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Sample records for circadian gene expression

  1. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

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    Gomes, Andre M.G.F.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies.

  2. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula.

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    Zhang, Beilin; Gao, Yanxia; Li, Yang; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis.

  3. Acute light exposure suppresses circadian rhythms in clock gene expression.

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    Grone, Brian P; Chang, Doris; Bourgin, Patrice; Cao, Vinh; Fernald, Russell D; Heller, H Craig; Ruby, Norman F

    2011-02-01

    Light can induce arrhythmia in circadian systems by several weeks of constant light or by a brief light stimulus given at the transition point of the phase response curve. In the present study, a novel light treatment consisting of phase advance and phase delay photic stimuli given on 2 successive nights was used to induce circadian arrhythmia in the Siberian hamster ( Phodopus sungorus). We therefore investigated whether loss of rhythms in behavior was due to arrhythmia within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). SCN tissue samples were obtained at 6 time points across 24 h in constant darkness from entrained and arrhythmic hamsters, and per1, per2 , bmal1, and cry1 mRNA were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. The light treatment eliminated circadian expression of clock genes within the SCN, and the overall expression of these genes was reduced by 18% to 40% of entrained values. Arrhythmia in per1, per2, and bmal1 was due to reductions in the amplitudes of their oscillations. We suggest that these data are compatible with an amplitude suppression model in which light induces singularity in the molecular circadian pacemaker.

  4. Deregulated expression of circadian clock and clock-controlled cell cycle genes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Rana, Sobia; Munawar, Mustafa; Shahid, Adeela; Malik, Meera; Ullah, Hafeez; Fatima, Warda; Mohsin, Shahida; Mahmood, Saqib

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous and self-sustained oscillations of multiple biological processes with approximately 24-h rhythmicity. Circadian genes and their protein products constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator that form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circadian regulation extends from core clock genes to various clock-controlled genes that include various cell cycle genes. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes, therefore, may lead to genomic instability and accelerated cellular proliferation potentially promoting carcinogenesis. The current study encompasses the investigation of simultaneous expression of four circadian clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) and three clock-controlled cell cycle genes (Myc, Cyclin D1 and Wee1) at mRNA level and determination of serum melatonin levels in peripheral blood samples of 37 CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) patients and equal number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls in order to indicate association between deregulated circadian clock and manifestation of CLL. Results showed significantly down-regulated expression of Bmal1, Per1, Per2 and Wee1 and significantly up-regulated expression of Myc and Cyclin D1 (P circadian clock genes can lead to aberrant expression of their downstream targets that are involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis and hence may result in manifestation of CLL. Moreover, shift-work and low melatonin levels may also contribute in etiology of CLL by further perturbing of circadian clock.

  5. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

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    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  6. Circadian rhythms of fetal liver transcription persist in the absence of canonical circadian clock gene expression rhythms in vivo.

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    Chengwei Li

    Full Text Available The cellular circadian clock and systemic cues drive rhythmicity in the transcriptome of adult peripheral tissues. However, the oscillating status of the circadian clocks in fetal tissues, and their response to maternal cues, are less clear. Most clock genes do not cycle in fetal livers from mice and rats, although tissue level rhythms rapidly emerge when fetal mouse liver explants are cultured in vitro. Thus, in the fetal mouse liver, the circadian clock does not oscillate at the cellular level (but is induced to oscillate in culture. To gain a comprehensive overview of the clock status in the fetal liver during late gestation, we performed microarray analyses on fetal liver tissues. In the fetal liver we did not observe circadian rhythms of clock gene expression or many other transcripts known to be rhythmically expressed in the adult liver. Nevertheless, JTK_CYCLE analysis identified some transcripts in the fetal liver that were rhythmically expressed, albeit at low amplitudes. Upon data filtering by coefficient of variation, the expression levels for transcripts related to pancreatic exocrine enzymes and zymogen secretion were found to undergo synchronized daily fluctuations at high amplitudes. These results suggest that maternal cues influence the fetal liver, despite the fact that we did not detect circadian rhythms of canonical clock gene expression in the fetal liver. These results raise important questions on the role of the circadian clock, or lack thereof, during ontogeny.

  7. Dissecting differential gene expression within the circadian neuronal circuit of Drosophila

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    Nagoshi, Emi; Sugino, Ken; Kula, Ela; Okazaki, Etsuko; Tachibana, Taro; Nelson, Sacha; Rosbash, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral circadian rhythms are controlled by a neuronal circuit consisting of diverse neuronal subgroups. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of neuronal subgroups within the Drosophila circadian circuit, we used cell-type specific gene-expression profiling and identified a large number of genes specifically expressed in all clock neurons or in two important subgroups. Moreover, we identified and characterized two circadian genes, which are expressed specifically in subsets of clock cells and affect different aspects of rhythms. The transcription factor Fer2 is expressed in ventral lateral neurons; it is required for the specification of lateral neurons and therefore their ability to drive locomotor rhythms. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the vertebrate circadian gene nocturnin is expressed in a subset of dorsal neurons and mediates the circadian light response. The approach should also enable the molecular dissection of many different Drosophila neuronal circuits. PMID:19966839

  8. Circadian modulation of gene expression, but not glutamate uptake, in mouse and rat cortical astrocytes.

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    Christian Beaulé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks control daily rhythms including sleep-wake, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These clocks are based on intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops that sustain daily oscillations of gene expression in many cell types. Mammalian astrocytes display circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1 and Period2 (Per2. However, a functional role for circadian oscillations in astrocytes is unknown. Because uptake of extrasynaptic glutamate depends on the presence of Per2 in astrocytes, we asked whether glutamate uptake by glia is circadian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured glutamate uptake, transcript and protein levels of the astrocyte-specific glutamate transporter, Glast, and the expression of Per1 and Per2 from cultured cortical astrocytes and from explants of somatosensory cortex. We found that glutamate uptake and Glast mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in Clock/Clock, Per2- or NPAS2-deficient glia. Uptake was augmented when the medium was supplemented with dibutyryl-cAMP or B27. Critically, glutamate uptake was not circadian in cortical astrocytes cultured from rats or mice or in cortical slices from mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that glutamate uptake levels are modulated by CLOCK, PER2, NPAS2, and the composition of the culture medium, and that uptake does not show circadian variations.

  9. Chronic mild stress alters circadian expressions of molecular clock genes in the liver.

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    Takahashi, Kei; Yamada, Tetsuya; Tsukita, Sohei; Kaneko, Keizo; Shirai, Yuta; Munakata, Yuichiro; Ishigaki, Yasushi; Imai, Junta; Uno, Kenji; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sawada, Shojiro; Oka, Yoshitomo; Katagiri, Hideki

    2013-02-01

    Chronic stress is well known to affect metabolic regulation. However, molecular mechanisms interconnecting stress response systems and metabolic regulations have yet to be elucidated. Various physiological processes, including glucose/lipid metabolism, are regulated by the circadian clock, and core clock gene dysregulation reportedly leads to metabolic disorders. Glucocorticoids, acting as end-effectors of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, entrain the circadian rhythms of peripheral organs, including the liver, by phase-shifting core clock gene expressions. Therefore, we examined whether chronic stress affects circadian expressions of core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver using the chronic mild stress (CMS) procedure. In BALB/c mice, CMS elevated and phase-shifted serum corticosterone levels, indicating overactivation of the HPA axis. The rhythmic expressions of core clock genes, e.g., Clock, Npas2, Bmal1, Per1, and Cry1, were altered in the liver while being completely preserved in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuculeus (SCN), suggesting that the SCN is not involved in alterations in hepatic core clock gene expressions. In addition, circadian patterns of glucose and lipid metabolism-related genes, e.g., peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (Ppar) α, Pparγ-1, Pparγ-coactivator-1α, and phosphoenolepyruvate carboxykinase, were also disturbed by CMS. In contrast, in C57BL/6 mice, the same CMS procedure altered neither serum corticosterone levels nor rhythmic expressions of hepatic core clock genes and metabolism-related genes. Thus, chronic stress can interfere with the circadian expressions of both core clock genes and metabolism-related genes in the liver possibly involving HPA axis overactivation. This mechanism might contribute to metabolic disorders in stressful modern societies.

  10. Expression of the Circadian Clock Genes Pert, Per2 in Sporadic, Familial Breast Tumors

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    Sherry L. Winter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence implicating aberrant circadian clock expression in the development of cancer. Based on our initial experiments identifying a putative interaction between BRCA1, the clock proteins Per1, Per2, as well as the reported involvement of the circadian clock in the development of cancer, we have performed an expression analysis of the circadian clock genes Per1, Per2 in both sporadic, familial primary breast tumors, normal breast tissues using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Significantly decreased levels of Per1 were observed between sporadic tumors, normal samples (P < .00001, as well as a further significant decrease between familial, sporadic breast tumors for both Per1 (P < .00001, Per2 (P < .00001. Decreased Per1 was also associated with estrogen receptor negativity (53% vs 15%, P = .04. These results suggest a role for both Perl, Per2 in normal breast function, show for the first time that deregulation of the circadian clock may be an important factor in the development of familial breast cancer. Aberrant expression of circadian clock genes could have important consequences on the transactivation of downstream targets that control the cell cycle, on the ability of cells to undergo apoptosis, potentially promoting carcinogenesis.

  11. Hepatitis B virus X protein disrupts the balance of the expression of circadian rhythm genes in hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Yang, Sheng-Li; Yu, Chao; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Liu, Li-Ping; Fang, Xiefan; Wu, Chao

    2014-12-01

    The human circadian rhythm is controlled by at least eight circadian clock genes and disruption of the circadian rhythm is associated with cancer development. The present study aims to elucidate the association between the expression of circadian clock genes and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and also to reveal whether the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) is the major regulator that contributes to the disturbance of circadian clock gene expression. The mRNA levels of circadian clock genes in 30 HCC and the paired peritumoral tissues were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). A stable HBx-expressing cell line, Bel-7404-HBx, was established through transfection of HBx plasmids. The mRNA level of circadian clock genes was also detected by RT-qPCR in these cells. Compared with the paired peritumoral tissues, the mRNA levels of the Per1, Per2, Per3 and Cry2 genes in HCC tissue were significantly lower (P0.05). Compared with Bel-7404 cells, the mRNA levels of the CLOCK, Per1 and Per2 genes in Bel-7404-HBx cells were significantly increased, while the mRNA levels of the BMAL1, Per3, Cry1, Cry2 and CKIɛ genes were decreased (Pgenes is common in HCC. HBx disrupts the expression of circadian clock genes and may, therefore, induce the development of HCC.

  12. Monitoring cell-autonomous circadian clock rhythms of gene expression using luciferase bioluminescence reporters.

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    Ramanathan, Chidambaram; Khan, Sanjoy K; Kathale, Nimish D; Xu, Haiyan; Liu, Andrew C

    2012-09-27

    In mammals, many aspects of behavior and physiology such as sleep-wake cycles and liver metabolism are regulated by endogenous circadian clocks (reviewed). The circadian time-keeping system is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the central clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) synchronizing and coordinating extra-SCN and peripheral clocks elsewhere. Individual cells are the functional units for generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms, and these oscillators of different tissue types in the organism share a remarkably similar biochemical negative feedback mechanism. However, due to interactions at the neuronal network level in the SCN and through rhythmic, systemic cues at the organismal level, circadian rhythms at the organismal level are not necessarily cell-autonomous. Compared to traditional studies of locomotor activity in vivo and SCN explants ex vivo, cell-based in vitro assays allow for discovery of cell-autonomous circadian defects. Strategically, cell-based models are more experimentally tractable for phenotypic characterization and rapid discovery of basic clock mechanisms. Because circadian rhythms are dynamic, longitudinal measurements with high temporal resolution are needed to assess clock function. In recent years, real-time bioluminescence recording using firefly luciferase as a reporter has become a common technique for studying circadian rhythms in mammals, as it allows for examination of the persistence and dynamics of molecular rhythms. To monitor cell-autonomous circadian rhythms of gene expression, luciferase reporters can be introduced into cells via transient transfection or stable transduction. Here we describe a stable transduction protocol using lentivirus-mediated gene delivery. The lentiviral vector system is superior to traditional methods such as transient transfection and germline transmission because of its efficiency and versatility: it permits efficient delivery and stable integration into the host

  13. A circadian gene expression atlas in mammals: implications for biology and medicine.

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    Zhang, Ray; Lahens, Nicholas F; Ballance, Heather I; Hughes, Michael E; Hogenesch, John B

    2014-11-11

    To characterize the role of the circadian clock in mouse physiology and behavior, we used RNA-seq and DNA arrays to quantify the transcriptomes of 12 mouse organs over time. We found 43% of all protein coding genes showed circadian rhythms in transcription somewhere in the body, largely in an organ-specific manner. In most organs, we noticed the expression of many oscillating genes peaked during transcriptional "rush hours" preceding dawn and dusk. Looking at the genomic landscape of rhythmic genes, we saw that they clustered together, were longer, and had more spliceforms than nonoscillating genes. Systems-level analysis revealed intricate rhythmic orchestration of gene pathways throughout the body. We also found oscillations in the expression of more than 1,000 known and novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Supporting their potential role in mediating clock function, ncRNAs conserved between mouse and human showed rhythmic expression in similar proportions as protein coding genes. Importantly, we also found that the majority of best-selling drugs and World Health Organization essential medicines directly target the products of rhythmic genes. Many of these drugs have short half-lives and may benefit from timed dosage. In sum, this study highlights critical, systemic, and surprising roles of the mammalian circadian clock and provides a blueprint for advancement in chronotherapy.

  14. Constitutive expression of the Period1 gene impairs behavioral and molecular circadian rhythms.

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    Numano, Rika; Yamazaki, Shin; Umeda, Nanae; Samura, Tomonori; Sujino, Mitsugu; Takahashi, Ri-ichi; Ueda, Masatsugu; Mori, Akiko; Yamada, Kazunori; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Inouye, Shin-ichi T; Menaker, Michael; Tei, Hajime

    2006-03-07

    Three mammalian Period (Per) genes, termed Per1, Per2, and Per3, have been identified as structural homologues of the Drosophila circadian clock gene, period (per). The three Per genes are rhythmically expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian pacemaker in mammals. The phases of peak mRNA levels for the three Per genes in the SCN are slightly different. Light sequentially induces the transcripts of Per1 and Per2 but not of Per3 in mice. These data and others suggest that each Per gene has a different but partially redundant function in mammals. To elucidate the function of Per1 in the circadian system in vivo, we generated two transgenic rat lines in which the mouse Per1 (mPer1) transcript was constitutively expressed under the control of either the human elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha) or the rat neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter. The transgenic rats exhibited an approximately 0.6-1.0-h longer circadian period than their wild-type siblings in both activity and body temperature rhythms. Entrainment in response to light cycles was dramatically impaired in the transgenic rats. Molecular analysis revealed that the amplitudes of oscillation in the rat Per1 (rPer1) and rat Per2 (rPer2) mRNAs were significantly attenuated in the SCN and eyes of the transgenic rats. These results indicate that either the level of Per1, which is raised by overexpression, or its rhythmic expression, which is damped or abolished in over expressing animals, is critical for normal entrainment of behavior and molecular oscillation of other clock genes.

  15. Light-Dependent Expression of Four Cryptic Archaeal Circadian Gene Homologs

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    Michael eManiscalco

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important biological signals that have been found in almost all major groups of life from bacteria to man, yet it remains unclear if any members of the second major prokaryotic domain of life, the Archaea, also possess a biological clock. To investigate this question, we examined the regulation of four cyanobacterial-like circadian gene homologs present in the genome of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii. These genes, designated cirA, cirB, cirC, and cirD, display similarity to the KaiC-family of cyanobacterial clock proteins, which act to regulate rhythmic gene expression and to control the timing of cell division. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis was used to examine the expression of each of the four cir genes in response to 12 h light/12 h dark cycles (LD 12:12 during balanced growth in H. volcanii. Our data reveal that there is an approximately two to sixteen-fold increase in cir gene expression when cells are shifted from light to constant darkness and this pattern of gene expression oscillates with the light conditions in a rhythmic manner. Targeted single- and double-gene knockouts in the H. volcanii cir genes results in disruption of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression, although it does not lead to any significant effect on growth under these conditions. Restoration of light-dependent, rhythmic gene expression was demonstrated by introducing, in trans, a wild-type copy of individual cir genes into knockout strains. These results are noteworthy as this is the first attempt to characterize the transcriptional expression and regulation of the ubiquitous kaiC homologs found among archaeal genomes.

  16. Loss of circadian clock gene expression is associated with tumor progression in breast cancer.

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    Cadenas, Cristina; van de Sandt, Leonie; Edlund, Karolina; Lohr, Miriam; Hellwig, Birte; Marchan, Rosemarie; Schmidt, Marcus; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Oster, Henrik; Hengstler, Jan G

    2014-01-01

    Several studies suggest a link between circadian rhythm disturbances and tumorigenesis. However, the association between circadian clock genes and prognosis in breast cancer has not been systematically studied. Therefore, we examined the expression of 17 clock components in tumors from 766 node-negative breast cancer patients that were untreated in both neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. In addition, their association with metastasis-free survival (MFS) and correlation to clinicopathological parameters were investigated. Aiming to estimate functionality of the clockwork, we studied clock gene expression relationships by correlation analysis. Higher expression of several clock genes (e.g., CLOCK, PER1, PER2, PER3, CRY2, NPAS2 and RORC) was found to be associated with longer MFS in univariate Cox regression analyses (HR<1 and FDR-adjusted P < 0.05). Stratification according to molecular subtype revealed prognostic relevance for PER1, PER3, CRY2 and NFIL3 in the ER+/HER2- subgroup, CLOCK and NPAS2 in the ER-/HER2- subtype, and ARNTL2 in HER2+ breast cancer. In the multivariate Cox model, only PER3 (HR = 0.66; P = 0.016) and RORC (HR = 0.42; P = 0.003) were found to be associated with survival outcome independent of established clinicopathological parameters. Pairwise correlations between functionally-related clock genes (e.g., PER2-PER3 and CRY2-PER3) were stronger in ER+, HER2- and low-grade carcinomas; whereas, weaker correlation coefficients were observed in ER- and HER2+ tumors, high-grade tumors and tumors that progressed to metastatic disease. In conclusion, loss of clock genes is associated with worse prognosis in breast cancer. Coordinated co-expression of clock genes, indicative of a functional circadian clock, is maintained in ER+, HER2-, low grade and non-metastasizing tumors but is compromised in more aggressive carcinomas.

  17. USP2 Regulates the Intracellular Localization of PER1 and Circadian Gene Expression

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    Yang, Yaoming; Duguay, David; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous 24-h rhythms in physiology are driven by a network of circadian clocks located in most tissues. The molecular clock mechanism is based on feedback loops involving clock genes and their protein products. Posttranslational modifications, including ubiquitination, are important...... of clock gene expression profiles were also observed in livers of Usp2 KO mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate a novel function of USP2 in the molecular clock in which it regulates PER1 function by gating its nuclear entry and accumulation....

  18. Effect of hyperlipidemia on the expression of circadian genes in apolipoprotein E knock-out atherosclerotic mice

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    Chen Sifeng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian patterns of cardiovascular vulnerability were well characterized, with a peak incidence of acute myocardial infarction and stroke secondary to atherosclerosis in the morning, which showed the circadian clock may take part in the pathological process of atherosclerosis induced by hyperlipidemia. Hence, the effect of hyperlipidemia on the expression of circadian genes was investigated in atherosclerotic mouse model. Results In apoE-/-mice on regular chow or high-fat diet, an atherosclerotic mouse model induced by heperlipidemia, we found that the peak concentration of serum lipids was showed four or eight hours later in apoE-/- mice, compared to C57BL/6J mice. During the artificial light period, a reduce in circulating level of serum lipids corresponded with the observed increase of the expression levels of some the transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism, such as PPARα and RXRα. Meanwhile, the expression of circadian genes was changed following with amplitude reduced or the peak mRNA level delayed. Conclusions Our studies indicated that heperlipidemia altered both the rhythmicity and expression of circadian genes. Diet-induced circadian disruption may affect the process of atherosclerosis and some acute cardiovascular disease.

  19. Differential expression of circadian clock genes in two strains of beetles reveals candidates related to photoperiodic induction of summer diapause.

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    Zhu, Li; Liu, Wen; Tan, Qian-Qian; Lei, Chao-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2017-03-01

    Diapause (also known as dormancy) is a state of arrested development induced by photoperiod or temperature that allows insects to survive adverse environmental conditions. By regulating diapause induction, the circadian clock is involved in short-day-induced winter diapause but whether this is also the case in long-day (LD)-induced summer diapause remains unknown. The cabbage beetle Colaphellus bowringi could enter summer diapause under LD conditions. However, a non-photoperiodic-diapause (NPD) strain of this species, which was developed in our laboratory by artificial selection, could not enter diapause under LD photoperiod. Therefore, we identified circadian clock genes in this species and measured differences in their expression between a high diapause (HD) strain and the NPD strain to investigate the potential relationship between circadian clock genes and summer diapause induction in C. bowringi. We successfully cloned eight circadian clock genes and obtained intact ORFs of four; cryptochrome2, double-time, shaggy and vrille. Phylogenetic trees and sequence alignment analyses indicated that these circadian clock genes were conserved across insect taxa. The quantitative real-time PCR indicated that clock, cycle, period, timeless, cryptochrome2, and vrille were differentially expressed between HD and NPD strains reared under LD photoperiod during the diapause induction phase. These findings suggest the potential relationship between circadian clock genes and LD-regulated summer diapause induction in C. bowringi.

  20. Disrupted light-dark cycle abolishes circadian expression of peripheral clock genes without inducing behavioral arrhythmicity in mice.

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    Oishi, Katsutaka; Higo-Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Saori; Yasumoto, Yuki

    2015-03-06

    The environmental light-dark (LD) cycle entrains the central circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of mammals. The present study examined the effects of disrupted LD cycles on peripheral clocks in mice housed under a normal 12 h light-12 h dark cycle (LD 12:12) or an ultradian LD 3:3 cycle. Drinking behavior seemed to be free-running with a long period (26.03 h) under ultradian LD 3:3 cycles, in addition to light-induced direct suppression (masking effect). Core body temperature completely lost robust circadian rhythm and acquired a 6-h rhythm with a low amplitude under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 mRNAs was similarly flattened to intermediate levels in the liver, heart and white adipose tissue under LD 3:3. Robust circadian expression of Rev-erbα mRNA was completely damped in these tissues. Circadian expression of Dbp, a clock-controlled gene, was also disrupted in these tissues from mice housed under LD 3:3. The aberrant LD cycle seemed to induce the loss of circadian gene expression at the level of transcription, because rhythmic pre-mRNA expression of these genes was also abolished under LD 3:3. In addition to the direct effect of the aberrant LD cycle, abolished systemic time cues such as those of plasma corticosterone and body temperature might be involved in the disrupted expression of these circadian genes under LD 3:3. Our findings suggest that disrupted environmental LD cycles abolish the normal oscillation of peripheral clocks and induce internal desynchrony in mammals.

  1. The period length of fibroblast circadian gene expression varies widely among human individuals.

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    Steven A Brown

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian circadian behavior is governed by a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain hypothalamus, and its intrinsic period length is believed to affect the phase of daily activities. Measurement of this period length, normally accomplished by prolonged subject observation, is difficult and costly in humans. Because a circadian clock similar to that of the suprachiasmatic nucleus is present in most cell types, we were able to engineer a lentiviral circadian reporter that permits characterization of circadian rhythms in single skin biopsies. Using it, we have determined the period lengths of 19 human individuals. The average value from all subjects, 24.5 h, closely matches average values for human circadian physiology obtained in studies in which circadian period was assessed in the absence of the confounding effects of light input and sleep-wake cycle feedback. Nevertheless, the distribution of period lengths measured from biopsies from different individuals was wider than those reported for circadian physiology. A similar trend was observed when comparing wheel-running behavior with fibroblast period length in mouse strains containing circadian gene disruptions. In mice, inter-individual differences in fibroblast period length correlated with the period of running-wheel activity; in humans, fibroblasts from different individuals showed widely variant circadian periods. Given its robustness, the presented procedure should permit quantitative trait mapping of human period length.

  2. Analysis of daily and circadian gene expression in the rat pineal gland.

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    Fukuhara, Chiaki; Tosini, Gianluca

    2008-02-01

    The mammalian pineal gland is an important component of the circadian system. In the present study, we examined the expression of roughly 8000 genes in the rat pineal gland as a function of time of day under light-dark (LD) cycles and in constant dark (DD) using oligo DNA microarray technique. We identified 47 and 13 genes that showed higher levels at night and day, respectively, under LD. The same patterns of expression were also observed in DD. About half of the genes that peaked at night have a known biological function, i.e., transcription factors and proteins that are involved in signaling cascades, whereas 14 are expressed sequence tags and 8 have an unknown biological function. Twelve of the genes that were up-regulated at night were also up-regulated after 1h NE stimulation, thus suggesting that the expression of these genes is controlled by adrenergic mechanisms. Of the 13 genes that were up-regulated in the daytime, 6 coded for proteins that are involved in intracellular signaling pathways. The results obtained with microarray analysis were well correlated with data obtained using real time quantitative RT-PCR. The present results provide new materials to dissect and understand the pineal physiology.

  3. Integration of light and temperature in the regulation of circadian gene expression in Drosophila.

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    Catharine E Boothroyd

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are aligned to the environment via synchronizing signals, or Zeitgebers, such as daily light and temperature cycles, food availability, and social behavior. In this study, we found that genome-wide expression profiles from temperature-entrained flies show a dramatic difference in the presence or absence of a thermocycle. Whereas transcript levels appear to be modified broadly by changes in temperature, there is a specific set of temperature-entrained circadian mRNA profiles that continue to oscillate in constant conditions. There are marked differences in the biological functions represented by temperature-driven or circadian regulation. The set of temperature-entrained circadian transcripts overlaps significantly with a previously defined set of transcripts oscillating in response to a photocycle. In follow-up studies, all thermocycle-entrained circadian transcript rhythms also responded to light/dark entrainment, whereas some photocycle-entrained rhythms did not respond to temperature entrainment. Transcripts encoding the clock components Period, Timeless, Clock, Vrille, PAR-domain protein 1, and Cryptochrome were all confirmed to be rhythmic after entrainment to a daily thermocycle, although the presence of a thermocycle resulted in an unexpected phase difference between period and timeless expression rhythms at the transcript but not the protein level. Generally, transcripts that exhibit circadian rhythms both in response to thermocycles and photocycles maintained the same mutual phase relationships after entrainment by temperature or light. Comparison of the collective temperature- and light-entrained circadian phases of these transcripts indicates that natural environmental light and temperature cycles cooperatively entrain the circadian clock. This interpretation is further supported by comparative analysis of the circadian phases observed for temperature-entrained and light-entrained circadian locomotor behavior. Taken

  4. Mitomycin C modulates the circadian oscillation of clock gene period 2 expression through attenuating the glucocorticoid signaling in mouse fibroblasts.

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    Kusunose, Naoki; Matsunaga, Naoya; Kimoto, Kenichi; Akamine, Takahiro; Hamamura, Kengo; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Kubota, Toshiaki

    2015-11-06

    Clock gene regulates the circadian rhythm of various physiological functions. The expression of clock gene has been shown to be attenuated by certain drugs, resulting in a rhythm disorder. Mitomycin C (MMC) is often used in combination with ophthalmic surgery, especially in trabeculectomy, a glaucoma surgical procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of MMC on clock gene expression in fibroblasts, the target cells of MMC. Following MMC treatment, Bmal1 mRNA levels was significantly decreased, whereas Dbp, Per1, and Rev-erbα mRNA levels were significantly increased in the mouse fibroblast cell line NIH3T3 cells. Microarray analysis was performed to explore of the gene(s) responsible for MMC-induced alteration of clock gene expression, and identified Nr3c1 gene encoding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) as a candidate. MMC suppressed the induction of Per1 mRNA by dexamethasone (DEX), ligand of GR, in NIH3T3 cells. MMC also modulated the DEX-driven circadian oscillations of Per2::Luciferase bioluminescence in mouse-derived ocular fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown effect of MMC in GR signaling and the circadian clock system. The present findings suggest that MMC combined with trabeculectomy could increase the risk for a local circadian rhythm-disorder at the ocular surface.

  5. Acute melatonin treatment alters dendritic morphology and circadian clock gene expression in the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-02-01

    In the hippocampus of Siberian hamsters, dendritic length and dendritic complexity increase in the CA1 region whereas dendritic spine density decreases in the dentate gyrus region at night. However, the underlying mechanism of the diurnal rhythmicity in hippocampal neuronal remodeling is unknown. In mammals, most daily rhythms in physiology and behaviors are regulated by a network of circadian clocks. The central clock, located in the hypothalamus, controls melatonin secretion at night and melatonin modifies peripheral clocks by altering expression of circadian clock genes. In this study, we examined the effects of acute melatonin treatment on the circadian clock system as well as on morphological changes of hippocampal neurons. Male Siberian hamsters were injected with melatonin in the afternoon; 4 h later, mRNA levels of hypothalamic and hippocampal circadian clock genes and hippocampal neuron dendritic morphology were assessed. In the hypothalamus, melatonin treatment did not alter Period1 and Bmal1 expression. However, melatonin treatment increased both Period1 and Bmal1 expression in the hippocampus, suggesting that melatonin affected molecular oscillations in the hippocampus. Melatonin treatment also induced rapid remodeling of hippocampal neurons; melatonin increased apical dendritic length and dendritic complexity in the CA1 region and reduced the dendritic spine density in the dentate gyrus region. These data suggest that structural changes in hippocampal neurons are regulated by a circadian clock and that melatonin functions as a nighttime signal to coordinate the diurnal rhythm in neuronal remodeling.

  6. Light entrained rhythmic gene expression in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis: the evolution of the animal circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M Reitzel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian rhythms in behavior and physiology are the observable phenotypes from cycles in expression of, interactions between, and degradation of the underlying molecular components. In bilaterian animals, the core molecular components include Timeless-Timeout, photoreceptive cryptochromes, and several members of the basic-loop-helix-Per-ARNT-Sim (bHLH-PAS family. While many of core circadian genes are conserved throughout the Bilateria, their specific roles vary among species. Here, we identify and experimentally study the rhythmic gene expression of conserved circadian clock members in a sea anemone in order to characterize this gene network in a member of the phylum Cnidaria and to infer critical components of the clockwork used in the last common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified homologs of circadian regulatory genes in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, including a gene most similar to Timeout, three cryptochromes, and several key bHLH-PAS transcription factors. We then maintained N. vectensis either in complete darkness or in a 12 hour light: 12 hour dark cycle in three different light treatments (blue only, full spectrum, blue-depleted. Gene expression varied in response to light cycle and light treatment, with a particularly strong pattern observed for NvClock. The cryptochromes more closely related to the light-sensitive clade of cryptochromes were upregulated in light treatments that included blue wavelengths. With co-immunoprecipitation, we determined that heterodimerization between CLOCK and CYCLE is conserved within N. vectensis. Additionally, we identified E-box motifs, DNA sequences recognized by the CLOCK:CYCLE heterodimer, upstream of genes showing rhythmic expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study reveals conserved molecular and functional components of the circadian clock that were in place at the divergence of the Cnidaria and Bilateria, suggesting

  7. Ontogeny of circadian clock gene expression in the pineal and the suprachiasmatic nucleus of chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Naritoshi; Yasuo, Shinobu; Watanabe, Miwa; Namikawa, Takao; Ebihara, Shizufumi; Yoshimura, Takashi

    2003-11-14

    Avian circadian rhythms are regulated by a multiple oscillatory system consisting of the pineal, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and the eye. In the present study, ontogeny of circadian clock in the pineal and the SCN of chick embryo was examined using Per2 expression as a marker. A daily rhythmicity of Per2 expression was first detectable at embryonic day (ED) 18 in the pineal and at ED 16 in the SCN under light-dark (LD) cycles. The amplitude of the rhythmicity increased during the development. In contrast, little expression was observed during the development in constant darkness. These results suggest that although circadian clock matures by the end of the embryonic life in chicken, LD cycles are required for the expression of the Per2.

  8. Ecstasy (MDMA) Alters Cardiac Gene Expression and DNA Methylation: Implications for Circadian Rhythm Dysfunction in the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Christopher A; Ludlow, Ivan; Hight, Robert S; Jiao, Zhe; Fields, Earl; Ludaway, Tomika; Russ, Rodney; Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2015-11-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug that stimulates monoamine neurotransmitter release and inhibits reuptake. MDMA's acute cardiotoxicity includes tachycardia and arrhythmia which are associated with cardiomyopathy. MDMA acute cardiotoxicity has been explored, but neither long-term MDMA cardiac pathological changes nor epigenetic changes have been evaluated. Microarray analyses were employed to identify cardiac gene expression changes and epigenetic DNA methylation changes. To identify permanent MDMA-induced pathogenetic changes, mice received daily 10- or 35-day MDMA, or daily 10-day MDMA followed by 25-day saline washout (10 + 25 days). MDMA treatment caused differential gene expression (p 1.5) in 752 genes following 10 days, 558 genes following 35 days, and 113 genes following 10-day MDMA + 25-day saline washout. Changes in MAPK and circadian rhythm gene expression were identified as early as 10 days. After 35 days, circadian rhythm genes (Per3, CLOCK, ARNTL, and NPAS2) persisted to be differentially expressed. MDMA caused DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation that was independent of gene expression; hypermethylation of genes was found to be 71% at 10 days, 68% at 35 days, and 91% at 10 + 25 days washout. Differential gene expression paralleled DNA methylation in 22% of genes at 10-day treatment, 17% at 35 days, and 48% at 10 + 25 days washout. We show here that MDMA induced cardiac epigenetic changes in DNA methylation where hypermethylation predominated. Moreover, MDMA induced gene expression of key elements of circadian rhythm regulatory genes. This suggests a fundamental organism-level event to explain some of the etiologies of MDMA dysfunction in the heart.

  9. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

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    Takao Hirai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG, was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1 and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl, which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts.

  10. [Circadian rhythms and light responses of clock gene and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene expressions in the pineal gland of rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Qing; Du, Yu-Zhen; Tong, Jian

    2005-02-25

    This study was to investigate the circadian rhythms and light responses of Clock gene and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) gene expressions in the rat pineal gland under the 12 h-light : 12 h-dark cycle condition (LD) and constant darkness (DD). Sprague-Dawley rats housed under the light regime of LD (n=36) for 4 weeks and of DD (n=36) for 8 weeks were sampled for the pineal gland once a group (n=6) every 4 h in a circadian day. The total RNA was extracted from each sample and the semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to determine the temporal changes in mRNA levels of Clock and NAT genes during different circadian times or zeitgeber times. The data were analysed by the cosine function software, Clock Lab software and the amplitude F test was used to reveal the circadian rhythm. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) In DD or LD condition, both of Clock and NAT genes mRNA levels in the pineal gland showed robust circadian oscillation (Ppineal gland were significantly reduced (Ppineal gland (P> 0.05). These findings suggest that the expressions of Clock and NAT genes in the pineal gland not only show remarkably synchronous endogenous circadian rhythmic changes, but also response to the ambient light signal in a reduced manner.

  11. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima; Trak-Smayra, Viviane; Martinais, Sophie; Porceddu, Mathieu; Robin, Marie-Anne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10⁶ ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10⁶ ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10²-10³ ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants.

  12. Temporal shift of circadian-mediated gene expression and carbon fixation contributes to biomass heterosis in maize hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heterosis has been widely used in agriculture, but the molecular mechanism for this remains largely elusive. In Arabidopsis hybrids and allopolyploids, increased photosynthetic and metabolic activities are linked to altered expression of circadian clock regulators, including CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIAT...

  13. Circadian expression of clock genes and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 receptors in suprachiasmatic nuclei of sinoaortic-denervated rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui LI; Ning-ling SUN; Jin WANG; Ai-jun LIU; Ding-feng SU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether the circadian expression of central clock genes and angiotensin Ⅱ type 1 (AT1) receptors was altered in sinoaortic-denervated (SAD)rats. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sinoaortic denervation or a sham operation at the age of 12 weeks. Four weeks after the operation, blood pressure and heart period were measured in the conscious state in a group of sham-operated (n=10) and SAD rats (n=9). Rest SAD and sham-operated rats were divided into 6 groups (n=6 in each group). The suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN)tissues were taken every 4 h throughout the day from each group for the determi-nation of the mRNA expression of clock genes (Per2 and Bmall) and the AT1receptor by RT-PCR; the protein expression of Per2 and Bmall was determined by Western blotting. Results: Blood pressure levels in the SAD rats were similar to those of the sham-operated rats. However, blood pressure variabilities signifi-cantly increased in the SAD rats compared with the sham-operated rats. The circadian variation of clock genes in the SCN of the sham-operated rats was char-acterized by a marked increase in the mRNA and protein expression during dark periods. Per2 and Bmall mRNA levels were significantly lower in the SAD rats,especially during dark periods. Western blot analysis confirmed an attenuation of the circadian rhythm of the 2 clock proteins in the SCN of the SAD rats. AT1 receptor mRNA expressions in the SCN were abnormally upregulated in the light phase, changed to a 12-h cycle in the SAD rats. Conclusion: The circadian varia-tion of the 2 central clock genes was attenuated in the SAD rats. Arterial baroreflex dysfunction also induced a disturbance in the expression of AT1 receptors in the SCN.

  14. LUX ARRHYTHMO encodes a nighttime repressor of circadian gene expression in the Arabidopsis core clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfer, Anne; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Chow, Brenda Y; Gehrke, Andrew R; Bulyk, Martha L; Kay, Steve A

    2011-01-25

    Circadian clocks provide an adaptive advantage by allowing organisms to anticipate daily and seasonal environmental changes [1, 2]. Eukaryotic oscillators rely on complex hierarchical networks composed of transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory circuits [3]. In Arabidopsis, current representations of the circadian clock consist of three or four interlocked transcriptional feedback loops [3, 4]. Although molecular components contributing to different domains of these circuits have been described, how the loops are connected at the molecular level is not fully understood. Genetic screens previously identified LUX ARRHYTHMO (LUX) [5], also known as PHYTOCLOCK1 (PCL1) [6], an evening-expressed putative transcription factor essential for circadian rhythmicity. We determined the in vitro DNA-binding specificity for LUX by using universal protein binding microarrays; we then demonstrated that LUX directly regulates the expression of PSEUDO RESPONSE REGULATOR9 (PRR9), a major component of the morning transcriptional feedback circuit, through association with the newly discovered DNA binding site. We also show that LUX binds to its own promoter, defining a new negative autoregulatory feedback loop within the core clock. These novel connections between the archetypal loops of the Arabidopsis clock represent a significant advance toward defining the molecular dynamics underlying the circadian network in plants and provide the first mechanistic insight into the molecular function of the previously orphan clock factor LUX.

  15. Chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals disturbs the hepatic expression of circadian genes in lean and obese mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthérieu, Sébastien; Le Guillou, Dounia; Coulouarn, Cédric; Begriche, Karima [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Trak-Smayra, Viviane [Pathology Department, Saint-Joseph University, Beirut (Lebanon); Martinais, Sophie [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Porceddu, Mathieu [Mitologics SAS, Hôpital Robert Debré, 48 Boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris (France); Robin, Marie-Anne [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France); Fromenty, Bernard, E-mail: bernard.fromenty@inserm.fr [INSERM, U991, Université de Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes (France)

    2014-04-01

    Drinking water can be contaminated with pharmaceuticals. However, it is uncertain whether this contamination can be harmful for the liver, especially during obesity. Hence, the goal of our study was to determine whether chronic exposure to low doses of pharmaceuticals could have deleterious effects on livers of lean and obese mice. To this end, lean and ob/ob male mice were treated for 4 months with a mixture of 11 drugs provided in drinking water at concentrations ranging from 10 to 10{sup 6} ng/l. At the end of the treatment, some liver and plasma abnormalities were observed in ob/ob mice treated with the cocktail containing 10{sup 6} ng/l of each drug. For this dosage, a gene expression analysis by microarray showed altered expression of circadian genes (e.g. Bmal1, Dbp, Cry1) in lean and obese mice. RT-qPCR analyses carried out in all groups of animals confirmed that expression of 8 different circadian genes was modified in a dose-dependent manner. For some genes, a significant modification was observed for dosages as low as 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} ng/l. Drug mixture and obesity presented an additive effect on circadian gene expression. These data were validated in an independent study performed in female mice. Thus, our study showed that chronic exposure to trace pharmaceuticals disturbed hepatic expression of circadian genes, particularly in obese mice. Because some of the 11 drugs can be found in drinking water at such concentrations (e.g. acetaminophen, carbamazepine, ibuprofen) our data could be relevant in environmental toxicology, especially for obese individuals exposed to these contaminants. - Highlights: • The contamination of drinking water with drugs may have harmful effects on health. • Some drugs can be more hepatotoxic in the context of obesity and fatty liver. • Effects of chronic exposure of trace drugs were studied in lean and obese mouse liver. Drugs and obesity present additive effects on circadian gene expression and toxicity. • Trace

  16. Expression of circadian genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese men with glucose intolerance and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro O. Minchenko

    2015-03-01

    Results: The expression levels of circadian genes PER2, CLOCK, ARNTL/BMAL1 and CRY1 were decreased in subcutaneous adipose tissue of NGT obese men versus lean controls and these changes were negatively correlated with increased body mass index (BMI. At the same time, no significant changes were observed in PER1 gene expression in adipose tissue of this group of patients. In subcutaneous adipose tissue of IGT obese cases we found decreased levels of PER1, CLOCK and ARNTL/BMAL1 gene expressions compared to NGT obese individuals. Moreover, the expression levels of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 genes were down-regulated in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese men with type 2 diabetes versus IGT obese patients; however, ARNTL/BMAL1 gene expression was up-regulated. Conclusions: Our data demonstrate that suppression of most circadian gene expressions in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese men with NGT is negatively correlated with increased BMI and can contribute to the development of obesity. The decreased expression of PER1 gene as well as an additional suppression of ARNTL/BMAL1 and CLOCK gene expressions in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese men with glucose intolerance is associated with insulin resistance and IGT. At the same time, development of type 2 diabetes in obese men correlates with suppression of CLOCK, PER2, and CRY1 gene expressions. These results demonstrate that obesity and its complications differentially suppress clock gene expressions in subcutaneous adipose tissue, rendering this pathway as a potential therapeutic target. [J Exp Integr Med 2015; 5(1.000: 23-29

  17. Expression patterns of a circadian clock gene are associated with age-related polyethism in harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingram Krista K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in sociogenomics allow for comparative analyses of molecular mechanisms regulating the development of social behavior. In eusocial insects, one key aspect of their sociality, the division of labor, has received the most attention. Age-related polyethism, a derived form of division of labor in ants and bees where colony tasks are allocated among distinct behavioral phenotypes, has traditionally been assumed to be a product of convergent evolution. Previous work has shown that the circadian clock is associated with the development of behavior and division of labor in honeybee societies. We cloned the ortholog of the clock gene, period, from a harvester ant (Pogonomyrmex occidentalis and examined circadian rhythms and daily activity patterns in a species that represents an evolutionary origin of eusociality independent of the honeybee. Results Using real time qPCR analyses, we determined that harvester ants have a daily cyclic expression of period and this rhythm is endogenous (free-running under dark-dark conditions. Cyclic expression of period is task-specific; foragers have strong daily fluctuations but nest workers inside the nest do not. These patterns correspond to differences in behavior as activity levels of foragers show a diurnal pattern while nest workers tend to exhibit continuous locomotor activity at lower levels. In addition, we found that foragers collected in the early fall (relative warm, long days exhibit a delay in the nightly peak of period expression relative to foragers collected in the early spring (relative cold, short days. Conclusion The association of period mRNA expression levels with harvester ant task behaviors suggests that the development of circadian rhythms is associated with the behavioral development of ants. Thus, the circadian clock pathway may represent a conserved 'genetic toolkit' that has facilitated the parallel evolution of age-related polyethism and task allocation in

  18. High expression of the circadian gene mPer2 diminishes the radiosensitivity of NIH 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, L.; Liu, Y.Y.; Zhu, B.; Li, Y.; Hua, H.; Wang, Y.H.; Zhang, J.; Jiang, Z.; Wang, Z.R. [Sichuan University, Chengdu (China). West China Medical Center. Health Ministry Key Lab. of Chronobiology], e-mail: wangzhengrong@126.com

    2009-10-15

    Period2 is a core circadian gene, which not only maintains the circadian rhythm of cells but also regulates some organic functions. We investigated the effects of mPeriod2 (mPer2) expression on radiosensitivity in normal mouse cells exposed to {sup 60}Co-{gamma}-rays. NIH 3T3 cells were treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) to induce endogenous mPer2 expression or transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)-mPer2 and irradiated with {sup 6}0Co-{gamma}-rays, and then analyzed by several methods such as flow cytometry, colony formation assay, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and colony formation assay revealed that irradiated NIH 3T3 cells expressing high levels of mPer2 showed a lower death rate (TPA: 24 h 4.3% vs 12 h 6.8% and control 9.4%; transfection: pcDNA3.1-mPer2 3.7% vs pcDNA3.1 11.3% and control 8.2%), more proliferation and clonogenic survival (TPA: 121.7 {+-} 6.51 vs 66.0 {+-} 3.51 and 67.7 {+-} 7.37; transfection: 121.7 {+-} 6.50 vs 65.3 {+-} 3.51 and 69.0 {+-} 4.58) both when treated with TPA and transfected with mPer2. RT-PCR analysis showed an increased expression of bax, bcl-2, p53, cmyc, mre11, and nbs1, and an increased proportionality of bcl-2/bax in the irradiated cells at peak mPer2 expression compared with cells at trough mPer2 expression and control cells. However, no significant difference in rad50 expression was observed among the three groups of cells. Immunohistochemistry also showed increased protein levels of P53, BAX and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in irradiated cells with peak mPer2 levels. Thus, high expression of the circadian gene mPer2 may reduce the radiosensitivity of NIH 3T3 cells. For this effect, mPer2 may directly or indirectly regulate the expressions of cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related genes and DNA repair-related genes. (author)

  19. Circadian genes, the stress axis, and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Dipak K

    2012-01-01

    The body's internal system to control the daily rhythm of the body's functions (i.e., the circadian system), the body's stress response, and the body's neurobiology are highly interconnected. Thus, the rhythm of the circadian system impacts alcohol use patterns; at the same time, alcohol drinking also can alter circadian functions. The sensitivity of the circadian system to alcohol may result from alcohol's effects on the expression of several of the clock genes that regulate circadian function. The stress response system involves the hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the brain and the adrenal glands, as well as the hormones they secrete, including corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, and glucocorticoids. It is controlled by brain-signaling molecules, including endogenous opioids such as β-endorphin. Alcohol consumption influences the activity of this system and vice versa. Finally, interactions exist between the circadian system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and alcohol consumption. Thus, it seems that certain clock genes may control functions of the stress response system and that these interactions are affected by alcohol.

  20. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  1. Circadian clocks - from genes to complex behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    1999-01-01

    Circadian clocks control temporal structure in practically all organisms and on all levels of biology, from gene expression to complex behaviour and cognition. Over the last decades, research has begun to unravel the physiological and, more recently, molecular mechanisms that underlie this endogenou

  2. Synchronized diurnal and circadian expressions of four subtypes of melatonin receptor genes in the diencephalon of a puffer fish with lunar-related spawning cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Taro; Motohashi, Eiji; Doi, Hiroyuki; Hattori, Atsuhiko; Ando, Hironori

    2009-10-02

    Multiple subtypes of melatonin receptors are expressed in neural and peripheral tissues to mediate melatonin actions on the regulation of circadian rhythms in vertebrates. To elucidate molecular basis of "circa" rhythms in the grass puffer Takifugu niphobles, which spawns synchronously with semilunar cycles, tissue distribution of four melatonin receptor subtype mRNAs (Mel(1a) 1.4, Mel(1a) 1.7, Mel(1b), and Mel(1c)) were examined, and diurnal and circadian changes in their absolute amounts were examined in the retina, diencephalon, and optic tectum. Mel(1a) 1.4, Mel(1a) 1.7, and Mel(1b) mRNAs were widely distributed in various brain regions, retina, pituitary, and peripheral tissues, whereas Mel(1c) mRNA was mainly detected in the nervous tissues and pituitary. All subtype genes showed diurnal expressions with one or two peaks during nighttime. When the fish were reared under constant darkness, the retinal expressions of Mel(1a) 1.7, Mel(1b), and Mel(1c) genes were markedly diminished but still showed circadian variations. In contrast, increased and synchronized expressions of the four subtype genes were noticeable with one peak at circadian time 18 in the diencephalon. The circadian expression profiles in the optic tectum were different among the subtypes. The present results suggest that melatonin receptor gene expression is regulated by circadian clock and light, but the effects of light are different among the tissues. The synchronized expressions of the four subtype genes in the diencephalon may be related to the exertion of reproductive rhythmicity in this puffer species.

  3. Plant-Pathogen Interaction, Circadian Rhythm, and Hormone-Related Gene Expression Provide Indicators of Phytoplasma Infection in Paulownia fortunei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Fan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches’ broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance.

  4. Plant-pathogen interaction, circadian rhythm, and hormone-related gene expression provide indicators of phytoplasma infection in Paulownia fortunei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guoqiang; Dong, Yanpeng; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Niu, Suyan; Xu, Enkai

    2014-12-12

    Phytoplasmas are mycoplasma-like pathogens of witches' broom disease, and are responsible for serious yield losses of Paulownia trees worldwide. The molecular mechanisms of disease development in Paulownia are of considerable interest, but still poorly understood. Here, we have applied transcriptome sequencing technology and a de novo assembly approach to analyze gene expression profiles in Paulownia fortunei infected by phytoplasmas. Our previous researches suggested that methyl methane sulfonated (MMS) could reverse the effects of the infection. In this study, leaf samples from healthy, infected, and both infected and methyl methane sulfonate treated plants were analyzed. The results showed that the gene expression profile of P. fortunei underwent dramatic changes after Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) phytoplasma infection. Genes that encoded key enzymes in plant-pathogen interaction processes were significantly up-regulated in the PaWB-infected Paulownia. Genes involved in circadian rhythm and hormone-related genes were also altered in Paulownia after PaWB infection. However, after the PaWB-infected plants were treated with MMS, the expression profiles of these genes returned to the levels in the healthy controls. The data will help identify potential PaWB disease-resistance genes that could be targeted to inhibit the growth and reproduction of the pathogen and to increase plant resistance.

  5. Circadian oscillation of starch branching enzyme gene expression in the sorghum endosperm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutisya, J.; Sun, C.; Jansson, C.

    2009-08-31

    Expression of the three SBE genes, encoding starch branching enzymes, in the sorghum endosperm exhibited a diurnal rhythm during a 24-h cycle. Remarkably, the oscillation in SBE expression was maintained in cultured spikes after a 48-h dark treatment, also when fed a continuous solution of sucrose or abscisic acid. Our findings suggest that the rhythmicity in SBE expression in the endosperm is independent of cues from the photosynthetic source and that the oscillator resides within the endosperm itself.

  6. Clock Genes Regulate the Circadian Expression of Piezo1, TRPV4, Connexin26, and VNUT in an Ex Vivo Mouse Bladder Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Tatsuya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Nakamura, Yuki; Kira, Satoru; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Norifumi; Hirayama, Yuri; Shibata, Keisuke; Shigetomi, Eiji; Shinozaki, Yoichi; Yoshiyama, Mitsuharu; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Nakao, Atsuhito; Takeda, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    Objectives ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice is an experimental model mouse for nocturia (NOC). Using the bladder mucosa obtained from ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, we investigated the gene expression rhythms of mechanosensory cation channels such as transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) and Piezo1, and main ATP release pathways including vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) and Connexin26(Cx26), in addition to clock genes. Materials and methods Eight- to twelve-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (WT) and age- and sex-matched C57BL/6 ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice, which were bred under 12-h light/dark conditions for 2 weeks, were used. Gene expression rhythms and transcriptional regulation mechanisms in clock genes, mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT were measured in the mouse bladder mucosa, collected every 4 hours from WT and ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice using quantitative RT-PCR, a Western blot analysis, and ChIP assays. Results WT mice showed circadian rhythms in clock genes as well as mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. Their expression was low during the sleep phase. The results of ChIP assays showed Clock protein binding to the promotor regions and the transcriptional regulation of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT. In contrast, all of these circadian expressions were disrupted in ClockΔ19/Δ19 mice. The gene expression of mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT was maintained at a higher level in spite of the sleep phase. Conclusions Mechanosensor, Cx26 and VNUT expressed with circadian rhythm in the mouse bladder mucosa. The disruption of circadian rhythms in these genes, induced by the abnormalities in clock genes, may be factors contributing to NOC because of hypersensitivity to bladder wall extension. PMID:28060940

  7. Circadian clock gene expression in the coral Favia fragum over diel and lunar reproductive cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Kenneth D; Szmant, Alina M; Pyott, Sonja J

    2011-05-06

    Natural light cycles synchronize behavioral and physiological cycles over varying time periods in both plants and animals. Many scleractinian corals exhibit diel cycles of polyp expansion and contraction entrained by diel sunlight patterns, and monthly cycles of spawning or planulation that correspond to lunar moonlight cycles. The molecular mechanisms for regulating such cycles are poorly understood. In this study, we identified four molecular clock genes (cry1, cry2, clock and cycle) in the scleractinian coral, Favia fragum, and investigated patterns of gene expression hypothesized to be involved in the corals' diel polyp behavior and lunar reproductive cycles. Using quantitative PCR, we measured fluctuations in expression of these clock genes over both diel and monthly spawning timeframes. Additionally, we assayed gene expression and polyp expansion-contraction behavior in experimental corals in normal light:dark (control) or constant dark treatments. Well-defined and reproducible diel patterns in cry1, cry2, and clock expression were observed in both field-collected and the experimental colonies maintained under control light:dark conditions, but no pattern was observed for cycle. Colonies in the control light:dark treatment also displayed diel rhythms of tentacle expansion and contraction. Experimental colonies in the constant dark treatment lost diel patterns in cry1, cry2, and clock expression and displayed a diminished and less synchronous pattern of tentacle expansion and contraction. We observed no pattern in cry1, cry2, clock, or cycle expression correlated with monthly spawning events suggesting these genes are not involved in the entrainment of reproductive cycles to lunar light cycles in F. fragum. Our results suggest a molecular clock mechanism, potentially similar to that in described in fruit flies, exists within F. fragum.

  8. Harmonics of circadian gene transcription in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hughes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a molecular and cellular oscillator found in most mammalian tissues that regulates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Numerous investigations have addressed the contribution of circadian rhythmicity to cellular, organ, and organismal physiology. We recently developed a method to look at transcriptional oscillations with unprecedented precision and accuracy using high-density time sampling. Here, we report a comparison of oscillating transcription from mouse liver, NIH3T3, and U2OS cells. Several surprising observations resulted from this study, including a 100-fold difference in the number of cycling transcripts in autonomous cellular models of the oscillator versus tissues harvested from intact mice. Strikingly, we found two clusters of genes that cycle at the second and third harmonic of circadian rhythmicity in liver, but not cultured cells. Validation experiments show that 12-hour oscillatory transcripts occur in several other peripheral tissues as well including heart, kidney, and lungs. These harmonics are lost ex vivo, as well as under restricted feeding conditions. Taken in sum, these studies illustrate the importance of time sampling with respect to multiple testing, suggest caution in use of autonomous cellular models to study clock output, and demonstrate the existence of harmonics of circadian gene expression in the mouse.

  9. Lunar Phase Modulates Circadian Gene Expression Cycles in the Broadcast Spawning Coral Acropora millepora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Aisling K; Willis, Bette L; Harder, Lawrence D; Vize, Peter D

    2016-04-01

    Many broadcast spawning corals in multiple reef regions release their gametes with incredible temporal precision just once per year, using the lunar cycle to set the night of spawning. Moonlight, rather than tides or other lunar-regulated processes, is thought to be the proximate factor responsible for linking the night of spawning to the phase of the Moon. We compared patterns of gene expression among colonies of the broadcast spawning coral Acropora millepora at different phases of the lunar cycle, and when they were maintained under one of three experimentally simulated lunar lighting treatments: i) lunar lighting conditions matching those on the reef, or lunar patterns mimicking either ii) constant full Moon conditions, or iii) constant new Moon conditions. Normal lunar illumination was found to shift both the level and timing of clock gene transcription cycles between new and full moons, with the peak hour of expression for a number of genes occurring earlier in the evening under a new Moon when compared to a full Moon. When the normal lunar cycle is replaced with nighttime patterns equivalent to either a full Moon or a new Moon every evening, the normal monthlong changes in the level of expression are destroyed for most genes. In combination, these results indicate that daily changes in moonlight that occur over the lunar cycle are essential for maintaining normal lunar periodicity of clock gene transcription, and this may play a role in regulating spawn timing. These data also show that low levels of light pollution may have an impact on coral biological clocks.

  10. Influence of torpor on cardiac expression of genes involved in the circadian clock and protein turnover in the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Fiona I J; Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Ivanova, Elena; Logunova, Larisa B; Evans, Gary J; Steinlechner, Stephan; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2007-11-14

    The Siberian hamster exhibits the key winter adaptive strategy of daily torpor, during which metabolism and heart rate are slowed for a few hours and body temperature declines by up to 20 degrees C, allowing substantial energetic savings. Previous studies of hibernators in which temperature drops by >30 degrees C for many days to weeks have revealed decreased transcription and translation during hypometabolism and identified several key physiological pathways involved. Here we used a cDNA microarray to define cardiac transcript changes over the course of a daily torpor bout and return to normothermia, and we show that, in common with hibernators, a relatively small proportion of the transcriptome (<5%) exhibited altered expression over a torpor bout. Pathways exhibiting significantly altered gene expression included transcriptional regulation, RNA stability and translational control, globin regulation, and cardiomyocyte function. Remarkably, gene representatives of the entire ubiquitylation pathway were significantly altered over the torpor bout, implying a key role for cardiac protein turnover and translation during a low-temperature torpor bout. The circadian clock maintained rhythmic transcription during torpor. Quantitative PCR profiling of heart, liver, and lung and in situ hybridization studies of clock genes in the hypothalamic circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus revealed that many circadian regulated transcripts exhibited synchronous alteration in expression during arousal. Our data highlight the potential importance of genes involved in protein turnover as part of the adaptive strategy of low-temperature torpor in a seasonal mammal.

  11. Folate deprivation modulates the expression of autophagy- and circadian-related genes in HT-22 hippocampal neuron cells through GR-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinwei; Yang, Yang; Li, Xi; He, Bin; Jia, Yimin; Zhang, Nana; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-08-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an extremely important nutrient for brain formation and development. FA deficiency is highly linked to brain degeneration and age-related diseases, which are also associated with autophagic activities and circadian rhythm in hippocampal neurons. However, little is known how autophagy- and circadian-related genes in hippocampal neurons are regulated under FA deficiency. Here, hippocampal neuroncells (HT-22) were employed to determine the effect of FA deprivation (FD) on the expression of relevant genes and to reveal the potential role of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). FD increased autophagic activities in HT-22 cells, associated with significantly (PGR activation indicated by higher ratio of GR phosphorylation. Out of 17 autophagy-related genes determined, 8 was significantly (PGR binding to the promoter sequence of ATG3 and Per2. Moreover, MeDIP analysis demonstrated significant (PGR-mediated pathway. Our results provide a basis for future investigations into the intracellular regulatory network in response to folate deficiency.

  12. Circadian phase has profound effects on differential expression analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polly Yingshan Hsu

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioral cycles with a period of approximately 24 hours that are generated by an endogenous clock, or oscillator. Found in diverse organisms, they are precisely controlled and provide growth and fitness benefits. Numerous microarray studies examining circadian control of gene expression have reported that a substantial fraction of the genomes of many organisms is clock-controlled. Here we show that a long-period mutant in Arabidopsis, rve8-1, has a global alteration in phase of all clock-controlled genes. After several days in constant environmental conditions, at which point the mutant and control plants have very different circadian phases, we found 1557 genes to be differentially expressed in rve8-1, almost all of which are clock-regulated. However, after adjusting for this phase difference, only a handful show overall expression level differences between rve8-1 and wild type. Thus the apparent differential expression is mainly due to the phase difference between these two genotypes. These findings prompted us to examine the effect of phase on gene expression within a single genotype. Using samples of wild-type plants harvested at thirty-minute intervals, we demonstrated that even this small difference in circadian phase significantly influences the results of differential expression analysis. Our study demonstrates the robust influence of the circadian clock on the transcriptome and provides a cautionary note for all biologists performing genome-level expression analysis.

  13. Temperature cycle amplitude alters the adult eclosion time and expression pattern of the circadian clock gene period in the onion fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yosuke; Watari, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Kazuhiro; Goto, Shin G

    2016-03-01

    Soil temperature cycles are considered to play an important role in the entrainment of circadian clocks of underground insects. However, because of the low conductivity of soil, temperature cycles are gradually dampened and the phase of the temperature cycle is delayed with increasing soil depth. The onion fly, Delia antiqua, pupates at various soil depths, and its eclosion is timed by a circadian clock. This fly is able to compensate for the depth-dependent phase delay of temperature change by advancing the eclosion time with decreasing amplitude of the temperature cycle. Therefore, pupae can eclose at the appropriate time irrespective of their location at any depth. However, the mechanism that regulates eclosion time in response to temperature amplitude is still unknown. To understand whether this mechanism involves the circadian clock or further downstream physiological processes, we examined the expression patterns of period (per), a circadian clock gene, of D. antiqua under temperature cycles that were square wave cycles of 12-h warm phase (W) and 12-h cool phase (C) with the temperature difference of 8 °C (WC 29:21 °C) and 1 °C (WC 25.5:24.5 °C). The phase of oscillation in per expression was found to commence 3.5h earlier under WC 25.5:24.5 °C as compared to WC 29:21 °C. This difference was in close agreement with the eclosion time difference between the two temperature cycles, suggesting that the mechanism that responds to the temperature amplitude involves the circadian clock.

  14. Non-circadian expression masking clock-driven weak transcription rhythms in U2OS cells.

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    Julia Hoffmann

    Full Text Available U2OS cells harbor a circadian clock but express only a few rhythmic genes in constant conditions. We identified 3040 binding sites of the circadian regulators BMAL1, CLOCK and CRY1 in the U2OS genome. Most binding sites even in promoters do not correlate with detectable rhythmic transcript levels. Luciferase fusions reveal that the circadian clock supports robust but low amplitude transcription rhythms of representative promoters. However, rhythmic transcription of these potentially clock-controlled genes is masked by non-circadian transcription that overwrites the weaker contribution of the clock in constant conditions. Our data suggest that U2OS cells harbor an intrinsically rather weak circadian oscillator. The oscillator has the potential to regulate a large number of genes. The contribution of circadian versus non-circadian transcription is dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and may determine the apparent complexity of the circadian transcriptome.

  15. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  16. Phase analysis of circadian-related genes in two tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Leping

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent circadian clock studies using gene expression microarray in two different tissues of mouse have revealed not all circadian-related genes are synchronized in phase or peak expression times across tissues in vivo. Instead, some circadian-related genes may be delayed by 4–8 hrs in peak expression in one tissue relative to the other. These interesting biological observations prompt a statistical question regarding how to distinguish the synchronized genes from genes that are systematically lagged in phase/peak expression time across two tissues. Results We propose a set of techniques from circular statistics to analyze phase angles of circadian-related genes in two tissues. We first estimate the phases of a cycling gene separately in each tissue, which are then used to estimate the paired angular difference of the phase angles of the gene in the two tissues. These differences are modeled as a mixture of two von Mises distributions which enables us to cluster genes into two groups; one group having synchronized transcripts with the same phase in the two tissues, the other containing transcripts with a discrepancy in phase between the two tissues. For each cluster of genes we assess the association of phases across the tissue types using circular-circular regression. We also develop a bootstrap methodology based on a circular-circular regression model to evaluate the improvement in fit provided by allowing two components versus a one-component von-Mises model. Conclusion We applied our proposed methodologies to the circadian-related genes common to heart and liver tissues in Storch et al. 2, and found that an estimated 80% of circadian-related transcripts common to heart and liver tissues were synchronized in phase, and the other 20% of transcripts were lagged about 8 hours in liver relative to heart. The bootstrap p-value for being one cluster is 0.063, which suggests the possibility of two clusters. Our methodologies can

  17. The molecular clock regulates circadian transcription of tissue factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohkura, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is involved in endotoxin-induced inflammation and mortality. We found that the circadian expression of TF mRNA, which peaked at the day to night transition (activity onset), was damped in the liver of Clock mutant mice. Luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses using embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type or Clock mutant mice showed that CLOCK is involved in transcription of the TF gene. Furthermore, the results of real-time luciferase reporter experiments revealed that the circadian expression of TF mRNA is regulated by clock molecules through a cell-autonomous mechanism via an E-box element located in the promoter region.

  18. Photoperiodic regulation of the sucrose transporter StSUT4 affects the expression of circadian-regulated genes and ethylene production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela eChincinska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Several recent publications report different subcellular localisation of members of the SUT4 subfamily of sucrose transporters. The physiological function of SUT4 sucrose transporters is still not entirely clarified as down-regulation of members of the SUT4 clade had very different effects in rice, poplar and potato. Here, we provide new data on the localization and function of the Solanaceous StSUT4 protein, further elucidating involvement in the onset of flowering, tuberization and in the shade avoidance syndrome of potato plants.Induction of early flowering and tuberization in SUT4-inhibited potato plants correlates with increased sucrose export from leaves and increased sucrose and starch accumulation in terminal sink organs such as developing tubers. SUT4 does not only affect the expression of gibberellin and ethylene biosynthetic enzymes, but also the rate of ethylene synthesis in potato. In SUT4-inhibited plants, the ethylene production no longer follows a diurnal rhythm, leading to the assumption that StSUT4 controls circadian gene expression, potentially by regulating sucrose export from leaves. Furthermore, SUT4 expression affects clock-regulated genes such as StFT, StSOC1 and StCO, which might also be involved in a photoperiod-dependently controlled tuberization. A model is proposed in which StSUT4 controls a phloem-mobile signalling molecule generated in leaves which together with enhanced sucrose export affects developmental switches in apical meristems. SUT4 seems to link photoreceptor-perceived information about the light quality and day length, with phytohormone biosynthesis and the expression of circadian genes.

  19. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2010-01-01

    OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP......Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we...

  20. Identified Circadian Rhythm Genes of Ciliary Epithelium with Differential Display

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanxia Li; Dongcheng Lu; Jian Ge; Yanna Li; Yehong Zhuo; Sears ML

    2001-01-01

    Purpose:To identify differential genes expressed in the rabbit ciliary epithelium duringthe circadian cycle of aqueous flow.Methods: Total RNA from ciliary epithelium of rabbits at 8AM (light on 1 hour) and8PM(light off 1 hour) were compared by differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaetion(DD RT-PCR), using 6 % denaturing polyacrylamide electro-phoresis, choose differential display bands, cut and reamplify with the same primer, cloneand sequence. Search the database of Genbank, prolong them with 5' RACE and 3'RACE technique then clone, sequence and search database of Genbank.Results: 93 Significant differences gene expression were detected between light on andlight off in the rabbit ciliary epithelium.Conclusion: Differential display is a powerful tool to screen differentially expressedgenes in circadian rhythm of ciliary epithelium.

  1. Circadian organization of the mammalian retina: from gene regulation to physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Douglas G; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2014-03-01

    The retinal circadian system represents a unique structure. It contains a complete circadian system and thus the retina represents an ideal model to study fundamental questions of how neural circadian systems are organized and what signaling pathways are used to maintain synchrony of the different structures in the system. In addition, several studies have shown that multiple sites within the retina are capable of generating circadian oscillations. The strength of circadian clock gene expression and the emphasis of rhythmic expression are divergent across vertebrate retinas, with photoreceptors as the primary locus of rhythm generation in amphibians, while in mammals clock activity is most robust in the inner nuclear layer. Melatonin and dopamine serve as signaling molecules to entrain circadian rhythms in the retina and also in other ocular structures. Recent studies have also suggested GABA as an important component of the system that regulates retinal circadian rhythms. These transmitter-driven influences on clock molecules apparently reinforce the autonomous transcription-translation cycling of clock genes. The molecular organization of the retinal clock is similar to what has been reported for the SCN although inter-neural communication among retinal neurons that form the circadian network is apparently weaker than those present in the SCN, and it is more sensitive to genetic disruption than the central brain clock. The melatonin-dopamine system is the signaling pathway that allows the retinal circadian clock to reconfigure retinal circuits to enhance light-adapted cone-mediated visual function during the day and dark-adapted rod-mediated visual signaling at night. Additionally, the retinal circadian clock also controls circadian rhythms in disk shedding and phagocytosis, and possibly intraocular pressure. Emerging experimental data also indicate that circadian clock is also implicated in the pathogenesis of eye disease and compelling experimental data

  2. Timing of circadian genes in mammalian tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenčič, Anja; Košir, Rok; Bordyugov, Grigory; Lehmann, Robert; Rozman, Damjana; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous oscillators driving daily rhythms in physiology. The cell-autonomous clock is governed by an interlocked network of transcriptional feedback loops. Hundreds of clock-controlled genes (CCGs) regulate tissue specific functions. Transcriptome studies reveal that different organs (e.g. liver, heart, adrenal gland) feature substantially varying sets of CCGs with different peak phase distributions. To study the phase variability of CCGs in mammalian peripheral tissues, we develop a core clock model for mouse liver and adrenal gland based on expression profiles and known cis-regulatory sites. ‘Modulation factors’ associated with E-boxes, ROR-elements, and D-boxes can explain variable rhythms of CCGs, which is demonstrated for differential regulation of cytochromes P450 and 12 h harmonics. By varying model parameters we explore how tissue-specific peak phase distributions can be generated. The central role of E-boxes and ROR-elements is confirmed by analysing ChIP-seq data of BMAL1 and REV-ERB transcription factors. PMID:25048020

  3. Photoperiodic Modulation of Circadian Clock and Reproductive Axis Gene Expression in the Pre-Pubertal European Sea Bass Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rute S T Martins

    Full Text Available The acquisition of reproductive competence requires the activation of the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG axis, which in most vertebrates, including fishes, is initiated by changes in photoperiod. In the European sea bass long-term exposure to continuous light (LL alters the rhythm of reproductive hormones, delays spermatogenesis and reduces the incidence of precocious males. In contrast, an early shift from long to short photoperiod (AP accelerates spermatogenesis. However, how photoperiod affects key genes in the brain to trigger the onset of puberty is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated if the integration of the light stimulus by clock proteins is sufficient to activate key genes that trigger the BPG axis in the European sea bass. We found that the clock genes clock, npas2, bmal1 and the BPG genes gnrh, kiss and kissr share conserved transcription factor frameworks in their promoters, suggesting co-regulation. Other gene promoters of the BGP axis were also predicted to be co-regulated by the same frameworks. Co-regulation was confirmed through gene expression analysis of brains from males exposed to LL or AP photoperiod compared to natural conditions: LL fish had suppressed gnrh1, kiss2, galr1b and esr1, while AP fish had stimulated npas2, gnrh1, gnrh2, kiss2, kiss1rb and galr1b compared to NP. It is concluded that fish exposed to different photoperiods present significant expression differences in some clock and reproductive axis related genes well before the first detectable endocrine and morphological responses of the BPG axis.

  4. Photoperiodic Modulation of Circadian Clock and Reproductive Axis Gene Expression in the Pre-Pubertal European Sea Bass Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Rute S. T.; Gomez, Ana; Zanuy, Silvia; Carrillo, Manuel; Canário, Adelino V. M.

    2015-01-01

    The acquisition of reproductive competence requires the activation of the brain-pituitary-gonad (BPG) axis, which in most vertebrates, including fishes, is initiated by changes in photoperiod. In the European sea bass long-term exposure to continuous light (LL) alters the rhythm of reproductive hormones, delays spermatogenesis and reduces the incidence of precocious males. In contrast, an early shift from long to short photoperiod (AP) accelerates spermatogenesis. However, how photoperiod affects key genes in the brain to trigger the onset of puberty is still largely unknown. Here, we investigated if the integration of the light stimulus by clock proteins is sufficient to activate key genes that trigger the BPG axis in the European sea bass. We found that the clock genes clock, npas2, bmal1 and the BPG genes gnrh, kiss and kissr share conserved transcription factor frameworks in their promoters, suggesting co-regulation. Other gene promoters of the BGP axis were also predicted to be co-regulated by the same frameworks. Co-regulation was confirmed through gene expression analysis of brains from males exposed to LL or AP photoperiod compared to natural conditions: LL fish had suppressed gnrh1, kiss2, galr1b and esr1, while AP fish had stimulated npas2, gnrh1, gnrh2, kiss2, kiss1rb and galr1b compared to NP. It is concluded that fish exposed to different photoperiods present significant expression differences in some clock and reproductive axis related genes well before the first detectable endocrine and morphological responses of the BPG axis. PMID:26641263

  5. Differential resetting process of circadian gene expression in rat pineal glands after the reversal of the light/dark cycle via a 24 h light or dark period transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Dong, Yue; Yang, Zhiqiu; Kato, Hisanori; Ni, Yinhua; Fu, Zhengwei

    2009-07-01

    Although studies involving the circadian response to time-zone transitions indicate that the circadian clock usually takes much longer to phase advance than delay, the discrepancy between the circadian resetting induced by photoperiod alteration via a dark or light period transition has yet to be investigated. In mammals, the pineal gland is an important component in the photoneuroendocrine axis, regulating biological rhythms. However, few studies have systematically examined the resetting process of pineal clock-gene expression to date. We investigated the resetting processes of four clock genes (Bmal1, Cry1, Per1, Dec1) and AANAT in the rat pineal gland after the light-dark (LD) reversal via a 24 h light or dark period transition. The resynchronization of the SCN-driven gene AANAT was nearly complete in three days in both situations, displaying similar resetting rates and processes after the differential LD reversals. The resetting processes of the clock genes were characterized by gene-specific, phase-shift modes and differential phase-shift rates between the two different LD reversal modes. The resetting processes of these clock genes were noticeably lengthened after the LD reversal via the light period transition in comparison to via the dark period transition. In addition, among the four examined clock genes, Per1 adjusted most rapidly after the differential LD reversals, while the rhythmic Cry1 expression adjusted most slowly.

  6. Circadian Kisspeptin expression in human term placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pedro, M A; Morán, J; Díaz, I; Murias, L; Fernández-Plaza, C; González, C; Díaz, E

    2015-11-01

    Kisspeptin is an essential gatekeeper of reproductive function. During pregnancy high circulating levels of kisspeptin have been described, however the clear role of this neuropeptide in pregnancy remains unknown. We tested the existence of rhythmic kisspeptin expression in human full-term placenta from healthy pregnant women at six different time points during the day. The data obtained by Western blotting were fitted to a mathematical model (Fourier series), demonstrating, for the first time, the existence of a circadian rhythm in placental kisspeptin expression.

  7. 不同昼夜节律下小鼠肝脏生物钟基因表达的变化及异氟醚麻醉对肝脏生物钟基因表达的影响%Changes in expression of hepatic circadian clock gene in different types of circadian rhythm and effect of isoflurane anesthesia on expression of hepatic circadian clock gene in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔银; 夏天娇; 马正良; 顾小萍

    2014-01-01

    目的 探讨不同昼夜节律下小鼠肝脏生物钟基因表达的变化及异氟醚麻醉对肝脏生物钟基因表达的影响.方法 选择雄性C57/B6小鼠72只,2月龄,体重20 ~ 25 g,采用随机数字表法,将其分为3组(n=24),昼夜节律正常组:采用12h光照(光照期8:00-20:00)与12 h黑暗(黑暗期20:00-8:00)交替,持续3周;昼夜节律颠倒组:采用12h黑暗(黑暗期8:00-20:00)与12 h光照(光照期20:00-8:00)交替,持续3周;麻醉组:光照处理同昼夜节律正常组,持续3周后,行麻醉处理.将自然时间转换为昼夜节律时间(CT),以光照起点定为CT0.麻醉组在小鼠的相对觉醒期行2%异氟醚麻醉6h,即CT14开始,持续至CT20.于CT2、CT8、CT14、CT20时取下丘脑视交叉上核(SCN)和肝脏,采用实时定量聚合酶链反应方法测定Clock mRNA及Cry1 mRNA表达.结果 两种昼夜节律下小鼠肝脏与SCN中Crv1 mRNA、Clock mRNA表达都呈现节律性.与SCN比较,两种昼夜节律下肝脏Cry1mRNA及Clock mRNA表达的峰值相位均滞后;与昼夜节律正常组比较,麻醉组肝脏Cry1 mRNA及Clock mRNA表达的峰值相位滞后.结论 不同昼夜节律下肝脏生物钟基因呈现节律性表达,且异氟醚麻醉可导致其表达峰值相位的明显滞后.%Objective To investigate the changes in the expression of hepatic circadian clock gene in different types of circadian rhythm and the effect of isoflurane anesthesia on the expression of hepatic circadian clwk gene in mice.Methods Seventy-two male C57/B6 mice,aged 2 months,weighing 20-25 g,were randomly divided into 3 groups (n =24 each):normal light/dark (LD) cycle group,reversal LD cycle group and anesthesia group.Normal LD cycle group and anesthesia groupwere maintained in a regular 12 h LD cycle with lights on at 8:00 am and off at 8:00 pm for 3 weeks,and in addition anesthesia was then performed with isoflurane in anesthesia group.Reversal LD cycle group was kept in an inverted12 h LD cycle with lights on at 8

  8. Circadian clocks and breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Blakeman, Victoria; Jack L. Williams; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, an...

  9. An unusual gene arrangement for the putative chromosome replication origin and circadian expression of dnaN in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Tsinoremas, N F

    1996-06-12

    In eubacteria, the clustering of DnaA boxes around the dnaN (beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) and dnaA genes usually defines the chromosome replication origin (oriC). In this study, the dnaN locus from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was sequenced. The gene order in this region is cbbZp-dnaN-orf288-purL-purF which contrasts with other eubacteria. A cluster of eleven DnaA boxes (consensus sequence: TTTTCCACA) was found in the intergenic region between dnaN and cbbZp. We also found a 41-bp sequence within this region that is 80% identical to the proposed oriC of Streptomyces coelicolor. Therefore, we propose that this intergenic region may serve as an oriC in Synechococcus. Using bacterial luciferase as a reporter, we also showed that dnaN is rhythmically expressed, suggesting that DNA replication could be under circadian control in this organism.

  10. Digital signal processing reveals circadian baseline oscillation in majority of mammalian genes.

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    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, circadian periodicity has been described for gene expression in the hypothalamus and multiple peripheral tissues. It is accepted that 10%-15% of all genes oscillate in a daily rhythm, regulated by an intrinsic molecular clock. Statistical analyses of periodicity are limited by the small size of datasets and high levels of stochastic noise. Here, we propose a new approach applying digital signal processing algorithms separately to each group of genes oscillating in the same phase. Combined with the statistical tests for periodicity, this method identifies circadian baseline oscillation in almost 100% of all expressed genes. Consequently, circadian oscillation in gene expression should be evaluated in any study related to biological pathways. Changes in gene expression caused by mutations or regulation of environmental factors (such as photic stimuli or feeding should be considered in the context of changes in the amplitude and phase of genetic oscillations.

  11. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  12. Circadian variations of clock gene Per2 and cell cycle genes in different stages of carcinogenesis in golden hamster buccal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xue-Mei; Ye, Hua; Yang, Kai; Chen, Dan; Wang, Qing-Qing; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Ning-Bo

    2015-05-07

    Previous studies have suggested that the expression of clock genes have circadian rhythms, and many cell cycle genes are regulated by clock genes. The disruption of circadian rhythms appears to be associated with the acceleration of cancer development. To investigate the circadian patterns of the clock gene Per2 and of cell cycle genes p53, Cyclin D1, CDK1 and Cyclin B1 in different stages of carcinogenesis, the daily mRNA profiles of these genes were detected by real-time RT-PCR in dimethylbenzanthracene-induced cancer, in precancerous lesions and in normal tissues. Per2, p53, Cyclin D1 and CDK1 showed circadian rhythms in the 3 different stages of carcinogenesis, whereas the circadian rhythm of Cyclin B1 was absent in the precancerous lesions. The mesors and amplitudes of Per2 and p53 were decreased (P circadian pattern variations of these genes in different stages of carcinogenesis.

  13. Human Gut Bacteria Are Sensitive to Melatonin and Express Endogenous Circadian Rhythmicity.

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    Jiffin K Paulose

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are fundamental properties of most eukaryotes, but evidence of biological clocks that drive these rhythms in prokaryotes has been restricted to Cyanobacteria. In vertebrates, the gastrointestinal system expresses circadian patterns of gene expression, motility and secretion in vivo and in vitro, and recent studies suggest that the enteric microbiome is regulated by the host's circadian clock. However, it is not clear how the host's clock regulates the microbiome. Here, we demonstrate at least one species of commensal bacterium from the human gastrointestinal system, Enterobacter aerogenes, is sensitive to the neurohormone melatonin, which is secreted into the gastrointestinal lumen, and expresses circadian patterns of swarming and motility. Melatonin specifically increases the magnitude of swarming in cultures of E. aerogenes, but not in Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae. The swarming appears to occur daily, and transformation of E. aerogenes with a flagellar motor-protein driven lux plasmid confirms a temperature-compensated circadian rhythm of luciferase activity, which is synchronized in the presence of melatonin. Altogether, these data demonstrate a circadian clock in a non-cyanobacterial prokaryote and suggest the human circadian system may regulate its microbiome through the entrainment of bacterial clocks.

  14. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

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    Francine Z Marques

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP, as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12 and 'trough' (n = 6 of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  15. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Campain, Anna E; Davern, Pamela J; Yang, Yee Hwa J; Head, Geoffrey A; Morris, Brian J

    2011-04-26

    Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP), as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12) and 'trough' (n = 6) of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension.

  16. Photoperiodic diapause under the control of circadian clock genes in an insect

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    Ikeno Tomoko

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most organisms have evolved a circadian clock in order to anticipate daily environmental changes and many of these organisms are also capable of sophisticated measurement of daylength (photoperiodism that is used to regulate seasonal events such as diapause, migration and polymorphism. It has been generally accepted that the same elements are involved in both circadian (daily and seasonal (annual rhythms because both rely upon daily light-dark cycles. However, as reasonable as this sounds, there remains no conclusive evidence of such a molecular machinery in insects. We have approached this issue by using RNA interference (RNAi in Riptortus pedestris. Results The cuticle deposition rhythm exhibited the major properties of circadian rhythms, indicating that the rhythm is regulated by a circadian clock. RNAi directed against the circadian clock genes of period and cycle, which are negative and positive regulators in the circadian clock, respectively, disrupted the cuticle deposition rhythm and distinct cuticle layers were produced by these RNAi. Simultaneously, period RNAi caused the insect to avert diapause under a diapause-inducing photoperiod whereas cycle RNAi induced diapause under a diapause-averting photoperiod. The expression patterns of juvenile hormone-regulated genes and the application of juvenile hormone analogue suggested that neither ovarian development itself nor a downstream cascade of juvenile hormone secretion, were disturbed by period and cycle RNAi. Conclusions This study revealed that the circadian clock genes are crucial not only for daily rhythms but also for photoperiodic diapause. RNAi directed against period and cycle had opposite effects not only in the circadian cuticle deposition rhythm but also in the photoperiodic diapause. These RNAi also had opposite effects on juvenile hormone-regulated gene expression. It is still possible that the circadian clock genes pleiotropically affect ovarian

  17. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on circadian and sleep parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malcolm Von Schantz

    2008-12-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep are two separate but intimately related processes. Circadian rhythms are generated through the precisely controlled, cyclic expression of a number of genes designated clock genes. Genetic variability in these genes has been associated with a number of phenotypic differences in circadian as well as sleep parameters, both in mouse models and in humans. Diurnal preferences as determined by the selfreported Horne–Östberg (HÖ) questionnaire, has been associated with polymorphisms in the human genes CLOCK, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been associated with mutations and polymorphisms in clock genes, with the advanced type cosegrating in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with mutations in the genes PER2 and CSNK1D, and the delayed type associating without discernible Mendelian inheritance with polymorphisms in CLOCK and PER3. Several mouse models of clock gene null alleles have been demonstrated to have affected sleep homeostasis. Recent findings have shown that the variable number tandem polymorphism in PER3, previously linked to diurnal preference, has profound effects on sleep homeostasis and cognitive performance following sleep loss, confirming the close association between the processes of circadian rhythms and sleep at the genetic level.

  18. Circadian clock genes contribute to the regulation of hair follicle cycling.

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    Kevin K Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hair follicles undergo recurrent cycling of controlled growth (anagen, regression (catagen, and relative quiescence (telogen with a defined periodicity. Taking a genomics approach to study gene expression during synchronized mouse hair follicle cycling, we discovered that, in addition to circadian fluctuation, CLOCK-regulated genes are also modulated in phase with the hair growth cycle. During telogen and early anagen, circadian clock genes are prominently expressed in the secondary hair germ, which contains precursor cells for the growing follicle. Analysis of Clock and Bmal1 mutant mice reveals a delay in anagen progression, and the secondary hair germ cells show decreased levels of phosphorylated Rb and lack mitotic cells, suggesting that circadian clock genes regulate anagen progression via their effect on the cell cycle. Consistent with a block at the G1 phase of the cell cycle, we show a significant upregulation of p21 in Bmal1 mutant skin. While circadian clock mechanisms have been implicated in a variety of diurnal biological processes, our findings indicate that circadian clock genes may be utilized to modulate the progression of non-diurnal cyclic processes.

  19. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

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    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  20. Assignment of an essential role for the Neurospora frequency gene in circadian entrainment to temperature cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregueiro, Antonio M; Price-Lloyd, Nathan; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah; Heintzen, Christian; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2005-02-08

    Circadian systems include slave oscillators and central pacemakers, and the cores of eukaryotic circadian clocks described to date are composed of transcription and translation feedback loops (TTFLs). In the model system Neurospora, normal circadian rhythmicity requires a TTFL in which a White Collar complex (WCC) activates expression of the frequency (frq) gene, and the FRQ protein feeds back to attenuate that activation. To further test the centrality of this TTFL to the circadian mechanism in Neurospora, we used low-amplitude temperature cycles to compare WT and frq-null strains under conditions in which a banding rhythm was elicited. WT cultures were entrained to these temperature cycles. Unlike those normal strains, however, frq-null mutants did not truly entrain to the same cycles. Their peaks and troughs always occurred in the cold and warm periods, respectively, strongly suggesting that the rhythm in Neurospora lacking frq function simply is driven by the temperature cycles. Previous reports suggested that a FRQ-less oscillator (FLO) could be entrained to temperature cycles, rather than being driven, and speculated that the FLO was the underlying circadian-rhythm generator. These inferences appear to derive from the use of a phase reference point affected by both the changing waveform and the phase of the oscillation. Examination of several other phase markers as well as results of additional experimental tests indicate that the FLO is, at best, a slave oscillator to the TTFL, which underlies circadian rhythm generation in Neurospora.

  1. Determination of reference genes for circadian studies in different tissues and mouse strains

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    Kosir Rok

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian rhythms have a profound effect on human health. Their disruption can lead to serious pathologies, such as cancer and obesity. Gene expression studies in these pathologies are often studied in different mouse strains by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR. Selection of reference genes is a crucial step of qPCR experiments. Recent studies show that reference gene stability can vary between species and tissues, but none has taken circadian experiments into consideration. Results In the present study the expression of ten candidate reference genes (Actb, Eif2a, Gapdh, Hmbs, Hprt1, Ppib, Rn18s, Rplp0, Tbcc and Utp6c was measured in 131 liver and 97 adrenal gland samples taken from three mouse strains (C57BL/6JOlaHsd, 129Pas plus C57BL/6J and Crem KO on 129Pas plus C57BL/6J background every 4 h in a 24 h period. Expression stability was evaluated by geNorm and NormFinder programs. Differences in ranking of the most stable reference genes were observed both between individual mouse strains as well as between tissues within each mouse strain. We show that selection of reference gene (Actb that is often used for analyses in individual mouse strains leads to errors if used for normalization when different mouse strains are compared. We identified alternative reference genes that are stable in these comparisons. Conclusions Genetic background and circadian time influence the expression stability of reference genes. Differences between mouse strains and tissues should be taken into consideration to avoid false interpretations. We show that the use of a single reference gene can lead to false biological conclusions. This manuscript provides a useful reference point for researchers that search for stable reference genes in the field of circadian biology.

  2. Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... microbes. The study of circadian rhythms is called chronobiology. Are circadian rhythms the same thing as biological ... the eyes cross. Do circadian rhythms have a genetic component? Yes. Researchers have already identified genes that ...

  3. Autonomous regulation of the insect gut by circadian genes acting downstream of juvenile hormone signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgar, Adam; Jindra, Marek; Dolezel, David

    2013-03-12

    In temperate regions, the shortening day length informs many insect species to prepare for winter by inducing diapause. The adult diapause of the linden bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus, involves a reproductive arrest accompanied by energy storage, reduction of metabolic needs, and preparation to withstand low temperatures. By contrast, nondiapause animals direct nutrient energy to muscle activity and reproduction. The photoperiod-dependent switch from diapause to reproduction is systemically transmitted throughout the organism by juvenile hormone (JH). Here, we show that, at the organ-autonomous level of the insect gut, the decision between reproduction and diapause relies on an interaction between JH signaling and circadian clock genes acting independently of the daily cycle. The JH receptor Methoprene-tolerant and the circadian proteins Clock and Cycle are all required in the gut to activate the Par domain protein 1 gene during reproduction and to simultaneously suppress a mammalian-type cryptochrome 2 gene that promotes the diapause program. A nonperiodic, organ-autonomous feedback between Par domain protein 1 and Cryptochrome 2 then orchestrates expression of downstream genes that mark the diapause vs. reproductive states of the gut. These results show that hormonal signaling through Methoprene-tolerant and circadian proteins controls gut-specific gene activity that is independent of circadian oscillations but differs between reproductive and diapausing animals.

  4. Circadian dysregulation of clock genes: clues to rapid treatments in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunney, B G; Li, J Z; Walsh, D M; Stein, R; Vawter, M P; Cartagena, P; Barchas, J D; Schatzberg, A F; Myers, R M; Watson, S J; Akil, H; Bunney, W E

    2015-02-01

    Conventional antidepressants require 2-8 weeks for a full clinical response. In contrast, two rapidly acting antidepressant interventions, low-dose ketamine and sleep deprivation (SD) therapy, act within hours to robustly decrease depressive symptoms in a subgroup of major depressive disorder (MDD) patients. Evidence that MDD may be a circadian-related illness is based, in part, on a large set of clinical data showing that diurnal rhythmicity (sleep, temperature, mood and hormone secretion) is altered during depressive episodes. In a microarray study, we observed widespread changes in cyclic gene expression in six regions of postmortem brain tissue of depressed patients matched with controls for time-of-death (TOD). We screened 12 000 transcripts and observed that the core clock genes, essential for controlling virtually all rhythms in the body, showed robust 24-h sinusoidal expression patterns in six brain regions in control subjects. In MDD patients matched for TOD with controls, the expression patterns of the clock genes in brain were significantly dysregulated. Some of the most robust changes were seen in anterior cingulate (ACC). These findings suggest that in addition to structural abnormalities, lesion studies, and the large body of functional brain imaging studies reporting increased activation in the ACC of depressed patients who respond to a wide range of therapies, there may be a circadian dysregulation in clock gene expression in a subgroup of MDDs. Here, we review human, animal and neuronal cell culture data suggesting that both low-dose ketamine and SD can modulate circadian rhythms. We hypothesize that the rapid antidepressant actions of ketamine and SD may act, in part, to reset abnormal clock genes in MDD to restore and stabilize circadian rhythmicity. Conversely, clinical relapse may reflect a desynchronization of the clock, indicative of a reactivation of abnormal clock gene function. Future work could involve identifying specific small

  5. Role of type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 in the regulation of Circadian Per1 gene.

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    Jungtae Na

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are the endogenous oscillators that regulate rhythmic physiological and behavioral changes to correspond to daily light-dark cycles. Molecular dissections have revealed that transcriptional feedback loops of the circadian clock genes drive the molecular oscillation, in which PER/CRY complexes inhibit the transcriptional activity of the CLOCK/BMAL1 heterodimer to constitute a negative feedback loop. In this study, we identified the type II protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 as an interacting molecule of CRY1. Although the Prmt5 gene was constitutively expressed, increased interaction of PRMT5 with CRY1 was observed when the Per1 gene was repressed both in synchronized mouse liver and NIH3T3 cells. Moreover, rhythmic recruitment of PRMT5 and CRY1 to the Per1 gene promoter was found to be associated with an increased level of histone H4R3 dimethylation and Per1 gene repression. Consistently, decreased histone H4R3 dimethylation and altered rhythmic Per1 gene expression were observed in Prmt5-depleted cells. Taken together, these findings provide an insight into the link between histone arginine methylation by PRMT5 and transcriptional regulation of the circadian Per1 gene.

  6. Smith-Magenis syndrome results in disruption of CLOCK gene transcription and reveals an integral role for RAI1 in the maintenance of circadian rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen R; Zies, Deborah; Mullegama, Sureni V; Grotewiel, Michael S; Elsea, Sarah H

    2012-06-08

    Haploinsufficiency of RAI1 results in Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), a disorder characterized by intellectual disability, multiple congenital anomalies, obesity, neurobehavioral abnormalities, and a disrupted circadian sleep-wake pattern. An inverted melatonin rhythm (i.e., melatonin peaks during the day instead of at night) and associated sleep-phase disturbances in individuals with SMS, as well as a short-period circadian rhythm in mice with a chromosomal deletion of Rai1, support SMS as a circadian-rhythm-dysfunction disorder. However, the molecular cause of the circadian defect in SMS has not been described. The circadian oscillator temporally orchestrates metabolism, physiology, and behavior largely through transcriptional modulation. Data support RAI1 as a transcriptional regulator, but the genes it might regulate are largely unknown. Investigation into the role that RAI1 plays in the regulation of gene transcription and circadian maintenance revealed that RAI1 regulates the transcription of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a key component of the mammalian circadian oscillator that transcriptionally regulates many critical circadian genes. Data further show that haploinsufficiency of RAI1 and Rai1 in SMS fibroblasts and the mouse hypothalamus, respectively, results in the transcriptional dysregulation of the circadian clock and causes altered expression and regulation of multiple circadian genes, including PER2, PER3, CRY1, BMAL1, and others. These data suggest that heterozygous mutation of RAI1 and Rai1 leads to a disrupted circadian rhythm and thus results in an abnormal sleep-wake cycle, which can contribute to an abnormal feeding pattern and dependent cognitive performance. Finally, we conclude that RAI1 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CLOCK, pinpointing a novel and important role for this gene in the circadian oscillator.

  7. Rhythmic profiles of cell cycle and circadian clock gene transcripts in mice: a possible association between two periodic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Yuval; Ashkenazi, Israel E; Peleg, Leah

    2013-06-15

    The circadian system shapes the rhythms of most biological functions. The regulation of the cell cycle by a circadian clock was suggested to operate via stages S, G2 and G2/M. This study investigated a possible time link at stages G1 and G1/S as well. The daily expression profiles of cell cycle markers (Ccnd1, Ccne1 and Pcna) and circadian clock genes (Per2 and Clock) were monitored in liver and esophagus (low and high proliferation index, respectively) of BALB/c mice. Locomotor activity displayed a 24 h rhythm, establishing the circadian organization of the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In the liver, the mRNA level of Per2 and Clock fitted the circadian rhythm with a 7.5 h shift. This temporal pattern suggests that the liver harbors a functional circadian clock. The rhythm of the analyzed cell cycle genes, however, was of low significance fitness and showed an opposite peak time between Pcna and Clock. These results indicate a weak regulatory role of the circadian clock. In the esophagus, the rhythms of Clock and Per2 mRNA had a similar peak time and non-circadian periods. These results suggest either that the esophagus does not harbor a functional circadian apparatus or that the phenotypes stem from differences in phase and amplitude of the rhythms of its various cell types. The similarity in the rhythm parameters of Clock, Ccne1 and Pcna transcripts questions the control of the circadian clock on the cell cycle along the G1 and G1/S stages. Yet the G1/S transition may play a role in modulating the local clock of proliferating tissues.

  8. Synchronized human skeletal myotubes of lean, obese and type 2 diabetic patients maintain circadian oscillation of clock genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jan; Timmers, Silvie; Moonen-Kornips, Esther; Duez, Helene; Staels, Bart; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.; Schrauwen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Cell and animal studies have demonstrated that circadian rhythm is governed by autonomous rhythmicity of clock genes. Although disturbances in circadian rhythm have been implicated in metabolic disease development, it remains unknown whether muscle circadian rhythm is altered in human models of type 2 diabetes. Here we used human primary myotubes (HPM) to investigate if rhythmicity of clock- and metabolic gene expression is altered in donors with obesity or type 2 diabetes compared to metabolically healthy donors. HPM were obtained from skeletal muscle biopsies of four groups: type 2 diabetic patients and their BMI- and age-matched obese controls and from lean, healthy and young endurance trained athletes and their age-matched sedentary controls. HPM were differentiated for 7 days before synchronization by serum shock followed by gene expression profiling over the next 72 hours. HPM display robust circadian rhythms in clock genes, but REVERBA displayed dampened rhythmicity in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, rhythmicity in NAMPT and SIRT1 expression was only observed in HPM from trained athletes. Rhythmicity in expression of key-regulators of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism was modest. We demonstrate that in human skeletal muscle REVERBA/B, NAMPT and SIRT1 circadian rhythms are affected in donors of sedentary life style and poor health status. PMID:27756900

  9. An approximation to the temporal order in endogenous circadian rhythms of genes implicated in human adipose tissue metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garaulet, Marta; Ordovás, José M; Gómez-Abellán, Purificación; Martínez, Jose A; Madrid, Juan A

    2011-08-01

    Although it is well established that human adipose tissue (AT) shows circadian rhythmicity, published studies have been discussed as if tissues or systems showed only one or few circadian rhythms at a time. To provide an overall view of the internal temporal order of circadian rhythms in human AT including genes implicated in metabolic processes such as energy intake and expenditure, insulin resistance, adipocyte differentiation, dyslipidemia, and body fat distribution. Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies (n=6) were obtained from morbid obese women (BMI≥40 kg/m(2) ). To investigate rhythmic expression pattern, AT explants were cultured during 24-h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00 h using quantitative real-time PCR. Clock genes, glucocorticoid metabolism-related genes, leptin, adiponectin and their receptors were studied. Significant differences were found both in achrophases and relative-amplitude among genes (P30%). When interpreting the phase map of gene expression in both depots, data indicated that circadian rhythmicity of the genes studied followed a predictable physiological pattern, particularly for subcutaneous AT. Interesting are the relationships between adiponectin, leptin, and glucocorticoid metabolism-related genes circadian profiles. Their metabolic significance is discussed. Visceral AT behaved in a different way than subcutaneous for most of the genes studied. For every gene, protein mRNA levels fluctuated during the day in synchrony with its receptors. We have provided an overall view of the internal temporal order of circadian rhythms in human adipose tissue.

  10. Modulation of metabolic and clock gene mRNA rhythms by pineal and retinal circadian oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaganis, Stephen P.; Bartell, Paul A.; Shende, Vikram R.; Moore, Ashli F.; Cassone, Vincent M.

    2009-01-01

    Avian circadian organization involves interactions between three neural pacemakers: the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), pineal, and retina. Each of these structures is linked within a neuroendocrine loop to influence downstream processes and peripheral oscillations. However, the contribution of each structure to drive or synchronize peripheral oscillators or circadian outputs in avian species is largely unknown. To explore these interactions in the chick, we measured 2-deoxy[14C]-glucose (2DG) uptake and mRNA expression of the chick clock genes bmal1, cry1, and per3 in three brain areas and in two peripheral organs in chicks that underwent pinealectomy, enucleation, or sham surgery. We found that 2DG uptake rhythms damp under constant darkness in intact animals, while clock gene mRNA levels continue to cycle, demonstrating that metabolic rhythms are not directly driven by clock gene transcription. Moreover, 2DG rhythms are not phase-locked to rhythms of clock gene mRNA. However, pinealectomy and enucleation had similar disruptive effects on both metabolic and clock gene rhythms, suggesting that both of these oscillators act similarly to reinforce molecular and physiological rhythms in the chicken. Finally, we show that the relative phasing of at least one clock gene, cry1, varies between central and peripheral oscillators in a tissue specific manner. These data point to a complex, differential orchestration of central and peripheral oscillators in the chick, and, importantly, indicate a disconnect between canonical clock gene regulation and circadian control of metabolism. PMID:19136000

  11. Maternal obesity disrupts circadian rhythms of clock and metabolic genes in the offspring heart and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Danfeng; Chen, Siyu; Liu, Mei; Liu, Chang

    2015-06-01

    Early life nutritional adversity is tightly associated with the development of long-term metabolic disorders. Particularly, maternal obesity and high-fat diets cause high risk of obesity in the offspring. Those offspring are also prone to develop hyperinsulinemia, hepatic steatosis and cardiovascular diseases. However, the precise underlying mechanisms leading to these metabolic dysregulation in the offspring remain unclear. On the other hand, disruptions of diurnal circadian rhythms are known to impair metabolic homeostasis in various tissues including the heart and liver. Therefore, we investigated that whether maternal obesity perturbs the circadian expression rhythms of clock, metabolic and inflammatory genes in offspring heart and liver by using RT-qPCR and Western blotting analysis. Offspring from lean and obese dams were examined on postnatal day 17 and 35, when pups were nursed by their mothers or took food independently. On P17, genes examined in the heart either showed anti-phase oscillations (Cpt1b, Pparα, Per2) or had greater oscillation amplitudes (Bmal1, Tnf-α, Il-6). Such phase abnormalities of these genes were improved on P35, while defects in amplitudes still existed. In the liver of 17-day-old pups exposed to maternal obesity, the oscillation amplitudes of most rhythmic genes examined (except Bmal1) were strongly suppressed. On P35, the oscillations of circadian and inflammatory genes became more robust in the liver, while metabolic genes were still kept non-rhythmic. Maternal obesity also had a profound influence in the protein expression levels of examined genes in offspring heart and liver. Our observations indicate that the circadian clock undergoes nutritional programing, which may contribute to the alternations in energy metabolism associated with the development of metabolic disorders in early life and adulthood.

  12. Circannual and circadian rhythms of hypothalamic DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase expression in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Tyler J

    2017-03-01

    Precise timing of gene transcription is a fundamental component of many biological rhythms. DNA methylation and histone acetylation are two epigenetic modifications that can affect the probability of gene transcription and RNA expression. Enzymes involved in DNA methylation (dnmts) have been shown to exhibit photoperiodic rhythms in expression in the hypothalamus, which coincide with hypothalamic expression of deiodinase type III (dio3), a gene involved in the photoperiodic regulation of reproduction. It is currently unknown whether enzymes involved in histone deacetylation (hdacs) also vary in response to photoperiod, nor have seasonal changes in the circadian waveforms of methylation and/or acetylation enzymes been examined. The present work documents circadian and photoperiodic changes in dnmts and hdacs in whole hypothalamic dissections obtained from male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) after 5-6weeks of exposure to SD. The data indicate that short days (SD) markedly inhibit dnmt3a expression, and that SD inhibition of dnmt3a was evident regardless of the alignment of circadian waveforms. Among hdacs, photoperiodic and circadian changes in expression were only observed in hdac4 expression. Recurrent temporal waveforms in epigenetic enzyme expression may provide molecular inputs to the timing systems that reprogram RNA expression to generate daily and annual phenotypic plasticity.

  13. Altered dynamics in the circadian oscillation of clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of patients suffering from idiopathic hypersomnia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Lippert

    Full Text Available From single cell organisms to the most complex life forms, the 24-hour circadian rhythm is important for numerous aspects of physiology and behavior such as daily periodic fluctuations in body temperature and sleep-wake cycles. Influenced by environmental cues - mainly by light input -, the central pacemaker in the thalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN controls and regulates the internal clock mechanisms which are present in peripheral tissues. In order to correlate modifications in the molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythm with the pathophysiology of idiopathic hypersomnia, this study aimed to investigate the dynamics of the expression of circadian clock genes in dermal fibroblasts of idiopathic hypersomniacs (IH in comparison to those of healthy controls (HC. Ten clinically and polysomnographically proven IH patients were recruited from the department of sleep medicine of the University Hospital of Muenster. Clinical diagnosis was done by two consecutive polysomnographies (PSG and Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT. Fourteen clinical healthy volunteers served as control group. Dermal fibroblasts were obtained via punch biopsy and grown in cell culture. The expression of circadian clock genes was investigated by semiquantitative Reverse Transcriptase-PCR qRT-PCR analysis, confirming periodical oscillation of expression of the core circadian clock genes BMAL1, PER1/2 and CRY1/2. The amplitude of the rhythmically expressed BMAL1, PER1 and PER2 was significantly dampened in dermal fibroblasts of IH compared to HC over two circadian periods whereas the overall expression of only the key transcriptional factor BMAL1 was significantly reduced in IH. Our study suggests for the first time an aberrant dynamics in the circadian clock in IH. These findings may serve to better understand some clinical features of the pathophysiology in sleep - wake rhythms in IH.

  14. Altered circadian rhythm and metabolic gene profile in rats subjected to advanced light phase shifts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Herrero

    Full Text Available The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level.

  15. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark.

  16. Metabolic regulation of circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Michael J; Hearn, Timothy J; Bell, Laura J; Hannah, Matthew A; Webb, Alex A R

    2013-05-01

    Circadian clocks are 24-h timekeeping mechanisms, which have evolved in plants, animals, fungi and bacteria to anticipate changes in light and temperature associated with the rotation of the Earth. The current paradigm to explain how biological clocks provide timing information is based on multiple interlocking transcription-translation negative feedback loops (TTFL), which drive rhythmic gene expression and circadian behaviour of growth and physiology. Metabolism is an important circadian output, which in plants includes photosynthesis, starch metabolism, nutrient assimilation and redox homeostasis. There is increasing evidence in a range of organisms that these metabolic outputs can also contribute to circadian timing and might also comprise independent circadian oscillators. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms of circadian regulation of metabolism by TTFL and consider increasing evidence that rhythmic metabolism contributes to the circadian network. We highlight how this might be relevant to plant circadian clock function.

  17. MYC/MIZ1-dependent gene repression inversely coordinates the circadian clock with cell cycle and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, Anton; Ruppert, Bianca; Ha, Nati; Bruns, Philipp; Toprak, Umut H; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Diernfellner, Axel; Brunner, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are major cellular systems that organize global physiology in temporal fashion. It seems conceivable that the potentially conflicting programs are coordinated. We show here that overexpression of MYC in U2OS cells attenuates the clock and conversely promotes cell proliferation while downregulation of MYC strengthens the clock and reduces proliferation. Inhibition of the circadian clock is crucially dependent on the formation of repressive complexes of MYC with MIZ1 and subsequent downregulation of the core clock genes BMAL1 (ARNTL), CLOCK and NPAS2. We show furthermore that BMAL1 expression levels correlate inversely with MYC levels in 102 human lymphomas. Our data suggest that MYC acts as a master coordinator that inversely modulates the impact of cell cycle and circadian clock on gene expression.

  18. 心肌收缩蛋白基因表达、左室压及收缩力的近日节律%Circadian Rhythm of Gene Expression of Myocardial Contractile Protein,Left Ventricular Pressure and Contractility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Objective A number of cardiovascular variables exhibit a circ adian rhythm. Whethe r myocardial contractile response and gene expression of the contractile protein also show changes with a similar period was here investigated. Method Circadi an variabilities in the left ventricular developed pressure (LVP) and contractil ity (LV dp/dt max) were measured in 24 Sprague-Dawley r ats by directly left ve ntricular catheterizing and compared with changes in the gene expression of α- myosin heavy chain (α-MHC) in myocytes obtained from the same animals by dot b lottin g analysis. Results A circadian rhythm was seen in the variabili ty of LVP (P<0.001), LV dp/dt max (P<0.001) and the bio chemically measured expression of the α- MHC gene (P<0.01). As compared to the amplitude of the rhythm i n α-MHC gene exp ression, the amplitude of the contractility rhythm was large (P< 0.01) and the ci rcadian amplitude of the LVP(P<0.001) was the largest, represent ing perhaps a co mposite of intracardiac plus any extracardiac contributions. Conclusion One of factors determing the circadian rhythm of myocardial contractile function is α -MHC gene expression level.%目的许多心血管变量存在着近日节律,心肌收缩反应及收缩蛋白基因表达是否存在着相应的周期性改变是值得深入研究.方法在24h内采用直接在大白鼠左心室内插入左心导管记录左室压(LVP)和左室压力微分最大值(dp/dtmax)以及检测比较心肌细胞的α-MHC基因表达改变.结果 LVP(P<0.001)、dp/dtmax(P<0.001)和α-MHC(P<0.01)的变化存在着近日节律.通过比较三者近日节律振幅显示LVP的振幅最大,dp/dtmax次之,α-MHC基因表达的节律振幅再次之,表明心肌收缩力的近日节律的变化是由心肌细胞内在和外在作用的结果.结论α-MHC基因表达水平的近日变化是决定着心肌收缩功能的近日节律的因素之一.

  19. Light-dependent changes in the chick pineal temperature and the expression of cHsp90 alpha gene: a potential contribution of in vivo temperature change to the photic-entrainment of the chick pineal circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Masao; Nakajima, Yoshito; Okano, Toshiyuki; Fukada, Yoshitaka

    2002-06-01

    The circadian clock is entrained to the diurnal alteration of environmental conditions such as light and temperature, but the molecular mechanism underlying the entrainment is not fully understood. In the present study, we employed a differential display-based screening for a set of genes that are induced by light in the chick pineal gland, a structure of the central clock entrainable to both light and temperature changes. We found that the level of the mRNA encoding chicken heat shock protein 90 alpha (cHSP90 alpha) was rapidly elevated in the pineal gland within a 5-min exposure of chicks to light. Furthermore, the pineal cHsp90 alpha mRNA was expressed rhythmically under both 12-hr light/12-hr dark (LD) cycles and constant dark (DD) conditions. The total amount of the pineal cHSP90 alpha protein was, however, kept at nearly constant levels under LD cycles, and immunohistochemical analyses of the pineal cHSP90 alpha showed invariable localization at the cytoplasm throughout the day. In vivo measurement of the chick pineal temperature demonstrated its light-dependent and time-of-day-dependent change, and the profile was very similar to that of the pineal cHSP90 alpha mRNA level. These observations suggest that the in vivo temperature change regulates the expression of temperature-responsive genes including cHSP 90 alpha in the pineal gland. The temperature change may induce a phase-shift of the pineal clock, thereby facilitating its efficient entrainment to environmental LD cycles.

  20. 大麦(Hordeum vulgare)昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析%Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 宋萌; 姚涵; 韩渊怀

    2012-01-01

    CCA 1 gene plays an important role in circadian clock sensitivity in rice (Oryza sativa L. ) and Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, CCAl gene in barley was cloned by RT-PCR using homological primers based on the highly conserved region of the multiple alignments of the rice and Arabidopsis. The similarities of this sequence were up to 72% and 69%, respectively, to corresponding mRNA sequences of rice and maize in BLASTx of GenBank database. Using ORF Finder software, a 2157 bp open reading frame was found to code 718 amino acids. Using Compute pI/Mw tool, the amino acid sequence was analyzed, and it revealed that the molecular weight of this protein was about 77 769. 4 Da, and isoelectric point was about 6. 55. We established fluorescence quantitative RT-PCR system with barley inbred lines HUADAMAI 1 and HUADAMAI 2, and studied the expression of CCAl in leaf under 16h/8h (light/ dark) conditions. Expression analysis showed that the gene expression peaked at dawn (ZTO) then gradually declined from ZTO to ZT15, bottomed at ZT15, then increased and returned to the initial level at ZT24. This study will provide information of barley CCAl gene for further studying the function in regulating photoperiod sensitivity in barley, and provide scientific basis for clarifying the mechanism of the circadian synchronization in barley.%昼夜节律钟基因CCA1在调解水稻和拟南芥的光周期反应中起着重要作用.利用BLAST手段以玉米中的CCA1基因序列作为靶序列,调取Genbank数据库信息,并结合RT-PCR方法获得了大麦的cDNA同源序列.BLASTx分析发现其与水稻和玉米的序列相似性分别达到72%和69%.通过ORF Finder软件分析发现,该序列包含一个2157 bp的开放阅读框,编码一个由718个氨基酸残基组成的蛋白序列,其分子量为77769.4 Da,等电点为6.55.采用实时荧光定量PCR分析发现,随光照时间的变化,该基因在大麦叶片中的表达量呈现出白天不断降低而夜晚逐渐

  1. The nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75 are required for the circadian rhythm in a primitive insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamae, Yuichi; Uryu, Outa; Miki, Taiki; Tomioka, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Insect circadian rhythms are generated by a circadian clock consisting of transcriptional/translational feedback loops, in which CYCLE and CLOCK are the key elements in activating the transcription of various clock genes such as timeless (tim) and period (per). Although the transcriptional regulation of Clock (Clk) has been profoundly studied, little is known about the regulation of cycle (cyc). Here, we identify the orphan nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75, which are orthologs of mammalian clock genes, Rorα and Rev-erbα, respectively, as factors involved in the rhythmic expression of the cyc gene in a primitive insect, the firebrat Thermobia domestica. Our results show that HR3 and E75 are rhythmically expressed, and their normal, rhythmic expression is required for the persistence of locomotor rhythms. Their RNAi considerably altered the rhythmic transcription of not only cyc but also tim. Surprisingly, the RNAi of HR3 revealed the rhythmic expression of Clk, suggesting that this ancestral insect species possesses the mechanisms for rhythmic expression of both cyc and Clk genes. When either HR3 or E75 was knocked down, tim, cyc, and Clk or tim and cyc, respectively, oscillated in phase, suggesting that the two genes play an important role in the regulation of the phase relationship among the clock genes. Interestingly, HR3 and E75 were also found to be involved in the regulation of ecdysis, suggesting that they interconnect the circadian clock and developmental processes.

  2. The nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75 are required for the circadian rhythm in a primitive insect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Kamae

    Full Text Available Insect circadian rhythms are generated by a circadian clock consisting of transcriptional/translational feedback loops, in which CYCLE and CLOCK are the key elements in activating the transcription of various clock genes such as timeless (tim and period (per. Although the transcriptional regulation of Clock (Clk has been profoundly studied, little is known about the regulation of cycle (cyc. Here, we identify the orphan nuclear receptor genes HR3 and E75, which are orthologs of mammalian clock genes, Rorα and Rev-erbα, respectively, as factors involved in the rhythmic expression of the cyc gene in a primitive insect, the firebrat Thermobia domestica. Our results show that HR3 and E75 are rhythmically expressed, and their normal, rhythmic expression is required for the persistence of locomotor rhythms. Their RNAi considerably altered the rhythmic transcription of not only cyc but also tim. Surprisingly, the RNAi of HR3 revealed the rhythmic expression of Clk, suggesting that this ancestral insect species possesses the mechanisms for rhythmic expression of both cyc and Clk genes. When either HR3 or E75 was knocked down, tim, cyc, and Clk or tim and cyc, respectively, oscillated in phase, suggesting that the two genes play an important role in the regulation of the phase relationship among the clock genes. Interestingly, HR3 and E75 were also found to be involved in the regulation of ecdysis, suggesting that they interconnect the circadian clock and developmental processes.

  3. Adult circadian behavior in Drosophila requires developmental expression of cycle, but not period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Tadahiro; Mirowska, Karolina; Currie, Jake; Kim, Min-Ho; Rao, Neethi Varadaraja; Bonilla, Gloribel; Wijnen, Herman

    2011-07-01

    Circadian clocks have evolved as internal time keeping mechanisms that allow anticipation of daily environmental changes and organization of a daily program of physiological and behavioral rhythms. To better examine the mechanisms underlying circadian clocks in animals and to ask whether clock gene expression and function during development affected subsequent daily time keeping in the adult, we used the genetic tools available in Drosophila to conditionally manipulate the function of the CYCLE component of the positive regulator CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) or its negative feedback inhibitor PERIOD (PER). Differential manipulation of clock function during development and in adulthood indicated that there is no developmental requirement for either a running clock mechanism or expression of per. However, conditional suppression of CLK/CYC activity either via per over-expression or cyc depletion during metamorphosis resulted in persistent arrhythmic behavior in the adult. Two distinct mechanisms were identified that may contribute to this developmental function of CLK/CYC and both involve the ventral lateral clock neurons (LN(v)s) that are crucial to circadian control of locomotor behavior: (1) selective depletion of cyc expression in the LN(v)s resulted in abnormal peptidergic small-LN(v) dorsal projections, and (2) PER expression rhythms in the adult LN(v)s appeared to be affected by developmental inhibition of CLK/CYC activity. Given the conservation of clock genes and circuits among animals, this study provides a rationale for investigating a possible similar developmental role of the homologous mammalian CLOCK/BMAL1 complex.

  4. Cloning and Expression Analysis of Circadian Clock Gene CCA1 in Maize%玉米昼夜节律钟基因CCA1的克隆及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢国芳; 杜伟建; 张雁明; 韩浩坤; 韩渊怀

    2011-01-01

    inbred line B73, and studied the expression of CCA1 in leaf under 16h/8h (light/dark) conditions. Expression analysis showed that the gene expression peaked at dawn (ZTO) then gradually declined from ZTO to ZT15, bottomed at ZT15, then increased and returned to the initial level at ZT24. Our present study will provide information of maize CCA1 gene for further studying the function in regulating photoperiod sensitivity in maize, and provide scientific basis for clarifying the mechanism of the circadian synchronization in maize.

  5. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2'E,3'Z-6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties.

  6. Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet affects circadian photosensitivity and coordinates TIM and PER expression in Drosophila clock neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleri, Shobi; Rieger, Dirk; Helfrich-Förster, Charlotte; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2007-02-01

    Extraretinal photoreception is a common input route for light resetting signals into the circadian clock of animals. In Drosophila melanogaster, substantial circadian light inputs are mediated via the blue light photoreceptor CRYPTOCHROME (CRY) expressed in clock neurons within the brain. The current model predicts that, upon light activation, CRY interacts with the clock proteins TIMELESS (TIM) and PERIOD (PER), thereby inducing their degradation, which in turn leads to a resetting of the molecular oscillations within the circadian clock. Here the authors investigate the function of another putative extraretinal circadian photoreceptor, the Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet (H-B eyelet), located between the retina and the medulla in the fly optic lobes. Blocking synaptic transmission between the H-B eyelet and its potential target cells, the ventral circadian pacemaker neurons, impaired the flies' ability to resynchronize their behavior under jet-lag conditions in the context of nonfunctional retinal photoreception and a mutation in the CRY-encoding gene. The same manipulation also affected synchronized expression of the clock proteins TIM and PER in different subsets of the clock neurons. This shows that synaptic communication between the H-B eyelet and clock neurons contributes to synchronization of molecular and behavioral rhythms and confirms that the H-B eyelet functions as a circadian photoreceptor. Blockage of synaptic transmission from the H-B eyelet in the presence of functional compound eyes and the absence of CRY also results in increased numbers of flies that are unable to synchronize to extreme photoperiods, supplying independent proof for the role of the H-B eyelet as a circadian photoreceptor.

  7. Fine-Tuning Circadian Rhythms: The Importance of Bmal1 Expression in the Ventral Forebrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieda, Michihiro; Hasegawa, Emi; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Although, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus acts as the central clock in mammals, the circadian expression of clock genes has been demonstrated not only in the SCN, but also in peripheral tissues and brain regions outside the SCN. However, the physiological roles of extra-SCN circadian clocks in the brain remain largely elusive. In response, we generated Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice in which Bmal1, an essential clock component, was genetically deleted specifically in the ventral forebrain, including the preoptic area, nucleus of the diagonal band, and most of the hypothalamus except the SCN. In these mice, as expected, PER2::LUC oscillation was drastically attenuated in the explants of mediobasal hypothalamus, whereas it was maintained in those of the SCN. Although, Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice were rhythmic and nocturnal, they showed altered patterns of locomotor activity during the night in a 12:12-h light:dark cycle and during subjective night in constant darkness. Control mice were more active during the first half than the second half of the dark phase or subjective night, whereas Nkx2.1-Bmal1−/− mice showed the opposite pattern of locomotor activity. Temporal patterns of sleep-wakefulness and feeding also changed accordingly. Such results suggest that along with mechanisms in the SCN, local Bmal1–dependent clocks in the ventral forebrain are critical for generating precise temporal patterns of circadian behaviors.

  8. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (‘circadian resonance hypothesis’). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural c

  9. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natura

  10. The Clock gene clone and its circadian rhythms in Pelteobagrus vachelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuanjie; Shao, Ting

    2015-05-01

    The Clock gene, a key molecule in circadian systems, is widely distributed in the animal kingdom. We isolated a 936-bp partial cDNA sequence of the Clock gene ( Pva-clock) from the darkbarbel catfish Pelteobagrus vachelli that exhibited high identity with Clock genes of other species of fish and animals (65%-88%). The putative domains included a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain and two period-ARNT-single-minded (PAS) domains, which were also similar to those in other species of fish and animals. Pva-Clock was primarily expressed in the brain, and was detected in all of the peripheral tissues sampled. Additionally, the pattern of Pva-Clock expression over a 24-h period exhibited a circadian rhythm in the brain, liver and intestine, with the acrophase at zeitgeber time 21:35, 23:00, and 23:23, respectively. Our results provide insight into the function of the molecular Clock of P. vachelli.

  11. Phenotypic effects of the circadian gene Cryptochrome 2 on cancer-related pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chun-Hui

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Circadian genes continue to gain attention as important transcriptional regulators with the potential to influence a variety of biological pathways, including many cancer-related processes. The core circadian gene cryptochrome 2 (CRY2 is essential for proper circadian timing, and is a key component of the negative arm of the circadian feedback loop. As such, aberrant expression of CRY2 may influence carcinogenic processes and thereby impact cancer susceptibility. Methods We silenced CRY2 in breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7 using small-interfering oligos (siRNA and measured the impact of CRY2 knockdown on a number of cancer-relevant parameters. Cell cycle distribution, cell viability, and apoptotic response were measured in CRY2 knockdown (CRY2- and normal (CRY2+ cell populations using flow cytometry in cells with and without exposure to a mutagen challenge. DNA damage accumulation was measured using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay, and damage was quantified using the Olive tail moment, which considers the amount and distance of DNA migration away from the nucleus, indicative of DNA strand breaks. Expression changes in cancer-relevant transcripts were measured by whole genome microarray. The Student's t-test was used for statistical comparisons, and P-values obtained from the microarray were adjusted for multiple comparisons using the false discovery rate correction, in order to obtain an adjusted Q-value for each observation. Results The comet assay results indicated that upon exposure to the same dose of chemical mutagen, CRY2- cells accumulate significantly more unrepaired DNA damage than CRY2+ cells (P = 0.040, suggesting that CRY2 may be important for DNA repair. In addition, a number of transcripts with relevance for DNA damage repair displayed altered expression following CRY2 silencing. These included BCCIP (Q = 0.002, BCL2 (Q = 0.049, CCND1 (Q = 0.009, CDKN1A (Q GADD45A (Q = 0.002, HERC5 (Q MCM5 (Q = 0

  12. Role of circadian gene Clock during differentiation of mouse pluripotent stem cells

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    Chao Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Biological rhythms controlled by the circadian clock are absent in embryonic stem cells (ESCs. However, they start to develop during the differentiation of pluripotent ESCs to downstream cells. Conversely, biological rhythms in adult somatic cells disappear when they are reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. These studies indicated that the development of biological rhythms in ESCs might be closely associated with the maintenance and differentiation of ESCs. The core circadian gene Clock is essential for regulation of biological rhythms. Its role in the development of biological rhythms of ESCs is totally unknown. Here, we used CRISPR/CAS9-mediated genetic editing techniques, to completely knock out the Clock expression in mouse ESCs. By AP, teratoma formation, quantitative real-time PCR and Immunofluorescent staining, we did not find any difference between Clock knockout mESCs and wild type mESCs in morphology and pluripotent capability under the pluripotent state. In brief, these data indicated Clock did not influence the maintaining of pluripotent state. However, they exhibited decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Furthermore, the biological rhythms failed to develop in Clock knockout mESCs after spontaneous differentiation, which indicated that there was no compensational factor in most peripheral tissues as described in mice models before (DeBruyne et al., 2007b. After spontaneous differentiation, loss of CLOCK protein due to Clock gene silencing induced spontaneous differentiation of mESCs, indicating an exit from the pluripotent state, or its differentiating ability. Our findings indicate that the core circadian gene Clock may be essential during normal mESCs differentiation by regulating mESCs proliferation, apoptosis and activity.

  13. Circadian Clock Gene Plays a Key Role on Ovarian Cycle and Spontaneous Abortion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiwen Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Circadian locomotor output cycles protein kaput (CLOCK plays a key role in maintaining circadian rhythms and activation of downstream elements. However, its function on human female reproductive system remains unknown. Methods: To investigate the potential role of CLOCK, CLOCK-shRNAs were transfected into mouse 129 ES cells or injected into the ovaries of adult female mice. Western blotting was utilized to analyze the protein interactions and flow cytometry was used to assess apoptosis. Results: The expression of CLOCK peaked at the 6th week in the healthy fetuses. However, an abnormal expression of CLOCK was detected in fetuses from spontaneous miscarriage. To determine the effect of CLOCK on female fertility, a small hairpin RNA (shRNA strategy was used to specifically knockdown the CLOCK gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of CLOCK induced apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem (mES cells and inhibited the proliferation in mES cells in vitro. CLOCK knockdown also led to decreased release of oocytes and smaller litter size compared with control in vivo. Conclusions: Collectively, theses findings indicate that CLOCK plays an important role in fertility and that the CLOCK knockdown leads to reduction in reproduction and increased miscarriage risk.

  14. Assignment of circadian function for the Neurospora clock gene frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Brunner, Michael; Roenneberg, Till

    1999-01-01

    Circadian clocks consist of three elements: entrainment pathways (inputs), the mechanism generating the rhythmicity (oscillator), and the output pathways that control the circadian rhythms. It is difficult to assign molecular clock components to any one of these elements. Experiments show that input

  15. Circadian systems biology in Metazoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Ling; Huang, Hsuan-Cheng; Juan, Hsueh-Fen

    2015-11-01

    Systems biology, which can be defined as integrative biology, comprises multistage processes that can be used to understand components of complex biological systems of living organisms and provides hierarchical information to decoding life. Using systems biology approaches such as genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics, it is now possible to delineate more complicated interactions between circadian control systems and diseases. The circadian rhythm is a multiscale phenomenon existing within the body that influences numerous physiological activities such as changes in gene expression, protein turnover, metabolism and human behavior. In this review, we describe the relationships between the circadian control system and its related genes or proteins, and circadian rhythm disorders in systems biology studies. To maintain and modulate circadian oscillation, cells possess elaborative feedback loops composed of circadian core proteins that regulate the expression of other genes through their transcriptional activities. The disruption of these rhythms has been reported to be associated with diseases such as arrhythmia, obesity, insulin resistance, carcinogenesis and disruptions in natural oscillations in the control of cell growth. This review demonstrates that lifestyle is considered as a fundamental factor that modifies circadian rhythm, and the development of dysfunctions and diseases could be regulated by an underlying expression network with multiple circadian-associated signals.

  16. Circadian rhythms and period expression in the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergus, Daniel J; Shaw, Kerry L

    2013-05-01

    Daily activity times and circadian rhythms of crickets have been a subject of behavioral and physiological study for decades. However, recent studies suggest that the underlying molecular mechanism of cricket endogenous clocks differ from the model of circadian rhythm generation in Drosophila. Here we examine the circadian free-running periods of walking and singing in two Hawaiian swordtail cricket species, Laupala cerasina and Laupala paranigra, that differ in the daily timing of mating related activities. Additionally, we examine variation in sequence and daily cycling of the period (per) gene transcript between these species. The species differed significantly in free-running period of singing, but did not differ significantly in the free-running period of locomotion. Like in Drosophila, per transcript abundance showed cycling consistent with a role in circadian rhythm generation. The amino acid differences identified between these species suggest a potential of the per gene in interspecific behavioral variation in Laupala.

  17. Light pulses administered during the circadian dark phase alter expression of cell cycle associated transcripts in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shlomo, R; Kyriacou, C P

    2010-02-01

    The circadian mode of cell division has been known for more than a century, but the association between circadian rhythms and mitosis is not yet clear. Synchronization of circadian oscillators with the outside world is achieved because light, or other external temporal cues, have acute effects on the levels of the clock's molecular components. Thus, an important question is whether environmental signals also affect transcription levels of cell machinery genes in a similar manner? In a microarray analysis, we have tested the influence of light pulses on the expression of transcripts in the mouse brain. Light pulses consistently affect transcription levels of genes that are essential and directly control the cell cycle mechanism, as well as levels of genes that are associated with the various cell cycle checkpoints. The changes in the levels and the direction of these changes could possibly lead to cell cycle arrest. We also found consistent changes in transcription levels of genes that are associated with tumorigenesis and are directly implicated with enhanced proliferation and metastasis.

  18. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  19. Systematic identification of rhythmic genes reveals camk1gb as a new element in the circadian clockwork.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Tovin

    Full Text Available A wide variety of biochemical, physiological, and molecular processes are known to have daily rhythms driven by an endogenous circadian clock. While extensive research has greatly improved our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that constitute the circadian clock, the links between this clock and dependent processes have remained elusive. To address this gap in our knowledge, we have used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and DNA microarrays to systematically identify clock-controlled genes in the zebrafish pineal gland. In addition to a comprehensive view of the expression pattern of known clock components within this master clock tissue, this approach has revealed novel potential elements of the circadian timing system. We have implicated one rhythmically expressed gene, camk1gb, in connecting the clock with downstream physiology of the pineal gland. Remarkably, knockdown of camk1gb disrupts locomotor activity in the whole larva, even though it is predominantly expressed within the pineal gland. Therefore, it appears that camk1gb plays a role in linking the pineal master clock with the periphery.

  20. Integrative Analysis of Circadian Transcriptome and Metabolic Network Reveals the Role of De Novo Purine Synthesis in Circadian Control of Cell Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Li; Guang Li; Benjamin Görling; Burkhard Luy; Jiulin Du; Jun Yan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an inter...

  1. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1-expressing neurons to circadian locomotor activity patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngseok Lee

    Full Text Available In both vertebrates and invertebrates, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP channels are expressed in sensory neurons and mediate environmental stimuli such as light, sound, temperature, and taste. Some of these channels, however, are expressed only in the brain and their functions remain incompletely understood. Using the GAL4/UAS binary system with a line in which the GAL4 had been knocked into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we recently reported new insights into TRPA1 localization and function, including its expression in approximately 15% of all circadian neurons. TRPA1 is expressed in lateral posterior neurons (LPNs, which are known to be highly sensitive to entrainment by temperature cycles. Here, I used the bacterial sodium channel, NaChBac, to examine the effects of altering the electrical properties of trpA1 neurons on circadian rhythms. My results indicate that circadian activity of the flies in the morning, daytime, and evening was affected in a temperature-dependent manner following TRPA1 neuronal activation. Remarkably, TRPA1 neuron activation in flies kept at 18°C impacted the morning peak of circadian activity even though TRPA1 is not expressed in morning cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the activation of TRPA1-expressing neurons may differentially coordinate light/dark circadian entrainment, depending on the temperature.

  2. Contribution of Drosophila TRPA1-expressing neurons to circadian locomotor activity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngseok

    2013-01-01

    In both vertebrates and invertebrates, Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels are expressed in sensory neurons and mediate environmental stimuli such as light, sound, temperature, and taste. Some of these channels, however, are expressed only in the brain and their functions remain incompletely understood. Using the GAL4/UAS binary system with a line in which the GAL4 had been knocked into the trpA1 locus in Drosophila, we recently reported new insights into TRPA1 localization and function, including its expression in approximately 15% of all circadian neurons. TRPA1 is expressed in lateral posterior neurons (LPNs), which are known to be highly sensitive to entrainment by temperature cycles. Here, I used the bacterial sodium channel, NaChBac, to examine the effects of altering the electrical properties of trpA1 neurons on circadian rhythms. My results indicate that circadian activity of the flies in the morning, daytime, and evening was affected in a temperature-dependent manner following TRPA1 neuronal activation. Remarkably, TRPA1 neuron activation in flies kept at 18°C impacted the morning peak of circadian activity even though TRPA1 is not expressed in morning cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the activation of TRPA1-expressing neurons may differentially coordinate light/dark circadian entrainment, depending on the temperature.

  3. Circadian rhythmicity of active GSK3 isoforms modulates molecular clock gene rhythms in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besing, Rachel C; Paul, Jodi R; Hablitz, Lauren M; Rogers, Courtney O; Johnson, Russell L; Young, Martin E; Gamble, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and synchronizes daily rhythms at the cellular level via transcriptional-translational feedback loops comprising clock genes such as Bmal1 and Period (Per). Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), a serine/threonine kinase, phosphorylates at least 5 core clock proteins and shows diurnal variation in phosphorylation state (inactivation) of the GSK3β isoform. Whether phosphorylation of the other primary isoform (GSK3α) varies across the subjective day-night cycle is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if the endogenous rhythm of GSK3 (α and β) phosphorylation is critical for rhythmic BMAL1 expression and normal amplitude and periodicity of the molecular clock in the SCN. Significant circadian rhythmicity of phosphorylated GSK3 (α and β) was observed in the SCN from wild-type mice housed in constant darkness for 2 weeks. Importantly, chronic activation of both GSK3 isoforms impaired rhythmicity of the GSK3 target BMAL1. Furthermore, chronic pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 with 20 µM CHIR-99021 enhanced the amplitude and shortened the period of PER2::luciferase rhythms in organotypic SCN slice cultures. These results support the model that GSK3 activity status is regulated by the circadian clock and that GSK3 feeds back to regulate the molecular clock amplitude in the SCN.

  4. Mutants of circadian-associated PRR genes display a novel and visible phenotype as to light responses during de-etiolation of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Takahiko; Murakami, Masaya; Nakamura, Yuko; Ito, Shogo; Nakamichi, Norihito; Yamashino, Takafumi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2007-03-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, it is currently accepted that certain mutants with lesions in clock-associated genes commonly display hallmarked phenotypes with regard to three characteristic biological events: (i) altered rhythmic expression of circadian-controlled genes, (ii) changes in flowering time, and (iii) altered sensitivity to red light in elongation of hypocotyls. During the course of examination of the clock-associated mutants of PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORS, PRRs, including TOC1 (PRR1), we found that they commonly show another visible phenotype of anomalous greening responses upon the onset to light exposure of etiolated seedlings. These findings are indicative of a novel link between circadian rhythms and chloroplast development.

  5. Circadian Regulation of Macronutrient Absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Various intestinal functions exhibit circadian rhythmicity. Disruptions in these rhythms as in shift workers and transcontinental travelers are associated with intestinal discomfort. Circadian rhythms are controlled at the molecular level by core clock and clock-controlled genes. These clock genes are expressed in intestinal cells, suggesting that they might participate in the circadian regulation of intestinal functions. A major function of the intestine is nutrient absorption. Here, we will review absorption of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids and circadian regulation of various transporters involved in their absorption. A better understanding of circadian regulation of intestinal absorption might help control several metabolic disorders and attenuate intestinal discomfort associated with disruptions in sleep-wake cycles.

  6. Circadian regulation of cell cycle: Molecular connections between aging and the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khapre, Rohini V; Samsa, William E; Kondratov, Roman V

    2010-09-01

    The circadian clock generates oscillations in physiology and behavior, known as circadian rhythms. Links between the circadian clock genes Periods, Bmal1, and Cryptochromes and aging and cancer are emerging. Circadian clock gene expression is changed in human pathologies, and transgenic mice with mutations in clock genes develop cancer and premature aging. Control of genome integrity and cell proliferation play key roles in the development of age-associated pathologies and carcinogenesis. Here, we review recent data on the connection between the circadian clock and control of the cell cycle. The circadian clock regulates the activity and expression of several critical cell cycle and cell cycle check-point-related proteins, and in turn cell cycle-associated proteins regulate circadian clock proteins. DNA damage can reset the circadian clock, which provides a molecular mechanism for reciprocal regulation between the circadian clock and the cell cycle. This circadian clock-dependent control of cell proliferation, together with other known physiological functions of the circadian clock such as the control of metabolism, oxidative and genotoxic stress response, and DNA repair, opens new horizons for understanding the mechanisms behind aging and carcinogenesis.

  7. Circadian rhythms regulate amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Li; Seon, Yoon Ji; Mourão, Marcio A; Schnell, Santiago; Kim, Doohak; Harada, Hidemitsu; Papagerakis, Silvana; Papagerakis, Petros

    2013-07-01

    Ameloblasts, the cells responsible for making enamel, modify their morphological features in response to specialized functions necessary for synchronized ameloblast differentiation and enamel formation. Secretory and maturation ameloblasts are characterized by the expression of stage-specific genes which follows strictly controlled repetitive patterns. Circadian rhythms are recognized as key regulators of the development and diseases of many tissues including bone. Our aim was to gain novel insights on the role of clock genes in enamel formation and to explore the potential links between circadian rhythms and amelogenesis. Our data shows definitive evidence that the main clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Per1 and Per2) oscillate in ameloblasts at regular circadian (24 h) intervals both at RNA and protein levels. This study also reveals that the two markers of ameloblast differentiation i.e. amelogenin (Amelx; a marker of secretory stage ameloblasts) and kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (Klk4, a marker of maturation stage ameloblasts) are downstream targets of clock genes. Both, Amelx and Klk4 show 24h oscillatory expression patterns and their expression levels are up-regulated after Bmal1 over-expression in HAT-7 ameloblast cells. Taken together, these data suggest that both the secretory and the maturation stages of amelogenesis might be under circadian control. Changes in clock gene expression patterns might result in significant alterations of enamel apposition and mineralization.

  8. Refined anatomical isolation of functional sleep circuits exhibits distinctive regional and circadian gene transcriptional profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winrow, Christopher J; Tanis, Keith Q; Rigby, Alison M; Taylor, Rhonda R; Serikawa, Kyle; McWhorter, Mollie; Tokiwa, George Y; Marton, Matthew J; Stone, David J; Koblan, Kenneth S; Renger, John J

    2009-05-19

    Powerful new approaches to study molecular variation in distinct neuronal populations have recently been developed enabling a more precise investigation of the control of neural circuits involved in complex behaviors such as wake and sleep. We applied laser capture microdissection (LCM) to isolate precise brain nuclei from rat CNS at opposing circadian time points associated with wake and sleep. Discrete anatomical and temporal analysis was performed to examine the extent of variation in the transcriptional control associated with both identifiable anatomical nuclei and with light/dark cycle. Precise isolation of specific brain nuclei regulating sleep and arousal, including the LC, SCN, TMN, VTA, and VLPO, demonstrated robust changes in gene expression. Many of these differences were not observed in previous studies where whole brain lysates or gross dissections were used to probe for changes in gene expression. The robust and differential profiles of genomic data obtained from the approaches used herein underscore the requirement for careful anatomical refinement in CNS gene expression studies designed to understand genomic control within behaviorally-linked, but functionally isolated brain nuclei.

  9. Pharmacological and Genetic Modulation of REV-ERB Activity and Expression Affects Orexigenic Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Amador

    Full Text Available The nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are transcription factors that play pivotal roles in the regulation of the circadian rhythm and various metabolic processes. The circadian rhythm is an endogenous mechanism, which generates entrainable biological changes that follow a 24-hour period. It regulates a number of physiological processes, including sleep/wakeful cycles and feeding behaviors. We recently demonstrated that REV-ERB-specific small molecules affect sleep and anxiety. The orexinergic system also plays a significant role in mammalian physiology and behavior, including the regulation of sleep and food intake. Importantly, orexin genes are expressed in a circadian manner. Given these overlaps in function and circadian expression, we wanted to determine whether the REV-ERBs might regulate orexin. We found that acute in vivo modulation of REV-ERB activity, with the REV-ERB-specific synthetic ligand SR9009, affects the circadian expression of orexinergic genes in mice. Long term dosing with SR9009 also suppresses orexinergic gene expression in mice. Finally, REV-ERBβ-deficient mice present with increased orexinergic transcripts. These data suggest that the REV-ERBs may be involved in the repression of orexinergic gene expression.

  10. PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPAR{gamma} activation in the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Katsutaka, E-mail: k-ooishi@aist.go.jp [Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Uchida, Daisuke [Biological Clock Research Group, Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohkura, Naoki [Department of Clinical Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Horie, Shuichi [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Kagawa Nutrition University, Sakado, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} PPAR{alpha} deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression. {yields} Hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and PCG-1{alpha} are induced by a ketogenic diet. {yields} PPAR{gamma} antagonist attenuates a ketogenic diet-induced PAI-1 expression. {yields} Ketogenic diet advances the phase of circadian clock in a PPAR{alpha}-independent manner. -- Abstract: An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPAR{alpha}-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPAR{alpha} target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPAR{alpha}-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPAR{alpha} activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPAR{gamma} and its coactivator PCG-1{alpha} were more effectively induced in PPAR{alpha}-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPAR{gamma} antagonist, in both WT and PPAR

  11. Circadian variations in expression of the trkB receptor in adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, Claudia; Montaruli, Angela; Roveda, Eliana; Barajon, Isabella; Vizzotto, Laura; Grassi Zucconi, Gigliola; Carandente, Franca

    2003-12-19

    The expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the central nervous system (CNS) and the expression of its high-affinity trkB receptor on neuron surfaces are known to depend on neuron activity. The expression of BDNF (mRNA and protein) and trkB mRNA shows circadian oscillations in rat hippocampal homogenates. We investigated circadian variations in trkB expression in specific areas of the adult rat hippocampal formation by immunohistochemistry. In sets of two experiments performed in the spring, 39 2-month-old male Wistar rats were accustomed to a 12-h light-12-h dark cycle for 2 weeks. Three animals were then sacrificed every 4 h. Forty-micrometer-thick coronal sections of hippocampal formation were obtained and processed for trkB immunohistochemistry. Cell staining intensity was assessed by image analysis of different hippocampal areas on five sections per animal. Circadian rhythmicity was evaluated by the cosinor method. Statistically significant circadian variations in trkB expression were found in dentate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, and the CA3 and hilar regions of the hippocampus, with highest expression during the first half of the dark (activity) period. These findings suggest a relationship between trkB expression and the physiological neuronal activation of wakefulness. TrkB receptor expression in the hippocampal regions studied was continuous and changes were gradual over the 24-h cycle, suggesting that more complex regulatory mechanisms also intervened.

  12. A circadian clock in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eelderink-Chen, Zheng; Mazzotta, Gabriella; Sturre, Marcel; Bosman, Jasper; Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2010-01-01

    Circadian timing is a fundamental biological process, underlying cellular physiology in animals, plants, fungi, and cyanobacteria. Circadian clocks organize gene expression, metabolism, and behavior such that they occur at specific times of day. The biological clocks that orchestrate these daily cha

  13. Comparison of Circadian Expression of Biological Clock Gene,Clock and Bmal 1 ,in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Chinese Antarctic Wintering Team Members before and after Antarctic Expedition%中国南极越冬队员外周血生物钟基因Clock和Bmal1昼夜性节律表达赴南极前后对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余万霰; 陈绍平; 夏艳芝; 王国卿; 王洁; 张永虹

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察中国南极考察队越冬队员外周血淋巴细胞钟基因Clock和Bmal 1表达昼夜节律性变化.方法 在中国第25次南极考察队越冬队员中选择8名队员,平均年龄38岁,均为男性,在1个昼夜周期内设立6个时点(ZT):02:00、06:00、10:00、14:00、18:00和22:00,每一时点采集外周静脉血6 mL,采集赴南极前后2组血样.用实时定量RT-PCR方法,测定不同昼夜时点(ZT)样品中核心钟基因Clock和Bmal 1的mRNA表达量,通过余弦法和Clock Lab软件获取节律参数,进行赴南极前后对比.结果 赴南极前,8个样本Clock和Bmal的mRNA表达均有显著昼夜节律特征(P<0.05),Clock的峰值相位位于-335.85士13.80,Bmal 1的峰值相位位于-307.12±8.17.赴南极后,仅2例Clock和3例Bmal1表达还存在显著昼夜节律变化.Clock的峰值相位移位到-42.28±5.27,Bmal 1的同峰值相位移位到-184.58±29.58.结论 南极特殊周期环境对人体生物钟基因表达的昼夜节律会产生影响.%Objective To investigate the circadian expression of core clock gene, Clock and Bmal 1 ,in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of Chinese scientific expeditioners during the Antarctic winter. Methods Peripheral blood (6 mL) were collected in 8 healthy male volunteers (mean age 38 years) from wintering team of the 25th Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition at 6 time points in the day-night cycle (02: 00,06:00,10; 00,14:00,18:00 and 22:00). In addition, blood samples were collected before and after Antarctic expedition. The expression of Clock and Bmal 1 at different Zeitgeber times (ZT) was detected by RT-PCR. The circadian parameters were obtained and analyzed by the cosine function,Clock Lab software and amplitude F test for comparison before and after Antarctic expedition. Results Before Antarctic expedition,the expression of Clock and Bmal 1 mRNA showed a significant circadian feature(P<0. 05). The Peak phase of Clock at -335. 85±13. 80. The Peak phase of Bmal 1 at -307. 12

  14. Crosstalk of clock gene expression and autophagy in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfalah, Faiza; Janke, Linda; Schiavi, Alfonso; Tigges, Julia; Ix, Alexander; Ventura, Natascia; Boege, Fritz; Reinke, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the circadian clock counteract tissue degeneration and support longevity in many organisms. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging compromises both the circadian clock and autophagy but the mechanisms involved are unknown. Here we show that the expression levels of transcriptional repressor components of the circadian oscillator, most prominently the human Period homologue PER2, are strongly reduced in primary dermal fibroblasts from aged humans, while raising the expression of PER2 in the same cells partially restores diminished autophagy levels. The link between clock gene expression and autophagy is corroborated by the finding that the circadian clock drives cell-autonomous, rhythmic autophagy levels in immortalized murine fibroblasts, and that siRNA-mediated downregulation of PER2 decreases autophagy levels while leaving core clock oscillations intact. Moreover, the Period homologue lin-42 regulates autophagy and life span in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionarily conserved role for Period proteins in autophagy control and aging. Taken together, this study identifies circadian clock proteins as set-point regulators of autophagy and puts forward a model, in which age-related changes of clock gene expression promote declining autophagy levels. PMID:27574892

  15. The Pentose Phosphate Pathway Regulates the Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Guillaume; Valekunja, Utham K; Feeney, Kevin A; Wulund, Lisa; Milev, Nikolay B; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Velagapudi, Vidya; O'Neill, John S; Reddy, Akhilesh B

    2016-09-13

    The circadian clock is a ubiquitous timekeeping system that organizes the behavior and physiology of organisms over the day and night. Current models rely on transcriptional networks that coordinate circadian gene expression of thousands of transcripts. However, recent studies have uncovered phylogenetically conserved redox rhythms that can occur independently of transcriptional cycles. Here we identify the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP), a critical source of the redox cofactor NADPH, as an important regulator of redox and transcriptional oscillations. Our results show that genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PPP prolongs the period of circadian rhythms in human cells, mouse tissues, and fruit flies. These metabolic manipulations also cause a remodeling of circadian gene expression programs that involves the circadian transcription factors BMAL1 and CLOCK, and the redox-sensitive transcription factor NRF2. Thus, the PPP regulates circadian rhythms via NADPH metabolism, suggesting a pivotal role for NADPH availability in circadian timekeeping.

  16. Cell "circadian" cycle: new role for mammalian core clock genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgs, Laurence; Beukelaers, Pierre; Vandenbosch, Renaud; Belachew, Shibeshih; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte

    2009-03-15

    In mammals, 24 hours rhythms are organized as a biochemical network of molecular clocks that are operative in all tissues, with the master clock residing in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The core pacemakers of these clocks consist of auto-regulatory transcriptional/post-transcriptional feedback loops. Several lines of evidence suggest the existence of a crosstalk between molecules that are responsible for the generation of circadian rhythms and molecules that control the cell cycle progression. In addition, highly specialized cell cycle checkpoints involved in DNA repair after damage seem also, at least in part, mediated by clock proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted a putative connection between clock protein dysfunction and cancer progression. This review discusses the intimate relation that exists between cell cycle progression and components of the circadian machinery.

  17. The circadian cycle : daily rhythms from behaviour to genes - First in the Cycles Review Series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Spoelstra, K; Roenneberg, T

    2005-01-01

    The daily recurrence of activity and rest are so common as to seem trivial. However, they reflect a ubiquitous temporal programme called the circadian clock. In the absence of either anatomical clock structures or clock genes, the timing of sleep and wakefulness is disrupted. The complex nature of c

  18. Association study of 21 circadian genes with bipolar I disorder, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hader A; Talkowski, Michael E; Wood, Joel; Chowdari, Kodavali V; McClain, Lora; Prasad, Konasale; Montrose, Debra; Fagiolini, Andrea; Friedman, Edward S; Allen, Michael H; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph; El-Mallakh, Rif S; Escamilla, Michael; Faraone, Stephen V; Fossey, Mark D; Gyulai, Laszlo; Loftis, Jennifer M; Hauser, Peter; Ketter, Terence A; Marangell, Lauren B; Miklowitz, David J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Patel, Jayendra; Sachs, Gary S; Sklar, Pamela; Smoller, Jordan W; Laird, Nan; Keshavan, Matcheri; Thase, Michael E; Axelson, David; Birmaher, Boris; Lewis, David; Monk, Tim; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J; Devlin, Bernie; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit L

    2012-01-01

    Objective Published studies suggest associations between circadian gene polymorphisms and bipolar I disorder (BPI), as well as schizoaffective disorder (SZA) and schizophrenia (SZ). The results are plausible, based on prior studies of circadian abnormalities. As replications have not been attempted uniformly, we evaluated representative, common polymorphisms in all three disorders. Methods We assayed 276 publicly available ‘tag’ single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 21 circadian genes among 523 patients with BPI, 527 patients with SZ/SZA, and 477 screened adult controls. Detected associations were evaluated in relation to two published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Results Using gene-based tests, suggestive associations were noted between EGR3 and BPI (p = 0.017), and between NPAS2 and SZ/SZA (p = 0.034). Three SNPs were associated with both sets of disorders (NPAS2: rs13025524 and rs11123857; RORB: rs10491929; p < 0.05). None of the associations remained significant following corrections for multiple comparisons. Approximately 15% of the analyzed SNPs overlapped with an independent study that conducted GWAS for BPI; suggestive overlap between the GWAS analyses and ours was noted at ARNTL. Conclusions Several suggestive, novel associations were detected with circadian genes and BPI and SZ/SZA, but the present analyses do not support associations with common polymorphisms that confer risk with odds ratios greater than 1.5. Additional analyses using adequately powered samples are warranted to further evaluate these results. PMID:19839995

  19. Rapid assessment of gene function in the circadian clock using artificial microRNA in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongsik; Somers, David E

    2010-10-01

    Rapid assessment of the effect of reduced levels of gene products is often a bottleneck in determining how to proceed with an interesting gene candidate. Additionally, gene families with closely related members can confound determination of the role of even a single one of the group. We describe here an in vivo method to rapidly determine gene function using transient expression of artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mesophyll protoplasts. We use a luciferase-based reporter of circadian clock activity to optimize and validate this system. Protoplasts transiently cotransfected with promoter-luciferase and gene-specific amiRNA plasmids sustain free-running rhythms of bioluminescence for more than 6 d. Using both amiRNA plasmids available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center, as well as custom design of constructs using the Weigel amiRNA design algorithm, we show that transient knockdown of known clock genes recapitulates the same circadian phenotypes reported in the literature for loss-of-function mutant plants. We additionally show that amiRNA designed to knock down expression of the casein kinase II β-subunit gene family lengthens period, consistent with previous reports of a short period in casein kinase II β-subunit overexpressors. Our results demonstrate that this system can facilitate a much more rapid analysis of gene function by obviating the need to initially establish stably transformed transgenics to assess the phenotype of gene knockdowns. This approach will be useful in a wide range of plant disciplines when an endogenous cell-based phenotype is observable or can be devised, as done here using a luciferase reporter.

  20. Circadian clock genes period and cycle regulate photoperiodic diapause in the bean bug Riptortus pedestris males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeno, Tomoko; Numata, Hideharu; Goto, Shin G

    2011-07-01

    The photoperiodic response is crucial for many insects to adapt to seasonal changes in temperate regions. It was recently shown that the circadian clock genes period (per) and cycle (cyc) are involved in the photoperiodic regulation of reproductive diapause in the bean bug Riptortus pedestris females. Here, we investigated the involvement of per and cyc both in the circadian rhythm of cuticle deposition and in the photoperiodic diapause of R. pedestris males using RNA interference (RNAi). RNAi of per and cyc disrupted the cuticle deposition rhythm and resulted in distinct cuticle layers. RNAi of per induced development of the male reproductive organs even under diapause-inducing short-day conditions, whereas RNAi of cyc suppressed development of the reproductive organs even under diapause-averting long-day conditions. Thus, the present study suggests that the circadian clock operated by per and cyc governs photoperiodism of males as that of females.

  1. Circadian regulation of myocardial sarcomeric Titin-cap (Tcap, telethonin: identification of cardiac clock-controlled genes using open access bioinformatics data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S Podobed

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are important for healthy cardiovascular physiology and are regulated at the molecular level by a circadian clock mechanism. We and others previously demonstrated that 9-13% of the cardiac transcriptome is rhythmic over 24 h daily cycles; the heart is genetically a different organ day versus night. However, which rhythmic mRNAs are regulated by the circadian mechanism is not known. Here, we used open access bioinformatics databases to identify 94 transcripts with expression profiles characteristic of CLOCK and BMAL1 targeted genes, using the CircaDB website and JTK_Cycle. Moreover, 22 were highly expressed in the heart as determined by the BioGPS website. Furthermore, 5 heart-enriched genes had human/mouse conserved CLOCK:BMAL1 promoter binding sites (E-boxes, as determined by UCSC table browser, circadian mammalian promoter/enhancer database PEDB, and the European Bioinformatics Institute alignment tool (EMBOSS. Lastly, we validated findings by demonstrating that Titin cap (Tcap, telethonin was targeted by transcriptional activators CLOCK and BMAL1 by showing 1 Tcap mRNA and TCAP protein had a diurnal rhythm in murine heart; 2 cardiac Tcap mRNA was rhythmic in animals kept in constant darkness; 3 Tcap and control Per2 mRNA expression and cyclic amplitude were blunted in Clock(Δ19/Δ19 hearts; 4 BMAL1 bound to the Tcap promoter by ChIP assay; 5 BMAL1 bound to Tcap promoter E-boxes by biotinylated oligonucleotide assay; and 6 CLOCK and BMAL1 induced tcap expression by luciferase reporter assay. Thus this study identifies circadian regulated genes in silico, with validation of Tcap, a critical regulator of cardiac Z-disc sarcomeric structure and function.

  2. Four of the six Drosophila rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment in low light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Charles, Alexandra; Michard-Vanhée, Christine; Alejevski, Faredin; Chélot, Elisabeth; Boivin, Antoine; Rouyer, François

    2016-10-01

    Light is the major stimulus for the synchronization of circadian clocks with day-night cycles. The light-driven entrainment of the clock that controls rest-activity rhythms in Drosophila relies on different photoreceptive molecules. Cryptochrome (CRY) is expressed in most brain clock neurons, whereas six different rhodopsins (RH) are present in the light-sensing organs. The compound eye includes outer photoreceptors that express RH1 and inner photoreceptors that each express one of the four rhodopsins RH3-RH6. RH6 is also expressed in the extraretinal Hofbauer-Buchner eyelet, whereas RH2 is only found in the ocelli. In low light, the synchronization of behavioral rhythms relies on either CRY or the canonical rhodopsin phototransduction pathway, which requires the phospholipase C-β encoded by norpA (no receptor potential A). We used norpA(P24) cry(02) double mutants that are circadianly blind in low light and restored NORPA function in each of the six types of photoreceptors, defined as expressing a particular rhodopsin. We first show that the NORPA pathway is less efficient than CRY for synchronizing rest-activity rhythms with delayed light-dark cycles but is important for proper phasing, whereas the two light-sensing pathways can mediate efficient adjustments to phase advances. Four of the six rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors can mediate circadian entrainment, and all are more efficient for advancing than for delaying the behavioral clock. In contrast, neither RH5-expressing retinal photoreceptors nor RH2-expressing ocellar photoreceptors are sufficient to mediate synchronization through the NORPA pathway. Our results thus reveal different contributions of rhodopsin-expressing photoreceptors and suggest the existence of several circuits for rhodopsin-dependent circadian entrainment. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2828-2844, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Association between circadian clock genes and diapause incidence in Drosophila triauraria.

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    Hirokazu Yamada

    Full Text Available Diapause is an adaptive response triggered by seasonal photoperiodicity to overcome unfavorable seasons. The photoperiodic clock is a system that controls seasonal physiological processes, but our knowledge about its physiological mechanisms and genetic architecture remains incomplete. The circadian clock is another system that controls daily rhythmic physiological phenomena. It has been argued that there is a connection between the two clocks. To examine the genetic connection between them, we analyzed the associations of five circadian clock genes (period, timeless, Clock, cycle and cryptochrome with the occurrence of diapause in Drosophila triauraria, which shows a robust reproductive diapause with clear photoperiodicity. Non-diapause strains found in low latitudes were compared in genetic crosses with the diapause strain, in which the diapause trait is clearly dominant. Single nucleotide polymorphism and deletion analyses of the five circadian clock genes in backcross progeny revealed that allelic differences in timeless and cryptochrome between the strains were additively associated with the differences in the incidence of diapause. This suggests that there is a molecular link between certain circadian clock genes and the occurrence of diapause.

  4. Circadian clocks are resounding in peripheral tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%-10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity.

  5. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes......The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators...... residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice...

  6. Circadian rhythms of PERIOD1 expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus in the absence of entrained food-anticipatory activity rhythms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwey, Michael; Lam, Germain Y M; Amir, Shimon

    2009-06-01

    When food availability is restricted to a single time of day, circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology in rodents shift to anticipate the predictable time of food arrival. It has been hypothesized that certain food-anticipatory rhythms are linked to the induction and entrainment of rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a putative food-entrained circadian oscillator. To study this concept further, we made food availability unpredictable by presenting the meal at a random time each day (variable restricted feeding, VRF), either during the day, night or throughout the 24-h cycle. Wheel running activity and the expression of the clock protein, Period1 (PER1), in the DMH and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) were assessed. Rats exhibited increased levels of activity during the portion of the day when food was randomly presented but, as expected, failed to entrain anticipatory wheel running activity to a single time of day. PER1 expression in the SCN was unchanged by VRF schedules. In the DMH, PER1 expression became rhythmic, peaking at opposite times of day in rats fed only during the day or during the night. In rats fed randomly throughout the entire 24-h cycle, PER1 expression in the DMH remained arrhythmic, but was elevated. These results demonstrate that VRF schedules confined to the day or night can induce circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the DMH. Such feeding schedules cannot entrain behavioral rhythms, thereby showing that food-entrainment of behavior and circadian rhythms of clock gene expression in the DMH are dissociable.

  7. The circadian cycle of mPER clock gene products in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the siberian hamster encodes both daily and seasonal time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuesslein-Hildesheim, B; O'Brien, J A; Ebling, F J; Maywood, E S; Hastings, M H

    2000-08-01

    The circadian clock in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) regulates the pattern of melatonin secretion from the pineal gland such that the duration of release reflects the length of the night. This seasonally specific endocrine cue mediates annual timing in photoperiodic mammals. The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in photoperiod influence the cyclic expression of recently identified clock gene products (mPER and mTIM) in the SCN of a highly seasonal mammal, the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus). Immunocytochemical studies indicate that the abundance of both mPER1 and mPER2 (but not mTIM) in the SCN exhibits very pronounced, synchronous daily cycles, peaking approximately 12 h after lights-on. These rhythms are circadian in nature as they continue approximately under free-running conditions. Their circadian waveform is modulated by photoperiod such that the phase of peak mPER expression is prolonged under long photoperiods. mPER1 protein is also expressed in the pars tuberalis of Siberian hamsters. In hamsters adapted to long days, the expression of mPER1 is elevated at the start of the light phase. In contrast, there is no clear elevation in mPER1 levels in the pars tuberalis of hamsters held on short photoperiods. These results indicate that core elements of the circadian clockwork are sensitive to seasonal time, and that encoding and decoding of seasonal information may be mediated by the actions of these transcriptional modulators.

  8. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc-Han Ha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies.

  9. The Circadian Rhythm Gene Arntl2 Is a Metastasis Susceptibility Gene for Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Ngoc-Han; Long, Jirong; Cai, Qiuyin; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis rather than primary tumors, yet relatively little is understood regarding the etiology of metastatic breast cancer. Previously, using a mouse genetics approach, we demonstrated that inherited germline polymorphisms contribute to metastatic disease, and that these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be used to predict outcome in breast cancer patients. In this study, a backcross between a highly metastatic (FVB/NJ) and low metastatic (MOLF/EiJ) mouse strain identified Arntl2, a gene encoding a circadian rhythm transcription factor, as a metastasis susceptibility gene associated with progression, specifically in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer patients. Integrated whole genome sequence analysis with DNase hypersensitivity sites reveals SNPs in the predicted promoter of Arntl2. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated substitution of the MOLF promoter, we demonstrate that the SNPs regulate Arntl2 transcription and affect metastatic burden. Finally, analysis of SNPs associated with ARNTL2 expression in human breast cancer patients revealed reproducible associations of ARNTL2 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) SNPs with disease-free survival, consistent with the mouse studies. PMID:27656887

  10. Epigenetic silencing of the circadian clock gene CRY1 is associated with an indolent clinical course in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

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    Maher Hanoun

    Full Text Available Disruption of circadian rhythm is believed to play a critical role in cancer development. Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1 is a core component of the mammalian circadian clock and we have previously shown its deregulated expression in a subgroup of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Using real-time RT-PCR in a cohort of 76 CLL patients and 35 normal blood donors we now demonstrate that differential CRY1 mRNA expression in high-risk (HR CD38+/immunoglobulin variable heavy chain gene (IgVH unmutated patients as compared to low-risk (LR CD38-/IgVH mutated patients can be attributed to down-modulation of CRY1 in LR CLL cases. Analysis of the DNA methylation profile of the CRY1 promoter in a subgroup of 57 patients revealed that CRY1 expression in LR CLL cells is silenced by aberrant promoter CpG island hypermethylation. The methylation pattern of the CRY1 promoter proved to have high prognostic impact in CLL where aberrant promoter methylation predicted a favourable outcome. CRY1 mRNA transcript levels did not change over time in the majority of patients where sequential samples were available for analysis. We also compared the CRY1 expression in CLL with other lymphoid malignancies and observed epigenetic silencing of CRY1 in a patient with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL.

  11. CLOCK expression identifies developing circadian oscillator neurons in the brains of Drosophila embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Fanny

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Drosophila circadian oscillator is composed of transcriptional feedback loops in which CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC heterodimers activate their feedback regulators period (per and timeless (tim via E-box mediated transcription. These feedback loop oscillators are present in distinct clusters of dorsal and lateral neurons in the adult brain, but how this pattern of expression is established during development is not known. Since CLK is required to initiate feedback loop function, defining the pattern of CLK expression in embryos and larvae will shed light on oscillator neuron development. Results A novel CLK antiserum is used to show that CLK expression in the larval CNS and adult brain is limited to circadian oscillator cells. CLK is initially expressed in presumptive small ventral lateral neurons (s-LNvs, dorsal neurons 2 s (DN2s, and dorsal neuron 1 s (DN1s at embryonic stage (ES 16, and this CLK expression pattern persists through larval development. PER then accumulates in all CLK-expressing cells except presumptive DN2s during late ES 16 and ES 17, consistent with the delayed accumulation of PER in adult oscillator neurons and antiphase cycling of PER in larval DN2s. PER is also expressed in non-CLK-expressing cells in the embryonic CNS starting at ES 12. Although PER expression in CLK-negative cells continues in ClkJrk embryos, PER expression in cells that co-express PER and CLK is eliminated. Conclusion These data demonstrate that brain oscillator neurons begin development during embryogenesis, that PER expression in non-oscillator cells is CLK-independent, and that oscillator phase is an intrinsic characteristic of brain oscillator neurons. These results define the temporal and spatial coordinates of factors that initiate Clk expression, imply that circadian photoreceptors are not activated until the end of embryogenesis, and suggest that PER functions in a different capacity before oscillator cell development is

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  13. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  14. 1a,25(OH)2 D3对心肌细胞生物钟基因表达的影响%Effect of 1a,25(OH)2 D3 on circadian clock gene expression in cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉梅; 范邁; 李杏; 李华; 吴丽洁; 张奇军; 程子杰; 钱玲梅

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨1a,25(OH)2 D3对心肌细胞生物钟基因 Bmal1 mRNA、Per2 mRNA 和 Rev-erba mRNA表达的影响。方法分离培养7日龄 SD 大鼠乳鼠心肌细胞,并用免疫荧光法鉴定。原代心肌细胞培养72 h后,设置1a,25(OH)2 D35个终浓度梯度即0 nmol/L、1 nmol/L、10 nmol/L、50 nmol/L 和100 nmol/L 处理心肌细胞2 h,然后提取细胞 RNA,实时荧光定量 PCR(RT-PCR)检测生物钟基因(Bmal1、Per2、Rev-erba)表达量变化,以确定1a,25(OH)2 D3最佳处理浓度。再将培养72 h 的原代心肌细胞分为3组,对照组:无血清培养基培养;血清休克组:含体积分数50%马血清的 DMEM培养2 h;1a,25(OH)2 D3处理组:最佳1a,25(OH)2 D3浓度培养2 h。分别于7个时间点(0 h、4 h、8 h、12 h、16 h、20 h、24 h)收集细胞,提取细胞总 RNA,再采用 RT-PCR 分析心肌细胞生物钟基因(Bmal1,Per2,Rev-erba)的转录水平。结果1a,25(OH)2 D3培养浓度为50 nmol/L 时, Bmal1 mRNA 表达水平最高,Per2和 Rev-erba mRNA 表达水平最低。与对照组相比,1a,25(OH)2 D3处理组和血清休克组均引起心肌细胞 Bmal1、Per2和 Rev-erba 基因呈日周期的节律振荡,且 Bmal1和 Per2的表达模式呈相反的时相表达,在12 h 时 Bmal1的表达量出现在波峰,而 Per2的表达量出现在波谷。Rev-erba 的表达变化趋势在8 h 开始上升,在12~16 h 出现最高表达量。结论1a,25(OH)2 D3可影响心肌细胞生物钟基因 Bmal1、Per2和 Rev-erba mRNA 表达。%Objective To explore the effect of 1a,25(OH)2 D3 on circadian clock gene expressions in cardiac myocytes.Methods Cultured cardiac myocytes isolated from 7 -day -old Sprague -Dawley(SD)rats were identified by immunofluorescence.The medium including 1a,25 (OH)2 D3 (final concentrations were 0 nmol/L,1 nmol/L, 10 nmol/L,50 nmol/L and 100 nmol/L)were added to primary myocardial cells to

  15. Diurnal variation of hepatic antioxidant gene expression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Qiao Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was aimed to examine circadian variations of hepatic antioxidant components, including the Nrf2- pathway, the glutathione (GSH system, antioxidant enzymes and metallothionein in mouse liver. METHODS AND RESULTS: Adult mice were housed in light- and temperature-controlled facilities for 2 weeks, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was isolated, purified, and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis. Hepatic mRNA levels of Nrf2, Keap1, Nqo1 and Gclc were higher in the light-phase than the dark-phase, and were female-predominant. Hepatic GSH presented marked circadian fluctuations, along with glutathione S-transferases (GST-α1, GST-µ, GST-π and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1. The expressions of GPx1, GST-µ and GST-π mRNA were also higher in females. Antioxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod1, catalase (CAT, cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2 and heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1 showed circadian rhythms, with higher expressions of Cox-2 and CAT in females. Metallothionein, a small non-enzymatic antioxidant protein, showed dramatic circadian variation in males, but higher expression in females. The circadian variations of the clock gene Brain and Muscle Arnt-like Protein-1(Bmal1, albumin site D-binding protein (Dbp, nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1, period protein (Per1 and Per2 and cryptochrome 1(Cry1 were in agreement with the literature. Furthermore, acetaminophen hepatotoxicity is more severe when administered in the afternoon when hepatic GSH was lowest. CONCLUSIONS: Circadian variations and gender differences in transcript levels of antioxidant genes exist in mouse liver, which could affect body responses to oxidative stress at different times of the day.

  16. Circadian expressions of related genes of cry2, per2, timeless and rev-erb in peripheral white blood cells in mice%小鼠外周血白细胞节律相关基因 cry2,per2,timeless,rev-erb表达的近日节律性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李科华; 王庆敏; 刘秋红; 戴圣龙; 时粉周; 姚永杰

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨在12 h光照/12 h黑暗(12L/12D)光暗循环条件下,小鼠外周血白细胞中相关基因cry2,per2,time-less,rev-erb近日节律性表达特点。方法用完全随机分组法将C57/BL6小鼠分成6组,每组对应一个时相点,在12L/12D条件下词养4周后分别在6个时相点(9:00,13:00,17:00,21:00,1:00,5:00)取外周血并分离白细胞。抽提总RNA,采用实时荧光定量PCR技术检测小鼠外周血白细胞cry2,per2,timeless,rev-erb 4种节律基因的mRNA水平,用余弦函数拟合节律参数,并经振幅f检验分析是否存在近日节律。结果 cry2,per2,timeless,rev-erb 4种基因mRNA存在明显的近日节律性,各基因的峰值明显高于谷值(P<0.01);per2峰值相位时间在4:00左右,而cry2,timeless,rev-erb基因的峰值时间在11:00-12:00;从峰值时间和震荡幅度看,cry2,timeless,rev-erb峰值时间比per2超前,振幅比per2高,cry2、timeless、rev-erb的峰值时间、振幅大小比较接近。结论 C57/BL6小鼠外周血白细胞4种基因cry2,per2,timeless,rev-erb的mRNA存在明显的近日节律性。 cry2,timeless, rev-erb在负反馈中的作用强于per2,而cry2,timeless,rev-erb在负反馈中的作用相似。该研究为深入理解哺乳动物的免疫功能昼夜波动打下了基础,也为诊断、治疗免疫功能紊乱相关疾病提供了靶目标。但这4种基因如何调控外周血中的免疫细胞,尚需进一步深入研究。%Objective To investigate features of circadian expressions of related genes of cry 2, per2, timeless and rev-erb in peripheral white blood cells in mice under the 12 h-light and 12 h-dark cycle conditions .Methods Forty-eight male C57/BL6 mice were randomly divided into 6 groups, with each group directed to a corresponding time point .The animals were kept under the light reg-imen of LD cycle (12L/12D) for four weeks.Then, peripheral

  17. Circadian Influences on Myocardial Infarction

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    Jitka A. I. Virag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or clock genes, are found in all peripheral tissues, including the heart, and influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on cardiovascular disease incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and cardiovascular disease may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations.

  18. Circadian expression of the presynaptic active zone protein Bruchpilot in the lamina of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska-Andrzejak, Jolanta; Makuch, Renata; Stefan, Joanna; Görlich, Alicja; Semik, Danuta; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    In the fly's visual system, the morphology of cells and the number of synapses change during the day. In the present study we show that in the first optic neuropil (lamina) of Drosophila melanogaster, a presynaptic active zone protein Bruchpilot (BRP) exhibits a circadian rhythm in abundance. In day/night (or light/dark, LD) conditions the level of BRP increases two times, in the morning and in the evening. The same pattern of changes in the BRP level was detected in whole brain homogenates, thus indicating that the majority of synapses in the brain peaks twice during the day. However, these two peaks in BRP abundance, measured as the fluorescence intensity of immunolabeling, seem to be regulated differently. The peak in the morning is predominantly regulated by light and involves the transduction pathway in the retina photoreceptors. This peak is present neither in wild-type Canton-S flies in constant darkness (DD), nor in norpA(7) phototransduction mutant in LD. However, it also depends on the clock gene per, because it is abolished in the per(0) arrhythmic mutant. In turn, the peak of BRP in the evening is endogenously regulated by an input from the pacemaker located in the brain. This peak is present in Canton-S flies in DD, as well as in the norpA(7) mutant in LD, but is absent in per(01), tim,(01) and cry(01) mutants in LD. In addition both peaks seem to depend on clock gene-expressing photoreceptors and glial cells of the visual system.

  19. Experimental jetlag disrupts circadian clock genes but improves performance in racehorses after light-dependent rapid resetting of neuroendocrine systems and the rest-activity cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortonese, D J; Preedy, D F; Hesketh, S A; Webb, H N; Wilkinson, E S; Allen, W R; Fuller, C J; Townsend, J; Short, R V

    2011-12-01

    Abrupt alterations in the 24-h light : dark cycle, such as those resulting from transmeridian air travel, disrupt circadian biological rhythms in humans with detrimental consequences on cognitive and physical performance. In the present study, a jetlag-simulated phase shift in photoperiod temporally impaired circadian peaks of peripheral clock gene expression in racehorses but acutely enhanced athletic performance without causing stress. Indices of aerobic and anaerobic capacities were significantly increased by a phase-advance, enabling prolonged physical activity before fatigue occurred. This was accompanied by rapid re-entrainment of the molecular clockwork and the circadian pattern of melatonin, with no disturbance of the adrenal cortical axis, but a timely rise in prolactin, which is a hormone known to target organs critical for physical performance. Subsequent studies showed that, unlike the circadian pattern of melatonin, and in contrast to other species, the daily rhythm of locomotor activity was completely eliminated under constant darkness, but it was restored immediately upon the reintroduction of a light : dark cycle. Resetting of the rhythm of locomotion was remarkably fast, revealing a rapid mechanism of adaptation and a species dependency on light exposure for the expression of daily diurnal activity. These results show that horses are exquisitely sensitive to sudden changes in photoperiod and that, unlike humans, can benefit from them; this appears to arise from powerful effects of light underlying a fast and advantageous process of adjustment to the phase shift.

  20. Simultaneous tracking of fly movement and gene expression using GFP

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    Tavaré Simon

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP is used extensively as a reporter for transgene expression in Drosophila and other organisms. However, GFP has not generally been used as a reporter for circadian patterns of gene expression, and it has not previously been possible to correlate patterns of reporter expression with 3D movement and behavior of transgenic animals. Results We present a video tracking system that allows tissue-specific GFP expression to be quantified and correlated with 3D animal movement in real time. eyeless/Pax6 reporter expression had a 12 hr period that correlated with fly activity levels. hsp70 and hsp22 gene reporters were induced during fly aging in circadian patterns (24 hr and 18 hr periods, respectively, and spiked in the hours preceding and overlapping the death of the animal. The phase of hsp gene reporter expression relative to fly activity levels was different for each fly, and remained the same throughout the life span. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate that GFP can readily be used to assay longitudinally fly movement and tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. The hsp22-GFP and hsp70-GFP expression patterns were found to reflect accurately the endogenous gene expression patterns, including induction during aging and circadian periodicity. The combination of these new tracking methods with the hsp-GFP reporters revealed additional information, including a spike in hsp22 and hsp70 reporter expression preceding death, and an intriguing fly-to-fly variability in the phase of hsp70 and hsp22 reporter expression patterns. These methods allow specific temporal patterns of gene expression to be correlated with temporal patterns of animal activity, behavior and mortality.

  1. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

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    Jinmi Koo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions.MethodsWe examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2 gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system.ResultsAdministration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms.ConclusionThese findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock.

  2. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in...

  3. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  4. Role for circadian clock genes in seasonal timing: testing the Bunning hypothesis.

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    Mirko Pegoraro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A major question in chronobiology focuses around the "Bünning hypothesis" which implicates the circadian clock in photoperiodic (day-length measurement and is supported in some systems (e.g. plants but disputed in others. Here, we used the seasonally-regulated thermotolerance of Drosophila melanogaster to test the role of various clock genes in day-length measurement. In Drosophila, freezing temperatures induce reversible chill coma, a narcosis-like state. We have corroborated previous observations that wild-type flies developing under short photoperiods (winter-like exhibit significantly shorter chill-coma recovery times (CCRt than flies that were raised under long (summer-like photoperiods. Here, we show that arrhythmic mutant strains, per01, tim01 and ClkJrk, as well as variants that speed up or slow down the circadian period, disrupt the photoperiodic component of CCRt. Our results support an underlying circadian function mediating seasonal daylength measurement and indicate that clock genes are tightly involved in photo- and thermo-periodic measurements.

  5. Discrete gene replication events drive coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Joris; Bosman, Mark; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Lubensky, David K

    2016-04-12

    Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a nonspecific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase-locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push-pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of different phosphoform concentrations, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene.

  6. Circadian Mechanisms of Food Anticipatory Rhythms in Rats Fed Once or Twice Daily: Clock Gene and Endocrine Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Danica F.; Katsuyama, Ângela M.; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Patterson, Zachary; Parfyonov, Maksim; Smit, Andrea N.; Marchant, Elliott G.; Chung, John; Abizaid, Alfonso; Storch, Kai-Florian; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Mistlberger, Ralph E.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian clocks in many brain regions and peripheral tissues are entrained by the daily rhythm of food intake. Clocks in one or more of these locations generate a daily rhythm of locomotor activity that anticipates a regular mealtime. Rats and mice can also anticipate two daily meals. Whether this involves 1 or 2 circadian clocks is unknown. To gain insight into how the circadian system adjusts to 2 daily mealtimes, male rats in a 12∶12 light-dark cycle were fed a 2 h meal either 4 h after lights-on or 4 h after lights-off, or a 1 h meal at both times. After 30 days, brain, blood, adrenal and stomach tissue were collected at 6 time points. Multiple clock genes from adrenals and stomachs were assayed by RT-PCR. Blood was assayed for corticosterone and ghrelin. Bmal1 expression was quantified in 14 brain regions by in situ hybridization. Clock gene rhythms in adrenal and stomach from day-fed rats oscillated in antiphase with the rhythms in night-fed rats, and at an intermediate phase in rats fed twice daily. Corticosterone and ghrelin in 1-meal rats peaked at or prior to the expected mealtime. In 2-meal rats, corticosterone peaked only prior the nighttime meal, while ghrelin peaked prior to the daytime meal and then remained elevated. The olfactory bulb, nucleus accumbens, dorsal striatum, cerebellum and arcuate nucleus exhibited significant daily rhythms of Bmal1 in the night-fed groups that were approximately in antiphase in the day-fed groups, and at intermediate levels (arrhythmic) in rats anticipating 2 daily meals. The dissociations between anticipatory activity and the peripheral clocks and hormones in rats anticipating 2 daily meals argue against a role for these signals in the timing of behavioral rhythms. The absence of rhythmicity at the tissue level in brain regions from rats anticipating 2 daily meals support behavioral evidence that circadian clock cells in these tissues may reorganize into two populations coupled to different meals. PMID:25502949

  7. Circadian rhythm variations of clock gene PER1 expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma and their relations with tumor growth in vivo%生物钟PER1基因在口腔鳞癌中的昼夜节律变化及与体内肿瘤生长的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵宁波; 杨凯; 陈丹; 唐洪; 赵丹; 赵春蓉

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨生物钟PER1基因在口腔鳞癌中的昼夜节律变化情况和与肿瘤体内生长的关系.方法 60只裸鼠置于12 h光照和12 h黑暗交替环境中饲养3周后,将人颊鳞癌BcaCD885细胞接种于裸鼠颊部,建立口腔颊鳞癌模型.3周成瘤后,在24 h内按灯亮后4、10、16、22 h(4 HALO、10 HALO、16 HALO、22 HALO)的4个时间点分别处死15只裸鼠,取出肿瘤,称量,常规切片在HE染色下计算各时间点肿瘤的有丝分裂指数(MI);分别用S-P免疫组化、Western blot和Real-time RT-PCR检测各时间点癌细胞中PER1蛋白和mRNA的表达;分别用方差分析和余弦分析检验各指标在4个时间点的差异性和是否具有昼夜节律性.结果 颊鳞癌细胞PER1蛋白、PER1 mRNA、肿瘤MI和肿瘤质量在昼夜不同时间点具有显著性差异(P<0.01),其变化波动具有昼夜节律性特征(P<0.05);肿瘤MI和肿瘤质量与PER1的表达水平呈反比关系,PER1 mRNA表达的峰值与肿瘤MI和质量的谷值均位于活动相的中期,而PER1 mRNA表达的谷值与肿瘤MI和质量的峰值均位于休息相中期.结论 口腔鳞癌中PER1的表达、肿瘤MI和质量在昼夜不同时间点的波动具有24 h昼夜节律性规律,PER1在口腔鳞癌中为抑癌基因.%Objective To determine the circadian rhythm variations of the expression of clock gene PER1 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and their relations with tumor growth in vivo.Methods Sixty nude mice were raised under 12 h light/12 h dark cycles for 3 weeks.Human OSCC cell line BcaCD885 was inoculated in the cheek of nude mice to establish a nude mice model of OSCC.In 3 weeks after the implantation,15 mice were sacrificed at 4 time points,including 4 h after light onset (HALO),10 HALO,16 HALO and 22 HALO,respectively,during a period of 24 h.Tumor tissues were excised and weighed.HE stained sections were prepared and mitotic index (MI) was calculated.The protein and mRNA expression of PER1 in the tumor

  8. Circadian Clocks in the Immune System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Nathalie; Cermakian, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    The immune system is a complex set of physiological mechanisms whose general aim is to defend the organism against non-self-bodies, such as pathogens (bacteria, viruses, parasites), as well as cancer cells. Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-h variations found in virtually all physiological processes. These circadian rhythms are generated by circadian clocks, located in most cell types, including cells of the immune system. This review presents an overview of the clocks in the immune system and of the circadian regulation of the function of immune cells. Most immune cells express circadian clock genes and present a wide array of genes expressed with a 24-h rhythm. This has profound impacts on cellular functions, including a daily rhythm in the synthesis and release of cytokines, chemokines and cytolytic factors, the daily gating of the response occurring through pattern recognition receptors, circadian rhythms of cellular functions such as phagocytosis, migration to inflamed or infected tissue, cytolytic activity, and proliferative response to antigens. Consequently, alterations of circadian rhythms (e.g., clock gene mutation in mice or environmental disruption similar to shift work) lead to disturbed immune responses. We discuss the implications of these data for human health and the areas that future research should aim to address.

  9. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

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    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  10. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

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    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  11. Circadian gene variants and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes: a pilot study.

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    M Ann Kelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of endogenous circadian rhythms has been shown to increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, suggesting that circadian genes might play a role in determining disease susceptibility. We present the results of a pilot study investigating the association between type 2 diabetes and selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in/near nine circadian genes. The variants were chosen based on their previously reported association with prostate cancer, a disease that has been suggested to have a genetic link with type 2 diabetes through a number of shared inherited risk determinants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The pilot study was performed using two genetically homogeneous Punjabi cohorts, one resident in the United Kingdom and one indigenous to Pakistan. Subjects with (N = 1732 and without (N = 1780 type 2 diabetes were genotyped for thirteen circadian variants using a competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction method. Associations between the SNPs and type 2 diabetes were investigated using logistic regression. The results were also combined with in silico data from other South Asian datasets (SAT2D consortium and white European cohorts (DIAGRAM+ using meta-analysis. The rs7602358G allele near PER2 was negatively associated with type 2 diabetes in our Punjabi cohorts (combined odds ratio [OR] = 0.75 [0.66-0.86], p = 3.18 × 10(-5, while the BMAL1 rs11022775T allele was associated with an increased risk of the disease (combined OR = 1.22 [1.07-1.39], p = 0.003. Neither of these associations was replicated in the SAT2D or DIAGRAM+ datasets, however. Meta-analysis of all the cohorts identified disease associations with two variants, rs2292912 in CRY2 and rs12315175 near CRY1, although statistical significance was nominal (combined OR = 1.05 [1.01-1.08], p = 0.008 and OR = 0.95 [0.91-0.99], p = 0.015 respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: None of the selected circadian gene variants was associated with type

  12. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm.

  13. Circadian rhythms synchronize mitosis in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Christian I; Zámborszky, Judit; Baek, Mokryun; Labiscsak, Laszlo; Ju, Kyungsu; Lee, Hyeyeong; Larrondo, Luis F; Goity, Alejandra; Chong, Hin Siong; Belden, William J; Csikász-Nagy, Attila

    2014-01-28

    The cell cycle and the circadian clock communicate with each other, resulting in circadian-gated cell division cycles. Alterations in this network may lead to diseases such as cancer. Therefore, it is critical to identify molecular components that connect these two oscillators. However, molecular mechanisms between the clock and the cell cycle remain largely unknown. A model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, is a multinucleate system used to elucidate molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms, but not used to investigate the molecular coupling between these two oscillators. In this report, we show that a conserved coupling between the circadian clock and the cell cycle exists via serine/threonine protein kinase-29 (STK-29), the Neurospora homolog of mammalian WEE1 kinase. Based on this finding, we established a mathematical model that predicts circadian oscillations of cell cycle components and circadian clock-dependent synchronized nuclear divisions. We experimentally demonstrate that G1 and G2 cyclins, CLN-1 and CLB-1, respectively, oscillate in a circadian manner with bioluminescence reporters. The oscillations of clb-1 and stk-29 gene expression are abolished in a circadian arrhythmic frq(ko) mutant. Additionally, we show the light-induced phase shifts of a core circadian component, frq, as well as the gene expression of the cell cycle components clb-1 and stk-29, which may alter the timing of divisions. We then used a histone hH1-GFP reporter to observe nuclear divisions over time, and show that a large number of nuclear divisions occur in the evening. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock-dependent molecular dynamics of cell cycle components that result in synchronized nuclear divisions in Neurospora.

  14. Structure, circadian regulation and bioinformatic analysis of the unique sigma factor gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Matthew L; Smith, Annette C; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Purton, Saul; Herrin, David L

    2004-01-01

    In higher plants, the transcription of plastid genes is mediated by at least two types of RNA polymerase (RNAP); a plastid-encoded bacterial RNAP in which promoter specificity is conferred by nuclear-encoded sigma factors, and a nuclear-encoded phage-like RNAP. Green algae, however, appear to possess only the bacterial enzyme. Since transcription of much, if not most, of the chloroplast genome in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is regulated by the circadian clock and the nucleus, we sought to identify sigma factor genes that might be responsible for this regulation. We describe a nuclear gene (RPOD) that is predicted to encode an 80 kDa protein that, in addition to a predicted chloroplast transit peptide at the N-terminus, has the conserved motifs (2.1- 4.2) diagnostic of bacterial sigma-70 factors. We also identified two motifs not previously recognized for sigma factors, adjacent PEST sequences and a leucine zipper, both suggested to be involved in protein-protein interactions. PEST sequences were also found in approximately 40% of sigma factors examined, indicating they may be of general significance. Southern blot hybridization and BLAST searches of the genome and EST databases suggest that RPODmay be the only sigma factor gene in C. reinhardtii. The levels of RPODmRNA increased 2- 3-fold in the mid-to-late dark period of light-dark cycling cells, just prior to, or coincident with, the peak in chloroplast transcription. Also, the dark-period peak in RPOD mRNA persisted in cells shifted to continuous light or continuous dark for at least one cycle, indicating that RPODis under circadian clock control. These results suggest that regulation of RPODexpression contributes to the circadian clock's control of chloroplast transcription.

  15. Characterization of Circadian-associated pseudo-response regulators: I. Comparative studies on a series of transgenic lines misexpressing five distinctive PRR Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushika, Akinori; Murakami, Masaya; Ito, Shogo; Nakamichi, Norihito; Yamashino, Takafumi; Mizuno, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Every member of a small family of Pseudo-Response Regulator (PRR) genes, including Timing of Cab Expression 1 (TOC1 [or PRR1]), are believed to play roles close to the circadian clock in the model higher plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study we established a transgenic line that misexpresses (or overexpresses) the PRR7 gene. As compared with wild-type plants, the resulting PRR7-misexpressing plants (designated PRR7-ox) showed characteristic phenotypes as to hallmarked circadian-associated biological events: (i) early flowering in a manner independent of photoperiodicity, (ii) hypersensitive response to red light during early photomorphogenesis, and (iii) altered free-running rhythms with long period of clock-associated genes. Finally, a series of all transgenic lines (PRR1-ox, PRR3-ox, PRR5-ox, PRR7-ox, and PRR9-ox) were characterized comparatively with regard to their clock-associated roles. The results suggested that the five homologous PRR factors play coordinate roles, distinctively from one another, and closely to the circadian clock in higher plants.

  16. Interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism: there are good times and bad times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Shi; Xiangzhong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An endogenous circadian (~24 h) clock regulates rhythmic processes of physiology,metabolism and behavior in most living organisms.While able to free-run under constant conditions,the circadian clock is coupled to day:night cycles to increase its amplitude and align the phase of circadian rhythms to the right time of the day.Disruptions of the circadian clock are correlated with brain dysfunctions,cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders.In this review,we focus on the interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism.We discuss recent findings on circadian clock regulation of feeding behavior and rhythmic expression of metabolic genes,and present evidence of metabolic input to the circadian clock.We emphasize how misalignment of circadian clocks within the body and with environmental cycles or daily schedules leads to the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes in modern society.

  17. Cloning and functional characterization of a beta-pinene synthase from Artemisia annua that shows a circadian pattern of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan; Xu, Ran; Jia, Jun-Wei; Pang, Jihai; Matsuda, Seiichi P T; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2002-09-01

    Artemisia annua plants produce a broad range of volatile compounds, including monoterpenes, which contribute to the characteristic fragrance of this medicinal species. A cDNA clone, QH6, contained an open reading frame encoding a 582-amino acid protein that showed high sequence identity to plant monoterpene synthases. The prokaryotically expressed QH6 fusion protein converted geranyl diphosphate to (-)-beta-pinene and (-)-alpha-pinene in a 94:6 ratio. QH6 was predominantly expressed in juvenile leaves 2 weeks postsprouting. QH6 transcript levels were transiently reduced following mechanical wounding or fungal elicitor treatment, suggesting that this gene is not directly involved in defense reaction induced by either of these treatments. Under a photoperiod of 12 h/12 h (light/dark), the abundance of QH6 transcripts fluctuated in a diurnal pattern that ebbed around 3 h before daybreak (9th h in the dark phase) and peaked after 9 h in light (9th h in the light phase). The contents of (-)-beta-pinene in juvenile leaves and in emitted volatiles also varied in a diurnal rhythm, correlating strongly with mRNA accumulation. When A. annua was entrained by constant light or constant dark conditions, QH6 transcript accumulation continued to fluctuate with circadian rhythms. Under constant light, advanced cycles of fluctuation of QH6 transcript levels were observed, and under constant dark, the cycle was delayed. However, the original diurnal pattern could be regained when the plants were returned to the normal light/dark (12 h/12 h) photoperiod. This is the first report that monoterpene biosynthesis is transcriptionally regulated in a circadian pattern.

  18. Time-of-day- and light-dependent expression of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4 in the suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrod H Ling

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are driven by the biological clock that operates endogenously but can also be entrained to the light-dark cycle of the environment. In mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, which is composed of individual cellular oscillators that are driven by a set of core clock genes interacting in transcriptional/translational feedback loops. Light signals can trigger molecular events in the SCN that ultimately impact on the phase of expression of core clock genes to reset the master pacemaker. While transcriptional regulation has received much attention in the field of circadian biology in the past, other mechanisms including targeted protein degradation likely contribute to the clock timing and entrainment process. In the present study, proteome-wide screens of the murine SCN led to the identification of ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 4 (UBR4, a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component of the N-end rule pathway, as a time-of-day-dependent and light-inducible protein. The spatial and temporal expression pattern of UBR4 in the SCN was subsequently characterized by immunofluorescence microscopy. UBR4 is expressed across the entire rostrocaudal extent of the SCN in a time-of-day-dependent fashion. UBR4 is localized exclusively to arginine vasopressin (AVP-expressing neurons of the SCN shell. Upon photic stimulation in the early subjective night, the number of UBR4-expressing cells within the SCN increases. This study is the first to identify a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase component, UBR4, in the murine SCN and to implicate the N-end rule degradation pathway as a potential player in regulating core clock mechanisms and photic entrainment.

  19. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  20. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its rec...

  1. A survey of genomic studies supports association of circadian clock genes with bipolar disorder spectrum illnesses and lithium response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McCarthy

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythm abnormalities in bipolar disorder (BD have led to a search for genetic abnormalities in circadian "clock genes" associated with BD. However, no significant clock gene findings have emerged from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. At least three factors could account for this discrepancy: complex traits are polygenic, the organization of the clock is more complex than previously recognized, and/or genetic risk for BD may be shared across multiple illnesses. To investigate these issues, we considered the clock gene network at three levels: essential "core" clock genes, upstream circadian clock modulators, and downstream clock controlled genes. Using relaxed thresholds for GWAS statistical significance, we determined the rates of clock vs. control genetic associations with BD, and four additional illnesses that share clinical features and/or genetic risk with BD (major depression, schizophrenia, attention deficit/hyperactivity. Then we compared the results to a set of lithium-responsive genes. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were both enriched among core clock genes but not among upstream clock modulators. Associations with BD-spectrum illnesses and lithium-responsiveness were also enriched among pervasively rhythmic clock-controlled genes but not among genes that were less pervasively rhythmic or non-rhythmic. Our analysis reveals previously unrecognized associations between clock genes and BD-spectrum illnesses, partly reconciling previously discordant results from past GWAS and candidate gene studies.

  2. The ticking tail: daily oscillations in mRNA poly(A) tail length drive circadian cycles in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotic, Ivana; Schibler, Ueli

    2012-12-15

    In this issue of Genes & Development, Kojima and colleagues (pp. 2724-2736) examined the impact of mRNA poly(A) tail length on circadian gene expression. Their study demonstrates how dynamic changes in transcript poly(A) tail length can lead to rhythmic protein expression, irrespective of whether mRNA accumulation is circadian or constitutive.

  3. Integrative analysis of circadian transcriptome and metabolic network reveals the role of de novo purine synthesis in circadian control of cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Li, Guang; Görling, Benjamin; Luy, Burkhard; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Metabolism is the major output of the circadian clock in many organisms. We developed a computational method to integrate both circadian gene expression and metabolic network. Applying this method to zebrafish circadian transcriptome, we have identified large clusters of metabolic genes containing mostly genes in purine and pyrimidine metabolism in the metabolic network showing similar circadian phases. Our metabolomics analysis found that the level of inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), an intermediate metabolite in de novo purine synthesis, showed significant circadian oscillation in larval zebrafish. We focused on IMP dehydrogenase (impdh), a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo purine synthesis, with three circadian oscillating gene homologs: impdh1a, impdh1b and impdh2. Functional analysis revealed that impdh2 contributes to the daily rhythm of S phase in the cell cycle while impdh1a contributes to ocular development and pigment synthesis. The three zebrafish homologs of impdh are likely regulated by different circadian transcription factors. We propose that the circadian regulation of de novo purine synthesis that supplies crucial building blocks for DNA replication is an important mechanism conferring circadian rhythmicity on the cell cycle. Our method is widely applicable to study the impact of circadian transcriptome on metabolism in complex organisms.

  4. Signaling to the circadian clock: plasticity by chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahata, Yasukazu; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Sahar, Saurabh; Hirayama, Jun; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    Circadian rhythms govern several fundamental physiological functions in almost all organisms, from prokaryotes to humans. The circadian clocks are intrinsic time-tracking systems with which organisms can anticipate environmental changes and adapt to the appropriate time of day. In mammals, circadian rhythms are generated in pacemaker neurons within the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), a small area of the hypothalamus, and are entrained by environmental cues, principally light. Disruption of these rhythms can profoundly influence human health, being linked to depression, insomnia, jet lag, coronary heart disease and a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. It is now well established that circadian clocks operate via transcriptional feedback autoregulatory loops that involve the products of circadian clock genes. Furthermore, peripheral tissues also contain independent clocks, whose oscillatory function is orchestrated by the SCN. The complex program of gene expression that characterizes circadian physiology involves dynamic changes in chromatin transitions. These remodeling events are therefore of great importance to ensure the proper timing and extent of circadian regulation. How signaling influences chromatin remodeling through histone modifications is therefore highly relevant in the context of circadian oscillation. Recent advances in the field have revealed unexpected links between circadian regulators, chromatin remodeling and cellular metabolism.

  5. [Circadian regulation of sleep-wake cycles and food anticipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Wataru

    2012-06-01

    The circadian clock is crucial for efficient physiological function and drives the temporal regulation of the sleep-wake state, metabolism, and behavior. The timing of food intake and the accompanying behavior are both controlled by the internal clock, which is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN is considered as the master clock because the circadian rhythms for most physiological and behavioral processes are terminated after SCN ablation. The molecular framework of circadian oscillations can be best studied in the SCN. A "core" set of circadian clock genes form autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loops that are believed to drive daily rhythms in individual cells. These clock genes are expressed in a circadian manner not only in the SCN but also in other parts of the brain and many peripheral tissues. Mammals can anticipate a predictable daily mealtime through entrainment of circadian oscillators. Because the restriction of food availability to a specific time of the day elicits anticipatory behavior even after ablation of the SCN, such behaviour is assumed to be controlled by another circadian oscillator. In this paper, we have (1) reviewed studies involving the identification of the circadian clock and (2) aimed to elucidate the complex mechanism underlying feeding-associated rhythms by achieving a deep understanding of the circadian phenotypes of the SCN.

  6. There Is No Association Between the Circadian Clock Gene HPER3 and Cognitive Dysfunction After Noncardiac Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt Hansen, Melissa; Simon Rasmussen, Lars; Jespersgaard, Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    The specific clock-gene PERIOD3 is important with regard to circadian rhythmicity, sleep homeostasis, and cognitive function. The allele PER3(5/5) has been associated with worse cognitive performance in response to sleep deprivation. We hypothesized that patients with the PER3(5/5) genotype would...

  7. Synergistic interactions between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks drive robust behavioral circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Weiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most organisms use 24-hr circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila melanogaster CLOCK (CLK and CYCLE (CYC initiates the circadian system by promoting rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes. However, it is still not clear whether high amplitude transcriptional oscillations are essential for circadian timekeeping. In order to address this issue, we generated flies in which the amplitude of CLK-driven transcription can be reduced partially (approx. 60% or strongly (90% without affecting the average levels of CLK-target genes. The impaired transcriptional oscillations lead to low amplitude protein oscillations that were not sufficient to drive outputs of peripheral oscillators. However, circadian rhythms in locomotor activity were resistant to partial reduction in transcriptional and protein oscillations. We found that the resilience of the brain oscillator is depending on the neuronal communication among circadian neurons in the brain. Indeed, the capacity of the brain oscillator to overcome low amplitude transcriptional oscillations depends on the action of the neuropeptide PDF and on the pdf-expressing cells having equal or higher amplitude of molecular rhythms than the rest of the circadian neuronal groups in the fly brain. Therefore, our work reveals the importance of high amplitude transcriptional oscillations for cell-autonomous circadian timekeeping. Moreover, we demonstrate that the circadian neuronal network is an essential buffering system that protects against changes in circadian transcription in the brain.

  8. Associations of PER3 and RORA Circadian Gene Polymorphisms and Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Jeanne E.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Parimi, Neeta; Evans, Daniel S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Stone, Katie L.; Yaffe, Kristine; Redline, Susan; Tranah, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Depressive symptoms are common in older adults and associated with poor outcomes. While circadian genes have been implicated in depression, the relationship between circadian genes and depressive symptoms in older adults is unclear. Methods A cross-sectional genetic association study of 529 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) representing 30 candidate circadian genes was performed in two population-based cohorts: Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study (MrOS, n=1270, age 76.58±5.61 years) and the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) in women (n=1740, 84.05±3.53 years) and a meta-analysis was performed. Depressive symptoms were assessed with the Geriatric Depression Scale categorizing participants as having “none-few symptoms” (0-2), “some depressive symptoms” (>2<6), or “many depressive symptoms” (≥6). Results We found associations meeting multiple testing criteria for significance between the PER3 intronic SNP rs12137927 and decreased odds of reporting “some depressive symptoms” in the SOF sample (OR 0.61, CI 0.48-0.78, df=1, Wald chi-square −4.04, p=0.000054) and the meta-analysis (OR 0.61, CI 0.48-0.78, z= −4.04, p=0.000054) and between the PER3 intronic SNPs rs228644 (OR 0.74, CI 0.63-0.86, z= 3.82, p-value=0.00013) and rs228682 (OR 0.74, CI 0.86 0.63, z= 3.81, p-value=0.00014) and decreased odds of reporting “some depressive symptoms” in the meta-analysis compared to endorsing none-few depressive symptoms. The RORA intronic SNP rs11632098 was associated with greater odds of reporting “many depressive symptoms” (OR 2.16, CI 1.45-3.23, df=1, Wald chi-square 3.76, p=0.000168) in the men. In the meta analysis the association was attenuated and nominally significant (OR 1.63, CI 1.24-2.16, z=3.45, p=0.00056). Conclusions PER3 and RORA may play important roles in the development of depressive symptoms in older adults. PMID:25892098

  9. Rhythmic Degradation Explains and Unifies Circadian Transcriptome and Proteome Data

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    Sarah Lück

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rich mammalian cellular circadian output affects thousands of genes in many cell types and has been the subject of genome-wide transcriptome and proteome studies. The results have been enigmatic because transcript peak abundances do not always follow the peaks of gene-expression activity in time. We posited that circadian degradation of mRNAs and proteins plays a pivotal role in setting their peak times. To establish guiding principles, we derived a theoretical framework that fully describes the amplitudes and phases of biomolecules with circadian half-lives. We were able to explain the circadian transcriptome and proteome studies with the same unifying theory, including cases in which transcripts or proteins appeared before the onset of increased production rates. Furthermore, we estimate that 30% of the circadian transcripts in mouse liver and Drosophila heads are affected by rhythmic posttranscriptional regulation.

  10. The mammalian circadian clock protein period counteracts cryptochrome in phosphorylation dynamics of circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Tsuchiya, Yoshiki; Tokuda, Isao; Matsuo, Takahiro; Sato, Miho; Node, Koichi; Nishida, Eisuke; Akashi, Makoto

    2014-11-14

    The circadian transcription factor CLOCK exhibits a circadian oscillation in its phosphorylation levels. Although it remains unclear whether this phosphorylation contributes to circadian rhythm generation, it has been suggested to be involved in transcriptional activity, intracellular localization, and degradative turnover of CLOCK. Here, we obtained direct evidence that CLOCK phosphorylation may be essential for autonomous circadian oscillation in clock gene expression. Importantly, we found that the circadian transcriptional repressors Cryptochrome (CRY) and Period (PER) showed an opposite effect on CLOCK phosphorylation; CRY impaired BMAL1-dependent CLOCK phosphorylation, whereas PER protected the phosphorylation against CRY. Interestingly, unlike PER1 and PER2, PER3 did not exert a protective action, which correlates with the phenotypic differences among mice lacking the Per genes. Further studies on the regulatory mechanism of CLOCK phosphorylation would thus lead to elucidation of the mechanism of CRY-mediated transcriptional repression and an understanding of the true role of PER in the negative feedback system.

  11. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the tem......Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart......, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism...... in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner....

  12. Tumor-specific gene expression patterns with gene expression profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUAN Xiaogang; LI Yingxin; LI Jiangeng; GONG Daoxiong; WANG Jinlian

    2006-01-01

    Gene expression profiles of 14 common tumors and their counterpart normal tissues were analyzed with machine learning methods to address the problem of selection of tumor-specific genes and analysis of their differential expressions in tumor tissues. First, a variation of the Relief algorithm, "RFE_Relief algorithm" was proposed to learn the relations between genes and tissue types. Then, a support vector machine was employed to find the gene subset with the best classification performance for distinguishing cancerous tissues and their counterparts. After tissue-specific genes were removed, cross validation experiments were employed to demonstrate the common deregulated expressions of the selected gene in tumor tissues. The results indicate the existence of a specific expression fingerprint of these genes that is shared in different tumor tissues, and the hallmarks of the expression patterns of these genes in cancerous tissues are summarized at the end of this paper.

  13. NONO couples the circadian clock to the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Elzbieta; Ripperger, Juergen A; Hoegger, Dominik C; Bruegger, Pascal; Buch, Thorsten; Birchler, Thomas; Mueller, Anke; Albrecht, Urs; Contaldo, Claudio; Brown, Steven A

    2013-01-29

    Mammalian circadian clocks restrict cell proliferation to defined time windows, but the mechanism and consequences of this interrelationship are not fully understood. Previously we identified the multifunctional nuclear protein NONO as a partner of circadian PERIOD (PER) proteins. Here we show that it also conveys circadian gating to the cell cycle, a connection surprisingly important for wound healing in mice. Specifically, although fibroblasts from NONO-deficient mice showed approximately normal circadian cycles, they displayed elevated cell doubling and lower cellular senescence. At a molecular level, NONO bound to the p16-Ink4A cell cycle checkpoint gene and potentiated its circadian activation in a PER protein-dependent fashion. Loss of either NONO or PER abolished this activation and circadian expression of p16-Ink4A and eliminated circadian cell cycle gating. In vivo, lack of NONO resulted in defective wound repair. Because wound healing defects were also seen in multiple circadian clock-deficient mouse lines, our results therefore suggest that coupling of the cell cycle to the circadian clock via NONO may be useful to segregate in temporal fashion cell proliferation from tissue organization.

  14. Homeobox genes and melatonin synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten; Rath, Martin Fredensborg

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a cAMP-based indu......Nocturnal synthesis of melatonin in the pineal gland is controlled by a circadian rhythm in arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) enzyme activity. In the rodent, Aanat gene expression displays a marked circadian rhythm; release of norepinephrine in the gland at night causes a c......AMP response element-based circadian melatonin production....

  15. Timed food availability affects circadian behavior but not the neuropeptide Y expression in Indian weaverbirds exposed to atypical light environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devraj; Trivedi, Neerja; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis whether daily food availability period would restore rhythmicity in individuals with disrupted circadian behavior with no effect on appetite regulation. Particularly, we investigated the effects of timed food availability on activity behavior, and Fos and neuropeptide Y expressions in Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) under atypical light conditions. Initially, weaverbirds in 3 groups of 7-8 each were entrained to 7L:17D (25: food ad libitum. Thereafter, food availability was restricted for 7h such that it overlapped with the light period. After a week, 7L:17D was replaced with 3.5L: 3.5D (T7, group 1), 3.5L: 20.5D (T24, group 2) or constant dim light, LLdim (Food cycles synchronized the circadian activity behavior, albeit with group differences, but did not affect body mass, blood glucose levels or testis size. Further, Fos, not NPY mRNA or peptide, expression measured at ZT2 and ZT14 (ZT0=time of food given) showed significant group differences in the hippocampus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and infundibular nuclear complex. Another identical experiment examined after-effects of the 3 light conditions on persistence of the circadian rhythms. Weaverbirds exposed for 4weeks to identical food but different light conditions, as above, were released into the free-running condition of food ad libitum and LLdim. Circadian rhythms were decayed in birds previously exposed to T7 LD cycle. Overall, these results show that timed meal restores rhythmicity in individuals with circadian rhythm disruptions without involving neuropeptide Y, the key appetite regulatory molecule.

  16. Circadian rhythm and its role in malignancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sobia; Mahmood, Saqib

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are daily oscillations of multiple biological processes directed by endogenous clocks. The circadian timing system comprises peripheral oscillators located in most tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Circadian genes and the proteins produced by these genes constitute the molecular components of the circadian oscillator which form positive/negative feedback loops and generate circadian rhythms. The circ...

  17. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The central circadian clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the circadian clockwork of the SCN constitutes a self-sustained autoregulatory feedback mechanism reflected by the rhythmic expression of clock genes. Howev...

  18. Expression of core clock genes in colorectal tumour cells compared with normal mucosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonnes, S; Donatsky, A M; Gögenur, I

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Experimental studies have shown that some circadian core clock genes may act as tumour suppressors and have an important role in the response to oncological treatment. This study investigated the evidence regarding modified expression of core clock genes in colorectal cancer and its correlat......AIM: Experimental studies have shown that some circadian core clock genes may act as tumour suppressors and have an important role in the response to oncological treatment. This study investigated the evidence regarding modified expression of core clock genes in colorectal cancer and its...... correlation to clinicopathological features and survival. METHOD: A systematic review was conducted without meta-analysis according to the PRISMA guidelines on 24 March 2014 using PubMed and EMBASE. Eligibility criteria were: study design, original research article, English language, human subjects and gene...

  19. Circadian arrhythmia dysregulates emotional behaviors in aged Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Onishi, Kenneth G; Patel, Priyesh N; Stevenson, Tyler J

    2014-03-15

    Emotional behaviors are influenced by the circadian timing system. Circadian disruptions are associated with depressive-like symptoms in clinical and preclinical populations. Circadian rhythm robustness declines markedly with aging and may contribute to susceptibility to emotional dysregulation in aged individuals. The present experiments used a model of chronic circadian arrhythmia generated noninvasively, via a series of circadian-disruptive light treatments, to investigate interactions between circadian desynchrony and aging on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, and on limbic neuroinflammatory gene expression that has been linked with emotionality. We also examined whether a social manipulation (group housing) would attenuate effects of arrhythmia on emotionality. In aged (14-18 months of age) male Siberian hamsters, circadian arrhythmia increased behavioral despair and decreased social motivation, but decreased exploratory anxiety. These effects were not evident in younger (5-9 months of age) hamsters. Social housing (3-5 hamsters/cage) abolished the effects of circadian arrhythmia on emotionality. Circadian arrhythmia alone was without effect on hippocampal or cortical interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) mRNA expression in aged hamsters, but social housing decreased hippocampal IL-1β and Ido mRNAs. The data demonstrate that circadian disruption can negatively impact affective state, and that this effect is pronounced in older individuals. Although clear associations between circadian arrhythmia and constitutive limbic proinflammatory activity were not evident, the present data suggest that social housing markedly inhibits constitutive hippocampal IL-1β and Ido activity, which may contribute to the ameliorating effects of social housing on a number of emotional behaviors.

  20. Rapid attenuation of circadian clock gene oscillations in the rat heart following ischemia-reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intracellular circadian clock consists of a series of transcriptional modulators that together allow the cell to perceive the time of day. Circadian clocks have been identified within various components of the cardiovascular system (e.g., cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells) and possess...

  1. Differential maturation of rhythmic clock gene expression during early development in medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, Ines H; Lahiri, Kajori; Lopez-Olmeda, Jose Fernando; Loosli, Felix; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Vallone, Daniela

    2014-05-01

    One key challenge for the field of chronobiology is to identify how circadian clock function emerges during early embryonic development. Teleosts such as the zebrafish are ideal models for studying circadian clock ontogeny since the entire process of development occurs ex utero in an optically transparent chorion. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) represents another powerful fish model for exploring early clock function with, like the zebrafish, many tools available for detailed genetic analysis. However, to date there have been no reports documenting circadian clock gene expression during medaka development. Here we have characterized the expression of key clock genes in various developmental stages and in adult tissues of medaka. As previously reported for other fish, light dark cycles are required for the emergence of clock gene expression rhythms in this species. While rhythmic expression of per and cry genes is detected very early during development and seems to be light driven, rhythmic clock and bmal expression appears much later around hatching time. Furthermore, the maturation of clock function seems to correlate with the appearance of rhythmic expression of these positive elements of the clock feedback loop. By accelerating development through elevated temperatures or by artificially removing the chorion, we show an earlier onset of rhythmicity in clock and bmal expression. Thus, differential maturation of key elements of the medaka clock mechanism depends on the developmental stage and the presence of the chorion.

  2. Independence of genetic variation between circadian rhythm and development time in the seed beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harano, Tomohiro; Miyatake, Takahisa

    2011-03-01

    A positive genetic correlation between periods of circadian rhythm and developmental time supports the hypothesis that circadian clocks are implicated in the timing of development. Empirical evidence for this genetic correlation in insects has been documented in two fly species. In contrast, here we show that there is no evidence of genetic correlation between circadian rhythm and development time in the adzuki bean beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis. This species has variation that is explained by a major gene in the expression and period length of circadian rhythm between strains. In this study, we found genetic variation in development time between the strains. The development time was not covaried with either the incidence or the period length of circadian rhythm among the strains. Crosses between strains suggest that development time is controlled by a polygene. In the F(2) individuals from the crosses, the circadian rhythm is attributable to allelic variation in the major gene. Across the F(2) individuals, development time was not correlated with either the expression or the period length of circadian rhythm. Thus, we found no effects of major genes responsible for variation in the circadian rhythm on development time in C. chinensis. Our findings collectively give no support to the hypothesis that the circadian clock is involved in the regulation of development time in this species.

  3. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide mediates circadian rhythms in mammalian olfactory bulb and olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jae-Eun Kang; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Wang, Thomas; Marpegan, Luciano; Holy, Timothy E; Herzog, Erik D

    2014-04-23

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the olfactory bulbs (OBs) function as an independent circadian system regulating daily rhythms in olfactory performance. However, the cells and signals in the olfactory system that generate and coordinate these circadian rhythms are unknown. Using real-time imaging of gene expression, we found that the isolated olfactory epithelium and OB, but not the piriform cortex, express similar, sustained circadian rhythms in PERIOD2 (PER2). In vivo, PER2 expression in the OB of mice is circadian, approximately doubling with a peak around subjective dusk. Furthermore, mice exhibit circadian rhythms in odor detection performance with a peak at approximately subjective dusk. We also found that circadian rhythms in gene expression and odor detection performance require vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) or its receptor VPAC2R. VIP is expressed, in a circadian manner, in interneurons in the external plexiform and periglomerular layers, whereas VPAC2R is expressed in mitral and external tufted cells in the OB. Together, these results indicate that VIP signaling modulates the output from the OB to maintain circadian rhythms in the mammalian olfactory system.

  4. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  5. Rhythms and synchronization patterns in gene expression in the Aedes aegypti mosquito

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    Carlson Jonathan O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aedes aegypti is arguably the most studied of all mosquito species in the laboratory and is the primary vector of both Dengue and Yellow Fever flaviviruses in the field. A large number of transcriptional studies have been made in the species and these usually report transcript quantities observed at a certain age or stage of development. However, circadian oscillation is an important characteristic of gene expression in many animals and plants, modulating both their physiology and behavior. Circadian gene expression in mosquito species has been previously reported but for only a few genes directly involved in the function of the molecular clock. Results Herein we analyze the transcription profiles of 21,494 messenger RNAs using an Ae. aegypti Agilent® microarray. Transcripts were quantified in adult female heads at 24 hours and then again at 72 hours and eight subsequent time points spaced four hours apart. We document circadian rhythms in multiple molecular pathways essential for growth, development, immune response, detoxification/pesticide resistance. Circadian rhythms were also noted in ribosomal protein genes used for normalization in reverse transcribed PCR (RT-PCR to determine transcript abundance. We report pervasive oscillations and intricate synchronization patterns relevant to all known biological pathways. Conclusion These results argue strongly that transcriptional analyses either need to be made over time periods rather than confining analyses to a single time point or development stage or exceptional care needs to be made to synchronize all mosquitoes to be analyzed and compared among treatment groups.

  6. The flow of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2004-03-01

    Gene expression is a highly interconnected multistep process. A recent meeting in Iguazu Falls, Argentina, highlighted the need to uncover both the molecular details of each single step as well as the mechanisms of coordination among processes in order to fully understand the expression of genes.

  7. The intrinsic microglial molecular clock controls synaptic strength via the circadian expression of cathepsin S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Koyanagi, Satoru; Kusunose, Naoki; Okada, Ryo; Wu, Zhou; Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Ukai, Kiyoharu; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Inoue, Kazuhide; Ohdo, Shigehiro; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2013-09-25

    Microglia are thought to play important roles in the maintenance of neuronal circuitry and the regulation of behavior. We found that the cortical microglia contain an intrinsic molecular clock and exhibit a circadian expression of cathepsin S (CatS), a microglia-specific lysosomal cysteine protease in the brain. The genetic deletion of CatS causes mice to exhibit hyperlocomotor activity and removes diurnal variations in the synaptic activity and spine density of the cortical neurons, which are significantly higher during the dark (waking) phase than the light (sleeping) phase. Furthermore, incubation with recombinant CatS significantly reduced the synaptic activity of the cortical neurons. These results suggest that CatS secreted by microglia during the dark-phase decreases the spine density of the cortical neurons by modifying the perisynaptic environment, leading to downscaling of the synaptic strength during the subsequent light-phase. Disruption of CatS therefore induces hyperlocomotor activity due to failure to downscale the synaptic strength.

  8. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep.

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    Hugues Dardente

    Full Text Available In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN, site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21 and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light, achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression.

  9. Effects of Photoperiod Extension on Clock Gene and Neuropeptide RNA Expression in the SCN of the Soay Sheep

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    Dardente, Hugues; Wyse, Cathy A.; Lincoln, Gerald A.; Wagner, Gabriela C.; Hazlerigg, David G.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, changing daylength (photoperiod) is the main synchronizer of seasonal functions. The photoperiodic information is transmitted through the retino-hypothalamic tract to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), site of the master circadian clock. To investigate effects of day length change on the sheep SCN, we used in-situ hybridization to assess the daily temporal organization of expression of circadian clock genes (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Fbxl21) and neuropeptides (Vip, Grp and Avp) in animals acclimated to a short photoperiod (SP; 8h of light) and at 3 or 15 days following transfer to a long photoperiod (LP3, LP15, respectively; 16h of light), achieved by an acute 8-h delay of lights off. We found that waveforms of SCN gene expression conformed to those previously seen in LP acclimated animals within 3 days of transfer to LP. Mean levels of expression for Per1-2 and Fbxl21 were nearly 2-fold higher in the LP15 than in the SP group. The expression of Vip was arrhythmic and unaffected by photoperiod, while, in contrast to rodents, Grp expression was not detectable within the sheep SCN. Expression of the circadian output gene Avp cycled robustly in all photoperiod groups with no detectable change in phasing. Overall these data suggest that synchronizing effects of light on SCN circadian organisation proceed similarly in ungulates and in rodents, despite differences in neuropeptide gene expression. PMID:27458725

  10. Ascidian gene-expression profiles

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    Jeffery, William R.

    2002-01-01

    With the advent of gene-expression profiling, a large number of genes can now be investigated simultaneously during critical stages of development. This approach will be particularly informative in studies of ascidians, basal chordates whose genomes and embryology are uniquely suited for mapping developmental gene networks.

  11. Circadian rhythms and endocrine functions in adult insects.

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    Bloch, Guy; Hazan, Esther; Rafaeli, Ada

    2013-01-01

    Many behavioral and physiological processes in adult insects are influenced by both the endocrine and circadian systems, suggesting that these two key physiological systems interact. We reviewed the literature and found that experiments explicitly testing these interactions in adult insects have only been conducted for a few species. There is a shortage of measurements of hormone titers throughout the day under constant conditions even for the juvenile hormones (JHs) and ecdysteroids, the best studied insect hormones. Nevertheless, the available measurements of hormone titers coupled with indirect evidence for circadian modulation of hormone biosynthesis rate, and the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in hormone biosynthesis, binding or degradation are consistent with the hypothesis that the circulating levels of many insect hormones are influenced by the circadian system. Whole genome microarray studies suggest that the modulation of farnesol oxidase levels is important for the circadian regulation of JH biosynthesis in honey bees, mosquitoes, and fruit flies. Several studies have begun to address the functional significance of circadian oscillations in endocrine signaling. The best understood system is the circadian regulation of Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) titers which is important for the temporal organization of sexual behavior in female moths. The evidence that the circadian and endocrine systems interact has important implications for studies of insect physiology and behavior. Additional studies on diverse species and physiological processes are needed for identifying basic principles underlying the interactions between the circadian and endocrine systems in insects.

  12. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S; Valcin, Jennifer A; Gamble, Karen L; Bailey, Shannon M

    2015-10-14

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  13. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

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    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  14. The Circadian Clock Gene Period1 Connects the Molecular Clock to Neural Activity in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Takashi; Block, Gene D; Colwell, Christopher S

    2015-01-01

    The neural activity patterns of suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) neurons are dynamically regulated throughout the circadian cycle with highest levels of spontaneous action potentials during the day. These rhythms in electrical activity are critical for the function of the circadian timing system and yet the mechanisms by which the molecular clockwork drives changes in the membrane are not well understood. In this study, we sought to examine how the clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates the electrical activity in the mouse SCN by transiently and selectively decreasing levels of PER1 through use of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide. We found that this treatment effectively reduced SCN neural activity. Direct current injection to restore the normal membrane potential partially, but not completely, returned firing rate to normal levels. The antisense treatment also reduced baseline [Ca(2+)]i levels as measured by Fura2 imaging technique. Whole cell patch clamp recording techniques were used to examine which specific potassium currents were altered by the treatment. These recordings revealed that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated potassium currents were reduced in antisense-treated neurons and that blocking this current mimicked the effects of the anti-sense on SCN firing rate. These results indicate that the circadian clock gene Per1 alters firing rate in SCN neurons and raise the possibility that the large conductance [Ca(2+)]i-activated channel is one of the targets.

  15. Sensitivity Measures for Oscillating Systems: Application to Mammalian Circadian Gene Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephanie R; Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Petzold, Linda R; Doyle, Francis J

    2008-01-01

    Vital physiological behaviors exhibited daily by bacteria, plants, and animals are governed by endogenous oscillators called circadian clocks. The most salient feature of the circadian clock is its ability to change its internal time (phase) to match that of the external environment. The circadian clock, like many oscillators in nature, is regulated at the cellular level by a complex network of interacting components. As a complementary approach to traditional biological investigation, we utilize mathematical models and systems theoretic tools to elucidate these mechanisms. The models are systems of ordinary differential equations exhibiting stable limit cycle behavior. To study the robustness of circadian phase behavior, we use sensitivity analysis. As the standard set of sensitivity tools are not suitable for the study of phase behavior, we introduce a novel tool, the parametric impulse phase response curve (pIPRC).

  16. Circadian Clock genes Per2 and clock regulate steroid production, cell proliferation, and luteinizing hormone receptor transcription in ovarian granulosa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takashi, E-mail: shimizut@obihiro.ac.jp [Graduate School of Animal and Food Hygiene, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Hirai, Yuko; Murayama, Chiaki; Miyamoto, Akio [Graduate School of Animal and Food Hygiene, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hitoshi [Gene Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Miyazaki, Koyomi [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) Central 6, 1-1-1, Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan)

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression. {yields}Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom. {yields} Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. {yields}Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. {yields} The expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. -- Abstract: Circadian Clock genes are associated with the estrous cycle in female animals. Treatment with Per2 and Clock siRNAs decreased the number of granulosa cells and LHr expression in follicle-stimulating hormone FSH-treated granulosa cells. Per2 siRNA treatment did not stimulate the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom, whereas Clock siRNA treatment inhibited the production of estradiol and expression of P450arom mRNA. Per2 and Clock siRNA treatment increased and unchanged, respectively, progesterone production in FSH-treated granulosa cells. Similarly, expression of StAR mRNA was increased by Per2 siRNA and unchanged by Clock siRNA. Our data provide a new insight that Per2 and Clock have different action on ovarian granulosa cell functions.

  17. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

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    Christian A Hundahl

    Full Text Available Neuroglobin (Ngb, a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1 and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  18. Circadian behaviour in neuroglobin deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hundahl, Christian A; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Georg, Birgitte; Faltoft, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb), a neuron-specific oxygen-binding globin with an unknown function, has been proposed to play a key role in neuronal survival. We have previously shown Ngb to be highly expressed in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The present study addresses the effect of Ngb deficiency on circadian behavior. Ngb-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice were placed in running wheels and their activity rhythms, endogenous period and response to light stimuli were investigated. The effect of Ngb deficiency on the expression of Period1 (Per1) and the immediate early gene Fos was determined after light stimulation at night and the neurochemical phenotype of Ngb expressing neurons in wt mice was characterized. Loss of Ngb function had no effect on overall circadian entrainment, but resulted in a significantly larger phase delay of circadian rhythm upon light stimulation at early night. A light-induced increase in Per1, but not Fos, gene expression was observed in Ngb-deficient mice. Ngb expressing neurons which co-stored Gastrin Releasing Peptide (GRP) and were innervated from the eye and the geniculo-hypothalamic tract expressed FOS after light stimulation. No PER1 expression was observed in Ngb-positive neurons. The present study demonstrates for the first time that the genetic elimination of Ngb does not affect core clock function but evokes an increased behavioural response to light concomitant with increased Per1 gene expression in the SCN at early night.

  19. Disconnected circadian and cell cycles in a tumor-driven cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Julie S; Yeom, Mijung; Reyes, Bryan A; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Shin

    2010-11-01

    Cell division occurs at a specific time of day in numerous species, suggesting that the circadian and cell cycles are coupled in vivo. By measuring the cell cycle rhythm in real-time, we recently showed that the circadian and cell cycles are not coupled in immortalized fibroblasts, resulting in a rapid rate of cell division even though the circadian rhythm is normal in these cells. Here we report that tumor-driven Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells have perfectly temperature compensated circadian clocks, but the periods of their cell cycle gene expression rhythms are temperature-dependent, suggesting that their circadian and cell cycles are not connected. These data support our hypothesis that decoupling of the circadian and cell cycles may underlie aberrant cell division in tumor cells.

  20. Entrainment of the mouse circadian clock by sub-acute physical and psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Yu; Shiraishi, Takuya; Kikuchi, Yosuke; Haraguchi, Atsushi; Kuriki, Daisuke; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Motohashi, Hiroaki; Sakai, Tomoko; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2015-01-01

    The effects of acute stress on the peripheral circadian system are not well understood in vivo. Here, we show that sub-acute stress caused by restraint or social defeat potently altered clock gene expression in the peripheral tissues of mice. In these peripheral tissues, as well as the hippocampus and cortex, stressful stimuli induced time-of-day-dependent phase-advances or -delays in rhythmic clock gene expression patterns; however, such changes were not observed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, i.e. the central circadian clock. Moreover, several days of stress exposure at the beginning of the light period abolished circadian oscillations and caused internal desynchronisation of peripheral clocks. Stress-induced changes in circadian rhythmicity showed habituation and disappeared with long-term exposure to repeated stress. These findings suggest that sub-acute physical/psychological stress potently entrains peripheral clocks and causes transient dysregulation of circadian clocks in vivo.

  1. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakalu, Vinay Kumar; Parameswaran, Sowmya; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Bahroos, Neil; Shah, Dhara; Ali, Marwan; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

    2017-01-01

    Background The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development. Methods We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium. Results The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described. Conclusions Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas. PMID:28081151

  2. Cellular circadian clocks in mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2012-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) are heritable neuropsychiatric disorders associated with disrupted circadian rhythms. The hypothesis that circadian clock dysfunction plays a causal role in these disorders has endured for decades but has been difficult to test and remains controversial. In the meantime, the discovery of clock genes and cellular clocks has revolutionized our understanding of circadian timing. Cellular circadian clocks are located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the brain's primary circadian pacemaker, but also throughout the brain and peripheral tissues. In BD and MDD patients, defects have been found in SCN-dependent rhythms of body temperature and melatonin release. However, these are imperfect and indirect indicators of SCN function. Moreover, the SCN may not be particularly relevant to mood regulation, whereas the lateral habenula, ventral tegmentum, and hippocampus, which also contain cellular clocks, have established roles in this regard. Dysfunction in these non-SCN clocks could contribute directly to the pathophysiology of BD/MDD. We hypothesize that circadian clock dysfunction in non-SCN clocks is a trait marker of mood disorders, encoded by pathological genetic variants. Because network features of the SCN render it uniquely resistant to perturbation, previous studies of SCN outputs in mood disorders patients may have failed to detect genetic defects affecting non-SCN clocks, which include not only mood-regulating neurons in the brain but also peripheral cells accessible in human subjects. Therefore, reporters of rhythmic clock gene expression in cells from patients or mouse models could provide a direct assay of the molecular gears of the clock, in cellular clocks that are likely to be more representative than the SCN of mood-regulating neurons in patients. This approach, informed by the new insights and tools of modern chronobiology, will allow a more definitive test of the role of cellular circadian clocks

  3. Ablation of the ID2 gene results in altered circadian feeding behavior, and sex-specific enhancement of insulin sensitivity and elevated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue.

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    Deepa Mathew

    Full Text Available Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2 is a helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor rhythmically expressed in many adult tissues. Our earlier studies have demonstrated a role for ID2 in the input pathway, core clock function and output pathways of the mouse circadian system. We have also reported that Id2 null (Id2-/- mice are lean with low gonadal white adipose tissue deposits and lower lipid content in the liver. These results coincided with altered or disrupted circadian expression profiles of liver genes including those involved in lipid metabolism. In the present phenotypic study we intended to decipher, on a sex-specific basis, the role of ID2 in glucose metabolism and in the circadian regulation of activity, important components of energy balance. We find that Id2-/- mice exhibited altered daily and circadian rhythms of feeding and locomotor activity; activity profiles extended further into the late night/dark phase of the 24-hr cycle, despite mice showing reduced total locomotor activity. Also, male Id2-/- mice consumed a greater amount of food relative to body mass, and displayed less weight gain. Id2-/- females had smaller adipocytes, suggesting sexual-dimorphic programing of adipogenesis. We observed increased glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in male Id2-/- mice, which was exacerbated in older animals. FDG-PET analysis revealed increased glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and brown adipose tissue of male Id2-/- mice, suggesting increased glucose metabolism and thermogenesis in these tissues. Reductions in intramuscular triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol were detected in male Id2-/- mice, highlighting its possible mechanistic role in enhanced insulin sensitivity in these mice. Our findings indicate a role for ID2 as a regulator of glucose and lipid metabolism, and in the circadian control of feeding/locomotor behavior; and contribute to the understanding of the development of obesity and diabetes, particularly in shift work

  4. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

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    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  5. Cryptochrome genes are highly expressed in the ovary of the African clawed frog, Xenopus tropicalis.

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    Yoko Kubo

    Full Text Available Cryptochromes (CRYs are flavoproteins sharing high homology with photolyases. Some of them have function(s including transcription regulation in the circadian clock oscillation, blue-light photoreception for resetting the clock phase, and light-dependent magnetoreception. Vertebrates retain multiple sets of CRY or CRY-related genes, but their functions are yet unclear especially in the lower vertebrates. Although CRYs and the other circadian clock components have been extensively studied in the higher vertebrates such as mice, only a few model species have been studied in the lower vertebrates. In this study, we identified two CRYs, XtCRY1 and XtCRY2 in Xenopus tropicalis, an excellent experimental model species. Examination of tissue specificity of their mRNA expression by real-time PCR analysis revealed that both the XtCRYs showed extremely high mRNA expression levels in the ovary. The mRNA levels in the ovary were about 28-fold (XtCry1 and 48-fold (XtCry2 higher than levels in the next abundant tissues, the retina and kidney, respectively. For the functional analysis of the XtCRYs, we cloned circadian positive regulator XtCLOCK and XtBMAL1, and found circadian enhancer E-box in the upstream of XtPer1 gene. XtCLOCK and XtBMAL1 exhibited strong transactivation from the XtPer1 E-box element, and both the XtCRYs inhibited the XtCLOCK:XtBMAL1-mediated transactivation, thereby suggesting this element to drive the circadian transcription. These results revealed a conserved main feedback loop in the X. tropicalis circadian clockwork and imply a possible physiological importance of CRYs in the ovarian functions such as synthesis of steroid hormones and/or control of estrus cycles via the transcription regulation.

  6. Genome-wide analysis of light- and temperature-entrained circadian transcripts in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Alexander M van der Linden

    Full Text Available Most organisms have an endogenous circadian clock that is synchronized to environmental signals such as light and temperature. Although circadian rhythms have been described in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans at the behavioral level, these rhythms appear to be relatively non-robust. Moreover, in contrast to other animal models, no circadian transcriptional rhythms have been identified. Thus, whether this organism contains a bona fide circadian clock remains an open question. Here we use genome-wide expression profiling experiments to identify light- and temperature-entrained oscillating transcripts in C. elegans. These transcripts exhibit rhythmic expression with temperature-compensated 24-h periods. In addition, their expression is sustained under constant conditions, suggesting that they are under circadian regulation. Light and temperature cycles strongly drive gene expression and appear to entrain largely nonoverlapping gene sets. We show that mutations in a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel required for sensory transduction abolish both light- and temperature-entrained gene expression, implying that environmental cues act cell nonautonomously to entrain circadian rhythms. Together, these findings demonstrate circadian-regulated transcriptional rhythms in C. elegans and suggest that further analyses in this organism will provide new information about the evolution and function of this biological clock.

  7. The promoter activities of sucrose phosphate synthase genes in rice, OsSPS1 and OsSPS11, are controlled by light and circadian clock, but not by sucrose

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    Madoka eYonekura

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although sucrose plays a role in sugar sensing and its signaling pathway, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of the expressions of plant sucrose-related genes. Our previous study on the expression of the sucrose phosphate synthase gene family in rice (OsSPSs suggested the involvement of sucrose sensing and/or circadian rhythm in the transcriptional regulation of OsSPS. To examine whether the promoters of OsSPSs can be controlled by sugars and circadian clock, we produced transgenic rice plants harboring a promoter–luciferase construct for OsSPS1 or OsSPS11 and analyzed the changes in the promoter activities by monitoring bioluminescence from intact transgenic plants in real time. Transgenic plants fed sucrose, glucose, or mannitol under continuous light conditions showed no changes in bioluminescence intensity; meanwhile, the addition of sucrose increased the concentration of sucrose in the plants, and the mRNA levels of OsSPS remained constant. These results suggest that these OsSPS promoters may not be regulated by sucrose levels in the tissues. Next, we investigated the changes in the promoter activities under 12-h light/12-h dark cycles and continuous light conditions. Under the light–dark cycle, both OsSPS1 and OsSPS11 promoter activities were low in the dark and increased rapidly after the beginning of the light period. When the transgenic rice plants were moved to the continuous light condition, both POsSPS1::LUC and POsSPS11::LUC reporter plants exhibited circadian bioluminescence rhythms; bioluminescence peaked during the subjective day with a 27-h period: in the early morning as for OsSPS1 promoter and midday for OsSPS11 promoter. These results indicate that these OsSPS promoters are controlled by both light illumination and circadian clock and that the regulatory mechanism of promoter activity differs between the 2 OsSPS genes.

  8. Mammalian TIMELESS Is Involved in Period Determination and DNA Damage-Dependent Phase Advancing of the Circadian Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Engelen (Erik); R. Janssens (Roel); K. Yagita (Kazuhiro); V.A.J. Smits (Veronique); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); F. Tamanini (Filippo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe transcription/translation feedback loop-based molecular oscillator underlying the generation of circadian gene expression is preserved in almost all organisms. Interestingly, the animal circadian clock proteins CRYPTOCHROME (CRY), PERIOD (PER) and TIMELESS (TIM) are strongly conserve

  9. The Clock Protein CCA1 and the bZIP Transcription Factor HY5 Physically Interact to Regulate Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christos Andronis; Simon Barak; Stephen M.Knowles; Shoji Sugano; Elaine M.Tobin

    2008-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates the expression of an array of Arabidopsis genes such as those encoding the LIGHT-HARVESTING CHLOROPHYLL A/B (Lhcb) proteins. We have previously studied the promoters of two of these Arabidopsis genes-Lhcb1*1 and Lhcb1*3-and identified a sequence that binds the clock protein CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). This sequence, designated CCAl-binding site (CBS), is necessary for phytochrome and circadian responsiveness of these genes. In close proximity to this sequence, there exists a G-box core element that has been shown to bind the bZIP transcription factor HY5 in other light-regulated plant promoters. In the present study, we examined the importance of the interaction of transcription factors binding the CBS and the G-box core element in the control of normal circadian rhythmic expression of Lhcb genes. Our results show that HY5 is able to specifically bind the G-box element in the Lhcb promoters and that CCA1 can alter the binding activity of HY5. We further show that CCA1 and HY5 can physically interact and that they can act synergistically on transcription in a yeast reporter gene assay. An absence of HY5 leads to a shorter period of Lhcb1*1 circadian expression but does not affect the circadian expression of CATALASE3 (CAT3), whose promoter lacks a G-box element. Our results suggest that interaction of the HY5 and CCA1 proteins on Lhcb promoters is necessary for normal circadian expression of the Lhcb genes.

  10. Mining gene expression data for pollutants (dioxin, toluene, formaldehyde) and low dose of gamma-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskalev, Alexey; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail; Snezhkina, Anastasia; Kogan, Valeria; Plyusnina, Ekaterina; Peregudova, Darya; Melnikova, Nataliya; Uroshlev, Leonid; Mylnikov, Sergey; Dmitriev, Alexey; Plusnin, Sergey; Fedichev, Peter; Kudryavtseva, Anna

    2014-01-01

    General and specific effects of molecular genetic responses to adverse environmental factors are not well understood. This study examines genome-wide gene expression profiles of Drosophila melanogaster in response to ionizing radiation, formaldehyde, toluene, and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. We performed RNA-seq analysis on 25,415 transcripts to measure the change in gene expression in males and females separately. An analysis of the genes unique to each treatment yielded a list of genes as a gene expression signature. In the case of radiation exposure, both sexes exhibited a reproducible increase in their expression of the transcription factors sugarbabe and tramtrack. The influence of dioxin up-regulated metabolic genes, such as anachronism, CG16727, and several genes with unknown function. Toluene activated a gene involved in the response to the toxins, Cyp12d1-p; the transcription factor Fer3's gene; the metabolic genes CG2065, CG30427, and CG34447; and the genes Spn28Da and Spn3, which are responsible for reproduction and immunity. All significantly differentially expressed genes, including those shared among the stressors, can be divided into gene groups using Gene Ontology Biological Process identifiers. These gene groups are related to defense response, biological regulation, the cell cycle, metabolic process, and circadian rhythms. KEGG molecular pathway analysis revealed alteration of the Notch signaling pathway, TGF-beta signaling pathway, proteasome, basal transcription factors, nucleotide excision repair, Jak-STAT signaling pathway, circadian rhythm, Hippo signaling pathway, mTOR signaling pathway, ribosome, mismatch repair, RNA polymerase, mRNA surveillance pathway, Hedgehog signaling pathway, and DNA replication genes. Females and, to a lesser extent, males actively metabolize xenobiotics by the action of cytochrome P450 when under the influence of dioxin and toluene. Finally, in this work we obtained gene expression signatures pollutants

  11. 蝗虫节律基因pdp的克隆和功能分析%Cloning and Functional Analysis of Circadian Gene pdp in Locusta migratoria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇刚; 郭宇辉; 陈光

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究不同条件下蝗虫(Locusta migratoria)节律基因pdp(Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase)的mRNA表达水平,进一步揭示蝗虫节律的分子机制。[方法]通过中国科学院动物研究所内的转录组数据库中找出pdp基因的原型来设计引物,以群居型东亚飞蝗的头部的反转录cDNA为模板,克隆出pdp基因的全序列。把一天24小时等分成八个点,进行定时取样,以qRT-PCR技术进行不同时段pdp基因表达量的测定;并在不同处理条件下,测定pdp基因的表达量。[结果]节律基因pdp在蝗虫的不同处理条件下变化不大。[结论]该研究对了解飞蝗节律规律﹑种族特点及有效防虫具有重要的现实意义。%[Objective] Through studying mRNA expression levels of circadian gene pdp(Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase) in Locusta migratoria under different conditions to reveal molecular mechanisms of rhythm of Locusta migratoria.[Methods] The prototype of the pdp gene and design primers were found out based on the database of Institute of Zoology,Chinese Academy of Sciences.Using aggregated locust head cDNA as templates,the complete sequence of the gene pdp was obtained.By dividing a day(24 hours) into eight points,fixed-point samples were taken,and the pdp gene expression levels at different time periods were determined by using qRT-PCR;and the pdp gene expression levels with different treatment were also determined.[Results] The circadian gene pdp in Locusta migratoria changed slightly with different treatment.[Conclusion] The study had extremely realistic significance for understanding the rhythm and population characteristics of Locusta migratoria as well as effective insect-resistant.

  12. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  13. HvLUX1 is a candidate gene underlying the early maturity 10 locus in barley: phylogeny, diversity, and interactions with the circadian clock and photoperiodic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoli, Chiara; Pankin, Artem; Drosse, Benedikt; Casao, Cristina M; Davis, Seth J; von Korff, Maria

    2013-09-01

    Photoperiodic flowering is a major factor determining crop performance and is controlled by interactions between environmental signals and the circadian clock. We proposed Hvlux1, an ortholog of the Arabidopsis circadian gene LUX ARRHYTHMO, as a candidate underlying the early maturity 10 (eam10) locus in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). The link between eam10 and Hvlux1 was discovered using high-throughput sequencing of enriched libraries and segregation analysis. We conducted functional, phylogenetic, and diversity studies of eam10 and HvLUX1 to understand the genetic control of photoperiod response in barley and to characterize the evolution of LUX-like genes within barley and across monocots and eudicots. We demonstrate that eam10 causes circadian defects and interacts with the photoperiod response gene Ppd-H1 to accelerate flowering under long and short days. The results of phylogenetic and diversity analyses indicate that HvLUX1 was under purifying selection, duplicated at the base of the grass clade, and diverged independently of LUX-like genes in other plant lineages. Taken together, these findings contribute to improved understanding of the barley circadian clock, its interaction with the photoperiod pathway, and evolution of circadian systems in barley and across monocots and eudicots.

  14. Screening of Clock Gene Polymorphisms Demonstrates Association of a PER3 Polymorphism with Morningness–Eveningness Preference and Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Kato, Mie; Ono, Hiroko; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Makoto; Ebisawa, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Kamei, Yuichi; Okawa, Masako; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Mishima, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    A system of self-sustained biological clocks controls the 24-h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes such as the sleep–wake cycle. The circadian clock system is regulated by transcriptional and translational negative feedback loops of multiple clock genes. Polymorphisms in circadian clock genes have been associated with morningness–eveningness (diurnal) preference, familial advanced sleep phase type (ASPT), and delayed sleep phase type (DSPT). We genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms in circadian clock genes in 182 DSPT individuals, 67 free-running type (FRT) individuals, and 925 controls. The clock gene polymorphisms were tested for associations with diurnal preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD) phenotypes. The PER3 polymorphism (rs228697) was significantly associated with diurnal preference and the FRT phenotype. The minor allele of rs228697 was more prevalent in evening types than in morning types (sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.483, Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.012) and in FRT individuals compared with the controls (age- and sex-adjusted OR, 2.021, permutated P = 0.017). Our findings support the notion that PER3 polymorphisms could be a potential genetic marker for an individual's circadian and sleep phenotypes. PMID:25201053

  15. Screening of clock gene polymorphisms demonstrates association of a PER3 polymorphism with morningness-eveningness preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Akiko; Kitamura, Shingo; Katayose, Yasuko; Kato, Mie; Ono, Hiroko; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Makoto; Ebisawa, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Kamei, Yuichi; Okawa, Masako; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Mishima, Kazuo

    2014-09-09

    A system of self-sustained biological clocks controls the 24-h rhythms of behavioral and physiological processes such as the sleep-wake cycle. The circadian clock system is regulated by transcriptional and translational negative feedback loops of multiple clock genes. Polymorphisms in circadian clock genes have been associated with morningness-eveningness (diurnal) preference, familial advanced sleep phase type (ASPT), and delayed sleep phase type (DSPT). We genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms in circadian clock genes in 182 DSPT individuals, 67 free-running type (FRT) individuals, and 925 controls. The clock gene polymorphisms were tested for associations with diurnal preference and circadian rhythm sleep disorder (CRSD) phenotypes. The PER3 polymorphism (rs228697) was significantly associated with diurnal preference and the FRT phenotype. The minor allele of rs228697 was more prevalent in evening types than in morning types (sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR), 2.483, Bonferroni-corrected P = 0.012) and in FRT individuals compared with the controls (age- and sex-adjusted OR, 2.021, permutated P = 0.017). Our findings support the notion that PER3 polymorphisms could be a potential genetic marker for an individual's circadian and sleep phenotypes.

  16. Temperature regulates transcription in the zebrafish circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajori Lahiri

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-documented that temperature influences key aspects of the circadian clock. Temperature cycles entrain the clock, while the period length of the circadian cycle is adjusted so that it remains relatively constant over a wide range of temperatures (temperature compensation. In vertebrates, the molecular basis of these properties is poorly understood. Here, using the zebrafish as an ectothermic model, we demonstrate first that in the absence of light, exposure of embryos and primary cell lines to temperature cycles entrains circadian rhythms of clock gene expression. Temperature steps drive changes in the basal expression of certain clock genes in a gene-specific manner, a mechanism potentially contributing to entrainment. In the case of the per4 gene, while E-box promoter elements mediate circadian clock regulation, they do not direct the temperature-driven changes in transcription. Second, by studying E-box-regulated transcription as a reporter of the core clock mechanism, we reveal that the zebrafish clock is temperature-compensated. In addition, temperature strongly influences the amplitude of circadian transcriptional rhythms during and following entrainment by light-dark cycles, a property that could confer temperature compensation. Finally, we show temperature-dependent changes in the expression levels, phosphorylation, and function of the clock protein, CLK. This suggests a mechanism that could account for changes in the amplitude of the E-box-directed rhythm. Together, our results imply that several key transcriptional regulatory elements at the core of the zebrafish clock respond to temperature.

  17. Alteration of PHYA expression change circadian rhythms and timing of bud set in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarewa, Iwanka; Ibáñez, Cristian; Johansson, Mikael; Ogren, Erling; Mozley, David; Nylander, Eva; Chono, Makiko; Moritz, Thomas; Eriksson, Maria E

    2010-05-01

    In many temperate woody species, dormancy is induced by short photoperiods. Earlier studies have shown that the photoreceptor phytochrome A (phyA) promotes growth. Specifically, Populus plants that over-express the oat PHYA gene (oatPHYAox) show daylength-independent growth and do not become dormant. However, we show that oatPHYAox plants could be induced to set bud and become cold hardy by exposure to a shorter, non-24 h diurnal cycle that significantly alters the relative position between endogenous rhythms and perceived light/dark cycles. Furthermore, we describe studies in which the expression of endogenous Populus tremula x P. tremuloides PHYTOCHROME A (PttPHYA) was reduced in Populus trees by antisense inhibition. The antisense plants showed altered photoperiodic requirements, resulting in earlier growth cessation and bud formation in response to daylength shortening, an effect that was explained by an altered innate period that leads to phase changes of clock-associated genes such as PttCO2. Moreover, gene expression studies following far-red light pulses show a phyA-mediated repression of PttLHY1 and an induction of PttFKF1 and PttFT. We conclude that the level of PttPHYA expression strongly influences seasonally regulated growth in Populus and is central to co-ordination between internal clock-regulated rhythms and external light/dark cycles through its dual effect on the pace of clock rhythms and in light signaling.

  18. Development of the circadian clockwork in the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mészáros, Krisztina; Pruess, Linda; Szabó, Attila J.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian molecular clock is an internal time-keeping system composed of centrally synchronized tissue-level pacemakers. Here, we explored the ontogeny of the clock machinery in the developing kidney. Pregnant rats were housed at 12-12 h light-dark cycles. Offsprings were killed at 4-h...... was modified postpartum. Clock, Rev-erbα, Per2, αENaC, SGK1, NHE3, and AVPR2 showed circadian expression at the end of intrauterine development. By 1 week, all genes oscillated with a distinct acrophase shift toward the time of peak feeding activity. Daily 4-hour withdrawal of mothers induced a 12-hour phase...... shift of Clock and Bmal1 expression, while disrupting oscillations of the other genes. After weaning, oscillation phases shifted back toward the adult pattern, which was fully expressed at 12 weeks. Thus, functional circadian molecular clockwork evolves in the late fetal and early postnatal kidney...

  19. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  20. The role of gene duplication and unconstrained selective pressures in the melanopsin gene family evolution and vertebrate circadian rhythm regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Borges

    Full Text Available Melanopsin is a photosensitive cell protein involved in regulating circadian rhythms and other non-visual responses to light. The melanopsin gene family is represented by two paralogs, OPN4x and OPN4m, which originated through gene duplication early in the emergence of vertebrates. Here we studied the melanopsin gene family using an integrated gene/protein evolutionary approach, which revealed that the rhabdomeric urbilaterian ancestor had the same amino acid patterns (DRY motif and the Y and E conterions as extant vertebrate species, suggesting that the mechanism for light detection and regulation is similar to rhabdomeric rhodopsins. Both OPN4m and OPN4x paralogs are found in vertebrate genomic paralogons, suggesting that they diverged following this duplication event about 600 million years ago, when the complex eye emerged in the vertebrate ancestor. Melanopsins generally evolved under negative selection (ω = 0.171 with some minor episodes of positive selection (proportion of sites = 25% and functional divergence (θ(I = 0.349 and θ(II = 0.126. The OPN4m and OPN4x melanopsin paralogs show evidence of spectral divergence at sites likely involved in melanopsin light absorbance (200F, 273S and 276A. Also, following the teleost lineage-specific whole genome duplication (3R that prompted the teleost fish radiation, type I divergence (θ(I = 0.181 and positive selection (affecting 11% of sites contributed to amino acid variability that we related with the photo-activation stability of melanopsin. The melanopsin intracellular regions had unexpectedly high variability in their coupling specificity of G-proteins and we propose that Gq/11 and Gi/o are the two G-proteins most-likely to mediate the melanopsin phototransduction pathway. The selection signatures were mainly observed on retinal-related sites and the third and second intracellular loops, demonstrating the physiological plasticity of the melanopsin protein group. Our results provide new

  1. Variations in daily expression of the circadian clock protein, PER2, in the rat limbic forebrain during stable entrainment to a long light cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Valerie L; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2011-10-01

    The circadian clock in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be entrained by light cycles longer than the normal 24-h light/dark (LD) cycle, but little is known about the effect of such cycles on circadian clocks outside the SCN. Here we examined the effect of exposure to a 26-h T cycle (T26, 1 h:25 h LD) on patterns of expression of the clock protein, PERIOD2 (PER2), in the SCN and in four regions of the limbic forebrain known to exhibit robust circadian oscillations in PER2: the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov), central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and dentate gyrus (DG). All rats showed stable entrainment of running wheel activity rhythms to the T26 cycle. As previously shown, PER2 expression in the SCN was stably entrained, peaking around the onset of locomotor activity. In contrast, exposure to the T26 cycle uncoupled the rhythms of PER2 expression in the BNSTov and CEA from that of the SCN, whereas PER2 rhythms in the BLA and DG were unaffected. These results show that exposure to long light cycles can uncouple circadian oscillators in select nuclei of the limbic forebrain from the SCN clock and suggest that such cycles may be used to study the functional consequences of coupling and uncoupling of brain circadian oscillators.

  2. How pervasive are circadian oscillations?

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillations play a critical role in coordinating the physiology, homeostasis, and behavior of biological systems. Once thought to only be controlled by a master clock, recent high-throughput experiments suggest many genes and metabolites in a cell are potentially capable of circadian oscillations. Each cell can reprogram itself and select a relatively small fraction of this broad repertoire for circadian oscillations, as a result of genetic, environmental, and even diet changes.

  3. Interplay between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isorna, Esther; de Pedro, Nuria; Valenciano, Ana I; Alonso-Gómez, Ángel L; Delgado, María J

    2017-03-01

    The circadian system is responsible for the temporal organisation of physiological functions which, in part, involves daily cycles of hormonal activity. In this review, we analyse the interplay between the circadian and endocrine systems in fishes. We first describe the current model of fish circadian system organisation and the basis of the molecular clockwork that enables different tissues to act as internal pacemakers. This system consists of a net of central and peripherally located oscillators and can be synchronised by the light-darkness and feeding-fasting cycles. We then focus on two central neuroendocrine transducers (melatonin and orexin) and three peripheral hormones (leptin, ghrelin and cortisol), which are involved in the synchronisation of the circadian system in mammals and/or energy status signalling. We review the role of each of these as overt rhythms (i.e. outputs of the circadian system) and, for the first time, as key internal temporal messengers that act as inputs for other endogenous oscillators. Based on acute changes in clock gene expression, we describe the currently accepted model of endogenous oscillator entrainment by the light-darkness cycle and propose a new model for non-photic (endocrine) entrainment, highlighting the importance of the bidirectional cross-talking between the endocrine and circadian systems in fishes. The flexibility of the fish circadian system combined with the absence of a master clock makes these vertebrates a very attractive model for studying communication among oscillators to drive functionally coordinated outputs.

  4. Circadian genes in a blind subterranean mammal II: conservation and uniqueness of the three Period homologs in the blind subterranean mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avivi, Aaron; Oster, Henrik; Joel, Alma; Beiles, Avigdor; Albrecht, Urs; Nevo, Eviatar

    2002-09-03

    We demonstrated that a subterranean, visually blind mammal has a functional set of three Per genes that are important components of the circadian clockwork in mammals. The mole rat superspecies Spalax ehrenbergi is a blind subterranean animal that lives its entire life underground in darkness. It has degenerated eyes, but the retina and highly hypertrophic harderian gland are involved in photoperiodic perception. All three Per genes oscillate with a periodicity of 24 h in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, eye, and harderian gland and are expressed in peripheral organs. This oscillation is maintained under constant conditions. The light inducibility of sPer1 and sPer2, which are similar in structure to those of other mammals, indicates the role of these genes in clock resetting. However, sPer3 is unique in mammals and has two truncated isoforms, and its expressional analysis leaves its function unresolved. Per's expression analysis in the harderian gland suggests an important participation of this organ in the stabilization and resetting mechanism of the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and in unique adaptation to life underground.

  5. Multiscale Problems in Circadian Systems Biology: From Gene to Cell to Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    Wenxue Wang, Christian Cajochen, Scott T. Grafton, Francis J. Doyle III. Modeling Circadian -Dependent Learning Performance of Sequence Structures...in zebrafish embryos to verify our theoretical predictions. The segmentation clock controls the somitogenesis in vertebrate development. It is...signaling synchronizes the cellular network (c.f. Figure 11). Treating wild-type zebrafish embryos with DAPT, a !-secretase inhibitor that suppresses

  6. Inferring bi-directional interactions between circadian clock genes and metabolism with model ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Aderhold, Andrej; Husmeier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    There has been much interest in reconstructing bi-directional regulatory networks linking the circadian clock to metabolism in plants. A variety of reverse engineering methods from machine learning and computational statistics have been proposed and evaluated. The emphasis of the present paper is on

  7. Systematic analysis of circadian genes in a population-based sample reveals association of TIMELESS with depression and sleep disturbance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddheshwar J Utge

    Full Text Available Disturbances in the circadian pacemaker system are commonly found in individuals with depression and sleep-related problems. We hypothesized that some of the canonical circadian clock genes would be associated with depression accompanied by signs of disturbed sleep, early morning awakening, or daytime fatigue. We tested this hypothesis in a population-based sample of the Health 2000 dataset from Finland, including 384 depressed individuals and 1270 controls, all with detailed information on sleep and daytime vigilance, and analyzed this set of individuals with regard to 113 single-nucleotide polymorphisms of 18 genes of the circadian system. We found significant association between TIMELESS variants and depression with fatigue (D+FAT+ (rs7486220: pointwise P = 0.000099, OR = 1.66; corrected empirical P for the model of D+FAT+ = 0.0056; haplotype 'C-A-A-C' of rs2291739-rs2291738-rs7486220-rs1082214: P = 0.0000075, OR = 1.72 in females, and association to depression with early morning awakening (D+EMA+ (rs1082214: pointwise P = 0.0009, OR = 2.70; corrected empirical P = 0.0374 for the model D+EMA+; haplotype 'G-T' of rs7486220 and rs1082214: P = 0.0001, OR = 3.01 in males. There was significant interaction of gender and TIMELESS (for example with rs1082214, P = 0.000023 to D+EMA+ and P = 0.005 to D+FAT+. We obtained supported evidence for involvement of TIMELESS in sleeping problems in an independent set of control individuals with seasonal changes in mood, sleep duration, energy level and social activity in females (P = 0.036, = 0.123 for rs1082214 and with early morning awakening or fatigue in males (P = 0.038 and P = 0.0016, respectively, for rs1082214. There was also some evidence of interaction between TIMELESS and PER1 in females to D+FAT+ as well as between TIMELESS and ARNTL, RORA or NR1D1 in males to D+EMA+. These findings support a connection between circadian genes and gender-dependent depression and defective sleep regulation.

  8. Circadian dysregulation disrupts bile acid homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bile acids are potentially toxic compounds and their levels of hepatic production, uptake and export are tightly regulated by many inputs, including circadian rhythm. We tested the impact of disrupting the peripheral circadian clock on integral steps of bile acid homeostasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both restricted feeding, which phase shifts peripheral clocks, and genetic ablation in Per1(-/-/Per2(-/- (PERDKO mice disrupted normal bile acid control and resulted in hepatic cholestasis. Restricted feeding caused a dramatic, transient elevation in hepatic bile acid levels that was associated with activation of the xenobiotic receptors CAR and PXR and elevated serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST, indicative of liver damage. In the PERDKO mice, serum bile acid levels were elevated and the circadian expression of key bile acid synthesis and transport genes, including Cyp7A1 and NTCP, was lost. This was associated with blunted expression of a primary clock output, the transcription factor DBP, which transactivates the promoters of both genes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that disruption of the circadian clock results in dysregulation of bile acid homeostasis that mimics cholestatic disease.

  9. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    CERN Document Server

    Furusawa, C; Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2002-01-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1, i.e., they obey Zipf's law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intra-cellular reaction network, we found that Zipf's law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  10. Zipf's Law in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Chikara; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2003-02-01

    Using data from gene expression databases on various organisms and tissues, including yeast, nematodes, human normal and cancer tissues, and embryonic stem cells, we found that the abundances of expressed genes exhibit a power-law distribution with an exponent close to -1; i.e., they obey Zipf’s law. Furthermore, by simulations of a simple model with an intracellular reaction network, we found that Zipf’s law of chemical abundance is a universal feature of cells where such a network optimizes the efficiency and faithfulness of self-reproduction. These findings provide novel insights into the nature of the organization of reaction dynamics in living cells.

  11. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin;

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies...... an analytical approach to examine the suitability of correction methods by considering the inter-treatment bias as well as the inter-replicate variance, which allows use of the best correction method with minimum residual bias. Analyses of RNA sequencing and microarray data showed that the efficiencies...

  12. Chronobiology and obesity: Interactions between circadian rhythms and energy regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Keith C; Turek, Fred W

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular, genetic, neural, and physiologic basis for the generation and organization of circadian clocks in mammals have revealed profound bidirectional interactions between the circadian clock system and pathways critical for the regulation of metabolism and energy balance. The discovery that mice harboring a mutation in the core circadian gene circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) develop obesity and evidence of the metabolic syndrome represented a seminal moment for the field, clearly establishing a link between circadian rhythms, energy balance, and metabolism at the genetic level. Subsequent studies have characterized in great detail the depth and magnitude of the circadian clock's crucial role in regulating body weight and other metabolic processes. Dietary nutrients have been shown to influence circadian rhythms at both molecular and behavioral levels; and many nuclear hormone receptors, which bind nutrients as well as other circulating ligands, have been observed to exhibit robust circadian rhythms of expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. Furthermore, the daily timing of food intake has itself been shown to affect body weight regulation in mammals, likely through, at least in part, regulation of the temporal expression patterns of metabolic genes. Taken together, these and other related findings have transformed our understanding of the important role of time, on a 24-h scale, in the complex physiologic processes of energy balance and coordinated regulation of metabolism. This research has implications for human metabolic disease and may provide unique and novel insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies to control and combat the epidemic of obesity.

  13. Messenger RNA expression of chicken CLOCK gene in the response to Campylobacter jejuni inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyi; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Maozhi; Yang, Ning; Qi, Yukai; Sun, Yu; Li, Xianyao

    2015-09-01

    Campylobacter jejuni (C. jejuni) is a leading cause of human bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Previous research has shown that circadian rhythm plays a critical role in host response to C. jejuni colonization. The CLOCK gene is one of the core genes regulating circadian rhythms and shows significant expression on 7 d post-C. jejuni inoculation. The objective of this study was to investigate temporal and spatial expression of chicken CLOCK gene post-C. jejuni inoculation. Cecal and splenic RNA were isolated from 2 distinct chicken breeds and used to compare the mRNA expression of CLOCK gene between inoculated and noninoculated chickens within each breed and between breeds within each of inoculated and noninoculated groups. Our results showed that the CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 20 h postinoculation (hpi) in cecum and spleen in Jiningbairi chicken. CLOCK gene was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 16 hpi and up-regulated at 8 hpi in cecum and spleen in specific pathogen free white leghorn noninoculated chicken. The findings suggested that expression of CLOCK gene was significantly changed post C. jejuin inoculation. This change was affected by genetic background, tissue, and time points postinoculation.

  14. Extreme obesity is associated with variation in genes related to the circadian rhythm of food intake and hypothalamic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariman, Edwin C M; Bouwman, Freek G; Aller, Erik E J G; van Baak, Marleen A; Wang, Ping

    2015-06-01

    The hypothalamus is important for regulation of energy intake. Mutations in genes involved in the function of the hypothalamus can lead to early-onset severe obesity. To look further into this, we have followed a strategy that allowed us to identify rare and common gene variants as candidates for the background of extreme obesity from a relatively small cohort. For that we focused on subjects with a well-selected phenotype and on a defined gene set and used a rich source of genetic data with stringent cut-off values. A list of 166 genes functionally related to the hypothalamus was generated. In those genes complete exome sequence data from 30 extreme obese subjects (60 genomes) were screened for novel rare indel, nonsense, and missense variants with a predicted negative impact on protein function. In addition, (moderately) common variants in those genes were analyzed for allelic association using the general population as reference (false discovery rategenes for BAIAP3, NBEA, PRRC2A, RYR1, SIM1, and TRH, and a novel indel variant in LEPR. Common variants in the six genes for MBOAT4, NPC1, NPW, NUCB2, PER1, and PRRC2A showed significant allelic association with extreme obesity. Our findings underscore the complexity of the genetic background of extreme obesity involving rare and common variants of genes from defined metabolic and physiologic processes, in particular regulation of the circadian rhythm of food intake and hypothalamic signaling.

  15. Bile acid-regulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα) activity underlies circadian expression of intestinal peptide absorption transporter PepT1/Slc15a1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Ayako; Koyanagi, Satoru; Dilxiat, Adila; Kusunose, Naoki; Chen, Jia Jun; Matsunaga, Naoya; Shibata, Shigenobu; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2014-09-05

    Digested proteins are mainly absorbed as small peptides composed of two or three amino acids. The intestinal absorption of small peptides is mediated via only one transport system: the proton-coupled peptide transporter-1 (PepT1) encoded from the soluble carrier protein Slc15a1. In mammals, intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 oscillates during the daily feeding cycle. Although the oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 is suggested to be controlled by molecular components of circadian clock, we demonstrated here that bile acids regulated the oscillation of PepT1/Slc15a1 expression through modulating the activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). Nocturnally active mice mainly consumed their food during the dark phase. PPARα activated the intestinal expression of Slc15a1 mRNA during the light period, and protein levels of PepT1 peaked before the start of the dark phase. After food intake, bile acids accumulated in intestinal epithelial cells. Intestinal accumulated bile acids interfered with recruitment of co-transcriptional activator CREB-binding protein/p300 on the promoter region of Slc15a1 gene, thereby suppressing PPARα-mediated transactivation of Slc15a1. The time-dependent suppression of PPARα-mediated transactivation by bile acids caused an oscillation in the intestinal expression of PepT1/Slc15a1 during the daily feeding cycle that led to circadian changes in the intestinal absorption of small peptides. These findings suggest a molecular clock-independent mechanism by which bile acid-regulated PPARα activity governs the circadian expression of intestinal peptide transporter.

  16. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. Not...

  17. Disrupted Ultradian Activity Rhythms and Differential Expression of Several Clock Genes in Interleukin-6-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, Francisco J.; Cicvaric, Ana; Acevedo Aguilar, Juan Pablo; Elbau, Immanuel; Horvath, Orsolya; Diao, Weifei; Glat, Micaela; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2017-01-01

    The characteristics of the cycles of activity and rest stand out among the most intensively investigated aspects of circadian rhythmicity in humans and experimental animals. Alterations in the circadian patterns of activity and rest are strongly linked to cognitive and emotional dysfunctions in severe mental illnesses such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and major depression (MDD). The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) has been prominently associated with the pathogenesis of AD and MDD. However, the potential involvement of IL-6 in the modulation of the diurnal rhythms of activity and rest has not been investigated. Here, we set out to study the role of IL-6 in circadian rhythmicity through the characterization of patterns of behavioral locomotor activity in IL-6 knockout (IL-6 KO) mice and wild-type littermate controls. Deletion of IL-6 did not alter the length of the circadian period or the amount of locomotor activity under either light-entrained or free-running conditions. IL-6 KO mice also presented a normal phase shift in response to light exposure at night. However, the temporal architecture of the behavioral rhythmicity throughout the day, as characterized by the quantity of ultradian activity bouts, was significantly impaired under light-entrained and free-running conditions in IL-6 KO. Moreover, the assessment of clock gene expression in the hippocampus, a brain region involved in AD and depression, revealed altered levels of cry1, dec2, and rev-erb-beta in IL-6 KO mice. These data propose that IL-6 participates in the regulation of ultradian activity/rest rhythmicity and clock gene expression in the mammalian brain. Furthermore, we propose IL-6-dependent circadian misalignment as a common pathogenetic principle in some neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Vascular Gene Expression: A Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Concepción eMartínez-Navarro

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The phloem is the conduit through which photoassimilates are distributed from autotrophic to heterotrophic tissues and is involved in the distribution of signaling molecules that coordinate plant growth and responses to the environment. Phloem function depends on the coordinate expression of a large array of genes. We have previously identified conserved motifs in upstream regions of the Arabidopsis genes, encoding the homologs of pumpkin phloem sap mRNAs, displaying expression in vascular tissues. This tissue-specific expression in Arabidopsis is predicted by the overrepresentation of GA/CT-rich motifs in gene promoters. In this work we have searched for common motifs in upstream regions of the homologous genes from plants considered to possess a primitive vascular tissue (a lycophyte, as well as from others that lack a true vascular tissue (a bryophyte, and finally from chlorophytes. Both lycophyte and bryophyte display motifs similar to those found in Arabidopsis with a significantly low E-value, while the chlorophytes showed either a different conserved motif or no conserved motif at all. These results suggest that these same genes are expressed coordinately in non- vascular plants; this coordinate expression may have been one of the prerequisites for the development of conducting tissues in plants. We have also analyzed the phylogeny of conserved proteins that may be involved in phloem function and development. The presence of CmPP16, APL, FT and YDA in chlorophytes suggests the recruitment of ancient regulatory networks for the development of the vascular tissue during evolution while OPS is a novel protein specific to vascular plants.

  19. Identification of Soybean Genes Involved in Circadian Clock Mechanism and Photoperiodic Control of Flowering Time by In Silico Analyses Flowering Time by In Silico Analyses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Glycine max is a photoperiodic short-day plant and the practical consequence of the response is latitude and sowing period limitations to commercial crops.Genetic and physiological studies using the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa)have uncovered several genes and genetic pathways controlling the process,however information about the corresponding pathways in legumes is scarce.Data mining prediction methodologies,Including multiple sequence alignment,phylogenetic analysis,bioinformatics expression and sequence motif pattern identification were used to identify soybean genes involved In day length perception and photoperiodic flowering induction.We have investigated approximately 330 000 sequences from open-access databases and have identified all bona fide central oscillator genes and circadian photoreceptors from A.thaliana in soybean sequence databases.We propose e working model for the photoperiodic control of flowering time in G.max,based on the identified key components.These results demonstrate the power of comparative genomics between model systems and crop species to elucidate the several aspects of plant physiology and metabolism.

  20. Differentiation of PC12 Cells Results in Enhanced VIP Expression and Prolonged Rhythmic Expression of Clock Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pretzmann, C.P.; Fahrenkrug, J.; Georg, B.

    2008-01-01

    PC12 cultures lasted only one 24-h period, while in differentiated cultures, the rhythms continued for at least 3 days. Thus, neuronal differentiation provided PC12 cells the ability to maintain rhythmicity for an extended period. Both vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and its receptor VPAC(2......) are expressed in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and in agreement with VIP signaling being crucial for maintenance of rhythmicity, we found both VIP and VPAC(2) mRNA increased after differentiation of PC12 cells. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) exerts time- and concentration-dependent......To examine for circadian rhythmicity, the messenger RNA (mRNA) amount of the clock genes Per1 and Per2 was measured in undifferentiated and nerve-growth-factor-differentiated PC12 cells harvested every fourth hour. Serum shock was needed to induce circadian oscillations, which in undifferentiated...

  1. Gene Expression in Trypanosomatid Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Martínez-Calvillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The parasites Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi are the trypanosomatid protozoa that cause the deadly human diseases leishmaniasis, African sleeping sickness, and Chagas disease, respectively. These organisms possess unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes and trans-splicing. Little is known about either the DNA sequences or the proteins that are involved in the initiation and termination of transcription in trypanosomatids. In silico analyses of the genome databases of these parasites led to the identification of a small number of proteins involved in gene expression. However, functional studies have revealed that trypanosomatids have more general transcription factors than originally estimated. Many posttranslational histone modifications, histone variants, and chromatin modifying enzymes have been identified in trypanosomatids, and recent genome-wide studies showed that epigenetic regulation might play a very important role in gene expression in this group of parasites. Here, we review and comment on the most recent findings related to transcription initiation and termination in trypanosomatid protozoa.

  2. Circadian clock gene Per2 plays an important role in cell proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle progression in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Ao, Yiran; Yang, Kai; Tang, Hong; Chen, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the aberrant expression of period circadian clock 2 (Per2) is closely related to the occurrence and development of cancers, but the specific mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we used shRNA to downregulate Per2 in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) Tca8113 cells, and then detected the alterations in cell cycle, cell proliferation and apoptosis by flow cytometric analysis and mRNA expression alterations in all the important genes in the cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK)/cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) cell cycle network by RT-qPCR. We found that in the Tca8113 cells, after Per2 downregulation, the mRNA expression levels of cyclin A2, B1 and D1, CDK4, CDK6 and E2F1 were significantly increased (Pcycle progression and the balance of cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulation of the cyclin/CDK/CKI cell cycle network. Further research on Per2 may provide a new effective molecular target for cancer treatments.

  3. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2016-12-03

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  4. My Path from Chemistry to Phytochrome and Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    I summarize my scientific journey from my first interest in science to my career investigating how plants use the phytochrome photoreceptor to regulate what genes they express. I then describe how this work led to an understanding of how circadian rhythms function in plants and to the discovery of CCA1, a component of the plant central oscillator. PMID:27014288

  5. The Network of Time : Understanding the Molecular Circadian System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenneberg, Till; Merrow, Martha

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock provides a temporal structure that modulates biological functions from the level of gene expression to performance and behaviour. Pioneering work on the fruitfly Drosophila has provided a basis for understanding how the temporal sequence of daily events is controlled in mammals.

  6. Circadian clock regulation of the cell cycle in the zebrafish intestine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Peyric

    Full Text Available The circadian clock controls cell proliferation in a number of healthy tissues where cell renewal and regeneration are critical for normal physiological function. The intestine is an organ that typically undergoes regular cycles of cell division, differentiation and apoptosis as part of its role in digestion and nutrient absorption. The aim of this study was to explore circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation and cell cycle gene expression in the zebrafish intestine. Here we show that the zebrafish gut contains a directly light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, which regulates the daily timing of mitosis. Furthermore, this intestinal clock controls the expression of key cell cycle regulators, such as cdc2, wee1, p21, PCNA and cdk2, but only weakly influences cyclin B1, cyclin B2 and cyclin E1 expression. Interestingly, food deprivation has little impact on circadian clock function in the gut, but dramatically reduces cell proliferation, as well as cell cycle gene expression in this tissue. Timed feeding under constant dark conditions is able to drive rhythmic expression not only of circadian clock genes, but also of several cell cycle genes, suggesting that food can entrain the clock, as well as the cell cycle in the intestine. Rather surprisingly, we found that timed feeding is critical for high amplitude rhythms in cell cycle gene expression, even when zebrafish are maintained on a light-dark cycle. Together these results suggest that the intestinal clock integrates multiple rhythmic cues, including light and food, to function optimally.

  7. Circadian clock regulation of the cell cycle in the zebrafish intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyric, Elodie; Moore, Helen A; Whitmore, David

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock controls cell proliferation in a number of healthy tissues where cell renewal and regeneration are critical for normal physiological function. The intestine is an organ that typically undergoes regular cycles of cell division, differentiation and apoptosis as part of its role in digestion and nutrient absorption. The aim of this study was to explore circadian clock regulation of cell proliferation and cell cycle gene expression in the zebrafish intestine. Here we show that the zebrafish gut contains a directly light-entrainable circadian pacemaker, which regulates the daily timing of mitosis. Furthermore, this intestinal clock controls the expression of key cell cycle regulators, such as cdc2, wee1, p21, PCNA and cdk2, but only weakly influences cyclin B1, cyclin B2 and cyclin E1 expression. Interestingly, food deprivation has little impact on circadian clock function in the gut, but dramatically reduces cell proliferation, as well as cell cycle gene expression in this tissue. Timed feeding under constant dark conditions is able to drive rhythmic expression not only of circadian clock genes, but also of several cell cycle genes, suggesting that food can entrain the clock, as well as the cell cycle in the intestine. Rather surprisingly, we found that timed feeding is critical for high amplitude rhythms in cell cycle gene expression, even when zebrafish are maintained on a light-dark cycle. Together these results suggest that the intestinal clock integrates multiple rhythmic cues, including light and food, to function optimally.

  8. Daily oscillation of gene expression associated with nacreous layer formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Three major organic matrix components,nacrein,MSI60 and N16 have been reported from the nacreous layer of Japanese pearl oyster,Pinctada fucata.Though several in vitro experiments have been carried out to elucidate the functions of these molecules details have not yet been clarified.In this report,we tempt to clarify the gene expression levels encoding the above three proteins between samples of 1) summer and winter seasons and 2) ocean and aquarium environments by using realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR).It was confirmed that the biomineralization process of P.fucata is mainly influenced by the circatidal rhythm of the ocean environment.The gene expressions coding for N16 and MSI60 increased at the time of high tide,while that of nacrein increased at the time of low tide.The similar tendency observed in N16 and MSI60 showed the possibility that both components are secreted simultaneously,supporting a hypothesis that N16 forms crosslinkage with MSI60 to form the membrane.The expressions of MSI60,N16 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) genes were remarkable in winter season,while no variation was found in the expression level of the nacrein gene in summer and winter season.The study is the first attempt regarding the seasonal and circadian rhythms observed on gene expressions incorporated into molluscan shell formation.The results will give a new insight into the relationship between molluscan physiology and the mechanism of shell formation.

  9. Microarray analysis of natural socially regulated plasticity in circadian rhythms of honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L; Southey, Bruce R; Shemesh, Yair; Rubin, Elad B; Cohen, Mira; Robinson, Gene E; Bloch, Guy

    2012-02-01

    Honey bee workers care for ("nurse") the brood around the clock without circadian rhythmicity, but then they forage outside with strong circadian rhythms and a consolidated nightly rest. This chronobiological plasticity is associated with variation in the expression of the canonical "clock genes" that regulate the circadian clock: nurse bees show no brain rhythms of expression, while foragers do. These results suggest that the circadian system is organized differently in nurses and foragers. Nurses switch to activity with circadian rhythms shortly after being removed from the hive, suggesting that at least some clock cells in their brain continue to measure time while in the hive. We performed a microarray genome-wide survey to determine general patterns of brain gene expression in nurses and foragers sampled around the clock. We found 160 and 541 transcripts that exhibited significant sinusoidal oscillations in nurses and foragers, respectively, with peaks of expression distributed throughout the day in both task groups. Consistent with earlier studies, transcripts of genes involved in circadian rhythms, including Clockwork Orange that has not been studied before in bees, oscillated in foragers but not in nurses. The oscillating transcripts also were enriched for genes involved in the visual system, "development" and "response to stimuli" (foragers), "muscle contraction" and "microfilament motor gene expression" (nurses), and "generation of precursor metabolites" and "energy" (both). Transcripts of genes encoding P450 enzymes oscillated in both nurses and foragers but with a different phase. This study identified new putative clock-controlled genes in the honey bee and suggests that some brain functions show circadian rhythmicity even in nurse bees that are active around the clock.

  10. Classification with binary gene expressions

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, Salih; Niranjan, Mahesan

    2009-01-01

    Microarray gene expression measurements are reported, used and archived usually to high numerical precision. However, properties of mRNA molecules, such as their low stability and availability in small copy numbers, and the fact that measurements correspond to a population of cells, rather than a single cell, makes high precision meaningless. Recent work shows that reducing measurement precision leads to very little loss of information, right down to binary levels. In this paper we show how p...

  11. The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the circadian rhythms of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the principal bloom-forming cyanobacteria present in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems. M. aeruginosa produces cyanotoxins, which can harm human and animal health. Many metabolic pathways in M. aeruginosa, including photosynthesis and microcystin synthesis, are controlled by its circadian rhythms. However, whether xenobiotics affect the cyanobacterial circadian system and change its growth, physiology and biochemistry is unknown. We used real-time PCR to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 on the expression of clock genes and some circadian genes in M. aeruginosa during the light/dark (LD cycle. RESULTS: The results revealed that H(2O(2 changes the expression patterns of clock genes (kaiA, kaiB, kaiC and sasA and significantly decreases the transcript levels of kaiB, kaiC and sasA. H(2O(2 treatment also decreased the transcription of circadian genes, such as photosynthesis-related genes (psaB, psbD1 and rbcL and microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH, and changed their circadian expression patterns. Moreover, the physiological functions of M. aeruginosa, including its growth and microcystin synthesis, were greatly influenced by H(2O(2 treatment during LD. These results indicate that changes in the cyanobacterial circadian system can affect its physiological and metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that a xenobiotic can change the circadian expression patterns of its clock genes to influence clock-controlled gene regulation, and these influences are evident at the level of cellular physiology.

  12. A circadian rhythm orchestrated by histone deacetylase 3 controls hepatic lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Dan; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zheng;

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian clock exacerbates metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. We show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) recruitment to the genome displays a circadian rhythm in mouse liver. Histone acetylation is inversely related to HDAC3 binding, and this rhythm is lost when...... HDAC3 is absent. Although amounts of HDAC3 are constant, its genomic recruitment in liver corresponds to the expression pattern of the circadian nuclear receptor Rev-erbα. Rev-erbα colocalizes with HDAC3 near genes regulating lipid metabolism, and deletion of HDAC3 or Rev-erbα in mouse liver causes...... hepatic steatosis. Thus, genomic recruitment of HDAC3 by Rev-erbα directs a circadian rhythm of histone acetylation and gene expression required for normal hepatic lipid homeostasis....

  13. The Gene Expression Omnibus database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, Emily; Barrett, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    The Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database is an international public repository that archives and freely distributes high-throughput gene expression and other functional genomics data sets. Created in 2000 as a worldwide resource for gene expression studies, GEO has evolved with rapidly changing technologies and now accepts high-throughput data for many other data applications, including those that examine genome methylation, chromatin structure, and genome–protein interactions. GEO supports community-derived reporting standards that specify provision of several critical study elements including raw data, processed data, and descriptive metadata. The database not only provides access to data for tens of thousands of studies, but also offers various Web-based tools and strategies that enable users to locate data relevant to their specific interests, as well as to visualize and analyze the data. This chapter includes detailed descriptions of methods to query and download GEO data and use the analysis and visualization tools. The GEO homepage is at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/. PMID:27008011

  14. Antisense expression increases gene expression variability and locus interdependency

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wu; Gagneur, Julien; Clauder-Münster, Sandra; Smolik, Miłosz; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide transcription profiling has revealed extensive expression of non-coding RNAs antisense to genes, yet their functions, if any, remain to be understood. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of sense–antisense expression in response to genetic and environmental changes in yeast. We find that antisense expression is associated with genes of larger expression variability. This is characterized by more ‘switching off' at low levels of expression for genes with antisense compa...

  15. Disrupting circadian homeostasis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor.

  16. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations...... have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed...

  17. Glucocorticoids play a key role in circadian cell cycle rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dickmeis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways play a pivotal role by relaying timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems. Both cell-autonomous and systemic mechanisms have been implicated as clock outputs; however, the relative importance and interplay between these mechanisms are poorly understood. The cell cycle represents a highly conserved regulatory target of the circadian timing system. Previously, we have demonstrated that in zebrafish, the circadian clock has the capacity to generate daily rhythms of S phase by a cell-autonomous mechanism in vitro. Here, by studying a panel of zebrafish mutants, we reveal that the pituitary-adrenal axis also plays an essential role in establishing these rhythms in the whole animal. Mutants with a reduction or a complete absence of corticotrope pituitary cells show attenuated cell-proliferation rhythms, whereas expression of circadian clock genes is not affected. We show that the corticotrope deficiency is associated with reduced cortisol levels, implicating glucocorticoids as a component of a systemic signaling pathway required for circadian cell cycle rhythmicity. Strikingly, high-amplitude rhythms can be rescued by exposing mutant larvae to a tonic concentration of a glucocorticoid agonist. Our work suggests that cell-autonomous clock mechanisms are not sufficient to establish circadian cell cycle rhythms at the whole-animal level. Instead, they act in concert with a systemic signaling environment of which glucocorticoids are an essential part.

  18. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  19. Circadian genes in a blind subterranean mammal II: Conservation and uniqueness of the three Period homologs in the blind subterranean mole rat, Spalax ehrenbergi superspecies

    OpenAIRE

    Avivi, A; Oster, H; A Joel; BEILES, A.; Albrecht, U; Nevo, E.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrated that a subterranean, visually blind mammal has a functional set of three Per genes that are important components of the circadian clockwork in mammals. The mole rat superspecies Spalax ehrenbergi is a blind subterranean animal that lives its entire life underground in darkness. It has degenerated eyes, but the retina and highly hypertrophic harderian gland are involved in photoperiodic perception. All three Per genes oscillate with a periodicity of 24 h in the suprachiasmatic ...

  20. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata;

    2015-01-01

    expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  1. Conserved and Divergent Rhythms of Crassulacean Acid Metabolism-Related and Core Clock Gene Expression in the Cactus Opuntia ficus-indica1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-01-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  2. Conserved and divergent rhythms of crassulacean acid metabolism-related and core clock gene expression in the cactus Opuntia ficus-indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallona, Izaskun; Egea-Cortines, Marcos; Weiss, Julia

    2011-08-01

    The cactus Opuntia ficus-indica is a constitutive Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) species. Current knowledge of CAM metabolism suggests that the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinase (PPCK) is circadian regulated at the transcriptional level, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK) are posttranslationally controlled. As little transcriptomic data are available from obligate CAM plants, we created an expressed sequence tag database derived from different organs and developmental stages. Sequences were assembled, compared with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information nonredundant database for identification of putative orthologs, and mapped using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Orthology and Gene Ontology. We identified genes involved in circadian regulation and CAM metabolism for transcriptomic analysis in plants grown in long days. We identified stable reference genes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction and found that OfiSAND, like its counterpart in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and OfiTUB are generally appropriate standards for use in the quantification of gene expression in O. ficus-indica. Three kinds of expression profiles were found: transcripts of OfiPPCK oscillated with a 24-h periodicity; transcripts of the light-active OfiNADP-ME and OfiPPDK genes adapted to 12-h cycles, while transcript accumulation patterns of OfiPEPC and OfiMDH were arrhythmic. Expression of the circadian clock gene OfiTOC1, similar to Arabidopsis, oscillated with a 24-h periodicity, peaking at night. Expression of OfiCCA1 and OfiPRR9, unlike in Arabidopsis, adapted best to a 12-h rhythm, suggesting that circadian clock gene interactions differ from those of Arabidopsis. Our results indicate that the evolution of CAM metabolism could be the result of modified circadian regulation at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional

  3. Identification of four soybean reference genes for gene expression normalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression analysis requires the use of reference genes stably expressed independently of specific tissues or environmental conditions. Housekeeping genes (e.g., actin, tubulin, ribosomal, polyubiquitin and elongation factor 1-alpha) are commonly used as reference genes with the assumption tha...

  4. Effects of Stress and MDMA on Hippocampal Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg F. Weber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine is a substituted amphetamine and popular drug of abuse. Its mood-enhancing short-term effects may prompt its consumption under stress. Clinical studies indicate that MDMA treatment may mitigate the symptoms of stress disorders such as posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD. On the other hand, repeated administration of MDMA results in persistent deficits in markers of serotonergic (5-HT nerve terminals that have been viewed as indicative of 5-HT neurotoxicity. Exposure to chronic stress has been shown to augment MDMA-induced 5-HT neurotoxicity. Here, we examine the transcriptional responses in the hippocampus to MDMA treatment of control rats and rats exposed to chronic stress. MDMA altered the expression of genes that regulate unfolded protein binding, protein folding, calmodulin-dependent protein kinase activity, and neuropeptide signaling. In stressed rats, the gene expression profile in response to MDMA was altered to affect sensory processing and responses to tissue damage in nerve sheaths. Subsequent treatment with MDMA also markedly altered the genetic responses to stress such that the stress-induced downregulation of genes related to the circadian rhythm was reversed. The data support the view that MDMA-induced transcriptional responses accompany the persistent effects of this drug on neuronal structure/function. In addition, MDMA treatment alters the stress-induced transcriptional signature.

  5. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  6. SVD-based anatomy of gene expressions for correlation analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Wada, Masayoshi; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Arita, Masanori

    2008-12-01

    Gene co-expression analysis has been widely used in recent years for predicting unknown gene function and its regulatory mechanisms. The predictive accuracy depends on the quality and the diversity of data set used. In this report, we applied singular value decomposition (SVD) to array experiments in public databases to find that co-expression linkage could be estimated by a much smaller number of array data. Correlations of co-expressed gene were assessed using two regulatory mechanisms (feedback loop of the fundamental circadian clock and a global transcription factor Myb28), as well as metabolic pathways in the AraCyc database. Our conclusion is that a smaller number of informative arrays across tissues can suffice to reproduce comparable results with a state-of-the-art co-expression software tool. In our SVD analysis on Arabidopsis data set, array experiments that contributed most as the principal components included stamen development, germinating seed and stress responses on leaf.

  7. Expression of Clock genes in the pineal glands of newborn rats with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Sun; Xing Feng; Xin Ding; Li Bao; Yongfu Li; Jun He; Meifang Jin

    2012-01-01

    Clock genes are involved in circadian rhythm regulation,and surviving newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy may present with sleep-wake cycle reversal.This study aimed to determine the expression of the clock genes Clock and Bmall,in the pineal gland of rats with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.Results showed that levels of Clock mRNA were not significantly changed within 48 hours after cerebral hypoxia and ischemia.Expression levels of CLOCK and BMAL1 protein were significantly higher after 48 hours.The levels of Bmall mRNA reached a peak at 36 hours,but were significantly reduced at 48 hours.Experimental findings indicate that Clock and Bmall genes were indeed expressed in the pineal glands of neonatal rats.At the initial stage (within 36 hours) of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage,only slight changes in the expression levels of these two genes were detected,followed by significant changes at 36 48 hours.These changes may be associated with circadian rhythm disorder induced by hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  8. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  9. MRI of Transgene Expression: Correlation to Therapeutic Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomotsugu Ichikawa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can provide highresolution 3D maps of structural and functional information, yet its use of mapping in vivo gene expression has only recently been explored. A potential application for this technology is to noninvasively image transgene expression. The current study explores the latter using a nonregulatable internalizing engineered transferrin receptor (ETR whose expression can be probed for with a superparamagnetic Tf-CLIO probe. Using an HSV-based amplicon vector system for transgene delivery, we demonstrate that: 1 ETR is a sensitive MR marker gene; 2 several transgenes can be efficiently expressed from a single amplicon; 3 expression of each transgene results in functional gene product; and 4 ETR gene expression correlates with expression of therapeutic genes when the latter are contained within the same amplicon. These data, taken together, suggest that MRI of ETR expression can serve as a surrogate for measuring therapeutic transgene expression.

  10. 蝗虫节律基因pdp的克隆及功能分析%Clone and Functional Analysis of Circadian Gene pdp in Locusta migratoria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭宇辉; 陈光

    2011-01-01

    [目的]研究不同条件下蝗虫(Locusta migratoria)节律基因Pdp( Pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase)的mRNA表达水平,进一步揭示蝗虫节律的分子机制.[方法]通过中国科学院动物研究所内的转录组数据库中找出pdp基因的原型来设计引物,以群居型东亚飞蝗的头部的反转录cDNA为模板,克隆出pdp基因的全序列.把一天24h等分成8个点,进行定时取样,以qRT-PCR技术进行不同时段pdp基因表达量的测定;并在不同处理条件下.测定pdp基因的表达量.[结果]节律基因pdp在蝗虫的不同处理条件下变化不大.[结论]该研究对了解飞蝗节律规律、种群特点及有效防虫具有重要的现实意义.%[Objective]Through studying mRNA expression levels of circadian gene pdp in Locusta migratoria under different conditions to reveal molecular mechanisms of rhythm of Locusta migratoria. [ Methods ] Based on the database of Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, to find out the prototype of the pdp gene and design primers. Using aggregated locust head cDNA cloning for templates, the complete sequence of the gene pdp was got. By dividing a day (24 hours)into eight points, we take fixed-point samples, and then measure the gene expression using qRT-PCR for different times of day. And then in different processing conditions, the pdp gene expression levels were determined. [ Results ] The rhythms of gene pdp locust changed slightly under different conditions. [ Conclusion ] The study had extremely realistic significance for understanding the rhythm and population characteristics of Locusta migratoria as well as effective insect-resistant.

  11. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-09-22

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, alphaENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function.

  12. Feeding cues and injected nutrients induce acute expression of multiple clock genes in the mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Oike

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is closely associated with energy metabolism. The liver clock can rapidly adapt to a new feeding cycle within a few days, whereas the lung clock is gradually entrained over one week. However, the mechanism underlying tissue-specific clock resetting is not fully understood. To characterize the rapid response to feeding cues in the liver clock, we examined the effects of a single time-delayed feeding on circadian rhythms in the liver and lungs of Per2::Luc reporter knockin mice. After adapting to a night-time restricted feeding schedule, the mice were fed according to a 4, 8, or 13 h delayed schedule on the last day. The phase of the liver clock was delayed in all groups with delayed feeding, whereas the lung clock remained unaffected. We then examined the acute response of clock and metabolism-related genes in the liver using focused DNA-microarrays. Clock mutant mice were bred under constant light to attenuate the endogenous circadian rhythm, and gene expression profiles were determined during 24 h of fasting followed by 8 h of feeding. Per2 and Dec1 were significantly increased within 1 h of feeding. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed a similarly acute response in hepatic clock gene expression caused by feeding wild type mice after an overnight fast. In addition to Per2 and Dec1, the expression of Per1 increased, and that of Rev-erbα decreased in the liver within 1 h of feeding after fasting, whereas none of these clock genes were affected in the lung. Moreover, an intraperitoneal injection of glucose combined with amino acids, but not either alone, reproduced a similar hepatic response. Our findings show that multiple clock genes respond to nutritional cues within 1 h in the liver but not in the lung.

  13. Correlating Expression Data with Gene Function Using Gene Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU,Qi; DENG,Yong; WANG,Chuan; SHI,Tie-Liu; LI,Yi-Xue

    2006-01-01

    Clustering is perhaps one of the most widely used tools for microarray data analysis. Proposed roles for genes of unknown function are inferred from clusters of genes similarity expressed across many biological conditions.However, whether function annotation by similarity metrics is reliable or not and to what extent the similarity in gene expression patterns is useful for annotation of gene functions, has not been evaluated. This paper made a comprehensive research on the correlation between the similarity of expression data and of gene functions using Gene Ontology. It has been found that although the similarity in expression patterns and the similarity in gene functions are significantly dependent on each other, this association is rather weak. In addition, among the three categories of Gene Ontology, the similarity of expression data is more useful for cellular component annotation than for biological process and molecular function. The results presented are interesting for the gene functions prediction research area.

  14. Glucocorticoids affect 24 h clock genes expression in human adipose tissue explant cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purificación Gómez-Abellán

    Full Text Available AIMS: to examine firstly whether CLOCK exhibits a circadian expression in human visceral (V and subcutaneous (S adipose tissue (AT in vitro as compared with BMAL1 and PER2, and secondly to investigate the possible effect of the glucocorticoid analogue dexamethasone (DEX on positive and negative clock genes expression. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: VAT and SAT biopsies were obtained from morbid obese women (body mass index ≥ 40 kg/m(2 (n = 6. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of clock genes and the effect of DEX on CLOCK, PER2 and BMAL1 expression, control AT (without DEX and AT explants treated with DEX (2 hours were cultured during 24 h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 10:00 h, 14:00 h, 18:00 h, 22:00 h, 02:00 h and 06:00 h, using qRT-PCR. RESULTS: CLOCK, BMAL1 and PER2 expression exhibited circadian patterns in both VAT and SAT explants that were adjusted to a typical 24 h sinusoidal curve. PER2 expression (negative element was in antiphase with respect to CLOCK and in phase with BMAL1 expression (both positive elements in the SAT (situation not present in VAT. A marked effect of DEX exposure on both positive and negative clock genes expression patterns was observed. Indeed, DEX treatment modified the rhythmicity pattern towards altered patterns with a period lower than 24 hours in all genes and in both tissues. CONCLUSIONS: 24 h patterns in CLOCK and BMAL1 (positive clock elements and PER2 (negative element mRNA levels were observed in human adipose explants. These patterns were altered by dexamethasone exposure.

  15. Methods to study the mechanism of the Neurospora Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Joonseok; Zhou, Mian; Liu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic circadian clocks are comprised of interlocked auto-regulatory feedback loops that control gene expression at the levels of transcription and translation. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa is an excellent model for the complex molecular network of regulatory mechanisms that are common to all eukaryotes. In the heart of the network, post-translational regulations and functions of the core clock elements are of major interest. This chapter will discuss the methods that were recently used to study the Neurospora circadian oscillator mechanisms at the molecular level. PMID:25662455

  16. A model of calcium-mediated coupling between membrane activity and clock gene expression in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Casado, J M

    2015-01-01

    Rhythms in electrical activity in the membrane of cells in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are crucial for the function of the circadian timing system, which is characterized by the expression of the so-called clock genes. Intracellular Ca$^{2+}$ ions seem to connect, at least in part, the electrical activity of SCN neurons with the expression of clock genes. In this paper, we introduce a simple mathematical model describing the linking of membrane activity to the transcription of one gene by means of a feedback mechanism based on the dynamics of intracellular calcium ions.

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Hypothalamic Gene Expression during Daily Torpor in Djungarian Hamsters (Phodopus sungorus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubuk, Ceyda; Kemmling, Julia; Fabrizius, Andrej; Herwig, Annika

    2017-01-01

    Animals living at high or temperate latitudes are challenged by extensive changes in environmental conditions over seasons. Djungarian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) are able to cope with extremely cold ambient temperatures and food scarcity in winter by expressing spontaneous daily torpor. Daily torpor is a circadian controlled voluntary reduction of metabolism that can reduce energy expenditure by up to 65% when used frequently. In the past decades it has become more and more apparent, that the hypothalamus is likely to play a key role in regulating induction and maintenance of daily torpor, but the molecular signals, which lead to the initiation of daily torpor, are still unknown. Here we present the first transcriptomic study of hypothalamic gene expression patterns in Djungarian hamsters during torpor entrance. Based on Illumina sequencing we were able to identify a total number of 284 differentially expressed genes, whereby 181 genes were up- and 103 genes down regulated during torpor entrance. The 20 most up regulated group contained eight genes coding for structure proteins, including five collagen genes, dnha2 and myo15a, as well as the procoagulation factor vwf. In a proximate approach we investigated these genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis over the circadian cycle in torpid and normothermic animals at times of torpor entrance, mid torpor, arousal and post-torpor. These qPCR data confirmed up regulation of dnah2, myo15a, and vwf during torpor entrance, but a decreased mRNA level for all other investigated time points. This suggests that gene expression of structure genes as well as the procoagulation factor are specifically initiated during the early state of torpor and provides evidence for protective molecular adaptions in the hypothalamus of Djungarian hamsters including changes in structure, transport of biomolecules and coagulation. PMID:28348515

  18. Synchronization of circadian Per2 rhythms and HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction in mouse fibroblasts after short-term heat shock pulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are the general physiological processes of adaptation to daily environmental changes, such as the temperature cycle. A change in temperature is a resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators, which are possibly regulated by the heat shock (HS pathway. The HS response (HSR is a universal process that provides protection against stressful conditions, which promote protein-denaturation. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is essential for HSR. In the study presented here, we investigated whether a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms. Circadian Per2 rhythm and HSF1-mediated gene expression were monitored by a real-time bioluminescence assay for mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase and HS element (HSE; HSF1-binding site-driven luciferase activity, respectively. By an optimal duration HS pulse (43°C for approximately 30 minutes, circadian Per2 rhythm was observed in the whole mouse fibroblast culture, probably indicating the synchronization of the phases of each cell. This rhythm was preceded by an acute elevation in mPer2 and HSF1-mediated gene expression. Mutations in the two predicted HSE sites adjacent (one of them proximally to the E-box in the mPer2 promoter dramatically abolished circadian mPer2 rhythm. Circadian Per2 gene/protein expression was not observed in HSF1-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 is essential to the synchronization of circadian rhythms by the HS pulse. Importantly, the interaction between HSF1 and BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer, a central circadian transcription factor, was observed after the HS pulse. These findings reveal that even a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms and cause the HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction, suggesting the pivotal role of crosstalk between the mammalian circadian and HSR systems.

  19. mTORC1 signaling in Agrp neurons mediates circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but is dispensable for regulation of feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Verena; Cornu, Marion; Hall, Michael N

    2015-08-21

    Orexigenic agouti-related protein/neuropeptide Y (Agrp/NPY) neurons and an orexigenic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons of the hypothalamus regulate feeding behavior and energy homeostasis. An understanding of the molecular signaling pathways that regulate Agrp/NPY and POMC function could lead to novel treatments for metabolic disorders. Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (TORC1) is a nutrient-activated protein kinase and central controller of growth and metabolism. We therefore investigated the role of mammalian TORC1 (mTORC1) in Agrp neurons. We generated and characterized Agrp neuron-specific raptor knockout (Agrp-raptor KO) mice. Agrp-raptor KO mice displayed reduced, non-circadian expression of Agrp and NPY but normal feeding behavior and energy homeostasis on both normal and high fat diet. Thus, mTORC1 in Agrp neurons controls circadian expression of orexigenic neuropeptides but is dispensable for the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism.

  20. Deoxyribozymes inhibit the expression of periodl gene in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Wei; WANG Yueqi; LIU Yanyou; PENG Wenzhen; XIAO Jing; ZHU Bin; WANG Zhengrong

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of two deoxyribozymes targeting periodl (perl) mRNA in vitro for exploring a novel gene therapy approach about circadian rhythm diseases, the specific deoxyribozymes targeting perl were designed and synthesized chemically following MFold analysis according to its mRNA secondary structure, perl RNA fragments were prepared by in vitro transcription of pcDNA3.1 (+)-perl164:256. The cleavage reactions containing deoxyribozymes and perl RNA fragments were performed under certain conditions. With the transfection technique mediated by LipofectAMINETM, pcDNA3-perl and DRz164 or DRz256 were introduced into NIH3T3 cells. The effects of deoxyribozymes on perl were studied by reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry (FCM). When deoxyribozymes and RNA transcripts were incubated under the adopted conditions at 37℃ for 2 h, about 63% of perl164:256 RNA transcripts were cleaved by DRz164 and about 50.5% by DRz256. After cotransfecting pcDNA3-perl with DRz164 or DRz256, the expression of perl mRNA was decreased, as indicated by RT-PCR semi-quantity analysis. FCM analysis showed that Perl protein was inhibited. Both DRz164 and DRz256 targeting perl have the specific cleavage activity toward perl mRNA in vitro and can highly block the expression of perl gene in cellular milieu.

  1. Neurospora WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel frequency and initiate a circadian cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Gerber, Scott A; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-09-01

    In the negative feedback loop comprising the Neurospora circadian oscillator, the White Collar Complex (WCC) formed from White Collar-1 (WC-1) and White Collar-2 (WC-2) drives transcription of the circadian pacemaker gene frequency (frq). Although FRQ-dependent repression of WCC has been extensively studied, the mechanism by which the WCC initiates a circadian cycle remains elusive. Structure/function analysis of WC-1 eliminated domains previously thought to transactivate frq expression but instead identified amino acids 100-200 as essential for frq circadian expression. A proteomics-based search for coactivators with WCC uncovered the SWI/SNF (SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable) complex: SWI/SNF interacts with WCC in vivo and in vitro, binds to the Clock box in the frq promoter, and is required both for circadian remodeling of nucleosomes at frq and for rhythmic frq expression; interestingly, SWI/SNF is not required for light-induced frq expression. These data suggest a model in which WC-1 recruits SWI/SNF to remodel and loop chromatin at frq, thereby activating frq expression to initiate the circadian cycle.

  2. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lehmann

    Full Text Available By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG. To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer.

  3. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circa...

  4. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue Expresión circadiana específica de la localización de leptina y su receptor en tejido adiposo humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Gómez Abellán

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. Objective: We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its receptor expression in human adipose tissue (AT. Subjects and methods: Visceral and subcutaneous abdominal AT biopsies (n = 6 were obtained from morbid obese women (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m². Anthropometric variables and fasting plasma glucose, leptin, lipids and lipoprotein concentrations were determined. In order to investigate rhythmic expression pattern of leptin and its receptor, AT explants were cultured during 24-h and gene expression was analyzed at the following times: 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00 h, using quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Leptin expression showed an oscillatory pattern that was consistent with circadian rhythm in cultured AT. Similar patterns were noted for the leptin receptor. Leptin showed its achrophase (maximum expression during the night, which might be associated to a lower degree of fat accumulation and higher mobilization. When comparing both fat depots, visceral AT anticipated its expression towards afternoon and evening hours. Interestingly, leptin plasma values were associated with decreased amplitude of LEP rhythm. This association was lost when adjusting for waist circumference. Conclusion: Circadian rhythmicity has been demonstrated in leptin and its receptor in human AT cultures in a site-specific manner. This new knowledge paves the way for a better understanding of the autocrine/paracrine role of leptin in human AT.Introducción: La variabilidad circadiana de los niveles de leptina circulante se ha establecido en la última década, pero actualmente se desconoce el comportamiento circadiano de leptina y su receptor en tejido adiposo (TA humano. Objetivo: Investigar si existe un comportamiento

  5. Role of monochromatic light on daily variation of clock gene expression in the pineal gland of chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-11-01

    The avian pineal gland is a master clock that can receive external photic cues and translate them into output rhythms. To clarify whether a shift in light wavelength can influence the circadian expression in chick pineal gland, a total of 240 Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) or blue light (BL). After 2weeks light illumination, circadian expressions of seven core clock genes in pineal gland and the level of melatonin in plasma were examined. The results showed after illumination with monochromatic light, 24h profiles of all clock gene mRNAs retained circadian oscillation, except that RL tended to disrupt the rhythm of cCry2. Compared to WL, BL advanced the acrophases of the negative elements (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) by 0.1-1.5h and delayed those of positive elements (cClock, cBmal1 and cBmal2) by 0.2-0.8h. And, RL advanced all clock genes except cClock and cPer2 by 0.3-2.1h, while GL delayed all clock genes by 0.5-1.5h except cBmal2. Meanwhile, GL increased the amplitude and mesor of positive and reduced both parameters of negative clock genes, but RL showed the opposite pattern. Although the acrophase of plasma melatonin was advanced by both GL and RL, the melatonin level was significantly increased in GL and decreased in RL. This tendency was consistent with the variations in the positive clock gene mRNA levels under monochromatic light and contrasted with those of negative clock genes. Therefore, we speculate that GL may enhance positive clock genes expression, leading to melatonin synthesis, whereas RL may enhance negative genes expression, suppressing melatonin synthesis.

  6. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai influences clock gene expression in the liver of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The circadian clock is involved in drug metabolism, efficacy and toxicity. Drugs could in turn affect the biological clock as a mechanism of their actions. Zuotai is an essential component of many popular Tibetan medicines for sedation, tranquil and “detoxification,” and is mainly composed of metacinnabar (β-HgS. The pharmacological and/or toxicological basis of its action is unknown. This study aimed to examine the effect of Zuotai on biological clock gene expression in the liver of mice. Materials and methods. Mice were orally given Zuotai (10 mg/kg, 1.5-fold of clinical dose daily for 7 days, and livers were collected every 4 h during the 24 h period. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to real-time RT-PCR analysis of circadian clock gene expression. Results. Zuotai decreased the oscillation amplitude of the clock core gene Clock, neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (Npas2, Brain and muscle Arnt-like protein-1 (Bmal1 at 10:00. For the clock feedback negative control genes, Zuotai had no effect on the oscillation of the clock gene Cryptochrome (Cry1 and Period genes (Per1–3. For the clock-driven target genes, Zuotai increased the oscillation amplitude of the PAR-bZip family member D-box-binding protein (Dbp, decreased nuclear factor interleukin 3 (Nfil3 at 10:00, but had no effect on thyrotroph embryonic factor (Tef; Zuotai increased the expression of nuclear receptor Rev-Erbα (Nr1d1 at 18:00, but had little influence on the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbβ (Nr1d2 and RORα. Conclusion. The Tibetan medicine Zuotai could influence the expression of clock genes, which could contribute to pharmacological and/or toxicological effects of Zuotai.

  7. Circadian adaptations to meal timing: Neuroendocrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica F Patton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are generated by central and peripheral circadian oscillators entrained by periodic environmental or physiological stimuli. A master circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus is directly entrained by daily light-dark cycles, and coordinates the timing of other oscillators by direct and indirect neural, hormonal and behavioral outputs. The daily rhythm of food intake provides stimuli that entrain most peripheral and central oscillators, some of which can drive a daily rhythm of food anticipatory activity if food is restricted to one daily mealtime. The location of food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs that drive food anticipatory rhythms, and the food-related stimuli that entrain these oscillators, remain to be clarified. Here, we critically examine the role of peripheral metabolic hormones as potential internal entrainment stimuli or outputs for FEOs controlling food anticipatory rhythms in rats and mice. Hormones for which data are available include corticosterone, ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide 1. All of these hormones exhibit daily rhythms of synthesis and secretion that are synchronized by meal timing. There is some evidence that ghrelin and leptin modulate the expression of food anticipatory rhythms, but none of the hormones examined so far are necessary for entrainment. Ghrelin and leptin likely modulate food-entrained rhythms by actions in hypothalamic circuits utilizing melanocortin and orexin signaling, although again food-entrained behavioral rhythms can persist in lesion and gene knockout models in which these systems are disabled. Actions of these hormones on circadian oscillators in central reward circuits remain to be evaluated. Food-entrained activity rhythms are likely mediated by a distributed system of circadian oscillators sensitive to multiple feeding related inputs. Metabolic hormones appear to play a modulatory role within this

  8. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Bachkirova, Elena (Davis, CA); Rey, Michael (Davis, CA)

    2012-05-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  9. Methods for monitoring multiple gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berka, Randy; Bachkirova, Elena; Rey, Michael

    2013-10-01

    The present invention relates to methods for monitoring differential expression of a plurality of genes in a first filamentous fungal cell relative to expression of the same genes in one or more second filamentous fungal cells using microarrays containing Trichoderma reesei ESTs or SSH clones, or a combination thereof. The present invention also relates to computer readable media and substrates containing such array features for monitoring expression of a plurality of genes in filamentous fungal cells.

  10. The daily rhythms of mitochondrial gene expression and oxidative stress regulation are altered by aging in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Changxia; Li, Chengwei; Qi, Xiaoqing; Song, Zhiyin; Wu, Jianguo; Hughes, Michael E; Li, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates many cellular processes, notably including the cell cycle, metabolism and aging. Mitochondria play essential roles in metabolism and are the major sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the cell. The clock regulates mitochondrial functions by driving daily changes in NAD(+) levels and Sirt3 activity. In addition to this central route, in the present study, we find that the expression of some mitochondrial genes is also rhythmic in the liver, and that there rhythms are disrupted by the Clock(Δ19) mutation in young mice, suggesting that they are regulated by the core circadian oscillator. Related to this observation, we also find that the regulation of oxidative stress is rhythmic in the liver. Since mitochondria and ROS play important roles in aging, and mitochondrial functions are also disturbed by aging, these related observations prompt the compelling hypothesis that circadian oscillators influence aging by regulating ROS in mitochondria. During aging, the expression rhythms of some mitochondrial genes were altered in the liver and the temporal regulation over the dynamics of mitochondrial oxidative stress was disrupted. However, the expression of clock genes was not affected. Our results suggested that mitochondrial functions are combinatorially regulated by the clock and other age-dependent mechanism(s), and that aging disrupts mitochondrial rhythms through mechanisms downstream of the clock.

  11. Interaction of growth hormone overexpression and nutritional status on pituitary gland clock gene expression in coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Hyoung; White, Samantha L; Devlin, Robert H

    2015-02-01

    Clock genes are involved in generating a circadian rhythm that is integrated with the metabolic state of an organism and information from the environment. Growth hormone (GH) transgenic coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, show a large increase in growth rate, but also attenuated seasonal growth modulations, modified timing of physiological transformations (e.g. smoltification) and disruptions in pituitary gene expression compared with wild-type salmon. In several fishes, circadian rhythm gene expression has been found to oscillate in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as in multiple peripheral tissues, but this control system has not been examined in the pituitary gland nor has the effect of transgenic growth modification been examined. Thus, the daily expression of 10 core clock genes has been examined in pituitary glands of GH transgenic (T) and wild-type coho salmon (NT) entrained on a regular photocycle (12L: 12D) and provided either with scheduled feeding or had food withheld for 60 h. Most clock genes in both genotypes showed oscillating patterns of mRNA levels with light and dark cycles. However, T showed different amplitudes and patterns of expression compared with wild salmon, both in fed and starved conditions. The results from this study indicate that constitutive expression of GH is associated with changes in clock gene regulation, which may play a role in the disrupted behavioural and physiological phenotypes observed in growth-modified transgenic strains.

  12. Gene Expression Patterns Define Key Transcriptional Events InCell-Cycle Regulation By cAMP And Protein Kinase A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zambon, Alexander C.; Zhang, Lingzhi; Minovitsky, Simon; Kanter, Joan R.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Salomonis, Nathan; Vranizan, Karen; Dubchak Inna,; Conklin, Bruce R.; Insel, Paul A.

    2005-06-01

    Although a substantial number of hormones and drugs increase cellular cAMP levels, the global impact of cAMP and its major effector mechanism, protein kinase A (PKA), on gene expression is not known. Here we show that treatment of murine wild-type S49 lymphoma cells for 24 h with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (8-CPTcAMP), a PKA-selective cAMP analog, alters the expression of approx equal to 4,500 of approx. equal to 13,600 unique genes. By contrast, gene expression was unaltered in Kin- S49 cells (that lack PKA) incubated with 8-CPTcAMP. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of several cell cycle regulators accompanied cAMP-induced G1-phase cell-cycle arrest of wild-type S49 cells. Within 2h, 8-CPT-cAMP altered expression of 152 genes that contain evolutionarily conserved cAMP-response elements within 5 kb of transcriptional start sites, including the circadian clock gene Per1. Thus, cAMP through its activation of PKA produces extensive transcriptional regulation in eukaryotic cells. These transcriptional networks include a primary group of cAMP-response element-containing genes and secondary networks that include the circadian clock.

  13. 大鼠松果体Clock基因和芳烷脘N-乙酰基转移酶基因的昼夜节律性表达及光照影响%Circadian rhythms and light responses of clock gene and arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene expressions in the pineal gland of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国卿; 杜玉珍; 童建

    2005-01-01

    探讨12 h光照、12 h黑暗交替(12 h-light:12 h-dark cycle,LD)及持续黑暗(constant darkness,DD)光制下松果体Clock基因和芳烷脘N-乙酰基转移酶基因(arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase gene,NAT)是否存在昼夜节律性表达及其光反应变化.Sprague-Dawley大鼠在LD和DD光制下分别被饲养4周(n=36)和8周(n=36)后,在一昼夜内每隔4 h采集一组松果体组织(n=6),提取总RNA,用竞争性定量RT-PCR测定不同昼夜时点样品中Clock及NAT基因的mRNA相对表达量,通过余弦法和ClockLab软件获取节律参数,并经振幅检验是否存在昼夜节律.结果如下:(1)在DD或LD光制下,松果体Clock和NAT基因mRNA的表达均呈现夜高昼低的节律性振荡(P<0.05).(2)与DD光制下比较,LD光制下松果体Clock和NAT基因的表达振幅及峰值相的mRNA水平均降低(P<0.05).(3)在DD或LD光制下,Clock和NAT基因之间显示相似的节律性表达(P>0.05).结果表明,Clock和NAT基因在松果体中存在同步的内源性昼夜节律表达,光照作用可使其表达下调.

  14. cis sequence effects on gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobs Kevin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence and transcriptional variability within and between individuals are typically studied independently. The joint analysis of sequence and gene expression variation (genetical genomics provides insight into the role of linked sequence variation in the regulation of gene expression. We investigated the role of sequence variation in cis on gene expression (cis sequence effects in a group of genes commonly studied in cancer research in lymphoblastoid cell lines. We estimated the proportion of genes exhibiting cis sequence effects and the proportion of gene expression variation explained by cis sequence effects using three different analytical approaches, and compared our results to the literature. Results We generated gene expression profiling data at N = 697 candidate genes from N = 30 lymphoblastoid cell lines for this study and used available candidate gene resequencing data at N = 552 candidate genes to identify N = 30 candidate genes with sufficient variance in both datasets for the investigation of cis sequence effects. We used two additive models and the haplotype phylogeny scanning approach of Templeton (Tree Scanning to evaluate association between individual SNPs, all SNPs at a gene, and diplotypes, with log-transformed gene expression. SNPs and diplotypes at eight candidate genes exhibited statistically significant (p cis sequence effects in our study, respectively. Conclusion Based on analysis of our results and the extant literature, one in four genes exhibits significant cis sequence effects, and for these genes, about 30% of gene expression variation is accounted for by cis sequence variation. Despite diverse experimental approaches, the presence or absence of significant cis sequence effects is largely supported by previously published studies.

  15. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  16. Differentially expressed genes associated with adaptation to different thermal environments in three sympatric Cuban Anolis lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Hiroshi D; Cádiz Díaz, Antonio; Shigenobu, Shuji; Makino, Takashi; Kawata, Masakado

    2016-05-01

    How animals achieve evolutionary adaptation to different thermal environments is an important issue for evolutionary biology as well as for biodiversity conservation in the context of recent global warming. In Cuba, three sympatric species of Anolis lizards (Anolis allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei) inhabit different thermal microhabitats, thereby providing an excellent opportunity to examine how they have adapted to different environmental temperatures. Here, we performed RNA-seq on the brain, liver and skin tissues from these three species to analyse their transcriptional responses at two different temperatures. In total, we identified 400, 816 and 781 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the two temperatures in A. allogus, A. homolechis and A. sagrei, respectively. Only 62 of these DEGs were shared across the three species, indicating that global transcriptional responses have diverged among these species. Gene ontology (GO) analysis showed that large numbers of ribosomal protein genes were DEGs in the warm-adapted A. homolechis, suggesting that the upregulation of protein synthesis is an important physiological mechanism in the adaptation of this species to hotter environments. GO analysis also showed that GO terms associated with circadian regulation were enriched in all three species. A gene associated with circadian regulation, Nr1d1, was detected as a DEG with opposite expression patterns between the cool-adapted A. allogus and the hot-adapted A. sagrei. Because the environmental temperature fluctuates more widely in open habitats than in forests throughout the day, the circadian thermoregulation could also be important for adaptation to distinct thermal habitats.

  17. Circadian regulation of glutathione levels and biosynthesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M Beaver

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks generate daily rhythms in neuronal, physiological, and metabolic functions. Previous studies in mammals reported daily fluctuations in levels of the major endogenous antioxidant, glutathione (GSH, but the molecular mechanisms that govern such fluctuations remained unknown. To address this question, we used the model species Drosophila, which has a rich arsenal of genetic tools. Previously, we showed that loss of the circadian clock increased oxidative damage and caused neurodegenerative changes in the brain, while enhanced GSH production in neuronal tissue conferred beneficial effects on fly survivorship under normal and stress conditions. In the current study we report that the GSH concentrations in fly heads fluctuate in a circadian clock-dependent manner. We further demonstrate a rhythm in activity of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, the rate-limiting enzyme in glutathione biosynthesis. Significant rhythms were also observed for mRNA levels of genes encoding the catalytic (Gclc and modulatory (Gclm subunits comprising the GCL holoenzyme. Furthermore, we found that the expression of a glutathione S-transferase, GstD1, which utilizes GSH in cellular detoxification, significantly fluctuated during the circadian day. To directly address the role of the clock in regulating GSH-related rhythms, the expression levels of the GCL subunits and GstD1, as well as GCL activity and GSH production were evaluated in flies with a null mutation in the clock genes cycle and period. The rhythms observed in control flies were not evident in the clock mutants, thus linking glutathione production and utilization to the circadian system. Together, these data suggest that the circadian system modulates pathways involved in production and utilization of glutathione.

  18. Synthetic promoter libraries- tuning of gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammer, Karin; Mijakovic, Ivan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2006-01-01

    The study of gene function often requires changing the expression of a gene and evaluating the consequences. In principle, the expression of any given gene can be modulated in a quasi-continuum of discrete expression levels but the traditional approaches are usually limited to two extremes: gene...... knockout and strong overexpression. However, applications such as metabolic optimization and control analysis necessitate a continuous set of expression levels with only slight increments in strength to cover a specific window around the wildtype expression level of the studied gene; this requirement can...... be met by using promoter libraries. This approach generally consists of inserting a library of promoters in front of the gene to be studied, whereby the individual promoters might deviate either in their spacer sequences or bear slight deviations from the consensus sequence of a vegetative promoter. Here...

  19. Molecular circadian rhythm shift due to bright light exposure before bedtime is related to subthreshold bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Moon, Joung-Ho; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Kang, Seung-Gul; Geum, Dongho; Son, Gi-Hoon; Lim, Jong-Min; Kim, Leen; Lee, Eun-Il; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2016-08-22

    This study examined the link between circadian rhythm changes due to bright light exposure and subthreshold bipolarity. Molecular circadian rhythms, polysomnography, and actigraphy data were studied in 25 young, healthy male subjects, divided into high and low mood disorder questionnaire (MDQ) score groups. During the first 2 days of the study, the subjects were exposed to daily-living light (150 lux) for 4 hours before bedtime. Saliva and buccal cells were collected 5 times a day for 2 consecutive days. During the subsequent 5 days, the subjects were exposed to bright light (1,000 lux), and saliva and buccal cell samples were collected in the same way. Molecular circadian rhythms were analyzed using sine regression. Circadian rhythms of cortisol (F = 16.956, p < 0.001) and relative PER1/ARNTL gene expression (F = 122.1, p < 0.001) showed a delayed acrophase in both groups after bright light exposure. The high MDQ score group showed a significant delay in acrophase compared to the low MDQ score group only in salivary cortisol (F = 8.528, p = 0.008). The high MDQ score group showed hypersensitivity in cortisol rhythm shift after bright light exposure, suggesting characteristic molecular circadian rhythm changes in the high MDQ score group may be related to biological processes downstream from core circadian clock gene expression.

  20. Cholecystokinin-2 receptor mediated gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Borup, Rehannah; Marstrand, Troels;

    2007-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is abundantly expressed in the CNS, in which it regulates feeding behavior and long-term memory. Moreover, CCK has been implicated in mental disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Despite its manifest physiological and pathophysiological role, the molecular targets...... could be identified. Comparison with forskolin- and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells showed that CCK induced a separate set of target genes. Taken together, we propose that neuronal CCK may have a role in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, the metabolism of cerebral cholesterol...

  1. Circadian modulation of sleep in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasenkov, Roman; Deboer, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is regulated by circadian and homeostatic processes. The sleep homeostat keeps track of the duration of prior sleep and waking and determines the intensity of sleep. In mammals, the homeostatic process is reflected by the slow waves in the non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). The circadian process is controlled by a pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and provides the sleep homeostat with a circadian framework. This review summarizes the changes in sleep obtained after different chronobiological interventions (changes in photoperiod, light availability, and running wheel availability), the influence of mutations or lesions in clock genes on sleep, and research on the interaction between sleep homeostasis and the circadian clock. Research in humans shows that the period of consolidated waking during the day is a consequence of the interaction between an increasing homeostatic sleep drive and a circadian signal, which promotes waking during the day and sleep during the night. In the rat, it was shown that, under constant homeostatic sleep pressure, with similar levels of slow waves in the NREM sleep EEG at all time points of the circadian cycle, still a small circadian modulation of the duration of waking and NREM sleep episodes was observed. Under similar conditions, humans show a clear circadian modulation in REM sleep, whereas in the rat, a circadian modulation in REM sleep was not present. Therefore, in the rat, the sleep homeostatic modulation in phase with the circadian clock seems to amplify the relatively weak circadian changes in sleep induced by the circadian clock. Knowledge about the interaction between sleep and the circadian clock and the circadian modulation of sleep in other species than humans is important to better understand the underlying regulatory mechanisms.

  2. Modulation of gene expression made easy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2002-01-01

    A new approach for modulating gene expression, based on randomization of promoter (spacer) sequences, was developed. The method was applied to chromosomal genes in Lactococcus lactis and shown to generate libraries of clones with broad ranges of expression levels of target genes. In one example...... beta-glucuronidase, resulting in an operon structure in which both genes are transcribed from a common promoter. We show that there is a linear correlation between the expressions of the two genes, which facilitates screening for mutants with suitable enzyme activities. In a second example, we show......, overexpression was achieved by introducing an additional gene copy into a phage attachment site on the chromosome. This resulted in a series of strains with phosphofructokinase activities from 1.4 to 11 times the wild-type activity level. In this example, the pfk gene was cloned upstream of a gusA gene encoding...

  3. Effects of circadian clock genes and health-related behavior on metabolic syndrome in a Taiwanese population: Evidence from association and interaction analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Kuo, Po-Hsiu; Liu, Yu-Li; Yang, Albert C.; Kao, Chung-Feng; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with the circadian clock genes. In this study, we assessed whether 29 circadian clock-related genes (including ADCYAP1, ARNTL, ARNTL2, BHLHE40, CLOCK, CRY1, CRY2, CSNK1D, CSNK1E, GSK3B, HCRTR2, KLF10, NFIL3, NPAS2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER1, PER2, PER3, REV1, RORA, RORB, RORC, SENP3, SERPINE1, TIMELESS, TIPIN, VIP, and VIPR2) are associated with MetS and its individual components independently and/or through complex interactions in a Taiwanese population. We also analyzed the interactions between environmental factors and these genes in influencing MetS and its individual components. A total of 3,000 Taiwanese subjects from the Taiwan Biobank were assessed in this study. Metabolic traits such as waist circumference, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and fasting glucose were measured. Our data showed a nominal association of MetS with several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in five key circadian clock genes including ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB; but none of these SNPs persisted significantly after performing Bonferroni correction. Moreover, we identified the effect of GSK3B rs2199503 on high fasting glucose (P = 0.0002). Additionally, we found interactions among the ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, RORA rs8034880, and RORB rs972902 SNPs influenced MetS (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Finally, we investigated the influence of interactions between ARNTL rs10832020, GSK3B rs2199503, PER3 rs10746473, and RORB rs972902 with environmental factors such as alcohol consumption, smoking status, and physical activity on MetS and its individual components (P < 0.001 ~ P = 0.002). Our study indicates that circadian clock genes such as ARNTL, GSK3B, PER3, RORA, and RORB genes may contribute to the risk of MetS independently as well as through gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. PMID:28296937

  4. Clock-controlled output gene Dbp is a regulator of Arnt/Hif-1β gene expression in pancreatic islet β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakabayashi, Hiroko; Ohta, Yasuharu, E-mail: yohta@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Susuki, Yosuke; Taguchi, Akihiko; Tanabe, Katsuya; Kondo, Manabu; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Nagao, Yuko; Tanizawa, Yukio, E-mail: tanizawa@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Arnt mRNA expressed in a circadian manner in mouse pancreatic islets. •Expressions of Dbp and Arnt damped in the islets of a diabetic model mouse. •DBP and E4BP4 regulate Arnt promoter activity by direct binding. •Arnt may have a role in connecting circadian rhythm and metabolism. -- Abstract: Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β) has emerged as a potential determinant of pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and type 2 diabetes in humans. An 82% reduction in Arnt expression was observed in islets from type 2 diabetic donors as compared to non-diabetic donors. However, few regulators of Arnt expression have been identified. Meanwhile, disruption of the clock components CLOCK and BMAL1 is known to result in hypoinsulinemia and diabetes, but the molecular details remain unclear. In this study, we identified a novel molecular connection between Arnt and two clock-controlled output genes, albumin D-element binding protein (Dbp) and E4 binding protein 4 (E4bp4). By conducting gene expression studies using the islets of Wfs1{sup −/−} A{sup y}/a mice that develop severe diabetes due to β-cell apoptosis, we demonstrated clock-related gene expressions to be altered in the diabetic mice. Dbp mRNA decreased by 50%, E4bp4 mRNA increased by 50%, and Arnt mRNA decreased by 30% at Zeitgever Time (ZT) 12. Mouse pancreatic islets exhibited oscillations of clock gene expressions. E4BP4, a D-box negative regulator, oscillated anti-phase to DBP, a D-box positive regulator. We also found low-amplitude circadian expression of Arnt mRNA, which peaked at ZT4. Over-expression of DBP raised both mRNA and protein levels of ARNT in HEK293 and MIN6 cell lines. Arnt promoter-driven luciferase reporter assay in MIN6 cells revealed that DBP increased Arnt promoter activity by 2.5-fold and that E4BP4 competitively inhibited its activation. In addition, on ChIP assay, DBP and E4BP4 directly bound to D-box elements within the

  5. Gene Expression Patterns in Ovarian Carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaner, Marci E.; Ross, Douglas T.; Ciaravino, Giuseppe; Sørlie, Therese; Troyanskaya, Olga; Diehn, Maximilian; Wang, Yan C.; Duran, George E.; Sikic, Thomas L.; Caldeira, Sandra; Skomedal, Hanne; Tu, I-Ping; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Johnson, Steven W.; O'Dwyer, Peter J.; Fero, Michael J.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hastie, Trevor; Tibshirani, Robert; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N.; Longacre, Teri A.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.; Sikic, Branimir I.

    2003-01-01

    We used DNA microarrays to characterize the global gene expression patterns in surface epithelial cancers of the ovary. We identified groups of genes that distinguished the clear cell subtype from other ovarian carcinomas, grade I and II from grade III serous papillary carcinomas, and ovarian from breast carcinomas. Six clear cell carcinomas were distinguished from 36 other ovarian carcinomas (predominantly serous papillary) based on their gene expression patterns. The differences may yield insights into the worse prognosis and therapeutic resistance associated with clear cell carcinomas. A comparison of the gene expression patterns in the ovarian cancers to published data of gene expression in breast cancers revealed a large number of differentially expressed genes. We identified a group of 62 genes that correctly classified all 125 breast and ovarian cancer specimens. Among the best discriminators more highly expressed in the ovarian carcinomas were PAX8 (paired box gene 8), mesothelin, and ephrin-B1 (EFNB1). Although estrogen receptor was expressed in both the ovarian and breast cancers, genes that are coregulated with the estrogen receptor in breast cancers, including GATA-3, LIV-1, and X-box binding protein 1, did not show a similar pattern of coexpression in the ovarian cancers. PMID:12960427

  6. The influence of population structure on gene expression and flowering time variation in the ubiquitous weed Capsella bursa-pastoris (Brassicaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvokhyzha, Dmytro; Holm, Karl; Chen, Jun; Cornille, Amandine; Glémin, Sylvain; Wright, Stephen I; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Lascoux, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Population structure is a potential problem when testing for adaptive phenotypic differences among populations. The observed phenotypic differences among populations can simply be due to genetic drift, and if the genetic distance between them is not considered, the differentiation may be falsely interpreted as adaptive. Conversely, adaptive and demographic processes might have been tightly associated and correcting for the population structure may lead to false negatives. Here, we evaluated this problem in the cosmopolitan weed Capsella bursa-pastoris. We used RNA-Seq to analyse gene expression differences among 24 accessions, which belonged to a much larger group that had been previously characterized for flowering time and circadian rhythm and were genotyped using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) technique. We found that clustering of accessions for gene expression retrieved the same three clusters that were obtained with GBS data previously, namely Europe, the Middle East and Asia. Moreover, the three groups were also differentiated for both flowering time and circadian rhythm variation. Correction for population genetic structure when analysing differential gene expression analysis removed all differences among the three groups. This may suggest that most differences are neutral and simply reflect population history. However, geographical variation in flowering time and circadian rhythm indicated that the distribution of adaptive traits might be confounded by population structure. To bypass this confounding effect, we compared gene expression differentiation between flowering ecotypes within the genetic groups. Among the differentially expressed genes, FLOWERING LOCUS C was the strongest candidate for local adaptation in regulation of flowering time.

  7. Microanalysis of gene expression in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van der Veer (Eveliene)

    1982-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis two aspects of gene expression in cultured cells have been studied: the heterogeneity in gene expression in relation with the development and application of microchemical techniques for the prenatal diagnosis of inborn errors of metabolism and the possibility of inducing g

  8. Arabidopsis gene expression patterns during spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.

    The exposure of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) plants to spaceflight environments resulted in the differential expression of hundreds of genes. A 5 day mission on orbiter Columbia in 1999 (STS-93) carried transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a transgene composed of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter linked to the β -Glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene. The plants were used to evaluate the effects of spaceflight on two fronts. First, expression patterns visualized with the Adh/GUS transgene were used to address specifically the possibility that spaceflight induces a hypoxic stress response, and to assess whether any spaceflight response was similar to control terrestrial hypoxia-induced gene expression patterns. (Paul et al., Plant Physiol. 2001, 126:613). Second, genome-wide patterns of native gene expression were evaluated utilizing the Affymetrix ATH1 GeneChip? array of 8,000 Arabidopsis genes. As a control for the veracity of the array analyses, a selection of genes identified with the arrays was further characterized with quantitative Real-Time RT PCR (ABI - TaqmanTM). Comparison of the patterns of expression for arrays of hybridized with RNA isolated from plants exposed to spaceflight compared to the control arrays revealed hundreds of genes that were differentially expressed in response to spaceflight, yet most genes that are hallmarks of hypoxic stress were unaffected. These results will be discussed in light of current models for plant responses to the spaceflight environment, and with regard to potential future flight opportunities.

  9. Circadian rhythms, metabolism, and insulin sensitivity: transcriptional networks in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Masashi

    2013-04-01

    Homeostatic systems have adapted to respond to the diurnal light/dark cycle. Numerous physiological pathways, including metabolism, are coordinated by this 24-h cycle. Animals with mutations in clock genes show abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism, indicating a critical relationship between the circadian clock and metabolism. Energy homeostasis is achieved through circadian regulation of the expression and activity of several key metabolic enzymes. Temporal organization of tissue metabolism is coordinated by reciprocal cross-talk between the core clock mechanism and key metabolic enzymes and transcriptional activators. The aim of this review is to define the role of the circadian clock in the regulation of insulin sensitivity by describing the interconnection between the circadian clock and metabolic pathways.

  10. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  11. FARO server: Meta-analysis of gene expression by matching gene expression signatures to a compendium of public gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manijak, Mieszko P.; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although, systematic analysis of gene annotation is a powerful tool for interpreting gene expression data, it sometimes is blurred by incomplete gene annotation, missing expression response of key genes and secondary gene expression responses. These shortcomings may be partially...... circumvented by instead matching gene expression signatures to signatures of other experiments. FINDINGS: To facilitate this we present the Functional Association Response by Overlap (FARO) server, that match input signatures to a compendium of 242 gene expression signatures, extracted from more than 1700...

  12. Diurnal variation of tight junction integrity associates inversely with matrix metalloproteinase expression in Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium: implications for circadian regulation of homeostatic surface cell desquamation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan F Wiechmann

    Full Text Available The corneal epithelium provides a protective barrier against pathogen entrance and abrasive forces, largely due to the intercellular junctional complexes between neighboring cells. After a prescribed duration at the corneal surface, tight junctions between squamous surface cells must be disrupted to enable them to desquamate as a component of the tissue homeostatic renewal. We hypothesize that matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs are secreted by corneal epithelial cells and cleave intercellular junctional proteins extracellularly at the epithelial surface. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of specific MMPs and tight junction proteins during both the light and dark phases of the circadian cycle, and to assess their temporal and spatial relationships in the Xenopus laevis corneal epithelium.Expression of MMP-2, tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 (TIMP-2, membrane type 1-MMP (MT1-MMP and the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4 were examined by confocal double-label immunohistochemistry on corneas obtained from Xenopus frogs at different circadian times. Occludin and claudin-4 expression was generally uniformly intact on the surface corneal epithelial cell lateral membranes during the daytime, but was frequently disrupted in small clusters of cells at night. Concomitantly, MMP-2 expression was often elevated in a mosaic pattern at nighttime and associated with clusters of desquamating surface cells. The MMP-2 binding partners, TIMP-2 and MT1-MMP were also localized to surface corneal epithelial cells during both the light and dark phases, with TIMP-2 tending to be elevated during the daytime.MMP-2 protein expression is elevated in a mosaic pattern in surface corneal epithelial cells during the nighttime in Xenopus laevis, and may play a role in homeostatic surface cell desquamation by disrupting intercellular junctional proteins. The sequence of MMP secretion and activation, tight junction protein cleavage, and subsequent surface

  13. Circadian profiles in the embryonic chick heart: L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Michael L; Shi, Liheng; Grushin, Kirill; Nigussie, Fikru; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2010-10-01

    Circadian clocks exist in the heart tissue and modulate multiple physiological events, from cardiac metabolism to contractile function and expression of circadian oscillator and metabolic-related genes. Ample evidence has demonstrated that there are endogenous circadian oscillators in adult mammalian cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian embryos cannot be entrained independently to light-dark (LD) cycles in vivo without any maternal influence, but circadian genes are well expressed and able to oscillate in embryonic stages. The authors took advantage of using chick embryos that are independent of maternal influences to investigate whether embryonic hearts could be entrained under LD cycles in ovo. The authors found circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channels responsible for the production of cardiac muscle contraction in embryonic chick hearts. The mRNA levels and protein expression of VGCCα1C and VGCCα1D are under circadian control, and the average L-VGCC current density is significantly larger when cardiomyocytes are recorded during the night than day. The phosphorylation states of several kinases involved in insulin signaling and cardiac metabolism, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk), stress-activated protein kinase (p38), protein kinase B (Akt), and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), are also under circadian control. Both Erk and p38 have been implicated in regulating cardiac contractility and in the development of various pathological states, such as cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Even though both Erk and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling pathways participate in complex cellular processes regarding physiological or pathological states of cardiomyocytes, the circadian oscillators in the heart regulate these pathways independently, and both pathways contribute to the circadian regulation of L-VGCCs.

  14. Coordinated Regulation of Gene Expression for Carotenoid Metabolism in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Hu Sun; Cheng-Qian Liu; Yuan-Yuan Hui; Wen-Kai Wu; Zhi-Gang Zhou; Shan Lu

    2010-01-01

    Carotenoids are important plant pigments for both light harvesting and photooxidation protection.Using the model system of the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii,we characterized the regulation of gene expression for carotenoid metabolism by quantifying changes in the transcript abundance of dxs,dxr and ipi in the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate pathway and of ggps,psy,pds,lcyb and bchy,directly involved in carotenoid metabolism,under different photoperiod,light and metabolite treatments.The expression of these genes fluctuated with light/dark shifting.Light treatment also promoted the accumulation of transcripts of all these genes.Of the genes studied,dxs,ggps and lcyb displayed the typical circadian pattern by retaining a rhythmic fluctuation of transcript abundance under both constant light and constant dark entrainments.The expression of these genes could also be regulated by metabolic intermediates.For example,ggps was significantly suppressed by a geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate supplement and ipi was upregulated by isopentenyl pyrophosphate.Furthermore,CrOr,a C.reinhardtii homolog of the recently characterized Or gene that accounts for carotenoid accumulation,also showed co-expression with carotenoid biosynthetic genes such as pds and lcyb.Our data suggest a coordinated regulation on carotenoid metabolism in C.reinhardtii at the transcriptional level.

  15. The functional landscape of mouse gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale quantitative analysis of transcriptional co-expression has been used to dissect regulatory networks and to predict the functions of new genes discovered by genome sequencing in model organisms such as yeast. Although the idea that tissue-specific expression is indicative of gene function in mammals is widely accepted, it has not been objectively tested nor compared with the related but distinct strategy of correlating gene co-expression as a means to predict gene function. Results We generated microarray expression data for nearly 40,000 known and predicted mRNAs in 55 mouse tissues, using custom-built oligonucleotide arrays. We show that quantitative transcriptional co-expression is a powerful predictor of gene function. Hundreds of functional categories, as defined by Gene Ontology 'Biological Processes', are associated with characteristic expression patterns across all tissues, including categories that bear no overt relationship to the tissue of origin. In contrast, simple tissue-specific restriction of expression is a poor predictor of which genes are in which functional categories. As an example, the highly conserved mouse gene PWP1 is widely expressed across different tissues but is co-expressed with many RNA-processing genes; we show that the uncharacterized yeast homolog of PWP1 is required for rRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We conclude that 'functional genomics' strategies based on quantitative transcriptional co-expression will be as fruitful in mammals as they have been in simpler organisms, and that transcriptional control of mammalian physiology is more modular than is generally appreciated. Our data and analyses provide a public resource for mammalian functional genomics.

  16. Circadian and developmental regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor 1 mRNA splice variants and N-methyl-d-aspartate-receptor 3 subunit expression within the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendová, Z; Sumová, A; Mikkelsen, Jens D.

    2009-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of mammals are generated by the circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Its intrinsic period is entrained to a 24 h cycle by external cues, mainly by light. Light impinging on the SCN at night causes either advancing or delaying phase...... shifts of the circadian clock. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) are the main glutamate receptors mediating the effect of light on the molecular clockwork in the SCN. They are composed of multiple subunits, each with specific characteristics whose mutual interactions strongly determine properties...... of the receptor. In the brain, the distribution of NMDAR subunits depends on the region and developmental stage. Here, we report the circadian expression of the NMDAR1 subunit in the adult rat SCN and depict its splice variants that may constitute the functional receptor channel in the SCN. During ontogenesis...

  17. Long-term effect of systemic RNA interference on circadian clock genes in hemimetabolous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uryu, Outa; Kamae, Yuichi; Tomioka, Kenji; Yoshii, Taishi

    2013-04-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) strategy, which enables gene-specific knock-down of transcripts, has been spread across a wide area of insect studies for investigating gene function without regard to model and non-model insects. This technique is of particular benefit to promote molecular studies on non-model insects. However, the optimal conditions for RNAi are still not well understood because of its variable efficiency depending on the species, target genes, and experimental conditions. To apply RNAi technique to long-running experiments such as chronobiological studies, the effects of RNAi have to persist throughout the experiment. In this study, we attempted to determine the optimal concentration of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for systemic RNAi and its effective period in two different insect species, the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus and the firebrat Thermobia domestica. In both species, higher concentrations of dsRNA principally yielded a more efficient knock-down of mRNA levels of tested clock genes, although the effect depended on the gene and the species. Surprisingly, the effect of the RNAi reached its maximum effect 1-2 weeks and 1 month after the injection of dsRNA in the crickets and the firebrats, respectively, suggesting a slow but long-term effect of RNAi. Our study provides fundamental information for utilizing RNAi technique in any long-running experiment.

  18. Rhythmic and sustained oscillations in metabolism and gene expression of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Bhupendra Gaudana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, oscillate between day and night time metabolisms with concomitant oscillations in gene expression in response to light/dark cycles (LD. The oscillations in gene expression have been shown to sustain in constant light (LL with a free running period of 24 h in a model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However, equivalent oscillations in metabolism are not reported under LL in this non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. Here we focus on Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium known to temporally separate the processes of oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation. In a recent report, metabolism of Cyanothece 51142 has been shown to oscillate between photosynthetic and respiratory phases under LL with free running periods that are temperature dependent but significantly shorter than the circadian period. Further, the oscillations shift to circadian pattern at moderate cell densities that are concomitant with slower growth rates. Here we take this understanding forward and demonstrate that the utradian rhythm under LL sustains at much higher cell densities when grown under turbulent regimes that simulate flashing light effect. Our results suggest that the ultradian rhythm in metabolism may be needed to support higher carbon and nitrogen requirements of rapidly growing cells under LL. With a comprehensive Real time PCR based gene expression analysis we account for key regulatory interactions and demonstrate the interplay between clock genes and the genes of key metabolic pathways. Further, we observe that several genes that peak at dusk in Synechococcus peak at dawn in Cyanothece and vice versa. The circadian rhythm of this organism appears to be more robust with peaking of genes in anticipation of the ensuing photosynthetic and respiratory metabolic phases.

  19. Clock is important for food and circadian regulation of macronutrient absorption in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyue; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2009-09-01

    Clock genes respond to external stimuli and exhibit circadian rhythms. This study investigated the expression of clock genes in the small intestine and their contribution in the regulation of nutrient absorption by enterocytes. We examined expression of clock genes and macronutrient transport proteins in the small intestines of wild-type and Clock mutant (Clk(mt/mt)) mice with free or limited access to food. In addition, we studied absorption of macronutrients in these mice. Intestinal clock genes show circadian expression and respond to food entrainment in wild-type mice. Dominant negative Clock in Clk(mt/mt) mice disrupts circadian expression and food entrainment of clock genes. The absorption of lipids and monosaccharides was high in Clk(mt/mt) mice whereas peptide absorption was reduced. Molecular studies revealed that Clock regulates several transport proteins involved in nutrient absorption. Clock plays an important role in light and food entrainment of intestinal functions by regulating nutrient transport proteins. Disruptions in intestinal circadian activity may contribute to hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia.

  20. Circadian regulation of abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Jack; Stoker, Claire; Carré, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    Extremes of temperatures, drought and salinity cause widespread crop losses throughout the world and impose severe limitations on the amount of land that can be used for agricultural purposes. Hence, there is an urgent need to develop crops that perform better under such abiotic stress conditions. Here, we discuss intriguing, recent evidence that circadian clock contributes to plants' ability to tolerate different types of environmental stress, and to acclimate to them. The clock controls expression of a large fraction of abiotic stress-responsive genes, as well as biosynthesis and signaling downstream of stress response hormones. Conversely, abiotic stress results in altered expression and differential splicing of the clock genes, leading to altered oscillations of downstream stress-response pathways. We propose a range of mechanisms by which this intimate coupling between the circadian clock and environmental stress-response pathways may contribute to plant growth and survival under abiotic stress.

  1. Differential gene expression during Trypanosoma cruzi metacyclogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Krieger

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The transformation of epimastigotes into metacyclic trypomastigotes involves changes in the pattern of expressed genes, resulting in important morphological and functional differences between these developmental forms of Trypanosoma cruzi. In order to identify and characterize genes involved in triggering the metacyclogenesis process and in conferring to metacyclic trypomastigotes their stage specific biological properties, we have developed a method allowing the isolation of genes specifically expressed when comparing two close related cell populations (representation of differential expression or RDE. The method is based on the PCR amplification of gene sequences selected by hybridizing and subtracting the populations in such a way that after some cycles of hybridization-amplification genes specific to a given population are highly enriched. The use of this method in the analysis of differential gene expression during T. cruzi metacyclogenesis (6 hr and 24 hr of differentiation and metacyclic trypomastigotes resulted in the isolation of several clones from each time point. Northern blot analysis showed that some genes are transiently expressed (6 hr and 24 hr differentiating cells, while others are present in differentiating cells and in metacyclic trypomastigotes. Nucleotide sequencing of six clones characterized so far showed that they do not display any homology to gene sequences available in the GeneBank.

  2. Multivariate search for differentially expressed gene combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klebanov Lev

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To identify differentially expressed genes, it is standard practice to test a two-sample hypothesis for each gene with a proper adjustment for multiple testing. Such tests are essentially univariate and disregard the multidimensional structure of microarray data. A more general two-sample hypothesis is formulated in terms of the joint distribution of any sub-vector of expression signals. Results By building on an earlier proposed multivariate test statistic, we propose a new algorithm for identifying differentially expressed gene combinations. The algorithm includes an improved random search procedure designed to generate candidate gene combinations of a given size. Cross-validation is used to provide replication stability of the search procedure. A permutation two-sample test is used for significance testing. We design a multiple testing procedure to control the family-wise error rate (FWER when selecting significant combinations of genes that result from a successive selection procedure. A target set of genes is composed of all significant combinations selected via random search. Conclusions A new algorithm has been developed to identify differentially expressed gene combinations. The performance of the proposed search-and-testing procedure has been evaluated by computer simulations and analysis of replicated Affymetrix gene array data on age-related changes in gene expression in the inner ear of CBA mice.

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in Porcine Fetal Thymus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanjiong Chen; Shengbin Li; Lin Ye; Jianing Geng; Yajun Deng; Songnian Hu

    2003-01-01

    obtain an initial overview of gene diversity and expression pattern in porcinethymus, 11,712 ESTs (Expressed Sequence Tags) from 100-day-old porcine thymus(FTY) were sequenced and 7,071 cleaned ESTs were used for gene expressionanalysis. Clustered by the PHRAP program, 959 contigs and 3,074 singlets wereobtained. Blast search showed that 806 contigs and 1,669 singlets (totally 5,442ESTs) had homologues in GenBank and 1,629 ESTs were novel. According to theGene Ontology classification, 36.99% ESTs were cataloged into the gene expressiongroup, indicating that although the functional gene (18.78% in defense group) ofthymus is expressed in a certain degree, the 100-day-old porcine thymus still existsin a developmental stage. Comparative analysis showed that the gene expressionpattern of the 100-day-old porcine thymus is similar to that of the human infantthymus.

  4. The relationship between circadian disruption and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatsoreos IN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ilia N Karatsoreos Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA Abstract: Circadian (daily rhythms are pervasive in nature, and expressed in nearly every behavioral and physiological process. In mammals, circadian rhythms are regulated by the master brain clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus that coordinates the activity of “peripheral” oscillators throughout the brain and body. While much progress has been made in understanding the basic functioning of the circadian clock at the level of genes, molecules, and cells, our understanding of how these clocks interact with complex systems is still in its infancy. Much recent work has focused on the role of circadian clocks in the etiology of disorders as diverse as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Given the rapid rise in obesity, and the economic costs involved in treating its associated cardiometabolic disorders such as heart disease and diabetes mellitus, understanding the development of obesity and metabolic dysregulation is crucial. Significant epidemiological data indicate a role for circadian rhythms in metabolic disorders. Shift workers have a higher incidence of obesity and diabetes, and laboratory studies in humans show misaligning sleep and the circadian clock leads to hyperinsulinemia. In animal models, body-wide “clock gene” knockout mice are prone to obesity. Further, disrupting the circadian clock by manipulating the light–dark cycle can result in metabolic dysregulation and development of obesity. At the molecular level, elegant studies have shown that targeted disruption of the genetic circadian clock in the pancreas leads to diabetes, highlighting the fact that the circadian clock is directly coupled to metabolism at the cellular level. Keywords: glucose, metabolism, sleep, rhythms, obesity

  5. Circadian cycle-dependent MeCP2 and brain chromatin changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Paz, Alexia; Sanchez-Mut, Jose Vicente; Samitier-Martí, Mireia; Petazzi, Paolo; Sáez, Mauricio; Szczesna, Karolina; Huertas, Dori; Esteller, Manel; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a chromosomal protein of the brain, very abundant especially in neurons, where it plays an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Hence it has the potential to be affected by the mammalian circadian cycle. We performed expression analyses of mice brain frontal cortices obtained at different time points and we found that the levels of MeCP2 are altered circadianly, affecting overall organization of brain chromatin and resulting in a circadian-dependent regulation of well-stablished MeCP2 target genes. Furthermore, this data suggests that alterations of MeCP2 can be responsible for the sleeping disorders arising from pathological stages, such as in autism and Rett syndrome.

  6. Phytochrome-regulated Gene Expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter H. Quail

    2007-01-01

    Identification of all genes involved in the phytochrome (phy)-mediated responses of plants to their light environment is an important goal in providing an overall understanding of light-regulated growth and development. This article highlights and integrates the central findings of two recent comprehensive studies in Arabidopsis that have identified the genome-wide set of phy-regulated genes that respond rapidly to red-light signals upon first exposure of dark-grown seedlings, and have tested the functional relevance to normal seedling photomorphogenesis of an initial subset of these genes. The data: (a) reveal considerable complexity in the channeling of the light signals through the different phy-family members (phyA to phyE) to responsive genes; (b) identify a diversity of transcription-factor-encoding genes as major early, if not primary, targets of phy signaling, and, therefore, as potentially important regulators in the transcriptional-network hierarchy; and (c) identify auxin-related genes as the dominant class among rapidly-regulated, hormone-related genes. However, reverse-genetic functional profiling of a selected subset of these genes reveals that only a limited fraction are necessary for optimal phy-induced seedling deetiolation.

  7. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  8. Isochron-Based Phase Response Analysis of Circadian Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Gunawan, Rudiyanto; Doyle, Francis J.

    2006-01-01

    Circadian rhythms possess the ability to robustly entrain to the environmental cycles. This ability relies on the phase synchronization of circadian rhythm gene regulation to different environmental cues, of which light is the most obvious and important. The elucidation of the mechanism of circadian entrainment requires an understanding of circadian phase behavior. This article presents two phase analyses of oscillatory systems for infinitesimal and finite perturbations based on isochrons as ...

  9. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Griniatsos; George Marinos; John Bramis; Panayiotis O Michail; Othon P Michail; Stamatios Theocharis; Antonios Arvelakis; Ioannis Papaconstantinou; Evangelos Felekouras; Emmanouel Pikoulis; Ioannis Karavokyros; Chris Bakoyiannis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm.METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004,twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism,underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalinfixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00,06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cydins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods.RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001).A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P<0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1-p21 and E-p21were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1-p16 and E-p16were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00.CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity.

  10. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  11. Gene expression profile of sprinter's muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, M; Tanaka, H; Shono, N; Shindo, M; St-Amand, J

    2007-12-01

    We have characterized the global gene expression profile in left vastus lateralis muscles of sprinters and sedentary men. The gene expression profile was analyzed by using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method. The abundantly expressed transcripts in the sprinter's muscle were mainly involved in contraction and energy metabolism, whereas six transcripts were corresponding to potentially novel transcripts. Thirty-eight transcripts were differentially expressed between the sprinter and sedentary individuals. Moreover, sprinters showed higher expressions of both uncharacterized and potentially novel transcripts. Sprinters also highly expressed seven transcripts, such as glycine-rich protein, myosin heavy polypeptide (MYH) 2, expressed sequence tag similar to (EST) fructose-bisphosphate aldolase 1 isoform A (ALDOA), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ATP synthase F0 subunit 6. On the other hand, 20 transcripts such as MYH1, tropomyosin 2 and 3, troponin C slow, C2 fast, I slow, T1 slow and T3 fast, myoglobin, creatine kinase, ALDOA, glycogen phosphorylase, cytochrome c oxidase II and III, and NADH dehydrogenase 1 and 2 showed lower expression levels in the sprinters than the sedentary controls. The current study has characterized the global gene expressions in sprinters and identified a number of transcripts that can be subjected to further mechanistic analysis.

  12. Regulated DNA Methylation and the Circadian Clock: Implications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M. Joska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the cloning and discovery of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT, there has been a growing interest in DNA methylation, its role as an epigenetic modification, how it is established and removed, along with the implications in development and disease. In recent years, it has become evident that dynamic DNA methylation accompanies the circadian clock and is found at clock genes in Neurospora, mice and cancer cells. The relationship among the circadian clock, cancer and DNA methylation at clock genes suggests a correlative indication that improper DNA methylation may influence clock gene expression, contributing to the etiology of cancer. The molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at clock loci is best studied in the filamentous fungi, Neurospora crassa, and recent data indicate a mechanism analogous to the RNA-dependent DNA methylation (RdDM or RNAi-mediated facultative heterochromatin. Although it is still unclear, DNA methylation at clock genes may function as a terminal modification that serves to prevent the regulated removal of histone modifications. In this capacity, aberrant DNA methylation may serve as a readout of misregulated clock genes and not as the causative agent. This review explores the implications of DNA methylation at clock loci and describes what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at circadian clock genes.

  13. Gremlin-2 is a BMP antagonist that is regulated by the circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Ching-Yan Chloé; Gossan, Nicole; Lu, Yinhui; Hughes, Alun; Hensman, James J.; Bayer, Monika L.; Kjær, Michael; Kadler, Karl E.; Meng, Qing-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Tendons are prominent members of the family of fibrous connective tissues (FCTs), which collectively are the most abundant tissues in vertebrates and have crucial roles in transmitting mechanical force and linking organs. Tendon diseases are among the most common arthropathy disorders; thus knowledge of tendon gene regulation is essential for a complete understanding of FCT biology. Here we show autonomous circadian rhythms in mouse tendon and primary human tenocytes, controlled by an intrinsic molecular circadian clock. Time-series microarrays identified the first circadian transcriptome of murine tendon, revealing that 4.6% of the transcripts (745 genes) are expressed in a circadian manner. One of these genes was Grem2, which oscillated in antiphase to BMP signaling. Moreover, recombinant human Gremlin-2 blocked BMP2-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and osteogenic differentiation of human tenocytes in vitro. We observed dampened Grem2 expression, deregulated BMP signaling, and spontaneously calcifying tendons in young CLOCKΔ19 arrhythmic mice and aged wild-type mice. Thus, disruption of circadian control, through mutations or aging, of Grem2/BMP signaling becomes a new focus for the study of calcific tendinopathy, which affects 1-in-5 people over the age of 50 years. PMID:24897937

  14. Gene Expression Associated with Early and Late Chronotypes in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko ePegoraro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock provides the temporal framework for rhythmic behavioural and metabolic functions. In the modern era of industrialization, work and social pressures, the clock function is often jeopardized, resulting in adverse and chronic effects on health. Understanding circadian clock function, particularly individual variation in diurnal phase preference (chronotype, and the molecular mechanisms underlying such chronotypes may lead to interventions that could abrogate clock dysfunction and improve human (and animal health and welfare. Our preliminary studies suggested that fruitflies, like humans, can be classified as early rising ‘larks’ or late rising ‘owls’, providing a convenient model system for these types of studies. We have identified strains of flies showing increased preference for morning emergence (Early or E from the pupal case, or more pronounced preference for evening emergence (Late or L. We have sampled pupae the day before eclosion (4th day after pupariation at 4 h intervals in the E and L strains, and examined differences in gene expression by RNAseq. We have identified differentially expressed transcripts between the E and L strains which provide candidate genes for studies of Drosophila chronotypes and their human orthologues.

  15. Regulation of meiotic gene expression in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele eZhou

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in genomics and sequencing technologies, databases of transcriptomes representing many cellular processes have been built. Meiotic transcriptomes in plants have been studied in Arabidopsis thaliana, rice (Oryza sativa, wheat (Triticum aestivum, petunia (Petunia hybrida, sunflower (Helianthus annuus, and maize (Zea mays. Studies in all organisms, but particularly in plants, indicate that a very large number of genes are expressed during meiosis, though relatively few of them seem to be required for the completion of meiosis. In this review, we focus on gene expression at the RNA level and analyze the meiotic transcriptome datasets and explore expression patterns of known meiotic genes to elucidate how gene expression could be regulated during meiosis. We also discuss mechanisms, such as chromatin organization and non-coding RNAs, that might be involved in the regulation of meiotic transcription patterns.

  16. Expression of polarity genes in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wan-Hsin; Asmann, Yan W; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-01-01

    Polarity protein complexes are crucial for epithelial apical-basal polarity and directed cell migration. Since alterations of these processes are common in cancer, polarity proteins have been proposed to function as tumor suppressors or oncogenic promoters. Here, we review the current understanding of polarity protein functions in epithelial homeostasis, as well as tumor formation and progression. As most previous studies focused on the function of single polarity proteins in simplified model systems, we used a genomics approach to systematically examine and identify the expression profiles of polarity genes in human cancer. The expression profiles of polarity genes were distinct in different human tissues and classified cancer types. Additionally, polarity expression profiles correlated with disease progression and aggressiveness, as well as with identified cancer types, where specific polarity genes were commonly altered. In the case of Scribble, gene expression analysis indicated its common amplification and upregulation in human cancer, suggesting a tumor promoting function.

  17. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tamaru (Teruya); M. Hattori (Mitsuru); K. Honda (Kousuke); Y. Nakahata (Yasukazu); P. Sassone-Corsi (Paolo); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); T. Ozawa (Takeaki); K. Takamatsu (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we establi

  18. Circadian oscillations of molecular clock components in the cerebellar cortex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Martin F; Rohde, Kristian; Møller, Morten

    2012-12-01

    The central circadian clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the circadian clockwork of the SCN constitutes a self-sustained autoregulatory feedback mechanism reflected by the rhythmic expression of clock genes. However, recent studies have shown the presence of extrahypothalamic oscillators in other areas of the brain including the cerebellum. In the present study, the authors unravel the cerebellar molecular clock by analyzing clock gene expression in the cerebellum of the rat by use of radiochemical in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The authors here show that all core clock genes, i.e., Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Clock, Arntl, and Nr1d1, as well as the clock-controlled gene Dbp, are expressed in the granular and Purkinje cell layers of the cerebellar cortex. Among these genes, Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Arntl, Nr1d1, and Dbp were found to exhibit circadian rhythms in a sequential temporal manner similar to that of the SCN, but with several hours of delay. The results of lesion studies indicate that the molecular oscillatory profiles of Per1, Per2, and Cry1 in the cerebellum are controlled, though possibly indirectly, by the central clock of the SCN. These data support the presence of a circadian oscillator in the cortex of the rat cerebellum.

  19. Ploidy and Hybridity Effects on Growth Vigor and Gene Expression in Arabidopsis thaliana Hybrids and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marisa; Zhang, Changqing; Chen, Z Jeffrey

    2012-04-01

    Both ploidy and hybridity affect cell size and growth vigor in plants and animals, but the relative effects of genome dosage and hybridization on biomass, fitness, and gene expression changes have not been systematically examined. Here we performed the first comparative analysis of seed, cell, and flower sizes, starch and chlorophyll content, biomass, and gene expression changes in diploid, triploid, and tetraploid hybrids and their respective parents in three Arabidopsis thaliana ecotypes: Columbia, C24, and Landsberg erecta (Ler). Ploidy affects many morphological and fitness traits, including stomatal size, flower size, and seed weight, whereas hybridization between the ecotypes leads to altered expression of central circadian clock genes and increased starch and chlorophyll content, biomass, and seed weight. However, varying ploidy levels has subtle effects on biomass, circadian clock gene expression, and chlorophyll and starch content. Interestingly, biomass, starch content, and seed weight are significantly different between the reciprocal hybrids at all ploidy levels tested, with the lowest and highest levels found in the reciprocal triploid hybrids, suggesting parent-of-origin effects on biomass, starch content, and seed weight. These findings provide new insights into molecular events of polyploidy and heterosis, as well as complex agronomic traits that are important to biomass and seed production in hybrid and polyploid crops.

  20. Identification, Characterization, and Diel Pattern of Expression of Canonical Clock Genes in Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Decapoda Eyestalk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Sbragaglia

    Full Text Available The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is a burrowing decapod with a rhythmic burrow emergence (24 h governed by the circadian system. It is an important resource for European fisheries and its behavior deeply affects its availability. The current knowledge of Nephrops circadian biology is phenomenological as it is currently the case for almost all crustaceans. In attempt to elucidate the putative molecular mechanisms underlying circadian gene regulation in Nephrops, we used a transcriptomics approach on cDNA extracted from the eyestalk, a structure playing a crucial role in controlling behavior of decapods. We studied 14 male lobsters under 12-12 light-darkness blue light cycle. We used the Hiseq 2000 Illumina platform to sequence two eyestalk libraries (under light and darkness conditions obtaining about 90 millions 100-bp paired-end reads. Trinity was used for the de novo reconstruction of transcriptomes; the size at which half of all assembled bases reside in contigs (N50 was equal to 1796 (light and 2055 (darkness. We found a list of candidate clock genes and focused our attention on canonical ones: timeless, period, clock and bmal1. The cloning of assembled fragments validated Trinity outputs. The putative Nephrops clock genes showed high levels of identity (blastx on NCBI with known crustacean clock gene homologs such as Eurydice pulchra (period: 47%, timeless: 59%, bmal1: 79% and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (clock: 100%. We also found a vertebrate-like cryptochrome 2. RT-qPCR showed that only timeless had a robust diel pattern of expression. Our data are in accordance with the current knowledge of the crustacean circadian clock, reinforcing the idea that the molecular clockwork of this group shows some differences with the established model in Drosophila melanogaster.

  1. Identification, Characterization, and Diel Pattern of Expression of Canonical Clock Genes in Nephrops norvegicus (Crustacea: Decapoda) Eyestalk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbragaglia, Valerio; Lamanna, Francesco; M. Mat, Audrey; Rotllant, Guiomar; Joly, Silvia; Ketmaier, Valerio; de la Iglesia, Horacio O.; Aguzzi, Jacopo

    2015-01-01

    The Norway lobster, Nephrops norvegicus, is a burrowing decapod with a rhythmic burrow emergence (24 h) governed by the circadian system. It is an important resource for European fisheries and its behavior deeply affects its availability. The current knowledge of Nephrops circadian biology is phenomenological as it is currently the case for almost all crustaceans. In attempt to elucidate the putative molecular mechanisms underlying circadian gene regulation in Nephrops, we used a transcriptomics approach on cDNA extracted from the eyestalk, a structure playing a crucial role in controlling behavior of decapods. We studied 14 male lobsters under 12–12 light-darkness blue light cycle. We used the Hiseq 2000 Illumina platform to sequence two eyestalk libraries (under light and darkness conditions) obtaining about 90 millions 100-bp paired-end reads. Trinity was used for the de novo reconstruction of transcriptomes; the size at which half of all assembled bases reside in contigs (N50) was equal to 1796 (light) and 2055 (darkness). We found a list of candidate clock genes and focused our attention on canonical ones: timeless, period, clock and bmal1. The cloning of assembled fragments validated Trinity outputs. The putative Nephrops clock genes showed high levels of identity (blastx on NCBI) with known crustacean clock gene homologs such as Eurydice pulchra (period: 47%, timeless: 59%, bmal1: 79%) and Macrobrachium rosenbergii (clock: 100%). We also found a vertebrate-like cryptochrome 2. RT-qPCR showed that only timeless had a robust diel pattern of expression. Our data are in accordance with the current knowledge of the crustacean circadian clock, reinforcing the idea that the molecular clockwork of this group shows some differences with the established model in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:26524198

  2. A novel protein, CHRONO, functions as a core component of the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Goriki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are controlled by a system of negative and positive genetic feedback loops composed of clock genes. Although many genes have been implicated in these feedback loops, it is unclear whether our current list of clock genes is exhaustive. We have recently identified Chrono as a robustly cycling transcript through genome-wide profiling of BMAL1 binding on the E-box. Here, we explore the role of Chrono in cellular timekeeping. Remarkably, endogenous CHRONO occupancy around E-boxes shows a circadian oscillation antiphasic to BMAL1. Overexpression of Chrono leads to suppression of BMAL1-CLOCK activity in a histone deacetylase (HDAC -dependent manner. In vivo loss-of-function studies of Chrono including Avp neuron-specific knockout (KO mice display a longer circadian period of locomotor activity. Chrono KO also alters the expression of core clock genes and impairs the response of the circadian clock to stress. CHRONO forms a complex with the glucocorticoid receptor and mediates glucocorticoid response. Our comprehensive study spotlights a previously unrecognized clock component of an unsuspected negative circadian feedback loop that is independent of another negative regulator, Cry2, and that integrates behavioral stress and epigenetic control for efficient metabolic integration of the clock.

  3. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis.

  4. Sexual Dimorphism in Circadian Physiology Is Altered in LXRα Deficient Mice.

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    Céline Feillet

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian timing system coordinates key molecular, cellular and physiological processes along the 24-h cycle. Accumulating evidence suggests that many clock-controlled processes display a sexual dimorphism. In mammals this is well exemplified by the difference between the male and female circadian patterns of glucocorticoid hormone secretion and clock gene expression. Here we show that the non-circadian nuclear receptor and metabolic sensor Liver X Receptor alpha (LXRα which is known to regulate glucocorticoid production in mice modulates the sex specific circadian pattern of plasma corticosterone. Lxrα(-/- males display a blunted corticosterone profile while females show higher amplitude as compared to wild type animals. Wild type males are significantly slower than females to resynchronize their locomotor activity rhythm after an 8 h phase advance but this difference is abrogated in Lxrα(-/- males which display a female-like phenotype. We also show that circadian expression patterns of liver 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1 and Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pepck differ between sexes and are differentially altered in Lxrα(-/- animals. These changes are associated with a damped profile of plasma glucose oscillation in males but not in females. Sex specific alteration of the insulin and leptin circadian profiles were observed in Lxα(-/- females and could be explained by the change in corticosterone profile. Together this data indicates that LXRα is a determinant of sexually dimorphic circadian patterns of key physiological parameters. The discovery of this unanticipated role for LXRα in circadian physiology underscores the importance of addressing sex differences in chronobiology studies and future LXRα targeted therapies.

  5. Involvement of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the influence of timed high-fat evening diet on the hepatic clock and lipogenic gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zengyan; Xie, Meilin; Xue, Jie

    2015-09-01

    A high-fat diet may result in changes in hepatic clock gene expression, but potential mechanisms are not yet elucidated. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recognized as a key regulator of energy metabolism and certain clock genes. Therefore, we hypothesized that AMPK may be involved in the alteration of hepatic clock gene expression under a high-fat environment. This study aimed to examine the effects of timed high-fat evening diet on the activity of hepatic AMPK, clock genes, and lipogenic genes. Mice with hyperlipidemic fatty livers were induced by orally administering high-fat milk via gavage every evening (19:00-20:00) for 6 weeks. Results showed that timed high-fat diet in the evening not only decreased the hepatic AMPK protein expression and activity but also disturbed its circadian rhythm. Accordingly, the hepatic clock genes, including clock, brain-muscle-Arnt-like 1, cryptochrome 2, and period 2, exhibited prominent changes in their expression rhythms and/or amplitudes. The diurnal rhythms of the messenger RNA expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorα, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1α, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 were also disrupted; the amplitude of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγcoactivator 1α was significantly decreased at 3 time points, and fatty liver was observed. These findings demonstrate that timed high-fat diet at night can change hepatic AMPK protein levels, activity, and circadian rhythm, which may subsequently alter the circadian expression of several hepatic clock genes and finally result in the disorder of hepatic lipogenic gene expression and the formation of fatty liver.

  6. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo;

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA...

  7. Gene Expression Profiles of Inflammatory Myopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous expression of 10,000 genes was measured, using Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays, in muscle specimens from 45 patients with various myopathies (dystrophy, congenital myopathy, and inflammatory myopathy examined at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

  8. Inferring gene networks from discrete expression data

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, L.

    2013-07-18

    The modeling of gene networks from transcriptional expression data is an important tool in biomedical research to reveal signaling pathways and to identify treatment targets. Current gene network modeling is primarily based on the use of Gaussian graphical models applied to continuous data, which give a closedformmarginal likelihood. In this paper,we extend network modeling to discrete data, specifically data from serial analysis of gene expression, and RNA-sequencing experiments, both of which generate counts of mRNAtranscripts in cell samples.We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution.We restrict the gene network structures to decomposable graphs and derive the graphs by selecting the covariance matrix of the Gaussian distribution with the hyper-inverse Wishart priors. Furthermore, we incorporate prior network models based on gene ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of our discrete graphical model and apply the method to two real datasets for gene network inference. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  9. Perspectives: Gene Expression in Fisheries Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Jennifer L.; Pavey, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Functional genes and gene expression have been connected to physiological traits linked to effective production and broodstock selection in aquaculture, selective implications of commercial fish harvest, and adaptive changes reflected in non-commercial fish populations subject to human disturbance and climate change. Gene mapping using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to identify functional genes, gene expression (analogue microarrays and real-time PCR), and digital sequencing technologies looking at RNA transcripts present new concepts and opportunities in support of effective and sustainable fisheries. Genomic tools have been rapidly growing in aquaculture research addressing aspects of fish health, toxicology, and early development. Genomic technologies linking effects in functional genes involved in growth, maturation and life history development have been tied to selection resulting from harvest practices. Incorporating new and ever-increasing knowledge of fish genomes is opening a different perspective on local adaptation that will prove invaluable in wild fish conservation and management. Conservation of fish stocks is rapidly incorporating research on critical adaptive responses directed at the effects of human disturbance and climate change through gene expression studies. Genomic studies of fish populations can be generally grouped into three broad categories: 1) evolutionary genomics and biodiversity; 2) adaptive physiological responses to a changing environment; and 3) adaptive behavioral genomics and life history diversity. We review current genomic research in fisheries focusing on those that use microarrays to explore differences in gene expression among phenotypes and within or across populations, information that is critically important to the conservation of fish and their relationship to humans.

  10. Variations in Phase and Amplitude of Rhythmic Clock Gene Expression across Prefrontal Cortex, Hippocampus, Amygdala, and Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Suprachiasmatic Nuclei of Male and Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Lauren E; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Morton, Sarah; Hinds, Laura R; Spencer, Robert L

    2015-10-01

    The molecular circadian clock is a self-regulating transcription/translation cycle of positive (Bmal1, Clock/Npas2) and negative (Per1,2,3, Cry1,2) regulatory components. While the molecular clock has been well characterized in the body's master circadian pacemaker, the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), only a few studies have examined both the positive and negative clock components in extra-SCN brain tissue. Furthermore, there has yet to be a direct comparison of male and female clock gene expression in the brain. This comparison is warranted, as there are sex differences in circadian functioning and disorders associated with disrupted clock gene expression. This study examined basal clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, Bmal1 mRNA) in the SCN, prefrontal cortex (PFC), rostral agranular insula, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), amygdala, and hippocampus of male and female rats at 4-h intervals throughout a 12:12 h light:dark cycle. There was a significant rhythm of Per1, Per2, and Bmal1 in the SCN, PFC, insula, PVN, subregions of the hippocampus, and amygdala with a 24-h period, suggesting the importance of an oscillating molecular clock in extra-SCN brain regions. There were 3 distinct clock gene expression profiles across the brain regions, indicative of diversity among brain clocks. Although, generally, the clock gene expression profiles were similar between male and female rats, there were some sex differences in the robustness of clock gene expression (e.g., females had fewer robust rhythms in the medial PFC, more robust rhythms in the hippocampus, and a greater mesor in the medial amygdala). Furthermore, females with a regular estrous cycle had attenuated aggregate rhythms in clock gene expression in the PFC compared with noncycling females. This suggests that gonadal hormones may modulate the expression of the molecular clock.

  11. New Developments in Sleep Research: Molecular Genetics, Gene Expression, and Systems Neurobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Kilduff, Thomas S.; Lein, Ed S; de la Iglesia, Horacio; Sakurai, Takeshi; Fu, Ying-Hui; Shaw, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that underlie the control of sleep and wakefulness is a major research area in neuroscience. This mini-symposium review highlights some recent developments at the gene, molecular, cellular, and systems level that have advanced this field. The studies discussed below utilize organisms ranging from flies to humans and focus on the interaction between the sleep homeostatic and circadian systems, the consequences of mutations in genes involved in the circadian clock o...

  12. Chronic mild stress and imipramine treatment elicit opposite changes in behavior and in gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erburu, M; Cajaleon, L; Guruceaga, E; Venzala, E; Muñoz-Cobo, I; Beltrán, E; Puerta, E; Tordera, R M

    2015-08-01

    Many studies suggest that the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is a target limbic region for stress response because a dysfunction here is linked to anhedonia, a decrease in reactivity to rewards, and to anxiety. It is suggested that stress-induced persistent molecular changes in this brain region could bring some light on the mechanisms perpetuating depressive episodes. In order to address this issue, here we have studied the long-term PFC gene expression pattern and behavioral effects induced by a chronic mild stress (CMS) model and antidepressant treatment in mice. CMS was applied to mice for six weeks and imipramine (10mg/kg, i.p.) or saline treatment was administered for five weeks starting from the third week of CMS. Mice were sacrificed one month after CMS and following two weeks after the discontinuation of drug treatment and the PFC was dissected and prepared for gene (mRNA) and protein expression studies. Using the same experimental design, a separate group of mice was tested for anhedonia, recognition memory, social interaction and anxiety. CMS induced a long-term altered gene expression profile in the PFC that was partially reverted by imipramine. Specifically, the circadian rhythm signaling pathway and functions such as gene expression, cell proliferation, survival and apoptosis as well as neurological and psychiatric disorders were affected. Of these, some changes of the circadian rhythm pathway (Hdac5, Per1, and Per2) were validated by RT-PCR and western-blot. Moreover, CMS induced long-lasting anhedonia that was reverted by imipramine treatment. Impaired memory, decreased social interaction and anxiety behavior were also induced by chronic stress. We have identified in the PFC molecular targets oppositely regulated by CMS and imipramine that could be relevant for chronic depression and antidepressant action. Among these, a possible candidate for further investigation could be the circadian rhythm pathway.

  13. Insulin gene: organisation, expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, E; Philippe, J

    1996-06-01

    Insulin, a major hormone of the endocrine pancreas, plays a key role in the control of glucose homeostasis. This review discusses the mechanisms of cell-specific expression and regulation of the insulin gene. Whereas expression is restricted to islet beta-cells in adults, the insulin gene is more widely expressed at several embryonic stages, although the role of extrapancreatic expression is still unclear. beta-cell-specific expression relies on the interactions of 5'-flanking sequence motifs of the promoter with a number of ubiquitous and islet-specific transcription factors. IEF1 and IPF-1, by their binding to the E and A boxes, respectively, of the insulin gene promoter, appear to be the major determinants of beta-cell-specific expression. IEF1 is a heterodimer of the basic helix-loop-helix family of transcription factors, whereas IPF-1 belongs to the homeodomain-containing family. beta-cell specific determinants are conserved throughout evolution, although the human insulin gene 5'-flanking sequence also contains a polymorphic minisatellite which is unique to primates and may play a role in insulin gene regulation. Glucose modulates insulin gene transcription, with multiple elements of the promoter involved in glucose responsiveness. Remarkably, IPF-1 and IEF1 are involved in both beta-cell-specific expression and glucose regulation of the insulin gene. cAMP also regulates insulin gene transcription through a CRE, in response to various hormonal stimuli. On the whole, recent studies have provided a better understanding of beta-cell differentiation and function.

  14. Gene expression studies using microarrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgess, Janette

    2001-01-01

    1. The rapid progression of the collaborative sequencing programmes that are unravelling the complete genome sequences of many organisms are opening pathways for new approaches to gene analysis. As the sequence data become available, the bottleneck in biological research will shift to understanding

  15. Application of multidisciplinary analysis to gene expression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xuefel (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kang, Huining (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fields, Chris (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Cowie, Jim R. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Sibirtsev, Valeriy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Mosquera-Caro, Monica P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Xu, Yuexian (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Shawn Bryan; Helman, Paul (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Andries, Erik (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Ar, Kerem (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Potter, Jeffrey (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Willman, Cheryl L. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Murphy, Maurice H. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cancer, at the genomic level, could lead to individualized patient diagnostics and treatments. The developments to follow will signal a significant paradigm shift in the clinical management of human cancer. Despite our initial hopes, however, it seems that simple analysis of microarray data cannot elucidate clinically significant gene functions and mechanisms. Extracting biological information from microarray data requires a complicated path involving multidisciplinary teams of biomedical researchers, computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and computational linguists. The integration of the diverse outputs of each team is the limiting factor in the progress to discover candidate genes and pathways associated with the molecular biology of cancer. Specifically, one must deal with sets of significant genes identified by each method and extract whatever useful information may be found by comparing these different gene lists. Here we present our experience with such comparisons, and share methods developed in the analysis of an infant leukemia cohort studied on Affymetrix HG-U95A arrays. In particular, spatial gene clustering, hyper-dimensional projections, and computational linguistics were used to compare different gene lists. In spatial gene clustering, different gene lists are grouped together and visualized on a three-dimensional expression map, where genes with similar expressions are co-located. In another approach, projections from gene expression space onto a sphere clarify how groups of genes can jointly have more predictive power than groups of individually selected genes. Finally, online literature is automatically rearranged to present information about genes common to multiple groups, or to contrast the differences between the lists. The combination of these methods has improved our understanding of infant leukemia. While the complicated reality of the biology dashed our initial, optimistic hopes for simple answers from

  16. Gene expression profiling: can we identify the right target genes?

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    J. E. Loyd

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling allows the simultaneous monitoring of the transcriptional behaviour of thousands of genes, which may potentially be involved in disease development. Several studies have been performed in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, which aim to define genetic links to the disease in an attempt to improve the current understanding of the underlying pathogenesis of the disease and target pathways for intervention. Expression profiling has shown a clear difference in gene expression between IPF and normal lung tissue, and has identified a wide range of candidate genes, including those known to encode for proteins involved in extracellular matrix formation and degradation, growth factors and chemokines. Recently, familial pulmonary fibrosis cohorts have been examined in an attempt to detect specific genetic mutations associated with IPF. To date, these studies have identified families in which IPF is associated with mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein C, or with mutations in genes encoding components of telomerase. Although rare and clearly not responsible for the disease in all individuals, the nature of these mutations highlight the importance of the alveolar epithelium in disease pathogenesis and demonstrate the potential for gene expression profiling in helping to advance the current understanding of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  17. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain: molecular clock components in the neocortex and cerebellar cortex.

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    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-09-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and granular cell layers of the cerebellar cortex of the mouse brain. Among these, Per1, Per2, Cry1, Arntl, and Nr1d1 exhibit circadian rhythms suggesting that local running circadian oscillators reside within neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellar cortex. The temporal expression profiles of clock genes are similar in the neocortex and cerebellum, but they are delayed by 5 h as compared to the SCN, suggestively reflecting a master-slave relationship between the SCN and extra-hypothalamic oscillators. Furthermore, ARNTL protein products are detectable in neurons of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. These findings give reason to further pursue the physiological significance of circadian oscillators in the mouse neocortex and cerebellum.

  18. Regulation of immunoglobulin gene rearrangement and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taussig, M J; Sims, M J; Krawinkel, U

    1989-05-01

    The molecular genetic events leading to Ig expression and their control formed the topic of a recent EMBO workshop. This report by Michael Taussig, Martin Sims and Ulrich Krawinkel discusses contributions dealing with genes expressed in early pre-B cells, the mechanism of rearrangement, aberrant rearrangements seen in B cells of SCID mice, the feedback control of rearrangement as studied in transgenic mice, the control of Ig expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, and class switching.

  19. 生物钟周期基因2与胰腺导管腺癌预后的相关性分析%Correlation analysis between period circadian clock 2 gene and the prognosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾玮; 刘孟刚; 刘宏鸣; 谢斌; 袁涛; 杨俊涛; 蓝翔; 陈平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the prognosis related genes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)and investigate the molecular regulation mechanism.Methods Gene expression data of 102 PDAC patients with complete clinical survival data were selected from gene expression database of National Center for Biotechnology Information.The 106 transcription regulation gene collection was collected from Transfac database.The 715 microRNA (miRNA)target regulation gene collection was selected according to PicTar and TargetScanS method.Biological pathway data obtained from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG).The known cancer genes were collected from the cancer gene census (CGC) database.Univariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to analyze the correlation between gene expression data and survival time,then obtained survival related candidate genes from the whole genome. Then the enriched genes were analyzed by hypergeometric distribution algorithm from three databases. Multiple correction testing was performed by BH-FDR method (FDR < 0.05 ).Kaplan-Meier was performed for survival curve analysis of PDAC.Results The results of data of 102 PDAC patients analyzed by univariate Cox proportional hazards model indicated that 273 genes were significantly related to the survival time of patients (P <0.000 1 ).After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in 106 transcription factor regulation gene collection,12 survival genes enriched transcription factor target gene sets were found.After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in 715 miRNA target regulation gene collection,11 survival genes enriched miRNAs target sets were discovered.After 273 survival genes were enrichment analyzed in pathway data of KEGG,15 survival genes enriched pathways were obtained. Period circadian clock 2 (PER2 )was regulated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBPA)at transcription level and regulated by miRNA-32 after transcription.The prognosis of PDAC was affected by circadian

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase is a functional component of the autonomous circadian system in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

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    Akashi, Makoto; Hayasaka, Naoto; Yamazaki, Shin; Node, Koichi

    2008-04-30

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the master circadian pacemaker driving behavioral and physiological rhythms in mammals. Circadian activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase [MAPK; also known as ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase)] is observed in vivo in the SCN under constant darkness, although the biological significance of this remains unclear. To elucidate this question, we first examined whether MAPK was autonomously activated in ex vivo SCN slices. Moreover, we investigated the effect of MAPK inhibition on circadian clock gene expression and neuronal firing rhythms using SCN-slice culture systems. We show herein that MAPK is autonomously activated in the SCN, and our data demonstrate that inhibition of the MAPK activity results in dampened rhythms and reduced basal levels in circadian clock gene expression at the SCN single-neuron level. Furthermore, MAPK inhibition attenuates autonomous circadian neuronal firing rhythms in the SCN. Thus, our data suggest that light-independent MAPK activity contributes to the robustness of the SCN autonomous circadian system.

  1. Noise minimization in eukaryotic gene expression.

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    Hunter B Fraser

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available All organisms have elaborate mechanisms to control rates of protein production. However, protein production is also subject to stochastic fluctuations, or "noise." Several recent studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli have investigated the relationship between transcription and translation rates and stochastic fluctuations in protein levels, or more generally, how such randomness is a function of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. However, the fundamental question of whether stochasticity in protein expression is generally biologically relevant has not been addressed, and it remains unknown whether random noise in the protein production rate of most genes significantly affects the fitness of any organism. We propose that organisms should be particularly sensitive to variation in the protein levels of two classes of genes: genes whose deletion is lethal to the organism and genes that encode subunits of multiprotein complexes. Using an experimentally verified model of stochastic gene expression in S. cerevisiae, we estimate the noise in protein production for nearly every yeast gene, and confirm our prediction that the production of essential and complex-forming proteins involves lower levels of noise than does the production of most other genes. Our results support the hypothesis that noise in gene expression is a biologically important variable, is generally detrimental to organismal fitness, and is subject to natural selection.

  2. Gene expression profiling of solitary fibrous tumors.

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    François Bertucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs are rare spindle-cell tumors. Their cell-of-origin and molecular basis are poorly known. They raise several clinical problems. Differential diagnosis may be difficult, prognosis is poorly apprehended by histoclinical features, and no effective therapy exists for advanced stages. METHODS: We profiled 16 SFT samples using whole-genome DNA microarrays and analyzed their expression profiles with publicly available profiles of 36 additional SFTs and 212 soft tissue sarcomas (STSs. Immunohistochemistry was applied to validate the expression of some discriminating genes. RESULTS: SFTs displayed whole-genome expression profiles more homogeneous and different from STSs, but closer to genetically-simple than genetically-complex STSs. The SFTs/STSs comparison identified a high percentage (∼30% of genes as differentially expressed, most of them without any DNA copy number alteration. One of the genes most overexpressed in SFTs encoded the ALDH1 stem cell marker. Several upregulated genes and associated ontologies were also related to progenitor/stem cells. SFTs also overexpressed genes encoding therapeutic targets such as kinases (EGFR, ERBB2, FGFR1, JAK2, histone deacetylases, or retinoic acid receptors. Their overexpression was found in all SFTs, regardless the anatomical location. Finally, we identified a 31-gene signature associated with the mitotic count, containing many genes related to cell cycle/mitosis, including AURKA. CONCLUSION: We established a robust repertoire of genes differentially expressed in SFTs. Certain overexpressed genes could provide new diagnostic (ALDH1A1, prognostic (AURKA and/or therapeutic targets.

  3. Soybean physiology and gene expression during drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolf-Moreira, R; Medri, M E; Neumaier, N; Lemos, N G; Pimenta, J A; Tobita, S; Brogin, R L; Marcelino-Guimarães, F C; Oliveira, M C N; Farias, J R B; Abdelnoor, R V; Nepomuceno, A L

    2010-10-05

    Soybean genotypes MG/BR46 (Conquista) and BR16, drought-tolerant and -sensitive, respectively, were compared in terms of morphophysiological and gene-expression responses to water stress during two stages of development. Gene-expression analysis showed differential responses in Gmdreb1a and Gmpip1b mRNA expression within 30 days of water-deficit initiation in MG/BR46 (Conquista) plants. Within 45 days of initiating stress, Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b had relatively higher expression. Initially, BR16 showed increased expression only for Gmdreb1a, and later (45 days) for Gmp5cs, Gmdefensin and Gmpip1b. Only BR16 presented down-regulated expression of genes, such as Gmp5cs and Gmpip1b, 30 days after the onset of moisture stress, and Gmgols after 45 days of stress. The faster perception of water stress in MG/BR46 (Conquista) and the better maintenance of up-regulated gene expression than in the sensitive BR16 genotype imply mechanisms by which the former is better adapted to tolerate moisture deficiency.

  4. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Manzella, Nicola; Tomasetti, Marco; Gaetani, Simona; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Santarelli, Lory

    2016-04-26

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  5. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 is a post-translational regulator of the mammalian circadian clock.

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    Isabelle Schmutz

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks coordinate the timing of important biological processes. Interconnected transcriptional and post-translational feedback loops based on a set of clock genes generate and maintain these rhythms with a period of about 24 hours. Many clock proteins undergo circadian cycles of post-translational modifications. Among these modifications, protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating activity, stability and intracellular localization of clock components. Several protein kinases were characterized as regulators of the circadian clock. However, the function of protein phosphatases, which balance phosphorylation events, in the mammalian clock mechanism is less well understood. Here, we identify protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 as regulator of period and light-induced resetting of the mammalian circadian clock. Down-regulation of PP1 activity in cells by RNA interference and in vivo by expression of a specific inhibitor in the brain of mice tended to lengthen circadian period. Moreover, reduction of PP1 activity in the brain altered light-mediated clock resetting behavior in mice, enhancing the phase shifts in either direction. At the molecular level, diminished PP1 activity increased nuclear accumulation of the clock component PER2 in neurons. Hence, PP1, may reduce PER2 phosphorylation thereby influencing nuclear localization of this protein. This may at least partially influence period and phase shifting properties of the mammalian circadian clock.

  6. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Bracci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  7. Photoperiod regulates multiple gene expression in the suprachiasmatic nuclei and pars tuberalis of the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

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    Johnston, Jonathan D; Ebling, Francis J P; Hazlerigg, David G

    2005-06-01

    Photoperiod regulates the seasonal physiology of many mammals living in temperate latitudes. Photoperiodic information is decoded by the master circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus and then transduced via pineal melatonin secretion. This neurochemical signal is interpreted by tissues expressing melatonin receptors (e.g. the pituitary pars tuberalis, PT) to drive physiological changes. In this study we analysed the photoperiodic regulation of the circadian clockwork in the SCN and PT of the Siberian hamster. Female hamsters were exposed to either long or short photoperiod for 8 weeks and sampled at 2-h intervals across the 24-h cycle. In the SCN, rhythmic expression of the clock genes Per1, Per2, Cry1, Rev-erbalpha, and the clock-controlled genes arginine vasopressin (AVP) and d-element binding protein (DBP) was modulated by photoperiod. All of these E-box-containing genes tracked dawn, with earlier peak mRNA expression in long, compared to short, photoperiod. This response occurred irrespective of the presence of additional regulatory cis-elements, suggesting photoperiodic regulation of SCN gene expression through a common E-box-related mechanism. In long photoperiod, expression of Cry1 and Per1 in the PT tracked the onset and offset of melatonin secretion, respectively. However, whereas Cry1 tracked melatonin onset in short period, Per1 expression was not detectably rhythmic. We therefore propose that, in the SCN, photoperiodic regulation of clock gene expression primarily occurs via E-boxes, whereas melatonin-driven signal transduction drives the phasing of a subset of clock genes in the PT, independently of the E-box.

  8. Circadian rhythms in floral scent emission

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    Myles eFenske

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To successfully recruit pollinators, plants often release attractive floral scents at specific times of day to coincide with pollinator foraging. This timing of scent emission is thought to be evolutionarily beneficial to maximize resource efficiency while attracting only useful pollinators. Temporal regulation of scent emission is tied to the activity of the specific metabolic pathways responsible for scent production. Although floral volatile profiling in various plants indicated a contribution by the circadian clock, the mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates timing of floral scent emission remained elusive. Recent studies using two species in the Solanaceae family provided initial insight into molecular clock regulation of scent emission timing. In Petunia hybrida, the benzenoid/phenylpropanoid (FVBP pathway is the major metabolic pathway that produces floral volatiles. Three MYB-type transcription factors, ODORANT1 (ODO1, EMISSION OF BENZENOIDS I (EOBI, and EOBII, all of which show diurnal rhythms in mRNA expression, act as positive regulators for several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway. Recently, in P. hybrida and Nicotiana attenuata, homologs of the Arabidopsis clock gene LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY have been shown to have a similar role in the circadian clock in these plants, and to also determine the timing of scent emission. In addition, in P. hybrida, PhLHY directly represses ODO1 and several enzyme genes in the FVBP pathway during the morning as an important negative regulator of scent emission. These findings facilitate our understanding of the relationship between a molecular timekeeper and the timing of scent emission, which may influence reproductive success.

  9. Circadian regulation of sunflower heliotropism, floral orientation, and pollinator visits.

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    Atamian, Hagop S; Creux, Nicky M; Brown, Evan A; Garner, Austin G; Blackman, Benjamin K; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-05

    Young sunflower plants track the Sun from east to west during the day and then reorient during the night to face east in anticipation of dawn. In contrast, mature plants cease movement with their flower heads facing east. We show that circadian regulation of directional growth pathways accounts for both phenomena and leads to increased vegetative biomass and enhanced pollinator visits to flowers. Solar tracking movements are driven by antiphasic patterns of elongation on the east and west sides of the stem. Genes implicated in control of phototropic growth, but not clock genes, are differentially expressed on the opposite sides of solar tracking stems. Thus, interactions between environmental response pathways and the internal circadian oscillator coordinate physiological processes with predictable changes in the environment to influence growth and reproduction.

  10. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

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    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  11. Early gene expression changes with rush immunotherapy

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    Barnett Sherry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether whole genome expression profiling could reveal changes in mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from allergic patients undergoing rush immunotherapy (RIT that might be manifest within the first few months of treatment. Methods For this study, PBMC from three allergic patients undergoing RIT were assessed at four timepoints: prior to RIT, at 1 week and 7 week post-RIT, during build-up and at 4 months, after establishment of a maintenance dose. PBMC mRNA gene expression changes over time were determined by oligonucleotide microarrays using the Illumina Human-6 BeadChip Platform, which simultaneously interrogates expression profiles of > 47,000 transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were identified using well-established statistical analysis for microarrays. In addition, we analyzed peripheral blood basophil high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI expression and T-regulatory cell frequency as detected by expression of CD3+CD4+CD25bright cells at each timepoint using flow cytometry. Results In comparing the initial 2 timepoints with the final 2 timepoints and analyzing for genes with ≥1.5-fold expression change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we identified 507 transcripts. At a 2-fold change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we found 44 transcripts. Of these, 28 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated genes. From these datasets, we have identified changes in immunologically relevant genes from both the innate and adaptive response with upregulation of expressed genes for molecules including IL-1β, IL-8, CD40L, BTK and BCL6. At the 4 month timepoint, we noted a downward trend in Fc epsilon RI expression in each of the three patients and increased allergen-specific IgG4 levels. No change was seen in the frequency of peripheral T-regulatory cells expressed over the four timepoints. Conclusions We observed significant changes in gene expression early in peripheral

  12. Circadian rhythms identified in Caenorhabditis elegans by in vivo long-term monitoring of a bioluminescent reporter.

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    Goya, María Eugenia; Romanowski, Andrés; Caldart, Carlos S; Bénard, Claire Y; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-11-29

    Circadian rhythms are based on endogenous clocks that allow organisms to adjust their physiology and behavior by entrainment to the solar day and, in turn, to select the optimal times for most biological variables. Diverse model systems-including mice, flies, fungi, plants, and bacteria-have provided important insights into the mechanisms of circadian rhythmicity. However, the general principles that govern the circadian clock of Caenorhabditis elegans have remained largely elusive. Here we report robust molecular circadian rhythms in C elegans recorded with a bioluminescence assay in vivo and demonstrate the main features of the circadian system of the nematode. By constructing a luciferase-based reporter coupled to the promoter of the suppressor of activated let-60 Ras (sur-5) gene, we show in both population and single-nematode assays that C elegans expresses ∼24-h rhythms that can be entrained by light/dark and temperature cycles. We provide evidence that these rhythms are temperature-compensated and can be re-entrained after phase changes of the synchronizing agents. In addition, we demonstrate that light and temperature sensing requires the photoreceptors LITE and GUR-3, and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel subunit TAX-2. Our results shed light on C elegans circadian biology and demonstrate evolutionarily conserved features in the circadian system of the nematode.

  13. The Role of Circadian Rhythms in Muscular and Osseous Physiology and Their Regulation by Nutrition and Exercise.

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    Aoyama, Shinya; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock regulates the day and night cycles of various physiological functions. The circadian clock system consists of a central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks in peripheral tissues. According to the results of circadian transcriptomic studies in several tissues, the majority of rhythmic genes are expressed in a tissue-specific manner and are influenced by tissue-specific circadian rhythms. Here we review the diurnal variations of musculoskeletal functions and discuss the impact of the circadian clock on homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone. Peripheral clocks are controlled by not only photic stimulation from the central clock in the SCN but also by external cues, such as feeding and exercise. In this review, we discuss the effects of feeding and exercise on the circadian clock and diurnal variation of musculoskeletal functions. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of chrono-nutrition and chrono-exercise on circadian disturbances and the failure of homeostasis in skeletal muscle and bone.

  14. Circadian clock proteins control adaptation to novel environment and memory formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.Kondratova, Anna; V.Dubrovsky, Yuliya; Antoch, Marina P.; Kondratov, Roman V.

    2010-01-01

    Deficiency of the transcription factor BMAL1, a core component of the circadian clock, results in an accelerated aging phenotype in mice. The circadian clock regulates many physiological processes and was recently implicated in control of brain-based activities, such as memory formation and the regulation of emotions. Aging is accompanied by the decline in brain physiology, particularly decline in the response and adaptation to novelty. We investigated the role of the circadian clock in exploratory behavior and habituation to novelty using the open field paradigm. We found that mice with a deficiency of the circadian transcription factor BMAL1 display hyperactivity in novel environments and impaired intra- and intersession habituation, indicative of defects in short- and long-term memory formation. In contrast, mice double-deficient for the circadian proteins CRY1 and CRY2 (repressors of the BMAL1-mediated transcription) demonstrate reduced activity and accelerated habituation when compared to wild type mice. Mice with mutation in theClock gene (encoding the BMAL1 transcription partner) show normal locomotion, but increased rearing activity and impaired intersession habituation. BMAL1 is highly expressed in the neurons of the hippocampus - a brain region associated with spatial memory formation; BMAL1 deficiency disrupts circadian oscillation in gene expression and reactive oxygen species homeostasis in the brain, which may be among the possible mechanisms involved. Thus, we suggest that the BMAL1:CLOCK activity is critical for the proper exploratory and habituation behavior, and that the circadian clock prepares organism for a new round of everyday activities through optimization of behavioral learning. PMID:20519775

  15. Regulation of per and cry genes reveals a central role for the D-box enhancer in light-dependent gene expression.

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    Philipp Mracek

    Full Text Available Light serves as a key environmental signal for synchronizing the circadian clock with the day night cycle. The zebrafish represents an attractive model for exploring how light influences the vertebrate clock mechanism. Direct illumination of most fish tissues and cell lines induces expression of a broad range of genes including DNA repair, stress response and key clock genes. We have previously identified D- and E-box elements within the promoter of the zebrafish per2 gene that together direct light-induced gene expression. However, is the combined regulation by E- and D-boxes a general feature for all light-induced gene expression? We have tackled this question by examining the regulation of additional light-inducible genes. Our results demonstrate that with the exception of per2, all other genes tested are not induced by light upon blocking of de novo protein synthesis. We reveal that a single D-box serves as the principal light responsive element within the cry1a promoter. Furthermore, upon inhibition of protein synthesis D-box mediated gene expression is abolished while the E-box confers light driven activation as observed in the per2 gene. Given the existence of different photoreceptors in fish cells, our results implicate the D-box enhancer as a general convergence point for light driven signaling.

  16. Impaired light detection of the circadian clock in a zebrafish melanoma model.

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    Hamilton, Noémie; Diaz-de-Cerio, Natalia; Whitmore, David

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock controls the timing of the cell cycle in healthy tissues and clock disruption is known to increase tumourigenesis. Melanoma is one of the most rapidly increasing forms of cancer and the precise molecular circadian changes that occur in a melanoma tumor are unknown. Using a melanoma zebrafish model, we have explored the molecular changes that occur to the circadian clock within tumors. We have found disruptions in melanoma clock gene expression due to a major impairment to the light input pathway, with a parallel loss of light-dependent activation of DNA repair genes. Furthermore, the timing of mitosis in tumors is perturbed, as well as the regulation of certain key cell cycle regulators, such that cells divide arhythmically. The inability to co-ordinate DNA damage repair and cell division is likely to promote further tumourigenesis and accelerate melanoma development.

  17. Alternative-splicing-mediated gene expression

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    Wang, Qianliang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a fundamental process during gene expression and has been found to be ubiquitous in eukaryotes. However, how AS impacts gene expression levels both quantitatively and qualitatively remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze two common models of gene expression, each incorporating a simple splice mechanism that a pre-mRNA is spliced into two mature mRNA isoforms in a probabilistic manner. In the constitutive expression case, we show that the steady-state molecular numbers of two mature mRNA isoforms follow mutually independent Poisson distributions. In the bursting expression case, we demonstrate that the tail decay of the steady-state distribution for both mature mRNA isoforms that in general are not mutually independent can be characterized by the product of mean burst size and splicing probability. In both cases, we find that AS can efficiently modulate both the variability (measured by variance) and the noise level of the total mature mRNA, and in particular, the latter is always lower than the noise level of the pre-mRNA, implying that AS always reduces the noise. These results altogether reveal that AS is a mechanism of efficiently controlling the gene expression noise.

  18. The circadian control of skin and cutaneous photodamage.

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    Desotelle, Joshua A; Wilking, Melissa J; Ahmad, Nihal

    2012-01-01

    Biologically, light including ultraviolet (UV) radiation is vital for life. However, UV exposure does not come without risk, as it is a major factor in the development of skin cancer. Natural protections against UV damage may have been affected by lifestyle changes over the past century, including changes in our sun exposure due to working environments, and the use of sunscreens. In addition, extended "day time" through the use of artificial light may contribute to the disruption of our circadian rhythms; the daily cycles of changes in critical bio-factors including gene expression. Circadian disruption has been implicated in many health conditions, including cardiovascular, metabolic and psychiatric diseases, as well as many cancers. Interestingly, the pineal hormone melatonin plays a role in both circadian regulation as well as protection from UV skin damage, and is therefore an important factor to consider when studying the impact of UV light. This review discusses the beneficial and deleterious effects of solar exposure, including UV skin damage, Vitamin D production, circadian rhythm disruption and the impact of melatonin. Understanding these benefits and risks is critical for the development of protective strategies against solar radiation.

  19. Lithium ions induce prestalk-associated gene expression and inhibit prespore gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Dorien J.M.; Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Spek, Wouter; Schaap, Pauline

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the effect of Li+ on two types of cyclic AMP-regulated gene expression and on basal and cyclic AMP-stimulated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3) levels. Li+ effectively inhibits cyclic AMP-induced prespore gene expression, half-maximal inhibition occurring at about 2mM-LiCl.

  20. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne;

    2007-01-01

    with the control muscles. Most interestingly, no changes in the expression of proteins involved in inflammatory responses or muscle regeneration was detected, indicating limited muscle damage and regeneration. Histological analysis revealed structural changes with loss of cell integrity and striation pattern......BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  1. Genome-wide and phase-specific DNA-binding rhythms of BMAL1 control circadian output functions in mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Rey

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian clock uses interlocked negative feedback loops in which the heterodimeric basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BMAL1/CLOCK is a master regulator. While there is prominent control of liver functions by the circadian clock, the detailed links between circadian regulators and downstream targets are poorly known. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with deep sequencing we obtained a time-resolved and genome-wide map of BMAL1 binding in mouse liver, which allowed us to identify over 2,000 binding sites, with peak binding narrowly centered around Zeitgeber time 6. Annotation of BMAL1 targets confirms carbohydrate and lipid metabolism as the major output of the circadian clock in mouse liver. Moreover, transcription regulators are largely overrepresented, several of which also exhibit circadian activity. Genes of the core circadian oscillator stand out as strongly bound, often at promoter and distal sites. Genomic sequence analysis of the sites identified E-boxes and tandem E1-E2 consensus elements. Electromobility shift assays showed that E1-E2 sites are bound by a dimer of BMAL1/CLOCK heterodimers with a spacing-dependent cooperative interaction, a finding that was further validated in transactivation assays. BMAL1 target genes showed cyclic mRNA expression profiles with a phase distribution centered at Zeitgeber time 10. Importantly, sites with E1-E2 elements showed tighter phases both in binding and mRNA accumulation. Finally, analyzing the temporal profiles of BMAL1 binding, precursor mRNA and mature mRNA levels showed how transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation contribute differentially to circadian expression phase. Together, our analysis of a dynamic protein-DNA interactome uncovered how genes of the core circadian oscillator crosstalk and drive phase-specific circadian output programs in a complex tissue.

  2. A software solution for recording circadian oscillator features in time-lapse live cell microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmon Patrick

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluorescent and bioluminescent time-lapse microscopy approaches have been successfully used to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying the mammalian circadian oscillator at the single cell level. However, most of the available software and common methods based on intensity-threshold segmentation and frame-to-frame tracking are not applicable in these experiments. This is due to cell movement and dramatic changes in the fluorescent/bioluminescent reporter protein during the circadian cycle, with the lowest expression level very close to the background intensity. At present, the standard approach to analyze data sets obtained from time lapse microscopy is either manual tracking or application of generic image-processing software/dedicated tracking software. To our knowledge, these existing software solutions for manual and automatic tracking have strong limitations in tracking individual cells if their plane shifts. Results In an attempt to improve existing methodology of time-lapse tracking of a large number of moving cells, we have developed a semi-automatic software package. It extracts the trajectory of the cells by tracking theirs displacements, makes the delineation of cell nucleus or whole cell, and finally yields measurements of various features, like reporter protein expression level or cell displacement. As an example, we present here single cell circadian pattern and motility analysis of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts expressing a fluorescent circadian reporter protein. Using Circadian Gene Express plugin, we performed fast and nonbiased analysis of large fluorescent time lapse microscopy datasets. Conclusions Our software solution, Circadian Gene Express (CGE, is easy to use and allows precise and semi-automatic tracking of moving cells over longer period of time. In spite of significant circadian variations in protein expression with extremely low expression levels at the valley phase, CGE allows accurate and

  3. Gene expression analysis of flax seed development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharpe Andrew

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flax, Linum usitatissimum L., is an important crop whose seed oil and stem fiber have multiple industrial applications. Flax seeds are also well-known for their nutritional attributes, viz., omega-3 fatty acids in the oil and lignans and mucilage from the seed coat. In spite of the importance of this crop, there are few molecular resources that can be utilized toward improving seed traits. Here, we describe flax embryo and seed development and generation of comprehensive genomic resources for the flax seed. Results We describe a large-scale generation and analysis of expressed sequences in various tissues. Collectively, the 13 libraries we have used provide a broad representation of genes active in developing embryos (globular, heart, torpedo, cotyledon and mature stages seed coats (globular and torpedo stages and endosperm (pooled globular to torpedo stages and genes expressed in flowers, etiolated seedlings, leaves, and stem tissue. A total of 261,272 expressed sequence tags (EST (GenBank accessions LIBEST_026995 to LIBEST_027011 were generated. These EST libraries included transcription factor genes that are typically expressed at low levels, indicating that the depth is adequate for in silico expression analysis. Assembly of the ESTs resulted in 30,640 unigenes and 82% of these could be identified on the basis of homology to known and hypothetical genes from other plants. When compared with fully sequenced plant genomes, the flax unigenes resembled poplar and castor bean more than grape, sorghum, rice or Arabidopsis. Nearly one-fifth of these (5,152 had no homologs in sequences reported for any organism, suggesting that this category represents genes that are likely unique to flax. Digital analyses revealed gene expression dynamics for the biosynthesis of a number of important seed constituents during seed development. Conclusions We have developed a foundational database of expressed sequences and collection of plasmid

  4. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  5. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C. [IBFM CNR - LATO, Cefalù, Segrate (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  6. Sequencing and Gene Expression Analysis of Leishmania tropica LACK Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Hammoudeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania Homologue of receptors for Activated C Kinase (LACK antigen is a 36-kDa protein, which provokes a very early immune response against Leishmania infection. There are several reports on the expression of LACK through different life-cycle stages of genus Leishmania, but only a few of them have focused on L.tropica.The present study provides details of the cloning, DNA sequencing and gene expression of LACK in this parasite species. First, several local isolates of Leishmania parasites were typed in our laboratory using PCR technique to verify of Leishmania parasite species. After that, LACK gene was amplified and cloned into a vector for sequencing. Finally, the expression of this molecule in logarithmic and stationary growth phase promastigotes, as well as in amastigotes, was evaluated by Reverse Transcription-PCR (RT-PCR technique.The typing result confirmed that all our local isolates belong to L.tropica. LACK gene sequence was determined and high similarity was observed with the sequences of other Leishmania species. Furthermore, the expression of LACK gene in both promastigotes and amastigotes forms was confirmed.Overall, the data set the stage for future studies of the properties and immune role of LACK gene products.

  7. Extracting expression modules from perturbational gene expression compendia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dijck Patrick

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compendia of gene expression profiles under chemical and genetic perturbations constitute an invaluable resource from a systems biology perspective. However, the perturbational nature of such data imposes specific challenges on the computational methods used to analyze them. In particular, traditional clustering algorithms have difficulties in handling one of the prominent features of perturbational compendia, namely partial coexpression relationships between genes. Biclustering methods on the other hand are specifically designed to capture such partial coexpression patterns, but they show a variety of other drawbacks. For instance, some biclustering methods are less suited to identify overlapping biclusters, while others generate highly redundant biclusters. Also, none of the existing biclustering tools takes advantage of the staple of perturbational expression data analysis: the identification of differentially expressed genes. Results We introduce a novel method, called ENIGMA, that addresses some of these issues. ENIGMA leverages differential expression analysis results to extract expression modules from perturbational gene expression data. The core parameters of the ENIGMA clustering procedure are automatically optimized to reduce the redundancy between modules. In contrast to the biclusters produced by most other methods, ENIGMA modules may show internal substructure, i.e. subsets of genes with distinct but significantly related expression patterns. The grouping of these (often functionally related patterns in one module greatly aids in the biological interpretation of the data. We show that ENIGMA outperforms other methods on artificial datasets, using a quality criterion that, unlike other criteria, can be used for algorithms that generate overlapping clusters and that can be modified to take redundancy between clusters into account. Finally, we apply ENIGMA to the Rosetta compendium of expression profiles for

  8. Circadian clock genes Per1 and Per2 regulate the response of metabolism-associated transcripts to sleep disruption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Husse

    Full Text Available Human and animal studies demonstrate that short sleep or poor sleep quality, e.g. in night shift workers, promote the development of obesity and diabetes. Effects of sleep disruption on glucose homeostasis and liver physiology are well documented. However, changes in adipokine levels after sleep disruption suggest that adipocytes might be another important peripheral target of sleep. Circadian clocks regulate metabolic homeostasis and clock disruption can result in obesity and the metabolic syndrome. The finding that sleep and clock disruption have very similar metabolic effects prompted us to ask whether the circadian clock machinery may mediate the metabolic consequences of sleep disruption. To test this we analyzed energy homeostasis and adipocyte transcriptome regulation in a mouse model of shift work, in which we prevented mice from sleeping during the first six hours of their normal inactive phase for five consecutive days (timed sleep restriction--TSR. We compared the effects of TSR between wild-type and Per1/2 double mutant mice with the prediction that the absence of a circadian clock in Per1/2 mutants would result in a blunted metabolic response to TSR. In wild-types, TSR induces significant transcriptional reprogramming of white adipose tissue, suggestive of increased lipogenesis, together with increased secretion of the adipokine leptin and increased food intake, hallmarks of obesity and associated leptin resistance. Some of these changes persist for at least one week after the end of TSR, indicating that even short episodes of sleep disruption can induce prolonged physiological impairments. In contrast, Per1/2 deficient mice show blunted effects of TSR on food intake, leptin levels and adipose transcription. We conclude that the absence of a functional clock in Per1/2 double mutants protects these mice from TSR-induced metabolic reprogramming, suggesting a role of the circadian timing system in regulating the physiological effects

  9. Free access to a running-wheel advances the phase of behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms and peripheral molecular clocks in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yasumoto

    Full Text Available Behavioral and physiological circadian rhythms are controlled by endogenous oscillators in animals. Voluntary wheel-running in rodents is thought to be an appropriate model of aerobic exercise in humans. We evaluated the effects of chronic voluntary exercise on the circadian system by analyzing temporal profiles of feeding, core body temperature, plasma hormone concentrations and peripheral expression of clock and clock-controlled genes in mice housed under sedentary (SED conditions or given free access to a running-wheel (RW for four weeks. Voluntary wheel-running activity advanced the circadian phases of increases in body temperature, food intake and corticosterone secretion in the mice. The circadian expression of clock and clock-controlled genes was tissue- and gene-specifically affected in the RW mice. The temporal expression of E-box-dependent circadian clock genes such as Per1, Per2, Nr1d1 and Dbp were slightly, but significantly phase-advanced in the liver and white adipose tissue, but not in brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. Peak levels of Per1, Per2 and Nr1d1 expression were significantly increased in the skeletal muscle of RW mice. The circadian phase and levels of hepatic mRNA expression of the clock-controlled genes that are involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism significantly differed between SED and RW mice. These findings indicated that endogenous clock-governed voluntary wheel-running activity provides feedback to the central circadian clock that systemically governs behavioral and physiological rhythms.

  10. Effects of bright light exposure during daytime on peripheral clock gene expression in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Wakamura, Tomoko; Morita, Takeshi; Okamoto, Akihiko; Akashi, Makoto; Matsui, Takuya; Sato, Motohiko

    2016-12-01

    Light is the strongest synchronizer controlling circadian rhythms. The intensity and duration of light change throughout the year, thereby influencing body weight, food preferences, and melatonin secretion in humans and animals. Although the expression of clock genes has been examined using human samples, it currently remains unknown whether bright light during the daytime affects the expression of these genes in humans. Therefore, we herein investigated the effects of bright light exposure during the daytime on clock gene expression in the hair follicular and root cells of the human scalp. Seven healthy men (20.4 ± 2.2 years old; 172.3 ± 5.8 cm; 64.3 ± 8.5 kg; BMI 21.7 ± 3.1 kg/m2, mean ± SD) participated in this study. Subjects completed 3-day experimental sessions twice in 1 month during which they were exposed to bright and dim light conditions. The mRNA expression of Per1-3, Cry1-2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2), and Dec1 was analyzed using branched DNA probes. No significant changes were observed in the expression of Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Rev-erb-α (Nr1d1), or Dec1 following exposure to bright light conditions. However, the expression of Rev-erb-β (Nr1d2) tended to be stronger under bright light than dim light conditions. These results suggest that the bright light stimulus did not influence the expression of clock genes in humans. Long-lasting bright light exposure during the daytime may be required to change the expression of clock genes in humans.

  11. Visualizing Gene Expression In Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S.

    1998-11-02

    Visualizing bacterial cells and describing their responses to the environment are difficult tasks. Their small size is the chief reason for the difficulty, which means that we must often use many millions of cells in a sample in order to determine what the average response of the bacteria is. However, an average response can sometimes mask important events in bacterial physiology, which means that our understanding of these organisms will suffer. We have used a variety of instruments to visualize bacterial cells, all of which tell us something different about the sample. We use a fluorescence activated cell sorter to sort cells based on the fluorescence provided by bioreporter genes, and these can be used to select for particular genetic mutations. Cells can be visualized by epifluorescent microscopy, and sensitive photodetectors can be added that allow us to find a single bacterial cell that is fluorescent or bioluminescent. We have also used standard photomultipliers to examine cell aggregates as field bioreporter microorganisms. Examples of each of these instruments show how our understanding of bacterial physiology has changed with the technology.

  12. Twilight, a Novel Circadian-Regulated Gene, Integrates Phototropism with Nutrient and Redox Homeostasis during Fungal Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhen Deng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Phototropic regulation of circadian clock is important for environmental adaptation, organismal growth and differentiation. Light plays a critical role in fungal development and virulence. However, it is unclear what governs the intracellular metabolic response to such dark-light rhythms in fungi. Here, we describe a novel circadian-regulated Twilight (TWL function essential for phototropic induction of asexual development and pathogenesis in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. The TWL transcript oscillates during circadian cycles and peaks at subjective twilight. GFP-Twl remains acetylated and cytosolic in the dark, whereas light-induced phosphorylation (by the carbon sensor Snf1 kinase drives it into the nucleus. The mRNA level of the transcription/repair factor TFB5, was significantly down regulated in the twl∆ mutant. Overexpression of TFB5 significantly suppressed the conidiation defects in the twl∆ mutant. Furthermore, Tfb5-GFP translocates to the nucleus during the phototropic response and under redox stress, while it failed to do so in the twl∆ mutant. Thus, we provide mechanistic insight into Twl-based regulation of nutrient and redox homeostasis in response to light during pathogen adaptation to the host milieu in the rice blast pathosystem.

  13. Argudas: arguing with gene expression information

    CERN Document Server

    McLeod, Kenneth; Burger, Albert

    2010-01-01

    In situ hybridisation gene expression information helps biologists identify where a gene is expressed. However, the databases that republish the experimental information are often both incomplete and inconsistent. This paper examines a system, Argudas, designed to help tackle these issues. Argudas is an evolution of an existing system, and so that system is reviewed as a means of both explaining and justifying the behaviour of Argudas. Throughout the discussion of Argudas a number of issues will be raised including the appropriateness of argumentation in biology and the challenges faced when integrating apparently similar online biological databases.

  14. Optogenetics for gene expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Konrad; Naumann, Sebastian; Weber, Wilfried; Zurbriggen, Matias D

    2015-02-01

    Molecular switches that are controlled by chemicals have evolved as central research instruments in mammalian cell biology. However, these tools are limited in terms of their spatiotemporal resolution due to freely diffusing inducers. These limitations have recently been addressed by the development of optogenetic, genetically encoded, and light-responsive tools that can be controlled with the unprecedented spatiotemporal precision of light. In this article, we first provide a brief overview of currently available optogenetic tools that have been designed to control diverse cellular processes. Then, we focus on recent developments in light-controlled gene expression technologies and provide the reader with a guideline for choosing the most suitable gene expression system.

  15. Genes Expressed in Human Tumor Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Croix, Brad; Rago, Carlo; Velculescu, Victor; Traverso, Giovanni; Romans, Katharine E.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Lal, Anita; Riggins, Gregory J.; Lengauer, Christoph; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2000-08-01

    To gain a molecular understanding of tumor angiogenesis, we compared gene expression patterns of endothelial cells derived from blood vessels of normal and malignant colorectal tissues. Of over 170 transcripts predominantly expressed in the endothelium, 79 were differentially expressed, including 46 that were specifically elevated in tumor-associated endothelium. Several of these genes encode extracellular matrix proteins, but most are of unknown function. Most of these tumor endothelial markers were expressed in a wide range of tumor types, as well as in normal vessels associated with wound healing and corpus luteum formation. These studies demonstrate that tumor and normal endothelium are distinct at the molecular level, a finding that may have significant implications for the development of anti-angiogenic therapies.

  16. [Imprinting genes and it's expression in Arabidopsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yu; Xu, Pei-Zhou; Yang, Hua; Wu, Xian-Jun

    2010-07-01

    Genomic imprinting refers to the phenomenon that the expression of a gene copy depends on its parent of origin. The Arabidopsis imprinted FIS (Fertilisation-independent seed) genes, mea, fis2, and fie, play essential roles in the repression of central cell and the regulation of early endosperm development. fis mutants display two phenotypes: autonomous diploid endosperm development when fertilization is absent and un-cellularised endosperm formation when fertilization occurs. The FIS Polycomb protein complex including the above three FIS proteins catalyzes histone H3 K27 tri-methylation on target loci. DME (DEMETER), a DNA glycosylase, and AtMET1 (Methyltransferase1), a DNA methyltransferase, are involved in the regulation of imprinted expression of both mea and fis2. This review summarizes the studies on the Arabidopsis imprinted FIS genes and other related genes. Recent works have shown that the insertion of transposons may affect nearby gene expression, which may be the main driving force behind the evolution of genomic imprinting. This summary covers the achievements on Arabidopsis imprinted genes will provide important information for studies on genomic imprinting in the important crops such as rice and maize.

  17. Designing genes for successful protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Mark; Villalobos, Alan; Gustafsson, Claes; Minshull, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequences are now far more readily available in silico than as physical DNA. De novo gene synthesis is an increasingly cost-effective method for building genetic constructs, and effectively removes the constraint of basing constructs on extant sequences. This allows scientists and engineers to experimentally test their hypotheses relating sequence to function. Molecular biologists, and now synthetic biologists, are characterizing and cataloging genetic elements with specific functions, aiming to combine them to perform complex functions. However, the most common purpose of synthetic genes is for the expression of an encoded protein. The huge number of different proteins makes it impossible to characterize and catalog each functional gene. Instead, it is necessary to abstract design principles from experimental data: data that can be generated by making predictions followed by synthesizing sequences to test those predictions. Because of the degeneracy of the genetic code, design of gene sequences to encode proteins is a high-dimensional problem, so there is no single simple formula to guarantee success. Nevertheless, there are several straightforward steps that can be taken to greatly increase the probability that a designed sequence will result in expression of the encoded protein. In this chapter, we discuss gene sequence parameters that are important for protein expression. We also describe algorithms for optimizing these parameters, and troubleshooting procedures that can be helpful when initial attempts fail. Finally, we show how many of these methods can be accomplished using the synthetic biology software tool Gene Designer.

  18. Sequence and gene expression evolution of paralogous genes in willows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Srilakshmy L; Pucholt, Pascal; Berlin, Sofia

    2015-12-22

    Whole genome duplications (WGD) have had strong impacts on species diversification by triggering evolutionary novelties, however, relatively little is known about the balance between gene loss and forces involved in the retention of duplicated genes originating from a WGD. We analyzed putative Salicoid duplicates in willows, originating from the Salicoid WGD, which took place more than 45 Mya. Contigs were constructed by de novo assembly of RNA-seq data derived from leaves and roots from two genotypes. Among the 48,508 contigs, 3,778 pairs were, based on fourfold synonymous third-codon transversion rates and syntenic positions, predicted to be Salicoid duplicates. Both copies were in most cases expressed in both tissues and 74% were significantly differentially expressed. Mean Ka/Ks was 0.23, suggesting that the Salicoid duplicates are evolving by purifying selection. Gene Ontology enrichment analyses showed that functions related to DNA- and nucleic acid binding were over-represented among the non-differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates, while functions related to biosynthesis and metabolism were over-represented among the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates. We propose that the differentially expressed Salicoid duplicates are regulatory neo- and/or subfunctionalized, while the non-differentially expressed are dose sensitive, hence, functionally conserved. Multiple evolutionary processes, thus drive the retention of Salicoid duplicates in willows.

  19. The TRANSFAC system on gene expression regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingender, E; Chen, X; Fricke, E; Geffers, R; Hehl, R; Liebich, I; Krull, M; Matys, V; Michael, H; Ohnhäuser, R; Prüss, M; Schacherer, F; Thiele, S; Urbach, S

    2001-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors and their DNA-binding sites and profiles (http://www.gene-regulation.de/) has been quantitatively extended and supplemented by a number of modules. These modules give information about pathologically relevant mutations in regulatory regions and transcription factor genes (PathoDB), scaffold/matrix attached regions (S/MARt DB), signal transduction (TRANSPATH) and gene expression sources (CYTOMER). Altogether, these distinct database modules constitute the TRANSFAC system. They are accompanied by a number of program routines for identifying potential transcription factor binding sites or for localizing individual components in the regulatory network of a cell.

  20. Timed maternal melatonin treatment reverses circadian disruption of the fetal adrenal clock imposed by exposure to constant light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mendez

    Full Text Available Surprisingly, in our modern 24/7 society, there is scant information on the impact of developmental chronodisruption like the one experienced by shift worker pregnant women on fetal and postnatal physiology. There are important differences between the maternal and fetal circadian systems; for instance, the suprachiasmatic nucleus is the master clock in the mother but not in the fetus. Despite this, several tissues/organs display circadian oscillations in the fetus. Our hypothesis is that the maternal plasma melatonin rhythm drives the fetal circadian system, which in turn relies this information to other fetal tissues through corticosterone rhythmic signaling. The present data show that suppression of the maternal plasma melatonin circadian rhythm, secondary to exposure of pregnant rats to constant light along the second half of gestation, had several effects on fetal development. First, it induced intrauterine growth retardation. Second, in the fetal adrenal in vivo it markedly affected the mRNA expression level of clock genes and clock-controlled genes as well as it lowered the content and precluded the rhythm of corticosterone. Third, an altered in vitro fetal adrenal response to ACTH of both, corticosterone production and relative expression of clock genes and steroidogenic genes was observed. All these changes were reversed when the mother received a daily dose of melatonin during the subjective night; supporting a role of melatonin on overall fetal development and pointing to it as a 'time giver' for the fetal adrenal gland. Thus, the present results collectively support that the maternal circadian rhythm of melatonin is a key signal for the generation and/or synchronization of the circadian rhythms in the fetal adrenal gland. In turn, low levels and lack of a circadian rhythm of fetal corticosterone may be responsible of fetal growth restriction; potentially inducing long term effects in the offspring, possibility that warrants further

  1. Zebrafish circadian clocks: cells that see light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, T K; Carr, A J; Whitmore, D

    2005-11-01

    In the classical view of circadian clock organization, the daily rhythms of most organisms were thought to be regulated by a central, 'master' pacemaker, usually located within neural structures of the animal. However, with the results of experiments performed in zebrafish, mammalian cell lines and, more recently, mammalian tissues, this view has changed to one where clock organization is now seen as being highly decentralized. It is clear that clocks exist in the peripheral tissues of animals as diverse as Drosophila, zebrafish and mammals. In the case of Drosophila and zebrafish, these tissues are also directly light-responsive. This light sensitivity and direct clock entrainability is also true for zebrafish cell lines and early-stage embryos. Using luminescent reporter cell lines containing clock gene promoters driving the expression of luciferase and single-cell imaging techniques, we have been able to show how each cell responds rapidly to a single light pulse by being shifted to a common phase, equivalent to the early day. This direct light sensitivity might be related to the requirement for light in these cells to activate the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair. It is also clear that the circadian clock in zebrafish regulates the timing of the cell cycle, demonstrating the wide impact that this light sensitivity and daily rhythmicity has on the biology of zebrafish.

  2. CRTC Potentiates Light-independent timeless Transcription to Sustain Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minkyung; Lee, Hoyeon; Hur, Jin-Hoe; Choe, Joonho; Lim, Chunghun

    2016-08-31

    Light is one of the strongest environmental time cues for entraining endogenous circadian rhythms. Emerging evidence indicates that CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1) is a key player in this pathway, stimulating light-induced Period1 (Per1) transcription in mammalian clocks. Here, we demonstrate a light-independent role of Drosophila CRTC in sustaining circadian behaviors. Genomic deletion of the crtc locus causes long but poor locomotor rhythms in constant darkness. Overexpression or RNA interference-mediated depletion of CRTC in circadian pacemaker neurons similarly impairs the free-running behavioral rhythms, implying that Drosophila clocks are sensitive to the dosage of CRTC. The crtc null mutation delays the overall phase of circadian gene expression yet it remarkably dampens light-independent oscillations of TIMELESS (TIM) proteins in the clock neurons. In fact, CRTC overexpression enhances CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC)-activated transcription from tim but not per promoter in clock-less S2 cells whereas CRTC depletion suppresses it. Consistently, TIM overexpression partially but significantly rescues the behavioral rhythms in crtc mutants. Taken together, our data suggest that CRTC is a novel co-activator for the CLK/CYC-activated tim transcription to coordinate molecular rhythms with circadian behaviors over a 24-hour time-scale. We thus propose that CRTC-dependent clock mechanisms have co-evolved with selective clock genes among different species.

  3. Mammalian cryptochromes impinge on cell cycle progression in a circadian clock-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destici, Eugin; Oklejewicz, Małgorzata; Saito, Shoko; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J

    2011-11-01

    By gating cell cycle progression to specific times of the day, the intracellular circadian clock is thought to reduce the exposure of replicating cells to potentially hazardous environmental and endogenous genotoxic compounds. Although core clock gene defects that eradicate circadian rhythmicity can cause an altered in vivo genotoxic stress response and aberrant proliferation rate, it remains to be determined to what extent these cell cycle related phenotypes are due to a cell-autonomous lack of circadian oscillations. We investigated the DNA damage sensitivity and proliferative capacity of cultured primary Cry1(-/- )|Cry2(-/-) fibroblasts. Contrasting previous in vivo studies, we show that the absence of CRY proteins does not affect the cell-autonomous DNA damage response upon exposure of primary cells in vitro to genotoxic agents, but causes cells to proliferate faster. By comparing primary wild-type, Cry1(-/-) |Cry2(-/-), Cry1(+/-)|Cry2(-/-) and Cry1(-/-)|Cry2(+/-) fibroblasts, we provide evidence that CRY proteins influence cell cycle progression in a cell-autonomous, but circadian clock-independent manner and that the accelerated cell cycle progression of Cry-deficient cells is caused by global dysregulation of Bmal1-dependent gene expression. These results suggest that the inconsistency between in vivo and in vitro observations might be attributed to systemic circadian control rather than a direct cell-autonomous control.

  4. SRC-2 Is an Essential Coactivator for Orchestrating Metabolism and Circadian Rhythm

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    Erin Stashi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchrony of the mammalian circadian clock is achieved by complex transcriptional and translational feedback loops centered on the BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer. Modulation of circadian feedback loops is essential for maintaining rhythmicity, yet the role of transcriptional coactivators in driving BMAL1:CLOCK transcriptional networks is largely unexplored. Here, we show diurnal hepatic steroid receptor coactivator 2 (SRC-2 recruitment to the genome that extensively overlaps with the BMAL1 cistrome during the light phase, targeting genes that enrich for circadian and metabolic processes. Notably, SRC-2 ablation impairs wheel-running behavior, alters circadian gene expression in several peripheral tissues, alters the rhythmicity of the hepatic metabolome, and deregulates the synchronization of cell-autonomous metabolites. We identify SRC-2 as a potent coregulator of BMAL1:CLOCK and find that SRC-2 targets itself with BMAL1:CLOCK in a feedforward loop. Collectively, our data suggest that SRC-2 is a transcriptional coactivator of the BMAL1:CLOCK oscillators and establish SRC-2 as a critical positive regulator of the mammalian circadian clock.

  5. Identification of genes expressed during myocardial development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小圆; 陈健宏; 张碧琪; 梁瑛; 梁平

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify genes expressed in the fetal heart that are potentially important for myocardial development and cardiomyocyte proliferation.Methods mRNAs from fetal (29 weeks) and adult cardiomyocytes were use for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Both forward (fetal as tester) and reverse (adult as driver) subtractions were performed. Clones confirmed by dot-blot analysis to be differentially expressed were sequenced and analyzed.Results Differential expressions were detected for 39 out of 96 (41%) clones on forward subtraction and 24 out of 80 (30%) clones on reverse. For fetal dominating genes, 28 clones matched to 10 known genes (COL1A2, COL3A1, endomucin, HBG1, HBG2, PCBP2, LOC51144, TGFBI, vinculin and PND), 9 clones to 5 cDNAs of unknown functions (accession AK021715, AF085867, AB040948, AB051460 and AB051512) and 2 clones had homology to hEST sequences. For the reverse subtraction, all clones showed homology to mitochondrial transcripts.Conclusions We successfully applied SSH to detect those genes differentially expressed in fetal cardiac myocytes, some of which have not been shown relative to myocardial development.

  6. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    that compare cells grown in suspension to similar cells grown attached to one another as aggregates have suggested that it is adhesion to the extracellular matrix of the basal membrane that confers resistance to apoptosis and, hence, resistance to cytotoxins. The genes whose expression correlates with poor...

  7. The Low Noise Limit in Gene Expression.

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    Roy D Dar

    Full Text Available Protein noise measurements are increasingly used to elucidate biophysical parameters. Unfortunately noise analyses are often at odds with directly measured parameters. Here we show that these inconsistencies arise from two problematic analytical choices: (i the assumption that protein translation rate is invariant for different proteins of different abundances, which has inadvertently led to (ii the assumption that a large constitutive extrinsic noise sets the low noise limit in gene expression. While growing evidence suggests that transcriptional bursting may set the low noise limit, variability in translational bursting has been largely ignored. We show that genome-wide systematic variation in translational efficiency can-and in the case of E. coli does-control the low noise limit in gene expression. Therefore constitutive extrinsic noise is small and only plays a role in the absence of a systematic variation in translational efficiency. These results show the existence of two distinct expression noise patterns: (1 a global noise floor uniformly imposed on all genes by expression bursting; and (2 high noise distributed to only a select group of genes.

  8. Gene expression profiling of human erythroid progenitors by micro-serial analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishima, Naohito; Hirokawa, Makoto; Aiba, Namiko; Ichikawa, Yoshikazu; Fujishima, Masumi; Komatsuda, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Yoshinari; Miura, Ikuo; Sawada, Ken-ichi

    2004-10-01

    We compared the expression profiles of highly purified human CD34+ cells and erythroid progenitor cells by micro-serial analysis of gene expression (microSAGE). Human CD34+ cells were purified from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized blood stem cells, and erythroid progenitors were obtained by cultivating these cells in the presence of stem cell factor, interleukin 3, and erythropoietin. Our 10,202 SAGE tags allowed us to identify 1354 different transcripts appearing more than once. Erythroid progenitor cells showed increased expression of LRBA, EEF1A1, HSPCA, PILRB, RANBP1, NACA, and SMURF. Overexpression of HSPCA was confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. MicroSAGE revealed an unexpected preferential expression of several genes in erythroid progenitor cells in addition to the known functional genes, including hemoglobins. Our results provide reference data for future studies of gene expression in various hematopoietic disorders, including myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia.

  9. Cluster Analysis of Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Domany, E

    2002-01-01

    The expression levels of many thousands of genes can be measured simultaneously by DNA microarrays (chips). This novel experimental tool has revolutionized research in molecular biology and generated considerable excitement. A typical experiment uses a few tens of such chips, each dedicated to a single sample - such as tissue extracted from a particular tumor. The results of such an experiment contain several hundred thousand numbers, that come in the form of a table, of several thousand rows (one for each gene) and 50 - 100 columns (one for each sample). We developed a clustering methodology to mine such data. In this review I provide a very basic introduction to the subject, aimed at a physics audience with no prior knowledge of either gene expression or clustering methods. I explain what genes are, what is gene expression and how it is measured by DNA chips. Next I explain what is meant by "clustering" and how we analyze the massive amounts of data from such experiments, and present results obtained from a...

  10. Circadian clock proteins in prokaryotes: hidden rhythms?

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    Maria eLoza-Correa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clock genes are vital features of eukaryotes that have evolved such that organisms can adapt to our planet’s rotation in order to anticipate the coming day or night as well as unfavorable seasons. This circadian clock uses oscillation as a timekeeping element. However, circadian clock mechanisms exist also in prokaryotes. The circadian clock of Cyanobacteria is well studied. It is regulated by a cluster of three genes: kaiA, kaiB and kaiC. In this review, we will discuss the circadian system in cyanobacteria, and provide an overview and up-dated phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic organisms that contain the main circadian genes. It is evident that the evolution of the kai genes has been influenced by lateral transfers but further and deeper studies are needed to get an in depth understanding of the exact evolutionary history of these genes. Interestingly, Legionella pneumophila an environmental bacterium and opportunistic human pathogen that parasitizes protozoa in fresh water environments also contains kaiB and kaiC, but their functions are not known. All of the residues described for the biochemical functions of the main pacemaker KaiC in Synechoccous elongates are also conserved in the L. pneumophila KaiC protein.

  11. Gene Expression Commons: an open platform for absolute gene expression profiling.

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    Jun Seita

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling using microarrays has been limited to comparisons of gene expression between small numbers of samples within individual experiments. However, the unknown and variable sensitivities of each probeset have rendered the absolute expression of any given gene nearly impossible to estimate. We have overcome this limitation by using a very large number (>10,000 of varied microarray data as a common reference, so that statistical attributes of each probeset, such as the dynamic range and threshold between low and high expression, can be reliably discovered through meta-analysis. This strategy is implemented in a web-based platform named "Gene Expression Commons" (https://gexc.stanford.edu/ which contains data of 39 distinct highly purified mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor/differentiated cell populations covering almost the entire hematopoietic system. Since the Gene Expression Commons is designed as an open platform, investigators can explore the expression level of any gene, search by expression patterns of interest, submit their own microarray data, and design their own working models representing biological relationship among samples.

  12. Effect of light on expression of clock genes in Xenopus laevis melanophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães Moraes, Maria Nathália de Carvalho; de Oliveira Poletini, Maristela; Ribeiro Ramos, Bruno Cesar; de Lima, Leonardo Henrique Ribeiro Graciani; de Lauro Castrucci, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Light-dark cycles are considered important cues to entrain biological clocks. A feedback loop of clock gene transcription and translation is the molecular basis underlying the mechanism of both central and peripheral clocks. Xenopus laevis embryonic melanophores respond to light with melanin granule dispersion, response possibly mediated by the photopigment melanopsin. To test whether light modulates clock gene expression in Xenopus melanophores, we used qPCR to evaluate the relative mRNA levels of Per1, Per2, Clock and Bmal1 in cultured melanophores exposed to light-dark (LD) cycle or constant darkness (DD). LD cycles elicited temporal changes in the expression of Per1, Per2 and Bmal1. A 10-min pulse of blue light was able to increases the expression of Per1 and Per2. Red light had no effect on the expression of these clock genes. These data suggest the participation of a blue-wavelength sensitive pigment in the light-dark cycle-mediated oscillation of the endogenous clock. Our results add an important contribution to the emerging field of peripheral clocks, which in nonmammalian vertebrates have been mostly studied in Drosophila and Danio rerio. Within this context, we show that X. laevis melanophores, which have already led to melanopsin discovery, represent an ideal model to understanding circadian rhythms.

  13. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  14. Regulation of noise in gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alvaro; Choubey, Sandeep; Kondev, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The biochemical processes leading to the synthesis of new proteins are random, as they typically involve a small number of diffusing molecules. They lead to fluctuations in the number of proteins in a single cell as a function of time and to cell-to-cell variability of protein abundances. These in turn can lead to phenotypic heterogeneity in a population of genetically identical cells. Phenotypic heterogeneity may have important consequences for the development of multicellular organisms and the fitness of bacterial colonies, raising the question of how it is regulated. Here we review the experimental evidence that transcriptional regulation affects noise in gene expression, and discuss how the noise strength is encoded in the architecture of the promoter region. We discuss how models based on specific molecular mechanisms of gene regulation can make experimentally testable predictions for how changes to the promoter architecture are reflected in gene expression noise.

  15. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  16. Photoperiod sensitivity of the Arabidopsis circadian clock is tissue-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hanako; Araki, Takashi; Endo, Motomu

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-specific functions of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis have recently been revealed. The vasculature clock shows distinctive gene expression profiles compared to the clock in other tissues under light-dark cycles. However, it has not yet been established whether the vasculature clock also shows unique gene expression patterns that correlate with temperature cycles, another important environmental cue. Here, we detected diel phase of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) expression in the vasculature and whole leaf under long-day light-dark cycles and temperature cycles. We found that the vasculature clock had advanced TOC1 phase under light-dark cycles but not under temperature cycles, suggesting that the vasculature clock has lower sensitivity against temperature signals. Furthermore, the phase advancement of TOC1 was seen only under long-day condition but not under short-day condition. These results support our previous conclusion that the circadian clock in vasculature preferentially senses photoperiodic signals.

  17. Circadian rhythms of Per2::Luc in individual primary mouse hepatocytes and cultures.

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    Casey J Guenthner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatocytes, the parenchymal cells of the liver, express core clock genes, such as Period2 and Cryptochrome2, which are involved in the transcriptional/translational feedback loop of the circadian clock. Whether or not the liver is capable of sustaining rhythms independent of a central pacemaker is controversial. Whether and how circadian information may be shared among cells in the liver in order to sustain oscillations is currently unknown. RESULTS: In this study we isolated primary hepatocytes from transgenic Per2(Luc mice and used bioluminescence as a read-out of the state of the circadian clock. Hepatocytes cultured in a collagen gel sandwich configuration exhibited persistent circadian rhythms for several weeks. The amplitude of the rhythms damped, but medium changes consistently reset the phase and amplitude of the cultures. Cry2(-/- Per2(Luc cells oscillated robustly and expressed a longer period. Co-culturing with wildtype cells did not significantly shorten the period, indicating that coupling among hepatocytes is insufficient to synchronize cells with significantly differing periods. However, spatial patterns revealed by cellular imaging of wildtype cultures provided evidence of weak local coupling among the hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results with primary hepatocyte cultures demonstrate that cultured hepatocytes are weakly coupled. While this coupling is not sufficient to sustain global synchrony, it does increase local synchrony, which may stabilize the circadian rhythms of peripheral oscillators, such as the liver, against noise in the entraining signals.

  18. Functional development of the circadian clock in the zebrafish pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Moshe, Zohar; Foulkes, Nicholas S; Gothilf, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish constitutes a powerful model organism with unique advantages for investigating the vertebrate circadian timing system and its regulation by light. In particular, the remarkably early and rapid development of the zebrafish circadian system has facilitated exploring the factors that control the onset of circadian clock function during embryogenesis. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular basis underlying functional development of the central clock in the zebrafish pineal gland. Furthermore, we examine how the directly light-entrainable clocks in zebrafish cell lines have facilitated unravelling the general mechanisms underlying light-induced clock gene expression. Finally, we summarize how analysis of the light-induced transcriptome and miRNome of the zebrafish pineal gland has provided insight into the regulation of the circadian system by light, including the involvement of microRNAs in shaping the kinetics of light- and clock-regulated mRNA expression. The relative contributions of the pineal gland central clock and the distributed peripheral oscillators to the synchronization of circadian rhythms at the whole animal level are a crucial question that still remains to be elucidated in the zebrafish model.

  19. Postnatal constant light compensates Cryptochrome1 and 2 double deficiency for disruption of circadian behavioral rhythms in mice under constant dark.

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    Daisuke Ono

    Full Text Available Clock genes Cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2 are essential for expression of circadian rhythms in mice under constant darkness (DD. However, circadian rhythms in clock gene Per1 expression or clock protein PER2 are detected in the cultured suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of neonatal Cry1 and Cry2 double deficient (Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice. A lack of circadian rhythms in adult Cry1 (-/-/Cry2 (-/- mice is most likely due to developmentally disorganized cellular coupling of oscillating neurons in the SCN. On the other hand, neonatal rats exposed to constant light (LL developed a tenable circadian system under