daily liraglutide (1.2 mg/day injected subcutaneously), to saxagliptin (5 mg once daily) or to vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily). Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values, fasting and postprandial blood glucose (FBG and P2BG), body weight, body mass index (BMI), episodes of hypoglycemia and adverse events were evaluated.Over the 24-week treatment period, greater lowering of mean of HbA1c was achieved with 1.2 mg liraglutide (-1.50%, 95% CI [-1.67, -1.34]) than with saxagliptin (-1.23%, 95% CI [-1.36, -1.11]) and vildagliptin (-1.25%, 95% CI [-1.37, -1.13]). There was no significant between-group difference of percentages of subjects who reached a target HbA1cvildagliptin. The mean reduction of FBG value from baseline was 2.23 mmol/L with liraglutide, much greater than 1.83 mmol/L with saxagliptin (p=0.013), but similar to 2.03 mmol/L with -vildaglitpin group. As to the P2BG value, greater reductions was found with liraglutide (-4.80 mmol/L) than -3.56 mmol/L with saxagliptin (p=0.000) and -3.57 mmol/L with vildagliptin (p=0.000). Moreover, greater mean reductions of body weight and BMI with liraglutide (-6.0 kg and -2.1 kg/m(2)) were achieved than with saxagliptin and vildagliptin (both pvildagliptin group. The incidence of hypoglycemia was recorded low and similar in each treatment group. Nausea was more common with liraglutide (27%) than with saxagliptin (3.2%) and vildagliptin (5.2%), but no significant between-group difference was reported in other AEs.Adding liraglutide demonstrated superiority to saxagliptin and vildagliptin for reductions of HbA1c and weight loss in Chinese subjects with T2DM who had inadequate glycemic

  18. Add-on Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Subacute Aphasia Therapy: Enhanced Improvement of Functional Communication and Basic Linguistic Skills. A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubi-Fessen, Ilona; Hartmann, Alexander; Huber, Walter; Fimm, Bruno; Rommel, Thomas; Thiel, Alexander; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter

    2015-11-01

    To determine to what extent repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with speech and language therapy improves functional communication and basic linguistic skills of individuals with subacute aphasia. Randomized, blinded, and sham-controlled study. Neurologic rehabilitation hospital. Participants (N=30) with subacute aphasia after stroke. During a 2-week treatment period, half of the participants received 10 sessions of 20-minute inhibitory 1-Hz rTMS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 45), and the other half received sham stimulation. Directly thereafter, all the participants underwent 45 minutes of speech and language therapy. Aachen Aphasia Test, Amsterdam-Nijmegen Everyday Language Test (ANELT), a naming screening, and subscales of the FIM, all assessed the day before and the day after treatment period. The participants who received real rTMS significantly improved with respect to all 10 measures of basic linguistic skills and functional communication, whereas sham-treated participants significantly improved in only 6 of 10 measures (paired t tests, Pcommunication (ANELT) (repeated-measures analysis of variance, P≤.05). For the first time, this study has demonstrated that basic linguistic skills as well as functional communication are bolstered by combining rTMS and behavioral language therapy in patients with subacute aphasia. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Combination of Citicoline and Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Nasiri

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Results demonstrated that citicoline in combination to physiotherapy appears to be a promising agent to improve gross motor function in patients with cerebral palsy versus physiotherapy alone. Although, further studies are need to be done.

  20. Efficacy of interpersonal therapy-group format adapted to post-traumatic stress disorder: an open-label add-on trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanini, Rosaly F B; Schoedl, Aline F; Pupo, Mariana C; Costa, Ana Clara H; Krupnick, Janice L; Mello, Marcelo F

    2010-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent condition, yet available treatments demonstrate only modest efficacy. Exposure therapies, considered by many to be the "gold-standard" therapy for PTSD, are poorly tolerated by many patients and show high attrition. We evaluated interpersonal therapy, in a group format, adapted to PTSD (IPT-G PTSD), as an adjunctive treatment for patients who failed to respond to conventional psychopharmacological treatment. Research participants included 40 patients who sought treatment through a program on violence in the department of psychiatry of Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP). They had received conventional psychopharmacological treatment for at least 12 weeks and failed to have an adequate clinical response. After signing an informed consent, approved earlier by the UNIFESP Ethics Review Board, they received a semi-structured diagnostic interview (SCID-I), administered by a trained mental health worker, to confirm the presence of a PTSD diagnosis according to DSM-IV criteria. Other instruments were administered, and patients completed out self-report instruments at baseline, and endpoint to evaluate clinical outcomes. Thirty-three patients completed the trial, but all had at least one second outcome evaluation. There were significant improvements on all measures, with large effect sizes. IPT-G PTSD was effective not only in decreasing symptoms of PTSD, but also in decreasing symptoms of anxiety and depression. It led to significant improvements in social adjustment and quality of life. It was well tolerated and there were few dropouts. Our results are very preliminary; they need further confirmation through randomized controlled clinical trials.

  1. Short-acting glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists as add-on to insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albèr, Anders; Brønden, Andreas; Knop, Filip K

    2017-01-01

    emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes, which could translate into effective lowering of postprandial glucose excursions; however, these observations regarding short-acting GLP-1RAs are all derived from small open-label trials and should thus be interpreted with caution. In the present paper we review......A large proportion of patients with type 1 diabetes do not reach their glycaemic target of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) type 1 diabetes are overweight and obese. Treatment of type 1 diabetes is based on insulin therapy......, which is associated with well-described and unfortunate adverse effects such as hypoglycaemia and increased body weight. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RAs) are the focus of increasing interest as a possible adjunctive treatment to insulin in type 1 diabetes because...

  2. Safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus add-on therapy for rheumatoid arthritis patients without an adequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs): Post-marketing surveillance in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Ishida, Kota; Shiraki, Katsuhisa; Yoshiyasu, Takashi

    2018-01-01

    Post-marketing surveillance (PMS) was conducted to assess the safety and effectiveness of tacrolimus (TAC) add-on therapy for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response to biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Patients with RA from 180 medical sites across Japan were registered centrally with an electronic investigation system. The observational period was 24 weeks from the first day of TAC administration concomitantly with biological DMARDs. Safety and effectiveness populations included 624 and 566 patients, respectively. Patients were predominantly female (81.1%), with a mean age of 61.9 years. Overall, 125 adverse drug reactions (ADRs) occurred in 94 patients (15.1%), and 15 serious ADRs occurred in 11 patients (1.8%). These incidences were lower compared with previously reported incidences after TAC treatment in PMS, and all of the observed ADRs were already known. A statistically significant improvement was observed in the primary effectiveness variable of Simplified Disease Activity Index after TAC treatment; 62.7% of patients achieved remission or low disease activity at week 24. TAC is well tolerated and effective when used as an add-on to biological DMARDs in Japanese patients with RA who do not achieve an adequate response to biological DMARDs in a real-world clinical setting.

  3. The real world effect of omalizumab add on therapy for patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma: The ASTERIX Observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Mohit; Yang, William H; Hébert, Jacques; de Takacsy, Frederica; Stril, Jean-Louis

    2017-01-01

    Omalizumab is a non-steroidal medication indicated for the treatment of poorly controlled moderate-to-severe allergic asthmatics. This observational study examines the "real world" effectiveness of omalizumab in this population. This is a one year open-label observational study that compared clinical outcomes including total oral corticosteroid use, exacerbation history, measures of quality of life and inflammation in patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, who were prescribed omalizumab as part of their treatment with the year prior to therapy. A total of 99 patients were enrolled at 25 sites in Canada. During the study period, the mean total annual OCS dose was reduced from 2301.5 mg (prednisone equivalents) in the year prior to omalizumab to 1130.0 mg (pomalizumab remained exacerbation free when compared to the year prior to study entry. Associated with this was reduced health care utilization. There were significant improvements in the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire (AQLQ) Patients with an elevated FeNO at baseline showed a better response to treatment. No new safety issues were identified during the study period. Our study demonstrates that in "real world" clinical practice, after initiating omalizumab, there is a reduction in total OCS use and exacerbation frequency in patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma. Patients on treatment reported improved asthma control and quality of life. FeNO may be a useful biomarker to identify patients who may benefit with omalizumab treatment.

  4. Twelve-week, prospective, open-label, randomized trial on the effects of an anticholinergic agent or antidiuretic agent as add-on therapy to an alpha-blocker for lower urinary tract symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin YS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu Seob Shin,1 Li Tao Zhang,1 Chen Zhao,2 Young Gon Kim,1 Jong Kwan Park1 1Department of Urology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, and Institute for Medical Sciences, Chonbuk National University and Biomedical Research Institute and Clinical Trial Center of Medical Device of Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju, South Korea; 2Department of Urology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, and Shanghai Institute of Andrology, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Purpose: The effects of an anticholinergic or antidiuretic agent as add-on therapy to an ­alpha-blocker for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS according to a voiding diary in 3 days are unknown. We prospectively investigated the efficacy of an anticholinergic or antidiuretic agent as add-on therapy for nocturia in men previously treated with an alpha-blocker for LUTS.Subjects and methods: Patients were randomly subdivided into two groups. All patients had a 4-week washout. Group A had alpha-blocker for 4 weeks, then an alpha-blocker plus an anticholinergic agent for 4 weeks, and, finally, 4 weeks of an alpha-blocker plus an antidiuretic agent. Group B had an alpha-blocker for 4 weeks, then an alpha-blocker plus an antidiuretic agent for 4 weeks, and, finally, 4 weeks of an alpha-blocker plus an anticholinergic agent. In both groups, patients were subdivided into nocturnal polyuria, decreased nocturnal bladder capacity (NBC, or nocturia by both causes subgroups. A 3-day voiding diary, total International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, IPSS sub-scores, Overactive Bladder Symptom Score, uroflowmetry, and post-void residual urine volume, were assessed at baseline, and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks.Results: A total of 405 patients completed the study. During treatment, the changes from baseline in total IPSS and IPSS sub-scores were significantly decreased at 4 weeks and were maintained for 12 weeks. In the nocturnal polyuria subgroup of Groups A and B

  5. Vildagliptin as add-on therapy to insulin improves glycemic control without increasing risk of hypoglycemia in Asian, predominantly Chinese, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Guang; Wang, Weiqing; Li, Ling; Ma, Jianhua; Lv, Xiaofeng; Yang, Ming; Wang, Wei; Woloschak, Michael; Lukashevich, Valentina; Kothny, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin added onto insulin with or without metformin in an Asian, predominantly Chinese, population with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this 24-week, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, patients with T2DM inadequately controlled (HbA1c 7.5%-11.0%) on stable therapy with long-acting, intermediate-acting, or premixed insulin, with or without concomitant metformin, were randomized to receive vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. or placebo. Of 293 patients randomized, 146 received vildagliptin and 147 received placebo treatment. At baseline, the overall mean age of patients was 58.1 years, mean T2DM duration was 11.3 years, and mean HbA1c was 8.7%. The adjusted mean (±SE) change in HbA1c at Week 24 in the vildagliptin and placebo groups was -1.08 ± 0.12% and -0.38 ± 0.12%, respectively (between-treatment difference -0.70 ± 0.16%; P vildagliptin than with placebo (23.6% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.006). The incidence of adverse events in the vildagliptin and placebo groups was 43.8% and 46.3%, whereas that of serious adverse events was 3.4% and 6.8%, respectively. The frequency of hypoglycemia was lower in the vildagliptin than placebo group (2.7% vs. 5.4%). The addition of vildagliptin 50 mg b.i.d. significantly improved glycemic control without an increased risk of hypoglycemia in Asian, predominantly Chinese, patients with T2DM inadequately controlled on insulin, with or without metformin. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley Sons Australia, & Ltd.

  6. The real world effect of omalizumab add on therapy for patients with moderate to severe allergic asthma: The ASTERIX Observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bhutani

    Full Text Available Omalizumab is a non-steroidal medication indicated for the treatment of poorly controlled moderate-to-severe allergic asthmatics. This observational study examines the "real world" effectiveness of omalizumab in this population.This is a one year open-label observational study that compared clinical outcomes including total oral corticosteroid use, exacerbation history, measures of quality of life and inflammation in patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma, who were prescribed omalizumab as part of their treatment with the year prior to therapy.A total of 99 patients were enrolled at 25 sites in Canada. During the study period, the mean total annual OCS dose was reduced from 2301.5 mg (prednisone equivalents in the year prior to omalizumab to 1130.0 mg (p<0.0001. There was a 71% reduction in asthma exacerbations and 56% of patients on omalizumab remained exacerbation free when compared to the year prior to study entry. Associated with this was reduced health care utilization. There were significant improvements in the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ and Asthma Quality of Life questionnaire (AQLQ Patients with an elevated FeNO at baseline showed a better response to treatment. No new safety issues were identified during the study period.Our study demonstrates that in "real world" clinical practice, after initiating omalizumab, there is a reduction in total OCS use and exacerbation frequency in patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma. Patients on treatment reported improved asthma control and quality of life. FeNO may be a useful biomarker to identify patients who may benefit with omalizumab treatment.

  7. Safety and efficacy of an add-on therapy with curcumin phytosome and piperine and/or lipoic acid in subjects with a diagnosis of peripheral neuropathy treated with dexibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Pierro F

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Francesco Di Pierro,1 Roberto Settembre2 1Scientific Department, Velleja Research, Milan, Italy; 2Neurosurgery Department, Di Venere Hospital, Bari, Italy Abstract: We conducted an 8-week, open, randomized controlled clinical trial on 141 subjects affected by neuropathic pain to investigate the role of an adjunctive therapy added to the administration of dexibuprofen (400 mg twice a day and based on a multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur, consisting of lipoic acid plus curcumin phytosome and piperine, in patients with a diagnosis of lumbar sciatica, lumbar disk herniation, and/or lumbar canal stenosis (96 subjects, or with carpal tunnel syndrome (45 subjects. A total of 135 participants completed the study. Treatment with the multi-ingredient formula (Lipicur reduced neuropathic pain by more than 66% in both conditions (subjects with lumbar sciatica and with carpal tunnel syndrome, and these reductions were statistically significant. Moreover, the treatment reduced dexibuprofen use by about 40%. An add-on therapy with only lipoic acid has not shown any significant results. On the basis of its safety and efficacy, Lipicur could be considered an effective complementary therapy to be added to conventional treatments to achieve better efficacy in reducing neuropathic pain. Keywords: curcumin, phytosome, piperine, dexibuprofen, neuropathic pain

  8. Southeast Economic Add-on 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  9. Southeast Economic Add-on 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To collect data on an angler's last trip for revealed preference models and economic valuation purposes. Typically done as an add-on to the MRIP intercept survey and...

  10. Firefox add-ons for medical reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Matthew B

    2010-07-01

    Firefox is a Web browser created by the Mozilla project, an open-source software group. Features of the browser include automated updates, advanced security and standards compliance, and the ability to add functionality through add-ons and extensions. First introduced in 2004, Firefox now accounts for roughly 30% of the browser market. This article will focus primarily on add-ons and extensions available for the browser that are useful to medical researchers.

  11. Short-term effect of add on bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. grossum) juice with integrated approach of yoga therapy on blood glucose levels and cardiovascular functions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasukeerthi, Padakandla; Mooventhan, A; Manjunath, N K

    2017-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major global health problem. Though various studies have reported the beneficial effect of Yoga in patient with T2DM, there is a lack of study in combination with bell pepper and yoga. Hence, the present study aims at evaluating short-term effect of add on bell pepper juice with integrated approach of yoga therapy (IAYT) on blood glucose levels and cardiovascular variables in patients with T2DM. Fifty T2DM subjects with the age varied from 34 to 69-years were recruited and randomly divided into either study group or control group. The study group received 100-ml of bell pepper juice (twice/day) along with IAYT while the control group received only IAYT for 4-consecutive days. Baseline and post-test assessments were taken before and after the intervention. Statistical analysis was performed using statistical package for the social sciences, version-16. Results of this study showed no significant difference in overall (fasting and post prandial) blood glucose level in the study group compared with control group. However, a significant reduction in Post prandial blood glucose (PPBG), systolic blood pressure (SBP), pulse pressure (PP), rate pressure product (RPP) and Double product (Do-P) was observed in the study group compared with control group. Results of this study suggest that though an addition of 100-ml of bell pepper juice (twice/day) along with IAYT is not more effective in reducing fasting blood glucose, it may be more effective in reducing PPBG, SBP, PP, RPP and Do-P than IAYT alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety of the CRTh2 antagonist AZD1981 as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2-agonists in patients with atopic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman ED

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Eric D Bateman,1 Christopher O’Brien,2 Paul Rugman,2 Sally Luke,2 Stefan Ivanov,2 Mohib Uddin2,3 1Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, 7700, South Africa; 2Research and Development, 3Respiratory, Inflammation, and Autoimmunity, IMED Biotech Unit, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, SE-431 83, Sweden Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of AZD1981, a potent, specific antagonist of the CRTh2 receptor, as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS and long-acting β2-agonists (LABA, in patients with persistent asthma with an allergic component.Patients and methods: In this placebo-controlled, parallel-group Phase IIb study, patients with persistent atopic asthma on ICS and LABA were randomized to receive 12 weeks of treatment with placebo or AZD1981 (80 mg daily, 200 mg daily, and 10 mg, 40 mg, 100 mg, or 400 mg twice daily [BID]. The primary end point was the mean change from baseline in predose, prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 averaged over weeks 2, 4, 8, and 12 in the AZD1981-treatment group vs the placebo group. Secondary end points included other measures of lung function, symptoms, and asthma control, as well as standard measures of safety.Results: In total, 1,140 patients (99.7% received study treatment. There were improvements in the primary end point across all treatment groups over 12 weeks of treatment. However, the improvement for the highest AZD1981 dose (400 mg BID vs placebo was not statistically significant (0.02 L, P=0.58, preventing interpretation of statistical testing for the lower doses. AZD1981 was well tolerated, and the incidence of adverse events was comparable across placebo and treatment groups.Conclusion: In patients with allergic asthma receiving ICS and LABA therapy, the addition of AZD1981 at doses up to 400 mg BID failed to produce a clinically relevant improvement in lung function or any other measured end point, but appeared to have an acceptable safety

  13. Safety Profile of Eslicarbazepine Acetate as Add-On Therapy in Adults with Refractory Focal-Onset Seizures: From Clinical Studies to 6 Years of Post-Marketing Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Helena; Vieira, Mariana; Costa, Raquel; Graça, Joana; Magalhães, Luís M; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate was first approved in the European Union in 2009 as adjunctive therapy in adults with partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalization. The objective of this study was to review the safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate analyzing the data from several clinical studies to 6 years of post-marketing surveillance. We used a post-hoc pooled safety analysis of four phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies (BIA-2093-301, -302, -303, -304) of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on therapy in adults. Safety data of eslicarbazepine acetate in special populations of patients aged ≥65 years with partial-onset seizures (BIA-2093-401) and subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (BIA-2093-111) and renal impairment (BIA-2093-112) are also considered. The incidences of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and serious adverse events were analyzed. The global safety database of eslicarbazepine acetate was analyzed for all cases from post-marketing surveillance from 1 October, 2009 to 21 October, 2015. From a pooled analysis of four phase III studies, it was concluded that the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events, treatment-emergent adverse events leading to discontinuation, and adverse drug reactions were dose dependent. Dizziness, somnolence, headache, and nausea were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events (≥10% of patients) and the majority were of mild-to-moderate intensity. No dose-dependent trend was observed for serious adverse events and individual serious adverse events were reported in less than 1% of patients. Hyponatremia was classified as a possibly related treatment-emergent adverse event in phase III studies (1.2%); however, after 6 years of post-marketing surveillance it represents the most frequently (10.2%) reported adverse drug reaction, with more than half of these cases occurring with eslicarbazepine acetate at

  14. Neuroprotective Effects of Citicoline in in Vitro Models of Retinal Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Matteucci

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, citicoline has been the object of remarkable interest as a possible neuroprotectant. The aim of this study was to investigate if citicoline affected cell survival in primary retinal cultures and if it exerted neuroprotective activity in conditions modeling retinal neurodegeneration. Primary retinal cultures, obtained from rat embryos, were first treated with increasing concentrations of citicoline (up to 1000 µM and analyzed in terms of apoptosis and caspase activation and characterized by immunocytochemistry to identify neuronal and glial cells. Subsequently, excitotoxic concentration of glutamate or High Glucose-containing cell culture medium (HG was administered as well-known conditions modeling neurodegeneration. Glutamate or HG treatments were performed in the presence or not of citicoline. Neuronal degeneration was evaluated in terms of apoptosis and loss of synapses. The results showed that citicoline did not cause any damage to the retinal neuroglial population up to 1000 µM. At the concentration of 100 µM, it was able to counteract neuronal cell damage both in glutamate- and HG-treated retinal cultures by decreasing proapoptotic effects and contrasting synapse loss. These data confirm that citicoline can efficiently exert a neuroprotective activity. In addition, the results suggest that primary retinal cultures, under conditions inducing neurodegeneration, may represent a useful system to investigate citicoline neuroprotective mechanisms.

  15. Cardioprotective properties of citicoline against hyperthyroidism-induced reperfusion damage in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Belmont, Javier; Chávez, Edmundo

    2015-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism represents an increased risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity, especially when the heart is subjected to an ischemia/reperfusion process. The aim of this study was to explore the possible protective effect of the nucleotide citicoline on the susceptibility of hyperthyroid rat hearts to undergo reperfusion-induced damage, which is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Hence, we analyzed the protective effect of citicoline on the electrical behavior and on the mitochondrial function in rat hearts. Hyperthyroidism was established after a daily i.p. injection of triiodothyronine (at 2 mg/kg of body weight) during 5 days. Thereafter, citicoline was administered i.p. (at 125 mg/kg of body weight) for 5 days. In hyperthyroid rat hearts, citicoline protected against reperfusion-induced ventricular arrhythmias. Moreover, citicoline maintained the accumulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+), allowing mitochondria to reach a high transmembrane electric gradient that protected against the release of cytochrome c. It also preserved the activity of the enzyme aconitase that inhibited the release of cytokines. The protection also included the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced mDNA disruption. We conclude that citicoline protects against the reperfusion damage that is found in the hyperthyroid myocardium. This effect might be due to its inhibitory action on the permeability transition in mitochondria.

  16. Effectiveness of add-on therapy with domperidone vs alginic acid in proton pump inhibitor partial response gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in systemic sclerosis: randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foocharoen, Chingching; Chunlertrith, Kitti; Mairiang, Pisaln; Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Namvijit, Suwassa; Wantha, Orathai; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2017-02-01

    Twice-daily dosing of proton pump inhibitor (PPI), the standard therapy for gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD), is an effective therapy for GERD in SSc. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of omeprazole in combination with domperidone vs in combination with algycon in reducing the severity and frequency of reflux symptoms of PPI partial response (PPI-PR) GERD in SSc. Adult SSc patients having PPI-PR GERD were randomly assigned to receive domperidone plus algycon placebo or algycon plus domperidone placebo in a 1:1 ratio plus omeprazole for 4 weeks. The assessment included severity of symptom grading by visual analogue scale, frequency of symptoms by frequency scale for symptoms of GERD and quality of life (QoL) by EuroQol five-dimensions questionnaire scoring. One hundred and forty-eight SSc-GERD patients were enrolled, of whom 88 had PPI-PR. Eighty cases were randomized for either domperidone (n = 38) or algycon (n = 37) therapy. The majority in both groups had the diffuse SSc subset. At the end of the study, no significant difference in symptom grading was found between groups. After treatment and compared with baseline, the severity of symptoms, frequency scale for symptoms of GERD and QoL significantly improved in both groups. Five (13.2%) and 8 (21.6%) respective cases in the domperidone and algycon groups did not respond. The prevalence of PPI-PR GERD is common. Domperidone and algycon are equally effective treatments in combination with omeprazole. However, ∼17% of patients were non-responsive, so the effectiveness of domperidone, algycon and PPI combination therapy should be further investigated. https://clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01878526). © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. [The effect of parenteral citicoline on visual functions and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, M A; Gonchar, P A; Barashkov, V I; Kumar, V; Morozova, N S; Frolov, A M; Kazakova, K A

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nootropic drug citicoline on visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) stage I-III and normalized intraocular pressure (IOP) was studied. 40 patients aged 46-78 years old with POAG stage I-III and normalized IOP were treated with citicoline. Among them there were 24 female and 16 male. The patients were divided into 2 equal groups--experimental and control. Patients of both groups were treated with intravenous citicoline for 10 days. The dose of citicoline in experimental group was 1000 mg/day, in control--500 mg/day. After treatment in both groups visual functions, perimetric indexes of static automated perimetry, morphometric characteristics of retinal tomography and life quality showed improvement. Citicoline has significant neuroprotective effect preventing apoptosis.

  18. Efficacy and safety comparison between liraglutide as add-on therapy to insulin and insulin dose-increase in Chinese subjects with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chun-jun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of adding liraglutide to established insulin therapy in poorly controlled Chinese subjects with type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity compared with increasing insulin dose. Methods A 12-week, randomized, parallel-group study was carried out. A total of 84 patients completed the trial who had been randomly assigned to either the liraglutide-added group or the insulin-increasing group while continuing current insulin based treatment. Insulin dose was reduced by 0-30% upon the initiation of liraglutide. Insulin doses were subsequently adjusted to optimized glycemic control. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c values, blood glucose, total daily insulin dose, body weight, waist circumference, and the number of hypoglycemic events and adverse events were evaluated. Results At the end of study, the mean reduction in HbA1c between the liraglutide-added group and the insulin-increasing group was not significantly different (1.9% vs. 1.77%, p>0.05. However, the percentage of subjects reaching the composite endpoint of HbA1c ≤ 7.0% with no weight gain and no hypoglycemia, was significantly higher in the liraglutide-added group than in the insulin-increasing group (67% vs. 19%, p2, p Conclusions Addition of liraglutide to abdominally obese, insulin-treated patients led to improvement in glycemic control similar to that achieved by increasing insulin dosage, but with a lower daily dose of insulin and fewer hypoglycemic events. Adding liraglutide to insulin also induced a significant reduction in body weight and waist circumference. Liraglutide combined with insulin may be the best treatment option for poorly controlled type 2 diabetes and abdominal obesity.

  19. Relative Efficacy of Piracetam, Modafinil and Citicoline on Cognitive Function in an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nootropic drugs or cognitive enhancers are pharmacological agents that improve cognitive function and memory by various mechanisms. Drugs like piracetam, modafinil and citicoline have been used as nootropic agents. Aim: To compare the relative efficacy of nootropics like piracetam, modafinil and citicoline on learning and memory in rats using the Morris water maze test. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 Wistar rats were used for the study. The animals were divided into five groups (n=6. The groups I to V received gum acacia orally, scopolamine 2 mg/kg intraperitoneally, piracetam (52.5 mg/kg, modafinil (2.5 mg/kg, citicoline (25 mg/kg respectively orally for twenty days. Learning and memory was evaluated using the Morris water maze test. The animals were trained in the Morris water maze on the last five days of dosing. Scopolamine 2 mg/kg was administered intraperitoneally to the above groups of animals (except Groups I and II for induction of amnesia, 45 minutes before the behavioural test. Results: Scopolamine induced marked impairment of memory evidenced by significant reduction (p<0.01 in the number of entries and time spent in the target quadrant when compared to the control group. There was significant (p<0.05 increase in the number of entries and time spent in target quadrant of the Morris water maze in the animals who were pretreated with piracetam, modafinil and citicoline, in comparison to the scopolamine treated group. Amongst the three nootropics, modafinil and citicoline showed significant (p<0.05 memory enhancement in comparison to piracetam. Conclusion: Modafinil and citicoline can significantly reverse the memory impairment in scopolamine induced amnesia model in comparison to piracetam. However, further studies are warranted to confirm this result.

  20. Citicoline: a food beneficial for patients suffering from or threated with glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel eGrieb

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Oral form of citicoline, a nootropic and neuroprotective drug in use for almost five decades, recently was pronounced a food supplement in both USA and EU. The idea of adding citicoline to topical treatment of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG aimed at decreasing intraocular pressure appeared as a logical consequence of accepting neurodegenerative character of this disease. Experimental data, and also few clinical studies indicate that this substance has potential to counteract some important pathological mechanisms which seem to contribute to POAG initiation and progression, such as excitotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  1. Estimation of citicoline sodium in tablets by difference spectrophotometric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Suman Panda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present work deals with development and validation of a novel, precise, and accurate spectrophotometric method for the estimation of citicoline sodium (CTS in tablets. This spectrophotometric method is based on the principle that CTS shows two different forms that differs in the absorption spectra in basic and acidic medium. Materials and Methods: The present work was being carried out on Shimadzu 1800 Double Beam UV-visible spectrophotometer. Difference spectra were generated using 10 mm quartz cells over the range of 200-400 nm. Solvents used were 0.1 M NaOH and 0.1 M HCl. Results: The maxima and minima in the difference spectra of CTS were found to be 239 nm and 283 nm, respectively. Amplitude was calculated from the maxima and minima of spectrum. The drug follows linearity in the range of 1-50 μ/ml (R 2 = 0.999. The average % recovery from the tablet formulation was found to be 98.47%. The method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use: ICH Q2(R1 Validation of Analytical Procedures: Text and Methodology guidelines. Conclusion: This method is simple and inexpensive. Hence it can be applied for determination of the drug in pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  2. Non-invasive beamforming add-on module

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2017-01-01

    An embodiment of a non-invasive beamforming add-on apparatus couples to an existing antenna port and rectifies the beam azimuth in the upstream and downstream directions. The apparatus comprises input circuitry that is configured to receive one

  3. [Assessing the impact of citicoline on the efficiency of rehabilitation measures in patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Мushba, A V; Ivanova, D S; Vinogradov, O I

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of citicoline on the efficacy of rehabilitation measures in patients with ischemic stroke (IS). Sixty patients were examined in the acute period of hemispheric IS. All patients underwent routine comprehensive treatment. The study group included 30 patients who received citicoline within the first 24 hours after IS onset. The control group consisted of 30 patients who were not treated with citicoline. The examination of patients included the assessment of neurological deficit, cognitive functions, P300 evoked potentials, head single photon emission computed tomography. Six months after the onset of disease, there was a significant improvement in cognitive functions as assessed with the MMSE and MoСa scale, and P300 latency in the main group. There was a trend towards the improvement in the activities of daily living (Barthel index) in patients of the main group compared to the control group. SPECT results showed the improvement in cerebral perfusion in an affected hemisphere: in Broca's area, the rear sections of the upper and middle frontal gyrus, the parietal lobe (p <0,05). Citicoline significantly improves cognitive function, which in turn has a positive effect on the efficacy of remediation and indirectly improves cerebral perfusion in patients with hemispheric IS.

  4. Eight weeks of citicoline treatment does not perturb sleep/wake cycles in cocaine-dependent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Bethany K; Penetar, David M; Rodolico, John; Ryan, Elizabeth T; Lukas, Scott E

    2011-06-01

    Citicoline (cytidine-5'-diphosphate) is a mononucleotide composed of ribose, cytosine, pyrophosphate, and choline, and is involved in the biosynthesis of the structural phosopholipids of cell membranes. Treatment with citicoline, improves memory in patients with dementia, and reduces damage to the brain after traumatic brain injury or stroke. Recent research has been conducted to assess whether citicoline is an effective treatment for cocaine dependence. In cocaine-dependent individuals, withdrawal from cocaine is associated with disturbed sleep, which may contribute to the high rate of relapse to cocaine use. Therefore, it is important to know the impact of citicoline on the sleep/wake cycle in these individuals in order to rate its overall efficacy. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, the effects of citicoline treatment on the sleep/wake cycles of cocaine dependent participants were assessed. The results of the current study are reported as part of a larger study, consisting of an eight-week treatment period to assess the efficacy of longer-term treatment with citicoline at decreasing cocaine consumption in cocaine-dependent polydrug using participants. In this non-abstinent, cocaine-dependent population, citicoline had no effect on any of the sleep parameters measured including sleep efficiency, sleep latency, total sleep time, number of waking episodes, time awake per episode, amount of time in bed spent moving, number of sleep episodes, time asleep per episode, and amount of time in bed spent immobile. These data suggest that eight weeks of citicoline administration does not disturb sleep/wake cycles of cocaine-dependent individuals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. PC add on card for processing of LSC signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadhav, S.R.; Nikhare, D.M.; Gurna, R.K.; Paulson, Molly; Kulkarni, C.P.; Vaidya, P.P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes PC- add on card developed at Electronics Division for processing of LSC signals. This card uses highly integrated digital and analog circuits, for entire processing of signals available from preamplifiers to get complete beta energy spectrum corresponding to coincident events in Liquid Scintillation Counting. LSC card along with High Voltage PC-add on card gives complete electronics required for LSC system. This card is also used in automatic LSC system along with interface circuits, which are used to control mechanical movements. (author)

  6. Add-on unidirectional elastic metamaterial plate cloak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Kyung; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-02-01

    Metamaterial cloaks control the propagation of waves to make an object invisible or insensible. To manipulate elastic waves in space, a metamaterial cloak is typically embedded in a base system that includes or surrounds a target object. The embedding is undesirable because it structurally weakens or permanently alters the base system. In this study, we propose a new add-on metamaterial elastic cloak that can be placed over and mechanically coupled with a base structure without embedding. We designed an add-on type annular metamaterial plate cloak through conformal mapping, fabricated it and performed cloaking experiments in a thin-plate with a hole. Experiments were performed in a thin plate by using the lowest symmetric Lamb wave centered at 100 kHz. As a means to check the cloaking performance of the add-on elastic plate cloak, possibly as a temporary stress reliever or a so-called “stress bandage”, the degree of stress concentration mitigation and the recovery from the perturbed wave field due to a hole were investigated.

  7. Add-on perampanel in Lance-Adams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Bernhard J; Bacher, Matthias; Kurth, Christoph; Staack, Anke M; Kornmeier, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    Perampanel (PER) is the first-in-class selective, noncompetitive α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist that has been licensed and marketed as antiepileptic drug (AED) indicated for patients with partial-onset and primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. A positive effect was reported in some patients with epileptic myoclonic jerks in idiopathic generalized epilepsy and in progressive myoclonic epilepsy. We treated a male patient with posthypoxic nonepileptic myoclonus (Lance-Adams syndrome) with add-on PER and achieved an almost complete cessation of jerks. This effect was reproducible and, therefore, we suggest that it might be worth trying PER in comparable cases.

  8. EFFECT OF CEREBROPROTEIN HYDROLYSATE WITH CITICOLINE VERSUS CITICOLINE ALONE IN THE INITIAL MANAGEMENT OF HEAD INJURY AND ITS CLINICAL OUTCOME “A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMISED COMPARATIVE STUDY”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadaraju D. N

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury is an important cause of morbidity. It also represents the most frequent reason for neurological illness after headache. Compared with other types of brain insult, traumatic brain injury produces more diffuse injury causing more cognitive and neuropsychiatric disturbances. Various drugs have been used in an attempt to improve the clinical outcome, citicoline and Cerebrolysin hydrolysate have been used to improve the clinical outcome in traumatic brain injury. The evidence thus far has been conflicting with reports in favour and against the use of these drugs in the clinical benefit of the patients with traumatic brain injury. We attempt to determine the benefits and advantages of using these drugs in the management of traumatic brain injury. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is a prospective study comprising 60 patients of head injury admitted in the Department of Neurosurgery at Vydehi Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Bangalore. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the effect of cerebroprotein hydrolysate with citicoline compared to citicoline alone in the initial management of head injury and its clinical outcome and to assess the improvement. RESULTS Sixty patients with head injury were recruited and divided into group A and group B randomly. The mean age was 43.5 years with 43 male patients and 17 female patients. The GCS at admission of 27 patients was mild head injury and of 33 patients was moderate head injury. Group A had 13 patients with mild head injury and 17 patients with moderate head injury. Group B had 14 patients with mild and 16 patients with moderate head injury at the time of admission. The GCS was assessed at 1 week and 3 weeks. On assessing the patients at 1 week, group A had 14 patients with mild head injury and 16 patients with moderate head injury, whereas group B had 14 patients with mild and 16 patients with moderate head injury. The extended Glasgow Outcome Scale

  9. A subsurface add-on for standard atomic force microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbiest, G. J., E-mail: Verbiest@physik.rwth-aachen.de [JARA-FIT and II. Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Zalm, D. J. van der; Oosterkamp, T. H.; Rost, M. J., E-mail: Rost@physics.leidenuniv.nl [Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9504, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    The application of ultrasound in an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) gives access to subsurface information. However, no commercially AFM exists that is equipped with this technique. The main problems are the electronic crosstalk in the AFM setup and the insufficiently strong excitation of the cantilever at ultrasonic (MHz) frequencies. In this paper, we describe the development of an add-on that provides a solution to these problems by using a special piezo element with a lowest resonance frequency of 2.5 MHz and by separating the electronic connection for this high frequency piezo element from all other connections. In this sense, we support researches with the possibility to perform subsurface measurements with their existing AFMs and hopefully pave also the way for the development of a commercial AFM that is capable of imaging subsurface features with nanometer resolution.

  10. Non-invasive beamforming add-on module

    KAUST Repository

    Bader, Ahmed

    2017-02-23

    An embodiment of a non-invasive beamforming add-on apparatus couples to an existing antenna port and rectifies the beam azimuth in the upstream and downstream directions. The apparatus comprises input circuitry that is configured to receive one or more signals from a neighboring node of the linear wireless sensor network; first amplifier circuitry configured to adjust an amplitude of a respective received signal in accordance with a weighting coefficient and invoke a desired phase to a carrier frequency of the received signal thereby forming a first amplified signal; and second amplifier circuitry configured to adjust a gain of the first amplified signal towards upstream and downstream neighbors of the linear wireless sensor in the linear wireless sensor network.

  11. [The add-on effect of omalizumab on patients with uncontrolled bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Yoshinori; Endo, Satoshi; Okumur, Shunsuke; Sasaki, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Ogasa, Toshiyuki; Osanai, Shinobu; Ohsaki, Yoshinobu

    2011-11-01

    A high-dose administration of inhaled corticosteroid is effective in the majority of patients with bronchial asthma, but is often difficult to attain sufficient control in certain subsets of patients. Omalizumab has recently emerged as a promising drug for bronchial asthma. To assess its add-on effect we administered omalizumab to patients with uncontrolled atopic asthma for more than 16 weeks and gave them questionnaires. The study population comprised 9 patients with frequent asthmatic symptoms despite the administration of high-dose inhaled corticosteroid and other disease controllers. We scored disease control using the Asthma Health Questionnaire-33-Japan and the Asthma Control Test, and evaluated the frequencies of short-acting beta2-agonist use for rescue and drip infusion of theophyllines and/or systemic steroids in a retrospective fashion. Asthmatic scores were significantly improved after 16 weeks of omalizumab therapy. The frequencies of reliever use and drip infusion were also decreased. These trends were present even in patients in whom no aeroallergen-specific IgE antibodies were detected. No statistically significant side effects were observed. Our study confirmed the add-on effect of omalizumab based on evaluation by simple questionnaires. Further studies are needed to clarify whether omalizumab therapy is suitable for patients without specific IgE antibodies.

  12. 40 CFR 75.34 - Units with add-on emission controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Units with add-on emission controls... add-on emission controls. (a) The owner or operator of an affected unit equipped with add-on SO2 and... assurance/quality control program for the unit, required by section 1 in appendix B of this part. To provide...

  13. Safety and tolerability of once-daily tiotropium Respimat(®) as add-on to at least inhaled corticosteroids in adult patients with symptomatic asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Engel, Michael; Dusser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tiotropium, a long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilator, has demonstrated efficacy and safety as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), with or without other maintenance therapies, in patients with symptomatic asthma. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate safety and tolerability of tiotro...

  14. Implementation of computerized add-on testing for hospitalized patients in a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeon; Kamis, Irina K; Singh, Balaji; Batra, Shalini; Dixon, Roberta H; Dighe, Anand S

    2011-05-01

    Physician requests for additional testing on an existing laboratory specimen (add-ons) are resource intensive and generally require a phone call to the laboratory. Verbal orders such as these have been noted to be associated with errors in accuracy. The aim of this study was to compare a novel computerized system for add-on requests to the prior verbal system. We compare the computerized add-on request system to the verbal system with respect to order completeness and workflow. We demonstrate that the computerized add-on system resulted in the complete in-laboratory documentation of the add-on request 100% of the time, compared to 58% with the verbal add-on system. In addition, we show that documentation of a verbal add-on request in the electronic medical record (EMR) occurred for 4% of requests, while in the computerized system EMR documentation occurred 100% of the time. We further demonstrate that the computerized add-on request process was well accepted by providers and did not significantly change the test mix of the add-on requests. In computerized physician order entry (CPOE) implementations, add-on order functionality should be considered so these orders are documented in the EMR.

  15. Citicoline for traumatic brain injury: a systematic review & meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Meshkini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity especially in young ages. Despite over 30 years of using Neuroprotective agents for TBI management, there is no absolute recommended agent for the condition yet. Methods: This study is a part of a scoping review thesis on "Neuroprotective agents using for Traumatic Brain Injury: a systematic review & meta-analyses"; which had a wide proposal keywords and ran in "Cochrane CENTRAL", "MedLine/PubMed", "SCOPUS", "Thomson Reuters Web of Science", "SID.ir", "Barket Foundation", and "clinicaltrials.gov" databases up to September 06, 2015. This study limits the retrieved search results only to those which used citicoline for TBI management. The included Randomized Clinical Trials' (RCTs were assessed for their quality of reporting by adapting CONSORT-checklist prior to extracting their data into meta-analysis. Meta-analyses of this review were conducted by Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS in acute TBI patients and total neuropsychological assessments in both acute and chronic TBI management, mortalities and adverse-effects. Results: Four RCTs were retrieved and included in this review with 1196 participants (10 were chronic TBI impaired patients; analysis of 1128 patients for their favorable GOS outcomes in two studies showed no significant difference between the study groups; however, neuropsychological outcomes were significantly better in placebo/control group of 971 patients of three studies. Mortality rates and adverse-effects analysis based on two studies with 1429 patients showed no significant difference between the study groups. However, two other studies have neither mortality nor adverse effects reports due to their protocol. Conclusions: Citicoline use for acute TBI seems to have no field of support anymore, whereas it may have some benefits in improving the neuro-cognitive state in chronic TBI patients. It's also recommended to keep in mind acute interventions

  16. Improvements in concentration, working memory and sustained attention following consumption of a natural citicoline-caffeine beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Steven E; Werner, Kimberly B; Preston, Brittany F; Baker, Laurie M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the neurocognitive and electrophysiological effects of a citicoline-caffeine-based beverage in 60 healthy adult participants enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Measures of electrical brain activity using electroencephalogram (EEG) and neuropsychological measures examining attention, concentration and reaction time were administered. Compared to placebo, participants receiving the citicoline-caffeine beverage exhibited significantly faster maze learning times and reaction times on a continuous performance test, fewer errors in a go/no-go task and better accuracy on a measure of information processing speed. EEG results examining P450 event-related potentials revealed that participants receiving the citicoline-caffeine beverage exhibited higher P450 amplitudes than controls, suggesting an increase in sustained attention. Overall, these findings suggest that the beverage significantly improved sustained attention, cognitive effort and reaction times in healthy adults. Evidence of improved P450 amplitude indicates a general improvement in the ability to accommodate new and relevant information within working memory and overall enhanced brain activation.

  17. Visual evoked potentials (VEP and visual acuity improvement after cytidine 52 -diphosphocholine (CDP-Choline therapy in amblyopic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Halfeld Furtado de Mendonça

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Citicoline may be used in many neurological disorders. Combined treatment of citicoline with patching in amblyopia has previously been researched. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the effect of citicoline in non-patching amblyopic patient. A 11-year-old amblyopic boy underwent complete ophthalmological examinations, including VEP with flash and pattern stimulus. Two averages of 100 sweep were performed for flash stimulus. Pattern reversal stimulus obtained with high contrast was performed with 60', 30' and 15' checks stimuli. The VEP was repeated 90 days later after a therapy with citicoline and vitamin and the results compared with the responses of the previous recording session. The visual acuity (VA was 0,7 in the RE and 1,0 in the LE. The VEP pattern amplitude was normal in both eyes. Delayed in latency was detected for all spatial frequency stimulus (SFS in the RE. Delay in latency was detected only for high SFS in the LE. After the treatment, the VA was 1,0 in both eyes. The latency was normalized with low SFS on the RE and with high SFS on the LE. The flash VEP was normal before and after the therapy. In conclusion, the citicoline demonstrated that it was effective in the treatment of amblyopic eye without patching. The VA and the VEP latency improvement demonstrated that the citicoline enhance the transmission of the electric impulse from retina to visual cortex. Further research is required to understand the immediate and long-term effect of coline treatment in amblyopic patients.

  18. Efficacy and Safety of Lamotrigine as Add-On Treatment to Lithium in Bipolar Depression : A Multicenter, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loos, Marc L. M.; Mulder, Paul G. H.; Hartong, Erwin G. Th. M.; Blom, Marc B. J.; Vergouwen, Anton C.; de Keyzer, Herman J. U. E. M.; Notten, Peter J. H.; Luteijn, Marijke L.; Timmermans, Manuela A.; Nolen, Willem A.

    Objective: Lamotrigine is one of the pharmacologic options for the treatment of bipolar depression but has only been studied as monotherapy. This study compared the acute effects of lamotrigine and placebo as add-on therapy to ongoing treatment with lithium in patients with bipolar depression.

  19. Rate and associated factors of solifenacin add-on after tamsulosin monotherapy in men with voiding and storage lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H N; Lee, K-S; Kim, J C; Chung, B H; Kim, C-S; Lee, J G; Kim, D K; Park, C H; Park, J K; Hong, S J

    2015-04-01

    To explore the rate of add-on therapy with solifenacin in men with voiding and storage lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) after tamsulosin monotherapy and to explore predictive factors for starting solifenacin add-on therapy. Men aged ≥ 45 years with IPSS ≥ 12 and symptoms of OAB (OAB-V8 ≥ 8, micturition ≥ 8/24 h, urgency ≥ 2/24 h) were enrolled to receive tamsulosin 0.2 mg once daily. After 4 weeks, men with residual symptoms of OAB and reported 'dissatisfied' or 'a little satisfied' were received solifenacin 5 mg in combination with tamsulosin monotherapy. Subjects completed an IPSS, a Quality of life (QoL) index, OAB V8, and an International Consultation of Incontinence Questionnaire (ICIQ)-Male LUTS, and patient perception of bladder condition (PPBC) at baseline and week 4. Of a total of 305 patients, 254 patients completed 4 weeks of tamsulosin treatment. For 176 patients, solifenacin was added (69.3%). Significant predictive factors of solifenacin add-on therapy included long LUTS duration, high IPSS, number of micturitions per 24 h, more urgency episodes, high urgency severity score in a voiding diary and high OAB V8 score. Based on multivariable analysis, potential predictive factors of solifenacin add-on therapy included long LUTS duration (OR = 1.008, 95% CI: 1.001-1.014), high serum PSA (OR = 1.543, 95% CI: 1.136-2.095) and small prostate size (OR = 0.970, 95% CI: 0.947-0.994) (p tamsulosin monotherapy. Two thirds of men with voiding and storage LUTS needed to add anticholinergics after 4 weeks of tamsulosin monotherapy. Patients with longer lasting symptoms and storage symptoms with small prostate volume may require the anticholinergic add-on. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evolutionary diversification of protein-protein interactions by interface add-ons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plach, Maximilian G; Semmelmann, Florian; Busch, Florian; Busch, Markus; Heizinger, Leonhard; Wysocki, Vicki H; Merkl, Rainer; Sterner, Reinhard

    2017-10-03

    Cells contain a multitude of protein complexes whose subunits interact with high specificity. However, the number of different protein folds and interface geometries found in nature is limited. This raises the question of how protein-protein interaction specificity is achieved on the structural level and how the formation of nonphysiological complexes is avoided. Here, we describe structural elements called interface add-ons that fulfill this function and elucidate their role for the diversification of protein-protein interactions during evolution. We identified interface add-ons in 10% of a representative set of bacterial, heteromeric protein complexes. The importance of interface add-ons for protein-protein interaction specificity is demonstrated by an exemplary experimental characterization of over 30 cognate and hybrid glutamine amidotransferase complexes in combination with comprehensive genetic profiling and protein design. Moreover, growth experiments showed that the lack of interface add-ons can lead to physiologically harmful cross-talk between essential biosynthetic pathways. In sum, our complementary in silico, in vitro, and in vivo analysis argues that interface add-ons are a practical and widespread evolutionary strategy to prevent the formation of nonphysiological complexes by specializing protein-protein interactions.

  1. Randomized, controlled trial of rasagiline as an add-on to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Silver, Dee; Choudhry, Azhar; Eyal, Eli; Isaacson, Stuart

    2014-07-01

    Dopamine agonists (DA) are often used as first-line monotherapy for the symptomatic control of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, DA monotherapy typically becomes inadequate within a few years, at which time the DA dosage must be increased or other antiparkinsonian medications added. Adding a monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) inhibitor to DA monotherapy might improve symptomatic control while maintaining good safety and tolerability. We conducted an 18-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of rasagiline 1 mg/d as an add-on to DA therapy (ropinirole ≥ 6 mg/d or pramipexole ≥ 1.0 mg/d) in early PD patients whose conditions were not adequately controlled on their current treatment regimen. The primary efficacy variable was the change in total Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) score (sum of parts I, II, and III) from baseline to week 18, comparing rasagiline and placebo groups. The modified intent-to-treat (ITT) population included 321 subjects whose mean ± SD age was 62.6 ± 9.7, and duration of PD was 2.1 ± 2.1 years. Results demonstrated a significantly greater improvement in total UPDRS scores from baseline to week 18 in the rasagiline group compared with the placebo group (least squares [LS] mean difference ± SE, -2.4 ± 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], -4.3, -0.5; P = 0.012). Mean improvement (LS mean ± SE) was -3.6 ± 0.68 in the rasagiline group and -1.2 ± 0.68 in the placebo group. Rasagiline was well tolerated, and the most common adverse events (AEs; rasagiline vs. placebo) were dizziness (7.4% vs. 6.1%), somnolence (6.8% vs. 6.7%), and headache (6.2% vs. 4.3%). Rasagiline 1 mg/d provided statistically significant improvement when added to dopamine agonist therapy and was well tolerated. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  2. Add-on effect of Brahmi in the management of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanto Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brahmi(Bacopa monnieri, an Ayurvedic herb has primarily been used to enhance cognitive ability, memory and learning skills. We present a case study of schizophrenia in which add-on Brahmi extracts 500 mg/day for a period of one month resulted in reduction in psychopathology without any treatment-emergent adverse effect. Although preliminary, our case study suggests therapeutic efficacy of add-on Brahmi in schizophrenia, thus opening up a new dimension of its role in alternative medicines.

  3. Appropriate statistical methods are required to assess diagnostic tests for replacement, add-on, and triage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayen, Andrew; Macaskill, Petra; Irwig, Les; Bossuyt, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To explain which measures of accuracy and which statistical methods should be used in studies to assess the value of a new binary test as a replacement test, an add-on test, or a triage test. Selection and explanation of statistical methods, illustrated with examples. Statistical methods for

  4. Development of a radiometer based on an Add-ON card for PC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolanos, L.; Lopez, B.; Fernandez, J.L.; Laria, J.

    1997-01-01

    The design of an add-on card for PC that enables it to record nuclear pulses provided by two channels is described in this paper. This card carries acts as a pulse discriminator, and according to the software it finds many appliances in radioimmunoassay, nuclear medicine, industry and other fields

  5. Weight gain with add-on second-generation antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: a naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar, H; Joas, E; Kardell, M; Pålsson, E; Landén, M

    2017-06-01

    Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and magnitude of weight gain in-patients with bipolar disorder when treated with a second-generation antipsychotic as an add-on treatment to a mood stabilizer in routine clinical practice. Data were derived from the quality register for bipolar disorder in Sweden (BipoläR). Patients with bipolar disorder who started add-on treatment with a SGA (n = 575) were compared at next yearly follow-up with age and sex matched patients who were only treated with a mood stabilizer (n = 566). The primary outcome measure was change in body weight and body mass index (BMI). We also assessed the prevalence of clinically significant weight gain defined as ≥7% gain in body weight. The group that received add-on treatment with antipsychotics neither gained more weight nor were at higher risk for a clinically significant weight gain than the reference group. Instead, factors associated with clinically significant weight gain were female sex, young age, low-baseline BMI, and occurrence of manic/hypomanic episodes. We found no evidence of an overall increased risk of weight gain for patients with bipolar disorder after receiving add-on SGA to a mood stabilizer in a routine clinical setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Effects of vildagliptin as add-on treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: insights from long-term clinical studies in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odawara, Masato; Sagara, Rieko

    2015-01-01

    Vildagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, is wildly used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with mono- or combination-therapy. We review two previously published open-label studies to extract insights on the long-term efficacy and safety of vildagliptin. Two studies were conducted in Japan to assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as an add-on to other oral antidiabetes drugs (OADs) for 52 weeks. These studies were performed under the similar protocol in Japanese patients with T2DM who were inadequately controlled with OAD monotherapy [excluding other dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors]. Addition of vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily) to other OAD monotherapy [sulfonylurea (SU), metformin, thiazolidinedione, alpha-glucosidase inhibitor and glinide] reduced glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels by -0.64 %,-0.75 %,-0.92 %,-0.94 % and - 0.64 %, respectively, over 52 weeks of treatment. Overall, the incidence of hypoglycemia was low and was slightly higher in the add-on to SU treatment group compared with the other groups. The incidences of adverse events were comparable among the treatment groups, and vildagliptin was well-tolerated as add-on therapy to other OADs. The evidence from the two studies indicates that vildagliptin as an add-on therapy to other OADs is a clinically reasonable option for Japanese patients with T2DM who respond inadequately to other OAD monotherapy.

  7. Pleasure and pedagogy: the consumption of DVD add-ons among Irish teenagers

    OpenAIRE

    Brereton, Pat; O'Connor, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the issue of young people and media use in the digital age, more specifically the interconnection between new media pleasures and pedagogy as they relate to the consumption of DVD add-ons. Arguing against the view of new media as having predominantly detrimental effects on young people, the authors claim that new media can enable young people to develop media literacy skills and are of the view that media literacy strategies must be based on an understanding and legitim...

  8. Hera-FFX: a Firefox add-on for Semi-automatic Web Accessibility Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Fuertes Castro, José Luis; González, Ricardo; Gutiérrez, Emmanuelle; Martínez Normand, Loïc

    2009-01-01

    Website accessibility evaluation is a complex task requiring a combination of human expertise and software support. There are several online and offline tools to support the manual web accessibility evaluation process. However, they all have some weaknesses because none of them includes all the desired features. In this paper we present Hera-FFX, an add-on for the Firefox web browser that supports semi-automatic web accessibility evaluation.

  9. Development of an add-on kit for scanning confocal microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kaikai; Zheng, Guoan

    2017-03-01

    Scanning confocal microscopy is a standard choice for many fluorescence imaging applications in basic biomedical research. It is able to produce optically sectioned images and provide acquisition versatility to address many samples and application demands. However, scanning a focused point across the specimen limits the speed of image acquisition. As a result, scanning confocal microscope only works well with stationary samples. Researchers have performed parallel confocal scanning using digital-micromirror-device (DMD), which was used to project a scanning multi-point pattern across the sample. The DMD based parallel confocal systems increase the imaging speed while maintaining the optical sectioning ability. In this paper, we report the development of an add-on kit for high-speed and low-cost confocal microscopy. By adapting this add-on kit to an existing regular microscope, one can convert it into a confocal microscope without significant hardware modifications. Compared with current DMD-based implementations, the reported approach is able to recover multiple layers along the z axis simultaneously. It may find applications in wafer inspection and 3D metrology of semiconductor circuit. The dissemination of the proposed add-on kit under $1000 budget could also lead to new types of experimental designs for biological research labs, e.g., cytology analysis in cell culture experiments, genetic studies on multicellular organisms, pharmaceutical drug profiling, RNA interference studies, investigation of microbial communities in environmental systems, and etc.

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Jjjj of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System If you are required to comply with operating... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System 1 Table 1 to Subpart JJJJ of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  11. 40 CFR Table 2 to Subpart Oooo of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OOOO of Part 63—Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System If you are required... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-On Control Devices and Capture System 2 Table 2 to Subpart OOOO of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Ssss of... - Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System If you are required to comply with operating limits by... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits if Using Add-on Control Devices and Capture System 1 Table 1 to Subpart SSSS of Part 63 Protection of Environment...

  13. WITHDRAWN: Oxcarbazepine add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Sergio M; Schmidt, Dieter B; White, Sarah; Shukralla, Arif

    2016-11-15

    Most people with epilepsy have a good prognosis and their seizures can be well controlled with the use of a single antiepileptic drug, but up to 30% develop refractory epilepsy, especially those with partial seizures. In this review we summarize the current evidence regarding oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the effects of oxcarbazepine when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group's Specialized Register (28 March 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2006), MEDLINE (1966 to March 2006). No language restrictions were imposed. We checked the reference lists of retrieved studies for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted Novartis (manufacturers of oxcarbazepine) and experts in the field. Randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, add-on trials of oxcarbazepine in patients with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and extracted the relevant data. The following outcomes were assessed : (a) 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency; (b) treatment withdrawal (any reason); (c) side effects. Primary analyses were intention-to-treat. Summary odds ratios were estimated for each outcome. Two trials were included representing 961 randomized patients.Overall Odds Ratio (OR) (95% Confidence Interval (CIs)) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency compared to placebo 2.96 (2.20, 4.00).Treatment withdrawal OR (95% CIs) compared to placebo 2.17 (1.59, 2.97).Side effects: OR (99% CIs) compared to placebo, ataxia 2.93 (1.72, 4.99); dizziness 3.05 (1.99, 4.67); fatigue 1.80 (1.02, 3.19); nausea 2.88 (1.77, 4.69); somnolence 2.55 (1.84, 3.55); diplopia 4.32 (2.65, 7.04), were significantly associated with oxcarbazepine. Oxcarbazepine has efficacy as an add-on treatment in patients with drug

  14. A high resolution 16 k multi-channel analyzer PC add-on card

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, C.P.; Paulson, Molly; Vaidya, P.P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the system details of a 16 K channel resolution Multi-Channel Analyzer (MCA) developed at Electronics Division, BARC, which is used in high resolution nuclear spectroscopy systems for pulse height analysis. The high resolution data acquisition PC add-on card is architectured using a state of the art digital circuit design technology which makes use of a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and some of the most modern and advanced analog counterparts like low power, high speed and high precision comparators, Op-amps, ADCs and DACs etc. The 16 K MCA card gives an economic, compact, and low power alternative for nuclear pulse spectroscopy use. (author)

  15. Development of a colonoscopy add-on device for improvement of the intubation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litten JD

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan D Litten1, JungHun Choi2, David Drozek31Department of Mechanical Engineering; 2Department of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering Program; 3College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Specialty Medicine, Ohio University, Athens, OH, USAAbstract: A colonoscopy add-on device has been developed to reduce intubation time without modification of the current colonoscope and peripheral devices. One of the main purposes of the system is to minimize trauma caused by the distal tip of the colonoscope. The detachable sensory fixture at the end of the distal tip measures the distance between the distal tip and the colon wall in three directions, and the actuation system attached at the base of the colonoscope controls the distal tip by rotating two dial knobs. The device controls the distal tip to minimize contact between the distal tip and the colon wall, and the distal tip ideally points out the next possible lumen. A compatibility test of the infrared sensory system was carried out, and the design of the actuation system was accomplished. The system is integrated and controlled by a microprocessor. The device was tested in a silicon colon and porcine intestine. The results showed that a colonoscopist successfully reached the cecum with the aid of the colonoscopy add-on device without significant contact between the colon wall and the distal tip. The colonoscopy aid device was very helpful for the novice colonoscopist.Keywords: colonoscope, infrared sensors, intubation, trauma, colonoscopy training model

  16. radEq Add-On Module for CFD Solver Loci-CHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloud, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Loci-CHEM to be applied to flow velocities where surface radiation due to heating from compression and friction becomes significant. The module adds a radiation equilibrium boundary condition to the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to produce accurate results. The module expanded the upper limit for accurate CFD solutions of Loci-CHEM from Mach 4 to Mach 10 based on Space Shuttle Orbiter Re-Entry trajectories. Loci-CHEM already has a very promising architecture and performance, but absence of radiation equilibrium boundary condition limited the application of Loci-CHEM to below Mach 4. The immediate advantage of the add-on module is that it allows Loci-CHEM to work with supersonic flows up to Mach 10. This transformed Loci-CHEM from a rocket engine- heritage CFD code with general subsonic and low-supersonic applications, to an aeroheating code with hypersonic applications. The follow-on advantage of the module is that it is a building block for additional add-on modules that will solve for the heating generated at Mach numbers higher than 10.

  17. Long-term efficacy and safety of sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors as add-on to metformin treatment in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Gong, Yanping; Li, Chunlin; Lu, Yanhui; Liu, Yu; Shao, Yinghong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Drug intensification is often required for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus on stable metformin therapy. Among the potential candidates for a combination therapy, sodium-glucose transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors have shown promising outcomes. This meta-analysis was performed to compare the efficacy and safety of SGLT2 inhibitors with non-SGLT2 combinations as add-on treatment to metformin. Methods: Literature search was carried out in multiple electronic databases for the acquisition of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) by following a priori eligibility criteria. After the assessment of quality of the included RCTs, meta-analyses of mean differences or odds ratios (OR) were performed to achieve overall effect sizes of the changes from baseline in selected efficacy and safety endpoints reported in the individual studies. Between-studies heterogeneity was estimated with between-studies statistical heterogeneity (I2) index. Results: Six RCTs fulfilled the eligibility criteria. SGLT2 inhibitors as add-on to metformin treatment reduced % HbA1c significantly more than non-SGLT2 combinations after 52 weeks (P = .002) as well as after 104 weeks (P SGLT2 inhibitors also reduced fasting plasma glucose levels, body weight, systolic, and diastolic blood pressures after 52 weeks and 104 weeks significantly (P SGLT2 combinations. Incidence of hypoglycemia was significantly lower (P = .02) but incidence of suspected or confirmed genital tract infections was significantly higher (P SGLT2 inhibitors treated in comparison with non-SGLT2 combinations. Conclusion: As add-on to metformin treatment, SGLT2 inhibitors are found significantly more efficacious than non-SGLT2 inhibitor combinations in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus, although, SGLT2 inhibitor therapy is associated with significantly higher incidence of suspected or confirmed genital tract infections. PMID:28682870

  18. Addiction surplus: the add-on margin that makes addictive consumptions difficult to contain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Peter J; Livingstone, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Addictive consumptions generate financial surpluses over-and-above non-addictive consumptions because of the excessive consumption of addicted consumers. This add-on margin or 'addiction surplus' provides a powerful incentive for beneficiaries to protect their income by ensuring addicted consumers keep consuming. Not only that, addiction surplus provides the financial base that enables producers to sponsor activities which aim to prevent public health initiatives from reducing consumption. This paper examines the potency of addiction surplus to engage industry, governments and communities in an on-going reliance on addiction surplus. It then explores how neo-liberal constructions of a rational consumer disguise the ethical and exploitative dynamics of addiction surplus by examining ways in which addictive consumptions fail to conform to notions of autonomy and rationality. Four measures are identified to contain the distorting effects of addiction surplus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Eslicarbazepine acetate add-on for drug-resistant partial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xian-Chao; Yuan, Hai; Wang, Yi; Xu, Hui-Qin; Hong, Wen-Ke; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2017-10-25

    This is an updated version of the Cochrane Review published in the Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12.The majority of people with epilepsy have a good prognosis, but up to 30% of people continue to have seizures despite several regimens of antiepileptic drugs. In this review, we summarized the current evidence regarding eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) when used as an add-on treatment for drug-resistant partial epilepsy. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of ESL when used as an add-on treatment for people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. The searches for the original review were run in November 2011. Subsequently, we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (6 December 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL 2016, Issue 11) and MEDLINE (1946 to 6 December 2016). There were no language restrictions. We reviewed the reference lists of retrieved studies to search for additional reports of relevant studies. We also contacted the manufacturers of ESL and experts in the field for information about any unpublished or ongoing studies. Randomized placebo controlled double-blind add-on trials of ESL in people with drug-resistant partial epilepsy. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Outcomes investigated included 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency, seizure freedom, treatment withdrawal, adverse effects, and drug interactions. Primary analyses were by intention to treat (ITT). The dose-response relationship was evaluated in regression models. We included five trials (1799 participants) rated at low risk of bias; all studies were funded by BIAL. The overall risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) for 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency was 1.71 (95% CI 1.42 to 2.05). Dose regression analysis showed evidence that ESL reduced seizure frequency with an increase in efficacy with increasing doses of ESL. ESL was significantly associated with seizure freedom

  20. Circadian rest-activity rhythms during benzodiazepine tapering covered by melatonin versus placebo add-on

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baandrup, Lone; Fasmer, Ole Bernt; Glenthøj, Birte Yding

    2016-01-01

    is associated with changes in circadian rhythm parameters. METHOD: Data were derived from a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial with 24 weeks follow-up. Participants were randomized to add-on treatment with prolonged-release melatonin (2 mg) or matching placebo, and usual benzodiazepine dosage...... significantly increased the interdaily stability and at a trend level decreased the intradaily variability compared with placebo. Benzodiazepine dose reduction was not associated with these circadian rhythm parameters. Activity counts were generally higher after benzodiazepine dose reduction compared with pre......BACKGROUND: Patients with severe mental illness often suffer from disruptions in circadian rest-activity cycles, which might partly be attributed to ongoing psychopharmacological medication. Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed for prolonged periods despite recommendations of only short...

  1. Numerical Study on Self-Cleaning Canister Filter With Add-On Filter Cap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Akmal Nizam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Filtration in a turbo machinery system such as a gas turbine will ensure that the air entering the inlet is free from contaminants that could bring damage to the main system. Self-cleaning filter systems for gas turbines are designed for continuously efficient flow filtration. A good filter would be able to maintain its effectiveness over a longer time period, prolonging the duration between filter replacements and providing lower pressure drop over its operating lifetime. With this goal in mind, the current study is focused on the difference in pressure loss of the benchmark Salutary Avenue Self-cleaning filter in comparison to a new design with an add-on filter cap. Geometry for the add-on filter cap will be based from Salutary Avenue Manufacturing Sdn.Bhd. SOLIDWORKS software was used to model the geometry of the filter, while simulation analysis on the flow through the filter was done using Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD software. The simulations are based on a low velocity condition, in which the parameter for the inlet velocity are set at 0.032 m/s, 0.063 m/s, 0.094 m/s and 0.126 m/s respectively. From the simulation data obtained for the inlet velocities considered, the pressure drop reduction of the modified filter compared to the benchmark was found to be between 7.59% and 30.18%. All in all, the modification of the filter cap produced a lower pressure drop in comparison with the benchmark filter; an improvement of 27.02% for the total pressure drop was obtained.

  2. Add-on conservation benefits of marine territorial user rights fishery policies in central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelcich, Stefan; Godoy, Natalio; Prado, Luis; Castilla, Juan Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To combine the rational use of marine benthic resources and economic development of small-scale fishers, Chile passed legislation in 1991 establishing a comanagement policy that grants exclusive territorial user rights for fisheries (TURFs) to artisanal fisher organizations in well-defined inshore coastal areas, known as Management and Exploitation Areas for Benthic Resources (MEABRs). In general the policy has been proclaimed a management and economic success because benthic resource abundances have increased inside MEABRs in comparison with open-access areas. However, there is a lack of studies assessing the impact of this management policy on nontargeted subtidal species and community assemblages and the policy's implications for biodiversity and conservation. This study starts to fill this gap and links the allocation of TURFs for benthic resources with add-on conservation benefits for species that are not directly linked with the fishery policy. Comparative subtidal surveys inside vs. outside MEABRs were used to assess the effects of three MEABRs on managed targeted benthic species, biodiversity (species richness), and community assemblages in central Chile. Surveys focused exclusively on subtidal kelp forest habitats dominated by Lessonia trabeculata, spanning 4-12 m in depth and with similar levels of habitat complexity. The study comprised: (1) quantification of kelp forest complexity, (2) understory survey of sessile species, (3) quantification of conspicuous benthic macroinvertebrates, including those under management, and (4) quantification of reef-fish species inside the kelp habitat. Results showed population enhancement of target-managed invertebrates inside MEABRs. Moreover, reef-fish species were significantly more diverse and abundant inside MEABRs, and community assemblages of nontarget benthic invertebrates and reef fish were significantly different inside vs. outside MEABRs. The comanagement of inshore benthic resources in Chile, through MEABRs

  3. Internet-based attentional bias modification training as add-on to regular treatment in alcohol and cannabis dependent outpatients: a study protocol of a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Janika; van Hemel-Ruiter, Madelon E; Vermeulen, Karin M; Ostafin, Brian D; MacLeod, Colin; Wiers, Reinout W; DeFuentes-Merillas, Laura; Fledderus, Martine; Markus, Wiebren; de Jong, Peter J

    2017-05-23

    The automatic tendency to attend to and focus on substance-related cues in the environment (attentional bias), has been found to contribute to the persistence of addiction. Attentional bias modification (ABM) interventions might, therefore, contribute to treatment outcome and the reduction of relapse rates. Based on some promising research findings, we designed a study to test the clinical relevance of ABM as an add-on component of regular intervention for alcohol and cannabis patients. The current protocol describes a study which will investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a newly developed home-delivered, multi-session, internet-based ABM (iABM) intervention as an add-on to treatment as usual (TAU). TAU consists of cognitive behavioural therapy-based treatment according to the Dutch guidelines for the treatment of addiction. Participants (N = 213) will be outpatients from specialized addiction care institutions diagnosed with alcohol or cannabis dependency who will be randomly assigned to one of three conditions: TAU + iABM; TAU + placebo condition; TAU-only. Primary outcome measures are substance use, craving, and rates of relapse. Changes in attentional bias will be measured to investigate whether changes in primary outcome measures can be attributed to the modification of attentional bias. Indices of cost-effectiveness and secondary physical and psychological complaints (depression, anxiety, and stress) are assessed as secondary outcome measures. This randomized control trial will be the first to investigate whether a home-delivered, multi-session iABM intervention is (cost-) effective in reducing relapse rates in alcohol and cannabis dependency as an add-on to TAU, compared with an active and a waiting list control group. If proven effective, this ABM intervention could be easily implemented as a home-delivered component of current TAU. Netherlands Trial Register, NTR5497 , registered on 18th September 2015.

  4. Add-on treatment of benzoate for schizophrenia: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of D-amino acid oxidase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Lin, Ching-Hua; Green, Michael F; Hellemann, Gerhard; Huang, Chih-Chia; Chen, Po-Wei; Tun, Rene; Chang, Yue-Cung; Tsai, Guochuan E

    2013-12-01

    In addition to dopaminergic hyperactivity, hypofunction of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) has an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Enhancing NMDAR-mediated neurotransmission is considered a novel treatment approach. To date, several trials on adjuvant NMDA-enhancing agents have revealed beneficial, but limited, efficacy for positive and negative symptoms and cognition. Another method to enhance NMDA function is to raise the levels of d-amino acids by blocking their metabolism. Sodium benzoate is a d-amino acid oxidase inhibitor. To examine the clinical and cognitive efficacy and safety of add-on treatment of sodium benzoate for schizophrenia. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 2 major medical centers in Taiwan composed of 52 patients with chronic schizophrenia who had been stabilized with antipsychotic medications for 3 months or longer. Six weeks of add-on treatment of 1 g/d of sodium benzoate or placebo. The primary outcome measure was the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score. Clinical efficacy and adverse effects were assessed biweekly. Cognitive functions were measured before and after the add-on treatment. Benzoate produced a 21% improvement in PANSS total score and large effect sizes (range, 1.16-1.69) in the PANSS total and subscales, Scales for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms-20 items, Global Assessment of Function, Quality of Life Scale and Clinical Global Impression and improvement in the neurocognition subtests as recommended by the National Institute of Mental Health's Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia initiative, including the domains of processing speed and visual learning. Benzoate was well tolerated without significant adverse effects. Benzoate adjunctive therapy significantly improved a variety of symptom domains and neurocognition in patients with chronic schizophrenia. The preliminary results show promise for d-amino acid oxidase

  5. ATOM - an OMERO add-on for automated import of image data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipp Peter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern microscope platforms are able to generate multiple gigabytes of image data in a single experimental session. In a routine research laboratory workflow, these data are initially stored on the local acquisition computer from which files need to be transferred to the experimenter's (remote image repository (e.g., DVDs, portable hard discs or server-based storage because of limited local data storage. Although manual solutions for this migration, such as OMERO - a client-server software for visualising and managing large amounts of image data - exist, this import process may be a time-consuming and tedious task. Findings We have developed ATOM, a Java-based and thus platform-independent add-on for OMERO enabling automated transfer of image data from a wide variety of acquisition software packages into OMERO. ATOM provides a graphical user interface and allows pre-organisation of experimental data for the transfer. Conclusions ATOM is a convenient extension of the OMERO software system. An automated interface to OMERO will be a useful tool for scientists working with file formats supported by the Bio-Formats file format library, a platform-independent library for reading the most common file formats of microscope images.

  6. A New and Versatile Adjustable Rigidity Actuator with Add-on Locking Mechanism (ARES-XL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cestari

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjustable compliant actuators are being designed and implemented in robotic devices because of their ability to minimize large forces due to impacts, to safely interact with the user, and to store and release energy in passive elastic elements. Conceived as a new force-controlled compliant actuator, an adjustable rigidity with embedded sensor and locking mechanism actuator (ARES-XL is presented in this paper. This compliant system is intended to be implemented in a gait exoskeleton for children with neuro muscular diseases (NMDs to exploit the intrinsic dynamics during locomotion. This paper describes the mechanics and initial evaluation of the ARES-XL, a novel variable impedance actuator (VIA that allows the implementation of an add-on locking mechanism to this system, and in combination with its zero stiffness capability and large deflection range, provides this novel joint with improved properties when compared to previous prototypes developed by the authors and other state-of-the-art (SoA devices. The evaluation of the system proves how this design exceeds the main capabilities of a previous prototype as well as providing versatile actuation that could lead to its implementation in multiple joints.

  7. Final Technical Report: Thermoelectric-Enhanced Cookstove Add-on (TECA) for Clean Biomass Cookstoves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stokes, David [RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-09-29

    This program seeks to demonstrate a solution to enhance existing biomass cookstove performance through the use of RTI’s Thermoelectric Enhanced Cookstove Add-on (TECA) device. The self-powered TECA device captures a portion of heat from the stove and converts it to electricity through a thermoelectric (TE) device to power a blower. Colorado State University and Envirofit International are partners to support the air injection design and commercialization to enhance combustion in the stove and reduce emissions. Relevance: By demonstrating a proof of concept of the approach with the Envirofit M-5000 stove and TECA device, we hope to apply this technology to existing stoves that are already in use and reduce emissions for stoves that have already found user acceptance to provide a true health benefit. Challenges: The technical challenges include achieving Tier 4 emissions from a biomass stove and for such a stove to operate reliably in the harsh field environment. Additional challenges include the fact that it is difficult to develop a cost effective solution and insure adoption and proper use in the field. Outcomes: In this program we have demonstrated PM emissions at 82 mg/MJd, a 70% reduction as compared to baseline stove operation. We have also developed a stove optimization approach that reduces the number of costly experiments. We have evaluated component-level reliability and will be testing the stove prototype in the field for performance and reliability.

  8. Development and validation of spectrophotometric methods for simultaneous estimation of citicoline and piracetam in tablet dosage form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Sivadas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Citicoline (CN and piracetam (PM combination in tablet formulation is newly introduced in market. It is necessary to develop suitable quality control methods for rapid and accurate determination of these drugs. Aim: The study aimed to develop the methods for simultaneous determination of CN and PM in combined dosage form. Materials and Methods: The first method was developed by formation and solving simultaneous equations using 280.3 and 264.1 nm as two analytical wavelengths. Second method was absorbance ratio in which wavelengths selected were 256.6 nm as its absorptive point and 280.3 nm as λmax of CN. According to International Conference on Harmonization (ICH norm, the parameters - linearity, precision, and accuracy were studied. The methods were validated statistically and by recovery studies. Results: Both the drugs obeyed Beer-Lambert′s law at the selected wavelengths in concentration range of 5-13 μg/ml for CN and 10-22 μg/ml for PM. The percentage of CN and PM in marketed tablet formulation was found to be 99.006 ± 0.173 and 99.257 ± 0.613, respectively; by simultaneous equation method. For Q-Absorption ratio method the percentage of CN and PM was found to be 99.078 ± 0.158 and 99.708 ± 0.838, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed methods were simple, reproducible, precise and robust. The methods can be successfully applied for routine analysis of tablets.

  9. Add-on deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) for the treatment of chronic migraine: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Del Casale, Antonio; Scatena, Paola; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Di Pietro, Simone; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Bersani, Francesco Saverio; Brugnoli, Roberto; Raccah, Ruggero Nessim; Zangen, Abraham; Ferracuti, Stefano; Orzi, Francesco; Girardi, Paolo; Sette, Giuliano

    2016-06-03

    Deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS) can be an alternative treatment to relieve pain in chronic migraine (CM). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-frequency dTMS in add-on to standard treatment for CM in patients not responding to effective abortive or preventive drug treatment. We randomized 14 patients with International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd Edition (ICHD-3) treatment-resistant CM to add-on dTMS (n=7) or standard abortive or preventive antimigraine treatment (n=7). Three sessions of alternate day 10Hz dTMS consisting of 600 pulses in 10 trains were delivered to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), bilaterally, but with left hemisphere prevalence, for 12 sessions spread over one month. The add-on dTMS treatment was well tolerated. Patients treated with dTMS showed significant reduction of pain intensity, frequency of attacks, analgesic overuse, and depressive symptoms during treatment and one month later, compared to the month preceding treatment and at the same time-points compared to the control group. As compared to standard pharmacological treatment alone, add-on high-frequency dTMS of the bilateral DLPFC reduced the frequency and intensity of migraine attack, drug overuse, and depressive symptoms. This study supports the add-on dTMS treatment in treatment-resistant CM. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. 40 CFR 63.4567 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4567 Section 63.4567... Emission Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4567 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the performance test required...

  11. 40 CFR 63.3546 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3546 Section 63.3546... device or system of multiple capture devices. The average duct static pressure is the maximum operating... Add-on Controls Option § 63.3546 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control...

  12. 40 CFR 63.4767 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4767 Section 63.4767... Rate with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4767 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the performance test required by § 63...

  13. 40 CFR 63.4167 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4167 Section 63.4167... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4167 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the performance test required by § 63.4160...

  14. 40 CFR 63.4966 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.4966 Section 63.4966... outlet gas temperature is the maximum operating limit for your condenser. (e) Emission capture system... with Add-on Controls Option § 63.4966 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3169 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... systems or add-on control devices which you choose not to take into account when demonstrating compliance... system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the....3169 What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

  16. Add-On Effect of Probucol in Atherosclerotic, Cholesterol-Fed Rabbits Treated with Atorvastatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyamura, Yuka; Nagano, Chifumi; Kohashi, Masayuki; Niimi, Manabu; Nozako, Masanori; Koyama, Takashi; Yasufuku, Reiko; Imaizumi, Ayako; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Yoshikawa, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lowering the blood concentration of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is the primary strategy employed in treating atherosclerotic disorders; however, most commonly prescribed statins prevent cardiovascular events in just 30% to 40% of treated patients. Therefore, additional treatment is required for patients in whom statins have been ineffective. In this study of atherosclerosis in rabbits, we examined the effect of probucol, a lipid-lowering drug with potent antioxidative effects, added to treatment with atorvastatin. Methods and Results Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding rabbits chow containing 0.5% cholesterol for 8 weeks. Probucol 0.1%, atorvastatin 0.001%, and atorvastatin 0.003% were administered solely or in combination for 6 weeks, beginning 2 weeks after the start of atherosclerosis induction. Atorvastatin decreased the plasma concentration of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDLC) dose-dependently; atorvastatin 0.003% decreased the plasma concentration of non-HDLC by 25% and the area of atherosclerotic lesions by 21%. Probucol decreased the plasma concentration of non-HDLC to the same extent as atorvastatin (i.e., by 22%) and the area of atherosclerotic lesions by 41%. Probucol with 0.003% atorvastatin decreased the plasma concentration of non-HDLC by 38% and the area of atherosclerotic lesions by 61%. Co-administration of probucol with atorvastatin did not affect the antioxidative effects of probucol, which were not evident on treatment with atorvastatin alone, such as prevention of in vitro LDL-oxidation, increase in paraoxonase-1 activity of HDL, and decreases in plasma and plaque levels of oxidized-LDL in vivo. Conclusions Probucol has significant add-on anti-atherosclerotic effects when combined with atorvastatin treatment; suggesting that this combination might be beneficial for treatment of atherosclerosis. PMID:24810608

  17. Establishing a Near Term Lunar Farside Gravity Model via Inexpensive Add-on Navigation Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David; Mesarch, Michael; Miller, Ronald; Bell, David; Jedrey, Tom; Butman, Stanley; Asmar, Sami

    2007-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation, Constellation Integration Project (SCIP) is tasked with defining, developing, deploying and operating an evolving multi-decade communications and navigation (C/N) infrastructure including services and subsystems that will support both robotic and human exploration activities at the Moon. This paper discusses an early far side gravitational mapping service and related telecom subsystem that uses an existing spacecraft (WIND) and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to collect data that would address several needs of the SCIP. An important aspect of such an endeavor is to vastly improve the current lunar gravity model while demonstrating the navigation and stationkeeping of a relay spacecraft. We describe a gravity data acquisition activity and the trajectory design of the relay orbit in an Earth-Moon L2 co-linear libration orbit. Several phases of the transfer from an Earth-Sun to the Earth-Moon region are discussed along with transfers within the Earth-Moon system. We describe a proposed, but not integrated, add-on to LRO scheduled to be launched in October of 2008. LRO provided a real host spacecraft against which we designed the science payload and mission activities. From a strategic standpoint, LRO was a very exciting first flight opportunity for gravity science data collection. Gravity Science data collection requires the use of one or more low altitude lunar polar orbiters. Variations in the lunar gravity field will cause measurable variations in the orbit of a low altitude lunar orbiter. The primary means to capture these induced motions is to monitor the Doppler shift of a radio signal to or from the low altitude spacecraft, given that the signal is referenced to a stable frequency reference. For the lunar far side, a secondary orbiting radio signal platform is required. We provide an in-depth look at link margins, trajectory design, and hardware implications. Our approach posed minimum risk to a host mission while

  18. Inflammation in Patients with Schizophrenia: the Therapeutic Benefits of Risperidone Plus Add-On Dextromethorphan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiou-Lan; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsieh; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Lee, I-Hui; Chen, Po-See; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Huang, San-Yuan; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation contributes to the etiology and progression of schizophrenia. Molecules that initiate inflammation, such as virus- and toxin-induced cytokines, are implicated in neuronal degeneration and schizophrenia-like behavior. Using therapeutic agents with anti-inflammatory or neurotrophic effects may be beneficial for treating schizophrenia. Methods One hundred healthy controls and 95 Han Chinese patients with schizophrenia were tested in this double-blind study. Their PANSS scores, plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were measured before and after pharmacological treatment. Results Pretreatment, plasma levels of IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly higher in patients with schizophrenia than in controls, but plasma BDNF levels were significantly lower. Patients were treated with the atypical antipsychotic risperidone (Risp) only or with Risp+add-on dextromethorphan (DM). PANSS scores and plasma IL-1β levels significantly decreased, but plasma TNF-α and BDNF levels significantly increased after 11 weeks of Risp treatment. Patients in the Risp+DM group showed a greater and earlier reduction of symptoms than did those in the Risp-only group. Moreover, Risp+DM treatment attenuated Risp-induced plasma increases in TNF-α. Conclusion Patients with schizophrenia had a high level of peripheral inflammation and a low level of peripheral BDNF. Long-term Risp treatment attenuated inflammation and potentiated the neurotrophic function but also produced a certain degree of toxicity. Risp+DM was more beneficial and less toxic than Risp-only treatment. PMID:22730040

  19. 40 CFR 63.4566 - How do I determine the add-on control device emission destruction or removal efficiency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by volume (ppmv), dry basis. Qsd = Volumetric flow rate of gases entering or exiting the add-on...). 0.0416 = Conversion factor for molar volume, kg-moles per cubic meter (mol/m3) (@ 293 Kelvin (K) and... to 40 CFR part 60, as appropriate, to measure gas volumetric flow rate. (3) Use Method 3, 3A, or 3B...

  20. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart IIIi of... - Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Operating Limits for Capture Systems... 63—Operating Limits for Capture Systems and Add-On Control Devices If you are required to comply with operating limits by § 63.3093, you must comply with the applicable operating limits in the following table...

  1. Measurement of the Economic Growth and Add-on of the R.M. Solow Adjusted Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Gh. Rosca

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Besides the models of M. Keynes, R.F. Harrod, E. Domar, D. Romer, Ramsey-Cass-Koopmans model etc., the R.M. Solow model is part of the category which characterizes the economic growth.The paper aim is the economic growth measurement and add-on of the R.M. Solow adjusted model.

  2. Real-life efficacy and safety of vildagliptin compared with sulfonylureas as add-on to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göke, R; Gruenberger, J B; Bader, G; Dworak, M

    2014-05-01

    Metformin is an established first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, but intensification of oral anti-diabetes therapy is usually required over time. A large observational study of 45,868 T2DM patients in 27 countries (EDGE) was conducted to compare the effectiveness and safety of vildagliptin as add-on therapy to another oral anti-diabetes drug (OAD) vs other dual OAD combinations. This report presents results from a post-hoc analysis of patients in Germany who received vildagliptin or a sulfonylurea (SU) in combination with metformin. Patients inadequately controlled with monotherapy became eligible only after the add-on treatment was finalized. Patients included were assigned to receive either vildagliptin or another OAD (SUs, thiazolidinediones, glinides, α-glucosidase inhibitors, or metformin; DPP-4 inhibitors or glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1] mimetics/analogs were excluded). The primary end-point was the proportion of patients achieving a reduction in HbA1c >0.3% without peripheral edema, hypoglycemia, discontinuation due to gastrointestinal event, or weight gain ≥5%. Of 8887 patients enrolled in Germany, 6439 received vildagliptin and 971 received SUs as add-on to metformin. The primary end-point was reached in 34.9% and 29.6% of patients in the vildagliptin and SU groups, respectively, with an unadjusted odds ratio of 1.27 (95% CI = 1.09, 1.47; p = 0.001). HbA1c decreased in both cohorts from baseline (-0.7% with vildagliptin vs -0.5% with SUs), with a mean between-group difference of -0.2% (95% CI = -0.22, -0.09). The number of hypoglycemic events was 4-fold higher in the SU group than in the vildagliptin group (vildagliptin = 0.11%; SU = 0.41%). In a real-life setting, vildagliptin was associated with a numerically greater reduction in HbA1c, less hypoglycemia, and more patients reaching target HbA1c without hypoglycemia or weight gain compared with SUs. Open-label design and under reporting of adverse

  3. Add-On Complementary Medicine in Cancer Care: Evidence in Literature and Experiences of Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio Rossi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the literature an increasing number of cancer patients demand for complementary therapies during their disease. Research has demonstrated that some of these therapies are effective and safe as adjunctive treatments in specific symptoms of these patients. Methods: The aims of the paper are to review the main and recent papers of international literature on the effectiveness of complementary medicine (CM therapies on side effects of anti-cancer protocols and improvement in the quality of life of oncological patients, and to describe the integration of evidence-based acupuncture, herbal medicine and homeopathy treatments in Public Cancer Network of the region of Tuscany. Results: After the review of literature and the approval of a Regional Resolution, some CM will be introduced in Cancer Departments in Tuscany to additionally treat cancer-related symptoms and side effects of conventional cancer therapy: acupuncture for nausea and post-chemotherapy and post-surgery vomiting, pain, hot flashes of iatrogenic menopause, xerostomia; homeopathy for hot flashes of iatrogenic menopause and the side effects of radiotherapy; herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, mucositis, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions: The integration of evidence-based complementary treatments allows for an effective response to the demand coming from cancer patients and combines safety and equity of access in public health systems.

  4. Add-On Complementary Medicine in Cancer Care: Evidence in Literature and Experiences of Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elio; Di Stefano, Mariella; Firenzuoli, Fabio; Monechi, Maria Valeria; Baccetti, Sonia

    2017-01-24

    Background : According to the literature an increasing number of cancer patients demand for complementary therapies during their disease. Research has demonstrated that some of these therapies are effective and safe as adjunctive treatments in specific symptoms of these patients. Methods : The aims of the paper are to review the main and recent papers of international literature on the effectiveness of complementary medicine (CM) therapies on side effects of anti-cancer protocols and improvement in the quality of life of oncological patients, and to describe the integration of evidence-based acupuncture, herbal medicine and homeopathy treatments in Public Cancer Network of the region of Tuscany. Results : After the review of literature and the approval of a Regional Resolution, some CM will be introduced in Cancer Departments in Tuscany to additionally treat cancer-related symptoms and side effects of conventional cancer therapy: acupuncture for nausea and post-chemotherapy and post-surgery vomiting, pain, hot flashes of iatrogenic menopause, xerostomia; homeopathy for hot flashes of iatrogenic menopause and the side effects of radiotherapy; herbal medicine for cancer-related fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, mucositis, anxiety, and depression. Conclusions : The integration of evidence-based complementary treatments allows for an effective response to the demand coming from cancer patients and combines safety and equity of access in public health systems.

  5. Resveratrol as Add-on Therapy in Subjects With Well-Controlled Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, S.; Ligt, M. de; Phielix, E.; Weijer, T. van de; Hansen, J.; Moonen-Kornips, E.; Schaart, G.; Kunz, I.; Hesselink, M.K.; Schrauwen-Hinderling, V.B.; Schrauwen, P.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether resveratrol supplementation can improve insulin sensitivity and promote overall metabolic health on top of standard diabetes care. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Seventeen subjects with well-controlled type 2 diabetes (T2D) were treated with placebo and 150 mg/day

  6. Cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus lixisenatide as add-on therapies to basal insulin in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericsson, Åsa; Glah, Divina; Lorenzi, Maria; Jansen, Jeroen P; Fridhammar, Adam

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the cost-effectiveness of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists liraglutide 1.8 mg and lixisenatide 20 μg (both added to basal insulin) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Sweden. The Swedish Institute for Health Economics cohort model for T2D was used to compare liraglutide and lixisenatide (both added to basal insulin), with a societal perspective and with comparative treatment effects derived by indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Drug prices were 2016 values, and all other costs 2015 values. The cost-effectiveness of IDegLira (fixed-ratio combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide) versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin was also assessed, under different sets of assumptions. From the ITC, decreases in HbA1c were -1.32% and -0.43% with liraglutide and lixisenatide, respectively; decreases in BMI were -1.29 and -0.65 kg/m2, respectively. An estimated 2348 cases of retinopathy, 265 of neuropathy and 991 of nephropathy would be avoided with liraglutide compared with lixisenatide in a cohort of 10,000 patients aged over 40 years. In the base-case analysis, total direct costs were higher with liraglutide than lixisenatide, but costs associated with complications were lower. The cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for liraglutide added to basal insulin was SEK30,802. Base-case findings were robust in sensitivity analyses, except when glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) differences for liraglutide added to basal insulin were abolished, suggesting these benefits were driving the cost/QALY. With liraglutide 1.2 mg instead of liraglutide 1.8 mg (adjusted for efficacy and cost), liraglutide added to basal insulin was dominant over lixisenatide 20μg.IDegLira was dominant versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin when a defined daily dose was used in the model. The costs/QALY for liraglutide, 1.8 or 1.2 mg, added to basal insulin, and for IDegLira (all compared with lixisenatide 20 μg added to basal insulin) were below the threshold considered low by Swedish authorities. In some scenarios, liraglutide and IDegLira were cost-saving.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of liraglutide versus lixisenatide as add-on therapies to basal insulin in type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Background We assessed the cost-effectiveness of the glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists liraglutide 1.8 mg and lixisenatide 20 μg (both added to basal insulin) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) in Sweden. Methods The Swedish Institute for Health Economics cohort model for T2D was used to compare liraglutide and lixisenatide (both added to basal insulin), with a societal perspective and with comparative treatment effects derived by indirect treatment comparison (ITC). Drug prices were 2016 values, and all other costs 2015 values. The cost-effectiveness of IDegLira (fixed-ratio combination of insulin degludec and liraglutide) versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin was also assessed, under different sets of assumptions. Results From the ITC, decreases in HbA1c were –1.32% and –0.43% with liraglutide and lixisenatide, respectively; decreases in BMI were –1.29 and –0.65 kg/m2, respectively. An estimated 2348 cases of retinopathy, 265 of neuropathy and 991 of nephropathy would be avoided with liraglutide compared with lixisenatide in a cohort of 10,000 patients aged over 40 years. In the base-case analysis, total direct costs were higher with liraglutide than lixisenatide, but costs associated with complications were lower. The cost/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for liraglutide added to basal insulin was SEK30,802. Base-case findings were robust in sensitivity analyses, except when glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) differences for liraglutide added to basal insulin were abolished, suggesting these benefits were driving the cost/QALY. With liraglutide 1.2 mg instead of liraglutide 1.8 mg (adjusted for efficacy and cost), liraglutide added to basal insulin was dominant over lixisenatide 20μg.IDegLira was dominant versus lixisenatide plus basal insulin when a defined daily dose was used in the model. Conclusions The costs/QALY for liraglutide, 1.8 or 1.2 mg, added to basal insulin, and for IDegLira (all compared with lixisenatide 20 μg added to basal insulin) were below the threshold considered low by Swedish authorities. In some scenarios, liraglutide and IDegLira were cost-saving. PMID:29408938

  8. Effectiveness of vildagliptin as add-on to metformin monotherapy among uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a real-world setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer Cohen, Cheli; Davis, Carla; Shalev, Varda; Chodick, Gabriel

    2018-01-01

    Vildagliptin is a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor commonly used as a dual oral agent with metformin, thiazolidinediones, or sulfonylurea for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The efficacy of dual therapy with vildagliptin and metformin has been established in randomized controlled trials, but there is little evidence from observational studies. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the effectiveness of vildagliptin as an add-on therapy to metformin in reducing HbA1c and its affects on body weight and blood lipids in a real-life setting. Included in the present retrospective cohort were T2DM patients (n = 345) who were uncontrolled on metformin monotherapy and intensified treatment with vildagliptin. The efficacy of at least 90 days of dual therapy with vildagliptin and metformin in reducing HbA1c levels, as well as changes in blood lipids and body weight, were evaluated. After 180 days (range 90-365 days) from the index date with a mean daily dose of 92 mg vildagliptin, HbA1c was significantly (P vildagliptin in uncontrolled patients on metformin monotherapy is associated with a significant improvement in the control of HbA1c. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  9. Granisetron as an add-on to risperidone for treatment of negative symptoms in patients with stable schizophrenia: randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaie-Ardakani, Mohammad-Reza; Seddighi, Sahar; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Rezaei, Farzin; Salehi, Bahman; Ashrafi, Mandana; Shams-Alizadeh, Narges; Mohammad-Karimi, Maryam; Esfandiari, Gholam-Reza; Hajiaghaee, Reza; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2013-04-01

    Some 5-HT3 antagonists such as ondansetron have shown beneficial effects on negative symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of granisetron (another 5-HT3 antagonist) add-on therapy in the treatment of negative symptoms of patients with stable schizophrenia. In a randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study, forty stable patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR), were randomized to either granisetron (1 mg twice daily) or placebo (twice daily) in addition to risperidone up to 6 mg/day for eight weeks. The patients were assessed using positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS) and extrapyramidal symptom rating scale (ESRS) at baseline, week 4 and 8. Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS) was used to assess depression at baseline and week 8. Thirty-eight patients completed the trial. Granisetron group showed a significantly greater improvement on negative subscale than the placebo group at endpoint [t(38) = 6.046, mean difference (±95% CI) = 3.2(1.8-3.7), P granisetron groups did not differ in their reduction of positive and general psychopathology symptoms scores. HDRS scores and its changes did not differ between the two groups. The ESRS score at week 4 was significantly lower in the granisetron than the placebo group while the two groups showed similar ESRS score at week 8. Frequency of other side effects was similar between the two groups. In summary, granisetron add-on can safely and effectively reduce the primary negative symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Phenobarbital or potassium bromide as an add-on antiepileptic drug for the management of canine idiopathic epilepsy refractory to imepitoin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royaux, E; Van Ham, L; Broeckx, B J G; Van Soens, I; Gielen, I; Deforce, D; Bhatti, S F M

    2017-02-01

    Imepitoin has recently been approved in Europe for the management of dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Currently, there is no evidence-based information available on the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs used as additions to the therapeutic regimen in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy that are not well controlled with imepitoin. The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of phenobarbital or potassium bromide (KBr) as add-on antiepileptic drugs for controlling dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin (30 mg/kg twice daily). The study was performed as a prospective, randomised, controlled clinical trial. The efficacy of phenobarbital and KBr was evaluated by comparing monthly seizure frequency (MSF), monthly seizure day frequency (MSDF), the presence of cluster seizures during a retrospective 2-month period with a prospective follow-up of 6 months, and the overall responder rate. Twenty-seven dogs were included in the study, 14 dogs in the phenobarbital group and 13 dogs in the KBr group. Both median MSF and MSDF decreased in the phenobarbital group (both P = 0.001) and in the KBr group (P = 0.004 and P = 0.003, respectively). Overall, the number of dogs with cluster seizures decreased (P = 0.0005). The responder rate was 79% vs. 69% in the phenobarbital and KBr groups, respectively. We conclude that phenobarbital or KBr add-on treatment decreases median MSF and MSDF in epileptic dogs refractory to a maximum dose of imepitoin. Combination therapy was generally well tolerated and resulted in an improvement in seizure management in the majority of the dogs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Stereotaxic core needle biopsy of breast microcalcifications obtained using a standard mammography table with an add-on unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, S.E.; Taves, D.H.; McCurdy, L.I.

    2000-01-01

    To demonstrate the reliability of stereotaxic biopsy of indeterminate microcalcifications using a standard mammography table with an add-on unit. In 121 cases of indeterminate microcalcifications, core biopsy was performed using a standard mammography table with an add-on stereotaxic unit. Microcalcifications were identified on radiography of core specimens. Microcalcifications and a definitive histologic diagnosis were obtained in 112 core biopsies (92.6%), with no significant complications. In 23 lesions frank malignancy was diagnosed, and all of these diagnoses were confirmed on surgery. Pathologic examination suggested carcinoma in 4 lesions, and open biopsy confirmed malignancy in 3 of these cases. Four lesions showed atypical ductal hyperplasia. Benign disease was diagnosed in 81 lesions, of which 78 remained stable on mammographic follow-up (mean 16 months later) and 3 were subjected to surgical biopsy (of which 1 was malignant and 2 were benign). Nine cases were technically unsatisfactory because microcalcifications were not sampled. Stereotaxic core biopsy performed with an add-on unit is a safe and reliable technique for biopsy of indeterminate microcalcifications. For successful biopsy, microcalcifications must be harvested. Pathologic results should be correlated with mammographic findings. The accuracy rate compares favourably with results reported using prone biopsy tables. In an era of cost containment, this alternative to prone biopsy tables could result m significant savings in terms of capital investment and use of hospital rooms. In this study, surgical biopsy could have been avoided in 64.5% of cases. (author)

  12. 40 CFR 63.3555 - How do I determine the outlet THC emissions and add-on control device emission destruction or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true How do I determine the outlet THC.../outlet Concentration Option § 63.3555 How do I determine the outlet THC emissions and add-on control... section to determine either the outlet THC emissions or add-on control device emission destruction or...

  13. Evaluation of homoeopathic medicines as add-on to institutional management protocol in Acute Encephalitis Syndrome: An exploratory observational comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Manchanda

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: This exploratory observational study suggests reduction of mortality and morbidity with add-on homoeopathic medicine. Further randomized controlled trial study with comparable groups is desirable. If findings are confirmed by subsequent research, add-on Homoeopathy might have relevant implication for its management.

  14. 40 CFR Table 4 to Subpart Kkkk of... - Operating Limits If Using the Emission Rate With Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rate With Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance Option 4... Add-on Controls Option or the Control Efficiency/Outlet Concentration Compliance Option If you are... volumetric flow rate at a location upstream of the control device, or duct static pressure at a location...

  15. 40 CFR 63.3556 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3556 Section 63.3556... of key parameters of the valve operating system (e.g., solenoid valve operation, air pressure.../outlet Concentration Option § 63.3556 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control...

  16. 40 CFR 63.3967 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.3967 Section 63.3967... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? During the... the operating limits required by § 63.3892 according to this section, unless you have received...

  17. 40 CFR 63.9324 - How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating limits during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... capture system and add-on control device operating limits during the performance test? 63.9324 Section 63... Requirements § 63.9324 How do I establish the emission capture system and add-on control device operating... the operating limits required by § 63.9302 according to this section, unless you have received...

  18. 40 CFR 63.3174 - What are the requirements for a capture system or add-on control device which is not taken into...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the applicable emission limitations? You may have capture systems or add-on control devices which you choose not to take into account... system or add-on control device which is not taken into account when demonstrating compliance with the...

  19. The COMT Val158Met Polymorphism Is Associated With Response to Add-on Dextromethorphan Treatment in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Chen, Kao Ching; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2017-02-01

    We previously conducted a randomized, double-blind, controlled, 12-week study evaluating the effect of add-on dextromethorphan (DM), a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, on patients with bipolar disorder (BD) treated using valproate (VPA), which showed negative clinical differences. The genetic variation between each individual may be responsible for interindividual differences. The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene has been a candidate gene for BD. In the current study, we investigated whether the COMT Val158Met polymorphism predicts treatment response to VPA + add-on DM and to VPA + placebo. Patients with BD (n = 309) undergoing regular VPA treatments were randomly assigned to groups given either add-on DM (30 mg/d) (n = 102), DM (60 mg/d) (n = 101), or placebo (n = 106) for 12 weeks. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale were used to evaluate clinical response during weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12. The genotypes of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism were determined using polymerase chain reaction plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. To adjust for within-subject dependence over repeated assessments, multiple linear regression with generalized estimating equation methods was used. When stratified by the COMT Val158Met genotypes, significantly greater decreases in Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were found in the VPA + DM (30 mg/d) group in patients with the Val/Met genotype (P = 0.008). We conclude that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism may influence responses to DM (30 mg/d) by decreasing depressive symptoms in BD patients.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of add-on treatments to metformin in a Swedish setting: liraglutide vs sulphonylurea or sitagplitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen Carlsson, Katarina; Persson, Ulf

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate long-run cost-effectiveness in a Swedish setting for liraglutide compared with sulphonylureas (glimepiride) or sitagliptin, all as add-on to metformin for patients with type 2 diabetes insufficiently controlled with metformin in monotherapy. The IHE Cohort Model of Type 2 Diabetes was used to evaluate clinical and economic outcomes from a societal perspective. Model input data were obtained from two clinical trials, the Swedish National Diabetes Register and the literature. Cost data reflected year 2013 price level. The robustness of results was checked with one-way-sensitivity analysis and probability sensitivity analysis. The cost per QALY gained for liraglutide (1.2 mg) compared to SU (glimepiride 4 mg), both as add-on to metformin, ranged from SEK 226,000 to SEK 255,000 in analyzed patient cohorts. The cost per QALY for liraglutide (1.2 mg) vs sitagliptin (100 mg) as second-line treatment was lower, ranging from SEK 149,000 to SEK 161,000. Costs of preventive treatment were driving costs, but there was also a cost offset from reduced costs of complications of ∼ 20%. Notable cost differences were found for nephropathy, stroke, and heart failure. The predicted life expectancy with liraglutide increased the cost of net consumption for liraglutide. The analysis was an ex-ante analysis using model input data from clinical trials which may not reflect effectiveness in real-world clinical practice in broader patient populations. This limitation was explored in the sensitivity analysis. The lack of specific data on loss of production due to diabetes complications implied that these costs may be under-estimated. Treatment strategies with liraglutide 1.2 mg improved the expected quality-of-life and increased costs when compared to SU and to sitagliptin for second-line add-on treatments. The cost per QALY for liraglutide was in the range considered medium by Swedish authorities.

  1. Usage of OpenStack Virtual Machine and MATLAB HPC Add-on leads to faster turnaround

    KAUST Repository

    Van Waveren, Matthijs

    2017-03-16

    We need to run hundreds of MATLAB® simulations while changing the parameters between each simulation. These simulations need to be run sequentially, and the parameters are defined manually from one simulation to the next. This makes this type of workload unsuitable for a shared cluster. For this reason we are using a cluster running in an OpenStack® Virtual Machine and are using the MATLAB HPC Add-on for submitting jobs to the cluster. As a result we are now able to have a turnaround time for the simulations of the order of a few hours, instead of the 24 hours needed on a local workstation.

  2. Omega-3 fatty acids decreased irritability of patients with bipolar disorder in an add-on, open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldassano Claudia F

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is a report on a 37-patient continuation study of the open ended, Omega-3 Fatty Acid (O-3FA add-on study. Subjects consisted of the original 19 patients, along with 18 new patients recruited and followed in the same fashion as the first nineteen. Subjects carried a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder and were visiting a Mood Disorder Clinic regularly through the length of the study. At each visit, patients' clinical status was monitored using the Clinical Monitoring Form. Subjects reported on the frequency and severity of irritability experienced during the preceding ten days; frequency was measured by way of percentage of days in which subjects experienced irritability, while severity of that irritability was rated on a Likert scale of 1 – 4 (if present. The irritability component of Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS was also recorded quarterly on 13 of the 39 patients consistently. Patients had persistent irritability despite their ongoing pharmacologic and psychotherapy. Omega-3 Fatty Acid intake helped with the irritability component of patients suffering from bipolar disorder with a significant presenting sign of irritability. Low dose (1 to 2 grams per day, add-on O-3FA may also help with the irritability component of different clinical conditions, such as schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder and other psychiatric conditions with a common presenting sign of irritability.

  3. ALDH2 polymorphism, associated with attenuating negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia treated with add-on dextromethorphan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Po-See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I-Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao-Chin; Yang, Yen-Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-10-01

    Increasing the evidence of inflammation's contribution to schizophrenia; using anti-inflammatory or neurotrophic therapeutic agents to see whether they improve schizophrenia treatment. Dextromethorphan (DM), a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, might protect monoamine neurons. Whether treating schizophrenia with risperidone plus add-on DM is more effective than risperidone (RISP) alone, and the association between the ALDH2 polymorphism and treatment response were investigated. A double-blind study in which patients with schizophrenia were randomly assigned to the RISP + DM (60 mg/day; n = 74) or the RISP + Placebo (n = 75) group. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) scores were used to evaluate clinical response during weeks 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 11. The genotypes of the ALDH2 polymorphism were determined using polymerase chain reactions plus restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. A generalized estimating equation was used to analyze the effects of ALDH2 polymorphism on the clinical performance of DM. PANSS and SANS scores were significantly lower in both groups after 11 weeks of treatment. SANS total scores were significantly lower in the RISP + DM group in patients with the ALDH2*2*2 genotype. RISP plus add-on DM treatment reduced negative schizophrenia symptoms in patients with the ALDH2 polymorphism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lacosamide as add-on treatment of focal symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with alcoholic liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romigi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of epileptic seizures in the presence of hepatic disease is not uncommon in clinical practice. Selecting an appropriate AED for patients affected by liver failure who have new-onset epileptic seizures can be challenging. We describe a 64-year-old man affected by liver cirrhosis. The patient developed partial epilepsy with secondary generalization because of an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parieto-occipital regions. After the neurosurgery procedure, seizures reappeared and were initially managed with levetiracetam. After one month, the patient experienced clusters of seizures while on stable treatment with levetiracetam. Pregabalin as add-on was not tolerated; therefore, he received a low dose of phenobarbital as add-on treatment. The patient developed hepatic encephalopathy. Phenobarbital was immediately stopped, and oral lacosamide was added. A rapid recovery of encephalopathy with a 6-month seizure freedom was obtained. The patient died 6 months later because of progressive impairment of liver function. Lacosamide may represent an alternative to other AEDs in patients with liver failure; however, further prospective evaluation of its efficacy and safety in this clinical setting is needed.

  5. Retention, dosing, tolerability and patient reported seizure outcome of Zonisamide as only add-on treatment under real-life conditions in adult patients with partial onset seizures: Results of the observational study ZOOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Hajo; Baulac, Michel; McMurray, Rob; Kockelmann, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Zonisamide is licensed for adjunctive therapy for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalisation in patients 6 years and older and as monotherapy for the treatment of partial seizures in adult patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy, and shows a favourable pharmacokinetic profile with low interaction potential with other drugs. The aim of the present study was to gather real-life data on retention and modalities of zonisamide use when administered as only add-on treatment to a current AED monotherapy in adult patients with partial-onset seizures. This multicenter observational study was performed in 4 European countries and comprised three visits: baseline, and after 3 and 6 months. Data on patients' retention, reported efficacy, tolerability and safety, and quality of life was collected. Of 100 included patients, 93 could be evaluated. After 6 months, the retention rate of zonisamide add-on therapy was 82.8%. At this time, a reduction of seizure frequency of at least 50% was observed in 79.7% of patients, with 43.6% reporting seizure freedom over the last 3 months of the study period. Adverse events were reported by 19.4% of patients, with fatigue, agitation, dizziness, and headache being most frequent. Approximately 25% of patients were older than 60 years, many of whom suffered from late-onset epilepsy. Compared to younger patients, these patients showed considerable differences with regard to their antiepileptic drug regimen at baseline, and slightly higher responder and retention rates at 6 months. Despite limitations due to the non-interventional open-label design and the low sample size, the results show that zonisamide as only add-on therapy is well retained, indicating effectiveness in the majority of patients under real-life conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Globes from global data: Charting international research networks with the GRASS GIS r.out.polycones add-on module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Many Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) tools have been created for the various application fields within geoscience. While FOSS allows re-implementation of functionalities in new environments by access to the original codebase, the easiest approach to build new software solutions for new problems is the combination or merging of existing software tools. Such mash-ups are implemented by embedding and encapsulating FOSS tools within each another, effectively focusing the use of the embedded software to the specific role it needs to perform in the given scenario, while ignoring all its other capabilities. GRASS GIS is a powerful and established FOSS GIS for raster, vector and volume data processing while the Generic Mapping Tools (GMT) are a suite of powerful Open Source mapping tools, which exceed the mapping capabilities of GRASS GIS. This poster reports on the new GRASS GIS add-on module r.out.polycones. It enables users to utilize non-continuous projections for map production within the GRASS production environment. This is implemented on the software level by encapsulating a subset of GMT mapping capabilities into a GRASS GIS (Version 6.x) add-on module. The module was developed at the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) to provide custom global maps of scientific collaboration networks, such as the DataCite consortium, the registration agency for Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for research data. The GRASS GIS add-on module can be used for global mapping of raster data into a variety of non continuous sinosoidal projections, allowing the creation of printable biangles (gores) to be used for globe making. Due to the well structured modular nature of GRASS modules, technical follow-up work will focus on API-level Python-based integration in GRASS 7 [1]. Based on this, GMT based mapping capabilities in GRASS will be extended beyond non-continuous sinosoidal maps and advanced from raster-layers to content GRASS display monitors. References

  7. Evaluation of add-on devices for the prevention of phlebitis and other complications associated with the use of peripheral catheters in hospitalised adults: a randomised controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J A; Piazuelo, M; Almela, M; Blecua, P; Gallardo, R; Rodríguez, S; Escalante, Z; Robau, M; Trilla, A

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of add-on devices for the prevention of phlebitis and other complications associated with the use of peripheral catheters. Patients admitted to an infectious diseases ward and requiring the insertion of a peripheral catheter for at least 24h were randomly allocated to be managed with or without add-on devices. Incidence of phlebitis and all complications were the primary outcomes. Extravasation, inadvertent withdrawal, obstruction and rupture were considered to be mechanical complications, and analysis was performed using survival methods. Of 683 evaluated catheters, 351 were allocated to the add-on device arm and 332 to the control arm. Despite randomisation, patients in the add-on device group were older (P=0.048), less likely to have human immunodeficiency virus (P=0.02) and more likely to have received antibiotics (P=0.05). After adjustment for these variables, the hazard ratio for phlebitis remained non-significant (hazard ratio: 0.95; 95% confidence interval: 0.7-1.3), but the risk of mechanical complications became lower in the add-on device arm (0.68; 0.5-0.94). This translated into a trend towards a lower risk of any complication (0.83; 0.67-1.01). The beneficial effect on mechanical or all complications was noticeable after six days of catheterisation. Add-on devices do not reduce the incidence of phlebitis but may prevent mechanical complications. However, the impact of add-on devices on the incidence of all complications is at most small and only apparent after the sixth day of catheter use.

  8. Low- vs high- frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as an add-on treatment for refractory depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    julien eeche

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS seems to be effective as an antidepressant treatment, however, some confusion remain about the best parameters to apply and the efficacy of its association with pharmacological antidepressant treatments.Method: In a single blind randomized study14 patients with unipolar resistant depression to one antidepressant treatment were enrolled to received, in combination with venlafaxine (150 mg, either 20 sessions of 10Hz rTMS (2 000 pulses per session applied over le left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC or 20 sessions of 1 Hz rTMS (120 stimulations per sessions applied over the right DLPFC. Results: A similar antidepressant effect was observed in both groups with a comparable antidepressant delay of action (2 weeks and a comparable number of patients in remission after 4 weeks of daily rTMS sessions (66 vs 50 %.Conclusion: Low- and high- frequency rTMS seem to be effective as an add-on treatment to venlafaxine in pharmacological refractory major depression. Due to its short duration and its safety, low frequency rTMS may be a useful alternative treatment for patients with refractory depression.

  9. Flexible add-on solution for MR image-guided interventions in a closed-bore scanner environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Garnov, Nikita; Thörmer, Gregor; Zajonz, Dirk; Gründer, Wilfried; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2010-09-01

    MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. In a standard closed-bore scanner, the simplest approach is to manipulate the instrument outside the bore and move the patient into the bore for reference and control imaging only. Without navigational assistance, however, such an approach can be difficult, inaccurate, and time consuming. Therefore, an add-on navigation solution is described that addresses these limitations. Patient registration is established by an automatic, robust, and fast (<30 sec) localization of table-mounted MR reference markers and the instrument is tracked optically. Good hand-eye coordination is provided by following the virtual instrument on MR images that are reconstructed in real time from the reference data. Needle displacements of 2.2 +/- 0.6 mm and 3.9 +/- 2.4 mm were determined in a phantom (P < 0.05), depending on whether the reference markers were placed at smaller (98-139 mm) or larger (147-188 mm) distances from the isocenter. Clinical functionality of the navigation concept is demonstrated by a double oblique, subscapular hook-wire insertion in a patient with a body mass index of 30.1 kg/m(2). Ease of use, compactness, and flexibility of this technique suggest that it can be used for many other procedures in different body regions. More patient cases are needed to evaluate clinical performance and workflow. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Comparison between the therapeutic effect of metformin, glimepiride and their combination as an add-on treatment to insulin glargine in uncontrolled patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol-Young Park

    Full Text Available To compare the commonly prescribed oral anti-diabetic drug (OAD combinations to use as an add-on therapy with insulin glargine in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes despite submaximal doses of OADs.People with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (n = 99 were randomly assigned on a 1∶1∶1 basis to receive insulin glargin, with fixed doses of glimepiride, metformin, and glimepiride plus metformin. Outcomes assessed included HbA1c, the changes in fasting glucose levels, body weight, serum lipids values, insulin dose and symptomatic hypoglycemia.After 24 weeks, HbA1C levels improved from (mean ± SD 8.5±0.9% to 7.7±0.8% (69.0±10.0 mmol/mol to 60.8±8.6 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus metformin, from 8.4±1.0% to 7.7±1.3% (68.8±10.6 mmol/mol to 61.1±14.4 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepiride and from 8.7±0.9% to 7.3±0.6% (71.7±9.8 mmol/mol to 56.2±6.7 mmol/mol with insulin glargine plus glimepirde plus metformin. The decrease in HbA1c was more pronounced with insulin glargine plus glimepiride plus metformin than with insulin glargine plus metformin (0.49% [CI, 0.16% to 0.82%]; P = 0.005 (5.10 mmol/mol [CI, 1.64 to 8.61]; P = 0.005 and insulin glargine plus glimepiride (0.59% [CI, 0.13% to 1.05%]; P = 0.012 (5.87 mmol/mol [CI, 1.10 to 10.64]; P = 0.012 (overall P = 0.02. Weight gain and the risk of hypoglycemia of any type did not significantly differ among the treatment groups.The combination therapy of metformin and glimepiride plus glargine insulin resulted in a significant improvement in overall glycemic control as compared with the other combinations.ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00708578. The approval number of Kangbuk Samsung hospital's institutional review board (IRB: C0825.

  11. Semi-Individualized Homeopathy Add-On Versus Usual Care Only for Premenstrual Disorders: A Randomized, Controlled Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Laansma, Christien T; Jong, Mats; von Hagens, Cornelia; Jansen, Jean Pierre C H; van Wietmarschen, Herman; Jong, Miek C

    2018-03-22

    Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMS/PMDD) bother a substantial number of women. Homeopathy seems a promising treatment, but it needs investigation using reliable study designs. The feasibility of organizing an international randomized pragmatic trial on a homeopathic add-on treatment (usual care [UC] + HT) compared with UC alone was evaluated. A multicenter, randomized, controlled pragmatic trial with parallel groups. The study was organized in general and private homeopathic practices in the Netherlands and Sweden and in an outpatient university clinic in Germany. Women diagnosed as having PMS/PMDD, based on prospective daily rating by the daily record of severity of problems (DRSP) during a period of 2 months, were included and randomized. Women were to receive UC + HT or UC for 4 months. Homeopathic medicine selection was according to a previously tested prognostic questionnaire and electronic algorithm. Usual care was as provided by the women's general practitioner according to their preferences. Before and after treatment, the women completed diaries (DRSP), the measure yourself concerns and well-being, and other questionnaires. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses were performed. In Germany, the study could not proceed because of legal limitations. In Sweden, recruitment proved extremely difficult. In the Netherlands and Sweden, 60 women were randomized (UC + HT: 28; UC: 32), data of 47/46 women were analyzed (ITT/PP). After 4 months, relative mean change of DRSP scores in the UC + HT group was significantly better than in the UC group (p = 0.03). With respect to recruitment and different legal status, it does not seem feasible to perform a larger, international, pragmatic randomized trial on (semi-)individualized homeopathy for PMS/PMDD. Since the added value of HT compared with UC was demonstrated by significant differences in symptom score changes, further studies are warranted.

  12. Two-year, randomized, controlled study of safinamide as add-on to levodopa in mid to late Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgohain, Rupam; Szasz, Jozsef; Stanzione, Paolo; Meshram, Chandrashekhar; Bhatt, Mohit H; Chirilineau, Dana; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Lucini, Valentina; Giuliani, Rodolfo; Forrest, Emma; Rice, Patricia; Anand, Ravi

    2014-09-01

    In a 6-month double-blind, placebo-controlled study of Parkinson's disease patients with motor fluctuations, safinamide 50 and 100 mg/d significantly increased ON-time without increasing dyskinesia. Further long-term safinamide use in these patients was evaluated over an additional 18 months. Patients continued on their randomized placebo, 50, or 100 mg/d safinamide. The primary endpoint was change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale total score during ON-time over 24 months. Other efficacy endpoints included change in ON-time without troublesome dyskinesia, changes in individual diary categories, depressive symptoms, and quality of life measures. Change in Dyskinesia Rating Scale was not significantly different in safinamide versus placebo groups, despite decreased mean total Dyskinesia Rating Scale with safinamide compared with an almost unchanged score in placebo. Ad hoc subgroup analysis of moderate to severe dyskinetic patients at baseline (36% of patients) showed a decrease with safinamide 100 mg/d compared with placebo (P = 0.0317). Improvements in motor function, activities of daily living, depressive symptoms, clinical status, and quality of life at 6 months remained significant at 24 months. Adverse events and discontinuation rates were similar with safinamide and placebo. This 2-year, controlled study of add-on safinamide in mid-to-late Parkinson's disease with motor fluctuations, although not demonstrating an overall difference in dyskinesias between patients and controls, showed improvement in dyskinesia in patients at least moderately dyskinetic at baseline. The study additionally demonstrated significant clinical benefits in ON-time (without troublesome dyskinesia), OFF-time, activities of daily living, motor symptoms, quality of life, and symptoms of depression. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  13. EMDR as Add-On Treatment for Psychiatric and Traumatic Symptoms in Patients with Substance Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Carletto

    2018-01-01

    significant improvement of post-traumatic and dissociative symptoms, accompanied by a reduction in anxiety and overall psychopathology levels, whereas TAU group showed a significant reduction only in post-traumatic symptoms. Although our results can only be considered preliminary, this study suggests that a combined TF- and AF- EMDR protocol is an effective and well-accepted add-on treatment for patients with SUD.

  14. The Strengthening Exercises in Shoulder Impingement trial (The SExSI-trial) investigating the effectiveness of a simple add-on shoulder strengthening exercise programme in patients with long-lasting subacromial impingement syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mikkel Bek; Bandholm, Thomas; Rathleff, Michael Skovdal

    2018-01-01

    with pronounced and long-lasting SIS. However, the current rehabilitation of such strength impairments may be inadequate, with novel rehabilitation programmes including exercise therapy only improving external rotation strength by 4-13%. As these previous studies are the basis of current practice, this suggests...... that the strengthening component could be inadequate in the rehabilitation of these patients, and it seems likely that more emphasis should be placed on intensifying this part of the rehabilitation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a programme consisting of progressive home...... with pronounced and long-lasting SIS, diagnosed using predefined criteria. Participants will be randomised to receive either an add-on intervention of progressive home-based resistance training using an elastic band in addition to usual care or usual care alone in a 1:1 allocation ratio. The randomisation...

  15. N-Acetylcysteine in the Treatment of Pediatric Trichotillomania: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Add-On Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Grant, Jon E.; Pittenger, Christopher; Leckman, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) for the treatment of pediatric trichotillomania (TTM) in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on study. Method: A total of 39 children and adolescents aged 8 to 17 years with pediatric trichotillomania were randomly assigned to receive NAC or matching placebo for 12 weeks. Our primary…

  16. Novel approaches to lipid-lowering therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lines, ezetimibe is recommended as an add-on therapy for patients on ... 2 Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Research Unit and Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism ... acting at the level of protein translation via RNA interference in the.

  17. Add-on deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) in patients with dysthymic disorder comorbid with alcohol use disorder: a comparison with standard treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Paolo; Rapinesi, Chiara; Chiarotti, Flavia; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Piacentino, Daria; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Scatena, Paola; Mascioli, Flavia; Raccah, Ruggero N; Brugnoli, Roberto; Digiacomantonio, Vittorio; Ferri, Vittoria Rachele; Ferracuti, Stefano; Zangen, Abraham; Angeletti, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is dysfunctional in mood and substance use disorders. We predicted higher efficacy for add-on bilateral prefrontal high-frequency deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS), compared with standard drug treatment (SDT) in patients with dysthymic disorder (DD)/alcohol use disorder (AUD) comorbidity. We carried-out a 6-month open-label study involving 20 abstinent patients with DSM-IV-TR AUD comorbid with previously developed DD. Ten patients received SDT for AUD with add-on bilateral dTMS (dTMS-AO) over the DLPFC, while another 10 received SDT alone. We rated alcohol craving with the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS), depression with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), clinical status with the Clinical Global Impressions scale (CGI), and global functioning with the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). At the end of the 20-session dTMS period (or an equivalent period in the SDT group), craving scores and depressive symptoms in the dTMS-AO group dropped significantly more than in the SDT group (P < 0.001 and P < 0.02, respectively). High frequency bilateral DLPFC dTMS with left preference was well tolerated and found to be effective as add-on in AUD. The potential of dTMS for reducing craving in substance use disorder patients deserves to be further investigated.

  18. Current therapy for chronic cerebrovascular attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Shmonin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic cerebrovascular attack (CCVA is a brain lesion caused by vascular factors. CCVA appears as cognitive impairments (CIs, affective (emotional disorders and focal syndromes. Treatment for CCVA requires a comprehensive approach. Effective combination therapy for CCVA involves secondary prevention of stroke and CIs; treatment of CIs; treatment of depression and other affective disorders; and neuroprotective therapy. Basic therapy for CCVA includes modification of risk factors, antihypertensive, hypolipidemic, and antithrombotic therapies. Central acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (galantamine, rivastigmine, donepezil and a reversible NMDA receptor blocker (memantine are symptomatically used at a stage of vascular and mixed dementia. There are no unique guidelines for the therapy of mild and moderate vascular nondementia-related CIs. Drug use, based on the neurochemical mechanisms underlying the development of vascular CIs, is substantiated. When choosing psychotropic agents, it is necessary to take into account the causes and clinical manifestations of neuromediator deficiency. Antidepressants are used as essential drugs. Neuroleptics and tranquilizers are additionally administered in complex-pattern syndromes, such as depression with marked anxiety. Prescription of neuroprotectors may be effective in treating both stroke and CCVA. These medicaments are most effective when a damaging factor acts, i.e. neuroprotectors should be given in a risk situation and to reduce damage. Citicoline is one of the most test drugs in a group of neuroprotectors. 

  19. Double-blind, randomized, clinical trial of metformin as add-on treatment with clozapine in treatment of schizophrenia disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Hebrani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of the major causes of death in schizophrenia is a metabolic syndrome. The clozapine has the highest rate of weight gain among antipsychotics. It has been shown that metformin can promote weight loss. We aimed to investigate the effect of metformin as an adjunctive therapy with clozapine to prevent metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: A total of 37 patients consisting metformin group (19 cases and a group of placebo consisting of 18 cases were evaluated. A brief psychiatric rating scale score (BPRS and metabolic profiles was determined for all patients. All of the variables were also determined at 2, 8, 16, and 20 weeks after the onset of the study. Results: The mean age of the group of metformin was 47.2 ± 10.4 compared with 45.8 ± 10.2 for the group of placebo. The difference in mean waist circumference and serum level of triglyceride at baseline compared with the end of study showed a statistically significant difference between two groups (P = 0. 000. A statistically significant difference was also observed in a comparison of mean difference of weight and body mass index at baseline compared with end of study (P = 0. 000. There was a statistically significant difference of fasting blood sugar (P = 0.011 and serum high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.000 between two groups but this difference was not significant for mean BPRS scores, mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure, serum level of triiodothyronine, thyroxin and thyroid stimulating hormone, serum low-density lipoprotein and serum cholesterol. Conclusion: Metformin could be considered an adjunctive therapy with clozapine to prevent metabolic syndrome in schizophrenic patients.

  20. Theatre Is a Valid Add-On Therapeutic Intervention for Emotional Rehabilitation of Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Mirabella

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional medical treatments of Parkinson’s disease (PD are effective on motor disturbances but may have little impact on nonmotor symptoms, especially psychiatric ones. Thus, even when motor symptomatology improves, patients might experience deterioration in their quality of life. We have shown that 3 years of active theatre is a valid complementary intervention for PD as it significantly improves the well-being of patients in comparison to patients undergoing conventional physiotherapy. Our aim was to replicate these findings while improving the efficacy of the treatment. We ran a single-blinded pilot study lasting 15 months on 24 subjects with moderate idiopathic PD. 12 were assigned to a theatre program in which patients underwent “emotional” training. The other 12 underwent group physiotherapy. Patients were evaluated at the beginning and at the end of their treatments, using a battery of eight clinical and five neuropsychological scales. We found that the emotional theatre training improved the emotional well-being of patients, whereas physiotherapy did not. Interestingly, neither of the groups showed improvements in either motor symptoms or cognitive abilities tested by the neuropsychological battery. We confirmed that theatre therapy might be helpful in improving emotional well-being in PD.

  1. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation add-on for the treatment of auditory hallucinations: a double-blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Oded; Gersner, Roman; Klein, Limor Dinur; Kotler, Moshe; Zangen, Abraham; Dannon, Pinhas

    2012-05-06

    About 25% of schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations are refractory to pharmacotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy. We conducted a deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pilot study in order to evaluate the potential clinical benefit of repeated left temporoparietal cortex stimulation in these patients. The results were encouraging, but a sham-controlled study was needed to rule out a placebo effect. A total of 18 schizophrenic patients with refractory auditory hallucinations were recruited, from Beer Yaakov MHC and other hospitals outpatient populations. Patients received 10 daily treatment sessions with low-frequency (1 Hz for 10 min) deep TMS applied over the left temporoparietal cortex, using the H1 coil at the intensity of 110% of the motor threshold. Procedure was either real or sham according to patient randomization. Patients were evaluated via the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms-Negative Symptoms, Clinical Global Impressions, and Quality of Life Questionnaire. In all, 10 patients completed the treatment (10 TMS sessions). Auditory hallucination scores of both groups improved; however, there was no statistical difference in any of the scales between the active and the sham treated groups. Low-frequency deep TMS to the left temporoparietal cortex using the protocol mentioned above has no statistically significant effect on auditory hallucinations or the other clinical scales measured in schizophrenic patients. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00564096.

  2. Deep transcranial magnetic stimulation add-on for the treatment of auditory hallucinations: a double-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Oded

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background About 25% of schizophrenia patients with auditory hallucinations are refractory to pharmacotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy. We conducted a deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS pilot study in order to evaluate the potential clinical benefit of repeated left temporoparietal cortex stimulation in these patients. The results were encouraging, but a sham-controlled study was needed to rule out a placebo effect. Methods A total of 18 schizophrenic patients with refractory auditory hallucinations were recruited, from Beer Yaakov MHC and other hospitals outpatient populations. Patients received 10 daily treatment sessions with low-frequency (1 Hz for 10 min deep TMS applied over the left temporoparietal cortex, using the H1 coil at the intensity of 110% of the motor threshold. Procedure was either real or sham according to patient randomization. Patients were evaluated via the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms-Negative Symptoms, Clinical Global Impressions, and Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results In all, 10 patients completed the treatment (10 TMS sessions. Auditory hallucination scores of both groups improved; however, there was no statistical difference in any of the scales between the active and the sham treated groups. Conclusions Low-frequency deep TMS to the left temporoparietal cortex using the protocol mentioned above has no statistically significant effect on auditory hallucinations or the other clinical scales measured in schizophrenic patients. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00564096.

  3. Linagliptin improves glycemic control after 1 year as add-on therapy to basal insulin in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Wayne H-H; Park, Sung Woo; Gong, Yan; Pinnetti, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Sudipta; Patel, Sanjay; Seck, Thomas; Woerle, Hans-Juergen

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and long-term safety of linagliptin added to basal insulin in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) inadequately controlled by basal insulin with/without oral agents. This was a post hoc analysis of Asian patients from a global ≥52 week study in which patients on basal insulin were randomized (1:1) to double-blind treatment with linagliptin 5 mg once daily or placebo (NCT00954447). Basal insulin dose remained stable for 24 weeks, after which adjustments could be made according to the investigator's discretion to improve glycemic control. The primary endpoint was the mean change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) from baseline to 24 weeks. Data were available for 154 Asian patients (80 linagliptin, 74 placebo). Baseline HbA1c (standard deviation [SD]) was 8.6 (0.9)% (70 [10] mmol/mol). The placebo-corrected mean change (standard error [SE]) in HbA1c from baseline was -0.9 (0.1)% (-10 [1] mmol/mol) (95% confidence interval [CI]: -1.2, -0.7; p1) at Week 24 and -0.9 (0.1)% (-10 [1] mmol/mol) (95% CI: -1.1, -0.6; p1) at Week 52. The frequency of adverse events (linagliptin 81.3%, placebo 91.9%) and hypoglycemia (Week 24: linagliptin 25.0%, placebo 25.7%; treatment end: linagliptin 28.8%, placebo 35.1%) was similar between groups. By Week 52, changes (SE) in mean body weight were similar in both groups (linagliptin -0.67 [0.26] kg, placebo -0.38 [0.25] kg). This study was limited by the post hoc nature of the analysis and the small number of patients in the subgroup. However, the results suggest that linagliptin significantly improves glycemic control in Asian patients with T2DM inadequately controlled by basal insulin, without increasing the risk for hypoglycemia or weight gain. ClinicalTrials identifier: NCT00954447.

  4. Efficacy of vildagliptin versus sulfonylureas as add-on therapy to metformin: comparison of results from randomised controlled and observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrén, Bo; Mathieu, Chantal; Bader, Giovanni; Schweizer, Anja; Foley, James E

    2014-07-01

    Randomised control trials (RCTs) do not always reflect real-life outcomes for glucose-lowering drugs. In this work we compared RCT and real-life data on the efficacy of the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-4) inhibitor vildagliptin or sulfonylureas when added to metformin. Data were pooled from five RCTs examining vildagliptin (n = 2,788) and sulfonylureas (glimepiride [n = 1,259] or gliclazide [n = 433]), added to metformin. For real-life conditions, data were extracted from an observational study examining vildagliptin (n = 7,002) or sulfonylureas (n = 3,702), added to metformin monotherapy. Linear regression analyses were performed between the baseline HbA1c and the change in HbA1c (Δ HbA1c) after 24 weeks. Baseline HbA1c correlated to Δ HbA1c (r (2) = 0.36, slope = -0.54 [95% CI -0.55, -0.53; p vildagliptin, the slope was virtually identical in the observational study and the RCTs (interaction coefficient = 0.024, p = 0.175). For any given baseline HbA1c, Δ HbA1c with sulfonylureas was smaller in real life than in RCTs, whereas Δ HbA1c with vildagliptin was the same. When comparing RCT to real-life data, the decrease in HbA1c from baseline with sulfonylurea treatment is smaller in real life than in RCTs, whereas the reduction with vildagliptin is essentially the same, suggesting that the full power of treatment is retained in real life for vildagliptin but not for sulfonylureas, possibly due to fear of hypoglycaemia.

  5. Randomised clinical trial: alginate (Gaviscon Advance) vs. placebo as add-on therapy in reflux patients with inadequate response to a once daily proton pump inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, C; Lødrup, A B; Smith, G; Wilkinson, J; Bytzer, P

    2016-04-01

    Many reflux patients remain symptomatic on a standard dose of proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Alginates decrease the number of reflux events by forming a raft on top of the stomach content and thus offer a supplemental mechanism of action to acid suppression. To assess the efficacy of an alginate (Gaviscon Advance, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, UK) on reflux symptoms in patients with persistent symptoms despite once daily PPI. This was a multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled, 7-day double-blind trial preceded by a 7-day run-in period. Reflux symptoms were assessed using the Heartburn Reflux Dyspepsia Questionnaire (HRDQ). Based on symptom score during run-in, eligible patients were randomised to Gaviscon Advance 10 mL four times a day or placebo in addition to a once daily PPI. The primary endpoint was change in HRDQ score post-treatment compared to baseline. One hundred and thirty-six patients were randomised. Change in HRDQ reflux score was significantly greater for Gaviscon Advance (mean: -5.0, s.d.: 4.7) than for placebo (mean: -3.5, s.d.: 5.5) with an LS mean difference of 1.6 [95% CI -3.1 to -0.1], P = 0.03. A decrease in the mean (s.d.) number of nights with symptoms was observed from 3.6 (2.8) to 3.0 (3.0) in the placebo group and from 3.9 (2.8) to 2.2 (2.7) for the Gaviscon Advance group. This reduction was significantly greater in the Gaviscon Advance group than in the placebo group [LS mean difference = -0.9, 95% CI (-1.6 to -0.2), P < 0.01]. In patients with residual reflux symptoms despite PPI treatment, adding an alginate offers additional decrease in the burden of reflux symptoms (EudraCT/IND Number: 2011-005486-21). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Efficacy and safety of golimumab as add-on therapy to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in rheumatoid arthritis: results of the GO-MORE study in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Alberto; González, Carlos M; Ballina, Javier; García Vivar, María L; Gómez-Reino, Juan J; Marenco, Jose Luis; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordás, Carmen; Cea-Calvo, Luis; Arteaga, María J; Sanmartí, Raimon

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of golimumab in the 140 patients included in Spain as the first part of the GO-MORE trial, a multinational study involving patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite treatment with different disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). The patients received subcutaneous golimumab 50mg once a month during 6 months. The primary endpoint was the percentage of individuals with a good or moderate EULAR DAS28-ESR response after 6 months of treatment. A total of 140 patients were included. Of these, 76.4% had very active disease (DAS28-ESR>5.1). 76.4% were taking methotrexate, 40.0% other DMARDs in monotherapy or combined, and 65.0% received corticosteroids. After 6 months, 82.9% of the patients showed a good or moderate EULAR response, 41.4% had low disease activity, and 30.7% were in remission. The percentage of responders one month after the first dose was 69.3%. The efficacy was similar in patients treated with methotrexate or other DMARDs, with different methotrexate doses, with or without corticosteroids, or in subjects who had failed one or more DMARDs. The response to golimumab was observed from the first dose. Golimumab was well tolerated and its safety profile was consistent with the findings of previous studies. Serious adverse events were reported in 11 patients (7.9%). The addition of subcutaneous golimumab 50 mg once a month to different DMARDs in patients with active RA yielded a moderate or good response after 6 months in 82.9% of the cases. The response was observed early, from the start of the second month, after a single dose of golimumab. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Urinary β-2 Microglobulin Levels Sensitively Altered in an Osteomalacia Patient Receiving Add-on Adefovir Dipivoxil Therapy for Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Junko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ito, Kiyoaki; Ohashi, Tomohiko; Hirase, Sho; Ito, Tatsuo; Morishima, Takkan; Otake, Kazuo; Yoneda, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Adefovir dipivoxil (ADV) is effective for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection; however, ADV may provoke renal injury resulting in osteomalacia, and this side effect is seldom recognized until bone fractures emerge. We herein present a 66-year-old woman with HBV infection who received ADV for 6 years. Although she exhibited no sign of bone fractures, her urinary β-2 microglobulin (β2MG) level increased to 83,837 μg/L and scintigraphy revealed minimal fractures of the third rib. ADV was subsequently reduced and her urinary β2MG rapidly fell to 3,637 μg/L. Conversely, her urinary N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase, and serum phosphate, alkaline phosphatase levels did not respond.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Vildagliptin as an Add-on to Insulin with or without Metformin in Japanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A 12-week, Double-Blind, Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Takahisa; Suzuki, Manabu; Tsumiyama, Isao

    2015-12-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of vildagliptin as add-on therapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), inadequately controlled on stable long-acting, intermediate-acting, or pre-mixed insulin, with or without concomitant metformin. In this 12-week placebo-controlled study, patients were randomized to receive either vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily (bid) or placebo treatment in a 1:1 ratio. The primary endpoint was change in glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) from baseline to 12-week endpoint. Secondary endpoints included proportion of patients achieving pre-defined HbA1c targets of ≤6.5%, vildagliptin, n = 76; placebo, n = 75). Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were comparable between the groups at baseline. Addition of vildagliptin resulted in statistically significant reductions in HbA1c after 12 weeks (-1.01 ± 0.06%), with a between-treatment difference of -0.91 ± 0.09% (p vildagliptin group (-1.2 ± 0.2 mmol/L), with a between-treatment difference of -1.2 ± 0.3 mmol/L which was significant (p vildagliptin treatment for all pre-defined responder rate categories. The overall incidence of AEs was comparable between groups (vildagliptin, 46.2% vs. placebo, 43.6%). The overall incidence of hypoglycemic events was low and all events were self-treatable without using drug therapy. No severe hypoglycemic events were reported. Treatment with vildagliptin 50 mg bid as add-on to insulin with or without metformin resulted in statistically significant reductions in HbA1c in Japanese patients with T2DM. Overall, vildagliptin was well tolerated with a safety profile similar to that of placebo in this patient population. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier, NCT02002221 FUNDING: Novartis Pharma K.K.

  9. Ursodeoxycholic acid potentiates dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor sitagliptin by enhancing glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion in patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic liver disease: a pilot randomized controlled and add-on study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Tsuguhito; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Takeshita, Yumie; Misu, Hirofumi; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the effects of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion and glucose tolerance in patients with type 2 diabetes with chronic liver disease. Research design and methods Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes (glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ≥7.0%) and chronic liver disease were included in this study. Sixteen patients (HbA1c level, 7.2%±0.6%(55.2 mmol/mol)) were randomized to receive 900 mg UDCA for 12 weeks followed by 50 mg sitagliptin add-on therapy for 12 weeks (UDCA-first group; n=8) or 50 mg sitagliptin for 12 weeks followed by 900 mg UDCA add-on therapy for 12 weeks (sitagliptin-first group; n=8). All patients underwent a liquid high-fat meal test before and after 12 or 24 weeks of treatment. Results The baseline characteristics were similar between the UDCA-first and sitagliptin-first groups. There was a decrease in body weight (72.5±8.4 to 70.6±8.6 kg; P=0.04) and the HbA1c level (7.0%±0.3% to 6.4%±0.5%(53.0 to 46.4 mmol/mol); P=0.01) in the UDCA-first group. The HbA1c level decreased further after sitagliptin administration (6.4%±0.5% to 6.0%±0.4%(46.4 to 42.1 mmol/mol); P<0.01). Although there were no initial changes in the weight and HbA1c level in the sitagliptin-first group, the HbA1c level decreased after UDCA addition (7.1%±1.1% to 6.6%±0.9%(54.1 to 48.6 mmol/mol); P=0.04). UDCA alone increased the area under the curve0–30 for GLP-1 response (115.4±47.2 to 221.9±48.9 pmol·min/L; P<0.01), but not the glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response, in the UDCA-first group. Conclusions UDCA treatment resulted in a greater reduction in HbA1c levels, and an increased early phase GLP-1 secretion. Trial registration number NCT01337440. PMID:29607050

  10. Efficacy and safety of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin treatment in patients with Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian S.; Madsbad, S

    2014-01-01

    diabetes. METHODS: We searched the MEDLINE and PubMed databases to identify all randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors as an add-on to insulin in patients with Type 2 diabetes, which were selected for review. The abstracts and posters of the recent annual...... and placebo treatment. CONCLUSION: Adding a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor treatment to insulin has a moderate effect on HbA1c , a weight-neutral effect and a good safety profile. The risk of hypoglycaemia is not increased despite a significant improvement in HbA1c ....

  11. The Add-On Effect of Solifenacin for Patients with Remaining Overactive Bladder after Treatment with Tamsulosin for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Suggestive of Benign Prostatic Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Masumori

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To investigate the add-on effect of solifenacin for Japanese men with remaining overactive bladder (OAB symptoms after tamsulosin monotherapy for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO in real-life clinical practice. Methods. Patients aged ≥ 50 having remaining OAB symptoms (≥ 3 of OAB symptom score (OABSS with ≥2 of urgency score after at least 4 weeks treatment by 0.2 mg of tamsulosin for BPO/LUTS received 2.5 or 5.0 mg of solifenacin for 12 weeks. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS, QOL index and OABSS, maximum flow rate (Qmax and postvoid residual urine volume (PVR were determined. Results. A total of 48 patients (mean age 72.5 years completed the study. There were significant improvement in IPSS (15.1 to 11.2 and QOL index (4.2 to 3.0 by add-on of solifenacin. Although the IPSS storage symptom score was significantly improved, there were no changes observed in the IPSS voiding symptom score. The OABSS showed significant improvement (8.0 to 4.8. No changes were observed in Qmax and PVR. Conclusions. Under the supervision of an experienced urologist, the additional administration of solifenacin to patients with BPO/LUTS treated with tamsulosin, is effective in controlling remaining OAB symptoms.

  12. Development of 8K-MCA Add-on based on FPGA technique with a control of VB6 software application under windows environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Lanh; Nguyen Nhi Dien; Nguyen Xuan Hai; Nguyen Bach Viet; Pham Ngoc Son; Huynh Minh; Vuong Huu Tan; Pham Dinh Khang; Phan Nam Anh

    2003-01-01

    The multichannel analyzer is the heart of most experimental measurements. Today, it becomes popular and convenient. It can play a role of getting, processing data and easily interfacing to PC. Some standard-alone multichannel analysis systems can be replaced by Add-on MCA card. Especially, MCA card is necessary for application in nuclear physics research. The main aim of this sub-project is to focus on a design and construction of an 8K-MCA Add-on served for studying nuclear structure, for development of Gamma spectroscopy system, and for a production of low-cost electronics instruments as well. Some experimental results were obtained through the aforementioned card combining with other needed functional analog units. A multichannel data processing (MCD) circuit for nuclear spectroscopy application was developed using a field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) as the central processing element. In addition to the first role, A 13-bit analog-to-digital converter (8k ADC) circuit for nuclear spectroscopy application was also developed using a successive approximation ADC with a control of FPGA technology. The FPGA operates a program that builds the distributed functions of data collected by the ADC and then corrects the ADC differential non-linearity (DNL) via the sliding scale method. The acquisition routine runs in 3.7μ s. the conversion time is approximated 2.2μ s, and the integral non-linearity ≤ 0.14%. (author)

  13. A heuristic model linking yoga philosophy and self-reflection to examine underlying mechanisms of add-on yoga treatment in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Naren; Menon, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests efficacy of yoga as add-on treatment for schizophrenia, but the underlying mechanism by which yoga improves the symptoms of schizophrenia is not completely understood. Yoga improves self-reflection in healthy individuals, and self-reflection abnormalities are typically seen in schizophrenia. However, whether yoga treatment improves impairments in self-reflection typically seen in patients with schizophrenia is not examined. This paper discusses the potential mechanism of yoga in the treatment of schizophrenia and proposes a testable hypothesis for further empirical studies. It is proposed that self-reflection abnormalities in schizophrenia improve with yoga and the neurobiological changes associated with this can be examined using empirical behavioural measures and neuroimaging measures such as magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Comparison of conventional inserts and an add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatanen, Tero; Lahtinen, Tapani; Traneus, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Background. Collimation of irregularly shaped clinical electron beams is currently based on electron inserts made of low melting point alloys. The present investigation compares a conventional electron applicator with insert and add-on eMLC-based dose distributions in the postoperative chest wall irradiation of left-sided breast cancer. Material and methods. Voxel Monte Carlo++ (VMC++) calculated dose distributions related to electron fields were compared with 10 left-sided breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy. The prescription dose was 50 Gy at a build-up maximum. The same dose was prescribed for the ipsilateral axillary, parasternal and supraclavicular lymph nodes that were treated with photons and calculated with a pencil beam algorithm. The insert beams were shaped with 1.5 cm thick Wood's metal electron inserts in an electron applicator of a Varian 2100 C/D linac. Doses for the eMLC-shaped beams were calculated for an eMLC prototype with 2 cm thick and 5 mm wide steel leaves. The same collimator-to-surface distance (CSD) of 5.8 cm was used for both collimators. Results. The mean PTV dose was slightly higher for the eMLC plans (50.7 vs 49.5 Gy, p<0.001, respectively). The maximum doses assessed by D5% for the eMLC and insert were 60.9 and 59.1 Gy (p<0.001). The difference was due to the slightly higher doses near the field edges for the eMLC. The left lung V20 volumes were 34.5% and 34.0% (p<0.001). There was only a marginal difference in heart doses. Discussion: Despite a slight increase of maximum dose in PTV the add-on electron MLC for chest wall irradiation results in practically no differences in dose distributions compared with the present insert-based collimation

  15. Computerized cognitive training in children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as add-on treatment to stimulants: feasibility study and protocol description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia de Oliveira Rosa

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive training has received increasing attention as a non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in children and adolescents. Few studies have assessed cognitive training as add-on treatment to medication in randomized placebo controlled trials. The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore the feasibility of implementing a computerized cognitive training program for ADHD in our environment, describe its main characteristics and potential efficacy in a small pilot study. Methods Six ADHD patients aged 10-12-years old receiving stimulants and presenting residual symptoms were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial to either a standard cognitive training program or a controlled placebo condition for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was core ADHD symptoms measured using the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Questionnaire (SNAP-IV scale. Results We faced higher resistance than expected to patient enrollment due to logistic issues to attend face-to-face sessions in the hospital and to fill the requirement of medication status and absence of some comorbidities. Both groups showed decrease in parent reported ADHD symptoms without statistical difference between them. In addition, improvements on neuropsychological tests were observed in both groups – mainly on trained tasks. Conclusions This protocol revealed the need for new strategies to better assess the effectiveness of cognitive training such as the need to implement the intervention in a school environment to have an assessment with more external validity. Given the small sample size of this pilot study, definitive conclusions on the effects of cognitive training as add-on treatment to stimulants would be premature.

  16. Computerized cognitive training in children and adolescents with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder as add-on treatment to stimulants: feasibility study and protocol description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Virginia de Oliveira; Schmitz, Marcelo; Moreira-Maia, Carlos Roberto; Wagner, Flavia; Londero, Igor; Bassotto, Caroline de Fraga; Moritz, Guilherme; de Souza, Caroline Dos Santos; Rohde, Luis Augusto Paim

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive training has received increasing attention as a non-pharmacological approach for the treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and adolescents. Few studies have assessed cognitive training as add-on treatment to medication in randomized placebo controlled trials. The purpose of this preliminary study was to explore the feasibility of implementing a computerized cognitive training program for ADHD in our environment, describe its main characteristics and potential efficacy in a small pilot study. Six ADHD patients aged 10-12-years old receiving stimulants and presenting residual symptoms were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial to either a standard cognitive training program or a controlled placebo condition for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was core ADHD symptoms measured using the Swanson, Nolan and Pelham Questionnaire (SNAP-IV scale). We faced higher resistance than expected to patient enrollment due to logistic issues to attend face-to-face sessions in the hospital and to fill the requirement of medication status and absence of some comorbidities. Both groups showed decrease in parent reported ADHD symptoms without statistical difference between them. In addition, improvements on neuropsychological tests were observed in both groups - mainly on trained tasks. This protocol revealed the need for new strategies to better assess the effectiveness of cognitive training such as the need to implement the intervention in a school environment to have an assessment with more external validity. Given the small sample size of this pilot study, definitive conclusions on the effects of cognitive training as add-on treatment to stimulants would be premature.

  17. Management implications for the perioperative surgical home related to inpatient case cancellations and add-on case scheduling on the day of surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Richard H; Dexter, Franklin

    2015-07-01

    The American Society of Anesthesiologists has embraced the concept of the Perioperative Surgical Home as a means through which anesthesiologists can add value to the health systems in which they practice. One key listed element of the Perioperative Surgical Home is to support "scheduling initiatives to reduce cancellations and increase efficiency." In this study, we explored the potential benefits of the Perioperative Surgical Home with respect to inpatient cancellations and add-on case scheduling. We evaluated 6 hypotheses related to the timing of inpatient cancellations and preoperative anesthesia evaluations. Inpatient cancellations were studied during 26 consecutive 4-week intervals between July 2012 and June 2014 at a tertiary care academic hospital. All timestamps related to scheduling, rescheduling, and cancellation activities were retrieved from the operating room (OR) case scheduling system. Timestamps when patients were seen by anesthesia residents were obtained from the preoperative evaluation system database. Batch mean methods were used to calculate means and SE. For cases cancelled, we determined whether, for "most" (>50%) cancellations, a subsequent procedure (of any type) was performed on the patient within 7 days of the cancellation. Comparisons with most and other fractions were assessed using the 1 group, 1-sided Student t test. We evaluated whether a few procedures were highly represented among the cancelled cases via the Herfindahl (Simpson's) index, comparing it with Data from 24,735 scheduled inpatient cases were assessed. Cases cancelled after 7 AM on the day before or at any time on the scheduled day of surgery accounted for 22.6% ± 0.5% (SE) of the scheduled minutes all scheduled cases, and 26.8% ± 0.4% of the case volume (i.e., number of cases). Most (83.1% ± 0.6%, P 50%, P = 0.12), implying that the indication for the cancelled procedure no longer existed or the patient/family decided not to proceed with surgery. When only

  18. Efficacy and safety of teneligliptin add-on to insulin monotherapy in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 16-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with an open-label period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadowaki, Takashi; Kondo, Kazuoki; Sasaki, Noriyuki; Miyayama, Kyoko; Yokota, Shoko; Terata, Ryuji; Gouda, Maki

    2017-09-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of teneligliptin as add-on to insulin monotherapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In a 16-week, double-blind period, 148 Japanese T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control with insulin and diet/exercise therapies were randomized to placebo or teneligliptin 20 mg. In a subsequent 36-week, open-label period, all patients received teneligliptin once daily. The primary outcome measure was change in HbA1c at the end of the double-blind period. The difference between placebo and teneligliptin in change in HbA1c in the double-blind period (least squares mean ± SE) was -0.80% ± 0.11%; teneligliptin was superior (ANCOVA, P 1). The HbA1c-lowering effect of teneligliptin was maintained throughout the open-label period. The incidence of adverse events was 53.5% with placebo and 44.2% with teneligliptin in the double-blind period, 66.7% in the placebo/teneligliptin group in the open-label period, and 77.9% in the teneligliptin/teneligliptin group over both double-blind/open-label periods. The incidence of hypoglycemic symptoms was 11.1% in the placebo/teneligliptin group in the open-label period and 27.3% in the teneligliptin/teneligliptin group over both double-blind/open-label periods. Teneligliptin was effective and well tolerated in Japanese T2DM patients with inadequate glycemic control. NCT02081599.

  19. Twelve-Week Treatment With Liraglutide as Add-on to Insulin in Normal-Weight Patients With Poorly Controlled Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Christian S; Dejgaard, Thomas F; Holst, Jens J

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the efficacy and safety of once-daily liraglutide 1.2 mg versus placebo as add-on to insulin treatment in normal-weight patients with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In a randomized (1:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 40...... patients with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c ≥8% [64 mmol/mol]) received once-daily liraglutide 1.2 mg or placebo for 12 weeks. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed before and at the end of treatment. The primary end point was change in HbA1c. Secondary end points included change in insulin dose, weight...... was more frequently associated with gastrointestinal adverse effects. The incidence of hypoglycemia did not differ between groups. CONCLUSIONS: Liraglutide significantly reduces body weight and insulin requirements but has no additional effect on HbA1c in normal-weight patients with type 1 diabetes...

  20. Add-On Aliskiren Elicits Stronger Renoprotection Than High-Dose Valsartan in Type 2 Diabetic KKAy Mice That Do Not Respond to Low-Dose Valsartan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Fan, Yu-Yan; Kitada, Kento; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Nishiyama, Akira

    2012-01-01

    We hypothesized that aliskiren provides renoprotection in diabetic animals that did not receive sufficient renoprotection by AT1-receptor antagonist treatment. Type 2 diabetic KKAy mice were treated with group 1: vehicle or group 2: valsartan (15 mg/kg per day) from 12 to 16 weeks of age. The mice were subsequently divided into 4 groups and treated with the following combinations of drugs for another 6 weeks: 1: group 1 kept receiving vehicle, 2: group 2 continuously received 15 mg/kg per day of valsartan (Val-Val15), 3: group 2 received 50 mg/kg per day of valsartan (Val-Val50), 4: group 2 continuously received 15 mg/kg per day of valsartan with 25 mg/kg per day of aliskiren (Val-Val+Ali). Aliskiren exerted significant anti-albuminuric effects, whereas valsartan failed to ameliorate the albuminuria in the first four weeks. Surprisingly, the increasing dosage of valsartan in the Val-Val50 group showed non-significant tendencies to attenuate the albuminuria compared with vehicle infusion. Val-Val+Ali significantly suppressed the development of albuminuria and podocyte injury. Val-Val50 and Val-Val+Ali showed similar suppression of angiotensin II contents in the kidney of KKAy mice. In conclusion, the anti-albuminuric effect that was observed in the type 2 diabetic mice showing no anti-albuminuric effect by valsartan can be attributed to the add-on aliskiren. PMID:22673148

  1. Stereotaxic percutaneous core biopsy versus surgical biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions using a standard mammographic table with an add-on device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, M.F.; Papoff, W.J.; Doan, L.; Eliasziw, M.

    2001-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of using a regular mammographic table with an add-on device for biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions in women in a community hospital setting. During a 3-year period, 70 consenting women (39-80 years of age) with a nonpalpable mammographically suspicious lesion on routine screening mammography underwent 14-gauge automated percutaneous core biopsies, immediate needle localization and lumpectomy. The needle and surgical biopsy results were independently classified into 1 of 5 categories: cancer, fibroadenomal fibrocystic change, normal or other. The procedure was well tolerated, and all core specimens yielded adequate tissue for pathologic evaluation. There were 3 episodes of vasovagal reaction. There was complete agreement in histologic findings in 64 cases (91%), including 22 of 24 cancers (92%). The overall agreement for categorizing lesions was 91% (k 0.88), and there was 97% agreement (k = 0.94) for the classification of cancer versus benign lesion. The results are similar to those of studies performed with dedicated prone equipment. Stereotaxic core biopsies can be done safely and accurately in a community hospital setting with relatively inexpensive nondedicated mammographic equipment. (author)

  2. Stereotaxic percutaneous core biopsy versus surgical biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions using a standard mammographic table with an add-on device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.F.; Papoff, W.J.; Doan, L.; Eliasziw, M. [St. Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, St. Thomas, Ontario (Canada)

    2001-02-01

    To determine the accuracy of using a regular mammographic table with an add-on device for biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions in women in a community hospital setting. During a 3-year period, 70 consenting women (39-80 years of age) with a nonpalpable mammographically suspicious lesion on routine screening mammography underwent 14-gauge automated percutaneous core biopsies, immediate needle localization and lumpectomy. The needle and surgical biopsy results were independently classified into 1 of 5 categories: cancer, fibroadenomal fibrocystic change, normal or other. The procedure was well tolerated, and all core specimens yielded adequate tissue for pathologic evaluation. There were 3 episodes of vasovagal reaction. There was complete agreement in histologic findings in 64 cases (91%), including 22 of 24 cancers (92%). The overall agreement for categorizing lesions was 91% (k 0.88), and there was 97% agreement (k = 0.94) for the classification of cancer versus benign lesion. The results are similar to those of studies performed with dedicated prone equipment. Stereotaxic core biopsies can be done safely and accurately in a community hospital setting with relatively inexpensive nondedicated mammographic equipment. (author)

  3. Add-on-Statin Extended Release Nicotinic Acid/Laropiprant but Not the Switch to High-Dose Rosuvastatin Lowers Blood Pressure: An Open-Label Randomized Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastazia Kei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nicotinic acid (NA and statins have been associated with reductions in blood pressure (BP. Patients and Methods. We recruited 68 normotensive and hypertensive dyslipidemic patients who were treated with a conventional statin dose and had not achieved lipid targets. Patients were randomized to switch to high-dose rosuvastatin (40 mg/day or to add-on current statin treatment with extended release (ER NA/laropiprant (1000/20 mg/day for the first 4 weeks followed by 2000/40 mg/day for the next 8 weeks for 3 months. Results. Switching to rosuvastatin 40 mg/day was not associated with significant BP alterations. In contrast, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to current statin treatment resulted in a 7% reduction of systolic BP (from 134±12 to 125±10 mmHg, <.001 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group and a 5% reduction of diastolic BP (from 81±9 to 77±6 mmHg, =.009 versus baseline and =.01 versus rosuvastatin group. These reductions were significant only in the subgroup of hypertensives and were independent of the hypolipidemic effects of ER-NA/laropiprant. Conclusions. Contrary to the switch to high-dose rosuvastatin, the addition of ER-NA/laropiprant to statin treatment was associated with significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic BP.

  4. N-Acetylcysteine in the Treatment of Pediatric Tourette Syndrome: Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Add-On Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H; Panza, Kaitlyn E; Yaffa, Alisa; Alvarenga, Pedro G; Jakubovski, Ewgeni; Mulqueen, Jilian M; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Leckman, James F

    2016-05-01

    Current pharmacological treatments for Tourette Syndrome (TS), such as antipsychotic agents and α-2 agonists, are moderately effective in the treatment of tics, but have substantial side effects that limit their use. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) modulates glutamatergic systems, and has been used safely as an antioxidant agent with minimal side effects for decades. NAC has been increasingly studied for the treatment of other obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. We aim to examine the efficacy of NAC for the treatment of pediatric TS in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on study. Thirty-one children and adolescents 8-17 years of age with TS were randomly assigned to receive NAC or matching placebo for 12 weeks. Our primary outcome was change in severity of tics as measured by the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS), Total tic score. Secondary measures assessed comorbid obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), depression, anxiety, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Linear mixed models in SAS were used to examine differences between NAC and placebo. Of 31 randomized subjects, 14 were assigned to placebo (two females; 11.5 + 2.8 years) and 17 to active NAC (five females; 12.4 + 1.4 years) treatment. No significant difference between NAC and placebo was found in reducing tic severity or any secondary outcomes. We found no evidence for efficacy of NAC in treating tic symptoms. Our findings stand in contrast to studies suggesting benefits of NAC in the treatment of other obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders in adults, including OCD and trichotillomania, but are similar to a recent placebo-controlled trial of pediatric trichotillomania that found no benefit of NAC.

  5. Circadian rest-activity rhythms during benzodiazepine tapering covered by melatonin versus placebo add-on: data derived from a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lone Baandrup

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe mental illness often suffer from disruptions in circadian rest-activity cycles, which might partly be attributed to ongoing psychopharmacological medication. Benzodiazepines are frequently prescribed for prolonged periods despite recommendations of only short-term usage. Melatonin, a naturally occurring nocturnal hormone, has the potential to stabilize disrupted circadian rhythmicity. Our aim was to investigate how prolonged-release melatonin affects rest-activity patterns in medicated patients with severe mental illness and if benzodiazepine dose reduction is associated with changes in circadian rhythm parameters. Method Data were derived from a randomized, double-blinded clinical trial with 24 weeks follow-up. Participants were randomized to add-on treatment with prolonged-release melatonin (2 mg or matching placebo, and usual benzodiazepine dosage was gradually tapered. Here we report the results of 72 h of actigraphic assessment of activity-rest cycles performed pre and post tapering. Changes in rest-activity rhythm parameters between the melatonin and placebo group were analyzed using the univariate general linear model. Change in activity counts per 6 h, from baseline to follow-up, in the whole sample was analyzed using paired samples t-test. Results A subsample of 48 patients participated in the actigraphic assessment: 20 in the melatonin group and 28 in the placebo group. Rest-activity cycles varied from regular to highly disrupted. Melatonin significantly increased the interdaily stability and at a trend level decreased the intradaily variability compared with placebo. Benzodiazepine dose reduction was not associated with these circadian rhythm parameters. Activity counts were generally higher after benzodiazepine dose reduction compared with pre tapering, but differences did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Our data suggest melatonin as an aid during benzodiazepine withdrawal for

  6. Study on Effectiveness of Low Dose Theophylline as Add-on to Inhaled Corticosteroid for Patients with Sulfur Mustard Induced Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi

    2013-12-01

    , Saburi A, Shohrati M, Ghanei M. Study on Effectiveness of Low Dose Theophylline as Add-on to Inhaled Corticosteroid for Patients with Sulfur Mustard Induced Bronchiolitis. Asia Pac J Med Toxicol 2013;2:126-130.

  7. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Busse

    Full Text Available MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out" in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators.Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators - attending (AR and resident radiologists (RR as well as medical students (MS - performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm. Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0.Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81% were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec differed significantly (p<0.01. Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8 and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4. Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8.The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between groups with different expertise there were

  8. Targeting Accuracy, Procedure Times and User Experience of 240 Experimental MRI Biopsies Guided by a Clinical Add-On Navigation System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Harald; Riedel, Tim; Garnov, Nikita; Thörmer, Gregor; Kahn, Thomas; Moche, Michael

    2015-01-01

    MRI is of great clinical utility for the guidance of special diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. The majority of such procedures are performed iteratively ("in-and-out") in standard, closed-bore MRI systems with control imaging inside the bore and needle adjustments outside the bore. The fundamental limitations of such an approach have led to the development of various assistance techniques, from simple guidance tools to advanced navigation systems. The purpose of this work was to thoroughly assess the targeting accuracy, workflow and usability of a clinical add-on navigation solution on 240 simulated biopsies by different medical operators. Navigation relied on a virtual 3D MRI scene with real-time overlay of the optically tracked biopsy needle. Smart reference markers on a freely adjustable arm ensured proper registration. Twenty-four operators - attending (AR) and resident radiologists (RR) as well as medical students (MS) - performed well-controlled biopsies of 10 embedded model targets (mean diameter: 8.5 mm, insertion depths: 17-76 mm). Targeting accuracy, procedure times and 13 Likert scores on system performance were determined (strong agreement: 5.0). Differences in diagnostic success rates (AR: 93%, RR: 88%, MS: 81%) were not significant. In contrast, between-group differences in biopsy times (AR: 4:15, RR: 4:40, MS: 5:06 min:sec) differed significantly (p<0.01). Mean overall rating was 4.2. The average operator would use the system again (4.8) and stated that the outcome justifies the extra effort (4.4). Lowest agreement was reported for the robustness against external perturbations (2.8). The described combination of optical tracking technology with an automatic MRI registration appears to be sufficiently accurate for instrument guidance in a standard (closed-bore) MRI environment. High targeting accuracy and usability was demonstrated on a relatively large number of procedures and operators. Between groups with different expertise there were

  9. Correlation between total vitamin D levels and psychotic psychopathology in patients with schizophrenia: therapeutic implications for add-on vitamin D augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüksel, Rabia Nazik; Altunsoy, Neslihan; Tikir, Baise; Cingi Külük, Merve; Unal, Kubranur; Goka, Sema; Aydemir, Cigdem; Goka, Erol

    2014-12-01

    . We recommend that, serum vitamin D levels should be measured in patients with schizophrenia especially in long term care. Appropriate further treatment with add-on vitamin D supplements and diets that are rich in vitamin D should be considered.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Canagliflozin versus Sitagliptin as Add-on to Metformin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neslusan, Cheryl; Teschemaker, Anna; Johansen, Pierre; Willis, Michael; Valencia-Mendoza, Atanacio; Puig, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    To assess the cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin versus sitagliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) as an add-on to metformin in Mexico. A validated model (Economic and Health Outcomes [ECHO]-T2DM) was used to estimate the cost-effectiveness of canagliflozin 300 or 100 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg in patients with T2DM inadequately controlled on metformin monotherapy. Data from a head-to-head, phase III clinical trial, including patients' baseline demographic characteristics, biomarker values, and treatment effects, were used to simulate outcomes and resource use over 20 years from the perspective of the Mexican health care system. Costs of complications and adverse events were tailored to the Mexican setting and discounted at 5%. Cost-effectiveness was assessed using willingness-to-pay thresholds equivalent to 1 times the gross domestic product per capita (locally perceived to be "very cost-effective") and 3 times the gross domestic product per capita (locally perceived to be "cost-effective") on the basis of recommendations of the Mexican government and the World Health Organization. Owing primarily to better glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ), body weight, and systolic blood pressure values, canagliflozin 300 and 100 mg were associated with an incremental benefit of 0.16 and 0.06 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) versus sitagliptin 100 mg, respectively, over 20 years. The mean differences in cost for canagliflozin 300 and 100 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg were Mexican pesos (MXP) 1797 (US $134) and MXP 7262 (US $540), respectively, resulting in a cost per QALY gained of MXP 11,210 (US $834) and MXP 128,883 (US $9590), respectively. Both of these cost-effectiveness ratios are below the very cost-effective willingness-to-pay threshold in Mexico. The general finding that canagliflozin is cost-effective versus sitagliptin in Mexico was supported by sensitivity analyses. In Mexico, both doses of canagliflozin are likely to be cost-effective versus

  11. F44. AN ADD-ON TRIAL WITH N-ACETYL-CYSTEINE (NAC) IN EARLY PSYCHOSIS PATIENTS: TOWARDS BIOMARKER GUIDED TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conus, Philippe; Fournier, Margot; Xin, Lijing; Cleusix, Martine; Baumann, Philipp S; Ferrari, Carina; Cousins, Ann; Alameda, Luis; Gholam-Razaee, Mehdi; Golay, Philippe; Jenni, Raoul; Woo, Tsung-Ung Wilson; Keshavan, Matcheri; Eap, Chin B; Wojcik, Joanne; Cuenod, Michel; Buclin, Thierry; Gruetter, Rolf; Seidman, Larry; Do, Kim

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Oxidative stress, coupled with dysregulation of inflammation, NMDAR and dopamine, is involved in schizophrenia (SZ) pathophysiology. Earlier add-on clinical trials showed in chronic SZ patients that NAC, a precursor of glutathione (GSH), an important cerebral antioxidant, improved negative symptoms, mismatch negativity and local synchronization. We hypothesized that NAC at an earlier stage of illness would have a greater impact. Methods Early psychosis patients (EP, less than 5 years of illness, N=63; NAC=32, placebo=31) were supplemented with NAC (2.7g/day, 6 months) in a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial. Outcome measures: PANSS and neurocognition (MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery; n=36); quantification of medial prefronfal cortex glutathione (GSHmPFC) by 1H-magnetic-resonance-spectroscopy, of white matter diffusion properties estimated by generalized fractional anisotropy (gFA) computed from diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI), of blood cells GSH (GSHBC) and GSH peroxidase activity (GPxBC) at start and end of trial Results While PANSS negative and positive were not affected by NAC, NAC improved Processing Speed (NAC > Placebo; F(1, 30)=5.849, p=.022), favoring 2 of 3 processing speed tasks (Trail Making A, F(1, 30)=4.279, p=.048 & Verbal Fluency, F(1, 30)=5.749, p=.023). GSHmPFC (+23%, p=0.005) and GSHBC (+19%, p=0.05) were increased following NAC treatment. In patients with high-baseline GPxBC (>22.3U/gHb), subgroup explorations revealed an improvement of PANSS positive compared to placebo (p=0.02). The change of PANSS positive correlated negatively with that of GPxBC activity, showing that the improvement paralleled the restoration of redox status. NAC group showed 11% increase in fornix white matter integrity as measured by gFA, correlating with an increase in GSHmPFC over the 6-months period. Discussion This is the first clinical trial assessing the impact of NAC treatment in a sample of EP and the potential predictive role

  12. Real-life safety and efficacy of vildagliptin as add-on to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes in Turkey--GALATA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, Goksun; Keskin, Lezzan; Akin, Fulya; Dokmetas, Hatice Sebile; Tasan, Ertugrul; Ar, Idilhan Baloglu; Uren, Emel

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate tolerability/safety and the efficacy of the combination of vildagliptin plus metformin in a real-life population of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This multicenter, single-arm, 6 month, observational, prospective cohort study was conducted at 39 centers across Turkey. T2DM patients on vildagliptin and metformin for ≤4 weeks were enrolled regardless of their previous antidiabetic therapy. Efficacy was evaluated by measuring hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels. Tolerability/safety parameters evaluated included hypoglycemic events, gastrointestinal events, peripheral edema and weight gain. This study enrolled 665 patients with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) age of 55.1 ± 10.2 years and female predominance (n = 394, 59.2%). Safety was assessed in all enrolled patients. Hypoglycemia was reported in 10 (1.5%) patients (95% confidence interval = 0.8-2.7%). Efficacy was assessed in 289 (43.5%) patients treated for 6 ± 1 months; these patients showed a mean decrease in HbA1c of 0.8% from baseline value of 7.8% (p 65 years) and body mass index (vildagliptin and metformin combination was associated with significant improvements in reaching target HbA1c levels, even in elderly and obese patients with T2DM. Moreover, vildagliptin and metformin demonstrated a good overall tolerability/safety profile.

  13. Effectiveness and safety of vildagliptin and vildagliptin add-on to metformin in real-world settings in Egypt - results from the GUARD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelbaya, Salah; Rakha, Sameh

    2017-05-01

    The GUARD study evaluated the effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of vildagliptin treatment with or without metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in real-life settings. Here we present the results of the GUARD study for the patient subset from Egypt. This was a 24 ± 6 weeks, prospective, non-interventional study that enrolled adult patients with T2DM receiving vildagliptin or vildagliptin + metformin combination therapy as per local prescribing information. The primary effectiveness endpoint was change in HbA1c levels from baseline to week 24 ± 6 endpoint. Safety was assessed by reporting of adverse events and serious adverse events (SAEs). Of 2786 patients enrolled from Egypt, 655 received vildagliptin and 2131 received vildagliptin + metformin. Overall, at baseline, mean (± standard deviation [SD]) age was 49.5 ± 9.49 years, BMI was 31.5 ± 4.85 kg/m 2 , HbA1c was 8.4 ± 0.86%, and duration of T2DM was 2.3 ± 3.78 years. At week 24, significant reductions in mean (±SD) HbA1c were observed in the vildagliptin (-1.47 ± 0.79%) and vildagliptin + metformin (-1.62 ± 0.82%) groups (both p vildagliptin group and 60.5% in the vildagliptin + metformin group achieved HbA1c ≤7.0%. Treatment with vildagliptin (± metformin) was well tolerated, with a low incidence of hypoglycemia in both groups (vildagliptin, 0.5%; vildagliptin + metformin, 0.6%). No SAEs or deaths were reported in the vildagliptin group; however, 0.2% of patients experienced SAEs and one death (accidental death) was reported in the vildagliptin + metformin group. In a real-world setting, vildagliptin, with or without metformin, resulted in significant reductions in HbA1c and was well tolerated in patients with T2DM from Egypt. Limitations of the study include non-randomization and the open-label, observational nature of the study.

  14. Safety and efficacy of rasagiline as an add-on therapy to riluzole in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludolph, Albert C; Schuster, Joachim; Dorst, Johannes; Dupuis, Luc; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Kassubek, Jan; Weiland, Ulrike; Petri, Susanne; Meyer, Thomas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Schrank, Berthold; Boentert, Matthias; Emmer, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas; Zeller, Daniel; Prudlo, Johannes; Winkler, Andrea S; Grehl, Torsten; Heneka, Michael T; Wollebæk Johannesen, Siw; Göricke, Bettina

    2018-06-18

    Rasagiline, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor with neuroprotective potential in Parkinson's disease, has shown a disease-modifying effect in the SOD1-Gly93Ala low-expressing mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, both alone and in combination with riluzole. We sought to test whether or not rasagiline 1 mg/day can prolong survival in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also receiving riluzole. Patients with possible, probable, or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were enrolled to our randomised, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, double-blind, phase 2 trial from 15 German network for motor neuron diseases (MND-NET) centres (university hospitals or clinics). Eligible patients were aged at least 18 years, had onset of progressive weakness within the 36 months before the study, had disease duration of more than 6 months and less than 3 years, and had a best-sitting slow vital capacity of at least 50%. After a 4-week screening period, eligible patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either rasagiline (1 mg/day) or placebo in addition to riluzole (100 mg/day), after stratification for site of onset (bulbar or spinal) and study centre. Patients and all personnel assessing outcome parameters were masked to treatment allocation. Patients were followed up 2, 6, 12, and 18 months after randomisation. The primary endpoint was survival time, defined as the time to death or time to study cutoff date (ie, the last patient's last visit plus 14 days). Analyses of primary outcome and safety measures were done in all patients who received at least one dose of trial treatment (intention-to-treat population). The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01879241. Between July 2, 2013, and Nov 11, 2014, 273 patients were screened for eligibility, and 252 patients were randomly assigned to receive rasagiline (n=127) or placebo (n=125). 126 patients taking rasagiline and 125 taking placebo were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. For the primary outcome, the survival probability at the end of the study was 0·43 (95% CI 0·25-0·59) in the rasagiline group (n=126) and 0·53 (0·43-0·62) in the placebo group (n=125). The estimated effect size (hazard ratio) was 0·91 (one-sided 97·5% CI -infinity to 1·34; p=0·31). Rasagiline was well tolerated, and most adverse events were due to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease progression rather than treatment; the most frequent of these were dysphagia (32 [25%] taking rasagiline vs 24 [19%] taking placebo) and respiratory failure (25 [20%] vs 31 [25%]). Frequency of adverse events were comparable between both groups. Rasagiline was safe in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. There was no difference between groups in the primary outcome of survival, although post-hoc analysis suggested that rasagiline might modify disease progression in patients with an initial slope of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale Revised greater than 0·5 points per month at baseline. This should be confirmed in another clinical trial. Teva Pharmaceutical Industries. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dulaglutide as add-on therapy to SGLT2 inhibitors in patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (AWARD-10): a 24-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludvik, Bernhard; Frías, Juan P; Tinahones, Francisco J; Wainstein, Julio; Jiang, Honghua; Robertson, Kenneth E; García-Pérez, Luis-Emilio; Woodward, D Bradley; Milicevic, Zvonko

    2018-05-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists and sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors improve glycaemic control and reduce bodyweight in patients with type 2 diabetes through different mechanisms. We assessed the safety and efficacy of the addition of the once-weekly GLP-1 receptor agonist dulaglutide to the ongoing treatment regimen in patients whose diabetes is inadequately controlled with SGLT2 inhibitors, with or without metformin. AWARD-10 was a phase 3b, double-blind, parallel-arm, placebo-controlled, 24-week study done at 40 clinical sites in Austria, Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Mexico, Spain, and the USA. Eligible adult patients (≥18 years) with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA 1c concentration ≥7·0% [53 mmol/mol] and ≤9·5% [80 mmol/mol]), a BMI of 45 kg/m 2 or less, and taking stable doses (>3 months) of an SGLT2 inhibitor (with or without metformin) were randomly assigned (1:1:1) via an interactive web-response system to subcutaneous injections of either dulaglutide 1·5 mg, dulaglutide 0·75 mg, or placebo once per week for 24 weeks. Patients and investigators were masked to dulaglutide and placebo assignment, and those assessing outcomes were masked to study drug assignment. The primary objective was to test for the superiority of dulaglutide (1·5 mg or 0·75 mg) versus placebo for change in HbA 1c concentration from baseline at 24 weeks. All analyses were done in the intention-to-treat population, defined as all randomly assigned patients who received at least one dose of study drug. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02597049. Between Dec 7, 2015, and Feb 3, 2017, 424 patients were randomly assigned to dulaglutide 1·5 mg (n=142), dulaglutide 0·75 mg (n=142), and placebo (n=140). One patient in the dulaglutide 0·75 mg group was excluded from the analysis because they did not receive any dose of the study drug. The reduction in HbA 1c concentration at 24 weeks was larger in patients receiving dulaglutide (least squares mean [LSM] for dulaglutide 1·5 mg -1·34% [SE 0·06] or -14·7 mmol/mol [0·6]; dulaglutide 0·75 mg -1·21% [0·06] or -13·2 mmol/mol [0·6]) than in patients receiving placebo (-0·54% [0·06] or -5·9 mmol/mol [0·6]; pEli Lilly and Company. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. METABOLIC THERAPY IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Zavaliy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the world experience of metabolic therapy use in the treatment of ischemic stroke. The issue still remains prominent. The reasonability of prescribing metabolic drugs is not completely clear, its effectiveness has not been fully proved, despite numerous studies which show only trends. The article presents an overview of the most popular drugs of different pharmacological groups with a metabolic effect which affect different parts of the ischemic cascade. Ethylmethylhydroxypyridine succinate and cytoflavin have predominantly antihypoxic effect, improve functional outcome and neurological functions, and normalize overall well-being and adaptation. Cerebrolysin is a complex of low molecular weight biologically active peptides derived from the pig’s brain. It has a multimodal effect on the brain, helps to reduce the volume of cerebral infarction, restores neurologic functions and improves the functional outcome. Cortexin is a mixture of cattle brain polypeptides, also has a complex action that provides the most complete reversion of neurological deficit, improves cognitive functions and the functional outcome, reduces the level of paroxysmal convulsive readiness and improves bioelectric activity of the brain. Citicoline is a precursor of cell membrane key ultrastructures, contributes to significant reduction in the volume of cortical brain damage, improves cholinergic transmission, which results in better clinical outcome, even despite the questionable impact on the neurological status. Choline Alfoscerate is a precursor of choline, and the use of the drug significantly limits the growth of the cerebral infarction area starting from the first day of therapy, leads to reversion of neurological symptoms and achievement of rehabilitation goals. Actovegin is deproteinized derivative of calf blood, activates metabolism in tissues, improves trophism and stimulates regeneration. In a large study, it was shown that Actovegin improved

  17. Southeast Economic Add-on 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Revealed preference models provide insights into recreational angler behavior and the economic value of recreational fishing trips. This data is for the Southeast...

  18. Northeast Economic Add-On Data 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Revealed preference models provide insights into recreational angler behavior and the economic value of recreational fishing trips. This data is for the Northeast...

  19. Non-severe Hypoglycemia Risk Difference between Sulfonylurea and Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter-2 Inhibitors (SGLT2-I) as an Add-On to Metformin in Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Pendar

    2017-05-23

    Non-severe hypoglycemia reduces well-being, lowers quality of life, reduces productivity and increases treatment costs. The non-severe hypoglycemia rate, attributable to sulfonylurea (SU) utilization compared with newer classes such as SGLT2-I, could be of clinical significance. To explore the non-severe hypoglycemia risk difference (RD) for SU use compared with SGLT2-I in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as an add on to metformin. A search was conducted for RCTs of SGLT2-I. PubMed database were utilized for this search. The search was limited to RCTs reported in English language for canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin. SU dose comparison was utilized to convert the dose of SUs to glimepiride equivalent doses. Totally, 118 RCTs were reviewed; 6 articles had an arm for a SU as add on to metformin. Six articles belong to 3 RCTs, which reported results for 52 weeks and 104 weeks. Average non-severe hypoglycemia rate for SU arm was 30% (5.5%) [Mean (SD)] for 52 weeks and 35.6% (6.1%) for 104 weeks. RD for non-severe hypoglycemia events for SU compared to SGLT2-I was 26.7% (4.9%) for 52 weeks (p-value less than 0.001) and 30.6% (5.5%) for 104 weeks (p-value less than 0.001). There was a significant correlation between dose of SU and hypoglycemia rate (Pearson correlation 0.995; R-square 99%). This study illustrated that a large proportion of patients who had exposure to SU in RCTs of SGLT2-I experienced non-severe hypoglycemia compared to SGLT2-I. There was a close relation between SU dose and increased probability of non-severe hypoglycemia events. © 2017 Journal of Population Therapeutics and Clinical Pharmacology. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluating the costs of glycemic response with canagliflozin versus dapagliflozin and empagliflozin as add-on to metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Agata; Buchholt, Anders T; El Khoury, Antoine C; Kamal, Ahmed; Taieb, Vanessa

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluates the cost of achieving glycemic control with three sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors, canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin, in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from the payer perspective in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A systematic literature review identified randomized controlled trials of antihyperglycemic agents as add-on to metformin in patients with T2DM of 26 ± 4 weeks in duration, published by 10 September 2014. A Bayesian network-meta analysis (NMA) compared HbA1c changes with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus dapagliflozin 10 mg and empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg. The cost associated with a 1% placebo-adjusted HbA1c reduction with each SGLT2 inhibitor as add-on to metformin was calculated based on NMA results and UAE drug costs. In the NMA, canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg were associated with HbA1c reductions (-0.67% and -0.79%) compared with dapagliflozin 10 mg (-0.41%) and empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg (-0.57% and -0.64%). Probabilities of canagliflozin 100 mg performing better were 79%, 60%, and 53% versus dapagliflozin 10 mg and empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg, respectively; probabilities for canagliflozin 300 mg performing better were 88%, 72%, and 65%, respectively. The cost per 1%-point reduction in HbA1c was projected to be lower with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg ($448 and $422) compared with dapagliflozin 10 mg ($785) and empagliflozin 10 and 25 mg ($527 and $563). Canagliflozin may provide a greater glycemic response at a lower effective cost than dapagliflozin or empagliflozin for patients with T2DM inadequately controlled with metformin from the payer perspective in the UAE.

  1. Add-on high frequency deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) to bilateral prefrontal cortex in depressive episodes of patients with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder I, and major depressive with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Ferracuti, Stefano; Girardi, Nicoletta; Zangen, Abraham; Sani, Gabriele; Raccah, Ruggero N; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Del Casale, Antonio

    2018-04-03

    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is critically involved in mood and alcohol use disorders. We aimed to investigate the safety of intervention with add-on bilateral prefrontal high-frequency deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) and between-group differences in treatment response in patients with different types of depressive episodes, including major depressive episodes in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, type I (BD-I), and MDD with alcohol use disorder (MDAUD). We conducted a 6-month open-label study, involving 82 patients with DSM-5 Depressive Episode. Of these, 41 had diagnosis of MDD, 20 BD-I, and 21 MDAUD. All patients received standard drug treatment and add-on dTMS over the bilateral DLPFC with left prevalence for four weeks, with five sessions in each week. We rated mood state with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) at baseline, one-month, and six-month follow-up visits. Mean total HDRS scores dropped from 22.8 (SD = 5.9) at baseline to 10.4 (SD = 3.6) at 1 month, to 10.0 (SD = 4.5) at 6 months, while response/remission were 70.73% (N = 58) and 19.51% (N = 16) at 1 month and 76.83% (N = 63) and 32.93% (27) at 6 months, respectively, with no between-group differences. No patient experienced any side effects. High-frequency DLPFC dTMS was well tolerated and did not significantly differ on improvement of depression in MDD, BD-I, and MDAUD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Add-on clinical effects of selective antagonist of 5HT6 receptors AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) in patients with schizophrenia stabilized on antipsychotic treatment: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Margarita A; Lepilkina, Taisiya A; Rupchev, Georgy E; Beniashvily, Allan G; Burminskiy, Denis S; Potanin, Sergey S; Bondarenko, Evgeny V; Kazey, Vasily I; Lavrovsky, Yan; Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V

    2014-08-01

    The serotoninergic system as a target for add-on treatment seems to be a promising approach in patients with schizophrenia. To clarify if selective 5HT-6 antagonist AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) adds clinical and cognitive effects to stable antipsychotic treatment. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, add-on, 4r-week trial in 47 schizophrenia patients (21 patients receiving study drug and 26 receiving placebo) who were stabilized on antipsychotic medication was performed. Seventeen patients from the study drug group and 25 patients from the placebo group completed the trial. Treatment effects were measured using clinical rating scales and attention tests. With no differences at baseline, there was a significant difference between the groups in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) positive subscale score (p = 0.058) in favor of patients in the treatment group at the endpoint. The PANSS positive subscore (p = 0.0068) and Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) (p = 0.048) score significantly changed only in the treatment group. Only in the placebo group were significant changes in Calgary Depression Rating Scale (CDRS) total score registered. The indices of attention tests at endpoint did not show differences between the groups, with the exception of the scope of change in the results of the subtest VIII of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), which showed difference between the groups (p = 0.02) and was significantly larger in the treatment group. Only inside the study drug group, significant changes in selectivity and continuous attention were observed regarding total correct responses (p = 0.0038) and reaction time (p = 0.058) in the Continuous Attention Task (CAT) test. Selective 5HT6 antagonist AVN-211 (CD-008-0173) added antipsychotic and some procognitive (attention) effects to antipsychotic medication.

  3. The add-on N-acetylcysteine is more effective than dimethicone alone to eliminate mucus during narrow-band imaging endoscopy: a double-blind, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Jen; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chang, Chen-Wang; Hu, Kuang-Chun; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Chen, Chih-Jen; Shih, Shou-Chuan

    2013-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that pronase can improve mucosal visibility, but this agent is not uniformly available for human use worldwide. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a mucolytic agent, in improving mucus elimination as measured by decreased endoscopic water flushes during narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopy. A consecutive series of patients scheduled for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy at outpatient clinics were enrolled in this double-blind, randomized controlled trial. The control group drank a preparation of 100 mg dimethicone (5 ml at 20 mg/ml) plus water up to 100 ml, and the NAC group drank 300 mg NAC plus 100 mg dimethicone and water up to 100 ml. During the endoscopy, the endoscopist used as many flushes of water as deemed necessary to produce a satisfactory NBI view of the entire gastric mucosa. In all, 177 patients with a mean age of 51 years were evaluated in this study. Significantly lesser water was used for flushing during NBI endoscopy for the NAC group than the control group; 40 ml (30-70, 0-120) versus 50 ml (30-100, 0-150) (median (interquartile range, range), p = 0.0095). Considering the safety profile of NAC, decreasing the number of water flushes for optimal vision and unavailability of pronase in some areas, the authors suggest the use of add-on NAC to eliminate mucus during NBI endoscopy.

  4. The Efficacy and Safety of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida as Add-On Medication in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Ineffectively Managed by Metformin Monotherapy: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Fengmei; Tian, Jiaxing; Chen, Xinyan; Li, Zhibin; Piao, Chunli; Guo, Junjie; Ma, Licheng; Zhao, Lijuan; Xia, Chengdong; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Tong, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Metformin plays an important role in diabetes treatment. Studies have shown that the combined use of oral hypoglycemic medications is more effective than metformin monotherapy. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, we evaluated whether Jinlida, a Chinese herbal medicine, enhances the glycemic control of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients whose HbA1c was ineffectively controlled with metformin alone. A total of 186 diabetes patients were enrolled in this double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive either Jinlida (9 g) or the placebo TID for 12 consecutive weeks. All subjects in both groups also continuously received their metformin without any dose change. During this 12-week period, the HbA1c, FPG, 2 h PG, body weight, BMI were assessed. HOMA insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and β-cell function (HOMA-β) were also evaluated. At week 12, compared to the HbA1c level from week 0, the level of the Jinlida group was reduced by 0.92 ± 1.09% and that of the placebo group was reduced by 0.53 ± 0.94%. The 95% CI was 0.69-1.14 for the Jinlida group vs. 0.34-0.72 for the placebo group. There was a very significant HbA1c reduction between the two groups after 12 weeks (p Jinlida group and placebo group were reduced from week 0. There were a very significant FG and 2 h PG level reductions between the two groups after 12 weeks (both p Jinlida group also showed improved β-cell function with a HOMA-β increase (p Jinlida significantly enhanced the hypoglycemic action of metformin when the drug was used alone. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value as an add-on medication to metformin monotherapy. Chinese Clinical Trial Register ChiCTR-TRC-13003159.

  5. TALEN/CRISPR-mediated eGFP knock-in add-on at the OCT4 locus does not impact differentiation of human embryonic stem cells towards endoderm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A J Krentz

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs have great promise as a source of unlimited transplantable cells for regenerative medicine. However, current progress on producing the desired cell type for disease treatment has been limited due to an insufficient understanding of the developmental processes that govern their differentiation, as well as a paucity of tools to systematically study differentiation in the lab. In order to overcome these limitations, cell-type reporter hESC lines will be required. Here we outline two strategies using Transcription Activator Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs and Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-Associated protein (Cas to create OCT4-eGFP knock-in add-on hESC lines. Thirty-one and forty-seven percent of clones were correctly modified using the TALEN and CRISPR-Cas9 systems, respectively. Further analysis of three correctly targeted clones demonstrated that the insertion of eGFP in-frame with OCT4 neither significantly impacted expression from the wild type allele nor did the fusion protein have a dramatically different biological stability. Importantly, the OCT4-eGFP fusion was easily detected using microscopy, flow cytometry and western blotting. The OCT4 reporter lines remained equally competent at producing CXCR4+ definitive endoderm that expressed a panel of endodermal genes. Moreover, the genomic modification did not impact the formation of NKX6.1+/SOX9+ pancreatic progenitor cells following directed differentiation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate for the first time that CRISPR-Cas9 can be used to modify OCT4 and highlight the feasibility of creating cell-type specific reporter hESC lines utilizing genome-editing tools that facilitate homologous recombination.

  6. Effects of Passion Flower Extract, as an Add-On Treatment to Sertraline, on Reaction Time in Patients ‎with Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojoumi, Mandana; Ghaeli, Padideh; Salimi, Samrand; Sharifi, Ali; Raisi, Firoozeh

    2016-07-01

    Objective: Because of functional impairment caused by generalized anxiety disorder and due to cognitive side ‎effects of many anti-anxiety agents, in this study we aimed to evaluate the influence of Passion ‎flower standardized extract on reaction time in patients with generalized anxiety disorder.‎ Method: Thirty patients aged 18 to 50 years of age, who were diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder and ‎fulfilled the study criteria, entered this double-blind placebo-controlled study. Reaction time was ‎measured at baseline and after one month of treatment using computerized software. Correct ‎responses, omission and substitution errors and the mean time of correct responses (reaction time) in ‎both visual and auditory tests were collected. The analysis was performed between the two groups ‎and within each group utilizing SPSS PASW- statics, Version 18. P-value less than 0.05 was ‎considered statistically significant.‎ Results: All the participants were initiated on Sertraline 50 mg/day, and the dosage was increased to 100 ‎mg / day after two weeks. Fourteen patients received Pasipy (Passion Flower) 15 drops three times ‎daily and 16 received placebo concurrently. Inter-group comparison proved no significant difference ‎in any of the test items between assortments while a significant decline was observed in auditory ‎omission errors in passion flower group after on month of treatment using intra-group analysis.‎‎ Conclusion: This study noted that passion flower might be suitable as an add-on in the treatment of generalized ‎anxiety disorder with low side effects. Further studies with longer duration are recommended to ‎confirm the results of this study.‎.

  7. The Efficacy and Safety of Chinese Herbal Medicine Jinlida as Add-On Medication in Type 2 Diabetes Patients Ineffectively Managed by Metformin Monotherapy: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengmei Lian

    Full Text Available Metformin plays an important role in diabetes treatment. Studies have shown that the combined use of oral hypoglycemic medications is more effective than metformin monotherapy. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial, we evaluated whether Jinlida, a Chinese herbal medicine, enhances the glycemic control of metformin in type 2 diabetes patients whose HbA1c was ineffectively controlled with metformin alone.A total of 186 diabetes patients were enrolled in this double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicenter trial. Subjects were randomly allocated to receive either Jinlida (9 g or the placebo TID for 12 consecutive weeks. All subjects in both groups also continuously received their metformin without any dose change. During this 12-week period, the HbA1c, FPG, 2 h PG, body weight, BMI were assessed. HOMA insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and β-cell function (HOMA-β were also evaluated.At week 12, compared to the HbA1c level from week 0, the level of the Jinlida group was reduced by 0.92 ± 1.09% and that of the placebo group was reduced by 0.53 ± 0.94%. The 95% CI was 0.69-1.14 for the Jinlida group vs. 0.34-0.72 for the placebo group. There was a very significant HbA1c reduction between the two groups after 12 weeks (p < 0.01. Both FG and 2 h PG levels of the Jinlida group and placebo group were reduced from week 0. There were a very significant FG and 2 h PG level reductions between the two groups after 12 weeks (both p < 0.01. The Jinlida group also showed improved β-cell function with a HOMA-β increase (p < 0.05. No statistical significance was observed in the body weight and BMI changes. No serious adverse events were reported.Jinlida significantly enhanced the hypoglycemic action of metformin when the drug was used alone. This Chinese herbal medicine may have a clinical value as an add-on medication to metformin monotherapy.Chinese Clinical Trial Register ChiCTR-TRC-13003159.

  8. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as continuation treatment to sustain response after electroconvulsive therapy in depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Merkl, Angela; Wilbertz, Gregor; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bührsch, Nicole; van Hall, Franziska; Kischkel, Eva; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Anghelescu, Ion; Heuser, Isabella; Kathmann, Norbert; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective acute antidepressant intervention, sustained response rates are low. It has never been systematically assessed whether psychotherapy, continuation ECT, or antidepressant medication is the most efficacious intervention to maintain initial treatment response. In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 90 inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with right unilateral ultra-brief acute ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy responders received 6 months guideline-based antidepressant medication (MED) and were randomly assigned to add-on therapy with cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT-arm), add-on therapy with ultra-brief pulse continuation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT-arm), or no add-on therapy (MED-arm). After the 6 months of continuation treatment, patients were followed-up for another 6 months. The primary outcome parameter was the proportion of patients who remained well after 12 months. Of 90 MDD patients starting the acute phase, 70% responded and 47% remitted to acute ECT. After 6 months of continuation treatment, significant differences were observed in the three treatment arms with sustained response rates of 77% in the CBT-arm, 40% in the ECT-arm, and 44% in the MED-arm. After 12 months, these differences remained stable with sustained response rates of 65% in the CBT-arm, 28% in the ECT-arm, and 33% in the MED-arm. These results suggest that ultra-brief pulse ECT as a continuation treatment correlates with low sustained response rates. However, the main finding implicates cognitive-behavioral group therapy in combination with antidepressants might be an effective continuation treatment to sustain response after successful ECT in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    ), Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT), and Psychoeducational Therapy (PET)). RESULTS Our main objective was to evaluate the current evidence on the effect of CBT on abstinence and drug use reduction for young people in outpatient treatment for non-opioid drug use. Seven randomised trials, involving 953......, and PET ) with respect to reduction in young people’s drug use. The evidence drawn from this systematic review is based on seven included studies analysed in two separate analyses, depending on whether the intervention was CBT with an add-on component such as motivational interviewing (four studies......) or CBT without an add-on component (three studies). The seven studies are very different in terms of their findings regarding the effects of CBT interventions compared to other interventions (ACRA, CBOP (+ACC), DHPE, FFT, IT, MDFT, and PET ) on young people’s drug use. Therefore, the overall conclusion...

  10. Absence of clinically relevant cardiovascular interaction upon add-on of mirabegron or tamsulosin to an established tamsulosin or mirabegron treatment in healthy middle-aged to elderly men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gelderen, Marcel; Tretter, Reiner; Meijer, John; Dorrepaal, Caroline; Gangaram-Panday, Shanti; Brooks, Ashley; Krauwinkel, Walter; Dickinson, James

    2014-08-01

    Tamsulosin and mirabegron may be used concomitantly in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Since alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists are associated with cardiovascular side effects, potential pharmacokinetic and cardiovascular interactions were evaluated. This was an open-label, randomized, 2-arm, 2-sequence study in 48 healthy men (24/arm) aged 44 - 72 years. In arm 1, subjects received single-dose tamsulosin hydrochloride modified release capsules (0.4 mg) alone and with steady-state mirabegron oral controlled absorption system tablets (100 mg once daily) in random sequence. In arm 2, subjects received single-dose mirabegron alone and with steady-state tamsulosin. Samples for mirabegron and tamsulosin plasma concentrations were collected. Blood pressure (BP) and pulse rate (PR) were measured and orthostatic stress tests were performed. Mirabegron increased tamsulosin C(max) to 159% (90% confidence interval (CI) 143 - 177%), AUC(∞) to 161% (90% CI 149 - 173%), and t(1/2) to 116%. Tamsulosin reduced mirabegron C(max) to 85% (90% CI 71 - 103%) and AUC(∞) to 84% (90% CI 74 - 95%) without effect on t1/2. Mirabegron and tamsulosin co-treatment caused no statistically significant changes (p > 0.05) in PR or systolic BP versus mono-treatment up to 12 hours post-dose. Mean diastolic BP decreases of -2.1 (95% CI -4.1, -0.1) to -4.2 (-7.5, -0.9) mmHg in arm 1 and -3.0 (-5.7, -0.3) to -4.2 (-7.4, -1.0) mmHg in arm 2 were observed, statistically significant (p tamsulosin to existing tamsulosin or mirabegron therapy did not cause clinically relevant changes in cardiovascular safety or safety profiles.

  11. Pooled efficacy and safety of eslicarbazepine acetate as add-on treatment in patients with focal-onset seizures: Data from four double-blind placebo-controlled pivotal phase III clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Christian; Koepp, Mathias; Trinka, Eugen; Villanueva, Vicente; Chaves, João; Ben-Menachen, Elinor; Kowacs, Pedro A; Gil-Nagel, António; Moreira, Joana; Gama, Helena; Rocha, José-Francisco; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2017-12-01

    Pooled evaluation of the key efficacy and safety profile of eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) added-on to stable antiepileptic therapy in adults with focal-onset seizures. Data from 1703 patients enrolled in four phase III double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies were pooled and analyzed. Following a 2 week titration period, ESL was administered at 400 mg, 800 mg, and 1200 mg once-daily doses for 12 weeks (maintenance period). Pooled efficacy variable was standardized (/4 weeks) seizure frequency (SSF) analyzed over the maintenance period as reduction in absolute and relative SSF and proportion of responders (≥50% reduction in SSF). Pooled safety was analyzed by means of adverse events and clinical laboratory assessments. SSF was significantly reduced with ESL 800 mg (P ESL 800 mg and 37.8% for 1200 mg (placebo: 17.6%), and responder rate was 33.8% and 43.1% (placebo: 22.2%). ESL was more efficacious than placebo regardless of gender, geographical region, epilepsy duration, age at time of diagnosis, seizure type, and type of concomitant antiepileptic drugs (AED). Incidence of adverse events (AEs) and AEs leading to discontinuation was dose dependent. Most common AEs (>10% patients) were dizziness, somnolence, and nausea. The incidence of treatment-emergent AEs (dizziness, somnolence, ataxia, vomiting, and nausea) was lower in patients who began taking ESL 400 mg (followed by 400 mg increments to 800 or 1200 mg) than in those who began taking ESL 600 mg or 800 mg. Once-daily ESL 800 mg and 1200 mg showed consistent results across all efficacy and safety endpoints, independent of study population characteristics and type of concomitant AEDs. Treatment initiated with ESL 400 mg followed by 400 mg increments to 800 or 1200 mg provides optimal balance of efficacy and tolerability. © 2017 The Authors. CNS Neuroscience & Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Sex Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex therapy Overview Sex therapy is a type of psychotherapy — a general term for treating mental health problems by talking with a mental health professional. Through sex therapy, you can address concerns about sexual function, ...

  13. Family Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Family therapy Overview Family therapy is a type of psychological counseling (psychotherapy) that can help family members improve communication and resolve conflicts. Family therapy is usually provided by a psychologist, ...

  14. Transarterial embolization (TAE) as add-on to percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of renal tumors: Review of the literature, overview of state-of-the-art embolization materials and further perspective of advanced image-guided tumor ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, C.M., E-mail: christof.sommer@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany); Pallwein-Prettner, L., E-mail: leo.pallwein-prettner@bhs.at [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern Linz, Linz (Austria); Vollherbst, D.F., E-mail: dominik@vollherbst.de [Clinic for Radiology, Minimally-Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK Kliniken Heilbronn GmbH, Heilbronn (Germany); Seidel, R., E-mail: roland.seidel@uks.eu [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Rieder, C., E-mail: christian.rieder@mevis.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer MEVIS, Institute for Medical Image Computing, Bremen (Germany); Radeleff, B.A., E-mail: boris.radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, H.U., E-mail: hu.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Wacker, F., E-mail: wacker.frank@mh-hannover.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Richter, G.M., E-mail: g.richter@klinikum-stuttgart.de [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum Stuttgart, Katharinenhospital, Stuttgart (Germany); Bücker, A., E-mail: arno.buecker@uks.eu [Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Saarland University Medical Center, Homburg/Saar (Germany); Rodt, T., E-mail: rodt.thomas@mh-hannover.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • TAE as add-on to percutaneous RFA is feasible, safe, and very effective. • State-of-the-art embolization materials include tightly-size-calibrated microspheres. • MWA, cryoablation and IRE are TA systems beyond RFA. • Visible beads rank among the most promising innovative embolization materials. • Software-based solutions will be increasingly important for treatment guidance. - Abstract: Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of stage I renal cell carcinoma has recently gained significant attention as the now available long-term and controlled data demonstrate that RFA can result in disease-free and cancer-specific survival comparable with partial and/or radical nephrectomy. In the non-controlled single center trials, however, the rates of treatment failure vary. Operator experience and ablation technique may explain some of the different outcomes. In the controlled trials, a major limitation is the lack of adequate randomization. In case reports, original series and overview articles, transarterial embolization (TAE) before percutaneous RFA was promising to increase tumor control and to reduce complications. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature on TAE as add-on to percutaneous RFA for renal tumors. Specific data regarding technique, tumor and patient characteristics as well as technical, clinical and oncologic outcomes have been analyzed. Additionally, an overview of state-of-the-art embolization materials and the radiological perspective of advanced image-guided tumor ablation (TA) will be discussed. In conclusion, TAE as add-on to percutaneous RFA is feasible and very effective and safe for the treatment of T1a tumors in difficult locations and T1b tumors. Advanced radiological techniques and technologies such as microwave ablation, innovative embolization materials and software-based solutions are now available, or will be available in the near future, to reduce the limitations of

  15. Somatosensory-evoked potentials as an add-on diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Lumbo-sacral spinal stenosis (LSS) is a frequent cause for chronic low back pain. The diagnosis is primarily radiological. Neural insult is not frequent in every case. Although the degree and type of LSS can exactly be described with the current imaging studies, the extent of neural impairment cannot be ...

  16. Somatosensory-evoked potentials as an add-on diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gihan A. Eltantawi

    2012-07-19

    Jul 19, 2012 ... H-reflex comes next (59.1%), and finally F-wave, which showed the lowest ... matology and Rehabilitation Department, Faculty of Medi- ... 611 mm and >8 mm and severe if 68 mm. ... As regards the deep and superficial reflexes; ankle reflex was ... Primary LSS was diagnosed in three patients due to short.

  17. Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  18. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  19. Robotic Mirror Therapy System for Functional Recovery of Hemiplegic Arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beom, Jaewon; Koh, Sukgyu; Nam, Hyung Seok; Kim, Wonshik; Kim, Yoonjae; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo; Chung, Sun Gun; Kim, Sungwan

    2016-08-15

    Mirror therapy has been performed as effective occupational therapy in a clinical setting for functional recovery of a hemiplegic arm after stroke. It is conducted by eliciting an illusion through use of a mirror as if the hemiplegic arm is moving in real-time while moving the healthy arm. It can facilitate brain neuroplasticity through activation of the sensorimotor cortex. However, conventional mirror therapy has a critical limitation in that the hemiplegic arm is not actually moving. Thus, we developed a real-time 2-axis mirror robot system as a simple add-on module for conventional mirror therapy using a closed feedback mechanism, which enables real-time movement of the hemiplegic arm. We used 3 Attitude and Heading Reference System sensors, 2 brushless DC motors for elbow and wrist joints, and exoskeletal frames. In a feasibility study on 6 healthy subjects, robotic mirror therapy was safe and feasible. We further selected tasks useful for activities of daily living training through feedback from rehabilitation doctors. A chronic stroke patient showed improvement in the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and elbow flexor spasticity after a 2-week application of the mirror robot system. Robotic mirror therapy may enhance proprioceptive input to the sensory cortex, which is considered to be important in neuroplasticity and functional recovery of hemiplegic arms. The mirror robot system presented herein can be easily developed and utilized effectively to advance occupational therapy.

  20. What Is Music Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and ... is Music Therapy? Print Email Share What is Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? Music Therapy is ...

  1. Adição de Bloqueador do receptor de angiotensina II na insuficiência cardíaca descompensada Adición de bloqueante del receptor de angiotensina II en la insuficiencia cardiaca descompensada Angiotensin II receptor blocker add-on therapy for low cardiac output in decompensated heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Ochiai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: Durante a descompensação da insuficiência cardíaca, ocorre uma intensa ativação do sistema renina-angiotensina-aldosterona, entretanto, o uso de inibidor da enzima de conversão de angiotensina (IECA não pode bloqueá-lo completamente. De outro modo, a adição de bloqueador do receptor de angiotensina II (BRA pode ser útil quando ocorre a dependência de inotrópico. Avaliamos a eficiência da associação BRA-IECA para retirada da dobutamina na insuficiência cardíaca avançada e descompensada. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia da associação de bloqueador do receptor AT1 de angiotensina II ao inibidor de enzima de conversão, para a retirada da dobutamina em pacientes com dependência de suporte inotrópico decorrente da descompensação aguda da insuficiência cardíaca crônica. MÉTODOS: Em um estudo caso-controle (N = 24, selecionamos pacientes internados por descompensação da insuficiência cardíaca e com uso por mais de 15 dias de dobutamina, ou uma ou mais tentativas sem sucesso de retirada; dose otimizada de IECA; e FEVE FUNDAMENTO: Durante la descompensación de la insuficiencia cardiaca, ocurre una intensa activación del sistema renina-angiotensina-aldosterona, sin embargo, el empleo de inhibidor de la enzima de conversión de angiotensina (IECA no puede bloquearlo completamente. De otro modo, la adición de bloqueante del receptor de angiotensina II (BRA puede ser útil cuando ocurre la dependencia de inotrópico. Evaluamos la eficiencia de la asociación BRA-IECA para retirada de la dobutamina en la insuficiencia cardiaca avanzada y descompensada. OBJETIVO: Evaluar la eficacia de la asociación de bloqueante del receptor AT1 de angiotensina II al inhibidor de enzima de conversión, para la retirada de la dobutamina en pacientes con dependencia de soporte inotrópico que trascurre de la descompensación aguda de la insuficiencia cardiaca crónica. MÉTODOS: En un estudio caso-control (N = 24, seleccionamos a pacientes internados por descompensación de la insuficiencia cardiaca y con empleo por más de 15 días de dobutamina, o una o más intentos sin éxito de retirada; dosis optimizada de IECA; y FEVI BACKGROUND: During heart failure (HF decompensation, an intense activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs; however, the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI cannot block it completely. Otherwise, the addition of angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB can be useful when the inotropic dependence occurs. We evaluated the efficacy of the ARB-ACEI association on dobutamine withdrawal in advanced decompensated HF. OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of association angiotensin receptor blocker - angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor to withdraw the intravenous inotropic support in decompensated severe heart failure. METHODS: In a case-control study (N = 24, we selected patients admitted at the hospital due to HF that had been using dobutamine for more than 15 days, with one or more unsuccessful drug withdrawal attempts; optimized dose of ACEI and ejection fraction (EF < 0.45. Then, the patients additionally received ARB (n=12 or not (control, n=12. The outcome was the successful dobutamine withdrawal, evaluated by logistic regression, with a p < 0.05. RESULTS: The EF was 0.25 and the age was 53 years, with a dobutamine dose of 10.7 μg/kg.min. The successful drug withdrawal was observed in 8 patients from the ARB group (67.7% and in 2 patients from the control group (16.7%. The odds ratio (OR was 10.0 (95%CI: 1.4 to 69.3; p = 0.02. The worsening in renal function was similar (ARB group: 42% vs. control group: 67%; p=0.129. CONCLUSION: In this pilot study, the ARB-ACEI association was associated with successful dobutamine withdrawal in advanced decompensated heart failure. The worsening in renal function was similar in both groups. Further studies are necessary to clarify the issue.

  2. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Alfred R

    2006-01-01

    Proton therapy has become a subject of considerable interest in the radiation oncology community and it is expected that there will be a substantial growth in proton treatment facilities during the next decade. I was asked to write a historical review of proton therapy based on my personal experiences, which have all occurred in the United States, so therefore I have a somewhat parochial point of view. Space requirements did not permit me to mention all of the existing proton therapy facilities or the names of all of those who have contributed to proton therapy. (review)

  3. Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  4. Hormone Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it also can be a sign of endometrial cancer. All bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. Other side effects reported by women who take hormone therapy include fluid retention and breast soreness. This soreness usually lasts for a short ...

  5. Manual Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hakgüder, Aral; Kokino, Siranuş

    2002-01-01

    Manual therapy has been used in the treatment of pain and dysfunction of spinal and peripheral joints for more than a hundred years. Manual medicine includes manipulation, mobilization, and postisometric relaxation techniques. The aim of manual therapy is to enhance restricted movement caused by blockage of joints keeping postural balance, restore function and maintain optimal body mechanics. Anatomic, biomechanical, and neurophysiological evaluations of the leucomotor system is essential for...

  6. Adaptive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatenby, Robert A; Silva, Ariosto S; Gillies, Robert J; Frieden, B Roy

    2009-06-01

    A number of successful systemic therapies are available for treatment of disseminated cancers. However, tumor response is often transient, and therapy frequently fails due to emergence of resistant populations. The latter reflects the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of the tumor microenvironment as well as the evolutionary capacity of cancer phenotypes to adapt to therapeutic perturbations. Although cancers are highly dynamic systems, cancer therapy is typically administered according to a fixed, linear protocol. Here we examine an adaptive therapeutic approach that evolves in response to the temporal and spatial variability of tumor microenvironment and cellular phenotype as well as therapy-induced perturbations. Initial mathematical models find that when resistant phenotypes arise in the untreated tumor, they are typically present in small numbers because they are less fit than the sensitive population. This reflects the "cost" of phenotypic resistance such as additional substrate and energy used to up-regulate xenobiotic metabolism, and therefore not available for proliferation, or the growth inhibitory nature of environments (i.e., ischemia or hypoxia) that confer resistance on phenotypically sensitive cells. Thus, in the Darwinian environment of a cancer, the fitter chemosensitive cells will ordinarily proliferate at the expense of the less fit chemoresistant cells. The models show that, if resistant populations are present before administration of therapy, treatments designed to kill maximum numbers of cancer cells remove this inhibitory effect and actually promote more rapid growth of the resistant populations. We present an alternative approach in which treatment is continuously modulated to achieve a fixed tumor population. The goal of adaptive therapy is to enforce a stable tumor burden by permitting a significant population of chemosensitive cells to survive so that they, in turn, suppress proliferation of the less fit but chemoresistant

  7. Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ri-Hui; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    This chapter first summarizes the therapy of addiction disorder, and elaborates on the progress of medication. First, the difference between dependency and addiction are introduced. The basic principles of the therapy of substance and non-substance addiction are then put forward. It is also pointed out in this chapter that with the progress of the study, the goal of addiction disorder therapy is expected to transfer from reducing the relapse and harm of the addiction to completely eliminating and recovering from it. This chapter also introduces the progress of psychological addiction elimination technology, especially the "Unconditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm and Conditioned Stimulus Retrieval Extinction Paradigm" and PITDH technology. Finally it is pointed out that in addiction disorder therapy, comprehensive intervention has become a trend. With regard to the medication for addiction disorders, this chapter also includes the progress and deficiencies of substance and non-substance addiction. In terms of addiction disorder rehabilitation, the foundation of substance addiction is medication which is, however, limited for non-substance addiction. The key to the rehabilitation of addiction disorder is psycho-behavioral therapy, which is especially effective in eliminating craving.

  8. Neutron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riesler, Rudi

    1995-01-01

    Standard radiotherapy uses Xrays or electrons which have low LET (linear energy transfer); in contrast, particles such as neutrons with high LET have different radiobiological responses. In the late 1960s, clinical trials by Mary Catterall at the Hammersmith Hospital in London indicated that fast neutron radiation had clinical advantages for certain malignant tumours. Following these early clinical trials, several cyclotron facilities were built in the 1980s for fast neutron therapy, for example at the University of Washington, Seattle, and at UCLA. Most of these newer machines use extracted cyclotron proton beams in the range 42 to 66 MeV with beam intensities of 15 to 60 microamps. The proton beams are transported to dedicated therapy rooms, where neutrons are produced from beryllium targets. Second-generation clinical trials showed that accurate neutron beam delivery to the tumour site is more critical than for photon therapy. In order to achieve precise beam geometries, the extracted proton beams have to be transported through a gantry which can rotate around the patient and deliver beams from any angle; also the neutron beam outline (''field shape'') must be adjusted to extremely irregular shapes using a flexible collimation system. A therapy procedure has to be appropriately organized, with physicians, radiotherapists, nurses, medical physicists and other staff in attendance; other specialized equipment, such as CT or MRI scanners and radiation simulators must be made available. Neutron therapy is usually performed only in radiation oncology departments of major medical centres

  9. Art Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibeke; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Based on a Jungian approach, this article will introduce an integrative model to therapeutic change using art therapy methods as practical tools, with the aim of improving quality of life and in the prevention of depression. In a research study involving six participants, painting, clay...... work and drumming were used together with imagination and personal dialogues linked to the artwork. These art therapy processes attempted to combine the participant’s experience of inner and outer reality. The effect of gaining more knowledge about their inner reality using dreams and symbols......, was that participants gained a new understanding about their personal life. In addition, some participants were able to continue to use art therapy experiences as selfdevelopmental tools after the research study terminated. Jung’s description of the interactive relationship between the two living parts of the psyche...

  10. Oxygen Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Solmes

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available LTOT is prescribed for people with chronic lung disease in whom there is a decrease in the ability of the lungs to supply enough oxygen to the body. The heart is obliged to pump faster to meet the body's oxygen requirements. This may place undue stress on the heart, resulting in palpitations, dizziness and fatigue. A low oxygen level in arterial blood is also harmful to the heart, the brain and the pulmonary blood vessels. Oxygen therapy is used to break this cycle. A person with low blood oxygen will often be able to accomplish more with less fatigue with the help of supplemental oxygen therapy. Shortness of breath is a mechanical problem resulting from the effects of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Oxygen therapy may or may not reduce shortness of breath, but it will help the lungs and heart to function with less stress.

  11. Music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    alternate with clear and lucid mental states. These states are important as it is here that it is possible to meet the person’s psychosocial needs. Ketil Normann’s conceps of periods of lucidity are presented and connected to clinical music therapy practice and how it is possible to use music in order...... as a consequence of person-centred care. Umeå University Medical Dissertations. New Series. Ridder, H.M. (2005). Music therapy as a way to enhance lucidity in persons with dementia in advanced stages. In: Esch, A.; Frohne-Hagemann, I.; Laqua, M.; Schirmer, H.; Seitz, E. (Eds.) Jahrbuch Musicktherapie. Forschung...... und Entwicklung Music Therapy Annual. Research and Development. 2005 (1), pp. 25-40. Reichert Verlag Wiesbaden....

  12. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschel, R.E; Fisher, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The new insights and controversies concerning the radiobiological properties of malignant melanoma and how these relate to new clinical approaches are reviewed. The recent clinical experience with large individual fraction sizes is analyzed. The treatment of malignant melanoma in certain specialized sites is also described. An attempt is made to place in perspective the usefulness of radiation therapy in the treatment of this complex disease. Finally, certain new applications for radiation therapy both alone and in combustion with other treatment modalities are proposed that may ultimately prove appropriate for clinical trials

  13. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). METHODS: A double......-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). RESULTS: Both groups improved...... with the sham group, from baseline to post-assessment (p = 0.158). CONCLUSIONS: Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor...

  14. Omalizumab therapy for children and adolescents with severe allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human IgE, was introduced in clinical practice more than a decade ago as an add-on therapy for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in patients aged ≥12 years. Omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective in adults with uncontrolled persistent asthma, with an excellent safety profile. In simple terms, omalizumab works by inhibiting the allergic cascade, that is, by neutralization of the circulating free IgE. This leads to reduction in the quantity of cell-bound IgE, downregulation of high-affinity IgE receptors, and, eventually, prevention of mediator release from effector cells. Evidence is far less abundant on the role of omalizumab in pediatric asthma. Although efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with uncontrolled, persistent allergic asthma has been recognized as well, further studies are needed to clarify a number of open questions in this specific patient population.

  15. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Keiichi; Miyoshi, Makoto; Jinguu, Ken-ichi

    1982-01-01

    Of the cases of lung cancer in which radiation therapy was given between 1961 and November 1981, 399 cases for which histological type was confirmed, and irradiated as follows were reviewed. The cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma irradiated with more than 5,000 rad or more, those of undifferentiated carcinoma irradiated with 3,000 rad or more, and those irradiated pre- and post-operatively with 3,000 rad or more. The actual 5 year survival rate for stages I, II, III and IV were 29.6, 9.3, 7.5 and 1.9% respectively, and the survival rate tended to be better for adenocarcinoma than squamous cell carcinoma at stages I, II and III, but not different at stage IV. There was no difference between large cell, small cell and squamous cell carcinomas. Irradiation with 200 rad every other day or 150 rad daily was better than that with 200 rad, and daily irradiation with 150 rad was used since 1976. The therapy of stage III small cell carcinoma at the age of up to 80 years was improved with the combination of anticancer agents, maintenance therapy and immunotherapy, but these combined therapies were not significantly effective for the cancers with other histological types or at other stages. Although there was no significant difference in statistics for resectable cases, clinically, the results were experienced to be better after resection, and surgery was done in combination as much as possible. (Kaihara, S.)

  16. Dance Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Marcia B.

    1980-01-01

    Dance therapy deals with personal growth via body-mind interaction. A change in movement expression is believed to result in a personality or behavior change. The therapist is trained to become sensitive to movement expression as it relates to the psychological, motor, and cognitive development of the child. (JN)

  17. Shock therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Erin

    2016-02-03

    Therapies administered by mental health nurses, aimed at "curing" gay people of their sexual preference were still in common use in the UK in the 1960s and early 1970s. Some nurses tried to avoid participating in these practices, but many believed that they were helping their patients, as a new book reveals.

  18. Proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jongen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Ideal radiotherapy deposits a large amount of energy in the tumour volume, and none in the surrounding healthy tissues. Proton therapy comes closer to this goal because of a greater concentration of dose, well defined proton ranges and points of energy release which are precisely known - the Bragg peak1. In the past, the development of clinical proton therapy has been hampered by complexity, size, and cost. To be clinically effective, energies of several hundred MeV are required; these were previously unavailable for hospital installations, and pioneering institutions had to work with complex, inadequate equipment originally intended for nuclear physics research. Recently a number of specialist organizations and commercial companies have been working on dedicated systems for proton therapy. One, IBA of Belgium, has equipment for inhouse hospital operation which encompasses a complete therapy centre, delivered as a turnkey package and incorporating a compact, automated, higher energy cyclotron with isocentric gantries. Their system will be installed at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. The proton therapy system comprises: - a 235 MeV isochronous cyclotron to deliver beams of up to 1.5 microamps, but with a hardware limitation to restrict the maximum possible dose; - variable energy beam (235 to 70 MeV ) with energy spread and emittance verification; - a beam transport and switching system to connect the exit of the energy selection system to the entrances of a number of gantries and fixed beamlines. Along the beam transport system, the beam characteristics are monitored with non-interceptive multiwire ionization chambers for automatic tuning; - gantries fitted with nozzles and beamline elements for beam control; both beam scattering and beam wobbling techniques are available for shaping the beam;

  19. Art Therapy: What Is Art Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... individual, couples, family, and group therapy formats. Art therapy is an effective treatment for people experiencing developmental, medical, educational, and social or psychological impairment. Individuals who benefit from art therapy include ...

  20. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Information for Families and Caretakers from The Progeria Research Foundation ... Inc. All rights reserved. Page 2 of 5 Physical and Occupational Therapy in Progeria Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria ...

  1. Music Therapy: A Career in Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    About Music Therapy & Music Therapy Training M usic therapy is a healthcare profession that uses music to help individuals of all ages improve physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning. Music therapists work with children and adults with developmental ...

  2. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  3. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  4. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  5. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trondalen, Gro; Bonde, Lars Ole

    2012-01-01

    music therapy orientations/models (Guided Imagery and Music, Nordoff-Robbins, Psychoanalytic, Cognitive-behavioral etc), their theoretical foundations and their practical approaches to health and wellbeing or ‘health musicking’. The relational context – the interplay of (expressive as well as receptive......Music therapy (MT) is most commonly defined as an intervention where “the therapist helps the client to promote health, using music experiences and the relationships developing through them” (Bruscia 1998). Also other definitions of MT agree that a therapeutic relationship is important for a music...... intervention to be considered MT. Other interventions that “use music for health-related goals, but in ways that do not qualify as music therapy” (Gold 2009), may be described as music medicine, or simply as music listening. In this text we elaborate on an overview chapter covering some of the different major...

  6. Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanfi, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    may cause detrimental long-term effects. Three studies have examined the effect of music therapy procedural support (MTPS) under needle procedures. Consequently, this study aims at examining the effects of MTPS in an RCT. Moreover, the study addresses clinical aspects of the applied MT intervention...... and provides research-based clinical tools. Methods 41 children (1 to 10 years) were enrolled and underwent a single PIVA procedure. The children were randomly assigned to either an MT or a comparable control group receiving PIVA. In addition, the music therapy (MT) group received individualised MTPS (i.......e. music alternate engagement) before, during, and after PIVA. The intervention was performed by a trained music therapist and comprised preferred songs, improvised songs/music, and instrument playing. The study was carried out in accordance with the rules in force regarding research ethics and clinical MT...

  7. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  8. Physical Therapy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Physical Therapy KidsHealth / For Parents / Physical Therapy Print en español Terapia física Physical Therapy Basics Doctors often recommend physical therapy (PT) ...

  9. [Gestalt therapy.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbeil, J; Poupard, D

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe Gestalt Therapy. They retrace its fundamental theoretical axes. These are psychoanalysis, character analysis, the german Gestalt theory of perception, existentialism, and the Orient. Some principal concepts are then elaborated more fully such as the cycle of awareness, desensitization, excitation anxiety and the five defense mechanisms: retroflection, introjection, projection, deflection, and confluence. The nature and goals of the therapeutic process are also described before the presentation of some techniques specific to this approach such as enactment and role playing. Finally, certain basic Gestalt rules, which aim at facilitating and intensifying the communication process among group members, are enunciated.

  10. [Peptidergic nootropic therapy in cerebral palsy associated with epilepsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholin, A A; Zavadenko, N N; Il Ina, E S; Kolpakchi, L M; Fedonyuk, I D; Bembeeva, R C; Esipova, E S

    To assess the efficacy and safety of сortexin in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy (CP) combined with epilepsy. Eighty-four patients (55 boys and 29 girls), aged from 1 to 11 years, with CP combined with epilepsy received cortexin together with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Cortexin was administered in doses of 5-10 mg depending on the patient's age and body weight intramuscularly during hospitalization. Cortexin as add-on to AEDs reduced for more than two times the number of seizures, along with improvement of motor function, in 31 (36.9%) patients. The improvement of motor function, but without a significant decrease in epileptic seizures, was achieved in 15 (17.8%) of the patients. Reduction of epileptic seizures frequency (>2 times), but without a significant effect on motor function, was observed in 14 cases (16.7%). Twenty-three patients (27.4%) did not respond the therapy. The aggravation of epileptic seizures during cortexin therapy was observed in only 1 girl with West syndrome (1.2%), and this was significantly lower than the probability of seizures aggravation on AED. Polypeptide nootropic medication cortexin demonstrated efficacy and safety as adjunctive therapy in children with CP combined with epilepsy.

  11. Mechanisms Mediating Pediatric Severe Asthma and Potential Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldara Martin Alonso

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although a rare disease, severe therapy-resistant asthma in children is a cause of significant morbidity and results in utilization of approximately 50% of health-care resources for asthma. Improving control for children with severe asthma is, therefore, an urgent unmet clinical need. As a group, children with severe asthma have severe and multiple allergies, steroid resistant airway eosinophilia, and significant structural changes of the airway wall (airway remodeling. Omalizumab is currently the only add-on therapy that is licensed for use in children with severe asthma. However, limitations of its use include ineligibility for approximately one-third of patients because of serum IgE levels outside the recommended range and lack of clinical efficacy in a further one-third. Pediatric severe asthma is thus markedly heterogeneous, but our current understanding of the different mechanisms underpinning various phenotypes is very limited. We know that there are distinctions between the factors that drive pediatric and adult disease since pediatric disease develops in the context of a maturing immune system and during lung growth and development. This review summarizes the current data that give insight into the pathophysiology of pediatric severe asthma and will highlight potential targets for novel therapies. It is apparent that in order to identify novel treatments for pediatric severe asthma, the challenge of undertaking mechanistic studies using age appropriate experimental models and airway samples from children needs to be accepted to allow a targeted approach of personalized medicine to be achieved.

  12. Radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bader, J.L.; Glatstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation oncologist encounters the critically ill immunosuppressed patient in four settings. First, the newly diagnosed cancer patient presents for initial evaluation and treatment, with immunosuppression from the cancer itself, malnutrition, concomitant infectious disease, prior drug or alcohol abuse or other medical problems. Second, the previously treated cancer patient presents with metastatic or recurrent primary cancer causing local symptoms. Immune dysfunction in this setting may be due to prior chemotherapy and/or radiation as well as any of the original factors. Third, the patient previously treated with radiation presents with a life-threatening problem possibly due to complications of prior therapy. In this setting, the radiation oncologist is asked to evaluate the clinical problem and to suggest whether radiation might be causing part or all of the problem and what can be done to treat these sequelae of radiation. Fourth, the patient with a benign diagnosis (not cancer) is seen with a problem potentially emeliorated by radiation (e.g., kidney transplant rejection, preparation for transplant, or intractable rheumatoid arthritis). This chapter reviews these four issues and presents clinical and radiobiologic principles on which recommendations for therapy are based

  13. Immunomodulatory therapy in refractory/recurrent ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Yu; Lai, Chyong-Huey; Yang, Lan-Yan; Tang, Yun-Hsin; Chou, Hung-Hsueh; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Tao

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the efficacy and toxicity of immunomodulatory therapy (IMT) alone or as an add-on to palliative/salvage chemotherapy in patients with refractory/recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We retrospectively analyzed the efficacy and toxicity of IMT in 15 patients with refractory/recurrent EOC who had previously received multiple chemotherapy regimens. The median age of the patients was 56 years (range, 41-75 years). Three patients were platinum-sensitive, two were platinum-resistant, and the remaining 10 patients were refractory to platinum-based front-line chemotherapy. IMT consisted of picibanil (OK-432) on Day 1, interleukin-2 and/or interferon-α on Day 2 administered by subcutaneous injection (every week or 2-weekly). Five patients never received metronomic oral cyclophosphamide. After IMT, three patients achieved partial remission (PR, lasting for 11 months, ≥ 12 months, and 16 months), and six patients had stable disease (SD). The disease stabilizing rate (PR+SD) was 60% (3/3 in platinum-sensitive and 6/12 in platinum-resistant/refractory patients). The absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) at 1 month after IMT was significantly higher in the PR+SD group (median 1242.0/μL) than in the progression group (median 325.0/μL) (p = 0.012). No ≥ Grade 3 toxicities were observed. The median post-IMT survival time was 12 months (range, 2-39 months). IMT alone or add-on to palliative/salvage chemotherapy for refractory/recurrent EOC achieves a substantial disease stabilizing rate without severe toxicity, which might be a potential option in selected patients. The ALC 1 month after IMT could be an early indicator to disease stabilization. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The therapeutic advantage of combination antihypertensive drug therapy using amlodipine and irbesartan in hypertensive patients: Analysis of the post-marketing survey data from PARTNER (Practical combination therapy of Amlodin and angiotensin II Receptor blocker; safety and efficacy in patients with hypertension) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimitsu, Toshihiko; Fukuda, Hirofumi; Uchida, Masako; Ishibashi, Kazushi; Sato, Fusako; Nukui, Kazuhiko; Nagao, Munehiko

    2015-01-01

    Two-thirds of hypertensive patients need a combination antihypertensive therapy to achieve the target blood pressure (BP). The PARTNER (Practical combination therapy of Amlodin and angiotensin II Receptor blocker; Safety and efficacy in paTieNts with hypERtension) study is a prospective specific clinical use survey examining the efficacy and safety of 12-week treatment with amlodipine (AML) and Angiotensin II Receptor Blocker (ARB) in 5900 hypertensive patients. The current analysis was performed as to the BP control, adverse reactions, and the effects on laboratory data in patients treated with the combination of AML and irbesartan (IRB), namely the patients added AML to already taking IRB (AML add-on group, n = 1202) and the patients added IRB to AML (IRB add-on group, n = 1050). Both study groups showed distinct decreases in office BP at 4 week (p 7 mg/dl. The incidence of adverse reactions was as few as 1.11% and there were no severe adverse reactions which hampered the continuation of combination therapy. In conclusion, combination antihypertensive therapy with AML and IRB effectively lowers BP without particular safety problems, reduces serum uric acid especially in patients with hyperuricemia and exhibits renoprotective effects in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  15. Dystonia: Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Online Support Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Physical Therapy Physical therapy may be an important component of treating ... everyday tasks, Since dystonia is a neurological disorder, physical therapy does not treat the dystonia directly but ...

  16. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Magnetic Seizure Therapy Deep Brain Stimulation Additional Resources Brain Stimulation Therapies Overview Brain stimulation therapies can play ... for a shorter recovery time than ECT Deep Brain Stimulation Deep brain stimulation (DBS) was first developed ...

  17. Laser therapy for cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000905.htm Laser therapy for cancer To use the sharing features ... Lasers are also used on the skin. How Laser Therapy is Used Laser therapy can be used ...

  18. American Music Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login Quick Links Facts About Music Therapy Qualifications ... with AMTA Sponsor AMTA Events Social Networking Support Music Therapy When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will ...

  19. [Physical therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohnabayashi, Naohiko

    2008-01-01

    Recently, pulmonary rehabilitation program is widely considered one of the most effective and evidence-based treatment for not only chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but many clinical situations including neuro-muscular disease, post-operative status and weaning period from the ventilator, etc. The essential components of a pulmonary rehabilitation program are team assessment, patient training, psycho-social intervention, exercise, and follow-up. In 2003, Japanese medical societies (J. Thoracic Society, J. Pul. Rehabilitation Society and J. Physiotherapist Society) made a new guideline for pulmonary rehabilitation, especially how to aproach the execise training. As for the duration after surgical operation, airway cleaning is the important technique to prevent post-operative complications including pneumonia. Postural dranage technique is well known for such condition, at the same time, several instruments (flutter vulve, positive expiratory mask, high frequecy oscillation, etc) were also used for the patient to expectrate airway mucus easier. Lung transplantation is a new method of treatment for the critically-ill patients with chronic respiratoy failure. Several techniques of physical therapy are must be needed before and after lung transplantation to prevent both pulmonary infection and osteoporosis.

  20. Trends in Prescription and Determinants of Persistence to Antihypertensive Therapy : The PAPEETE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Francesco Vittorio; Degli Esposti, Luca; Cerra, Carlo; Veronesi, Chiara; Buda, Stefano

    2009-12-01

    To assess trends in prescriptions, determinants and timing of treatment discontinuation and/or changes in antihypertensive drug therapy in a cohort of hypertensive patients living in Pavia, a city in the north of Italy. The cohort included 61 493 patients aged ≥18 years who received their first antihypertensive drug prescription (monotherapy, fixed or extemporaneous combination) during the period 2003-6. Patients were classified as 'persistent' if 12 months after the beginning of treatment they were still taking a regular therapy (same drug = 'same therapy users', added one or more drugs = 'add-on therapy users', different drug = 'switchers'). Otherwise, they were classified as 'non-persistent' (stopping therapy after the first prescription = 'occasional users'; stopping treatment early = 'stoppers'; taking medicines in an erratic fashion = 'intermittent users'). ACE inhibitors were the most frequently prescribed drugs (22.8%), followed by β-adrenoceptor antagonists (β-blockers) [14.3%], diuretics (13.9%), Ca(2+) antagonists (11.4%) and angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists (angiotensin receptor blockers [ARBs]) [9.3%]. After 12 months, persistent patients were only 11.2% (same therapy users 6.7%, switchers 3.2%, add-on therapy users 1.3%). Non-persistent patients were 88.8% (35.3% occasional users, 20.6% stoppers, 32.8% intermittent users). Patient-related predictors of persistence were older age, male sex, concomitant treatment with antidiabetic and hypolipidaemic drugs and previous hospitalizations for cardiovascular events. Highest level of persistence was seen in patients starting with ARBs (18.8%), followed by ACE inhibitors (11.4%), β-blockers (11.0%), Ca(2+) antagonists (10.8%) and diuretics (3.0%). Among ARBs, considering separately monotherapy and fixed-combination therapy, highest level of persistence was observed in patients starting with candesartan, irbesartan, valsartan and telmisartan given in monotherapy, and with valsartan and

  1. Antiemetic therapy for non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide moderately emetogenic chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inui, Naoki

    2017-05-01

    Although antiemetic management in cancer therapy has improved, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting remain common and troubling adverse events. Chemotherapeutic agents are classified based on their emetogenic effects, and appropriate antiemetics are recommended according to this categorization. Chemotherapy categorized as moderately emetogenic is associated with a wide spectrum of emetic risks. Combined anthracycline and cyclophosphamide regimens have been recently reclassified as highly emetogenic chemotherapy regimen. This review focuses on antiemetic pharmacotherapy in patients receiving non-anthracycline and cyclophosphamide-based moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens. Combination therapy with a 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 receptor agonist, preferably palonosetron, and dexamethasone is the standard therapy in moderately emetogenic chemotherapy, although triple therapy with add-on neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist is used as an alternative treatment strategy. Among moderately emetogenic chemotherapy regimens, carboplatin-containing chemotherapy has considerable emetic potential, particularly during the delayed phase. However, the additional of a neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist to the standard antiemetic therapy prevents carboplatin-induced nausea and vomiting. For regimens including oxaliplatin, the benefit of adding neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist requires further clarification.

  2. The Efficacy of Balance Training with Video Game-Based Therapy in Subacute Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Morone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The video game-based therapy emerged as a potential valid tool in improving balance in several neurological conditions with controversial results, whereas little information is available regarding the use of this therapy in subacute stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of balance training using video game-based intervention on functional balance and disability in individuals with hemiparesis due to stroke in subacute phase. Fifty adult stroke patients participated to the study: 25 subjects were randomly assigned to balance training with Wii Fit, and the other 25 subjects were assigned to usual balance therapy. Both groups were also treated with conventional physical therapy (40 min 2 times/day. The main outcome was functional balance (Berg Balance Scale-BBS, and secondary outcomes were disability (Barthel Index-BI, walking ability (Functional Ambulation Category, and walking speed (10-meters walking test. Wii Fit training was more effective than usual balance therapy in improving balance (BBS: 53 versus 48, P=0.004 and independency in activity of daily living (BI: 98 versus 93, P=0.021. A balance training performed with a Wii Fit as an add on to the conventional therapy was found to be more effective than conventional therapy alone in improving balance and reducing disability in patients with subacute stroke.

  3. Low-Level Laser Therapy and Cryotherapy as Mono- and Adjunctive Therapies for Achilles Tendinopathy in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Sturla; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Frigo, Lúcio; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Naterstad, Ingvill Fjell; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Joensen, Jon

    2017-01-01

    Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) and cryotherapy are widely used treatments in the acute phase of tendon injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction of these two treatments on tendon inflammation and mechanical properties. Six groups of six Wistar rats were used in this study. The Achilles tendons of the healthy control group were not subjected to injury or treatment. The tendons of the injured nontreated group (ING) were injured, but not treated. The remaining four groups were injured and subjected to LLLT, cryotherapy, LLLT first/cryotherapy, or cryotherapy first/LLLT. All treatments were performed at 1 h post-trauma. Inflammatory mediators, tendon histology, and biomechanical properties were assessed at 24 h post-trauma by comparing the treatment groups with the ING. In all treatment groups, the inflammatory process shifted in an anti-inflammatory direction compared with the ING. Significant alterations in cytokine expression were found in only the LLLT group (↓IL-1β) and the combined intervention groups (↓IL-1β, ↓TNF-α, ↑IL-6). It was also found that cryotherapy followed by LLLT was the only treatment that significantly (p cryotherapy in combination with LLLT can produce an anti-inflammatory "add-on" effect. The order of therapy administration seems essential, as superior histology and biomechanical results were found in the cryotherapy first/LLLT group.

  4. Complementary and Integrative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: • Acupressure and acupuncture • Aromatherapy • Art therapy and music therapy • Chiropractic medicine and massage • Guided imagery • Meditation and ... should I avoid? • Is this complementary therapy (name therapy) safe? Is there research showing it is safe? • Are there side effects ...

  5. Radiotechnologies and gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Jinsong

    2001-01-01

    Gene therapy is an exciting frontier in medicine today. Radiologist will make an uniquely contribution to these exciting new technologies at every level by choosing sites for targeting therapy, perfecting and establishing routes of delivery, developing imaging strategies to monitor therapy and assess gene expression, developing radiotherapeutic used of gene therapy

  6. [Physical therapy for scars].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanovic, Marguerite Guillot

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy consists notably of hand or mechanical massages, pressure therapy using various fabrics or splints, cryotherapy, laser therapy, etc. It forms part of the range of therapies used to treat pathological scars, including medical and surgical treatment. While the results are often satisfactory for hypertrophic scars, they remain uncertain for major keloids.

  7. Music therapy in kindergarten

    OpenAIRE

    Šírová, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    This work deals with the subject of music therapy in a special kindergarten for the children with combined disabilities. In the theoretical part it clarifies the concept and principle of music therapy and characterizes the types of disabilities that occur at researched clients. As a research method were used observation and interviews with three music therapists from the institution. KEYWORDS Music therapy, preschool education, special pedagogy, group music therapy,individual music therapy, p...

  8. Music-supported therapy in the rehabilitation of subacute stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau-Sánchez, Jennifer; Duarte, Esther; Ramos-Escobar, Neus; Sierpowska, Joanna; Rueda, Nohora; Redón, Susana; Veciana de Las Heras, Misericordia; Pedro, Jordi; Särkämö, Teppo; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2018-04-01

    The effect of music-supported therapy (MST) as a tool to restore hemiparesis of the upper extremity after a stroke has not been appropriately contrasted with conventional therapy. The aim of this trial was to test the effectiveness of adding MST to a standard rehabilitation program in subacute stroke patients. A randomized controlled trial was conducted in which patients were randomized to MST or conventional therapy in addition to the rehabilitation program. The intensity and duration of the interventions were equated in both groups. Before and after 4 weeks of treatment, motor and cognitive functions, mood, and quality of life (QoL) of participants were evaluated. A follow-up at 3 months was conducted to examine the retention of motor gains. Both groups significantly improved their motor function, and no differences between groups were found. The only difference between groups was observed in the language domain for QoL. Importantly, an association was encountered between the capacity to experience pleasure from music activities and the motor improvement in the MST group. MST as an add-on treatment showed no superiority to conventional therapies for motor recovery. Importantly, patient's intrinsic motivation to engage in musical activities was associated with better motor improvement. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of the TCM Qi-Supplementing Therapy in Patients with Myasthenia Gravis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-qian Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM Qi-supplementing therapy has been used widely for treating myasthenia gravis (MG in China. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Qi-supplementing therapy as an adjunctive therapy in MG patients. Methods. Seven electronic databases were searched through June 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating the add-on effect of Qi-supplementing therapy in MG patients were included. The outcome measures were the total effective rate, relapse rate, and adverse events. Results. Twenty-three RCTs involving 1,691 MG patients were included. The included studies were of low-to-moderate quality. Meta-analysis showed that Qi-supplementing therapy combined with Western medicine (WM significantly improved the total response rate and reduced the relapse risk during 6–24 months of follow-up. Subgroup analysis showed that Qi-supplementing therapy only affected the total response rate within the first 6 months of treatment. Moreover, the rate of adverse events was lower with the addition of Qi-supplementing therapy to WM than with WM only. Conclusions. Short-term Qi-supplementing therapy combined with WM appears to be superior to WM for improving the total response rate and reducing the relapse rate. However, more high-quality RCTs are warranted owing to methodological flaws of previous trials.

  10. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-01-01

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied

  11. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  12. Adlerian Marriage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon; Dinkmeyer, Don, Sr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the assumptions, processes, and techniques used in Alderian marriage therapy. Describes purpose of therapy as assessing current beliefs and behaviors while educating the couple in new procedures that can help the couple establish new goals. (Author/ABL)

  13. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  14. Complementary Pancreatitis Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medication, and improve quality of life.1,2 Massage Therapy Massage therapy involves touch and different techniques of stroking ... of the body or be a full-body massage. Massage can be performed through one’s clothing or ...

  15. [Play therapy in hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Katharina; Grothues, Dirk; Leitzmann, Michael; Gruber, Hans; Melter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The following article presents an overview of current research studies on play therapy in the hospital. It highlights individual diagnoses for which play therapy has shown reasonable success. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of the scientific debate on play therapy for sick children in order to allow conclusions regarding the indications for which play therapy is or might be useful.

  16. Tumor therapy and pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joss, R.; Brunner, K.W.

    1982-01-01

    Many successfully treated tumour patients are children and juveniles. This raises questions as to the effects of tumour therapy on reproductiveness and offspring. The possible extent of damage to the male and female gonads caused by surgical, chemical, and radiological tumour therapy is investigated. Also, the problem of tumour therapy or women developing neoplasms during pregnancy. Pregnancies after successful tumour therapy are quite frequent today. Experience so far suggests that the rate of congenital deformities is not significantly increased. (orig.) [de

  17. Combined tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrba, H.

    1990-01-01

    This comprehensive survey of current methods and achievements first takes a look at the two basic therapies, devoting a chapter each to the surgery and radiotherapy of tumors. The principal subjects of the book, however, are the systemic, adjuvant therapy, biological therapies, hyperthermia and various other therapies (as e.g. treatment with ozone, oxygen, or homeopathic means), and psychotherapy. (MG) With 54 figs., 86 tabs [de

  18. Play Therapy: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  19. Evaluation of Inter Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This article (revised conference lecture from the 10th World Congress of Music Therapy, Oxford July 2002)) emphasizes the evaluation of the training of Inter Therapy for music therapy students at the MA training at Aalborg University. The students take turns in being client and therapist within...

  20. Music Therapy for Seniors

    OpenAIRE

    SLUNEČKOVÁ, Petra

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the use of music therapy in the lives of seniors. The target of this thesis is to map the possibilities of using music therapy ways with seniors and to recommend a suitable music therapy resources on the basis of the research and evaluation of obtained dates. The theoretical part describes the term "the music therapy", e.g. concept, definition, types and forms, the development of music therapy, the history, methods and techniques. This age group is defined in t...

  1. Inhalation Therapy in Horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mandy L; Costa, Lais R R

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the benefits and limitations of inhalation therapy in horses. Inhalation drug therapy delivers the drug directly to the airways, thereby achieving maximal drug concentrations at the target site. Inhalation therapy has the additional advantage of decreasing systemic side effects. Inhalation therapy in horses is delivered by the use of nebulizers or pressured metered dose inhalers. It also requires the use of a muzzle or nasal mask in horses. Drugs most commonly delivered through inhalation drug therapy in horses include bronchodilators, antiinflammatories, and antimicrobials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endoscopic therapy in early adenocarcinomas (Barrett's cancer) of the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knabe, Mate; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of early esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing significantly in recent decades. Prognosis depends greatly on the choice of treatment. Early cancers can be treated by endoscopic resection, whereas advanced carcinomas have to be sent for surgery. Esophageal resection is associated with high perioperative mortality (1-5%) even in specialized centers. Early diagnosis enables curative endoscopic treatment option. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms and a familial risk for esophageal cancer should undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. High-definition endoscopes have been developed with technical add-on that helps endoscopists to find fine irregularities in the esophageal mucosa, but interpreting the findings remains challenging. In this review we discussed novel and old diagnostic procedures and their values, as well as our own recommendations and those of the authors discussed for the diagnosis and treatment of early Barrett's carcinoma. Endoscopic resection is the therapy of choice in early esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is mandatory to perform a subsequent ablation of all residual Barrett's mucosa to avoid metachronous lesions. © 2015 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Effect of running therapy on depression (EFFORT-D. Design of a randomised controlled trial in adult patients [ISRCTN 1894

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruisdijk Frank R

    2012-01-01

    -effectiveness. Discussion Exercise in depression can be used as a standalone or as an add-on intervention. In specialised mental health care, chronic forms of depression, co-morbid anxiety or physical complaints and treatment resistance are common. An add-on strategy therefore seems the best choice. This is the first high quality large trial into the effectiveness of exercise as an add-on treatment for depression in adult patients in specialised mental health care. Trial registration Netherlands Trial Register (NTR: NTR1894

  4. [Music therapy and depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Assche, E; De Backer, J; Vermote, R

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a predominantly non-verbal psychotherapy based on music improvisation, embedded in a therapeutic relationship. This is the reason why music therapy is also used to treat depression. To examine the efficacy of music therapy and to report on the results of recent research into the value of music therapy as a treatment for depression. We reviewed the literature on recent research into music therapy and depression, reporting on the methods used and the results achieved, and we assessed the current position of music therapy for depression in the context of evidence-based scientific research. A wide variety of research methods was used to investigate the effects of using music therapy as a psychotherapy. Most studies focused usually on the added value that music therapy brings to the standard form of psychiatric treatment, when administered with or without psychopharmacological support. Music therapy produced particularly significant and favourable results when used to treat patients with depression. Current research into music therapy and depression points to a significant and persistent reduction in patients' symptoms and to improvements in their quality of life. However, further research is needed with regard to the best methods of illustrating the effects of music therapy.

  5. Hendee's radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd; Starkschall, George

    2016-01-01

    The publication of this fourth edition, more than ten years on from the publication of Radiation Therapy Physics third edition, provides a comprehensive and valuable update to the educational offerings in this field. Led by a new team of highly esteemed authors, building on Dr Hendee’s tradition, Hendee’s Radiation Therapy Physics offers a succinctly written, fully modernised update. Radiation physics has undergone many changes in the past ten years: intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has become a routine method of radiation treatment delivery, digital imaging has replaced film-screen imaging for localization and verification, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) is frequently used, in many centers proton therapy has become a viable mode of radiation therapy, new approaches have been introduced to radiation therapy quality assurance and safety that focus more on process analysis rather than specific performance testing, and the explosion in patient-and machine-related data has necessitated an ...

  6. Radon therapy; Radon in der Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spruck, Kaija [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz

    2017-04-01

    Radon therapies are used since more than 100 years in human medicine. Today this method is controversially discussed due to the possible increase of ionizing radiation induced tumor risk. Although the exact mode of biological radiation effect on the cell level is still not known new studies show the efficiency of the radon therapy without side effect for instance for rheumatic/inflammatory or respiratory disorders.

  7. A Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Text Messaging Intervention for Methamphetamine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keoleian, Victoria; Stalcup, S. Alex; Polcin, Douglas L.; Brown, Michelle; Galloway, Gantt

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial treatments for methamphetamine dependence are of limited effectiveness. Thus, a significant need exists for add-on therapy for this substance user disorder. The aim of this study was to develop and test a novel text messaging intervention for use as an adjunct to cognitive behavioral group therapy for methamphetamine users. Text messaging has the potential to support patients in real-time, around the clock. We convened 2 meetings of an expert panel, held 3 focus groups in current and former users, and conducted 15 semi-structured interviews with in-treatment users in order to develop a fully-automated, cognitive behavioral therapy-based text messaging intervention. We then conducted a randomized, crossover pre-test in 5 users seeking treatment. Participants’ ratings of ease of use and functionality of the system were high. During the pre-test we performed real-time assessments via text messaging on daily methamphetamine use, craving levels, and the perceived usefulness of messages; 79% of scheduled assessments were collected. The odds of messages being rated as “very” or “extremely” useful were 6.6 times [95% CI: 2.2, 19.4] higher in the active vs. placebo periods. The intervention is now ready for testing in randomized clinical trials. PMID:24592670

  8. 75 FR 50880 - TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-18

    ... 0720-AB36 TRICARE: Non-Physician Referrals for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, and Speech... referrals of beneficiaries to the Military Health System for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and... practitioners will be allowed to issue referrals to patients for physical therapy, occupational therapy, and...

  9. [Therapy of intermediate uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doycheva, D; Deuter, C; Zierhut, M

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate uveitis is a form of intraocular inflammation in which the vitreous body is the major site of inflammation. Intermediate uveitis is primarily treated medicinally and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. When recurrence of uveitis or side effects occur during corticosteroid therapy an immunosuppressive treatment is required. Cyclosporine A is the only immunosuppressive agent that is approved for therapy of uveitis in Germany; however, other immunosuppressive drugs have also been shown to be effective and well-tolerated in patients with intermediate uveitis. In severe therapy-refractory cases when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed, biologics can be used. In patients with unilateral uveitis or when the systemic therapy is contraindicated because of side effects, an intravitreal steroid treatment can be carried out. In certain cases a vitrectomy may be used.

  10. Fertility and cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maguire, L.C.

    1979-01-01

    With increased survival of increasing numbers of cancer patients as a result of therapy, the consequences, early and late, of the therapies must be realized. It is the treating physician's duty to preserve as much reproductive potential as possible for patients, consistent with adequate care. With radiotherapy this means shielding the gonads as much as possible, optimal but not excessive doses and fields, oophoropexy, or sperm collection and storage prior to irradiation. With chemotherapy it means the shortest exposure to drugs consistent with best treatment and prior to therapy the collection and storage of sperm where facilities are available. At present this is still an experimental procedure. Artificial insemination for a couple when the male has received cancer therapy is another alternative. Finally, it is the responsibility of physicians caring for patients with neoplasms to be knowledgeable about these and all other effects of therapy so that patients may be counseled appropriately and understand the implications of therapy for their life

  11. Genetically Guided Statin Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    number of new statin prescriptions, and (4) patient reported quality of life, physical activity, perceptions regarding statin therapy , and pain as...outcomes known to be prevented by statin therapy , we examined hospitalizations for three diagnoses: acute myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and...cholesterol. However, the ultimate goal of statin therapy is to decrease incidence of CAD, acute myocardial infarction and perhaps stroke. However, there is a

  12. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  13. Endoscopic add-on stiffness probe for real-time soft surface characterisation in MIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faragasso, A; Stilli, A; Bimbo, J; Noh, Y; Liu, H; Nanayakkara, T; Dasgupta, P; Wurdemann, H A; Althoefer, K

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores a novel stiffness sensor which is mounted on the tip of a laparoscopic camera. The proposed device is able to compute stiffness when interacting with soft surfaces. The sensor can be used in Minimally Invasive Surgery, for instance, to localise tumor tissue which commonly has a higher stiffness when compared to healthy tissue. The purely mechanical sensor structure utilizes the functionality of an endoscopic camera to the maximum by visually analyzing the behavior of trackers within the field of view. Two pairs of spheres (used as easily identifiable features in the camera images) are connected to two springs with known but different spring constants. Four individual indenters attached to the spheres are used to palpate the surface. During palpation, the spheres move linearly towards the objective lens (i.e. the distance between lens and spheres is changing) resulting in variations of their diameters in the camera images. Relating the measured diameters to the different spring constants, a developed mathematical model is able to determine the surface stiffness in real-time. Tests were performed using a surgical endoscope to palpate silicon phantoms presenting different stiffness. Results show that the accuracy of the sensing system developed increases with the softness of the examined tissue.

  14. Need for Affiliation as a Motivational Add-On for Leadership Behaviors and Managerial Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Barbara; Ötting, Sonja K; Maier, Günter W

    2016-01-01

    In a sample of 70 leader-follower dyads, this study examines the separate and interactive effects of the leaders' implicit needs for power, achievement, and affiliation on leadership behaviors and outcomes. Results show that whereas the need for achievement was marginally associated with follower-rated passive leadership, the need for affiliation was significantly related to ratings of the leaders' concern for the needs of their followers. Analyzing motive combinations in terms of interactive effects and accounting for the growing evidence on the value of affiliative concerns in leadership, we assumed the need for affiliation would channel the interplay among the needs for power and achievement in such a way that the leaders would become more effective in leading others. As expected, based on high need for achievement, the followers were more satisfied with their jobs and with their leaders and perceived more transformational leadership behavior if power-motivated leaders equally had a high need for affiliation. Moreover, the leaders indicated higher career success when this was the case. However, in indicators of followers' performance, the three-way interaction among the needs for power, achievement, and affiliation did not account for additional variance.

  15. Improving Wi-Fi Based Indoor Positioning Using Bluetooth Add-Ons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baniukevic, Artur; Sabonis, Dovydas; Jensen, Christian S.

    2011-01-01

    enabling indoor LBSs. Existing indoor positioning services typically use a single technology such as Wi-Fi, RFID or Bluetooth. Wi-Fi based indoor positioning is relatively easy to deploy, but does often not offer good positioning accuracy. In contrast, the use of RFID or Bluetooth for positioning requires...... considerable investments in equipment in order to ensure good positioning accuracy. Motivated by these observations, we propose a hybrid approach to indoor positioning. In particular, we introduce Bluetooth hotspots into an indoor space with an existing Wi-Fi infrastructure such that better positioning...

  16. Epilepsy with myoclonic absences - favourable response to add-on rufinamide treatment in 3 cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häusler, M; Kluger, G; Nikanorova, M

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy with myoclonic absences (EMA) is a rare epileptic syndrome with frequently poor response to antiepileptic treatment. Rufinamide (RUF) is a relatively new EMEA- and FDA-approved anticonvulsant licensed as an orphan drug for the adjunctive treatment of patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome....

  17. A review of low add-on and foam application techniques

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Walt, GHJ

    1984-02-01

    Full Text Available -February 1984 This application system consists of four major components: the engraved roller (A), a rubber roller (B), a doctor blade (C), and the liquor The engraved roller rotates in the liquor bath (D) where its cavities are ffled with Liquor...".'". 5.2 Different Systems for the AppUeatioa of Foam There are several basic mechanisms for the application of foam to textiles. The foam can be applied either to one side or both sides of the fabric. In the former case a doctor blade or knife, or a...

  18. Technical report for generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can be dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C

  19. Private Cross-page Movie Recommendations with the Firefox add-on OMORE

    OpenAIRE

    Bannwart, T; Bouza, A; Reif, G; Bernstein, A

    2009-01-01

    Online stores and Web portals bring information about a myriad of items such as books, CDs, restaurants or movies at the user's fingertips. Although, the Web reduces the barrier to the information, the user is overwhelmed by the number of available items. Therefore, recommender systems aim to guide the user to relevant items. Current recommender systems store user ratings on the server side. This way the scope of the recommendations is limited to this server only. In addition, the user entru...

  20. Digital spot mammography using an add-on upright unit: diagnostic application in daily practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesurolle, Benoit; Mignon, Francois; Ariche-Cohen, Michele; Kao, Ellen; Gagnon, Jean H.; Goumot, Pierre-Alain

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: To present the use of digital spot mammography (DSM) in a diagnostic practice. Methods and patients: Digital spot images of 779 women requiring a spot compression or a spot magnification view were collected. The digital images were acquired on a digital spot upright unit using a 61 mmx61 mm field of view. Lesions reported included masses, calcifications, and areas of distortions. Results: 1065 lesions required additional views with DSM. Lesions reported included masses (n=113), masses and microcalcifications (n=53), spiculated masses (n=34), architectural distortions (n=16), and microcalcifications (n=849). DSMs were considered to be adequate in 97.7% of patients. Unsatisfactory exams resulted from difficulties encountered in targeting the area of interest at the beginning of our experience. Conclusion: DSM, most commonly used to perform interventional procedures, can also be used in a diagnostic practice taking advantage of post-processing of images not available with conventional spot compression and magnification

  1. Atypical antipsychotics as add-on treatment in late-life depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cakir S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sibel Cakir,1 Zeynep Senkal2 1Department of Psychiatry, Mood Disorders, Geriatric Psychiatry Unit, Istanbul Medical School, Istanbul University, 2Department of Psychiatry, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey Background: Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs have been used in the augmentation of treatment-resistant depression. However, little is known about their effectiveness, tolerability, and adverse events in the treatment of late-life depression, which were the aim of this study.Methods: The retrospective data of patients aged >65 years who had a major depressive episode with inadequate response to antidepressant treatment and had adjuvant SGA treatment were analyzed. The outcome measures were the number of the patients who continued to use SGAs in the fourth and twelfth weeks, adverse events, and changes in symptoms of depression. Results: Thirty-five patients were screened: 21 (60% had quetiapine, twelve (34.28% had aripiprazole, and two (5.71% had olanzapine adjuvant treatment. The mean age was 72.17±5.02 years, and 65.7% of the patients were women. The mean daily dose was 85.71±47.80 mg for quetiapine, 3.33±1.23 mg for aripiprazole, and 3.75±1.76 mg for olanzapine. The Geriatric Depression Scale scores of all patients were significantly decreased in the fourth week and were significant in the aripiprazole group (P=0.02. Of the 35 patients, 23 (65.7% patients discontinued the study within 12 weeks. The frequency of adverse events was similar in all SGAs, and the most common were sedation, dizziness, constipation, and orthostatic hypotension with quetiapine, and akathisia and headache because of aripiprazole. Conclusion: This study indicates that dropout ratio of patients with SGAs is high, and a subgroup of patients with late-life depression may benefit from SGAs. Effectiveness is significant in aripiprazole, and adverse events of SGAs were not serious but common in elderly patients. Keywords: treatment resistance, aripiprazole, quetiapine, olanzapine, elderly

  2. Safety and pharmacokinetics of intravenous levetiracetam infusion as add-on in status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uges, Joris W F; van Huizen, Marc D; Engelsman, Jeroen; Wilms, Erik B; Touw, Daniel J; Peeters, Els; Vecht, Charles J

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of intravenous (iv) levetiracetam (LEV) added to the standard therapeutic regimen in adults with status epilepticus (SE), and as secondary objective to assess a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for ivLEV in patients with SE. METHODS: In 12 adults

  3. Gantry and isocenter displacements of a linear accelerator caused by an add-on micromultileaf collimator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, H. L.; Zimmermann, S. J.; Hjelm-Hansen, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The delivery of high quality stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) treatments to the patient requires knowledge of the position of the isocenter to submillimeter accuracy. To meet the requirements the deviation between the radiation and mechanical isocenters...... isocenter was measured using a ball-bearing phantom and the electronic portal image device system. These measurements were based on 8 MV photon beams irradiated onto the ball from the four cardinal angles and two opposed collimator angles. The measurements and analysis of the data were carried out...

  4. TEST DESIGN FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) OF ADD-ON NOX CONTROL UTILIZING OZONE INJECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses the test design for environmental technology verification (ETV) of add-0n nitrogen oxides (NOx) control utilizing ozone injection. (NOTE: ETV is an EPA-established program to enhance domestic and international market acceptance of new or improved commercially...

  5. Tramadol versus methadone for the management of acute opioid withdrawal: an add-on study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Salehi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Opioid agonists such as methadone have been used widely in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms. Tramadol, a partial opioid agonist, also has been prescribed to manage acute and chronic pain. We sought to compare the efficacy of tramadol and methadone in reducing the severity of opioid withdrawal symptoms. METHODS: In a double blind clinical trial 70 opioid dependent patients who used daily opium equal to 15 mg methadone randomly were assigned in two groups. In one group, methadone was started at 15 mg/day while in the other group 450 mg/day tramadol was prescribed. Both drugs were tapered in a week and placebo was prescribed in the 2nd week. The severity of withdrawal symptoms were assessed five times by short opioid withdrawal scale (SOWS. Data were analyzed by Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance, Mann-Whitney U, and Wilcoxon tests. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences between two groups in the severity of anxiety (P = 0.015, irritability (P = 0.044, palpitation (P = 0.018, agitation (P = 0.037, and dysphoria (P = 0.044 that all were more common in methadone group. Comparison of side effects revealed statistically significant differences in sweating (P = 0.003 and drowsiness (P = 0.019 between two groups that were more frequent in methadone group. DISCUSSION: Tramadol was more efficacious in controlling opioid withdrawal symptoms with lower side effects. KEYWORDS: Methadone, tramadol, opioid withdrawal.

  6. The Add-On Impact of Mobile Applications in Learning Strategies: A Review Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ting-Ting; Huang, Yueh-Min; Tan, Qing; Yang, Stephen J. H.

    2010-01-01

    Mobile devices are more powerful and portable nowadays with plenty of useful tools for assisting people to handle daily life. With the advance of mobile technology, the issue of mobile learning has been widely investigated in e-learning research. Many researches consider it is important to integrate pedagogical and technical strengths of mobile…

  7. Add-on treatment with N-acetylcysteine for bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the development and progression of mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Currently, there is a scarcity of useful treatment options for bipolar depressive episodes, especially compared with the efficacy of treatment for acute ...

  8. Ciprofloxacin and probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle add-on treatment in active ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Andreas Munk; Mirsepasi, Hengameh; Halkjær, Sofie Ingdam

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The probiotic bacterium Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been used to maintain and induce clinical remission in UC. Our aim was to test the effect of Ciprofloxacin and/or orally administered EcN as add...

  9. Corrosion failure due to flux residues in an electronic add-on device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Minzari, Daniel; Rathinavelu, Umadevi

    2010-01-01

    of the electrochemical behavior metallic materials (alloys) used in the switch and risk of electrochemical migration (ECM) between the switch components in presence of flux residues was also carried out. Investigations included potentiodynamic polarization measurements on the switch electrodes using a micro......-electrochemical technique, in situ ECM studies, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Failure of the switches was found to be either due to the flux residue acting as an nsulating layer or as a corrosion accelerator causing ECM....

  10. Need for Affiliation as a Motivational Add-On for Leadership Behaviors and Managerial Success

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmann, Barbara; ?tting, Sonja K.; Maier, G?nter W.

    2016-01-01

    In a sample of 70 leader-follower dyads, this study examines the separate and interactive effects of the leaders’ implicit needs for power, achievement, and affiliation on leadership behaviors and outcomes. Results show that whereas the need for achievement was marginally associated with follower-rated passive leadership, the need for affiliation was significantly related to ratings of the leaders’ concern for the needs of their followers. Analyzing motive combinations in terms of interactive...

  11. Veiligheid en farmacokinetiek van levetiracetam intraveneus add-on bij status epilepticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uges, Joris; Van Huizen, Marc; Engelsman, Jeroen; Wilms, Erik; Touw, Daan; Peeters, Els; Vecht, Charles

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate safety of intravenous levetiracetam added to the standard therapeutic regimen in adults with status epilepticus. and to assess a population pharmacokinetic model for intravenous levetiracetam in patients with status epilepticus. Design: Prospective, single-centre, single-arm,

  12. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. American Physical Therapy Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Do APTA represents more than 100,000 members: physical therapists, physical therapist assistants, and students of physical therapy. Other Popular Resources: - Member Directory - Annual Reports ...

  14. Is Bicarbonate Therapy Useful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopper, Kate

    2017-03-01

    Despite concerns about the negative effects of metabolic acidosis, there is minimal evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration is an effective treatment. In addition, sodium bicarbonate therapy is associated with many adverse effects, including paradoxic intracellular acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypernatremia, and hyperosmolality. Definitive recommendations regarding bicarbonate therapy are challenging as there is little high-quality evidence available. In most clinical scenarios of metabolic acidosis, treatment efforts should focus on resolution of the underlying cause, and sodium bicarbonate therapy should be used with caution, if at all. An exception to this is kidney disease, wherein sodium bicarbonate therapy may have a valuable role. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Nanomedicine and cancer therapies

    CERN Document Server

    Sebastian, Mathew; Ninan, Neethu

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the power to radically change the way cancer is diagnosed, imaged, and treated. The holistic approach to cancer involves noninvasive procedures that emphasize restoring the health of human energy fields. Presenting a wealth of information and research about the most potent cancer healing therapies, this forward-thinking book explores how nanomedicine, holistic medicine, and other cancer therapies play important roles in treatment of this disease. Topics include nanobiotechnology for antibacterial therapy and diagnosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer, antioxidants and combinatorial therapies, and optical and mechanical investigations of nanostructures for biomolecular detection.

  16. Medical Art Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgul Aydin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Art therapy is a form of expressive therapy that uses art materials. Art therapy combines traditional psychotherapeutic theories and techniques with an understanding of the psychological aspects of the creative process, especially the affective properties of the different art materials. Medical art therapy has been defined as the clinical application of art expression and imagery with individuals who are physically ill, experiencing physical trauma or undergoing invasive or aggressive medical procedures such as surgery or chemotherapy and is considered as a form of complementary or integrative medicine. Several studies have shown that patients with physical illness benefit from medical art therapy in different aspects. Unlike other therapies, art therapy can take the patients away from their illness for a while by means of creative activities during sessions, can make them forget the illness or lost abilities. Art therapy leads to re-experiencing normality and personal power even with short creative activity sessions. In this article definition, influence and necessity of medical art therapy are briefly reviewed.

  17. Biological therapies for spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Vincenzo; Atteno, Mariangela; Spanò, Angelo; Scarpa, Raffaele; Peluso, Rosario

    2014-06-01

    Biological therapies and new imaging techniques have changed the therapeutic and diagnostic approach to spondyloarthritis. In patients with axial spondyloarthritis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor treatment is currently the only effective therapy in patients for whom conventional therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) has failed. TNFα inhibitor treatment is more effective in preventing articular damage in peripheral joints than in axial ones. It is important to treat patients at an early stage of disease to reduce disease progression; moreover it is necessary to identify causes of therapy inefficacy in preventing joint damage in the axial subset.

  18. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  19. Therapy with radionuclides. Radionuklid-Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.L. (Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin)

    1992-12-01

    Radioiodine therapy of benign and malignant thyroid diseases is a well-established procedure in Nuclear Medicine. However, the therapeutic use of radioisotopes in other diseases is relatively unknown among our refering physicians. The therapeutic effects of intraarticular (rheumatoid arthritis) and intracavitary (pleural and peritoneal carcinosis) applications yields good results. The radiophosphorus therapy in polycythemia vera rubra has always to be considered as an alternative to chemotherapy. The use of analgetics may be reduced by pain therapy of bone metastasis by injection of bone-seeking beta emitters like Rh-186 HEDP. Other procedures like therapeutic application of meta-iodo-benzylguanidine in neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma resulted in at least remissions of the disease. Radioimmunotherapy needs further evaluation before it can be recommended as a routine procedure. (orig.).

  20. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  1. Aripiprazole Improves Depressive Symptoms and Immunological Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in an HIV-Infected Subject with Resistant Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cecchelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aripiprazole is the first medication approved by the FDA as an add-on treatment for MDD. The impact of aripiprazole on the response to HIV is unknown. The patient we report on was diagnosed HIV-positive in 1997 and has been treated with antiretroviral therapy since then. In 2008, we diagnosed resistant major depression, hypochondria, and panic disorder. On that occasion, blood tests showed a significantly reduced CD4 count and a positive viral load. We treated this patient with aripiprazole and citalopram. Mood, somatic symptoms, and occupational functioning progressively improved. The last blood examination showed an increase in the CD4 count and a negative viral load. On the basis of the present case study and the review of the literature concerning the effects of psychotropic agents on viral replication, we suggest that the use of aripiprazole in HIV-infected subjects warrants further research.

  2. Benralizumab: From the Basic Mechanism of Action to the Potential Use in the Biological Therapy of Severe Eosinophilic Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Pelaia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a very frequent chronic airway disease that includes many different clinical phenotypes and inflammatory patterns. In particular, eosinophilic bronchial inflammation is often associated with allergic as well as nonallergic asthma. The most important cytokine involved in the induction, maintenance, and amplification of airway eosinophilia in asthma is interleukin-5 (IL-5, released by both T helper 2 (Th2 lymphocytes and group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2. Hence, IL-5 and its receptor are suitable targets for selective biologic drugs which can play a key role in add-on treatment of severe eosinophilic asthma refractory to corticosteroids. Within such a context, the anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibodies mepolizumab and reslizumab have been developed and approved for biological therapy of uncontrolled eosinophilic asthma. In this regard, on the basis of several successful randomized controlled trials, the anti-IL-5 receptor benralizumab has also recently obtained the approval from US Food and Drug Administration (FDA.

  3. Combined transcranial direct current stimulation and home-based occupational therapy for upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage: a double-blind randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Figlewski, Krystian; Andersen, Henning

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the combined effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and home-based occupational therapy on activities of daily living (ADL) and grip strength, in patients with upper limb motor impairment following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A double-blind randomized controlled trial with one-week follow-up. Patients received five consecutive days of occupational therapy at home, combined with either anodal (n = 8) or sham (n = 7) tDCS. The primary outcome was ADL performance, which was assessed with the Jebsen-Taylor test (JTT). Both groups improved JTT over time (p occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is a promising add-on intervention regarding training of upper limb motor impairment. It is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based training. Larger studies with long-term follow-up are needed to further explore possible effects of tDCS in patients with ICH. Five consecutive days of tDCS combined with occupational therapy provided greater improvements in grip strength compared with occupational therapy alone. tDCS is well tolerated by patients and can easily be applied for home-based rehabilitation.

  4. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Antiproton Cancer Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bassler, Niels

    An essential part in cancer radiotherapy, is to direct a sufficiently high dose towards the tumour, without damaging the surrounding tissue. Different techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton therapy have been developed, in order to reduce the dose to the normal tissue...

  6. Play Therapy. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreth, Garry; Bratton, Sue

    Play therapy is based on developmental principles and, thus, provides, through play, developmentally appropriate means of expression and communication for children. Therefore, skill in using play therapy is an essential tool for mental health professionals who work with children. Therapeutic play allows children the opportunity to express…

  7. Therapy of Lies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Conversion therapy comes in many forms, ranging from informal chats with counselors to aggressive physical coercion, but all are based on the belief that a gay male or a lesbian can be changed "back" to heterosexual behavior. It is not just alarmed parents who turn to this therapy. Many LGBT individuals seek out such treatment in an effort to…

  8. Therapy in Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costonis, Maureen Needham, Ed.

    This book contains a collection of articles on the subject of movement therapy. It can be used as a set of supplementary readings for an academic course in dance therapy or a psychiatric residency program. It includes an exhaustive bibliography on this field for students and practioners in this field. Four principal themes have been selected as a…

  9. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  10. Electroconvulsive Therapy and Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanney, Bryan L.

    1986-01-01

    When the effectiveness and mortality-morbidity of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) are compared with those of drug therapies, it appears that ECT is an effective and preferred treatment strategy. It remains underutilized as a modality of suicide prevention. Addresses controversies that presently limit the use of this treatment. (Author/ABB)

  11. Massage Therapy Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany; Diego, Miguel; Hernandez-Reif, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Massage therapy has been notably effective in preventing prematurity, enhancing growth of infants, increasing attentiveness, decreasing depression and aggression, alleviating motor problems, reducing pain, and enhancing immune function. This review covers massage therapy research from the last decade, as an update to the American Psychologist 1998…

  12. Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Radiation Therapy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ... Information Translations Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Expand Section Radiation Therapy - Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) ... Health Information Translations Characters not displaying correctly on this page? See language display issues . Return to the MedlinePlus Health Information ...

  13. Boganmeldelse - Music Therapy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2006-01-01

    . Alligevel følger her en anbefaling af bogen: for musikterapeuter er det en bog, man ikke kommer uden om. Music Therapy Research, på dansk Musikterapiforskning, er en gennemrevideret, ja faktisk nyudgivelse, af bogen Music Therapy Research: Quantitative and Qualitative Perspectives, som udkom i 1995. Også...

  14. Pediatric Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathom-Radocy, Wanda B.

    This book on music therapy includes relevant medical, psychological, and developmental information to help service providers, particularly music therapists, and parents to understand children with disabilities. The first two chapters describe the process of assessment and delineation of goals in music therapy that leads to the design of the music…

  15. Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... et al. Photodynamic therapy. Journal of the National Cancer Institute 1998; 90(12):889–905. [PubMed Abstract] Gudgin Dickson EF, Goyan RL, Pottier RH. New directions in photodynamic therapy. Cellular and Molecular Biology 2002; 48(8):939–954. [PubMed Abstract] Capella ...

  16. Radiation Therapy Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy has side effects because it not only kills or slows the growth of cancer cells, it can also affect nearby healthy cells. Many people who get radiation therapy experience fatigue. Other side effects depend on the part of the body that is being treated. Learn more about possible side effects.

  17. Art Therapy: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Linda, Comp.; Schmal, Marilyn Strauss, Comp.

    The bibliography on art therapy presents 1175 citations (1940-1973) drawn from searches of the medical indexes, computer systems of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institute of Mental Health, other bibliographies, Centre International de Documentation Concernant les Expressions Plastiques, and the American Journal of Art Therapy.…

  18. Experiential Learning and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatala, Elaine

    This paper describes the experiential therapy program at the Bowling Green Adolescent Center (New Jersey). This model supports the view that the therapeutic process of addiction treatment is accelerated and enhanced by providing the patients with experiential interventions. Experiential therapy includes goal setting, hands-on participation,…

  19. Activity Therapy: An Alternative Therapy for Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottman, Terry T.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of activity therapy for preteens and adolescents, where the client is engaged in nonverbal modes of relationship--games, free play, movement, drama, music, art or other activities, as the chief therapeutic media in which conflicts are resolved and intellectual and emotional energies freed. Reviews the literature, describes…

  20. Animal-Assisted Therapy and Occupational Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Gena; Stella, Tiffany; Wilkison, Megan; Szczech Moser, Christy; Hoelzel, Allison; Hendricks, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of animals for therapeutic purposes has been documented in the literature for centuries. This review will highlight evidence of the benefits of animal-assisted therapy as well as provide a plethora of resources for therapists interested in learning more about how animals can provide restorative benefits for their clients.

  1. Esophageal mucosal breaks in gastroesophageal reflux disease partially responsive to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Denison, Hans; Björck, Karin; Silberg, Debra G

    2013-04-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not experience complete symptom resolution during proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks among patients who have a partial response to PPI therapy. This was an analysis of data from a phase 2b clinical trial carried out to assess the efficacy and safety of a reflux inhibitor, lesogaberan (AZD3355), as an add-on to PPI therapy in this patient population (clinicaltrials.gov reference: NCT01005251). A total of 661 patients with persistent GERD symptoms who had received a minimum of 4 weeks of PPI therapy were included in the study. The prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks was assessed according to (i) the most recent endoscopy results from within the previous 24 months, if available ("historical" endoscopies), and (ii) the results of endoscopies performed at study baseline ("baseline" endoscopies). Baseline endoscopies were not carried out in patients who had a historical endoscopy showing an absence of esophageal mucosal breaks. Historical endoscopy results were available for 244 patients, of whom 48 (19.7%) had esophageal mucosal breaks. Baseline endoscopies were carried out in 465 patients, of whom 146 (31.4%) had esophageal mucosal breaks. Sensitivity analyses showed a prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks of 20-30%. In both the historical and baseline endoscopies, most esophageal mucosal breaks were Los Angeles grades A or B. In patients with GERD symptoms partially responsive to PPI therapy, mild-to-moderate severity esophageal mucosal breaks are common (prevalence 20-30%), and may contribute to symptom etiology.

  2. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  3. Medical therapy in acromegaly.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sherlock, Mark

    2011-05-01

    Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by excess secretion of growth hormone (GH) and increased circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) concentrations. The disease is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality, but these effects can be reduced if GH levels are decreased to <2.5 μg\\/l and IGF-1 levels are normalized. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and IGF-1 levels, ameliorating patients\\' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, radiotherapy and medical therapies, such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant. Medical therapy is currently most widely used as secondary treatment for persistent or recurrent acromegaly following noncurative surgery, although it is increasingly used as primary therapy. This Review provides an overview of current and future pharmacological therapies for patients with acromegaly.

  4. Pharmacological therapy for amblyopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Amblyopia is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children and young adults. Most of the amblyopic visual loss is reversible if detected and treated at appropriate time. It affects 1.0 to 5.0% of the general population. Various treatment modalities have been tried like refractive correction, patching (both full time and part time, penalization and pharmacological therapy. Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in one third of patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Various drugs have also been tried of which carbidopa & levodopa have been popular. Most of these agents are still in experimental stage, though levodopa-carbidopa combination therapy has been widely studied in human amblyopes with good outcomes. Levodopa therapy may be considered in cases with residual amblyopia, although occlusion therapy remains the initial treatment choice. Regression of effect after stoppage of therapy remains a concern. Further studies are therefore needed to evaluate the full efficacy and side effect profile of these agents.

  5. Music therapy improvisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Kuzma

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the technique of music therapy – music therapy improvisation is introduced. In this form of music therapy the improvising partners share meaning through the improvisation: the improvisation is not an end in itself: it portrays meaning that is personal, complex and can be shared with the partner. The therapeutic work, then, is meeting and matching the client's music in order to give the client an experience of "being known", being responded through sounds and being able to express things and communicate meaningfully. Rather than the client playing music, the therapy is about developing the engagement through sustained, joint improvisations. In music therapy, music and emotion share fundamental features: one may represent the other, i.e., we hear the music not as music but as dynamic emotional states. The concept of dynamic structure explains why music makes therapeutic sense.

  6. Accelerators for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene J.

    2000-01-01

    The vast majority of radiation treatments for cancerous tumors are given using electron linacs that provide both electrons and photons at several energies. Design and construction of these linacs are based on mature technology that is rapidly becoming more and more standardized and sophisticated. The use of hadrons such as neutrons, protons, alphas, or carbon, oxygen and neon ions is relatively new. Accelerators for hadron therapy are far from standardized, but the use of hadron therapy as an alternative to conventional radiation has led to significant improvements and refinements in conventional treatment techniques. This paper presents the rationale for radiation therapy, describes the accelerators used in conventional and hadron therapy, and outlines the issues that must still be resolved in the emerging field of hadron therapy

  7. Music therapy in dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDermott, Orii; Crellin, Nadia; Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2013-01-01

    Objective Recent reviews on music therapy for people with dementia have been limited to attempting to evaluate whether it is effective, but there is a need for a critical assessment of the literature to provide insight into the possible mechanisms of actions of music therapy. This systematic review......, five studies investigated hormonal and physiological changes, and five studies focused on social and relational aspects of music therapy. The musical interventions in the studies were diverse, but singing featured as an important medium for change. Conclusions Evidence for short-term improvement...... in mood and reduction in behavioural disturbance was consistent, but there were no high-quality longitudinal studies that demonstrated long-term benefits of music therapy. Future music therapy studies need to define a theoretical model, include better-focused outcome measures, and discuss how the findings...

  8. Proton therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Proton Therapy Physics goes beyond current books on proton therapy to provide an in-depth overview of the physics aspects of this radiation therapy modality, eliminating the need to dig through information scattered in the medical physics literature. After tracing the history of proton therapy, the book summarizes the atomic and nuclear physics background necessary for understanding proton interactions with tissue. It describes the physics of proton accelerators, the parameters of clinical proton beams, and the mechanisms to generate a conformal dose distribution in a patient. The text then covers detector systems and measuring techniques for reference dosimetry, outlines basic quality assurance and commissioning guidelines, and gives examples of Monte Carlo simulations in proton therapy. The book moves on to discussions of treatment planning for single- and multiple-field uniform doses, dose calculation concepts and algorithms, and precision and uncertainties for nonmoving and moving targets. It also exami...

  9. Pharmacological therapy for amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anupam; Nagpal, Ritu; Mittal, Sanjeev Kumar; Bahuguna, Chirag; Kumar, Prashant

    2017-01-01

    Amblyopia is the most common cause of preventable blindness in children and young adults. Most of the amblyopic visual loss is reversible if detected and treated at appropriate time. It affects 1.0 to 5.0% of the general population. Various treatment modalities have been tried like refractive correction, patching (both full time and part time), penalization and pharmacological therapy. Refractive correction alone improves visual acuity in one third of patients with anisometropic amblyopia. Various drugs have also been tried of which carbidopa & levodopa have been popular. Most of these agents are still in experimental stage, though levodopa-carbidopa combination therapy has been widely studied in human amblyopes with good outcomes. Levodopa therapy may be considered in cases with residual amblyopia, although occlusion therapy remains the initial treatment choice. Regression of effect after stoppage of therapy remains a concern. Further studies are therefore needed to evaluate the full efficacy and side effect profile of these agents. PMID:29018759

  10. Five-year efficacy and safety of tenofovir-based salvage therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis B who previously failed LAM/ADV therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lucy; Thompson, Alexander; Patterson, Scott; George, Jacob; Strasser, Simone; Lee, Alice; Sievert, William; Nicoll, Amanda; Desmond, Paul; Roberts, Stuart; Marion, Kaye; Bowden, Scott; Locarnini, Stephen; Angus, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Multidrug-resistant HBV continues to be an important clinical problem. The TDF-109 study demonstrated that TDF±LAM is an effective salvage therapy through 96 weeks for LAM-resistant patients who previously failed ADV add-on or switch therapy. We evaluated the 5-year efficacy and safety outcomes in patients receiving long-term TDF±LAM in the TDF-109 study. A total of 59 patients completed the first phase of the TDF-109 study and 54/59 were rolled over into a long-term prospective open-label study of TDF±LAM 300 mg daily. Results are reported at the end of year 5 of treatment. At year 5, 75% (45/59) had achieved viral suppression by intent-to-treat analysis. Per-protocol assessment revealed 83% (45/54) were HBV DNA undetectable. Nine patients remained HBV DNA detectable, however 8/9 had very low HBV DNA levels (<264IU/mL) and did not meet virological criteria for virological breakthrough (VBT). One patient experienced VBT, but this was in the setting of documented non-compliance. The response was independent of baseline LAM therapy or mutations conferring ADV resistance. Four patients discontinued TDF, one patient was lost to follow-up and one died from hepatocellular carcinoma. Long-term TDF treatment appears to be safe and effective in patients with prior failure of LAM and a suboptimal response to ADV therapy. These findings confirm that TDF has a high genetic barrier to resistance is active against multidrug-resistant HBV, and should be the preferred oral anti-HBV agent in CHB patients who fail treatment with LAM and ADV. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. [Therapy-resistant and therapy-refractory arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, M; Koziolek, M J

    2018-05-02

    Therapy-resistant and therapy-refractory arterial hypertension differ in prevalence, pathogenesis, prognosis and therapy. In both cases, a structured approach is required, with the exclusion of pseudoresistance and, subsequently, secondary hypertension. Resistant hypertension has been reported to be more responsive to intensified diuretic therapy, whereas refractory hypertension is presumed to require sympathoinhibitory therapy. Once the general measures and the drug-based step-up therapy have been exhausted, interventional procedures are available.

  12. Targeted enzyme prodrug therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellmann, N; Deckert, P M; Bachran, D; Fuchs, H; Bachran, C

    2010-09-01

    The cure of cancer is still a formidable challenge in medical science. Long-known modalities including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy are successful in a number of cases; however, invasive, metastasized and inaccessible tumors still pose an unresolved and ongoing problem. Targeted therapies designed to locate, detect and specifically kill tumor cells have been developed in the past three decades as an alternative to treat troublesome cancers. Most of these therapies are either based on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, targeted delivery of cytotoxic drugs or tumor site-specific activation of prodrugs. The latter is a two-step procedure. In the first step, a selected enzyme is accumulated in the tumor by guiding the enzyme or its gene to the neoplastic cells. In the second step, a harmless prodrug is applied and specifically converted by this enzyme into a cytotoxic drug only at the tumor site. A number of targeting systems, enzymes and prodrugs were investigated and improved since the concept was first envisioned in 1974. This review presents a concise overview on the history and latest developments in targeted therapies for cancer treatment. We cover the relevant technologies such as antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT) as well as related therapies such as clostridial- (CDEPT) and polymer-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (PDEPT) with emphasis on prodrug-converting enzymes, prodrugs and drugs.

  13. Massage therapy research review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Medical Therapy of Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Plöckinger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the present status of medical therapy of acromegaly. Indications for permanent postoperative treatment, postirradiation treamtent to bridge the interval until remission as well as primary medical therapy are elaborated. Therapeutic efficacy of the different available drugs—somatostatin receptor ligands (SRLs, dopamine agonists, and the GH antagonist Pegvisomant—is discussed, as are the indications for and efficacy of their respective combinations. Information on their mechanism of action, and some pharmakokinetic data are included. Special emphasis is given to the difficulties to define remission criteria of acromegaly due to technical assay problems. An algorithm for medical therapy in acromegaly is provided.

  15. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Feminist music therapy pedagogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahna, Nicole; Swantes, Melody

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed 188 music therapy educators regarding their views and use of feminist pedagogy and feminist music therapy. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (a) to determine how many music therapy educators used feminist pedagogy and (b) to determine if there was a relationship between......) participatory learning, (b) validation of personal experience/development of confidence, (c) political/social activism, and (d) critical thinking/ open-mindedness. The results revealed that 46% (n = 32) of participants identified as feminist music therapists and 67% (n = 46) of participants identified as using...

  17. Complications of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.S.; Parker, B.R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review systematically the toxicity of contemporary chemotherapy and irradiation on normal tissues of growing children. Whenever possible, the separate toxicity of chemotherapy, irradiation, and combination therapy is addressed. However, it is not always possible to quantitate specifically such reactions in the face of multiple drug therapy, which may enhance radiation injury or reactivate prior radiation injury. Prior detailed reviews have provided important sources of information concerning radiation injury for this more general discussion. The information provided will assist both the clinician and the radiologist in the recognition of early and late complications of therapy in pediatric oncology

  18. Combination therapy in type 2 diabetes mellitus: adding empagliflozin to basal insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ahmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM management is complex, with few patients successfully achieving recommended glycemic targets with monotherapy, most progressing to combination therapy, and many eventually requiring insulin. Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitors are an emerging class of antidiabetes agents with an insulin-independent mechanism of action, making them suitable for use in combination with any other class of antidiabetes agents, including insulin. This review evaluates a 78-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial investigating the impact of empagliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor, as add-on to basal insulin in patients with inadequate glycemic control on basal insulin, with or without metformin and/or a sulfonylurea. Empagliflozin added on to basal insulin resulted in significant and sustained reductions in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels compared with placebo. Empagliflozin has previously been shown to induce weight loss, and was associated with sustained weight loss in this study. This combination therapy was well tolerated, with similar levels of hypoglycemic adverse events in the empagliflozin and placebo groups over the 78-week treatment period. Urinary tract infections and genital infections, side effects associated with SGLT2 inhibitors, were reported more commonly in the empagliflozin group; however, such events led to treatment discontinuation in very few patients. These findings suggest that, with their complementary mechanisms of action, empagliflozin added on to basal insulin may be a useful treatment option in patients on basal insulin who need additional glycemic control without weight gain.

  19. Longterm clinical outcomes of omalizumab therapy in severe allergic asthma: Study of efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansur, Adel H; Srivastava, Sapna; Mitchell, Verity; Sullivan, Julie; Kasujee, Ismail

    2017-03-01

    Omalizumab has been shown to be an effective add-on therapy for patients with uncontrolled severe persistent allergic asthma. There has been a steady accumulation of evidence on the long-term effectiveness of omalizumab; however, data on real-life outcomes beyond one year of treatment is limited. In this study, we report on long-term outcomes of omalizumab treatment. We collected data from our severe asthma registry on hospitalisations, exacerbations, corticosteroid sparing, asthma control, lung function, biomarkers and side effects, to determine if the benefit was sustained and treatment was safe on the long term. Forty-five patients [mean age 44.9 years (range 19-69), females 37/45 (82%), mean duration of omalizumab treatment = 60.7 ± 30.9 months (range 23-121) were included in the analysis. We observed a reduction in the annual acute asthma related hospital admissions for the total population from 207 at baseline to 40 on treatment (80.7% reduction), whilst the per patient annual hospitalisations were reduced from a mean of 4.8 to 0.89 post-omalizumab treatment (p omalizumab therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prostate Cancer (Radiation Therapy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be considered carefully, balancing the advantages against the disadvantages as they relate to the individual man's age, ... therapy with photon or x-rays: Uses advanced technology to tailor the x-ray or photon radiation ...

  1. Music therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbers, Sonja; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Freeman, Ruth E; Spreen, Marinus; Ket, Johannes Cf; Vink, Annemiek C; Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike; Chen, Xi-Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-11-16

    Depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder that is characterised by persistent low mood, diminished interest, and loss of pleasure. Music therapy may be helpful in modulating moods and emotions. An update of the 2008 Cochrane review was needed to improve knowledge on effects of music therapy for depression. 1. To assess effects of music therapy for depression in people of any age compared with treatment as usual (TAU) and psychological, pharmacological, and/or other therapies.2. To compare effects of different forms of music therapy for people of any age with a diagnosis of depression. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Common Mental Disorders Controlled Trials Register (CCMD-CTR; from inception to 6 May 2016); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; to 17 June 2016); Thomson Reuters/Web of Science (to 21 June 2016); Ebsco/PsycInfo, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Embase, and PubMed (to 5 July 2016); the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP), ClinicalTrials.gov, the National Guideline Clearing House, and OpenGrey (to 6 September 2016); and the Digital Access to Research Theses (DART)-Europe E-theses Portal, Open Access Theses and Dissertations, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Database (to 7 September 2016). We checked reference lists of retrieved articles and relevant systematic reviews and contacted trialists and subject experts for additional information when needed. We updated this search in August 2017 and placed potentially relevant studies in the "Awaiting classification" section; we will incorporate these into the next version of this review as appropriate. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) comparing music therapy versus treatment as usual (TAU), psychological therapies, pharmacological therapies, other therapies, or different forms of music therapy for reducing depression. Two review

  2. Therapy Provider Phase Information

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Therapy Provider Phase Information dataset is a tool for providers to search by their National Provider Identifier (NPI) number to determine their phase for...

  3. Oxygen therapy - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... breathe increased amounts of oxygen to get normal levels of oxygen in their blood. Oxygen therapy provides babies with the extra oxygen. Information Oxygen is a gas that the cells in your body need to work properly. The ...

  4. Interactional Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warehime, Robert G.

    1981-01-01

    Group gestalt therapy in which the leader facilitates the development of helping capacity in group members is described. The general characteristics of this approach are discussed and ground rules concerning leader and member behaviors are suggested. (RC)

  5. Drug therapy smartens up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christian

    2015-11-01

    The submission of the first 'smart pill' for market approval, combined with progress in the European nanomedicine landscape, illustrates the positive outlook for drug therapy and health monitoring, explains Christian Martin.

  6. Nicotine replacement therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking cessation - nicotine replacement; Tobacco - nicotine replacement therapy ... Before you start using a nicotine replacement product, here are some things to know: The more cigarettes you smoke, the higher the dose you may need to ...

  7. Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Active Cycle of Breathing Technique Airway Clearance Techniques Autogenic Drainage Basics of Lung Care Chest Physical Therapy ... care. Clinician Awards Clinician Career Development Awards Clinician Training Awards Mutation Analysis Program Network News Network News: ...

  8. Therapy and Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... system of rewards and reinforcement of positive behavior. Psychoanalysis. This type of treatment encourages you to think ... work, marriage and family therapy, rehabilitation counseling, and psychoanalysis. Your family doctor can help you choose the ...

  9. Photodynamic Therapy (PDT)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a newly emerging modal- ... Porphyrins are a ubiquitous class of naturally occurring heterocyclic ..... mechanism leading to tumor necrosis. ... The vascular endothelium may be the main target of tumor.

  10. External Beam Therapy (EBT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: ... Colorectal Cancer Treatment Head and Neck Cancer Treatment Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) Brain ...

  11. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiation therapy is a type of cancer treatment that uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Learn about the types of radiation, why side effects happen, which ones you might have, and more.

  12. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... behaviour therapy approach, and a brief example of its use in depression. Cognitive .... dream, or recollection, leading to unpleasant emotion. DATE. SITUATION. EMOTION ... Write rational response to automatic thought(s). 2.

  13. Consumer Health: Alternative Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as massage. These systems center on a philosophy, such as the power of nature or the ... medicine values therapies that have been demonstrated through research and testing to be safe and effective. While ...

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Hong; He, Ri-Hui; Zheng, Yun-Rong; Tao, Ran

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the main method of psychotherapy generally accepted in the field of substance addiction and non-substance addiction. This chapter mainly introduces the methods and technology of cognitive-behavior therapy of substance addiction, especially in order to prevent relapse. In the cognitive-behavior treatment of non-substance addiction, this chapter mainly introduces gambling addiction and food addiction.

  15. Concept Analysis: Music Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrock, Carolyn J; Bekhet, Abir K

    2016-01-01

    Down through the ages, music has been universally valued for its therapeutic properties based on the psychological and physiological responses in humans. However, the underlying mechanisms of the psychological and physiological responses to music have been poorly identified and defined. Without clarification, a concept can be misused, thereby diminishing its importance for application to nursing research and practice. The purpose of this article was for the clarification of the concept of music therapy based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy. A review of recent nursing and health-related literature covering the years 2007-2014 was performed on the concepts of music, music therapy, preferred music, and individualized music. As a result of the search, the attributes, antecedents, and consequences of music therapy were identified, defined, and used to develop a conceptual model of music therapy. The conceptual model of music therapy provides direction for developing music interventions for nursing research and practice to be tested in various settings to improve various patient outcomes. Based on Walker and Avant's concept analysis strategy, model and contrary cases are included. Implications for future nursing research and practice to use the psychological and physiological responses to music therapy are discussed.

  16. Journal of Proton Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal of Proton Therapy (JPT is an international open access, peer-reviewed journal, which publishes original research, technical reports, reviews, case reports, editorials, and other materials on proton therapy with focus on radiation oncology, medical physics, medical dosimetry, and radiation therapy.No article processing/submission feeNo publication feePeer-review completion within 3-6 weeksImmediate publication after the completion of final author proofreadDOI assignment for each published articleFree access to published articles for all readers without any access barriers or subscriptionThe views and opinions expressed in articles are those of the author/s and do not necessarily reflect the policies of the Journal of Proton Therapy.Authors are encouraged to submit articles for publication in the inaugural issue of the Journal of Proton Therapy by online or email to editor@protonjournal.comOfficial Website of Journal of Proton Therapy: http://www.protonjournal.org/

  17. Humanistic therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Davies, Philippa; Caldwell, Deborah; Moore, Theresa HM; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different humanistic therapy models (person-centred, gestalt, process-experiential, transactional analysis, existential and non-directive therapies) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all humanistic therapies compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression. PMID:25278809

  18. Manual therapy and exercise for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; McBain, Brodwen; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; Lyttle, Nicolette; Mrocki, Marshall A; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease often includes manual therapy and exercise, usually delivered together as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of manual therapy and exercise, alone or in combination, for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCO, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease, and comparing any manual therapy or exercise intervention with placebo, no intervention, a different type of manual therapy or exercise or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Interventions included mobilisation, manipulation and supervised or home exercises. Trials investigating the primary or add-on effect of manual therapy and exercise were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success, quality of life and the number of participants experiencing adverse events. Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion, extracted the data, performed a risk of bias assessment and assessed the quality of the body of evidence for the main outcomes using the GRADE approach. We included 60 trials (3620 participants), although only 10 addressed the main comparisons of interest. Overall risk of bias was low in three, unclear in 14 and high in

  19. Food therapy and medical diet therapy of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qunli Wu; Xiaochun Liang

    2018-01-01

    Food therapy of traditional Chinese medicine aims to maintain balanced nutrition through diet. Medical diet therapy, however, is to achieve the balance of Yin and Yang through the combination of nutrition and medicine. Either “food therapy” or “medical diet therapy” aims to keep health, prevent disease, remove illness and slow aging. In recent years, both food therapy and medical diet therapy have been increasingly applied in clinical nutrition therapy. In terms of traditional Chinese food th...

  20. Effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine as an adjunct therapy for Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxin Zhang

    Full Text Available Idiopathic Parkinson disease (PD is a common neurodegenerative disease that seriously hinders limb activities and affects patients' lives. We performed a meta-analysis aiming to systematically review and quantitatively synthesize the efficacy and safety of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM as an adjunct therapy for clinical PD patients.An electronic search was conducted in PubMed, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Scientific Journals Database and Wanfang data to identify randomized trials evaluating TCM adjuvant therapy versus conventional treatment. The change from baseline of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (UPDRS was used to estimate the effectiveness of the therapies.Twenty-seven articles involving 2314 patients from 1999 to 2013 were included. Potentially marked improvements were shown in UPDRS I (SMD 0.68, 95%CI 0.38, 0.98, II (WMD 2.41, 95%CI 1.66, 2.62, III (WMD 2.45, 95%CI 2.03, 2.86, IV (WMD 0.32, 95%CI 0.15, 049 and I-IV total scores (WMD 6.18, 95%CI 5.06, 7.31 in patients with TCM plus dopamine replacement therapy (DRT compared to DRT alone. Acupuncture add-on therapy was markedly beneficial for improving the UPDRS I-IV total score of PD patients (WMD 10.96, 95%CI 5.85, 16.07. However, TCM monotherapy did not improve the score. The effectiveness seemed to be more obvious in PD patients with longer adjunct durations. TCM adjuvant therapy was generally safe and well tolerated.Although the data were limited by methodological flaws in many studies, the evidence indicates the potential superiority of TCM as an alternative therapeutic for PD treatment and justifies further high-quality studies.

  1. Complementary therapies in social psychiatry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Anita; Dürr, Dorte Wiwe

    three residential homes (n= 51 / 91 respondents - response rate 56 %) shows that the most common used complementary therapy is music therapy 43%, and only 10% of residents do not use these therapies at all. Overall, 43% of residents strongly agree, that these therapies strengthens their recovery process...

  2. Hadron Therapy for Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, Arlene

    2003-01-01

    The biological and physical rationale for hadron therapy is well understood by the research community, but hadron therapy is not well established in mainstream medicine. This talk will describe the biological advantage of neutron therapy and the dose distribution advantage of proton therapy, followed by a discussion of the challenges to be met before hadron therapy can play a significant role in treating cancer. A proposal for a new research-oriented hadron clinic will be presented.

  3. and in anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Toma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, cancer and anticancer therapy are increasingly mentioned topics. Groups of researchers keep looking for a tool that will specifically and efficiently eliminate abnormal cells without any harm for the normal ones. Such method entails the reduction of therapy’s side effects, thus also improving patient’s recovery. Discovery of synthetic lethality has become a new hope to create effective, personalized therapy of cancer. Researchers noted that pairs of simultaneously mutated genes can lead to cell death, whereas each gene from that pair mutated individually does not result in cell lethality. Cancer cells accumulate numerous changes in their genetic material. By defining the pairs of genes interacting in cell pathways we are able to identify a potential anticancer therapy. It is believed that such a process has evolved to create cell resistance for a single gene mutation. Proper functioning of a pathway is not dependent on a single gene. Such a solution, however, also led to the evolution of multifactorial diseases such as cancer. Research techniques using iRNA, shRNA or small molecule libraries allow us to find genes that are connected in synthetic lethality interactions. Synthetic lethality may be applied not only as an anticancer therapy but also as a tool for identifying the functions of recently recognized genes. In addition, studying synthetic lethality broadens our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing cancer cells, which should be helpful in designing highly effective personalized cancer therapies.

  4. Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunst, J.; Sauer, R.

    1993-01-01

    Therapy of Ewing's sarcoma requires a qualified clinical, radiological, and pathohistological diagnosis and, in particular, an optimal therapy by an experienced team of oncological specialists. Important prognostic factors are the presence of hematogenous metastases at diagnosis, the initial tumor volume, the response to chemotherapy, and adequate local therapy. Presently, cure rates of more than 60% can be achieved for localized Ewing's sarcoma by combination of local therapy and chemotherapy. The four-drug combination VACA (vincristin, actinomycin D, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin) can be considered as cytostatic gold standard. More aggressive regimens (VAIA, EVAIA, autologous bone marrow transplant) may be beneficial in subgroups and are under investigation. Concerning local therapy adequate radiotherapy plays a major role and achieves the same survival rates as radical surgery, comparable patient selection provided. Several factors have impact on radiotherapeutic results, especially total dose (45 Gy large volume, 55 Gy to the primary tumor), target volume (safety margin at least 2 cm according to the pretreatment volume, at least 5 cm in proximal and distal extension of long bones), timing of radiotherapy (as early as possible) and quality of treatment. Radiotherapy as sole local treatment is indicated in inoperable lesions (spine, sacrum, skull) and in small, good-responding tumors. High-risk patients should receive combined radiotherapeutic-surgical treatment, preferably as pre-operative irradiation. The value of hyperfractionation is not yet proven despite theoretical advantages. (orig.) [de

  5. Therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildmeister, W.

    1982-01-01

    The etiology of hyperthyroidism is still largely unknown and therefore no causal therapy of this condition is possible. Antithyroid drug treatment is usually carried out with thiocarbamides. When an euthyroid state is achieved synthetic thyroid hormones are added. Pregnancy and iodine contamination (after exposure to contrast medium) require individual treatment. In this paper the advantages, indications and contraindications are discussed as well as supportive drug therapy necessary in specific cases. Radioiodine therapy is reserved for patients over 35 years of age; the individual dose is calculated according to the size of the thyroid gland and the iodine uptake. Disadvantageous is the late onset of therapeutic efficiency, the small effect on the size of goitre and the exposure to radiation. A patient should be operated upon in an euthyroid state, i.e. after preoperative drug therapy. Operations are normally performed on individuals with a coexistent goitre or where antithyroid drugs or radioiodine therapy are contraindicated. Paresis of the recurrent laryngeal nerve and hypoparathyroidism are rare complications. 3 to 4 g of thyroid tissues should remain. Of great importance in all cases are precise diagnostics both before and after commencing treatment and adequate follow up. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  7. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domb, William C

    2014-01-01

    Summary The 21st century dental practice is quite dynamic. New treatment protocols and new materials are being developed at a rapid pace. Ozone dental therapy falls into the category of new treatment protocols in dentistry, yet ozone is not new at all. Ozone therapy is already a major treatment modality in Europe, South America and a number of other countries. What is provided here will not be an exhaustive scientific treatise so much as a brief general introduction into what dentists are now doing with ozone therapies and the numerous oral/systemic links that make this subject so important for physicians so that, ultimately, they may serve their patients more effectively and productively. PMID:25363268

  8. Therapy with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Hotze, A.L.

    1992-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy of benign and malignant thyroid diseases is a well-established procedure in Nuclear Medicine. However, the therapeutic use of radioisotopes in other diseases is relatively unknown among our refering physicians. The therapeutic effects of intraarticular (rheumatoid arthritis) and intracavitary (pleural and peritoneal carcinosis) applications yields good results. The radiophosphorus therapy in polycythemia vera rubra has always to be considered as an alternative to chemotherapy. The use of analgetics may be reduced by pain therapy of bone metastasis by injection of bone-seeking beta emitters like Rh-186 HEDP. Other procedures like therapeutic application of meta-iodo-benzylguanidine in neuroblastoma and malignant pheochromocytoma resulted in at least remissions of the disease. Radioimmunotherapy needs further evaluation before it can be recommended as a routine procedure. (orig.) [de

  9. Laser therapy for periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efanov, O. I.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made of applying pulsed (lambda) equals 0.89 micrometers laser radiation in the treatment for early diagnosed periodontitis. The investigation was made on 65 patients (47 patients constituted the experimental group and 18 patients constituted a control group) affected by periodontitis. Clinical and functional tests revealed that laser therapy produced a string effect on the course of the illness. It reduced bleeding, inflammation, and pruritus. However, it did not produce an affect on electroexcitation. Biomicroscopic examinations and periodontium rheography revealed that the gingival blood flow became normal after the course of laser therapy. The capillary permeability and venous congestion decreased, which was confirmed by the increased time of vacuum tests, raised gingival temperature, reduced tissue clearance, and increased oxygen tension. Apart from that, laser therapy subsided fibrinolysis, proteolytic tissue activity, and decreased the exudative inflammation of periodontium.

  10. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Novel Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Bittar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterised by arterial and/or venous thrombosis, recurrent pregnancy loss, and persistently positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs. It could be life-threatening as in the case of catastrophic APS where multi-organ failure is observed. APS morbidities are thought to be the result of a combination of thrombotic and inflammatory processes. Over the past decades, the mainstay of therapy of APS has been anticoagulation. As new mechanisms of pathogenesis are being unravelled with time, novel targeted immunomodulatory therapies are being proposed as promising agents in the treatment of APS. In this article, we present an overview of new pathogenetic mechanisms in APS as well as novel antithrombotic and immunomodulatory therapies.

  11. PUVA combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, W L

    1985-08-01

    Various adjunctive treatments are now frequently used in combination with PUVA therapy with the aims of limiting adverse effects, improving efficacy and decreasing the cost of treatment. In the management of psoriasis, PUVA plus retinoids, PUVA plus methotrexate and PUVA plus UVB phototherapy are the most frequently used combinations. PUVA plus topical corticosteroids and PUVA plus anthralin are also efficacious but adverse effects and poor acceptance by patients are limiting factors. Combinations of PUVA plus nitrogen mustard and ionizing radiation are used in mycosis fungoides to treat tumors and residual disease in secluded sites. In the management of photodermatoses with PUVA therapy, prednisone is often required to prevent exacerbation of disease. A combination of prednisone and PUVA therapy can also be useful in lichen planus and atopic eczema. The selection of a suitable combination treatment, will depend upon the preferences of the clinician, the disease being treated, and the characteristics of the patient.

  12. Music Therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Professional development and recognition is an 'old' issue in music therapy but still a relevant, complex and crucial one. Burning questions regarding professionalisation are at the forefront of most music therapy associations’ agendas across Europe and beyond, and feed back directly to the work...... of the EMTC. Considering the wider political, socio-economic, cultural and disciplinary aspects of professionalisation, different development pathways impact directly on music therapy practice, training, ethics, professional collaboration and employment conditions. Although a number of endeavours have been...... implemented regarding music therapy’s professional development and recognition in different countries, documentation and sharing of such endeavours on international level has been limited and scattered. Drawing from the EMTC’s work since the early ‘90s, as well as from colleagues’ experiences (and struggles...

  13. Involved Node Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Aznar, Marianne C; Vogelius, Ivan R

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy...... to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. RESULTS: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field......, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7...

  14. Anticholinerge Therapie der OAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampel C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Kenntnisse über Differentialdiagnostik und Pathophysiologie des Blasenüberaktivitäts-Syndroms sind essentiell für eine erfolgreiche Therapie. Obwohl Verhaltenstraining und Elektrostimulation ihre Wirksamkeit bei OAB bewiesen haben, ist die Therapie der ersten Wahl nach wie vor die anticholinerge Behandlung. Dessen ungeachtet ist die Einnahmetreue der Patienten unbefriedigend, was in der letzten Zeit zu verschiedenen Medikamentenneuentwicklungen mit verbesserter Verträglichkeit bei gleichbleibend hoher Effektivität geführt hat. Retard-Formulierungen, extraenterale Applikationswege und Rezeptor-Subselektivität sind hierbei die Prinzipien, welche die Behandlungsakzeptanz und Patientenzufriedenheit steigern sollen.

  15. Drug therapy in headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherall, Mark W

    2015-06-01

    All physicians will encounter patients with headaches. Primary headache disorders are common, and often disabling. This paper reviews the principles of drug therapy in headache in adults, focusing on the three commonest disorders presenting in both primary and secondary care: tension-type headache, migraine and cluster headache. The clinical evidence on the basis of which choices can be made between the currently available drug therapies for acute and preventive treatment of these disorders is presented, and information given on the options available for the emergency parenteral treatment of refractory migraine attacks and cluster headache. © Royal College of Physicians 2015. All rights reserved.

  16. Isotope therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Junji; Kasagi, Kanji; Iida, Yasuhiro; Torizuka, Kanji; Mori, Toru.

    1979-01-01

    131 I was first used to treat Basedow's disease approximately thirty years ago. Today, 131 I therapy widely used because it is effective and easy to apply. No notable side effects have been observed until now. The only demerit is a high incidence of hypothyroidism which occurs many years after therapy. The onset of hypothyroidism can be delayed by reducing the dose but can not be prevented. Therefore, patients should understand fully the possibility of the onset of hypothyroidism in the future. To obtain favorable results, patients with Basedow's disease should be given an ordinary dose of 131 I and should be followed up. (Nisio, M.)

  17. Antiretroviral therapy: current drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pau, Alice K; George, Jomy M

    2014-09-01

    The rapid advances in drug discovery and the development of antiretroviral therapy is unprecedented in the history of modern medicine. The administration of chronic combination antiretroviral therapy targeting different stages of the human immunodeficiency virus' replicative life cycle allows for durable and maximal suppression of plasma viremia. This suppression has resulted in dramatic improvement of patient survival. This article reviews the history of antiretroviral drug development and discusses the clinical pharmacology, efficacy, and toxicities of the antiretroviral agents most commonly used in clinical practice to date. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Cerebrospinal tomo-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fumagalli, I.; Coche-Dequeant, B.; Lacornerie, T.; Reynaert, N.; Lartigau, E.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the study of the feasibility of a cerebrospinal tomo-therapy, of the protection of organs at risk, and of tolerance. Nine patients have been treated, one with a bi-fractionated irradiation and the others with a conventional fractionation. Seven had chemotherapy before radiotherapy, and two had intensification with self-grafting of stem cells. The dose constraints and the planning target volume (PTV) differed with respect to the treated organ (kidney, lung, thyroid, parotid, hypophysis). The tolerance was good. It appears that cerebrospinal tomo-therapy results in a better comfort for the patient and an easier treatment plan with a good dose homogeneity. Short communication

  19. Spa therapy in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeba Riyaz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spa therapy constitutes the use of mineral springs and thermal mud to soothe and heal various ailments. Like the mineral springs, seas and oceans are also important centers for spa therapy of which the most important is Dead Sea (DS. DS has been famous for thousands of years for its miraculous curative and cosmetic properties. Intensive research is going on using DS minerals in a wide range of dermatological conditions especially psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and other eczemas and several papers have been published in various international and pharmacological journals.

  20. Neutron irradiation therapy machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Conventional neutron irradiation therapy machines, based on the use of cyclotrons for producing neutron beams, use a superconducting magnet for the cyclotron's magnetic field. This necessitates complex liquid He equipment and presents problems in general hospital use. If conventional magnets are used, the weight of the magnet poles considerably complicates the design of the rotating gantry. Such a therapy machine, gantry and target facilities are described in detail. The use of protons and deuterons to produce the neutron beams is compared and contrasted. (U.K.)

  1. Anti-IgE: lessons from clinical trials in patients with severe allergic asthma symptomatic despite optimised therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Buhl

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of omalizumab has been extensively investigated in clinical trials in patients with severe persistent allergic (pre-treatment total immunoglobulin E 30–700 IU·mL–1 asthma including the Investigation of Omalizumab in Severe Asthma Treatment (INNOVATE study, which enrolled patients with inadequately controlled severe persistent allergic asthma despite receiving high-dose inhaled corticosteroid in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist, and also additional controller medication if required. In the INNOVATE study, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced clinically significant exacerbation rates by 26% (0.68 versus 0.91, severe exacerbation rates by 50% (0.24 versus 0.48 and emergency visit rates by 44% (0.24 versus 0.43 and significantly improved asthma-related quality of life (QoL compared with placebo. In a pooled analysis of data from seven studies, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced asthma exacerbation rates by 38% (0.91 versus 1.47 and total emergency visits by 47% (0.332 versus 0.623. In addition, omalizumab significantly improved QoL versus current asthma therapy in a pooled analysis of data from six studies. Omalizumab has demonstrated a good safety and tolerability profile in completed phase-I, -II and -III studies involving >7,500 patients with asthma, rhinitis or related conditions. Omalizumab represents a major advance for the treatment of severe persistent allergic asthma that is inadequately controlled despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and a long-acting beta2-agonist.

  2. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  3. The effects of infrared laser therapy and weightbath traction hydrotherapy as components of complex physical treatment in disorders of the lumbar spine: a controlled pilot study with follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Csaba; Oláh, Mihály; Demeter, Béla; Jancsó, Zoltán; Páll, Valéria; Bender, Tamás

    2010-02-01

    Introduction: The therapeutic modalities available for the conservative management of chronic lumbar pain included infrared laser therapy and underwater traction, which usefulness is not universally acknowledged. This study was intended to ascertain any beneficial impact of infrared laser therapy and weightbath treatment on the clinical parameters and quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy. Material and methods: The study population comprised 54 randomised subjects. I. group of 18 patents received only infrared laser therapy to lumbar region and painful Valley points. II. group of 18 subjects each received underwater traction therapy of lumbar spine with add-on McKenzie exercise and iontophoresis. The remaining III. group treated with exercise and iontophoresis, served as control. VAS, Oswestry index, SF36 scores, range of motion, neurological findings and thermography were monitored to appraise therapeutic afficacy in lumbar discopathy. A CT or MRI scan was done at baseline and after 3 months follow-up. Result:Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction for discopathy achieved significant improvement of all study parameters, which was evident 3 months later. Among the controls, significant improvement of only a single parameter was seen in patients with lumbar discopathy. Conclusions: Infrared laser therapy and underwater traction treatment effectively mitigate pain, muscle spasms, enhance joint flexibility, and improve the quality of life of patients with lumbar discopathy.

  4. The ethics of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sarah; Harris, John

    2006-10-01

    Recent developments have progressed in areas of science that pertain to gene therapy and its ethical implications. This review discusses the current state of therapeutic gene technologies, including stem cell therapies and genetic modification, and identifies ethical issues of concern in relation to the science of gene therapy and its application, including the ethics of embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning, the risks associated with gene therapy, and the ethics of clinical research in developing new therapeutic technologies. Additionally, ethical issues relating to genetic modification itself are considered: the significance of the human genome, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, and concerns regarding gene therapy as a eugenic practice.

  5. Combination therapy with renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitor telmisartan and serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate provides further renoprotection in a rat chronic kidney disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Narita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that camostat mesilate (CM had renoprotective and antihypertensive effects in rat CKD models. In this study, we examined if CM has a distinct renoprotective effect from telmisartan (TE, a renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAS inhibitor, on the progression of CKD. We evaluated the effect of CM (400 mg/kg/day and/or TE (10 mg/kg/day on renal function, oxidative stress, renal fibrosis, and RAS components in the adenine-induced rat CKD model following 5-weeks treatment period. The combination therapy with CM and TE significantly decreased the adenine-induced increase in serum creatinine levels compared with each monotherapy, although all treatment groups showed similar reduction in blood pressure. Similarly, adenine-induced elevation in oxidative stress markers and renal fibrosis markers were significantly reduced by the combination therapy relative to each monotherapy. Furthermore, the effect of the combination therapy on plasma renin activity (PRA and plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC was similar to that of TE monotherapy, and CM had no effect on both PRA and PAC, suggesting that CM has a distinct pharmacological property from RAS inhibition. Our findings indicate that CM could be a candidate drug for an add-on therapy for CKD patients who had been treated with RAS inhibitors.

  6. Room for iodo therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, A.L.A.; Derivi, A.; Bacelar, A.; Ramos, F.R.; Dias, T.M.; Baptista, I.S.

    1996-01-01

    A description of rules to assemble, to install and to maintain a room for iodo therapy is presented. The necessities of the patients and procedures to meet the norms of radiologic protection established by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil) are highlighted

  7. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  8. Salk therapy begins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A clinical trial to test an immune therapy developed by polio pioneer Jonas Salk has begun enrollment of 3,000 participants, who will receive Remune shots every 12 weeks for 3 years to see if disease progression is slowed. The manufacturer is Immune Response, and the study is being conducted by the University of California at San Francisco.

  9. [Domiciliary oxygen therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kafi, S

    2010-09-01

    In Belgium, oxygen therapy is becoming more and more accessible. When oxygen is needed for short periods or for special indications as palliative care, an agreement between mutual insurance companies and pharmacists allows the practitioner the home installation of gazeous oxygen cylinder or of oxygen concentrator. When long term oxygen therapy (LTOT) is indicated for patients with respiratory insufficiency, the pneumologist must first ask the INAMI the authorization to install one of the following modalities: oxygen concentrator with or without demand oxygen delivery cylinder and liquid oxygen. The goal of LTOT is to increase survival and quality of life. The principal and well accepted indication for LTOT is severe hypoxemia. The beneficial effects of oxygen therapy limited at night or on exertion are controversial. In order to increase patient's autonomy, oxygen can be prescribed for ambulation, respecting prescription's rules. At each step of oxygen therapy implementing (indication, choice of the device and follow-up) the patient under oxygen may benefit from a joint approach between the general practitioner and the chest specialist.

  10. Drama Therapies in Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Judith; Prosperi, Mario

    1976-01-01

    Explores the use of drama as a therapeutic tool at various hospitals and records specific therapy groups dialogues. Available from: The Drama Review, 51 West 4th Street, Room 300, New York, N.Y. 10012. Subscription Rates: $12.50 per year. (MH)

  11. Dimensions of Feminist Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marecek, Jeanne

    This paper reviews the current status of psychotherapy for women from a feminist perspective. It examines the sexist prejudices and biases of traditional psychotherapies and psychological approaches; notes the manners in which therapy has often tended to reinforce the traditional sex role stereotyping and the women's consequent negative self…

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A.; Stegenga, B.; Wijkstra, P. J.; van der Hoeven, J. H.; Meinesz, A. F.; de Bont, L. G. M.

    In clinical practice, oral appliances are used primarily for obstructive sleep apnea patients who do not respond to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We hypothesized that an oral appliance is not inferior to CPAP in treating obstructive sleep apnea effectively. We randomly assigned

  13. Music therapy for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalbers, Sonja; Fusar-Poli, Laura; Freeman, Ruth E.; Spreen, Marinus; Ket, Johannes C.F.; Vink, Annemiek C.; Maratos, Anna; Crawford, Mike; Chen, Xi Jing; Gold, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression is a highly prevalent mood disorder that is characterised by persistent low mood, diminished interest, and loss of pleasure. Music therapy may be helpful in modulating moods and emotions. An update of the 2008 Cochrane review was needed to improve knowledge on effects of music

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, C.R.; Maisey, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    Several factors influencing the choice of radiopharmaceutical used in the treatment of benign and malignant disease are discussed. A brief review is given of the routine clinical uses of radiopharmaceuticals including treatments for hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, polycythaemia rubra vera and intracavitary therapy. Finally clinical situations using radionuclides under evaluation including the treatment of bone disease, adrenal tumours and monoclonal antibodies are discussed. (UK)

  15. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  16. Radiation Therapy for Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can cause pain. Radiation given to shrink a tumor near the esophagus , which can interfere with a patient’s ability to eat and drink. How is radiation therapy planned for an individual ... show the location of a patient’s tumor and the normal areas around it. These scans ...

  17. [The Bioptron light therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dediulescu, Lucretia

    2004-01-01

    The Bioptron light therapy system acts naturally, upholding the capacity of regeneration of the body. Since the discovery of the therapeutical effects of the Bioptron light, over 20 years ago, its use as treatment has been developed for a large variety of diseases, among which also the eye-diseases (simplex and zoster herpes, conjunctivitis).

  18. Tumor therapy evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blattmann, H.; Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs

  19. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G M; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  20. Physical therapy and manual physical therapy: Differences in patient characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, G.G.M.; Pool, J.J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  1. Physical Therapy and Manual Physical Therapy: Differences in Patient Characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravensberg, C. D. Dorine; Oostendorp, Rob A B; van Berkel, Lonneke M.; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G. M.; Pool, Jan J.M.; Swinkels, Raymond A. H. M.; Huijbregts, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    This study compared socio-demographic characteristics, health problem characteristics, and primary process data between database samples of patients referred to physical therapy (PT) versus a sample of patients referred to manual physical therapy (MPT) in the Netherlands. Statistical analysis

  2. Therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Sadeghi, R.; Takavar, A.; Fard, A.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although there have been very significant development in the field of radionuclide therapy within the past 10 years, radionuclide therapy in the form of 131 I, 33 P,.... have been in use for over 46 years. Palliation of bone pain is a good example for radionuclide therapy. It has an especial role in advanced metastatic cancer. 32 P, 89 Sr-Cl, 186 Re-HEDP, 133 Sm-EDTMP, and 117 mSn-DTPA are used in these patients. They are usually effective and help to maintain a painless life for patients with advanced cancer. Although this kind of therapy is not as rapid as radiotherapy, its effect lasts longer. In addition re-treatment with these agents is safe and effective. Radioimmunotherapy is a new exciting technique in the radionuclide therapy. In this technique monoclonal antibodies or their fragments are labeled with a suitable radionuclide, these antibodies can irradiate tumor cells over a distance of some fraction of a millimeter. Bulky tumors are obviously unsuitable targets for Rit. Several antibodies specific for Cd 20 (B1 and 1 F 5) and CD 37 (Mb-1) labeled with 131 I have been used for hematologic malignancies with good response. Several antigens associated with carcinomas of various histologic types have been targeted for therapeutic purposes by antibodies labeled with different radionuclides. Other routes of administration like intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and intravesical have been used with different rates of success. Pre targeting techniques can be used to reduce unwanted radioactive concentration in normal tissues. The avidin-biotin system is an example, which exploits the high-affinity binding between avidin and biotin, and was first used with anti-Cea antibody. Radiation synovectomy is another aspect of radionuclide therapy 198 Au colloid, 90 Y resin colloid, and 165 Dy-FHMA are some of the radionuclides used in the field of hematology. There has been significant advances in the field of therapy in nuclear medicine in recent years, which are briefly

  3. Horticultural therapy for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Bo, Li; Sampson, Stephanie; Roberts, Samantha; Zhang, Guoyou; Wu, Weiping

    2014-05-19

    Horticultural therapy is defined as the process of utilising fruits, vegetables, flowers and plants facilitated by a trained therapist or healthcare provider, to achieve specific treatment goals or to simply improve a person's well-being. It can be used for therapy or rehabilitation programs for cognitive, physical, social, emotional, and recreational benefits, thus improving the person's body, mind and spirit. Between 5% to 15% of people with schizophrenia continue to experience symptoms in spite of medication, and may also develop undesirable adverse effects, horticultural therapy may be of value for these people. To evaluate the effects of horticultural therapy for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like illnesses compared with standard care or other additional psychosocial interventions. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (Janurary 2013) and supplemented this by contacting relevant study authors, and manually searching reference lists. We included one randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing horticultural therapy plus standard care with standard care alone for people with schizophrenia. We reliably selected, quality assessed and extracted data. For continuous outcomes, we calculated a mean difference (MD) and for binary outcomes we calculated risk ratio (RR), both with 95% confidence intervals (CI). We assessed risk of bias and created a 'Summary of findings' table using the GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. We included one single blind study (total n = 24). The overall risk of bias in the study was considered to be unclear although the randomisation was adequate. It compared a package of horticultural therapy which consisted of one hour per day of horticultural activity plus standard care with standard care alone over two weeks (10 consecutive days) with no long-term follow-up. Only two people were lost to follow-up in the study, both in the horticultural therapy group (1 RCT

  4. Current perspectives of radiation therapy. History of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, Jun

    2011-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the discovery of X-Strahlen by Roentgen. The history of radiation therapy has evolved under mutual stimulating relationships of the external beam radiation therapy by X-ray tubes and accelerators, and the internal radiation therapy employing radium and other radionuclides. The currently employed technologies in radiation therapy have its origin already till nineteen sixties and the development of physics and engineering have realized the original concept. (author)

  5. Emotion Regulation in Schema Therapy and Dialectical Behavior Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassbinder, E.; Schweiger, U.; Martius, D.; Brand-de Wilde, O.; Arntz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Schema therapy (ST) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) have both shown to be effective treatment methods especially for borderline personality disorder. Both, ST and DBT, have their roots in cognitive behavioral therapy and aim at helping patient to deal with emotional dysregulation. However,

  6. What Is Nutrition Support Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sponsored CE Programs Calendar of Events What Is Nutrition Support Therapy All people need food to live. ... patient populations from pediatrics to geriatrics. Key Terms: Nutrition Support Therapy The provision of enteral or parenteral ...

  7. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2008-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  8. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert

    2007-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., ̃40...

  9. Endocrine Therapy of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, Robert S

    2005-01-01

    ...) or TAM should be given as first line endocrine therapy. Unfortunately, response rates are lower, and response durations are shorter, on crossover than when these agents are given as first line therapies, e.g., -40...

  10. Cybernetics of Brief Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeney, Bradford P.; Ross, Jeffrey M.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cybernetic view of brief family therapy. Includes a historical discussion of the key ideas underlying brief family therapy, a cybernetic model of therapeutic change, and a clinical case for exemplification. (Author/JAC)

  11. Parental Involvement In Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlson, E. Lamonte

    1976-01-01

    Play therapy acts as a medium of expression for children. The purpose of this article is to outline a methodological approach as well as to emphasize the necessity of including the parent in the play therapy situation. (Author)

  12. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Katsumasa

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, where the mortality rate of prostate cancer is lower than in Western countries, radical prostatectomy or hormonal therapy has been applied more frequently than radiation therapy. However, the number of patients with prostate cancer has been increasing recently and the importance of radiation therapy has rapidly been recognized. Although there have been no randomized trials, results from several institutions in Western countries suggest that similar results of cancer control are achieved with either radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy. For higher-risk cases, conformal high-dose therapy or adjuvant hormonal therapy is more appropriate. In this article, the results of radiation therapy for prostate cancer were reviewed, with a view to the appropriate choice of therapy in Japan. (author)

  13. Cryogen therapy of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zikiryakhodjaev, D.Z.; Sanginov, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter authors studied the cure of skin cancer in particular cryogen therapy of skin cancer. They noted that cryogen therapy of skin cancer carried new possibilities and improved results of neoplasms treatment

  14. Lamivudine plus adefovir combination therapy versus entecavir monotherapy for lamivudine-resistant chronic hepatitis B: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Peng

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection represents a serious global health problem and resistance to lamivudine (LAM has become a serious clinical challenge. Previous rescue therapy for the treatment of chronic LAM-resistant hepatitis B infected patients included switching to entecavir (ETV and adding adefovir (ADV or tenofovir (TFV. At present, switching to ETV is not recommended for rescue therapy for LAM-resistant chronic hepatitis B (CHB. The aim of this report was to determine whether add-on ADV was a superior rescue strategy in the treatment of CHB patients with LAM resistance. Methods We searched Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Knowledge, and the Cochrane Library. Relative risks (RRs of virologic response, virologic breakthrough, normalization of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels and HBeAg seroconversion rates were studied. Factors predicting virologic response, standardized mean differences (SMD in HBV DNA levels and safety were reviewed. Results Six eligible trials (451 patients in total were included in the analysis. The rate of virologic breakthrough in the ETV group was higher than that in the LAM plus ADV group. There were no statistical differences in virologic response, ALT normalization and HBeAg seroconversion in either group 48 weeks post treatment. LAM plus ADV combination therapy produced faster and greater HBV DNA reduction rates 24 weeks post therapy compared to ETV monotherapy. HBV DNA baseline levels and the initial virologic response (IVR were predictive of the virologic response. Additionally, combination therapy or monotherapy were both well tolerated. Conclusions LAM plus ADV combination therapy was more effective and produced longer-lasting effects than switching to ETV monotherapy in treating CHB patients with LAM resistance. However, considering the practical benefits and limitations of ADV, individualized therapy will be needed in patients with prior history of LAM resistant infections.

  15. Moral Education through Play Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalle, Salwa; Zakaria, Gamal Abdul Nasir; Nawi, Aliff

    2014-01-01

    This paper will discuss on how sand therapy (as one type of play therapies) can be applied as an additional technique or approach in counseling. The research questions for this study are to see what are the development, challenges faced by the therapist during the sessions given and how sand therapy can aid to the progress of the client. It is a…

  16. Massage Therapy for Health Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... C. Changes in clinical parameters in patients with tension-type headache following massage therapy: a pilot study . Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy . 2008; 16(2):106–112. Moraska A, Pollini RA, ... adjustments to stress measures following massage therapy: a review of the ...

  17. Comments on chelation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrenn, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    The primary purpose of actinide chelation is to decrease the risk from radiation-induced cancer. While occupational exposures in the past have mainly involved low specific activity 239 Pu, future exposures will increasingly involve high specific activity plutonium, americium, and curium - all of which clear more rapidly from the lung. This will tend to shift the cancer risk from lung to bone and liver. Although therapy with Ca- or Zn-DTPA rapidly removes 241 Am from the canine, the sub-human primate, and the human liver, improved methods for removal from bone and lung are needed. DTPA can remove 241 Am more easily from the growing skeleton of a child than from the mature skeleton of an adult. Investigators at Karlsruhe are developing chelation agents for oral administration and are investigating the reduction in local dose to bone resulting from chelation therapy

  18. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akine, Yasuyuki; Tokita, Nobuhiko; Tokuuye, Koichi; Satoh, Michinao; Churei, Hisahiko

    1993-01-01

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  19. Medical leech therapy (Hirudotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Wollina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches have been used in medicine long time before BC. In recent years medical leech therapy has gained increasing interest in reconstructive surgery and pain management and other medical fields. The possible indications and success rates of this treatment are discussed. There is a special interest in salvage of flaps and grafts by the use of medical leeches. Retrospective analysis indicates a success rate of >80%. Randomized controlled trials have been performed in osteoarthritis. Case reports and smaller series are available for the treatment of chronic wounds, post-phlebitic syndrome and inflammatory skin diseases. The most common adverse effects are prolonged bleeding and infection by saprophytic intestinal bacteria of leeches. Medical leech therapy is a useful adjunct to other measures wound management.

  20. Drug therapy of leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kubanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy (Hansen’s disease is a chronic granulomatous bacterial infection mainly affecting the skin and peripheral nervous system yet also involving other organs and systems as a result of a pathological process. The causative agent of leprosy - Mycobacterium leprae - is an obligate intracellular microorganism. Despite the removal of a threat of a leprosy epidemic, European countries still record outbreaks of the disease mainly among migrants coming from endemic areas. A golden standard of the treatment of leprosy is a WHO-recommended combined drug therapy comprising drugs such as dapsone, clofazimine and rifampicin. The article provides current data on the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety of these drugs and their combined scheme of treatment obtained as a result of clinical trials. Moreover, it also reviews new regimens of the drug therapy of leprosy including those with the use of drugs from the group of fluoroquinols as well as immunotherapy of the disease.

  1. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... to monitor and evaluate the learning process. The course is embedded in a graduate programme of applied cognitive, developmental and neuropsychology, and includes 92 hours (17 days spanning one academic year) of lectures and workshops on cognitive behavioural therapy and coaching. Seven behaviour competence...... coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...

  2. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should...... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  3. Selective retina therapy (SRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkmann, R.; Birngruber, R.

    2007-01-01

    Selective Retina Therapy (SRT) is a new and very gentle laser method developed at the Medical Laser Center Luebeck. It is currently investigated clinically in order to treat retinal disorders associated with a decreased function of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). SRT is designed to selectively effect the RPE while sparing the neural retina and the photoreceptors as well as the choroid. Aim of the therapy is the rejuvenation of the RPE in the treated areas, which should ideally lead to a long term metabolic increase at the chorio-retinal junction. In contrast to conventional laser photocoagulation, which is associated with a complete thermal necrosis of the treated site, SRT completely retains full vision. This paper reviews the methods and mechanisms behind selective RPE effects and reports the first clinical results. An online dosimetry technique to visualize the ophthalmoscopically invisible effects is introduced. (orig.)

  4. Antiplatelet therapy in PCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanaroff, Alexander; Rao, Sunil

    2018-01-01

    Platelets play a key role in mediating stent thrombosis, the major cause of ischemic events in the immediate period following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). For this reason, antiplatelet therapy, started at the time of PCI and continued for at least 30 days afterwards, is the cornerstone of antithrombotic therapy after PCI. However, the use of antiplatelet agents increase bleeding risk, with more potent antiplatelet agents further increasing bleeding risk. For this reason, balancing prevention of ischemic events with risk of bleeding is fundamental to the effective use of antiplatelet agents. In the past 5 years, potent and fast-acting P2Y12 inhibitors have been introduced, and have augmented the antiplatelet armamentarium available to interventional cardiologists. In this review, we review the preclinical and clinical data surrounding these new agents, and discuss the significant questions and controversies that still exist regarding the optimal antiplatelet strategy. PMID:28582206

  5. Tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastreboff, P J

    2007-01-01

    Tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) is a specific clinical method based on the neurophysiological model of tinnitus described by Jastreboff (Jastreboff, P.J. (1990). Neurosci. Res., 8: 221-254). The method is aimed at habituation of reactions evoked by tinnitus, and subsequently habituation of the tinnitus perception. Several other methods have been suggested for habituation of tinnitus, but in TRT two components that strictly follow the principles of the neurophysiological model of tinnitus are implemented and necessary: (1) counseling, aimed at reclassification of tinnitus to a category of a neutral signals and (2) sound therapy, aimed at weakening tinnitus-related neuronal activity as suggested by Jastreboff and Hazell (Jastreboff, P.J. and Hazell, J.W.P. (2004). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge). This chapter outlines the theoretical basis of TRT as well as comments on the clinical outcome of the use of TRT for different kinds of tinnitus.

  6. Gestalt Therapy and Cognitive Therapy - Contrasts or Complementarities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesvang, Jan; Sommer, Ulla; Hammink, James

    2010-01-01

    The article investigates the relationship between crucial concepts and understandings in gestalt therapy and cognitive therapy aiming at discussing if and how they can be mutually enriching when considered as complementary parts in a more encompassing integrative therapeutic approach. It is argued...... that gestalt therapy, defined as a fieldtheoretical approach to the study of gestalt formation process, can complement the schema-based understanding and practice in cognitive therapy. The clinical benefits from a complementary view of the two approaches will be a wider scope of awareness toward individual...... between fundamental awareness work in gestalt therapy and the tendency within cognitive therapy toward incorporating mindfulness as a therapeutic tool. In the conclusion of the article, additional complementary points between the two approaches are outlined. Keywords: integrative therapy, gestalt...

  7. Individualization of antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlos R

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rebecca Pavlos, Elizabeth J PhillipsInstitute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Murdoch University, Murdoch, Western Australia, AustraliaAbstract: Antiretroviral therapy (ART has evolved considerably over the last three decades. From the early days of monotherapy with high toxicities and pill burdens, through to larger pill burdens and more potent combination therapies, and finally, from 2005 and beyond where we now have the choice of low pill burdens and once-daily therapies. More convenient and less toxic regimens are also becoming available, even in resource-poor settings. An understanding of the individual variation in response to ART, both efficacy and toxicity, has evolved over this time. The strong association of the major histocompatibility class I allele HLA-B*5701 and abacavir hypersensitivity, and its translation and use in routine HIV clinical practice as a predictive marker with 100% negative predictive value, has been a success story and a notable example of the challenges and triumphs in bringing pharmacogenetics to the clinic. In real clinical practice, however, it is going to be the exception rather than the rule that individual biomarkers will definitively guide patient therapy. The need for individualized approaches to ART has been further increased by the importance of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV clinical practice. In the future, the ideal utilization of the individualized approach to ART will likely consist of a combined approach using a combination of knowledge of drug, virus, and host (pharmacogenetic and pharmacoecologic [factors in the individual's environment that may be dynamic over time] information to guide the truly personalized prescription. This review will focus on our knowledge of the pharmacogenetics of the efficacy and toxicity of currently available antiretroviral agents and the current and potential utility of such information and approaches in present and future HIV clinical care.Keywords: HIV

  8. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Moghaddam, Nima G.; Dawson, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a generic term, encompassing both: (1) approaches underpinned by an assumption that presenting emotional and behavioural difficulties are cognitively mediated or moderated; and (2) atheoretical bricolages of cognitive and behavioural techniques. This latter category may include effective therapeutic packages (perhaps acting through mechanisms articulated in the first category) but, when theory is tacit, it becomes harder to make analytical generalisation...

  9. Cognitive behavior therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Labanya Bhattacharya; Bhushan Chaudari; Daniel Saldanha; Preethi Menon

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is one of the most extensively researched psychotherapeutic modalities which is being used either in conjunction with psychotropic drugs or alone in various psychiatric disorders. CBT is a short-term psychotherapeutic approach that is designed to influence dysfunctional emotions, behaviors, and cognitions through a goal-oriented, systematic procedure. Recent advances in CBT suggest that there is a fresh look on a "third wave" CBT that has a greater impact and ...

  10. Assessment in Cognitive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gary P.; Clark, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts to explore the state of the art of cognitive clinical assessment and identify cutting-edge approaches of interest to clinicians and researchers. The book highlights fundamental problems concerning the validity of assessments that are widely used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Key directions for further research and development are identified. Updated cognitive assessment methods are described in detail, with particular attention to transdiag...

  11. Virtual reality exposure therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rothbaum, BO; Hodges, L; Kooper, R

    1997-01-01

    It has been proposed that virtual reality (VR) exposure may be an alternative to standard in vivo exposure. Virtual reality integrates real-time computer graphics, body tracking devices, visual displays, and other sensory input devices to immerse a participant in a computer- generated virtual environment. Virtual reality exposure is potentially an efficient and cost-effective treatment of anxiety disorders. VR exposure therapy reduced the fear of heights in the first control...

  12. Intracavitary therapy of craniopharyngiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, B.; Fig, L. M.; Gross, M.D.; Ann Arbor Nuclear Medicine Service, Ann Arbor, MI

    1999-01-01

    Craniopharyngiomas are benign cystic para-hypophyseal tumors often associated with hypopituitarism and visual-field abnormalities. Their therapy by surgery and external beam radiotherapy is imperfect. The intracavitary instillation of beta-emitting colloid radiopharmaceuticals into the cysts permits the delivery of far higher radiation doses to the cyst lining than is possible by external beam radiotherapy. This technique permits destruction of the lining epithelium with resultant elimination of cyst fluid formation and cyst shrinkage in up to 80% of cases

  13. Proton beam therapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs

  14. Neutron beams for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuplenikov, Eh.L.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Telegin, Yu.N.; Tsymbal, V.A.; Kandybej, S.S.

    2011-01-01

    It was given the analysis and generalization of the study results carried out during some decades in many world countries on application of thermal, epithermal and fast neutrons for neutron, gamma-neutron and neutron-capture therapy. The main attention is focused on the practical application possibility of the accumulated experience for the base creation for medical research and the cancer patients effective treatment.

  15. Psychological therapies for thalassaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anie, Kofi A; Massaglia, Pia

    2014-03-06

    Thalassaemia is a group of genetic blood disorders characterised by the absence or reduction in the production of haemoglobin. Severity is variable from less severe anaemia, through thalassaemia intermedia, to profound severe anaemia (thalassaemia major). In thalassaemia major other complications include growth retardation, bone deformation, and enlarged spleen. Blood transfusion is required to treat severe forms of thalassaemia, but this results in excessive accumulation of iron in the body (iron overload), removed mostly by a drug called desferrioxamine through 'chelation therapy'. Non-routine treatments are bone marrow transplantation (which is age restricted), and possibly hydroxyurea, designed to raise foetal haemoglobin level, thus reducing anaemia. In addition, psychological therapies seem appropriate to improving outcome and adherence to medical treatment. To examine the evidence that in people with thalassaemia, psychological treatments improve the ability to cope with the condition, and improve both medical and psychosocial outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register which comprises of references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. Searches on the Internet were also performed.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 11 November 2013. All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing the use of psychological intervention to no (psychological) intervention in people with thalassaemia. No trials of psychological therapies have been found in the literature for inclusion in this review. There are currently no results to be reported. As a chronic disease with a considerable role for self-management, psychological support seems appropriate for managing thalassaemia. However, from the information currently available, no conclusions

  16. Proton beam therapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Radiation therapy physics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide a uniquely comprehensive source of information on the entire field of radiation therapy physics. The very significant advances in imaging, computational, and accelerator technologies receive full consideration, as do such topics as the dosimetry of radiolabeled antibodies and dose calculation models. The scope of the book and the expertise of the authors make it essential reading for interested physicians and physicists and for radiation dosimetrists.

  18. A Technique: Exposure Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan AKKOYUNLU

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exposure with response prevention is an effective treatment for all anxiety disorders. According to the behavioral learning theories, fears which are conditioned via classical conditioning are reinforced by respondent conditioning. Avoidance and safety seeking behaviors prevent disconfirmation of anxious beliefs. In exposure client faces stimulates or cues that elicit fear or distress, by this avoidance is inhibited. Clients are also encouraged to resists performing safety seeking behaviors or rituals that they utilize to reduce fear or distress. Accomplishing these habituation or extinction is achieved. In addition to this clients learn that feared consequences does not realize or not harmful as they believed by experiencing. Emotional processing is believed to be the mechanism of change in exposure.Objective: The aim of this review is to provide a definition of exposure and its effectiveness briefly, and describe how to implement exposure, its steps and remarkable aspects using. Exposure therapies and treatments that involve exposure are proved to be effective in all anxiety disorders. Exposure therapy can be divided in three parts: Assessment and providing a treatment rationale, creating an exposure hierarchy and response prevention plan, implementing exposure sessions. Clients must also continue to perform exposure between sessions. Therapy transcripts are also provided to exemplify these parts. Conclusion: Exposure with response prevention is a basic and effective technique. Every cognitive behavior therapist must be able to implement this technique and be cognizant of pearls of this procedure.

  19. Smart Radiation Therapy Biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Boateng, Francis; Kumar, Rajiv; Irvine, Darrell J; Formenti, Silvia; Ngoma, Twalib; Herskind, Carsten; Veldwijk, Marlon R; Hildenbrand, Georg Lars; Hausmann, Michael; Wenz, Frederik; Hesser, Juergen

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a crucial component of cancer care, used in the treatment of over 50% of cancer patients. Patients undergoing image guided RT or brachytherapy routinely have inert RT biomaterials implanted into their tumors. The single function of these RT biomaterials is to ensure geometric accuracy during treatment. Recent studies have proposed that the inert biomaterials could be upgraded to "smart" RT biomaterials, designed to do more than 1 function. Such smart biomaterials include next-generation fiducial markers, brachytherapy spacers, and balloon applicators, designed to respond to stimuli and perform additional desirable functions like controlled delivery of therapy-enhancing payloads directly into the tumor subvolume while minimizing normal tissue toxicities. More broadly, smart RT biomaterials may include functionalized nanoparticles that can be activated to boost RT efficacy. This work reviews the rationale for smart RT biomaterials, the state of the art in this emerging cross-disciplinary research area, challenges and opportunities for further research and development, and a purview of potential clinical applications. Applications covered include using smart RT biomaterials for boosting cancer therapy with minimal side effects, combining RT with immunotherapy or chemotherapy, reducing treatment time or health care costs, and other incipient applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiotherapy : proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The first phase of proton therapy at the National Accelerator Centre will be the development of a 200 MeV small-field horizontal beam radioneurosurgical facility in the south treatment vault. A progressive expansion of this facility is planned. The patient support and positioning system has been designed and developed by the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Surveying of the University of Cape Town to ensure the accurate positioning in the proton beam of the lesion to be treated. The basic components of the system are an adjustable chair, a series of video cameras and two computers. The specifications for the proton therapy interlock system require that the inputs to and the outputs from the system be similar to those of the neutron therapy system. Additional facilities such as a full diagnostic system which would assist the operators in the event of an error will also be provided. Dosimeters are required for beam monitoring, for monitor calibration and for determining dose distributions. Several designs of transmission ionization chambers for beam monitoring have been designed and tested, while several types of ionization chambers and diodes have been used for the dose distribution measurements. To facilitate the comparison of measured ranges and energy losses of proton beams in the various materials with tabled values, simple empirical approximations, which are sufficiently accurate for most applications, have been used. 10 refs., 10 fig., 4 tabs

  1. Radiation therapy for chordomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Hajime; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakamura, Yuji; Niibe, Hideo

    1995-01-01

    Chordomas are slow-growing primary malignant bone tumors which originate from remnants of the fetal notochordal system. They are difficult to control by surgery alone. Four patients with chordomas treated with radiation therapy were studied, and the effectiveness of radiotherapy was evaluated. These 4 (3.8%) patients were among 106 patients with primary malignant bone tumors referred to us from 1959 to 1987. Primary sites were the sacrococcygeal region in three patients and the clivus in one. The patients' ages ranged from 51 to 75 years. The male : female ratio was 1 : 1. Patients received 48 to 60 Gy of radiation to the primary sites. Because the radiosensitivity of the tumors was low, the responses were poor. The duration of survival was 6, 33, 68, and 125 months. The cause of death in each case was local recurrence of tumor. As a result, a dose greater than 60 Gy is thought to be necessary for curative radiotherapy. Proton beam therapy seems to be best choice for chordomas in the clivus, and mixed-beam (proton and megavolt age X-ray) therapy or multiportal irradiation, which gives an ideal spatial dose distribution, seems to be most suitable for sacrococcygeal chordomas. (author)

  2. [Family therapy of encopresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitczok von Brisinski, Ingo; Lüttger, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Encopresis is a taboo symptom, which is connected with great suffering from mental pressure not only for the children concerned, but also their relatives. Family related approaches are indispensable to understand encopresis, because as a result of high symptom persistence and psychological comorbidity in many cases a purely behavior-therapeutic, symptom focused approach is not sufficient, and further psychotherapeutic interventions are necessary. There is a strong temporal correlation between family interaction and frequency of soiling and changes of interaction influence changes in soiling more than the other way round. In a literature review different family relationship patterns and approaches of family therapy are represented regarding encopresis. Meaningful differences for family therapy are represented regarding primary/secondary encopresis, encopresis with/without comorbid psychiatric disorder as well as encopresis with/without dysfunctional family interaction. Distinctions are made between symptom focused, not-symptom focused and combined family therapeutic approaches, which are illustrated with case examples of outpatient and inpatient treatment. Symptom focused family therapy like e.g. externalizing of the soiling is helpful also if no dysfunctional family interaction patterns are present, because all family members can contribute to treatment success according to their own resources.

  3. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: dynamic MLC (DMLC) therapy, multisegment therapy and tomotherapy. An example of QA in DMLC therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy will make a quantum leap in tumor control. It is the new radiation therapy for the new millennium. The major methods to achieve IMRT are: 1. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) therapy, 2. multisegment therapy, and 3. tomotherapy. The principles of these 3 techniques are briefly reviewed. Each technique presents unique QA issues which are outlined. As an example this paper will present the results of a recent new study of an important QA concern in DMLC therapy. (orig.) [de

  4. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gene & Cell Therapy Defined Gene therapy and cell therapy are overlapping fields of biomedical research that aim to repair the direct cause of genetic diseases. Read More Gene & Cell Therapy FAQ's Read the most common questions raised by ...

  5. Proton therapy in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, M.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Proton therapy has been in use since 1954 and over 25,000 patients have been treated worldwide. Until recently most patients were treated at physics research facilities but with the development of more compact and reliable accelerators it is now possible to realistically plan for proton therapy in an Australian hospital. The Australian National Proton Project has been formed to look at the feasibility of a facility which would be primarily for patient treatment but would also be suitable for research and commercial applications. A detailed report will be produced by the end of the year. The initial clinical experience was mainly with small tumours and other lesions close to critical organs. Large numbers of eye tumours have also been treated. Protons have a well-defined role in these situations and are now being used in the treatment of more common cancers. With the development of hospital-based facilities, over 2,500 patients with prostate cancer have been treated using a simple technique which gives results at least as good as radical surgery, external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Importantly, the incidence of severe complications is very low. There are encouraging results in many disease sites including lung, liver, soft tissue sarcomas and oesophagus. As proton therapy becomes more widely available, randomised trials comparing it with conventional radiotherapy or Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) will be possible. In most situations the use of protons will enable a higher dose to be given safely but in situations where local control rates are already satisfactory, protons are expected to produce less complications than conventional treatment. The initial costs of a proton facility are high but the recurrent costs are similar to other forms of high technology radiotherapy. . Simple treatment techniques with only a few fields are usually possible and proton therapy avoids the high integral doses associated with IMRT. This reduction in

  6. Omalizumab therapy for treatment of recalcitrant chronic spontaneous urticaria in an Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulthanan, Kanokvalai; Tuchinda, Papapit; Chularojanamontri, Leena; Likitwattananurak, Chayanee; Ungaksornpairote, Chanida

    2017-03-01

    There are limited data regarding omalizumab in the treatment of recalcitrant chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) in Asian populations. This study evaluated the effectiveness and the proper dosage of omalizumab for Asian CSU patients in a real-life setting. We retrospectively reviewed recalcitrant CSU patients seeking treatment at the Skin Allergy Clinic, Siriraj Hospital during the 3-year period. All patients were treated with omalizumab as an add-on therapy. Standard seven-day urticaria activity score (UAS7) and medication score were used to assess omalizumab response. Of 13 patients, 9 patients (70%) responded well to 150 mg omalizumab injection every month, whereas 4 patients requiring updosing to 300 mg. In the 150 mg group, one patient achieved complete symptom control without antihistamine intake. Most of them required antihistamines without prednisolone and ciclosporin. Onset of omalizumab was fast, usually within the first week. Though only two patients in the 300 mg group achieved complete absence of symptoms, ciclosporin and oral corticosteroids could be discontinued. No patients reported adverse effects. Omalizumab at an initial dosage of 150 mg was effective in the treatment of recalcitrant CSU among Asians. Updosing to 300 mg was required to achieve satisfactory outcomes.

  7. Omalizumab in Japanese children with severe allergic asthma uncontrolled with standard therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odajima, Hiroshi; Ebisawa, Motohiro; Nagakura, Toshikazu; Fujisawa, Takao; Akasawa, Akira; Ito, Komei; Doi, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Koichi; Katsunuma, Toshio; Kurihara, Kazuyuki; Kondo, Naomi; Sugai, Kazuko; Nambu, Mitsuhiko; Hoshioka, Akira; Yoshihara, Shigemi; Sato, Norio; Seko, Noriko; Nishima, Sankei

    2015-10-01

    Omalizumab has demonstrated clinical benefits in children with moderate to severe allergic asthma. However, no studies have been performed in Japanese asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy including free IgE suppression and safety of omalizumab in Japanese children with severe allergic asthma. The primary objective was to examine whether omalizumab decreases serum free IgE levels to less than 25 ng/ml (target level of suppression). Thirty-eight Japanese children (6-15 years) with uncontrolled severe allergic asthma despite inhaled corticosteroids (>200 μg/day fluticasone propionate or equivalent) and two or more controller therapies received add-on treatment with omalizumab in a 24-week, multicenter, uncontrolled, open-label study. The geometric mean serum free IgE level at 24 weeks was 15.6 ng/mL. Compared with baseline, total asthma symptom scores, daily activity scores and nocturnal sleep scores at 24 weeks were significantly improved. The rates of asthma exacerbation and hospitalization due to asthma were reduced by 69.2% and 78.2%, respectively (p omalizumab decreased free IgE levels to less than 25 ng/mL. Omalizumab improved asthma control and was well-tolerated, as well. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Benralizumab in the treatment of severe asthma: design, development and potential place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelaia C

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Corrado Pelaia,1 Alessandro Vatrella,2 Andrea Bruni,1 Rosa Terracciano,3 Girolamo Pelaia1 1Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Section of Respiratory Diseases, “Magna Græcia” University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry, Section of Respiratory Diseases, University of Salerno, Salerno, Italy; 3Department of Health Sciences, “Magna Græcia” University of Catanzaro, Catanzaro, Italy Abstract: Asthma is a widespread and heterogeneous inflammatory disease of the airways, which is characterized by several different phenotypes and endotypes. In particular, eosinophilic airway inflammation is a common pathologic trait of both allergic and nonallergic asthma. The key cytokine responsible for maturation, activation, recruitment, and survival of eosinophils is interleukin (IL-5, which is mainly produced by T helper 2 (Th2 lymphocytes and group 2 innate lymphoid cells. Therefore, for uncontrolled patients with severe eosinophilic asthma, who are not fully responsive to corticosteroids, IL-5 represents a very important molecular target for add-on biological therapies. Among these new treatments, anti-IL-5 monoclonal antibodies such as mepolizumab and reslizumab have been developed and clinically evaluated. Furthermore, benralizumab is currently the only available biologic drug that specifically binds to the IL-5 receptor, thus preventing the interaction with its ligand and the consequent pro-inflammatory effects. The effectiveness of benralizumab in improving severe eosinophilic asthma has been well-documented by many randomized controlled trials. Keywords: IL-5, IL-5 receptor, severe eosinophilic asthma, benralizumab

  9. Internet delivered cognitive behavior therapy for antenatal depression: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsell, Erik; Bendix, Marie; Holländare, Fredrik; Szymanska von Schultz, Barbara; Nasiell, Josefine; Blomdahl-Wetterholm, Margareta; Eriksson, Caroline; Kvarned, Sara; Lindau van der Linden, Johanna; Söderberg, Elin; Jokinen, Jussi; Wide, Katarina; Kaldo, Viktor

    2017-10-15

    Major depression occurs in 5-10% of pregnancies and is associated with many negative effects for mother and child, yet treatment options are scarce. To our knowledge, this is the first published randomised controlled trial on Internet delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy (ICBT) for this group. To test the efficacy of a pregnancy adapted version of an existing 10-week ICBT-program for depression as well as assessing acceptability and adherence DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. Online and telephone. Self-referred pregnant women (gestational week 10-28 at intake) currently suffering from major depressive disorder. 42 pregnant women (gestational week 12-28) with major depression were randomised to either treatment as usual (TAU) provided at their antenatal clinic or to ICBT as an add-on to usual care. The primary outcome was depressive symptoms measured with the Montgomery-Åsberg depression rating scale-self report (MADRS-S). The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and measures of anxiety and sleep were used. Credibility, satisfaction, adherence and utilization were also assessed. The ICBT group had significantly lower levels of depressive symptoms post treatment (p treatment credibility, satisfaction, utilization, and adherence were comparable to implemented ICBT for depression. Small sample size and no long-term evaluation. Pregnancy adapted ICBT for antenatal depression is feasible, acceptable and efficacious. These results need to be replicated in larger trials to validate these promising findings. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillecke, Thomas; Nickel, Anne; Bolay, Hans Volker

    2005-12-01

    What needs to be done on the long road to evidence-based music therapy? First of all, an adequate research strategy is required. For this purpose the general methodology for therapy research should be adopted. Additionally, music therapy needs a variety of methods of allied fields to contribute scientific findings, including mathematics, natural sciences, behavioral and social sciences, as well as the arts. Pluralism seems necessary as well as inevitable. At least two major research problems can be identified, however, that make the path stony: the problem of specificity and the problem of eclecticism. Neuroscientific research in music is giving rise to new ideas, perspectives, and methods; they seem to be promising prospects for a possible contribution to a theoretical and empirical scientific foundation for music therapy. Despite the huge heterogeneity of theoretical approaches in music therapy, an integrative model of working ingredients in music therapy is useful as a starting point for empirical studies in order to question what specifically works in music therapy. For this purpose, a heuristic model, consisting of five music therapy working factors (attention modulation, emotion modulation, cognition modulation, behavior modulation, and communication modulation) has been developed by the Center for Music Therapy Research (Viktor Dulger Institute) in Heidelberg. Evidence shows the effectiveness of music therapy for treating certain diseases, but the question of what it is in music therapy that works remains largely unanswered. The authors conclude with some questions to neuroscientists, which we hope may help elucidate relevant aspects of a possible link between the two disciplines.

  11. Radiation therapy for digestive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedbois, P.; Levy, E.; Thirion, P.; Martin, L.; Calitchi, E.; Otmezguine, Y.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    This brief review of radiation therapy of digestive tumors in 1994 seeks to provide practical answers to the most commonly asked questions: What is the place of radiation therapy versus chemotherapy for the treatment of these patients ? What are the approved indications of radiation therapy and which avenues of research are being explored ? Radiation therapy is used in over two-thirds of patients referred to an oncology department for a gastrointestinal tract tumor. The main indications are reviewed: cancer of the rectum and anal canal and, to a lesser extent, cancer of the esophagus and pancreas. The main focuses of current research include radiation therapy-chemotherapy combinations, intraoperative radiation therapy, and radiation therapy of hepatobiliary tumors. (authors). 23 refs., 1 fig

  12. Advances in inmune therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvalheim, G.

    2004-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies either alone or combined with isotopes as radio immuno conjugates has proven to be very efficient treatment for cancers such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas or breast cancer. Cellular based immunotherapy treatment modalities are also currently in use. Allogeneic T lymphocytes infused during haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTSC) mediate graft-versus-tumour effects, but also initiate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which remains the primary complications of allogeneic HTSC. The current clinical need for GVHD prophylaxis, which at a minimum involves single agents immune suppression generally limits the success of allogeneic HTSC immunotherapy to patients with indolent or chemotherapy sensitive malignancy. Therefore the use of allogeneic HTSC as a cancer therapy still needs to augment the anti-tumour effects and improve GVHD control. During the presentation several ongoing studies addressing these questions will be discussed. Since 1996 more than 500 patients have been recruited into >30 clinical trials with dendritic cell vaccines. Most clinical trials used different protocols with variations in D C generation, Dc maturation stage, D C-Ag loading, route of administration, vaccination intervals and vaccination frequency. The overall response rate is 20%(0- >50%) with occasional complete or partial regressions, prolonged stable disease, but no cure. Little or no toxicity has been observed which might suggest that the vaccines do not work as efficient as expected. As will be discussed the reason for these modest clinical effects observed can be many. Therefore, careful study design and use of standardized clinical and immunological criteria are needed. Recently, we have started a process for production of TILs, antigen specific T cells. During our DC vaccine programs tumour specific T-cell clones have been developed and such T-cells might also be useful as therapy in the vaccinated patients. The principal of such therapy and the

  13. Manipulative therapy in addition to usual medical care accelerates recovery of shoulder complaints at higher costs: economic outcomes of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Gert JD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder complaints are common in primary care and have unfavourable long term prognosis. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of manipulative therapy of the cervicothoracic spine and the adjacent ribs in addition to usual medical care (UMC by the general practitioner in the treatment of shoulder complaints. Methods This economic evaluation was conducted alongside a randomized trial in primary care. Included were 150 patients with shoulder complaints and a dysfunction of the cervicothoracic spine and adjacent ribs. Patients were treated with UMC (NSAID's, corticosteroid injection or referral to physical therapy and were allocated at random (yes/no to manipulative therapy (manipulation and mobilization. Patient perceived recovery, severity of main complaint, shoulder pain, disability and general health were outcome measures. Data about direct and indirect costs were collected by means of a cost diary. Results Manipulative therapy as add-on to UMC accelerated recovery on all outcome measures included. At 26 weeks after randomization, both groups reported similar recovery rates (41% vs. 38%, but the difference between groups in improvement of severity of the main complaint, shoulder pain and disability sustained. Compared to the UMC group the total costs were higher in the manipulative group (€1167 vs. €555. This is explained mainly by the costs of the manipulative therapy itself and the higher costs due sick leave from work. The cost effectiveness ratio showed that additional manipulative treatment is more costly but also more effective than UMC alone. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve shows that a 50%-probability of recovery with AMT within 6 months after initiation of treatment is achieved at €2876. Conclusion Manipulative therapy in addition to UMC accelerates recovery and is more effective than UMC alone on the long term, but is associated with higher costs. International Standard

  14. Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis: Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Paulina K; Lucey, Michael R

    2016-08-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) causes great morbidity and mortality in the United States and throughout the world. Advances in therapy have proven difficult. In part, this reflects challenges in diagnosis, including the distinction between AH and acute-on-chronic liver failure. Liver biopsy is the best method to clarify the cause in circumstances whereby conflicting clinical data confound the diagnosis. All treatment of AH begins with abstinence from alcohol. All patients with AH should be given sufficient nutrition. Prednisolone has become the principal agent for treating patients with severe AH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Electroconvulsive therapy and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, R G; Wiens, A N

    1975-10-01

    Recent research on the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on memory is critically reviewed. Despite some inconsistent findings, unilateral nondominant ECT appears to affect verbal memory less than bilateral ECT. Adequate research on multiple monitored ECT is lacking. With few exceptions, the research methodologies for assessing memory have been inadequate. Many studies have confounded learning with retention, and only very recently has long term memory been adequately studied. Standardized assessment procedures for short term and long term memory are needed, in addition to more sophisticated assessment of memory processes, the duration of memory loss, and qualitative aspects of memories.

  16. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cheng

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  17. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersahin, Devrim, E-mail: devrimersahin@yahoo.com; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, 333 Cedar St., New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2011-10-11

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose.

  18. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  19. Metformin poisoning: which therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Casagranda

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious adverse effect in metformintreated- patients. The authors report a case of metformin-associated lactic acidosis and discuss the appropriated therapy. The patient was treated with bicarbonate iv and with two short dialysis session, also because of acute renal failure. Many authors do not agree with using bicarbonate, and about hemodialysis some authors suggest that the session should go on at least 12 hours. In this case the use of bicarbonate and short hemodialysis determinated a favourable outcame.

  20. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose