WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronically ill children

  1. Social functioning in children with a chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, SA; Sinnema, G; Bijstra, JO; Mellenbergh, GJ; Wolters, WHG

    2000-01-01

    Behavioural, cognitive, and affective aspects of social functioning of 107 children with a chronic illness were studied. The aim of the study was twofold. (I) to describe peer interaction of children with a chronic illness in comparison with normative data of healthy children; (2) to examine whether

  2. A NARRATIVE: MEDITATION IN THE LIVES OF CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS

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    Taunya WIDEMAN-JOHNSTON

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of chronic illness in one’s life often entails endless appointments, tests, medications, treatments, and procedures. In the instances of children with chronic illness, they do not know what life consists of without their illness, and consequently, have lived with many restrictions. Children with chronic illness and their families are not only in need of traditional methods and strategies from the medical model but are often in need of additional strategies to support and cope with the nature and effects of the chronic illness. This paper focuses on how mediation, mindfulness, and visualization strategies aid individuals with chronic illness.

  3. Coping with Chronic Illness

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    Having a long-term, or chronic, illness can disrupt your life in many ways. You may often be tired and in pain. Your illness might affect your ... able to work, causing financial problems. For children, chronic illnesses can be frightening, because they may not ...

  4. Parental Involvement of Mothers with Chronic Illness and Children's Academic Achievement

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    Chen, Yung-Chi; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how maternal chronic illnesses may affect children's academic achievement through parental involvement. A total of 189 mothers diagnosed with chronic illnesses, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain, asthma, myelodysplasic syndrome, and fibromyalgia, and with a child in middle school or high…

  5. Parental Involvement of Mothers with Chronic Illness and Children's Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Chi; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how maternal chronic illnesses may affect children's academic achievement through parental involvement. A total of 189 mothers diagnosed with chronic illnesses, such as multiple sclerosis, diabetes, cancer, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain, asthma, myelodysplasic syndrome, and fibromyalgia, and with a child in middle school or high…

  6. Self-esteem of children and adolescents with chronic illness: a meta-analysis.

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    Pinquart, M

    2013-03-01

    Chronic illness may be a risk factor for low self-esteem; however, previous meta-analyses are inconclusive whether children with a chronic illness have lower self-esteem than their healthy peers. The goal of the present study was to summarize available research in order to compare the self-esteem of children and adolescents with a chronic illness with that of healthy children. Random-effects meta-analysis was used to integrate the results of 621 empirical studies that compare levels of self-esteem of children with a chronic physical illness with healthy peers or general test norms. Studies were identified via the electronic databases Adolesc, Embase, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, PSNYDEX, PSYCINFO, and cross-referencing. Children with chronic illnesses have lower self-esteem than healthy peers or test norms (g = -0.18 standard deviation units). The lowest levels of self-esteem were observed in children with chronic fatigue syndrome and chronic headaches. Lower levels of self-esteem in children with a chronic illness were found in girls than in boys, in adolescents than in children, in children from developing or threshold countries, when results were collected from observer ratings rather than child reports, in studies published in the 1990s, and when children with chronic illnesses were directly compared with healthy children instead of test norms. Paediatricians, parents, and teachers should promote experiences of success and positive peer-relations, which are important sources of self-esteem. In addition, psychosocial interventions for children with chronic illnesses should be offered for children with reduced self-esteem.

  7. Supporting the Learning of Children with Chronic Illness

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    A'Bear, David

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the challenges that chronically ill students face in their learning as a result of prolonged and intermittent absences from school. It shows how the use of iPod technology as a communicative link minimized the impact of absences and allowed the student to experience true inclusion in their classroom, enabling the…

  8. Playful intervention with chronically-ill children: promoting coping

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    Flávia Moura de Moura

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases can adversely affect the development process of children. This qualitative, action-research study had the aim to analyze the effects of activities in the manual "Como Hóspede no Hospital" (As a patient in the hospital on the coping process of children with chronic diseases. Study participants included six children and adolescents aged seven to 13 years, who suffered from a chronic disease. Data were collected in the pediatric clinic of a public hospital in the Brazilian state of Paraíba, through participant observation and individual sessions with activities from the manual. Data interpretation followed the principles of thematic analysis. The activities from the manual encouraged participants' search for information about their disease and treatment, and increased their interest and participation in their health care process, thereby contributing to better coping. The study points to the need for comprehensive care for children with chronic diseases.

  9. Aspects of protein metabolism in children in acute and chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geukers, V.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    In critically ill children, a negative protein balance is associated with an increased incidence of infections, fewer ventilator-free days, and increased length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit. Additionally, a malnourished state due to chronic illness increases the risk of respiratory i

  10. School nurse case management for children with chronic illness: health, academic, and quality of life outcomes.

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    Keehner Engelke, Martha; Guttu, Martha; Warren, Michelle B; Swanson, Melvin

    2008-08-01

    More children with chronic illnesses are attending school, and some of them struggle academically because of issues related to their health. School-based case management has been suggested as one strategy to improve the academic success of these children. This study tracked the academic, health, and quality of life outcomes for 114 children with asthma, diabetes, severe allergies, seizures, or sickle-cell anemia in 5 different school districts who were provided case management by school nurses. The children ranged in age from 5 to 19 years. At the end of the school year, children experienced an improvement in quality of life and gained skills and knowledge to manage their illness more effectively. Classroom participation, grades, and participation in extracurricular activities also increased for many children. The study provides evidence of the positive impact school nurses have on children with chronic illness and suggests ways they can measure the outcomes of their interventions.

  11. [The difficulties of educating children with chronic illness in the hospital context].

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    de Holanda, Eliane Rolim; Collet, Neusa

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this qualitative study was to understand the perception that families of hospitalized children with chronic illness about their being away from the process of education. The empirical material was produced by means of interviews performed with families of hospitalized children with chronic illness. The data was analyzed based on the principles of thematic analysis. Among other aspects, the data showed the lack of systematized pedagogical actions in the studied hospital, in a way that the educational activities that were developed were seen as a moment of leisure. We understand that the hospital class is becoming an important health care technology for hospitalized children. Therefore, it requires support, especially from the Departments of Education, in terms of providing the necessary human resources, funding and materials. This is a pioneer study, capable of helping improve the quality of life of children with chronic illness.

  12. A Multi-Modal Digital Game-Based Learning Environment for Hospitalized Children with Chronic Illnesses.

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    Chin, Jui-Chih; Tsuei, Mengping

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the digital game-based learning for children with chronic illnesses in the hospital settings. The design-based research and qualitative methods were applied. Three eight-year-old children with leukemia participated in this study. In the first phase, the multi-user game-based learning system was developed and…

  13. Accuracy of triage for children with chronic illness and infectious symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Seiger (Nienke); M.V. Veen (Mirjam Van); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J. van der Lei (Johan); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: This prospective observational study aimed to assess the validity of the Manchester Triage System (MTS) for children with chronic illnesses who presented to the emergency department (ED) with infectious symptoms. METHODS: Children (<16 years old) presenting to the ED of a univ

  14. Chronically Ill and Handicapped Children and Adolescents: Personality Studies in Relation to Disease.

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    Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph

    1981-01-01

    Personality was studied in three groups of chronically ill (diabetic or hemophiliac) and physically handicapped children and adolescents (N=104, mean age 13 years) and compared to that of healthy control groups. Among physically handicapped children a pattern emerged indicating lack of emotional integration into environment without conflict.…

  15. Home Care for Children with Chronic Illnesses and Severe Disabilities: A Bibliography and Resource Guide.

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    Wells, Alice; And Others

    The bibliography and resource guide summarizes relevant research and information on home care for children with disabilities and chronic illnesses, including those with such diagnoses as spina bifida, cerebral palsy, severe mental retardation, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, autism, or failure-to-thrive…

  16. The psychological and social impact of camp for children with chronic illnesses: a systematic review update.

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    Moola, F J; Faulkner, G E J; White, L; Kirsh, J A

    2014-09-01

    Advances in medicine have reduced mortality among children with complex medical conditions, resulting in a growing number of young patients living with chronic illnesses. Despite an improved prognosis, these children experience significant psychosocial morbidity, such as depression and anxiety. Therapeutic summer recreation camps have been proposed as an intervention to enhance quality of life among these children. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the psychosocial impact of camp for children with chronic illnesses. A systematic review of central databases was undertaken using key words, and a rating tool – the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies – was employed to rate methodological quality. 21 studies were included in this systematic review. Although overall methodological quality was weak, camp participation appeared to offer short-term psychosocial benefits on some parameters in children with a variety of chronic illnesses. There was some consistency in improved social outcomes, such as social interaction and acceptance. Based on the available evidence, it is premature to make robust claims regarding the psychosocial impact of camp as a therapeutic intervention. Theoretically informed camp programs, long-term follow-up, and incorporating camp-based messaging into routine hospital care,may enhance the utility of camp as a potential psychosocial intervention in paediatrics.

  17. Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness

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    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160011.html Helping a Child Manage a Chronic Illness Feeling they have control over their ... News) -- Children and teens who feel confident handling a chronic illness on their own appear better able ...

  18. Godly play: an intervention for improving physical, emotional, and spiritual responses of chronically ill hospitalized children.

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    Farrell, Joan; Cope, Scott Brooks; Cooper, James H; Mathias, Leigh

    2008-01-01

    An experimental two-group comparison pilot study of forty chronically ill hospitalized children was carried out at Wolfson Children's Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida. Three Godly Play interventions were given to participants in the experimental group. Children in the control group did not participate but received a fairy tale book as a control. The sample was evenly distributed with twenty (20) males and twenty (20) females. Ages ranged from six (6) to fifteen (15) years and all participants were chronically ill. Five (5) variables were studied. Of the five (5), three (3) showed significant differences before and after Godly Play: the Staic-Trait Anxiety Scale (p = .049), the Children's Depression Inventory (p = .011), and the McBride Spirituality Assessment (p = .033). A marginal difference in parent satisfaction with hospital care of children in the experimental and control groups was also determined (p = .058). Findings suggest that Godly Play had a significant effect on anxiety, depression, and spirituality of children and support the idea that the parents of children who participated in Godly Play were more satisfied with hospital care than those parents whose children did not engage in Godly Play.

  19. Illness beliefs and self-management in children and young people with chronic illness: a systematic review.

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    Law, Gary Urquhart; Tolgyesi, Charlotte Sarah; Howard, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    To review the extent to which illness representations, based on Leventhal's Common Sense Model, relate to self-management in children and young people with chronic physical health conditions. A systematic literature review was carried out to identify relevant studies and each included paper was assessed for risk of bias. Fifteen papers met criteria for inclusion within the review. The majority of studies were cross-sectional, and small sample sizes for some studies made it difficult to generalise findings. The method of measuring both illness representations and outcomes varied. Timeline, identity, control and consequences beliefs were the most frequently assessed domains of illness representations included within the studies. While there is variability, there are indications that control beliefs, specifically treatment control beliefs, are more consistently and strongly associated with self-management than other representation domains. Control beliefs should be targeted for intervention in studies trying to improve adolescent self-management. In addition, the relationship between illness representations and self-management needs to be considered within both developmental and systemic contexts. It is likely that the variation in self-management will be more fully explained in future research that explores the combined effects of individual representations and the influence of wider contexts.

  20. Psychological complications of childhood chronic physical illness in Nigerian children and their mothers: the implication for developing pediatric liaison services

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    Meremikwu Martin M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatric liaison services attending to the psychological health needs of children with chronic physical illness are limited or virtually non-existent in Nigeria and most sub-Saharan African countries, and psychological problems complicate chronic physical illness in these children and their mothers. There exist needs to bring into focus the public health importance of developing liaison services to meet the psychological health needs of children who suffer from chronic physical illness in this environment. Sickle cell disease (SCD and juvenile diabetes mellitus (JDM are among the most common chronic physical health conditions in Nigerian children. This study compared the prevalence and pattern of emotional disorders and suicidal behavior among Nigerian children with SCD, JDM and a group of healthy children. Psychological distress in the mothers of these children that suffer chronic physical illness was also compared with psychological distress in mothers of healthy control children. Methods Forty-five children aged 9 to 17 years were selected for each group of SCD, JDM and controls. The SCD and JDM groups were selected by consecutive clinic attendance and the healthy children who met the inclusion criteria were selected from neighboring schools. The Youth version of the Computerized Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children, version IV (C- DISC- IV was used to assess for diagnosis of emotional disorders in these children. Twelve-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ – 12 was used to assess for psychological distress in mothers of these children and healthy control children. Results Children with JDM were significantly more likely to experience DSM – IV emotional disorders than children with SCD and the healthy group (p = 0.005, while children with JDM and SCD were more likely to have 'intermediate diagnoses' of emotional disorders (p = 0.0024. Children with SCD and JDM had higher rates of suicidal ideation when

  1. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Scholten; A.M. Willemen; M.A. Grootenhuis; H. Maurice-Stam; C. Schuengel; B.F. Last

    2011-01-01

    Coping with a chronic illness (CI) challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the int

  2. Chronic Critical Illness

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    ... the patient’s situation and on the hospital and city. Do Chronically Critically Ill Patients Regain the Ability ... as the patient. You may feel stress, worry, sadness, or fatigue. Some families worry about financial burdens. ...

  3. Chronic Illness & Mental Health

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    ... is present. For More Information Share Chronic Illness & Mental Health Download PDF Download ePub Order a free hardcopy ... For more information, see the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) booklet on Depression at http://www.nimh. ...

  4. Chronic Complications After Femoral Central Venous Catheter-related Thrombosis in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol, Jeanine J; Knoester, Hennie; de Neef, Marjorie; Smets, Anne M J B; Betlem, Aukje; van Ommen, C Heleen

    2015-08-01

    Prescription of thromboprophylaxis is not a common practice in pediatric intensive care units. Most thrombi are catheter-related and asymptomatic, without causing acute complications. However, chronic complications of these (a)symptomatic catheter-related thrombi, that is, postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) and residual thrombosis have not been studied. To investigate these complications, critically ill children of 1 tertiary center with percutaneous inserted femoral central venous catheters (FCVCs) were prospectively followed. Symptomatic FCVC-thrombosis occurred in 10 of the 134 children (7.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4-9.5). Only FCVC-infection appeared to be independently associated (P=0.001) with FCVC-thrombosis. At follow-up 2 of the 5 survivors diagnosed with symptomatic thrombosis developed mild PTS; one of them had an occluded vein on ultrasonography. A survivor without PTS had a partial occluded vein at follow-up. Asymptomatic FCVC-thrombosis occurred in 3 of the 42 children (7.1%; 95% CI, 0.0-16.7) screened by ultrasonography within 72 hours after catheter removal. At follow-up, mild PTS was present in 6 of the 33 (18.2%; 95% CI, 6.1-30.3) screened children. Partial and total vein occlusion was present in 1 (3%) and 4 (12%) children, respectively. In conclusion, children on pediatric intensive care units are at risk for (a)symptomatic FCVC-thrombosis, especially children with FCVC-infection. Chronic complications of FCVC-thrombosis are common. Therefore, thromboprophylaxis guidelines are warranted in pediatric intensive care units to minimize morbidity as a result of FCVC-thrombosis.

  5. The use of central venous lines in the treatment of chronically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczykowska, Ewa; Szwed-Kolińska, Marzena; Wróbel-Bania, Agnieszka; Ślusarz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic diseases in children is a special medical problem. Maintaining constant access to the central vascular system is necessary for long-term hemato-oncological and nephrological therapies as well as parenteral nutrition. Providing such access enables chemotherapic treatment, complete parenteral nutrition, long-term antibiotic therapy, hemodialysis, treatment of intensive care unit patients, monitoring blood pressure in the pulmonary artery and stimulation of heart rate in emergency situations as well as treatment of patients suffering from complications, especially when chances of access into peripheral veins are exhausted. Continuous access to the central vascular system is desirable in the treatment of chronically ill children. Insertion of a central venous catheter line eliminates the unnecessary pain and stress to a child patient accompanying injection into peripheral vessels. In order to gain long-term and secure access to the central venous system, respecting the guidelines of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention contained in the updated 'Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections' is necessary.

  6. Ministry to the Chronically Ill Child.

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    Spinetta, Pat Deasy; Collins, Denis E.

    1993-01-01

    Reports growth in the number of chronically ill children attending Catholic schools. Describes the separate roles of home, school, and hospital in children's long-term care. Urges educators to obtain necessary information on children's attendance, peer interaction, education, and medical compliance. Reviews issues specific to chronically ill…

  7. Exploring views on satisfaction with life in young children with chronic illness: an innovative approach to the collection of self-report data from children under 11.

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    Christie, Deborah; Romano, Gabriella; Barnes, Jacqueline; Madge, Nicola; Nicholas, David B; Koot, Hans M; Armstrong, Daniel F; Shevlin, Mark; Kantaris, Xenya; Khatun, Hasina; Sutcliffe, Alastair G

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore young children's views on the impact of chronic illness on their life in order to inform future development of a patient-based self-report health outcome measure. We describe an approach to facilitating self-report views from young children with chronic illness. A board game was designed in order to obtain qualitative data from 39 children with a range of chronic illness conditions and 38 healthy controls ranging in age from 3 to 11 years. The format was effective in engaging young children in a self-report process of determining satisfaction with life and identified nine domains. The board game enabled children aged 5-11 years with chronic illness to describe the effects of living with illness on home, family, friends, school and life in general. It generated direct, non-interpreted material from children who, because of their age, may have been considered unable or limited their ability to discuss and describe how they feel. Obtaining this information for children aged 4 and under continues to be a challenge.

  8. Belgian siblings of children with a chronic illness: Is their quality of life different from their peers?

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    Havermans, Trudy; Croock, Ilse De; Vercruysse, Trui; Goethals, Eveline; Diest, Ilse Van

    2015-06-01

    To assess Belgian siblings' self-reported quality of life (QoL) and the impact of illness on four different paediatric illnesses. Healthy siblings (n = 131) of children with type 1 diabetes, cancer, congenital heart disease (CHD) and cystic fibrosis (CF) completed the Child Health Questionnaire and the Sibling Perception Questionnaire. Results were compared to those of a matched group of siblings of healthy children. Siblings reported a good QoL, similar to controls, with the exception that siblings reported better on the QoL domain pain (p siblings of children with CHD or cancer was lower than QoL in the CF or type 1 diabetes group whilst impact of illness was highest for the CHD group. QoL of siblings of a child with a chronic illness is similar to the QoL of peers. Studies investigating siblings' QoL or the impact of illness on siblings should include the day-to-day demands of the illness as well as less obvious illness-related issues like 'hidden stress' and 'sense of control'.

  9. Comparison of Health-Related Quality of Life among 10- to 12-Year-Old Children with Chronic Illnesses and Healthy Children: The Parents' Perspective

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    Svavarsdottir, Erla Kolbrun; Orlygsdottir, Brynja

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate mothers' and fathers' perception of their child's health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among 10- to 12-year-old Icelandic children with or without chronic health condition or illness. A total of 912 Icelandic parents (510 mothers and 402 fathers) and 480 children (209 boys and 271 girls) participated in…

  10. Association between nutritional status and subjective health status in chronically ill children attending special schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.F.M. Joosten (Koen); K. van der Velde (Kelly); P. Joosten (Pieter); H. Rutten (Hans); J.M. Hulst (Jessie); K. Dulfer (Karolijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: In hospitalized children with a chronic disease, malnutrition was associated with a lower subjective health status. In outpatient children with a chronic disease attending special schools, this association has never been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the associati

  11. [Family dynamics and chronic illness: children with diabetes in the context of their families].

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    Wirlach-Bartosik, S; Schubert, M T; Freilinger, M; Schober, E

    2005-01-01

    The present study is based on the assumption of an interaction between family functioning and chronic illness. Using a systemic approach, the intra-familial situation of families with a diabetes-affected child is examined. 44 families were evaluated using a family diagnostic instrument ("Familienbögen") and compared with 31 control families with a healthy child. Furthermore, the study looked at the influence of the level of family functioning on glycemic control, as measured by HbA1c values, and vice versa. Families with a child affected by diabetes showed significantly more dysfunctional domains and higher discrepancies of the ratings in the family diagnostic instrument (p family functioning and glycemic control was found. Poor glycemic control therefore did not have any negative effects on the family dynamics, in fact, the opposite was often the case. Also, the relationship between siblings was judged more positively when one of the siblings was chronically ill (p familial dynamics, it may, at the same time, offer opportunities for an improvement of family relationships. However, if physiological parameters deteriorate in the child (poor glycemic control), family problems seem to become less important. Success in the treatment of diabetes patients should therefore not only be measured by the quality of glycemic control, but also by considering psychological factors and aspects of family dynamics.

  12. The impact of chronic physical illness, maternal depressive symptoms, family functioning, and self-esteem on symptoms of anxiety and depression in children.

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    Ferro, Mark A; Boyle, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    The present study extends earlier research identifying an increased risk of anxiety among children with chronic physical illness (CwCPI) by examining a more complete model that explains how physical illness leads to increased symptoms of anxiety and depression. We tested a stress-generation model linking chronic physical illness to symptoms of anxiety and depression in a population-based sample of children aged 10 to 15 years. We hypothesized that having a chronic physical illness would be associated with more symptoms of anxiety and depression, increased levels of maternal depressive symptoms, more family dysfunction, and lower self-esteem; and, that maternal depressive symptoms, family dysfunction, and child self-esteem would mediate the influence of chronic physical illness on symptoms of anxiety and depression. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (N = 10,646). Mediating processes were analyzed using latent growth curve modeling. Childhood chronic physical illness was associated with increases in symptoms of anxiety and depression, β = 0.20, p anxiety and depression. CwCPI are at-risk for symptoms of anxiety and depression. Some of this elevated risk appears to work through family processes and child self-esteem. This study supports the use of family-centered care approaches among CwCPI to minimize burden on families and promote healthy psychological development for children.

  13. A cognitive behavioral based group intervention for children with a chronic illness and their parents: a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schuengel Carlo

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coping with a chronic illness (CI challenges children's psychosocial functioning and wellbeing. Cognitive-behavioral intervention programs that focus on teaching the active use of coping strategies may prevent children with CI from developing psychosocial problems. Involvement of parents in the intervention program may enhance the use of learned coping strategies in daily life, especially on the long-term. The primary aim of the present study is to examine the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral based group intervention (called 'Op Koers' 1 for children with CI and of a parallel intervention for their parents. A secondary objective is to investigate why and for whom this intervention works, in order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the intervention effect. Methods/design This study is a multicentre randomized controlled trial. Participants are children (8 to 18 years of age with a chronic illness, and their parents, recruited from seven participating hospitals in the Netherlands. Participants are randomly allocated to two intervention groups (the child intervention group and the child intervention combined with a parent program and a wait-list control group. Primary outcomes are child psychosocial functioning, wellbeing and child disease related coping skills. Secondary outcomes are child quality of life, child general coping skills, child self-perception, parental stress, quality of parent-child interaction, and parental perceived vulnerability. Outcomes are evaluated at baseline, after 6 weeks of treatment, and at a 6 and 12-month follow-up period. The analyses will be performed on the basis of an intention-to-treat population. Discussion This study evaluates the effectiveness of a group intervention improving psychosocial functioning in children with CI and their parents. If proven effective, the intervention will be implemented in clinical practice. Strengths and limitations of the study design are discussed

  14. Burden and quality of life of mothers of children and adolescents with chronic illnesses: an integrative review

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    Eliza Cristina Macedo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective:to identify and analyze the evidence available regarding evaluation of burden and quality of life of mothers who are caregivers for children and adolescents with chronic illnesses.Method:an integrative review, undertaken in the electronic sources MEDLINE; Academic Search Premier; CINAHL; LILACS; SciELO and PubMed, between 2010 and 2014.Results:among the 22 documents selected, there was a predominance of convenience samples and non-experimental transversal designs, at the levels IV and III2. The caregiver burden scales used were the Zarit Burden Interview and Montgomery-Borgatta Caregiver Burden Scale-Revised along with the following instruments for evaluating quality of life: The World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale; Self-report questionnaires; The Ulm Quality of Life Inventory for Parents of chronically ill children; Asthma Caregiver Quality of Life Questionnaire; and the Nottingham Health Profile. Quality-of-life appears to be influenced in a complex and interrelated way by the physical and mental health of the mothers who are caregivers, in accordance with their level of independence, social relationships, environment, and the extent to which they see themselves as burdened.Conclusion: the revealing of the results for the evaluation of burden and quality of life of mothers who are caregivers has implications for the planning and implementation of effective interventions, by the multidisciplinary team, if they are to relieve the burden.

  15. [Focus on Siblings of Children with Chronic Illness or Disability - A Family Oriented Counselling Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Birgit; Schepper, Florian; Herrmann, Jessy; Gude, Marlies

    2016-01-01

    In the psychosocial support of families with a chronically ill or disabled child siblings are increasingly addressed as a target group for prevention and rehabilitation projects intending to reduce the risk for adverse health consequences. The following article presents a childfocused approach to family counselling as a short-term intervention. Ten flexibly applicable counselling core points covering commonly reported problems of affected siblings and their families are available - including the communication about the disease within the family or the expression of the sibling's feelings and needs. For this purpose an approach in specific counselling sessions has been determined which is used similarly by adept child and youth psychotherapists. The counselling approach is founded theoretically. Furthermore, the counselling approach provides guidance for the structured approach in the diagnosis of potential difficulties, the choice of core points and setting, the closure of counseling sessions as well as the recommendation of additional programs.

  16. The Ubiquity of Chronic Illness.

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    Fonseca, Claudia; Fleischer, Soraya; Rui, Taniele

    2016-01-01

    This is a review of five different books dealing with some aspect of what might be termed a "chronic illness" - Alzheimer's disease, lupus, addiction, erectile dysfunction, and leprosy. The array of different subjects examined in these books points to the negotiable limits of this hugely open category. What exactly constitutes an "illness"? Why not use a less biomedical term instead: "disturbance", "problem", or simply "condition"? And how are we to understand "chronic" - simply as the flipside of "acute" or "curable"?

  17. What stops children with a chronic illness accessing health care: a mixed methods study in children with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME

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    Webb Carly M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatric Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME is relatively common and disabling with a mean time out of school of more than one academic year. NICE guidelines recommend referral to specialist services immediately if severely affected, within 3 months if moderately affected and within 6 months if mildly affected. However, the median time-to-assessment by a specialist service in the UK is 18 months. This study used a mixed-methods approach to examine factors associated with time taken to access specialist services. Methods Time-to-assessment was analysed as a continuous "survival-time" variable in Cox regression models using data from self-completed assessment forms for children attending a regional specialist CFS/ME service between January 2006 and December 2009. Semi-structured interviews about barriers experienced in accessing healthcare for their child were conducted with nine parents of children aged Results 405 children were assessed between 2006 and 2009 and information on school attendance was available on 388. Only 1/125 with severe CFS/ME and 49/263 (19% with mild to moderate CFS/ME were seen within NICE recommended timeframe. Increased fatigue was associated with shorter time to assessment (HR = 1.15; 95% CI 1.03, 1.29 per unit increase in Chalder fatigue score; P = 0.01. Time-to-assessment was not associated with disability, mood, age or gender. Parents described difficulties accessing specialist services because of their own as well as their GP's and Paediatrician's lack of knowledge. They experienced negative attitudes and beliefs towards the child's condition when they consulted GPs, Paediatricians and Child Psychiatrists. Parents struggled to communicate an invisible illness that their child and not themselves were experiencing. Conclusions GPs, Child Psychiatrists and Paediatricians need more knowledge about CFS/ME and the appropriate referral pathways to ensure timeliness in referral

  18. [Evaluation of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms and infections' frequency in chronically and incurably ill children under care of the Cracow children's Hospice of Father J. Tischner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogała, Wojciech; Goździk, Jolanta; Czogała, Małgorzata; Klepacka, Joanna; Krasowska-Kwiecień, Aleksandra; Skoczen, Szymon; Wiecha, Oktawiusz; Pietrys, Danuta; Wedrychowicz, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Infections are one of the most important clinical problem and most frequent cause of interventions among chronically ill children under hospice care. Frequent and long-lasting hospitalizations before admission to the hospice cause patients' colonization with nosocomial pathogens. These pathogens usually cause returning infections, difficult to cure in home care. The aim of the study was evaluation of colonization by multidrug-resistant organisms and infections' frequency in chronically and incurably ill children under care of the Cracow Children's Hospice of Father J. Tischner. We analyzed infections in patients of the Hospice in 2008-2009. Frequency of infections, their localization, pathogens and necessity of hospitalization were evaluated. On the basis of microbiological examination we distinguished infections caused by multidrug resistant pathogens. Ninety microbiological examination were made in 24 children. Urine, stool, pharyngeal and nasal swap and others were examined. Nosocomial pathogens including Gram-negative rods with ESBL phenotype, Gram-positive Enterococci with HLAR phenotype and Staphylococci with MRCNS and MRSA phenotype were isolated in 36 (40%) examinations, in 17 (71%) patients. Frequency of infections was higher in patients colonized by nosocomial pathogens in comparison with patients without colonization, but difference was not statistically important. There are many factors that increase risk of infections and make them difficult to treat, like: immobilization, impaired swallowing and coughing reflexes, thorax deformation, neurogenic bladder, tracheostomy. Multi-drug resistant pathogens are additional risk factor that can lead to the necessity of hospitalization. In chronically and incurably ill patients time of hospitalization should be minimized to reduce the risk of colonization with multi-drug resistant pathogens.

  19. A predictive model of Health Related Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children: the importance of care-dependency of their child and their support system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hatzmann, J.; Maurice-Stam, H.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Parents of chronically ill children are at risk for a lower Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). Insight in the dynamics of factors influencing parental HRQoL is necessary for development of interventions. Aim of the present study was to explore the influence of demographic and diseas

  20. Communication About Chronic Critical Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Judith E.; Mercado, Alice F.; Camhi, Sharon L.; Tandon, Nidhi; Wallenstein, Sylvan; August, Gary I.; Morrison, R. Sean

    2008-01-01

    Background Despite poor outcomes, life-sustaining treatments including mechanical ventilation are continued for a large and growing population of patients with chronic critical illness. This may be owing in part to a lack of understanding resulting from inadequate communication between clinicians and patients and families. Our objective was to investigate the informational needs of patients with chronic critical illness and their families and the extent to which these needs are met. Methods In this prospective observational study conducted at 5 adult intensive care units in a large, university-affiliated hospital in New York, New York, 100 patients with chronic critical illness (within 3–7 days of elective tracheotomy for prolonged mechanical ventilation) or surrogates for incapacitated patients were surveyed using an 18-item questionnaire addressing communication about chronic critical illness. Main outcome measures included ratings of importance and reports of whether information was received about questionnaire items. Results Among 125 consecutive, eligible patients, 100 (80%) were enrolled; questionnaire respondents included 2 patients and 98 surrogates. For all items, more than 78% of respondents rated the information as important for decision making (>98% for 16 of 18 items). Respondents reported receiving no information for a mean (SD) of 9.0 (3.3) of 18 items, with 95% of respondents reporting not receiving information for approximately one-quarter of the items. Of the subjects rating the item as important, 77 of 96 (80%) and 69 of 74 (93%) reported receiving no information about expected functional status at hospital discharge and prognosis for 1-year survival, respectively. Conclusions Many patients and their families may lack important information for decision making about continuation of treatment in the chronic phase of critical illness. Strategies for effective communication in this clinical context should be investigated and implemented. PMID

  1. Meditation's impact on chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonadonna, Ramita

    2003-01-01

    Meditation is becoming widely popular as an adjunct to conventional medical therapies. This article reviews the literature regarding the experience of chronic illness, theories about meditation, and clinical effects of this self-care practice. Eastern theories of meditation include Buddhist psychology. The word Buddha means the awakened one, and Buddhist meditators have been called the first scientists, alluding to more than 2500 years of precise, detailed observation of inner experience. The knowledge that comprises Buddhist psychology was derived inductively from the historical figure's (Prince Siddhartha Gautama) diligent self-inquiry. Western theories of meditation include Jungian, Benson's relaxation response, and transpersonal psychology. Clinical effects of meditation impact a broad spectrum of physical and psychological symptoms and syndromes, including reduced anxiety, pain, and depression, enhanced mood and self-esteem, and decreased stress. Meditation has been studied in populations with fibromyalgia, cancer, hypertension, and psoriasis. While earlier studies were small and lacked experimental controls, the quality and quantity of valid research is growing. Meditation practice can positively influence the experience of chronic illness and can serve as a primary, secondary, and/or tertiary prevention strategy. Health professionals demonstrate commitment to holistic practice by asking patients about use of meditation, and can encourage this self-care activity. Simple techniques for mindfulness can be taught in the clinical setting. Living mindfully with chronic illness is a fruitful area for research, and it can be predicted that evidence will grow to support the role of consciousness in the human experience of disease.

  2. Nutrition in chronic critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, S K

    2001-03-01

    Nutritional management of patients with respiratory failure can be a model of nutritional management in chronically critically ill patients. This model requires recognition of the differing metabolic states of starvation and hypermetabolism. Starvation can result in malnutrition, with adverse effect on respiratory muscle strength, ventilatory drive, and immune defense mechanisms. General nutritional goals include preservation of lean body mass by providing adequate energy and positive nitrogen balance. General nutritional prescriptions for both states include a substrate mix of 20% protein, 60% to 70% carbohydrates, and 20% to 30% fat. Positive nitrogen balance is difficult to attain in hypermetabolic patients and energy requirements are increased compared with starved patients. Enteral nutrition should be the mode of initial nutrient delivery unless the gastrointestinal tract is nonfunctional. Monitoring of nutritional support is essential. Complications of nutritional support are multiple. Nutritional hypercapnia is an important complication in a chronically critically ill patient. Outcomes of selected long-term acute patients are poor, with only 8% of patients fully functional 1 year after discharge. Appropriate nutritional therapy is one aspect of management of these patients that has the possibility of optimizing function and survival.

  3. Early nutritional depletion in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, M M; Wiley, J S; Holbrook, P R

    1981-08-01

    Nutritional status was evaluated in 50 medical admissions to a pediatric ICU. All patients were evaluated within 48 h of admission; none had chronic organ failure or malignancies. Nutritional assessment included weight/50th percentile weight for length, length/50th percentile length for age, triceps skinfold thickness, and midarm muscle circumference. Acute protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) occurred in 16% of all children. Chronic PEM also occurred in 16%. The nutrient stores of fat and somatic protein were deficient in 18 and 20% of all children. Acute PEM and deficient somatic protein stores were more frequent in children less than 2 years (p less than 0.05). These findings indicate that malnutrition and nutrient store deficiencies are common early in the course of critical illnesses in children, especially in those less than 2 years of age. However, the findings do not indicate if the severity of illness was the cause or effect of poor nutritional status.

  4. A predictive model of Health Related Quality of life of parents of chronically ill children: the importance of care-dependency of their child and their support system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heymans Hugo SA

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parents of chronically ill children are at risk for a lower Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. Insight in the dynamics of factors influencing parental HRQoL is necessary for development of interventions. Aim of the present study was to explore the influence of demographic and disease related factors on parental HRQoL, mediated by employment, income, leisure time, holiday and emotional support in a comprehensive model. Methods In a cross-sectional design, 543 parents of chronically ill children completed questionnaires. A conceptual model of parental HRQoL was developed. Structural equation modeling was performed to explore the relations in the conceptual model, and to test if the model fitted the data. Results The model fitted the data closely (CHISQ(14 = 11.37, p = 0.66; RMSEA = 0.0, 90%CI [0.00;0.034]. The effect of socio-demographic and medical data on HRQoL was mediated by days on holiday (MCS: β = .21 and emotional support (PCS: β = .14; MCS: β = .28. Also, female gender (β = -.10, age (β = .10, being chronically ill as a parent (β = -.34, and care dependency of the child (β = -.14; β = -.15 were directly related to parental HRQoL. Conclusion The final model was slightly different from the conceptual model. Main factors explaining parental HRQoL seemed to be emotional support, care dependency, days on holiday and being chronically ill as a parent. Holiday and emotional support mediated the effect of demographic and disease-related factors on HRQoL. Hours of employment, leisure time and household income did not mediate between background characteristics and HRQoL, contrasting the hypotheses.

  5. Looking after chronically ill dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Stine B.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri; Sandøe, Peter

    2013-01-01

    thus face similar challenges when caring for their animals. This qualitative study uncovers impacts on an owner's life, when attending to the care of an aged or chronically ill dog and reflects on the differing roles of caregivers with animal and human patients. Twelve dog owners were selected for in......-depth interviews based on the dogs' diagnoses, and the choice of treatments and care expected to affect the owner's life. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed qualitatively. The dog owners reported several changes in their lives due to their dog's condition: practicalities like extra care, changes...... in use of the home, and restrictions relating to work, social life, and finances. These were time-consuming, tough, and annoying, but could often be dealt with through planning and prioritizing. Changes in the human–dog relationship and activities caused sadness and frustration, which in turn led...

  6. Transfusion in critically ill children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, E L; Stensballe, J; Afshari, A

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood products is a cornerstone in managing many critically ill children. Major improvements in blood product safety have not diminished the need for caution in transfusion practice. In this review, we aim to discuss the interplay between benefits and potential adverse effects...... of transfusion in critically ill children by including 65 papers, which were evaluated based on previously agreed selection criteria. Current practice on transfusing critically ill children is mainly founded on the basis of adult studies, common practices with cut-off values, and expert opinions, rather than...... evidence-based medicine. Paediatric patients have explicit physiological challenges and requirements to be addressed. Critically ill children often suffer from anaemia, have substantial iatrogenic blood loss with subsequent transfusions, and are at a higher risk of complications, often due to human errors...

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information > Children/Pediatric > Chronic Pancreatitis in Children test Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child ... pancreatitis will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are ...

  8. Impact of childhood chronic illnesses on siblings: a literature review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Brien, Irene

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Childhood illness can have a significant impact on families, particularly on the ill child\\'s siblings. There is a dearth of published literature focusing on the needs of siblings of ill children. AIM: This literature review aims to provide an overview of the current healthcare literature in relation to the impact of childhood chronic illness or disability on siblings. METHOD: A literature review was undertaken by searching the databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, ProQuest and Cochrane Library for relevant articles in English using the search terms: \\'siblings\\

  9. Chronic illness in adolescents: a sociological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, T J

    1983-01-01

    This article relates chronic illness in adolescents to a sociological model of deviance. This is an area of controversy: the views of Freidson, Lorber and Robinson are presented as being representative of the dispute. Four situations are discussed in which the issues of prognosis, responsibility and stigma elicit societal response. The usefulness of a sociological model consists in making vague societal perception and rules explicit. The concept of the chronically ill adolescent as deviant is descriptive and devoid of value judgment. Only through such rigorous assessment is it possible to gain a realistic understanding of the societal role in the life of the chronically ill adolescent.

  10. Understanding the impact of chronic childhood illness on families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbeth, B

    1984-02-01

    A great deal has been written about mothers and their relationships with their ill children. Fathers, however, have been relatively excluded from the research, as they have been from many pediatrician-mother-child interactions. Although it has been noted that some fathers tend to withdraw from the family, in fact very little is known about the impact of childhood illness on their lives. In general, studies of mothers, fathers, siblings, marriage, and families emphasize psychopathology and other psychosocial problems. Yet, there is a growing awareness in the social sciences that we have much to learn from the capacity to adjust. How is it that some families of chronically ill children survive so well? This question has not been addressed. Most studies focus on individual constituents of the family. Minuchin and others have taught us about aberrant family systems that sometimes develop around chronically ill children. Such systems are characterized by high cohesion and conformity, and the absence of apparent friction. How frequently do such systems develop? How can they be prevented? Finally, understanding the impact of chronic childhood illness on families is a difficult task. Parents have reasons for obscuring the impact, and particularly their distress, from the view of their pediatrician. Physicians are often uncertain how much understanding they ought to offer. Careful attention to the parent-pediatrician relationship is essential to a thorough understanding of the impact of childhood illness on the family.

  11. Summarizing activity limitations in children with chronic illnesses living in the community: a measurement study of scales using supplemented interRAI items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Charles D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To test the validity and reliability of scales intended to measure activity limitations faced by children with chronic illnesses living in the community. The scales were based on information provided by caregivers to service program personnel almost exclusively trained as social workers. The items used to measure activity limitations were interRAI items supplemented so that they were more applicable to activity limitations in children with chronic illnesses. In addition, these analyses may shed light on the possibility of gathering functional information that can span the life course as well as spanning different care settings. Methods Analyses included testing the internal consistency, predictive, concurrent, discriminant and construct validity of two activity limitation scales. The scales were developed using assessment data gathered in the United States of America (USA from over 2,700 assessments of children aged 4 to 20 receiving Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT services, specifically Personal Care Services to assist children in overcoming activity limitations. The Medicaid program in the USA pays for health care services provided to children in low-income households. Data were collected in a single, large state in the southwestern USA in late 2008 and early 2009. A similar sample of children was assessed in 2010, and the analyses were replicated using this sample. Results The two scales exhibited excellent internal consistency. Evidence on the concurrent, predictive, discriminant, and construct validity of the proposed scales was strong. Quite importantly, scale scores were not correlated with (confounded with a child's developmental stage or age. The results for these scales and items were consistent across the two independent samples. Conclusions Unpaid caregivers, usually parents, can provide assessors lacking either medical or nursing training with reliable and valid information

  12. Support and education of immigrants with chronically ill children: Identified needs from a case study of Turkish and Kurdish families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, L.; Karlberg, I.; Ringsberg, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    that the content of the education is understood, implemented and maintained; 2) special support to enable parents to deal with practical and emotional problems and conflicts related to diabetes management; 3) closer contact and psychosocial support in order to promote learning and motivation for selfcare as well......Objective The aim of the study was to analyse how parents of Turkish and Turkish/Kurdish children with diabetes and health care professionals perceived the education and support provided, and to assess what was required to improve the collaboration between the families and the team in order......, their parents, the Turkish interpreter and the paediatric diabetes team. Results The study identified the following factors that might contribute to improve the outcome: 1) Adjusted educational initiatives to promote a better understanding of concepts like chronic disease and selfcare, and to ensure...

  13. The Chronic Illness Initiative: Supporting College Students with Chronic Illness Needs at DePaul University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royster, Lynn; Marshall, Olena

    2008-01-01

    College students with chronic illness find it difficult to succeed in traditional degree programs due to disruptions caused by relapses and unpredictable waxing and waning symptoms. College disability offices are often unable to help, both because their standard supports are not appropriate and because students with chronic illness frequently do…

  14. Attitudes toward patient expertise in chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, S E; Ternulf Nyhlin, K; Paterson, B L

    2000-08-01

    Although it has become an accepted standard to acknowledge the patient as a full partner in health care decisions, replacing traditional authoritative relationships with those based on an emancipatory model, the experiences of persons living with chronic illness confirm that this paradigm shift is not yet apparent in many health care relationships. In this paper, the authors present a qualitative secondary analysis of combined data sets from their research into chronic illness experience with two quite different chronic diseases - Type I Diabetes (a socially legitimized chronic disease) and Environmental Sensitivities (a disease which is currently treated with considerable scepticism). Comparing the experiences of individuals with diseases that are quite differently socially constructed, it becomes possible to detect common underlying health professional values and attitudes that powerfully influence the experience of living with and negotiating health care for a chronic illness. In the discussion of findings from this study, the authors examine the implications of the spiral of behaviors that fuels mutual alienation in chronic illness care relationships if professionals are unable to value patient expertise.

  15. Contribution of Qualitative Methods in the Validity of an Instrument which Measures Quality of Life Related to Health in Children Suffering from a Chronic Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Toledo Gutiérrez

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life related to health (QLRH is a multidimensional concept, which requires the elaboration of instruments through the combination of qualitative and quantitative methodologies in order to measure it. Furthermore, to use a QLRH measurement instrument designed in another country, it must first undergo a socio-cultural adaptation and validity process. In addition to these two moves, further special consideration is needed for patients who are children. This is because the different degrees of cognitive and emotional development in this age group have an influence on the dimensions of the construct of quality of life as well as on the capacity of respondents for giving autonomous responses during their evaluations, and so the qualitative phase of this process has special considerations which must be taken into account for children with a chronic illness. This article discusses how qualitative methodologies were used in the validation process of a measurement instrument of QLRH for children (8-16 aged who suffered from a congenital cardiopathy. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0902257

  16. HYPOPHOSPHATAEMIA IN CRITICALLY ILL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima Shankar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND To estimate the prevalence of hypophosphataemia and outcome associated with this disturbance in children admitted to PICU. METHOD In this prospective cohort study, 102 children admitted consecutively to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU were monitored regarding their phosphorus serum levels during the first 7 days of admission. Age, gender, diagnosis at admission, malnutrition, starvation period, length of stay, and outcome were analysed as independent variables for hypophosphataemia. RESULTS Most of our patients (56% developed hypophosphataemia during their PICU stay. The number of starvation days, days on mechanical ventilation, and survival to discharge were significantly associated with hypophosphataemia. The worst outcomes correlated well with this abnormality. CONCLUSION Hypophosphataemia was commonly observed in our PICU and was associated with the presence of respiratory diseases, infections, and increased starvation days and ventilation days. These factors might be considered as risk factors for hypophosphataemia in critically ill children

  17. New European policy toward chronically ill employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kopnina, H.; Haafkens, J.; Elling, L.R.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current policies related to the chronically ill employees in the Netherlands. Different levels of policy are discussed: those formulated at the European, Dutch and organizational levels. A significantg percentage of Dutch employees suffer from longstanding diseas

  18. Role conflict, uncertainty in illness, and illness-related communication avoidance: College students facing familial chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    Suchak, Meghana

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the current study was on examining possible differences in college students' adjustment based on residency status (i.e., international Asian vs. domestic students) and illness status (i.e., having a family member with a chronic illness vs. not having a family member with a chronic illness). The study also examined the associations between overall college student adjustment and the family and illness-related factors of role conflict, uncertainty in illness, and illness-related com...

  19. Moving towards effective chronic illness management: asthma as an exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Tracy S

    2011-01-01

    The United States health care system is at a pivotal point in its ability to manage chronic illness. The demands and philosophical differences between the management of acute and chronic illnesses suggest the need for different strategies for effective and efficient management of chronic illness. The purpose of this article is to discuss the Chronic Care Model and the collaborative approach to managing chronic illnesses. Asthma, as an exemplar, will be used to illustrate the need for the development of new models of collaborative care for the treatment of chronic illnesses.

  20. Hypophosphatemia in critically ill children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavous Shahsavari Nia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypophosphatemia is a common disorder in critically ill patients, and is associated with myasthenia, especially in respiratory muscles, and respiratory infections. This study was conducted to describe the prevalence of hypophosphatemia in children hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU of Children’s Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, in 2014-2015. Methods: In this descriptive study, medical records of all children admitted to the PICU of the children’s university hospital affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences were collected from archives of the hospital from 2014-2015 upon adopting permission. The medical records were examined in terms of demographic information, clinical diagnosis of the disease, serum phosphate level, nutritional status, therapeutic interventions, and other underlying specifications. The data were analyzed using SPSS software and descriptive tests. Results: Of the 83 eligible medical records, 45 records belonged to boys, and 38 records belonged to girls. The most prevalent and the least prevalent diseases in these children were acute pulmonary disease (57.8% and septic shock (1.2% respectively. Regarding the nutritional status, 38.6% of the children suffered malnutrition. Phosphorus deficiency was prevalent in the first day in 10.8% of the children, and abnormal levels of phosphorus were observed from the fourth to the sixth day in 26.5% of the children, which increased to 34.9% from the seventh to the tenth day. Conclusion: This study showed no statistically significant correlation between sex and prevalence of hypophosphatemia. Type of disease was not significantly associated with the level of phosphorus. Moreover, the patients’ nutritional status was not significantly associated with the prevalence of hypophosphatemia.

  1. Illness in Children and Parental Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Bruijnzeels (Marc)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractMost children suffer from illnesses from time to time. In only a small part of these ill children parents decide to seek professional help. So, most child health care is carried out by parents. In general, this phenomenon is called the iceberg of symptoms. The part of the iceberg under t

  2. Labour participation of the chronically ill: a profile sketch.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baanders, A.N.; Rijken, P.M.; Peters, L.

    2002-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the problematic labour market position of people with a chronic disease, this paper describes the participation rates of several subgroups of the chronically ill in the Netherlands, as well as the aspects by which the working chronically ill differ from those who are

  3. Acute Stress Response in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. den Brinker (Marieke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe understanding of the endocrine changes in critically ill children is important, as it provides insights in the pathophysiology of the acute stress in children and its differences compared with adults. Furthermore, it delineates prognostic factors for survival and supports the rati

  4. Mental Illness in Children: Know the Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Autism spectrum disorder: Signs and symptoms. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/autism/signs.html. Accessed Dec. 8, 2014. Feb. 11, 2015 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/childrens-health/in-depth/mental-illness-in-children/ ...

  5. Peer interaction in adolescents with a chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, SA; Sinnema, G; Bijstra, JO; Mellenbergh, GJ; Wolters, WHG

    2000-01-01

    This study examined behavioural, cognitive and affective aspects of peer interaction of adolescents with a chronic illness. The aim of the study was twofold: (1) describe peer interaction of adolescents with a chronic illness in comparison with norms of healthy adolescents; (2) examine the relations

  6. THE RESULTS OF STUDY OF THE LEVELS OF SPECIFIC ANTIBODIES TO THE COMBINED INJECTION VACCINES AGAINST INFLUENZA, MEASLES, RUBELLA AND MUMPS AND DT IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC PHYSICAL ILLNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Haritе

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of antibodies to the separate and combined administration of the vaccine plus Grippol® Plus and vaccines against measles, mumps and/or rubella, diphtheria and tetanus (DT in children with chronic medical illnesses, including HIV and organic CNS. Revealed that at low reactogenicity and safety of the vaccine Grippol® Plus, concomitant vaccination does not affect the dynamics of the synthesis (seroprotection, seroconversion, diphtheria, mumps, and rubella antibodies, however, reduces the synthesis of measles antibodies. When combined administration of DT and mumps-measles vaccines + Grippol® Plus suppressed antibody response to a strain of influenza virus A/H3N2. 

  7. Nonthyroidal illness syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Seth D

    2009-12-01

    Neuroendocrine changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis during critical illness result in nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) characterized by abnormal thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroid hormone levels. Studies looking at the natural history of neuroendocrine changes during critical illness have revealed the presence of NTIS. NTIS has been described in a variety of patient settings. Many studies have tried to uncover the pathophysiology behind NTIS and several theories are proposed. Whether NTIS requires treatment or intervention is still controversial and the results of the treatment studies are arguably mixed. Whether implicitly stated or not, the underlying purpose of all the natural history, pathophysiology, or treatment studies is to determine whether NTIS is adaptive or maladaptive. Some studies have illustrated a correlation between illness severity and the degree of NTIS but a cause and effect relationship is still elusive. The human studies can be divided between those with either adult or pediatric subjects, with much less data available in the latter. This review examines the available literature on NTIS with an emphasis on the pediatric literature.

  8. An intelligent partner system for improving chronic illness care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Deutsch

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic care consists of a sequence of actions to treat a specific clinical disorder over time as a function of the ways in which illness progresses and patients respond to management actions. Outcomes depend on physicians' skills to select the actions best suited for their patients and competent self-management. This paper presents the architecture of an intelligent partner system (IPS, which helps to provide doctors with relevant data and skills and empowers chronically ill patients with the information and confidence to manage their health wisely. The services of this intelligent system are presented as 'therapies' for the information-processing 'pathologies' associated with traditional chronic illness care.

  9. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from...... Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show...

  10. Telehomecare for patients with multiple chronic illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddy, Clare; Dusseault, Joanne J.; Dahrouge, Simone; Hogg, William; Lemelin, Jacques; Humber, Jennie

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the feasibility and efficacy of integrating home health monitoring into a primary care setting. DESIGN A mixed method was used for this pilot study. It included in-depth interviews, focus groups, and surveys. SETTING A semirural family health network in eastern Ontario comprising 8 physicians and 5 nurses caring for approximately 10 000 patients. PARTICIPANTS Purposeful sample of 22 patients chosen from the experimental group of 120 patients 50 years old or older in a larger randomized controlled trial (N = 240). These patients had chronic illnesses and were identified as being at risk based on objective criteria and physician assessment. INTERVENTIONS Between November 2004 and March 2006, 3 nurse practitioners and a pharmacist installed telehomecare units with 1 or more peripheral devices (eg, blood-pressure monitor, weight scale, glucometer) in patients’ homes. The nurse practitioners incorporated individualized instructions for using the unit into each patient’s care plan. Patients used the units every morning for collecting data, entering values into the system either manually or directly through supplied peripherals. The information was transferred to a secure server and was then uploaded to a secure Web-based application that allowed care providers to access and review it from any location with Internet access. The devices were monitored in the office on weekdays by the nurse practitioners. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Acceptance and use of the units, patients’ and care providers’ satisfaction with the system, and patients’ demographic and health characteristics. RESULTS All 22 patients, 12 men and 10 women with an average age of 73 years (range 60 to 88 years), agreed to participate. Most were retired, and a few were receiving community services. Common diagnoses included hypertension, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. All patients had blood pressure monitors installed, 11 had wired weight

  11. Prevalence and factors associated with behavioral disorders in children with chronic health conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Santoso Adji

    2010-03-01

    Conclusions Prevalence of behavioral disorders in children with chronic health condition is 37.5%. The duration of illness contributes to the manifestation of behavioral disorders in children with chronic health conditions. [Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:1-5].

  12. Intravenous levetiracetam in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To report the effectiveness and safety of intravenous (IV levetiracetam (LEV in the treatment of critically ill children with acute repetitive seizures and status epilepticus (SE in a children′s hospital. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed data from children treated with IV LEV. Results: The mean age of the 108 children was 69.39 ± 46.14 months (1-192 months. There were 58 (53.1% males and 50 (46.8% females. LEV load dose was 28.33 ± 4.60 mg/kg/dose (10-40 mg/kg. Out of these 108 patients, LEV terminated seizures in 79 (73.1%. No serious adverse effects were observed but agitation and aggression were developed in two patients, and mild erythematous rash and urticaria developed in one patient. Conclusion: Antiepileptic treatment of critically ill children with IV LEV seems to be effective and safe. Further study is needed to elucidate the role of IV LEV in critically ill children.

  13. Living with a chronic illness - dealing with feelings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... art class, play an instrument, or listen to music. Call or spend time with a friend. Finding ... Larsen PD, ed. Lubkin's Chronic Illness: Impact and Intervention . 9th ed. Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Learning; ...

  14. Illness perception in Polish patients with chronic diseases: Psychometric properties of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka-Sauer, Katarzyna; Banaszkiewicz, Dorota; Staśkiewicz, Izabela; Kopczyński, Piotr; Hajduk, Adam; Czuszyńska, Zenobia; Ejdys, Mariola; Szostakiewicz, Małgorzata; Sablińska, Agnieszka; Kałużna, Anna; Tomaszewska, Magda; Siebert, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    The study evaluates the psychometric properties of a Polish translation of the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire. A total of 276 patients with chronic conditions (58.7% women) completed the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The internal consistency of the Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire measured with Cronbach's alpha was satisfactory (α = 0.74). Structural validity was demonstrated by significant inter-correlations between the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire components. Discriminant validity was supported by the fact that the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire enables patients with various conditions to be differentiated. Significant correlations were found between Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire and depression and anxiety levels. The Polish Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire thus evaluated is a reliable and valid tool.

  15. Children of Parents With Serious Mental Illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranning, Anne; Munk Laursen, Thomas; Thorup, Anne

    2016-01-01

    analyses were performed assessing the risk of dissolution of the conjugal family. RESULTS: Children's living arrangements were characterized by fewer nuclear families and more single-parent-headed households when parents had serious mental illness (SMI). From birth, 15% to 20% of children lived...... with a single mother with SMI. Conjugal families were dissolved at higher rates if a parent had SMI, especially if the mother (incidence rate ratio 2.98; 95% CI 2.80-3.17) or the father (incidence rate ratio 2.60; 95% CI 2.47-2.74) had schizophrenia. Risks for family dissolution varied greatly with parents......' socioeconomic position in all diagnostic groups. CONCLUSION: Parents' SMI affects children's family living arrangements because fewer children live with both parents and more children live with a single parent or are separated from both parents. Family cohesion seems especially difficult to maintain when...

  16. Expanding Transition to Address the Needs of Students with Invisible Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Jeanne B.; Horky, Susan Chauncey; Miney, Angela; Reiss, John; Saidi, Arwa; Wolcott, Lisa; Saldana, Pablo; Jaress, Jennifer M.

    2012-01-01

    Many children with invisible chronic illnesses (ICIs) are living to adulthood, necessitating that they prepare for their future. Health care and education systems have different meanings and processes for transition, although both systems are designed to help young adults prepare for independence. As health care and educational services support…

  17. Identity and psychological ownership in chronic illness and disease state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnilowicz, W

    2011-03-01

    Psychological ownership is rarely considered in health discourse related to chronic illness or disease state. Construction of identity is an important consideration within this framework. This autoethnographic study explores psychological ownership and identity related to prostate cancer and chronic illness. Conclusions about the nature of psychological ownership and identity were gathered from the relevant literature and personal experience. Themes include the patient-healthcare professional relationship and that psychological ownership is personal and grounded in an individual's sense of identity, control and perceived capacity to control illness or disease. Personal reflection through autoethnography guides discussion of psychological ownership and identity.

  18. The impact of parents’ chronic medical condition on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieh, D.S.

    2012-01-01

    The results of this research suggests that latency-aged and adolescent children generally cope well with the parent’s chronic disease. In terms of parent attachment, coping skills, and salivary cortisol, adolescents with a chronically ill parent have similar scores as those who do not have a chronic

  19. Hypothalamic inflammation and food intake regulation during chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Marks, D.L.; Witkamp, R.F.; Norren, van K.

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia is a common symptom in chronic illness. It contributes to malnutrition and strongly affects survival and quality of life. A common denominator of many chronic diseases is an elevated inflammatory status, which is considered to play a pivotal role in the failure of food-intake regulating sys

  20. Chronic cough in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Rigoberto; Bahna, Sami L

    2014-08-01

    Cough is probably the most common cause of seeking medical care in pediatric practice. Most acute cough is caused by infection and usually resolves within less than 4 weeks. If it lasts longer, it is considered chronic and deserves investigation to identify the underlying cause, which can be almost any of a wide variety of illnesses of the respiratory tract and certain extrathoracic conditions. This review provides an optimal approach for diagnosis through a skillful history taking, physical examination, and selection of appropriate tests.

  1. Sexual function of women with chronic illness and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basson, Rosemary

    2010-05-01

    Addressing the sexual sequelae of chronic disease and its treatment is now accepted as a fundamental part of healthcare. Most of the sexual effects of chronic disease are negative, and ongoing illness continues to modulate a woman's sexual self-image, energy and interest in sexual activity, as well as her ability to respond to sexual stimuli with pleasurable sensations, excitement, orgasm and freedom from pain with genital stimulation or intercourse. Nevertheless, for many women with chronic illness, sexuality remains extremely important despite the commonly associated fatigue and acquired sexual dysfunctions; sexual resilience can be substantial. Following recovery from cancer surgery, chemotherapy and radiation, prognosis can be excellent and a return to full health can often be expected, and yet, there may have been devastating changes to sexual function owing to the cancer treatment. Women with metastatic disease may still treasure sexual intimacy. Assessment and management of sexual dysfunction is therefore necessary in all women with chronic illness or past or present cancer.

  2. Neighbourly support of people with chronic illness; is it related to neighbourhood social capital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waverijn, Geeke; Heijmans, Monique; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2017-01-01

    The neighbourhood may provide resources for health. It is to date unknown whether people who live in neighbourhoods with more social capital have more access to practical and emotional support by neighbours, or whether this is a resource only available to those who are personally connected to people in their neighbourhood. We investigated whether support by neighbours of people with chronic illness was related to neighbourhood social capital and to individual neighbourhood connections. Furthermore, we investigated whether support received from neighbours by people with chronic illness differed according to demographic and disease characteristics. We collected data on support by neighbours and individual connections to neighbours among 2272 people with chronic illness in 2015. Data on neighbourhood social capital were collected among 69,336 people in 3425 neighbourhoods between May 2011 and September 2012. Neighbourhood social capital was estimated with ecometric measurements. We conducted multilevel regression analyses. People with chronic illness were more likely to receive practical and emotional support from neighbours if they had more individual connections to people in their neighbourhood. People with chronic illness were not more likely to receive practical and emotional support from neighbours if they lived in a neighbourhood with more social capital. People with chronic illness with moderate physical disabilities or with comorbidity, and people with chronic illness who lived together with their partner or children, were more likely to receive support from neighbours. To gain more insight into the benefits of neighbourhood social capital, it is necessary to differentiate between the resources only accessible through individual connections to people in the neighbourhood and resources provided through social capital on the neighbourhood level.

  3. Benzodiazepine pathways in the chronically ill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hulten, Rolf; Heerdink, Eibert R.; Bakker, Albert; Leufkens, Hubert G.

    1999-01-01

    The association between patterns of use of benzodiazepines and chronic somatic morbidity was examined by applying the Chronic Disease Score (CDS). In the only pharmacy in a Dutch community, 6921 patients with data available covering a 10-year period (1983-1992) were included. In 1992, two-thirds of

  4. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  5. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from D...... of illness, health did matter. Viewed as physical, social and mental well-being in line with WHO’s definition of health, health was indeed one of the most important factors when the decision to return was made.......Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from...... Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show...

  6. Florence Nightingale: her Crimean fever and chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossey, Barbara M

    2010-03-01

    Florence Nightingale's Crimean fever and chronic illness have intrigued historians for more than a century and a half. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) to discuss the facts that point to the cause of Nightingale's Crimean fever as brucellosis, (b) to show that her debilitating illness for 32 years (1855-1887) was compatible with the specific form of chronic brucellosis, and (c) to present new evidence that she was still having severe symptoms in December 1887, when it was previously felt that she had no severe symptoms after 1870.

  7. Bullying e a criança com doença crónica Bullying y el niño con enfermedad crónica Bullying and children with chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Rita de Jesus Azenha

    2012-03-01

    guiar la revisión se utilizaron las palabras de búsqueda: “niño”, “bullying”, “necesidades especiales”, “enfermedad crónica”, “victimización”, “violencia”, “agresión” y “daños psicológicos”, tras lo cual se identificaron 97 artículos de los cuales se seleccionaron 40, se localizaron 10 y se utilizaron 6. Los resultados de la búsqueda fueron analizados de acuerdo con el tema investigado y los aspectos metodológicos clasificados. Los principales tópicos tratados en los estudios fueron la incidencia del bullying, las distintas formas de bullying y la quiebra del silencio por parte del niño. Los estudios analizados muestran la relación entre el hecho de que el niño sea portador de enfermedad crónica y que sea víctima de bullying, tras compararlos con el grupo de niños sanos. Los estudios revelaron que existen diferencias significativas entre tener o no una enfermedad crónica y ser víctima de bullying.Awareness of the very high prevalence of chronic illness in children led us to carry out a systematic literature review of studies indexed in the databases SciElo, LILACS, CINAHL, PubMed, Nursing Reference Center, PepsiCo, Medline, PsycoInfo and ScienceDirect published between 2001 and 2010, related to the topic bullying in Children with Chronic Illness, in which we tried to determine whether children with a chronic illness are more likely to be victims of bullying than healthy children. To guide the review we used the search words “child,” “bullying”, “special needs”, “chronic disease”, “victimization,” “violence”, “aggression” and “psychological damage”, and identified 97 articles, 40 of which were selected, 10 were located and 6 were used. The results were analyzed according to the topic investigated and the methodological aspects were categorized. The main topics covered in the study were the incidence of bullying, different forms of bullying and breaking of silence by the child. The studies

  8. Information Technology to Support Improved Care For Chronic Illness

    OpenAIRE

    Young, Alexander S.; Chaney, Edmund; Shoai, Rebecca; Bonner, Laura; Cohen, Amy N.; Doebbeling, Brad; Dorr, David; Goldstein, Mary K.; Kerr, Eve; Nichol, Paul; Perrin, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Background In populations with chronic illness, outcomes improve with the use of care models that integrate clinical information, evidence-based treatments, and proactive management of care. Health information technology is believed to be critical for efficient implementation of these chronic care models. Health care organizations have implemented information technologies, such as electronic medical records, to varying degrees. However, considerable uncertainty remains regarding the relative ...

  9. Divorce and Childhood Chronic Illness: A Grounded Theory of Trust, Gender, and Third-Party Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Luke T; Coleman, Marilyn; Ganong, Lawrence H; Gayer, Debra

    2016-05-01

    Divorced parents face distinct challenges in providing care for chronically ill children. Children's residence in two households necessitates the development of family-specific strategies to ensure coparents' supervision of regimen adherence and the management of children's health care. Utilizing a risk and resilience perspective, a grounded theory study was conducted with 14 divorced parents of children with chronic illnesses. The importance of trust, gender, and relationships with third-party care providers emerged as key themes related to the development of effective coparenting relationships for maintaining children's health. Divorced parents were best able to support the management of their children's chronic conditions when care providers operated as neutral third parties and intermediaries. Collaborative family care may require health care practitioners to avoid being drawn into contentious inter-parental conflicts.

  10. The role of illness perceptions in labour participation of the chronically ill.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, C.R.L.; Heijmans, M.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Rijken, M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate associations between work disability and illness perceptions, over and above medical assessment and self-reported health. METHODS: A representative sample of people aged 15-64 years with various chronic physical diseases was derived from the Panel of Patients with

  11. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from...

  12. Social representations of illness among people with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Gonçalves Pustiglione Campos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the social representations of illness among people with chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis. METHOD: Descriptive, qualitative research, anchored on the social representations theory. This study was conducted in the municipality of Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil, with 23 adults with chronic kidney disease. Data were collection between February and November 2012 by means of a semi-structured interview, and analyzed using Content Analysis. RESULTS: The interviews led to the categories "the meaning of kidney disease": awareness of finitude, and "survival": the visible with chronic kidney disease. The representation of illness unveiled a difference and interruption in life projects, and haemodialysis meant loss of freedom, imprisonment and stigma. CONCLUSION: Family ties and the individuals´ social role are determining representations for healthcare.

  13. Children's Conceptions of Mental Illness: A Naive Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Claudine; Buchanan-Barrow, Eithne; Barrett, Martyn

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports two studies that investigated children's conceptions of mental illness using a naive theory approach, drawing upon a conceptual framework for analysing illness representations which distinguishes between the identity, causes, consequences, curability, and timeline of an illness. The studies utilized semi-structured interviewing…

  14. Patients' and partners' perspectives of chronic illness and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checton, Maria G; Greene, Kathryn; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Venetis, Maria K

    2012-06-01

    This study is framed in theories of illness uncertainty (Babrow, A. S., 2007, Problematic integration theory. In B. B. Whaley & W. Samter (Eds.), Explaining communication: Contemporary theories and exemplars (pp. 181-200). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum; Babrow & Matthias, 2009; Brashers, D. E., 2007, A theory of communication and uncertainty management. In B. B. Whaley & W. Samter (Eds.), Explaining communication: Contemporary theories and exemplars (pp. 201-218). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum; Hogan, T. P., & Brashers, D. E. (2009). The theory of communication and uncertainty management: Implications for the wider realm of information behavior. In T. D. Afifi & W. A. Afifi (Eds.), Uncertainty and information regulation in interpersonal contexts: Theories and applications, (pp. 45-66). New York, NY: Routledge; Mishel, M. H. (1999). Uncertainty in chronic illness. Annual Review of Nursing Research, 17, 269-294; Mishel, M. H., & Clayton, M. F., 2003, Theories of uncertainty. In M. J. Smith & P. R. Liehr (Eds.), Middle range theory for nursing (pp. 25-48). New York, NY: Springer) and health information management (Afifi, W. A., & Weiner, J. L., 2004, Toward a theory of motivated information management. Communication Theory, 14, 167-190. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2885.2004.tb00310.x; Greene, K., 2009, An integrated model of health disclosure decision-making. In T. D. Afifi & W. A. Afifi (Eds.), Uncertainty and information regulation in interpersonal contexts: Theories and applications (pp. 226-253). New York, NY: Routledge) and examines how couples experience uncertainty and interference related to one partner's chronic health condition. Specifically, a model is hypothesized in which illness uncertainty (i.e., stigma, prognosis, and symptom) and illness interference predict communication efficacy and health condition management. Participants include 308 dyads in which one partner has a chronic health condition. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results indicate that there

  15. Chronic Neurodegenerative Illnesses and Epilepsy in Danish Adventists and Baptists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Gimsing, Louise NØrreslet; Bautz, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited knowledge of the influence of lifestyle risk factors and religious living on chronic neurological diseases exist. Seventh-day Adventists (SDA) do not consume tobacco, alcohol, or pork, and many adhere to lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet, and Baptists discourage excessive use of alcohol...... and tobacco. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the incidence of four common chronic neurological illnesses: dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and epilepsy in a large cohort of Danish Adventists and Baptists was different compared to the general Danish population. Three of the illnesses...... are neurodegenerative, whereas epilepsy can occur at any age. METHODS: We compared hospital admission rates for some major neurological diseases among members of the Danish Religious Societies Health Study comprising 6,532 SDA and 3,720 Baptists with the general Danish population. Standardized incidence rates (SIR...

  16. Rural women, technology, and self-management of chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Clarann; Cudney, Shirley; Hill, Wade G

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the differences in the psychosocial status of 3 groups of chronically ill rural women participating in a computer intervention. The 3 groups were: intense intervention, less-intense intervention, and control. At baseline and following the intervention, measures were taken for social support, self-esteem, empowerment, self-efficacy, depression, stress, and loneliness. ANCOVA results showed group differences for social support and self-efficacy among the overall group. The findings differed for a vulnerable subgroup, with significant between-group differences for social support and loneliness. It was concluded that a computer-delivered intervention can improve social support and self-efficacy and reduce loneliness in rural women, enhancing their ability to self-manage and adapt to chronic illness.

  17. Systematic review of character development and childhood chronic illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Gary R; Hill, Sherika N

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review empirical evidence on character development among youth with chronic illnesses. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted using PubMed and PSYCHINFO from inception until November 2013 to find quantitative studies that measured character strengths among youth with chronic illnesses. Inclusion criteria were limited to English language studies examining constructs of character development among adolescents or young adults aged 13-24 years with a childhood-onset chronic medical condition. A librarian at Duke University Medical Center Library assisted with the development of the mesh search term. Two researchers independently reviewed relevant titles (n = 549), then abstracts (n = 45), and finally manuscripts (n = 3). RESULTS: There is a lack of empirical research on character development and childhood-onset chronic medical conditions. Three studies were identified that used different measures of character based on moral themes. One study examined moral reasoning among deaf adolescents using Kohlberg’s Moral Judgement Instrument; another, investigated moral values of adolescent cancer survivors with the Values In Action Classification of Strengths. A third study evaluated moral behavior among young adult survivors of burn injury utilizing the Tennessee Self-Concept, 2nd edition. The studies observed that youth with chronic conditions reasoned at less advanced stages and had a lower moral self-concept compared to referent populations, but that they did differ on character virtues and strengths when matched with healthy peers for age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Yet, generalizations could not be drawn regarding character development of youth with chronic medical conditions because the studies were too divergent from each other and biased from study design limitations. CONCLUSION: Future empirical studies should learn from the strengths and weaknesses of the existing literature on character development among youth with chronic medical conditions

  18. Catatonia in children following systemic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The term catatonia was first introduced in 1874 and several etiologies, both organic and psychiatric have been attributed to the clinical phenotype of catatonia. The interesting feature is their response to lorazepam irrespective of their etiology. Patients and Methods: Four patients admitted with verbal and motor unresponsiveness following febrile illness were evaluated for infective and metabolic causes. Those who qualified for catatonia as per Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition criteria and Bush-Francis Catatonia Screening Instrument screening tool and rating scale were evaluated in detail and reported. Observations: Catatonia occurs in clusters, females are more affected than males. Electroencephalogram can be abnormal based on the precipitating symptom. Minor changes in serum total iron and transferrin saturation and nonspecific elevation of viral antibody titers are seen in some patients. Lorazepam challenge always gives the diagnosis. Result: All patients where females and had preceeding systemic or CNS infection. Three out of the Four patients where independent at the end of one month. Conclusion: Catatonia should be considered as a differential diagnosis in all children with verbal and motor unresponsiveness, which have no other explanation. Early initiation of treatment is very rewarding at least during short term follow-up.

  19. [Meaning and spirituality in patients with chronic somatic illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehnert, A

    2006-08-01

    Issues of the meaning of life and spirituality are particularly important subjects given the threat of a serious illness and the confrontation with the finiteness of one's own life. Thus, addressing questions of meaning and spiritual domains of supportive care has been identified as essential by patients as well as by health care professionals. In recent years more research has focussed on theoretical conceptualization, empirical examination as well as on the development of meaning-centred interventions in somatically ill patients. Theoretical models for the understanding, development and adaptation of concepts and interventions addressing meaning and spirituality in the chronically ill are offered by the philosophical tradition of existentialism, logotherapy as well as by cognitive and developmental psychology, in particular studies on autobiographical memory and life story. However, the current state of empirical research focussing on the association between meaning, spirituality and physical as well as mental health and underlying mechanisms is not sufficient to draw reliable conclusions. With regard to psychosocial care, meaning-centred interventions have been developed in recent years primarily within the context of palliative care. These interventions are intended to support patients to find meaning in life in the face of a serious illness and to experience their life as fulfilled.

  20. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... maintaining good health. Can chronic pancreatitis give my child cancer? If your child has chronic pancreatitis, he or she will be at an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer compared to the general population. The degree of ...

  1. Self-referral and serious illness in children with fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. van Ierland (Yvette); N. Seiger (Nienke); M. van Veen (Mirjam); A.H.J. van Meurs (Alfred); M. Ruige (Madelon); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to evaluate parents' capability to assess their febrile child's severity of illness and decision to present to the emergency department. We compared children referred by a general practitioner (GP) with those self-referred on the basis of illness-sev

  2. The Impact of Chronic Illness on Psychosocial Stages of Human Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, E. Virginia, Ed.; Shevlin, Kathleen M., Ed.

    This book addresses critical issues regarding the impact of chronic illness and disability on human development. It was written for health care professionals who help chronically ill and disabled persons deal with the psychological and social as well as the biological aspects of their illness or disability. An expanded version of Erik Erikson's…

  3. Treatment of Children with Mental Illness: Frequently Asked Questions about the Treatment of Mental Illness in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Research shows that half of all lifetime cases of mental illness begin by age 14. Scientists are discovering that changes in the body leading to mental illness may start much earlier, before any symptoms appear. Through greater understanding of when and how fast specific areas of children's brains develop, we are learning more about the early…

  4. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Andre Kowacs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas.

  5. Latent viral immune inflammatory response model for chronic multisymptom illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Sean R; Jensen, Susan; Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Goolkasian, Paula

    2013-03-01

    A latent viral immune inflammatory response (LVIIR) model is presented which integrates factors that contribute to chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) in both the veteran and civilian populations. The LVIIR model for CMI results from an integration of clinical experience with a review of the literature in four distinct areas: (1) studies of idiopathic multisymptom illness in the veteran population including two decades of research on Gulf War I veterans with CMI, (2) new evidence supporting the existence of chronic inflammatory responses to latent viral antigens and the effect these responses may have on the nervous system, (3) recent discoveries concerning the role of vitamin D in maintaining normal innate and adaptive immunity including suppression of latent viruses and regulation of the immune inflammatory response, and (4) the detrimental effects of extreme chronic repetitive stress (ECRS) on the immune and nervous systems. The LVIIR model describes the pathophysiology of a pathway to CMI and presents a new direction for the clinical assessment of CMI that includes the use of neurological signs from a physical exam, objective laboratory data, and a new proposed latent viral antigen-antibody imaging technique for the peripheral and central nervous system. The LVIIR model predicts that CMI can be treated by a focus on reversal of immune system impairment, suppression of latent viruses and their antigens, and healing of nervous system tissue damaged by chronic inflammation associated with latent viral antigens and by ECRS. In addition, the LVIIR model suggests that maintaining optimal serum 25 OH vitamin D levels will maximize immune system suppression of latent viruses and their antigens and will minimize immune system inflammation. This model also emphasizes the importance of decreasing ECRS to improve immune system function and to minimize nervous system injury from excess serum glucocorticoid levels. The proposed model supports growing evidence that increasing

  6. Stress, emotional skill, and illness in children: the importance of distinguishing between children's and parents' reports of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, J A; Lumley, M A; Casey, R J

    2001-03-01

    This study examined relationships of stress (negative event frequency during the last year) to reports of illness among 92 children, aged 10 to 13 years. Children's health status was reported separately by children and parents, and children's skill in identifying and communicating their feelings was tested for direct and buffering relationships on illness reports. Analyses controlled for demographics and negative affect of both children and parents, and children's verbal ability was also tested for confounding. Results showed that stress correlated positively with children's poor health, whether the children's health status was reported by children or by parents. Children's emotional skill was correlated with better health when health was reported by children, but with worse health when health was reported by parents. Further, moderator analyses indicated that the relationship between negative event frequency and children's poor health as reported by parents held only for children with high levels of skill in identifying and communicating feelings. These findings suggest that negative life events impair children's health, but that the health reports of children and parents are quite different, and parents' views may be affected by children's skill in communicating their internal states.

  7. Chronic Diarrhea in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Content Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) in Children Lactose Intolerance Ménétrier’s Disease Microscopic Colitis Ostomy Surgery of the ... and Diseases Diarrhea Celiac Disease IBS in Children Lactose Intolerance Related Diagnostic Tests Colonoscopy Flexible Sigmoidoscopy Upper GI ...

  8. Poor, ill, and sometimes abandoned: tubercular children in Buenos Aires, 1880-1920.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Vera Blinn

    2002-04-01

    Ill children with chronic diseases, such as tuberculosis, have faced difficult lives. Poverty proved a factor in their susceptibility to disease, their abandonment, and their treatment. When public health policies in Buenos Aires shifted from ignoring children to viewing them as victims who needed protection, government agencies, charitable organizations, public schools, and hospitals developed special programs that emphasized both prevention and cure of childhood tuberculosis. Argentine physicians and hygienists supported programs that were similar to those in Europe and the United States. Despite efforts, from 1880 to 1920, diagnosis of tuberculosis remained problematic, health professionals failed to prevent tuberculosis in children, and physicians were unable to cure the disease.

  9. Fever and feverish illness in children under five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Penny; Harrison, Maureen

    This article discusses the causes and management of fever in children. In line with guidance from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, it explores the importance of identifying children at risk of serious illness and those that can be managed safely at home. The article also identifies the skills and knowledge required by paediatric and general nurses working with children, alongside the need to offer parents guidance on antipyretics and how to care for their child at home.

  10. [Sensitivity to antibiotics monitoring of oral microflora in practically sound children and patients with chronic gastroduodenitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilova, O A; Davydov, B N; Chervinets, Iu V; Chervinets, V M

    2009-01-01

    Characteristic of oral microflora in practically sound children and patients with chronic gastroduodenitis was offered. Microflora singled out from ill persons differed by pathogenicity in previously opportunistic pathogenic forms. Monitoring of sensitivity and resistivity to antibiotics of the singled out microflora in practically sound children and ill with chronic gastroduodenitis was presented. When treating oral diseases one should take into account the high resistivity to antibiotics (especially to benzilpenicillin) of opportunistic pathogenic forms.

  11. 77 FR 64597 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Chronic Gastrointestinal Illness in Persian Gulf... the notice. This notice solicits comments on information needed to evaluate chronic gastrointestinal... comments on the collection of information through the Federal Docket Management System (FDMS) at...

  12. Early hospital readmission in the perspective of chronically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elen Ferraz Teston

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : learn, from the perspective of chronically ill patients, the reasons for rehospitalization. Methods : qualitative study with 19 patients in a general hospital. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews, submitted to content analysis and grouped into two categories. Results : the first category revealed that patients attributed the occurrence of rehospitalization to the living conditions and social determinants. The second category showed that patients believed that, by following medical advice and taking the prescribed medicines they could prevent rehospitalizations, but they did not associate these actions with other actions of self-care. Conclusion : the discharge planning is an opportunity to add new self-care actions that must be based on the real needs of individual, in order to avoid further rehospitalizations.

  13. Children, Sports, and Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Barry

    1990-01-01

    Discusses four chronic diseases (cystic fibrosis, congenital heart disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and asthma) that affect American children. Many have their physical activities unnecessarily restricted, though sports and exercise can actually alleviate symptoms and improve their psychosocial development. Physicians are encouraged to prescribe…

  14. Parenting stress and impact of illness in parents of children with coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Stella Epifanio

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coeliac disease (CD is a chronic disease which could stress patients and their family. Although, poor attention has been paid to the quality of life in CD children and to the functioning of families with CD children. The study aims to evaluate the parenting perception of the CD impact and the parenting distress level. A group of 74 parents of CD children compiled the Impact Childhood Illness Scale and the Parenting Stress Index which is also compiled by 74 parents of health children. The assessment does not reveal a significant impact of CD on patient’s personal life although some critical areas emerged. Results evidenced an higher level of parenting stress in parents of CD children than parents of healthy children. CD, if suitably managed, has not a critical impact on parenting perception. Although, CD certainly put parents through an higher risk of a distress related to parenting role than parents with health children. A early identification of parenting distress in a pediatric chronic illness could facilitate the adjustment to pathology.

  15. Indications and Effects of Plasma Transfusions in Critically Ill Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karam, Oliver; Demaret, Pierre; Shefler, Alison

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Plasma transfusions are frequently prescribed for critically ill children, although their indications lack a strong evidence base. Plasma transfusions are largely driven by physician conceptions of need, and these are poorly documented in pediatric intensive care patients. OBJECTIVES......: To identify patient characteristics and to characterize indications leading to plasma transfusions in critically ill children, and to assess the effect of plasma transfusions on coagulation tests. METHODS: Point-prevalence study in 101 pediatric intensive care units in 21 countries, on 6 predefined weeks. All...

  16. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  17. Continuous EEG in Critically Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Kurz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from the Critical Care Continuous EEG Task Force of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society reported a consensus statement on indications for the use of critical care continuous electroencephalographic monitoring (ccEEG in adults and children.

  18. Role of lactate in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chugh Krishan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acidosis is a common finding in critically ill patients. It has been used as a prognostic marker of the outcome in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit patients. Lactic acid is produced as a product of anaerobic glycolysis and is reversibly converted to pyruvate in the presence of favorable metabolic environment. All the body tissues can produce and consume lactate with few having predominant function of production and others of consumption. Liver is a major organ for lactate consumption and it is the liver, which metabolizes the increased lactic acid produced in regional tissue beds. The lactate levels can be done on arterial, venous, or mixed venous blood and can be measured by various methods. Serial lactate concentrations and the difference in arterial and mixed venous lactate levels or between the arterial and regional blood lactate levels like jugular venous lactate levels have been shown to have better correlation with the outcome. High initial blood lactate levels and persistently high lactate levels have been correlated with poor outcome. There are various causes of lactic acid overproduction, which may produce either hyperlactatemia or lactic acidosis. High blood lactate levels are found in critically ill patients with shock of any etiology and sepsis due to various reasons, which include increased catecholamine induced glucose flux apart from the tissue hypoperfusion and hypoxia. Various other illnesses can cause an increase in blood lactate levels like acute lung/liver injury, severe asthma, poisoning, post cardiac surgery etc. Treating the underlying disease leading to lactic acidosis is the best measure to control lactic acidosis. Some therapeutic choices are available to neutralize the effect of lactic acid on cell function, but none has stood the test of time and are tried only in desperate situations.

  19. Multimorbidity in a Mexican Community: Secondary Analysis of Chronic Illness and Depression Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Kathleen; Vizcaino, Maricarmen; Ibarra, Jorge M.; Balcazar, Hector; Perez, Eduardo; Flores, Luis; Anders, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this article are: 1) to examine the associations between health provider-diagnosed depression and multimorbidity, the condition of suffering from more than two chronic illnesses; 2) to assess the unique contribution of chronic illness in the prediction of depression; and 3) to suggest practice changes that would address risk of depression among individuals with chronic illnesses. Data collected in a cross-sectional community health study among adult Mexicans (n= 274) living in a low income neighborhood (colonia) in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico, were examined. We tested the hypotheses that individuals who reported suffering chronic illnesses would also report higher rates of depression than healthy individuals; and having that two or more chronic illnesses further increased the risk of depression. PMID:26640817

  20. Othering the Chronically Ill: A Discourse Analysis of New Zealand Health Policy Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Jo Ann; Lazzaro-Salazar, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that chronic illnesses pose significant challenges for health care systems around the world. In response, most governments have set health policies in order to manage (or better, reduce) demand and improve the health of their populations. A discourse analysis of four policy documents that shape these strategies in New Zealand reveals that the policies construct the chronically ill as "others," that is, as deviant or different from the "normal" population. The discourse further serves to blame the chronically ill both for being sick, and for placing a serious financial burden on society. We identify problems that arise from this discourse. They relate to (a) the fact that chronic illnesses are so prevalent, (b) the fallacy of categorizing all chronic illnesses as the same,

  1. The importance of productive patient–professional interaction for the well-being of chronically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective To investigate patient–professional interactions and identify the association between quality of care, productivity of patient–professional interaction, and chronically ill patients’ well-being. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to chronically ill patien

  2. The importance of assessing for abuse and neglect in children with chronic health conditions referred for neuropsychological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Katie; Jacobson, Kristin K

    2014-01-01

    Chronic childhood illnesses have been demonstrated to negatively impact family functioning by introducing new or additive stress on all members of the family system, as well as by increasing financial burden and social isolation. Although these factors have not necessarily been shown to have a direct causal effect on increased rates of abuse in children with chronic illnesses, these children have nonetheless been demonstrated to be at greater risk for neglect and physical and sexual abuse. Children with chronic health care needs are increasingly likely to be referred for neuropsychological evaluation. Thorough assessment of maltreatment would be a valuable addition to all neuropsychological evaluations of children presenting with chronic health conditions.

  3. Inter-hospital transport of critically ill children.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Aherne, E

    2009-10-01

    Most Irish paediatric tertiary care services are centralised in Dublin. Many children are transferred there each year from regional paediatric units around the country. We aimed to quantify and describe all children transferred from one regional tertiary hospital over a two year period. Seventy three out of 75 identified transfers were examined. Sixty nine transfers (94.5%) were sent to the major tertiary centre. Fifteen (20.5%) required intensive care services for transfer. Seventeen seriously ill neonates required transfer, however only 4 (23.5%) of those met both the criteria for and the availability of the National Neonatal Transfer Team (NNTT). Significant events during transfer were only documented in 3 cases. Most transfers arrived in Dublin outside normal working hours. Standards of documentation were found to be very inconsistent. In conclusion, a national transport service for all critically ill children is urgently needed in Ireland.

  4. Interpretation of illness in patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai and their associations with life satisfaction, escape from illness, and ability to reflect the implications of illness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arndt Bssing; Ariane von Bergh; Xiao-feng Zhai; Chang-quan Ling

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:The aim of this study is to analyze how patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai interpret their disease, and how these interpretations inlfuence patients’ life satisfaction, intention to escape from their illness and their ability to relfect on the implications of their illness. METHODS:A cross-sectional study enrolling 142 patients (mean age (50 ± 16) years;63%men, 37%women) with chronic diseases (60%cancer) was recruited in the Changhai Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China and surveyed using standardized questionnaires. RESULTS: Patients with chronic diseases from Shanghai interpreted their illness mostly as an Adverse Interruption of Life (55%), as a Threat/Enemy (50%), but also as a Challenge (49%), and only rarely as a Call for Help (18%) or as a Punishment (13%). Particularly fatalistic negative (i.e., Threat/Enemy, Adverse Interruption of Life) and strategy-associated disease interpretations (i.e., Relieving Break, Call for Help) were moderately associated with patients’ intention to escape from illness. In contrast, positive interpretations (i.e., something of Value, Challenge) and also the guilt-associated negative interpretation Failure were moderately related with patients’ ability to relfect on their illness. However, life satisfaction was weakly associated only with the view that il ness might be a Chal enge. Interestingly, 58%of those who would see their il ness as an Adverse Interruption (AI+) could see it also as a Challenge (Ch+). Detailed analyses showed that AI+Ch+patients differ from their AI+Ch- counterparts signiifcantly with respect to their ability to relfect life and implications of illness (F=9.1;P=0.004). CONCLUSION: The observed interpretations of illness, particularly the negative perceptions, could be used as indicators that patients require further psychological assistance to cope with their burden. Helping AI+patients see their illness also as a Challenge, and thus develop a higher

  5. Blood Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammation in Gulf War Illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Johnson

    Full Text Available More than twenty years following the end of the 1990-1991 Gulf War it is estimated that approximately 300,000 veterans of this conflict suffer from an unexplained chronic, multi-system disorder known as Gulf War Illness (GWI. The etiology of GWI may be exposure to chemical toxins, but it remains only partially defined, and its case definition is based only on symptoms. Objective criteria for the diagnosis of GWI are urgently needed for diagnosis and therapeutic research.This study was designed to determine if blood biomarkers could provide objective criteria to assist diagnosis of GWI.A surveillance study of 85 Gulf War Veteran volunteers identified from the Department of Veterans Affairs Minnesota Gulf War registry was performed. All subjects were deployed to the Gulf War. Fifty seven subjects had GWI defined by CDC criteria, and 28 did not have symptomatic criteria for a diagnosis of GWI. Statistical analyses were performed on peripheral blood counts and assays of 61 plasma proteins using the Mann-Whitney rank sum test to compare biomarker distributions and stepwise logistic regression to formulate a diagnostic model.Lymphocyte, monocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were higher in GWI subjects. Six serum proteins associated with inflammation were significantly different in GWI subjects. A diagnostic model of three biomarkers-lymphocytes, monocytes, and C reactive protein-had a predicted probability of 90% (CI 76-90% for diagnosing GWI when the probability of having GWI was above 70%.The results of the current study indicate that inflammation is a component of the pathobiology of GWI. Analysis of the data resulted in a model utilizing three readily measurable biomarkers that appears to significantly augment the symptom-based case definition of GWI. These new observations are highly relevant to the diagnosis of GWI, and to therapeutic trials.

  6. Associations Between Fluid Balance and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alobaidi, Rashid; Morgan, Catherine; Basu, Rajit K.; Stenson, Erin; Featherstone, Robin; Majumdar, Sumit R.; Bagshaw, Sean M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Fluid therapy is a mainstay during the resuscitation of critically ill children. After initial stabilization, excessive fluid accumulation may lead to complications of fluid overload, which has been independently associated with increased risk for mortality and major morbidity in critically ill children. Objectives: Perform an evidence synthesis to describe the methods used to measure fluid balance, define fluid overload, and evaluate the association between fluid balance and outcomes in critically ill children. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Measurements: Fluid balance, fluid accumulation, and fluid overload as defined by authors. Methods: We will search Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest, Dissertations and Theses. In addition, we will search www.clinicaltrials.gov, World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP) and the proceedings of selected key conferences for ongoing and completed studies. Search strategy will be done in consultation with a research librarian. Clinical trials and observational studies (from database inception to present) in patients (<25 years) admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) reporting fluid balance, fluid accumulation, or fluid overload, and associated outcomes will be included. Language will not be restricted. Two reviewers will independently screen studies and extract data. Primary outcome is mortality, and secondary outcomes encompass critical care resource utilization. Quality of evidence and risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Results will be synthesized qualitatively and pooled for meta-analysis if possible. Limitations: Quality of the included studies; lack of randomized trials; high degrees of expected heterogeneity; and variations in definitions of fluid balance and fluid overload between studies. Conclusion: We will comprehensively appraise and summarize the evidence of the association between

  7. Nutrition therapy in critically ill infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillman, Heather E; Wischmeyer, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Infants and children are susceptible to the profound metabolic effects of critical illness. In addition, preexisting malnutrition and obesity have adverse consequences during the intensive care unit stay. Early enteral and parenteral feeding can improve nutrition deficits, but neither has been sufficiently studied to show an effect on clinical outcomes in pediatric critical care. Indirect calorimetry is a useful technique that identifies patients receiving inadequate or excessive nutrition, but this technique is underused.

  8. Do everyday problems of people with chronic illness interfere with their self-management?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtum, L. van; Rijken, M.; Groenewegen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Being chronically ill is a continuous process of balancing the demands of the illness and the demands of everyday life. Understanding how everyday life affects self-management might help to provide better professional support. However, little attention has been paid to the influence of e

  9. Illness Perception and Information Behaviour of Patients with Rare Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavic, Snježana Stanarevic; Tanackovic, Sanjica Faletar; Badurina, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined possible correlations between health information behaviour and illness perception among patients with rare chronic diseases. Illness perception is related to coping strategies used by patients, and some health information behaviour practices may be associated with better coping and more positive perception of…

  10. Can the common-sense model predict adherence in chronically ill patients? A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brandes; B. Mullan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore whether mental representations, derived from the common-sense model of illness representations (CSM), were able to predict adherence in chronically ill patients. Electronic databases were searched for studies that used the CSM and measured adherence behav

  11. Dissimilary in patients' and spouses' representations of chronic illness: exploration of relations to patient adaptation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijmans, M.; Ridder, D. de; Bensing, J.

    1999-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, the illness representations of patients suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (n=49) and Addison's Disease (n=52) and those of their spouses were compared. Couples generally held similar views with regard to the dimensions of illness identity and cause but disagreed

  12. Malnutrition in acutely ill children at the paediatric emergency unit in a tertiary hospital in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac E Ocheke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many developing countries, malnutrition remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality particularly in under-five children. The factors responsible for malnutrition could be immediate, underlying or basic, acting either alone or together. It has been shown that children who are malnourished have poorer outcomes from other illnesses than well-nourished children. It is important therefore to periodically describe the extent and pattern of childhood malnutrition so that effective preventive measures can be put in place. Objective: To describe the prevalence and pattern of malnutrition in children presenting with acute illnesses at the Jos University Teaching Hospital. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study in children aged 6 to 59 months seen at the paediatric emergency unit from April to October 2012. The subjects were recruited consecutively. Each child had both clinical assessment and appropriate laboratory evaluations done alongside anthropometric measurements. The nutritional/dietary and socio-demographic histories were also obtained. Results: Of the 379 children, 224 (59.1% were males and 155 (40.9% females. The median age was 17 months, range (6-57. Wasting (WFH z-scores ≤−3 to <−1SD was evident in one hundred children, giving an overall prevalence of 26.9%. Severe wasting (WFH z-score <−3, was present in 22 (5.9% children indicating the prevalence of marasmus, whereas only two children (0.53% had oedematous malnutrition (kwashiorkor. Stunting or chronic malnutrition, (HFA z-scores ≤−3 to <−1SD was present in 67 children (18.0%. Seventeen (4.6% were severely stunted (HFA z-score <−3. Conclusions: Wasting was the most common form of malnutrition in the study.

  13. Do illness perceptions of people with chronic low back pain differ from people without chronic low back pain?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wilgen, C. Paul; van Ittersum, Miriam W.; Kaptein, Ad A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine why some people develop chronic low back pain, and whether illness perceptions are an important risk factor in the transition from acute to chronic low back pain. Design Cross-sectional study. Participants Four hundred and two members of the general Dutch population, with and

  14. The therapeutic effects of traditional Turkish Marbling Art on the treatment of children with suffering from chronic illnessesGeleneksel Türk Ebru Sanatının kronik hastalığı olan çocukların terapisi üzerine etkisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meltem Kürtüncü

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic illness is defined as follows: “aberration or anomaly, a situation in which the patient may be left with permanent disability with no chances of recovery, where the patient is required to be treated for a long period of time, and maintained under constant supervision that would necessitate special training in terms of rehabilitation”. It is possible to obtain beneficial results in different areas in the case where children afflicted with chronic illnesses  are treated via art therapy. Traditional Marbling art presents us not only with visual grace but with interesting beauties from the micro and macro realms unseen by the naked eye as well. Furthermore, therapeutic healing power of marbling art is incontestable. Each marbling art that is created is differs from one another; this means that for children endowed with different features, then each marbling art shall constitute a different experience for each child. Due to the aforementioned factors, it can be said that Traditional Turkish Art may contribute significantly in the treatment of children suffering from chronic illnesses. ÖzetKronik hastalık, ‘normalden sapma veya bozukluk gösteren, kalıcı yetersizlik bırakabilen, geriye dönüşü olmayan, patolojik değişiklikler sonucu oluşan, hastanın rehabilitasyonu için özel eğitim gerektiren, uzun süre bakım, gözetim ve denetim gerektireceği beklenen durum’ olarak tanımlanmaktadır. Sanat terapileri ile kronik hastalığı olan çocuklarda farklı alanlarda yararlar sağlanabilmektedir. Geleneksel Türk ebru sanatı, görsel zerafetin yanı sıra, bizlere mikro ve makro alemlerden, çıplak gözün göremeyeceği ilginç güzellikler sunar. Ayrıca Ebru’nun terapi özelliğine sahip olduğu, tartışılmayan bir gerçektir. Yapılan her bir ebrunun birbirinden farklı olması, farklı özellikteki çocuklar için ayrı bir deneyim demektir. Bu nedenle, Geleneksel Türk Ebru Sanatı; kronik hastalığı olan

  15. Factors associated with chronic illness among the elderly in a rural community in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherina, M S; Rampal, L; Mustaqim, A

    2004-01-01

    Chronic illness is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity among the elderly. To determine the prevalence and factors associated with chronic illness among the elderly in a rural community setting. A cross sectional study design was used. Stratified proportionate cluster sampling method was used to select respondents in Mukim Sepang, Sepang, Selangor, Malaysia. Out of 263 elderly residents (6.2% of the total population), 223 agreed to participate in the study giving a response rate of 84.8%. The prevalence of chronic illness among the elderly in Mukim Sepang was 60.1%. Out of 223 respondents, 134 were diagnosed as having chronic illness such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischaemic heart disease, bronchial asthma or gout. Chronic illness was found to be significantly associated with functional dependence among the elderly (chi2=6.863, df=1, p<0.05). The prevalence of chronic illness among the elderly in the rural community is very high. Problems facing this age-group should be addressed comprehensively in order to formulate appropriate programmes for the health care of the elderly.

  16. The Relationship between Age and Illness Duration in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kidd

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating illness, but it is unclear if patient age and illness duration might affect symptoms and functioning of patients. In the current study, participants were categorized into four groups based upon age (under or over age 55 and illness duration (more or less than 10 years. The groups were compared on functioning and symptoms. Findings indicated that those who were older with a longer illness duration had significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than those who were younger with a shorter or longer illness duration and the older group with a shorter illness duration. The results suggest that older patients with an illness duration of over 10 years have significantly higher levels of mental health functioning than the three other groups. For symptoms, the younger/longer illness duration group had significantly worse immune and autonomic domains than the older/longer illness group. In addition, the younger patients with a longer illness duration displayed greater autonomic and immune symptoms in comparison to the older group with a longer illness duration. These findings suggest that both age and illness duration need to be considered when trying to understand the influence of these factors on patients.

  17. Probiotics in critically ill children [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunit C. Singhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gut microflora contribute greatly to immune and nutritive functions and act as a physical barrier against pathogenic organisms across the gut mucosa. Critical illness disrupts the balance between host and gut microflora, facilitating colonization, overgrowth, and translocation of pathogens and microbial products across intestinal mucosal barrier and causing systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. Commonly used probiotics, which have been developed from organisms that form gut microbiota, singly or in combination, can restore gut microflora and offer the benefits similar to those offered by normal gut flora, namely immune enhancement, improved barrier function of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT, and prevention of bacterial translocation. Enteral supplementation of probiotic strains containing either Lactobacillus alone or in combination with Bifidobacterium reduced the incidence and severity of necrotizing enterocolitis and all-cause mortality in preterm infants. Orally administered Lactobacillus casei subspecies rhamnosus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus were effective in the prevention of late-onset sepsis and GIT colonization by Candida in preterm very low birth weight infants. In critically ill children, probiotics are effective in the prevention and treatment of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Oral administration of a mix of probiotics for 1 week to children on broad-spectrum antibiotics in a pediatric intensive care unit decreased GIT colonization by Candida, led to a 50% reduction in candiduria, and showed a trend toward decreased incidence of candidemia. However, routine use of probiotics cannot be supported on the basis of current scientific evidence. Safety of probiotics is also a concern; rarely, probiotics may cause bacteremia, fungemia, and sepsis in immunocompromised critically ill children. More studies are needed to answer questions on the effectiveness of a mix versus single-strain probiotics

  18. Neostigmine in the treatment of refractory constipation in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Rafael; López-Herce, Jesús; García, Ana; Botrán, Marta; Solana, Maria Jose; Urbano, Javier

    2011-08-01

    Constipation is a common complication in critically ill children and it is occasionally resistant to the drugs typically used in treatment. Neostigmine has been used in some cases of refractory constipation in critically ill adults. There is no reference to its use in critically ill children. We describe 3 cases of refractory constipation in critically ill children treated with intravenous neostigmine by continuous infusion. Two patients responded well. There were no adverse effects. We conclude that continuous intravenous neostigmine can be effective in critically ill children with refractory constipation. Further studies are necessary to determine the dose and safety of the treatment.

  19. Patients' narratives of chronic illnesses and the notion of biographical disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbene, Roxana

    2011-01-01

    Bury's (1982) argument that the onset of a chronic illness represents a biographical disruption has become paradigmatic in the sociology of illness studies. More recently Bury (1991, 1997) himself Williams (2000) and other medical sociologists have argued that the notion of illness as biographical disruption needs re-examination. Following a phenomenological approach, in this paper the author draws on different narrative models (Labov and Waletzky 1967 and Ricoeur 1980) to analyze how patients orient to the onset of chronic illness as the complicating action. The data comprise eight narratives collected in South America: three correspond to patients with renal failure, and five to patients with HIV/AIDS disease. It is observed that in some cases, patients' complicating actions are rather oriented to experiences of poverty, drug addiction, and criminality that took place prior to their onset of their illnesses. These experiences, instead of the onset of their illnesses, occupy the place of the complicating action in these patients' narratives. The author discusses that in the studies of illness narratives, it is difficult to operate from a different paradigm, but argues that conflating the onset of chronic illness with a biographical disruption may confuse the episodic dimension of narrative with the configurational dimension.

  20. Thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nñnez, A. Rodríguez; Fonte, M.; Faustino, E.V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although critically ill children may be at risk from developing deep venous thrombosis (DVT), data on its incidence and effectiveness of thromboprophylaxis are lacking. Objective To describe the use of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children in Spain and Portugal, and to compare the results with international data. Material and methods Secondary analysis of the multinational study PROTRACT, carried out in 59 PICUs from 7 developed countries (4 from Portugal and 6 in Spain). Data were collected from patients less than 18 years old, who did not receive therapeutic thromboprophylaxis. Results A total of 308 patients in Spanish and Portuguese (Iberian) PICUS were compared with 2176 admitted to international PICUs. Risk factors such as femoral vein (P = .01), jugular vein central catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .03), and sepsis (P < .001), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. The percentage of patients with pharmacological thromboprophylaxis was similar in both groups (15.3% vs. 12.0%). Low molecular weight heparin was used more frequently in Iberian patients (P < .001). In treated children, prior history of thrombosis (P = .02), femoral vein catheter (P < .001), cancer (P = .02) and cranial trauma or craniectomy (P = .006), were more frequent in Iberian PICUs. Mechanical thromboprophylaxis was used in only 6.8% of candidates in Iberian PICUs, compared with 23.8% in the international PICUs (P < .001). Conclusions Despite the presence of risk factors for DVT in many patients, thromboprophylaxis is rarely prescribed, with low molecular weight heparin being the most used drug. Passive thromboprophylaxis use is anecdotal. There should be a consensus on guidelines of thromboprophylaxis in critically ill children. PMID:24907863

  1. A meta-ethnographic synthesis on phenomenographic studies of patients’ experiences of chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Röing

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenography is a qualitative research approach developed within an educational framework, focusing on the qualitative experience of learning. It is also being used, to a lesser degree, in healthcare research. In the present study, we conducted a meta-ethnographic synthesis of phenomenographic studies on chronic illness, in order to give a broader perspective of how chronic illness can be experienced. Our aim was not to describe patients’ various individual experiences of illness, but instead to identify the different ways chronic illness can be experienced by patients. Our synthesis and phenomenographic interpretation of 12 selected articles found that patients’ experiences of chronic illness can be described in terms of a different lived body, a struggle with threat to identity and self-esteem, a diminished lifeworld, and a challenging reality. These experiences relate to each other in a process of recurring loops, where the different ways of experiencing continue to influence each other over time. According to these findings, the use of phenomenography as a research approach has the potential to add to the understanding of how chronic illness can be experienced. Patients may benefit from seeing that their illness can be experienced in many different ways and that it has many aspects, which then can lead to a better understanding and coping with their illness. We suggest that it may be worthwhile to expand the scope of phenomenography outside pedagogics. This presupposes a revision of the application to include a wider and more comprehensive description, for instance, of the different ways illness and healthcare phenomena can be experienced, and how these different ways are related to each other, with less focus on hierarchical relations.

  2. Theory of planned behavior and adherence in chronic illness: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Rich; K. Brandes; B. Mullan; M.S. Hagger

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive models such as the theory of planned behavior have demonstrated efficacy in predicting behavior, but few studies have examined the theory as a predictor of treatment adherence in chronic illness. We tested the efficacy of the theory for predicting adherence to treatment in chronic i

  3. Agreement between children and parents demonstrated that illness-related absenteeism was validly reported by children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denbæk, Anne Maj; Bonnesen, Camilla Thørring; Andersen, Anette;

    2016-01-01

    of 22 weeks. Text messages and questionnaire data were linked at the individual level, leaving 2,269 child-parent pairs in the analysis, corresponding to 27% of the eligible sample. RESULTS: The agreement between children's and parents' reports of illness-related absenteeism was good, with high absolute...... parent of each child were invited to participate in the Hi Five baseline study. The response rate for children answering a questionnaire was 89% (n = 7,525), and 36% of the parents (n = 3,008) participated in a weekly illness registration study using text messages (short message service) over a period......OBJECTIVES: To examine the agreement between children's and parents' reporting of illness-related absenteeism from school and to examine predictors for disagreement between children and parents. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A total of 8,438 schoolchildren aged from 5 to 15 years (grade 0-8) and one...

  4. Experiences of coexisting with chronic illnesses among elderly women in communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Tsao, Lee-Ing; Huang, Min-His

    2014-01-01

    Based on the increasing numbers of women in the aging population, the health of women will become critical in the future. Our purpose in this study was to analyze the experiences of elderly women with chronic illness. Twelve elderly Taiwanese women participated in in-depth interviews. "Using my own power out of the disease shackle" was the core category referring to elderly women who coexist with chronic illnesses. Elderly women should be provided with individually targeted plans for disease management and health maintenance to enable them to participate in health care decisions at the onset of chronic diseases.

  5. Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease - Multicenter National Study Results

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska; Anna Medyńska; Piotr Adamczak; Irena Bałasz- Chmielewska; Ryszard Grenda; Agnieszka Kluska-Jóźwiak; Beata Leszczyńska; Ilona Olszak-Szot; Monika Miklaszewska; Maria Szczepańska; Marcin Tkaczyk; Anna Wasilewska; Katarzyna Zachwieja; Maria Zajączkowska; Helena Ziółkowska

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims: Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders. The aims of the study were: to investigate the level of anxiety in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and to identify factors associated with the presence of that emotional problem. Methods: CKD children on hemodialysis (HD, n=22), peritoneal dialysis (PD, n=20,) and on conservative treatment (CT, n=95) were enrolled in the study. We used State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (S...

  6. Blood Glucose Variability and Outcomes in Critically Ill Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranje, Kirti Mahadeorao; Poddar, Banani; Bhriguvanshi, Arpita; Lal, Richa; Azim, Afzal; Singh, Ratender K.; Gurjar, Mohan; Baronia, Arvind K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To find the incidence of hyperglycemia (blood glucose [BG] ≥150 mg/dl), hypoglycemia (BG ≤60 mg/dl), and variability (presence of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia) in critically ill children in the 1st week of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay and their association with mortality, length of ICU stay, and organ dysfunction. Materials and Methods: The design was a retrospective observational cohort study. Consecutive children ≤18 years of age admitted from March 2003 to April 2012 in a combined adult and pediatric closed ICU. Relevant data were collected from chart review and hospital database. Results: Out of 258 patients included, isolated hyperglycemia was seen in 139 (53.9%) and was unrelated to mortality and morbidity. Isolated variability in BG was noted in 76 (29.5%) patients and hypoglycemia was seen in 9 (3.5%) patients. BG variability was independently associated with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome on multivariate analysis (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 7.1; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6–31.1). Those with BG variability had longer ICU stay (11 days vs. 4 days, on log-rank test, P = 0.001). Insulin use was associated with the occurrence of variability (adjusted OR: 3.6; 95% CI: 1.8–7.0). Conclusion: Glucose disorders were frequently observed in critically ill children. BG variability was associated with multiorgan dysfunction and increased ICU stay.

  7. Constructing an Explanation of Illness with Children: A Sample Case Study of Juvenile Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Michele; Lo Bianco, Maria; Cortis, Elisabetta; Rossetti, Corrado

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to create a book to explain juvenile arthritis to newly diagnosed children, starting with the narratives of currently ill children. The development of the book followed a socio-constructivist approach and occurred over several stages, including: design of a comic-based workbook; conducting a workshop with ill children to listen to…

  8. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Sancho

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71% patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days, of whom 40 (21.4% needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15, p=0.013, with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97. NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning.

  9. Noninvasive ventilation during the weaning process in chronically critically ill patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servera, Emilio; Barrot, Emilia; Sanchez-Oro-Gómez, Raquel; Gómez de Terreros, F. Javier; Martín-Vicente, M. Jesús; Utrabo, Isabel; Núñez, M. Belen; Binimelis, Alicia; Sala, Ernest; Zamora, Enrique; Segrelles, Gonzalo; Ortega-Gonzalez, Angel; Masa, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Chronically critically ill patients often undergo prolonged mechanical ventilation. The role of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) during weaning of these patients remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the value of NIV and whether a parameter can predict the need for NIV in chronically critically ill patients during the weaning process. We conducted a prospective study that included chronically critically ill patients admitted to Spanish respiratory care units. The weaning method used consisted of progressive periods of spontaneous breathing trials. Patients were transferred to NIV when it proved impossible to increase the duration of spontaneous breathing trials beyond 18 h. 231 chronically critically ill patients were included in the study. 198 (85.71%) patients achieved weaning success (mean weaning time 25.45±16.71 days), of whom 40 (21.4%) needed NIV during the weaning process. The variable which predicted the need for NIV was arterial carbon dioxide tension at respiratory care unit admission (OR 1.08 (95% CI 1.01–1.15), p=0.013), with a cut-off point of 45.5 mmHg (sensitivity 0.76, specificity 0.67, positive predictive value 0.76, negative predictive value 0.97). NIV is a useful tool during weaning in chronically critically ill patients. Hypercapnia despite mechanical ventilation at respiratory care unit admission is the main predictor of the need for NIV during weaning. PMID:28053973

  10. Integration of Biosensors and Drug Delivery Technologies for Early Detection and Chronic Management of Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viness Pillay

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biosensor design and sensing efficacy need to be amalgamated with research in responsive drug delivery systems for building superior health or illness regimes and ensuring good patient compliance. A variety of illnesses require continuous monitoring in order to have efficient illness intervention. Physicochemical changes in the body can signify the occurrence of an illness before it manifests. Even with the usage of sensors that allow diagnosis and prognosis of the illness, medical intervention still has its downfalls. Late detection of illness can reduce the efficacy of therapeutics. Furthermore, the conventional modes of treatment can cause side-effects such as tissue damage (chemotherapy and rhabdomyolysis and induce other forms of illness (hepatotoxicity. The use of drug delivery systems enables the lowering of side-effects with subsequent improvement in patient compliance. Chronic illnesses require continuous monitoring and medical intervention for efficient treatment to be achieved. Therefore, designing a responsive system that will reciprocate to the physicochemical changes may offer superior therapeutic activity. In this respect, integration of biosensors and drug delivery is a proficient approach and requires designing an implantable system that has a closed loop system. This offers regulation of the changes by means of releasing a therapeutic agent whenever illness biomarkers prevail. Proper selection of biomarkers is vital as this is key for diagnosis and a stimulation factor for responsive drug delivery. By detecting an illness before it manifests by means of biomarkers levels, therapeutic dosing would relate to the severity of such changes. In this review various biosensors and drug delivery systems are discussed in order to assess the challenges and future perspectives of integrating biosensors and drug delivery systems for detection and management of chronic illness.

  11. Mind's response to the body's betrayal: Gestalt/Existential therapy for clients with chronic or life-threatening illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imes, Suzanne A; Clance, Pauline Rose; Gailis, Andra T; Atkeson, Ellen

    2002-11-01

    In the literature on chronic or life-threatening illness, there is an overriding emphasis on clients' psychological coping styles and how they relate to psychological functioning. By contrast, in our approach, we look at the subjective mind/body experiences that clients have of their illness and how their lives are impacted by their illness. As psychotherapists, we address their existential distress, pain, body experience, thoughts, and feelings, as well as their efforts to cope or find meaning in their illness. We summarize Gestalt/Existential therapy for chronic illness, illustrate the approach with three case-vignettes, and stress the importance of attending to each client's unique responses to illness.

  12. Perceived conflict in the couple and chronic illness management: Preliminary analyses from the Quebec Health Survey

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    Hudon Catherine

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of the relationship with the spouse/partner appears crucial among patients with multiple chronic conditions where illness management is complex and multifaceted. This study draws on data from the Quebec Health Survey (QHS to examine, among patients with one or more chronic conditions, the relation between marital status, the perceived conflict with the spouse/partner, and what the patients do to manage their illness as well as how they perceive their health. Methods Data from the QHS 1998 were used. The sample included 7547 coupled adults who had one or more chronic health problems lasting more than 6 months. Independent variables included marital status, perceived conflict with the spouse/partner, and the number of chronic conditions. Illness management was defined broadly as a measure of the patient's efforts at self-care and an illness status indicator, including visits to the generalist and the specialist, the use of telephone health line in the last 12 months, self-rated general health, mental health, and a measure of psychological distress. Linkages between the independent variables and illness management were assessed for males and females separately with logistic regressions, while accounting for the survey sampling design and household clustering. Results Female patients who did not live with their partner and had never been married were more likely to report a negative perception of their general health and a higher psychological distress than those who were married. Perceived conflict with the partner was linked to a negative perception of mental health and a higher psychological distress among both men and women. Compared to patients with only one chronic condition, males who reported more than one chronic condition were more likely to have consulted a generalist prior to the survey and used the telephone health line, whereas females were more likely to have consulted a specialist. Both males and

  13. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393).

  14. The economic impact of the insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses: a qualitative approach

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    Budi Aji

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Little research has focused on the economic hardship among the insured with severe illnesses and high treatment costs, in particular, the consequence of poorer insurance coverage for high-cost illnesses. Therefore, we presented the case for identifying the experiences of insured patients with severe chronic and acute illnesses. This study identified a qualitative understanding of the economic impact of severe chronic and acute illnesses and household strategies to deal with high treatment costs. Design: Interviews were conducted with 19 insured households of three different health insurance programs with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic or acute illnesses in either Banyumas or Margono Sukarjo hospitals in Banyumas, Central Java, Indonesia. A thematic analysis was applied to guide the interpretation of the data. Results: Insured households with a family member that had been hospitalized for severe chronic and acute illnesses were greatly affected by the high treatment costs. Four major issues emerged from this qualitative study: insured patients are still burdened with high out-of-pocket payments, households adopt various strategies to cope with the high cost of treatments, households experience financial hardships, and positive and negative perceptions of the insured regarding their health insurance coverage for acute and chronic illnesses. Conclusions: Askes and Jamsostek patients faced financial burdens from high cost sharing for hospital amenities, non-covered drugs, and treatments and other indirect costs. Meanwhile, Jamkesmas beneficiaries faced no financial burden for related medical services but were rather burdened with indirect costs for the carers. Households relied on internal resources to cover hospital bills as the first strategy, which included the mobilization of savings, sale of assets, and borrowing of money. External support was tapped secondarily and included financial support from

  15. Alagille Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Dysmorphic Facies, Chronic Illness, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winthrop, Zachary A.; Salman, Rabia; Majeed, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Alagille syndrome is a rare multisystem disorder affecting the liver, heart, vertebrae, eyes, and face. Alagille syndrome shares multiple phenotypic variants of other congenital or chronic childhood illnesses such as DiGeorge syndrome, Down syndrome, spina bifida, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis. All of these chronic illnesses have well-established links to psychiatric conditions. There are few community resources for Alagille patients, as it is an extremely rare condition. Despite the overlap with other chronic childhood illnesses, the psychiatric manifestations of Alagille syndrome have not been previously discussed in literature. The current study is a case report of a twelve-year-old female hospitalized in our pediatric psychiatric hospital for suicidal ideation with intent and plan. The patient had major depressive disorder, anxiety, other specified feeding and eating disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder. PMID:28018696

  16. Review article Homebound instruction for students with chronic illness: reducing risk outside of the box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven R. Shaw

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Students with chronic illness are at risk for a host of academic and social problems. The risk is exacerbated when students are unable to attend school short term or long term due to medical problems. Educators may be able to reduce academic and social risk for students with chronic illness through effective homebound instruction. However, there remain many barriers to effective homebowund instruction. Effective interdisciplinary and community coordination, development of policies, teacher support, inclusion of families, and use of technology can be combined to overcome these barriers and create effective homebound programs and policies. The result is reduced risk for the large and vulnerable population of students with chronic illness.

  17. The role of parental and adolescent attributions in adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guion, Kimberly; Mrug, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    Previous literature has demonstrated the separate contributions of parental attributions and adolescent attributions to psychosocial adjustment of adolescents with chronic illness. However, it is unknown whether parental attributions affect adolescents' mental health directly or indirectly by influencing the youths' attributional style. This study evaluated the direct and indirect (through adolescent attributions) effects of parental attributions on internalizing and externalizing problems of adolescents with chronic illness. Adolescents (N = 128; M = 14.7 years) diagnosed with cystic fibrosis or diabetes and their caregivers completed measures of attributional style and adolescent adjustment. Parents' optimistic attributions were associated with fewer adolescent internalizing and externalizing problems. These effects were partly mediated by adolescent attributions. These results suggest that targeting both adolescent and parent attributions may be important for improving adolescents' adjustment to a chronic illness.

  18. Alagille Syndrome: A Case Report Highlighting Dysmorphic Facies, Chronic Illness, and Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Bresnahan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare multisystem disorder affecting the liver, heart, vertebrae, eyes, and face. Alagille syndrome shares multiple phenotypic variants of other congenital or chronic childhood illnesses such as DiGeorge syndrome, Down syndrome, spina bifida, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and cystic fibrosis. All of these chronic illnesses have well-established links to psychiatric conditions. There are few community resources for Alagille patients, as it is an extremely rare condition. Despite the overlap with other chronic childhood illnesses, the psychiatric manifestations of Alagille syndrome have not been previously discussed in literature. The current study is a case report of a twelve-year-old female hospitalized in our pediatric psychiatric hospital for suicidal ideation with intent and plan. The patient had major depressive disorder, anxiety, other specified feeding and eating disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder.

  19. Women's perspectives on chronic illness: ethnicity, ideology and restructuring of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J M; Blue, C; Lau, A

    1991-01-01

    This inquiry into the lives of women living with a chronic illness brings to attention the complex processes that frame the existential meanings of illness. Data from immigrant Chinese and Anglo-Canadian women with diabetes are used to show that illness is constructed in a complex social, political and economic nexus. When the circumstances of women's lives are examined, styles of managing illness that could be attributed to ethnicity, become recognizable as pragmatic ways of dealing with the harsh realities of material existence. It is argued that the trends toward individualizing social problems, and shifting the responsibility for caretaking from the state to the individual, obfuscate the social context of illness, and exclude the socially disadvantaged from adequate health care.

  20. Collaborative decision-making and promoting treatment adherence in pediatric chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Drotar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Drotar, Peggy Crawford, Margaret BonnerCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USAAbstract: Collaborative or shared decision-making between health care providers and families can facilitate treatment adherence, health outcomes, and satisfaction with care in the management of pediatric chronic illness, but raises special challenges. Barriers such as authoritarian models of medical care as well as absence of time and opportunity for dialogue limit collaborative decision making and can disrupt treatment adherence. However, models of provider-family communication that emphasize communication and shared goal-setting inform an anticipatory guidance model of collaborative decision-making that can enhance treatment adherence. Salient challenges and strategies involved in implementing collaborative decision-making in pediatric chronic illness care are described. Research is needed to: 1 describe the communication and decision-making process in the management of pediatric chronic illness; and 2 evaluate the impact of interventions that enhance collaborative decision-making on provider-family communication, illness management, and treatment adherence.Keywords: collaborative decision-making, shared decision-making, treatment adherence, pediatric chronic illness

  1. Continuity in care of older people chronically ill patients in a battlefield of competing rationales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerholt, Mette; Wagner, Lis; Delmar, Charlotte;

    2014-01-01

    perspective in older, chronically ill patients' care as reflected in nursing staff's communication about the patients. DESIGN: Explorative Participatory Action Research (PAR). SETTING: An acute, general medical ward at a Danish university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Hospital and municipality nurses (n = 29......BACKGROUND: Continuity is crucial when caring for older chronically ill patients. Research has shown that the integration of patients' own perspectives on their situation is of utmost importance for continuity and quality of care. Studies have, however, demonstrated a number of problems with health...

  2. Facilitating job retention for chronically ill employees: perspectives of line managers and human resource managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meerman Martha GM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic diseases are a leading contributor to work disability and job loss in Europe. Recent EU policies aim to improve job retention among chronically ill employees. Disability and occupational health researchers argue that this requires a coordinated and pro-active approach at the workplace by occupational health professionals, line managers (LMs and human resource managers (HRM. Little is known about the perspectives of LMs an HRM on what is needed to facilitate job retention among chronically ill employees. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and compare the perspectives of Dutch LMs and HRM on this issue. Methods Concept mapping methodology was used to elicit and map statements (ideas from 10 LMs and 17 HRM about what is needed to ensure continued employment for chronically ill employees. Study participants were recruited through a higher education and an occupational health services organization. Results Participants generated 35 statements. Each group (LMs and HRM sorted these statements into six thematic clusters. LMs and HRM identified four similar clusters: LMs and HRM must be knowledgeable about the impact of chronic disease on the employee; employees must accept responsibility for work retention; work adaptations must be implemented; and clear company policy. Thematic clusters identified only by LMs were: good manager/employee cooperation and knowledge transfer within the company. Unique clusters identified by HRM were: company culture and organizational support. Conclusions There were both similarities and differences between the views of LMs and HRM on what may facilitate job retention for chronically ill employees. LMs perceived manager/employee cooperation as the most important mechanism for enabling continued employment for these employees. HRM perceived organizational policy and culture as the most important mechanism. The findings provide information about topics that occupational health

  3. Caregivers’ hair cortisol: a possible biomarker of chronic stress is associated with obesity measures among children with disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiaoli; Gelaye, Bizu; Velez, Juan Carlos; Barbosa,Clarita; Pepper, Micah; Andrade, Asterio; Gao, Wei; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Williams, Michelle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The stress of caring for a loved one with chronic illness has been associated with childhood obesity. Hair cortisol has been proposed as a novel biomarker of chronic psychological stress. This study aimed to evaluate the associations between caregivers’ chronic stress evaluated by hair cortisol concentrations (HCC) and obesity measures among children with disabilities such as autism. Methods: Eighty-five dyads of children with disabilities and their primary caregivers participated...

  4. Common elements in self-management of HIV and other chronic illnesses: an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendeman, Dallas; Ingram, Barbara L; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2009-10-01

    HIV/AIDS is widely recognized as a chronic illness within HIV care, but is often excluded from chronic disease lists outside the field. Similar to other chronic diseases, HIV requires lifetime changes in physical health, psychological functioning, social relations, and adoption of disease-specific regimens. The shift from acute to chronic illness requires a self-management model in which patients assume an active and informed role in healthcare decision making to change behaviors and social relations to optimize health and proactively address predictable challenges of chronic diseases generally and HIV specifically. This article reviews literature on chronic disease self-management to identify factors common across chronic diseases, highlight HIV-specific challenges, and review recent developments in self-management interventions for people living with HIV (PLH) and other chronic diseases. An integrated framework of common elements or tasks in chronic disease self-management is presented that outlines 14 elements in three broad categories: physical health; psychological functioning; and social relationships. Common elements for physical health include: a framework for understanding illness and wellness; health promoting behaviors; treatment adherence; self-monitoring of physical status; accessing appropriate treatment and services; and preventing transmission. Elements related to psychological functioning include: self-efficacy and empowerment; cognitive skills; reducing negative emotional states; and managing identity shifts. Social relationship elements include: collaborative relationships with healthcare providers; social support; disclosure and stigma management; and positive social and family relationships. There is a global need to scale up chronic disease self-management services, including for HIV, but there are significant challenges related to healthcare system and provider capacities, and stigma is a significant barrier to HIV-identified service

  5. Factors associated with acute respiratory illness in day care children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakka, Katja; Piirainen, Laura; Pohjavuori, Sara; Poussa, Tuija; Savilahti, Erkki; Korpela, Riitta

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between child characteristics, parental and environmental factors and the occurrence of acute respiratory illness (ARI) and acute otitis media (AOM) among Finnish children attending day care centres (DCCs). The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire of 594 children aged 1-6 y from 18 DCCs in Helsinki, Finland. Recurrent (> or =4 diseases/y) ARI was present in 44% of the 1-3-y-olds and 23% of the 4-6-y-olds, and recurrent AOM in 15% and 2.5%, respectively. Parent atopic disease (odds ratio (OR) 1.53, p = 0.033), mother's academic education (OR 1.77, p = 0.008) and a medium length of DCC attendance compared to a short period (OR 1.67, p = 0.049) increased, while furry pets (OR 0.44, p = 0.003) and older child age (OR 0.38, p or =6 months (OR 0.20, p = 0.002) and older child age (OR 0.05, p < 0.001) reduced the risk of recurrent AOM. Parental and environmental factors had a significant impact on recurrent ARI and AOM episodes in children attending DCCs. These risk factors should be considered in future studies intending to reduce DCC infections.

  6. Chronic hepatosplenomegaly in African achool children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Dunne, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic hepatosplenomegaly, which is known to have a complex aetiology, is common amongst children who reside in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. Two of the more common infectious agents of hepatosplenomegaly amongst these children are malarial infections and schistosomiasis. The historical vie...

  7. Chronic Migraine in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özge, Aynur; Yalin, Osman Özgür

    2016-02-01

    Chronic migraine is defined as having more than 15 headache days in a month, half of these showing migraine features, for at least 3 months. It is a chronic painful syndrome with aspects such as psychiatric comorbid, decreased quality of life, and environmental and intrinsic psychological factors that make face-to-face treatment difficult. Children and adolescent migraine differ from adults as a result of growing brain and evolving disorder. In this paper, we will emphasize the definition, diagnosis, epidemiology, burden of life, and management of chronic migraine in children and adolescent.

  8. Resiliencia en niños enfermos crónicos: aspectos teóricos Resiliência em crianças com doenças crônicas: aspectos teóricos Resilience in children with physical chronic illness: theoretical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Kern de Castro

    2007-04-01

    refers to the children, adolescent and adults positive adaptation in the presence of adverse and risk circumstances, like is pediatric chronic disease. Currently there are few studies on the topic, but despite that, evidences showed that adaptation of chronic ill children is higher than would be expected. In contrast, some chronic ill children present emotional and behavior problems. Resilience related to pediatric chronic disease means a perspective change in health field because the focus is on child positive development. Practical applications of resilience findings are a challenge to health professionals.

  9. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  10. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees: Does Health Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Neerup Handlos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show that physical health, in the sense of the absence of illness and easy access to necessary health-care services and medicines, was not highly prioritized when the decision was made whether or not to return. However, if health is regarded more broadly as involving more than mere physical health and the absence of illness, health did matter. Viewed as physical, social and mental well-being in line with WHO’s definition of health, health was indeed one of the most important factors when the decision to return was made.

  11. Return Migration among Elderly, Chronically Ill Bosnian Refugees: Does Health Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Olwig, Karen Fog; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Kristiansen, Maria; Norredam, Marie Louise

    2015-10-12

    Elderly migrants constitute a considerable share of global return migration; nevertheless, literature on the health aspects of the return migration among these migrants is still scarce. This study explores the significance of return migration among elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees from Denmark and the role of health issues in their decision to return. It is based on semi-structured interviews with 33 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have moved back to Bosnia and Herzegovina, and 10 elderly, chronically ill Bosnian refugees who have remained in Denmark. The interviews show that physical health, in the sense of the absence of illness and easy access to necessary health-care services and medicines, was not highly prioritized when the decision was made whether or not to return. However, if health is regarded more broadly as involving more than mere physical health and the absence of illness, health did matter. Viewed as physical, social and mental well-being in line with WHO's definition of health, health was indeed one of the most important factors when the decision to return was made.

  12. Effect of hyperglycemia on mortality rates in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongkuk Kim

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To verify the effect of hyperglycemia on mortality rates in critically ill children and to identify the blood glucose level that influences prognosis. Methods : From July 2006 to June 2008, a total of 206 patients who were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU at Asan Medical Center and who survived for more than 7 days were retrospectively reviewed. We analyzed the maximum glucose value within 7 days in PICU, PRISM-III score and SOFA score within 24 hours, and mortality. We did not perform an adjustment analysis of drugs affecting glucose level. Results : The maximum glucose level within 7 days in PICU was higher in the nonsurvival group than in the survival group. Using 4 cutoff values (125, 150, 175, and 200 mg/dL, the mortality of patients with hyperglycemia was found to be 13.0 %, 14.4%, 19.8%, and 21.1%, respectively, and the cutoff values of 175 and 200 mg/dL revealed significant differences in mortalities between the hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups. The PRISM-III score was not significantly different between the hyperglycemic and normoglycemic groups under a glucose cutoff value of 175 mg/dL, but the SOFA score was higher in the hyperglycemic group. Under a glucose cutoff value of 200 mg/dL, the PRISM-III score was higher in the hyperglycemic group, and the SOFA score did not differ between the 2 groups. Conclusion : Hyperglycemia with a maximal glucose value ?#241;75 mg/dL during the first 7 days after PICU admission was associated with increased mortality in critically ill children.

  13. A Research Agenda Concerning Depictions of Mental Illness in Children's Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, John H.; Nairn, Raymond

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To review research on depictions of mental illness in mass media directed to children and to identify requirements for further research in this important field. Methods: The authors identified published research on depictions of mental illness in children's media and the important strengths and weaknesses of such research. Results: Only…

  14. Maternal Mental Illness and the Safety and Stability of Maltreated Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Patricia L.; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Drake, Brett

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Children of mothers with mental illness are at risk for multiple untoward outcomes, including child maltreatment and foster care placement. The purpose of this analysis was to determine the association between maternal mental illness and children's long term safety and stability. Methods: A multi-sector administrative dataset from the…

  15. Development of disaster pamphlets based on health needs of patients with chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoki, Emi; Mori, Kikuko; Kaji, Hidesuke; Nonami, Yoko; Fukano, Chika; Kayano, Tomonori; Kawada, Terue; Kimura, Yukari; Yasui, Kumiko; Ueki, Hiroko; Ugai, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a pamphlet that would enable patients with diabetes, rheumatic diseases, chronic respiratory disease, and dialysis treatment to be aware of changes in their physical conditions at an early stage of a disaster, cope with these changes, maintain self-care measures, and recover their health. Illness-specific pamphlets were produced based on disaster-related literature, news articles, surveys of victims of the Great Hanshin-Awaji Earthquake Disaster and Typhoon Tokage, and other sources. Each pamphlet consisted of seven sections-each section includes items common to all illnesses as well as items specific to each illness. The first section, "Physical Self-Care", contains a checklist of 18 common physical symptoms as well as symptoms specific to each illness, and goes on to explain what the symptoms may indicate and what should be done about them. The main aim of the "Changes in Mental Health Conditions" section is to detect posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at an early stage. The section "Preventing the Deterioration of Chronic Illnesses" is designed to prevent the worsening of each illness through the provision of information on cold prevention, adjustment to the living environment, and ways of coping with stress. In the sections, "Medication Control" and "Importance of Having Medical Examinations", spaces are provided to list medications currently being used and details of the hospital address, in order to ensure the continued use of medications. The section, "Preparing for Evacuations" gives a list of everyday items and medical items needed to be prepared for a disaster. Finally, the "Methods of Contact in an Emergency" section provides details of how to use the voicemail service. The following content-specific to each illness also was explained in detail: (1) for diabetes, complications arising from the deterioration of the illness, attention to nutrition, and insulin management; (2) for rheumatic diseases, a checklist of

  16. Chronic Illness and Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Older Adults: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Chi, Iris

    2002-01-01

    Depression is quite common among the elderly members of Hong Kong Chinese society. This study examined the impact of a series of chronic illnesses on change in depressive symptoms among the older people. The respondents were 260 people aged 70 years or older from a longitudinal study of a representative community sample of the elderly population…

  17. Illness perceptions and treatment perceptions of patients with chronic kidney disease: different phases, different perceptions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Rijken, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Grootendorst, D.C.; Dekker, F.W.; Boeschoten, E.W.; Kaptein, A.A.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the variability of illness and treatment perceptions – that have been found to be associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients' outcomes (e.g., quality of life) – across the CKD trajectory, by investigating whether there are differences in perceptions in patients: (1)

  18. Loneliness, depression, social support, and quality of life in older chronically ill Appalachians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theeke, Laurie A; Goins, R Turner; Moore, Julia; Campbell, Heather

    2012-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe loneliness and to examine the relationships between loneliness, depression, social support, and QOL in chronically ill, older Appalachians. In-person interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 60 older, chronically ill, community-dwelling, and rural adults. Those with dementia or active grief were excluded. The UCLA Loneliness Scale (Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1985), Geriatric Depression Scale (Shiekh & Yesavage, 1986), Katz ADL scale (Katz, Down, & Cash, 1970), MOS Social Support Scale (Sherbourne & Stewart, 1991), and a visual analog scale for Quality of Life (Spitzer et al., 1981) scale were used. Diagnoses were obtained through chart reviews. SPSS was used for data analyses. The majority of the 65% female sample (M age = 75 years) were married and impoverished. Participants' number of chronic illnesses averaged more than 3. Over 88% of participants reported at least 1 area of functional impairment. Loneliness was prevalent with UCLA loneliness scores indicating moderate to high loneliness, ranging from 39 to 62 (possible scores were 20-80). Higher loneliness scores correlated with depression, lower Qol, and lower social support, particularly lower emotional support. This study provides evidence that loneliness is a significant problem for older chronically ill Appalachian adults and that it may be related to low emotional support. Further, it provides evidence that this population may be significantly lonely and may not self-identify as lonely. Screening for loneliness and designing interventions that target the emotional aspects of loneliness could be important in this population.

  19. Personalized and contextualized information in self-management systems for chronically ill patients (PERISCOPE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laverman, M.; Schonk, J.H.M.; Boog, P.J.M. van der; Neerincx, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation - It is becoming necessary to seriously consider self-management in the treatment of chronically ill patients. A number of self-management applications have already been developed, but an explicit theoretical model is lacking. The PERISCOPE-project aims to provide (1) a conceptual framewo

  20. Rethinking ‘risk' and self-management for chronic illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morden, Andrew; Jinks, Clare; Ong, Bie Nio

    2012-01-01

    Self-management for chronic illness is a current high profile UK healthcare policy. Policy and clinical recommendations relating to chronic illnesses are framed within a language of lifestyle risk management. This article argues the enactment of risk within current UK self-management policy is intimately related to neo-liberal ideology and is geared towards population governance. The approach that dominates policy perspectives to ‘risk' management is critiqued for positioning people as rational subjects who calculate risk probabilities and act upon them. Furthermore this perspective fails to understand the lay person's construction and enactment of risk, their agenda and contextual needs when living with chronic illness. Of everyday relevance to lay people is the management of risk and uncertainty relating to social roles and obligations, the emotions involved when encountering the risk and uncertainty in chronic illness, and the challenges posed by social structural factors and social environments that have to be managed. Thus, clinical enactments of self-management policy would benefit from taking a more holistic view to patient need and seek to avoid solely communicating lifestyle risk factors to be self-managed. PMID:23226974

  1. Introduction to Health Promotion for People with Chronic Illness and Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fong; Chiu, Chung-Yi; Bezyak, Jill L.; Keegan, John

    2012-01-01

    Health promotion has received increasing attention in rehabilitation counseling research. Health promotion research contributes to theory building and provides the foundation for empirically supported interventions that can improve the health-related quality of life and employment outcomes of people with chronic illness and disability. In this…

  2. Issues in Nutrition for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

    This annotated bibliography lists print materials, training and educational materials, and programs concerned with nutrition for youth with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Basic bibliographic information and a brief abstract are provided for each of the 87 bibliographic citations which date from 1980 through 1991. Citations are organized into…

  3. Promoting Healthy Work for Employees with Chronic Illness : Analysis of Models of Good Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkman, Anja; Have, Kristin ten; Gründemann, Rob; Wevers, Cees

    2012-01-01

    The ENWHP project and campaign Promoting Healthy Work for Employees with Chronic Illness (PH Work) should contribute towards the implementation of effective workplace health practices within corporate policies of enterprises in Europe. More specific the project should stimulate activities and polici

  4. Effects of Continued Care: A Study of Chronic Illness in the Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sidney; And Others

    This study of chronic illness in the home originates in theoretical and practical questions posed by physicians, nurses, and biometricians. The study covers the following elements: The research plan, the patient sample, providing continued care, interviewing, classification of disease and mental status, effect of treatment program, classification…

  5. Can the common-sense model predict adherence in chronically ill patients? A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Kim; Mullan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to explore whether mental representations, derived from the common-sense model of illness representations (CSM), were able to predict adherence in chronically ill patients. Electronic databases were searched for studies that used the CSM and measured adherence behaviour in chronically ill patients. Correlations from the included articles were meta-analysed using a random-size effect model. A moderation analysis was conducted for the type of adherence behaviour. The effect sizes for the different mental representations and adherence constructs ranged from -0.02 to 0.12. Further analyses showed that the relationship between the mental representations and adherence did not differ by the type of adherence behaviour. The low-effect sizes indicate that the relationships between the different mental representations of the CSM and adherence are very weak. Therefore, the CSM may not be the most appropriate model to use in predictive studies of adherence.

  6. Coping styles and locus of control as predictors for psychological adjustment of adolescents with a chronic illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, SA; Sinnema, G; Bijstra, JO; Mellenbergh, GJ; Wolters, WHG

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the way coping styles and locus of control contribute to the prediction of psychosocial adjustment in adolescents with a chronic illness. Psychosocial adjustment of 84 adolescents aged 13-16 years with a chronic illness was assessed with measures of social adjustment. global self

  7. The degree of parental awareness of using means of physical rehabilitation on the frequently ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmyla Demchenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to establish the degree of parental awareness of using means of physical rehabilitation on the frequently ill children with acute respiratory viral infections. Material & Methods: analysis of scientific and methodological literature, surveys and questionnaires. Results: the research involved 54 families with the frequently ill children. The paper characterizes and establishes the degree of parental awareness in the sphere of physical rehabilitation of the frequently ill children, determines the level of parental interest in cooperation, presents the plan of seminars with parents. Conclusions: increasing the degree of parental awareness by studying and explaining is a prerequisite to achieve high effectiveness in health recovery process of the frequently ill children. Keywords: frequently ill children, parental awareness, physical rehabilitation.

  8. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Anselm Chi-Wai; Siao-Ping Ong, Nellie Dawn

    2011-08-31

    Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14%) episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets.

  9. Food-borne bacteremic illnesses in febrile neutropenic children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm Chi-wai Lee

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia following febrile neutropenia is a serious complication in children with malignancies. Preventive measures are currently targeted at antimicrobial prophylaxis, amelioration of drug-induced neutropenia, and nosocomial spread of pathogens, with little attention to community-acquired infections. A retrospective study was conducted at a pediatric oncology center during a 3-year period to identify probable cases of food-borne infections with bacteremia. Twenty-one bacteremic illnesses affecting 15 children receiving chemotherapy or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were reviewed. Three (14% episodes were highly suspected of a food-borne origin: a 17-year-old boy with osteosarcoma contracted Sphingomonas paucimobilis septicemia after consuming nasi lemak bought from a street hawker; a 2-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed Chryseobacterium meningosepticum septicemia after a sushi dinner; a 2-year-old girl was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and Lactobacillus bacteremia suspected to be of probiotic origin. All of them were neutropenic at the time of the infections and the bacteremias were cleared with antibiotic treatment. Food-borne sepsis may be an important, but readily preventable, cause of bloodstream infections in pediatric oncology patients, especially in tropical countries with an abundance of culinary outlets.

  10. Mindfulness-based stress reduction: a non-pharmacological approach for chronic illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfandyar Khan Niazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR therapy is a meditation therapy, though originally designed for stress management, it is being used for treating a variety of illnesses such as depression, anxiety, chronic pain, cancer, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, skin and immune disorders. Aim: The aim of this systematic review is to determine the efficacy of MBSR in the treatment of chronic illnesses; it’s mechanism of action and adverse effects. It describes an alternative method of treatment for physicians and patients that may help patients cope with their diseases in a more effective way. Materials and Methods: COCHRANE, EMBASE and MEDLINE were systematically searched for data on outcome of treatment with MBSR used alone or in conjunction with other treatments. The data available on prevention of diseases through MBSR was also analyzed. Results: All the 18 studies included in this systematic review showed improvement in the condition of patients after MBSR therapy. These studies were focused on patients with chronic diseases like cancer, hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain and skin disorders, before and after MBSR therapy. Conclusions: Although the research on MBSR is sparse, the results of these researches indicate that MBSR improves the condition of patients suffering from chronic illnesses and helps them cope with a wide variety of clinical problems.

  11. Mindfulness-based stress reduction: A non-pharmacological approach for chronic illnesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asfandyar Khan Niazi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR therapy is a meditation therapy, though originally designed for stress management, it is being used for treating a variety of illnesses such as depression, anxiety, chronic pain, cancer, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, skin and immune disorders. Aim: The aim of this systematic review is to determine the efficacy of MBSR in the treatment of chronic illnesses; it′s mechanism of action and adverse effects. It describes an alternative method of treatment for physicians and patients that may help patients cope with their diseases in a more effective way. Materials and Methods: COCHRANE, EMBASE and MEDLINE were systematically searched for data on outcome of treatment with MBSR used alone or in conjunction with other treatments. The data available on prevention of diseases through MBSR was also analyzed. Results: All the 18 studies included in this systematic review showed improvement in the condition of patients after MBSR therapy. These studies were focused on patients with chronic diseases like cancer, hypertension, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, chronic pain and skin disorders, before and after MBSR therapy. Conclusions: Although the research on MBSR is sparse, the results of these researches indicate that MBSR improves the condition of patients suffering from chronic illnesses and helps them cope with a wide variety of clinical problems.

  12. Emergency and disaster preparedness for chronically ill patients: a review of recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomio J

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jun Tomio,1 Hajime Sato2 1Department of Public Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 2Department of Health Policy and Technology Assessment, National Institute of Public Health, Wako, Japan Abstract: Recent disasters, especially those in developed countries, have highlighted the importance of disaster preparedness measures for chronic diseases. A number of surviving patients experienced the exacerbation of a chronic illness, such as hypertension, diabetes, cancer, and chronic respiratory diseases, due to disaster-related stress, interruption of care, or both; for some patients, these exacerbations resulted in death. Here, we review reports from recent disasters in developed countries and summarize the recommendations for disaster preparedness of chronically ill patients. A considerable number of recommendations based on the lessons learned from recent disasters have been developed, and they provide practical and essential steps to prevent treatment interruption during and after a disaster. To improve preparedness efforts, we suggest that health care providers should be aware of the following three suggestions: 1 recommendations should be evidence-based; 2 recommendations should contain consistent messages; and 3 recommendations should be feasible. Keywords: disaster, chronic illness, preparedness

  13. Personal concept of chronic illness in rural population-identifying myths and beliefs

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    Shakuntala Nallagatla

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The morbidity of Chronic Renal Failure (CRF is not only physical but also psychological and social. The study aimed at identifying whether there was any mythological belief in being afflicted with such a chronic illness and the personal concept of a chronic illness. Therefore patients with chronic renal failure were selected for the study. Methods: The study includes two different groups of patients, 25 per group examined at two different places at two different points of time. The two groups attended different hospitals in their local areas. Patients who were suffering from chronic renal failure were examined and selected for the study. In both groups results were obtained based on questions designed to get information on four themes: their economic status, their status of work, their dependency status and their personal concept of the illness. All the patients belong to rural areas and have had less than formal education or no education at all. Results: The most important finding in this study was a belief expressed in five patients (Two males and three female. They believed that indulging in sex in their marital life itself was a cause of the illness. One other female patient who had a bad obstetric history felt that her illness was due to the number of abortions she had. Conclusion: In a country like India especially in rural India where people believe in alternative medicine, magico-religious methods of native healers, it is difficult to convince people to go for a counselling service. They have to be provided such a service after the initial physical treatments have been started. It is essential that a service of such kind is provided free of cost at any level, even in a primary health centre. Where possible it is necessary to use diagnostic tools to designate severity of the problem. Otherwise personal ideas about illness that marital life has caused the disease can reflect adversely on the harmony and quality of life of

  14. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carmel M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core

  15. Family Stress with Chronic Childhood Illness: Cystic Fibrosis, Neuromuscular Disease, and Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holroyd, Jean; Guthrie, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Parents of children with neuromuscular disease, cystic fibrosis, and renal disease were compared with parents of control subjects matched by age to the clinical cases. The three clinical groups exhibited different patterns of stressful response, consistent with the nature of their illnesses and the requirements for care imposed on the families.…

  16. Anticipated stigma in chronic illness patients in Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence and relationship of anticipated chronic illness stigma among patients diagnosed with a variety of chronic diseases in three Southeast Asian countries (Cambodia, Myanmar and Vietnam). A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 4,803 adult chronic disease patients (mean age 49.3 years; SD=16.5) recruited systematically from health facilities. Overall, the results indicate that 20.7% of patients reported that for any of the 12 stigma items, they anticipated they were likely or very likely to experience chronic disease stigma. A multivariate analysis of sociodemographics revealed the following were associated with anticipated chronic disease stigma: older versus younger age, OR (odds ratio) = 0.71; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) [0.58, 0.87]; higher versus lower education, OR = 2.23; 95% CI [1.81, 2.75]; origin from Myanmar or Vietnam, being single, divorced or widowed, rural residence, and health status (having three or more chronic conditions versus having one chronic condition), OR = 1.93; 95% CI [1.58, 2.35]; lower versus higher quality of life, OR = 0.73; 95% CI [0.63, 0.85]); health risk behavior (physical inactivity, poor diet, current smoking, and problem drinking) and low versus medium or high medication adherence (OR = 0.69; 95% CI [0.55,0.86]). This study demonstrated the possible consequences of anticipated stigma on the health and behavior of people living with chronic diseases, and several factors for chronic disease stigma were identified that can help guide interventions to reduce chronic illness stigma in this population.

  17. Achieving Effective Universal Health Coverage And Diagonal Approaches To Care For Chronic Illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Bhadelia, Afsan; Atun, Rifat; Frenk, Julio

    2015-09-01

    Health systems in low- and middle-income countries were designed to provide episodic care for acute conditions. However, the burden of disease has shifted to be overwhelmingly dominated by chronic conditions and illnesses that require health systems to function in an integrated manner across a spectrum of disease stages from prevention to palliation. Low- and middle-income countries are also aiming to ensure health care access for all through universal health coverage. This article proposes a framework of effective universal health coverage intended to meet the challenge of chronic illnesses. It outlines strategies to strengthen health systems through a "diagonal approach." We argue that the core challenge to health systems is chronicity of illness that requires ongoing and long-term health care. The example of breast cancer within the broader context of health system reform in Mexico is presented to illustrate effective universal health coverage along the chronic disease continuum and across health systems functions. The article concludes with recommendations to strengthen health systems in order to achieve effective universal health coverage.

  18. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, Susan M.; Geary, Denis F.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction wit...

  19. Prediction of chronic critical illness in a general intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio H. Loss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence, costs, and mortality associated with chronic critical illness (CCI, and to identify clinical predictors of CCI in a general intensive care unit. METHODS: This was a prospective observational cohort study. All patients receiving supportive treatment for over 20 days were considered chronically critically ill and eligible for the study. After applying the exclusion criteria, 453 patients were analyzed. RESULTS: There was an 11% incidence of CCI. Total length of hospital stay, costs, and mortality were significantly higher among patients with CCI. Mechanical ventilation, sepsis, Glasgow score < 15, inadequate calorie intake, and higher body mass index were independent predictors for cci in the multivariate logistic regression model. CONCLUSIONS: CCI affects a distinctive population in intensive care units with higher mortality, costs, and prolonged hospitalization. Factors identifiable at the time of admission or during the first week in the intensive care unit can be used to predict CCI.

  20. Co-construction of chronic illness narratives by older stroke survivors and their spouses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radcliffe, Eloise; Lowton, Karen; Morgan, Myfanwy

    2013-09-01

    Illness narratives have mainly focused on individual patients' accounts, and particularly those of people experiencing the onset of chronic illness in mid-life. However, a growing number of older people are spending their later life with their partner, with both experiencing complex morbidities. We examine the shared creation of meanings among older stroke survivors and their spouses and the implications for individual and couple identity. Joint biographical narrative interviews were held with 13 stroke survivors aged 75-85 and their spouses. The analysis examined both narrative content and narrative style. Three main types of co-presentation of identity were identified. The 'united couple' described couples who pulled together and emphasised their accommodation of the stroke and normality as a couple, despite often considerable disability, and was strongly underpinned by collaborative interaction in interviews. Caring relationships were distinguished as 'positive', involving self-reliant couples who took pride in how they managed and 'frustrated' in couples who emphasised the difficulties of caring and hardships experienced and were characterised by a conflictual style of narrative. We argue that joint interviews provide new forms of data that extend notions of how illness is lived and demonstrates how the marital relationship can mediate the experience of chronic illness and disability and its impact on identity.

  1. Feasibility of a multiple-choice mini mental state examination for chronically critically ill patients

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Following treatment in an ICU, up to 70% of chronically critically ill patients present neurocognitive impairment that can have negative effects on their quality of life, daily activities, and return to work. The Mini Mental State Examination is a simple, widely used tool for neurocognitive assessment. Although of interest when evaluating ICU patients, the current version is restricted to patients who are able to speak. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a visual, mul...

  2. Self-esteem in adolescents with chronic physical illness vs. controls in Northern Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Zashikhina, Anna; Hägglöf, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This work aims to study self-esteem in adolescents with diabetes, asthma and epilepsy; compare the results with those of the representative sample of healthy adolescents; and evaluate the predictive value of certain demographic, family-related, and disease-related factors on self-esteem. Methods: A total of 148 chronically ill adolescents and 301 matched healthy counterparts completed the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale and the "I think I am" questionnaire. Adolescents' parents answere...

  3. Chronically ill patients’ expectations of therapeutic education and their health locus of control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Anna Basińska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Beliefs as cognitive components of personality indicate what we consider as true or false and help us to answer questions concerning others, the world surrounding us and situations that we encounter. Beliefs about the health locus of control and their relations with expectations pertaining to therapeutic education seem to be of vital importance in the case of occurrence of a chronic illness. The aim of this paper is to verify whether expectations concerning therapeutic education in chronically ill patients demonstrate a relation with beliefs about the health locus of control and whether they vary according to gender, age and health, and to present the results of research that applies the Polish OE-15 scale for the evaluation of therapeutic education expectations depending on the health condition. Participants and procedure Two hundred and ninety-one persons were examined, including 180 patients and 111 healthy controls (the control group, 187 women and 104 men. The average age of subjects was 45.71 (SD = 13.51 years, ranging from 21 to 80 years. The OE-15 Therapeutic Education Expectations Scale and the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale in versions relevant for patients and healthy controls as well as demographics were used. Results Age, gender and beliefs about the health locus of control are related to expectations of therapeutic education. Conclusions When providing therapeutic education for chronically ill patients, one should assess their expectations and pay attention to patients’ beliefs about the health locus of control.

  4. Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses: School Absenteeism, Perceived Peer Aggression, and Loneliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalyn H. Shute

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Frequent school absence is often cited as a risk factor for peer relationship problems in youngsters with chronic illnesses, but this assumption has not been subjected to quantitative empirical examination. This issue was examined in the present study by exploring the relationship between school absenteeism, peer aggression, and loneliness in adolescents with chronic illnesses. Forty-one adolescents with chronic illnesses completed a modified version of the Direct and Indirect Aggression Scale and the Asher Loneliness Scale. Details of school absences and hospitalizations were obtained from parents and school and hospital records. No evidence was found to support the notion that peer aggression and loneliness are related to absenteeism, but social aggression (for both boys and girls and verbal aggression (more markedly for girls were associated with loneliness. Of the group, 19% reported experiencing verbal aggression and 12% social aggression at least weekly; informal qualitative data suggesting that such aggression is often related to limited sporting ability and appearance. Interventions at both the individual and school community level are warranted.

  5. Use of virtual reality gaming systems for children who are critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Yasser; Elokda, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Children who are critically ill are frequently viewed as "too sick" to tolerate physical activity. As a result, these children often fail to develop strength or cardiovascular endurance as compared to typically developing children. Previous reports have shown that early participation in physical activity in is safe and feasible for patients who are critically ill and may result in a shorter length of stay and improved functional outcomes. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems has become a popular form of therapy for children with disabilities and has been supported by a growing body of evidence substantiating its effectiveness with this population. The use of the virtual reality gaming systems in pediatric rehabilitation provides the children with opportunity to participate in an exercise program that is fun, enjoyable, playful, and at the same time beneficial. The integration of those systems in rehabilitation of children who are critically ill is appealing and has the potential to offer the possibility of enhancing physical activities. The lack of training studies involving children who are critically ill makes it difficult to set guidelines on the recommended physical activities and virtual reality gaming systems that is needed to confer health benefits. Several considerations should be taken into account before recommended virtual reality gaming systems as a training program for children who are critically ill. This article highlighted guidelines, limitations and challenges that need to be considered when designing exercise program using virtual reality gaming systems for critically ill children. This information is helpful given the popular use of virtual reality gaming systems in rehabilitation, particularly in children who are critically ill.

  6. Protein, Energy and Their Interaction in Critically Ill Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.A.T. Verbruggen (Sascha)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCritically ill patients are in a catabolic state, characterized by three major metabolic changes. First, there is an increased protein turnover with enhanced hepatic protein synthesis and muscle protein breakdown. Second, during critical illness there is increased lipolysis, or the break

  7. Giving patients responsibility or fostering mutual response-ability: family physicians' constructions of effective chronic illness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thille, Patricia H; Russell, Grant M

    2010-10-01

    Current visions of family medicine and models of chronic illness management integrate evidence-based medicine with collaborative, patient-centered care, despite critiques that these constructs conflict with each other. With this potential conflict in mind, we applied a critical discursive psychology methodology to present discursive patterns articulated by 13 family physicians in Ontario, Canada, regarding care of patients living with multiple chronic illnesses. Physicians constructed competing versions of the terms "effective chronic illness management" and "patient involvement." One construction integrated individual responsibility for health with primacy of "evidence," resulting in a conceptualization consistent with paternalistic care. The second constructed effective care as involving active partnership of physician and patient, implying a need to foster the ability of both practitioners and patients to respond to complex challenges as they arose. The former pattern is inconsistent with visions of family medicine and chronic illness management, whereas the latter embodies it.

  8. The Influence of Chronic Illness and Lifestyle Behaviors on Quality of Life among Older Thais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratana Somrongthong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic conditions and lifestyle behaviors have a detrimental influence on the quality of life for seniors because of physical disability and emotional concerns. This study aimed to assess the influence of chronic illness, smoking, and alcohol use on quality of life among Thai seniors. A cross-sectional study was conducted in three communities, selected purposively from the North, Northeast, and Central regions, and 1278 senior participants were recruited. Binary logistic regression was used to predict the influence of factors on quality of life with adjusted covariates. Most participants were aged 60–70 years and married, earned 500–1,000 Baht/month (US $17–$35, had one chronic illness, and were nonsmokers and nondrinkers. Surprisingly, there appeared to be no link between chronic conditions and quality of life. Current drinkers were more likely to have a high quality of life, with Odds Ratios of 2.16 for men and 2.73 for women. Seniors of both genders who were current drinkers were more likely to accept death and dying and this improved their quality of life. Social participation in alcohol consumption may encourage seniors to share their concerns about death and dying and eventually accept this as a foundation of life.

  9. Validation of the Spanish Translation of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Aragones, MD, MSCI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC survey is a patient-centered instrument for evaluating the quality and patient-centeredness of chronic illness care received according to the Chronic Care Model paradigm. This study validates the Spanish translation of the PACIC in an urban, Spanish-speaking population.MethodsOne hundred Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes completed the translated PACIC and sociodemographic and cultural questionnaires. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a subset of 20 patients who completed the questionnaire 2 to 4 months later. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach α. PACIC score and subscale associations with sociodemographic characteristics were examined.ResultsTest-retest reliability for the overall translated PACIC scale was 0.77. Scores were not associated with patient sociodemographic characteristics, including age, country of birth, years living in the United States, or education level (P >.05.ConclusionThe Spanish translation of the PACIC survey demonstrated high reliability, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. Scores showed no association with sociodemographic or cultural characteristics. The Spanish version can reliably be used to assess care delivered according to the Chronic Care Model in a heterogeneous Spanish-speaking population.

  10. Living on social assistance with chronic illness: Buffering and undermining features to well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead Margaret

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sweden, the social security and sickness insurance systems are comprehensive and aim to provide people whose illness prevents them from earning their own living, with either sickness benefits or disability pension. Some, however, are not entitled to these benefits or receive social insurance benefits at a level too low for subsistence, and are referred to social assistance. The purpose of this study was to explore in depth how social assistance recipients with chronic illness perceive and respond to the experience of living on social assistance. Methods Seventeen in-depth interviews were carried out with chronically ill people who had received social assistance for several years. Grounded theory informed the design of the study. Results The study showed that different strategies (living one day at a time, taking steps forwards and backwards and making attempts to find ways out of the situation were employed by social assistance recipients to maintain or improve their well-being. Contextual features like the prevailing welfare system, public services and the local neighbourhood could buffer or undermine these strategies and their overall well-being. These features together influenced how interviewees perceived their situation, the possible ways out of the situation and the consequences for their well-being. Conclusion From this study it is evident that the way in which individuals on social assistance interact with services and how they are treated by professionals plays an important role in their well-being, in combination with what kind of help and support is available for recipients through the welfare system. In this respect, persons living on social assistance with chronic illness are particularly vulnerable. This study suggests that more effort should be made to find long term solutions concerning income support, rehabilitation and other services provided to this group.

  11. Communication and cybercoping: coping with chronic illness through communicative action in online support networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Nam; Lee, Seungyoon

    2014-01-01

    Computer-mediated communication, specifically blogs, has expanded the range of the communicative action of patients with chronic disease from information seeking to information forwarding. The authors examine the effects of these 2 types of communicative action on perceived affective and physical coping outcomes. Using a survey dataset of 254 chronic disease patients, the authors tested 2 models using structural equation modeling: first, the effects of communicative action about chronic illness on coping outcomes; and second, the mediating role of emotion-focused and problem-focused coping processes. Findings indicate overall positive effects of communicative action on coping processes and outcomes, yet with different magnitudes of effects depending on the dimensions of communication behavior, the coping process, and outcome. Implications for patients and health care providers are discussed.

  12. Comparing and improving chronic illness primary care in Sweden and the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øvretveit, John; Ramsay, Patricia; Shortell, Stephen M; Brommels, Mats

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities for improving primary care services for people with chronic illnesses by comparing how Sweden and US services use evidence-based practices (EBPs), including digital health technologies (DHTs). Design/methodology/approach - A national primary healthcare center (PHCC) heads surveys in 2012-2013 carried out in both countries in 2006. Findings - There are large variations between the two countries. The largest, regarding effective DHT use in primary care centers, were that few Swedish primary healthcare compared to US heads reported having reminders or prompts at the point of care (38 percent Sweden vs 84 percent USA), despite Sweden's established electronic medical records (EMR). Swedish heads also reported 30 percent fewer centers receiving laboratory results (67 percent Sweden vs 97 percent USA). Regarding following other EBPs, 70 percent of Swedish center heads reported their physicians had easy access to diabetic patient lists compared to 14 percent in the USA. Most Swedish PHCC heads (96 percent) said they offered same day appointment compared to 36 percent in equivalent US practices. Practical implications - There are opportunities for improvement based on significant differences in effective practices between the countries, which demonstrates to primary care leaders that their peers elsewhere potentially provide better care for people with chronic illnesses. Some improvements are under primary care center control and can be made quickly. There is evidence that people with chronic illnesses in these two countries are suffering unnecessarily owing to primary care staff failing to provide proven EBP, which would better meet patient needs. Public finance has been invested in DHT, which are not being used to their full potential. Originality/value - The study shows the gaps between current and potential proven effective EBPs for services to patients with chronic conditions. Findings suggest possible

  13. High-quality chronic care delivery improves experiences of chronically ill patients receiving care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective. Investigate whether high-quality chronic care delivery improved the experiences of patients. Design. This study had a longitudinal design. Setting and Participants. We surveyed professionals and patients in 17 disease management programs targeting patients wi

  14. A family nursing approach to the care of a child with a chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D A

    1992-03-01

    Chronic illness in childhood affects family functioning, and professional support is required when the child is being cared for at home. The focus of concern for this study is the nursing contribution to the support of the family. A longitudinal ethnographic study of the experience of four families caring for a child with cystic fibrosis provided data. Analysis of the four case studies provides insight to the effect of cystic fibrosis on family interaction. The genetic aspects and the life-threatening nature of the illness are seen to have a profound effect on the parents' lives. The experience of crisis and the chronic burden of care are described. The context of long-term care requires the nurse to share the illness trajectory with the families and to help family members to travel it together. This is seen to require a high level of interpersonal skill and considerable emotional investment. The issues for nursing are examined. The research arose from practice, and it contributes to theoretical explanation of nursing interaction, and the relationship of systems thinking to understanding of the nursing situation. The case for the development of family nursing practice to meet contemporary health care needs is argued.

  15. Daily interpersonal events in pain patients: applying action theory to chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary C; Affleck, Glenn; Zautra, Alex J; Tennen, Howard

    2006-09-01

    Action theory proposes that individuals actively shape and then respond to their environments, highlighting the role of stable person characteristics in the development and maintenance of life's interpersonal difficulties. In this study, the authors adopt the action perspective in their examination of predictors of daily interpersonal events among chronic pain patients with rheumatoid arthritis. They probe the extent to which stable symptoms of illness explained between-person variation, and fluctuating symptoms explain day-to-day variation in both positive and negative events. Their evaluation of patients' daily diary reports indicate that between-person differences accounted for more variance in the occurrence of positive events relative to negative events (48% vs. 31%, respectively). Likewise, between-person factors accounted for more variance in appraisals of positive compared to negative events across relationship domains. Both intractable illness symptoms and disability, and daily fluctuations in pain and fatigue, were only weakly related to patients' reports of their interpersonal experiences. Consistent with action theory, these results suggest that stable person characteristics are strongly related to daily stressors and particularly daily positive events in pain patients, but still account for less than 50% of the variance in events and their appraisals. In contrast, elevations in illness-related features, both between individuals and within individuals from day-to-day, are not robust predictors of positive or negative social exchanges. These findings point to the value of capturing the experiences of individuals intensively over time, an approach that can help to elaborate the contributions of both stable factors and circumstance in shaping social contexts in chronic illness.

  16. Illness experiences of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: self-perceived efficacy of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria de Sousa Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study explores the illness experiences, the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation as perceived by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and their rationale for improvements in health. 23 patients participated in a daily, three-month home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. A pre-post self-perceived assessment of efficacy was conducted. Semi-structured interviews, illness narratives and participant-observation provided a “dense description” of patients' lived-experience before and after the program. Interviews and narratives were tape-recorded, transcribed and coded. Qualitative data was subjected to “thematic content analysis” and “contextualized semantic interpretation”. Patients compare functional status before and after falling ill, experience loss, stigma and depression, describe health improvements and judge the pulmonary rehabilitation’s efficacy. Giving voice to chronically-ill patients, as individuals, is needed. To reduce clinical conflicts, health professionals should encourage illness narratives and value their patients’ lived-experience.

  17. Illness experiences of persons with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: self-perceived efficacy of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Martín-Nogueras, Ana; Nations, Marilyn

    2014-06-01

    This qualitative study explores the illness experiences, the efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation as perceived by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and their rationale for improvements in health. 23 patients participated in a daily, three-month home-based pulmonary rehabilitation. A pre-post self-perceived assessment of efficacy was conducted. Semi-structured interviews, illness narratives and participant-observation provided a "dense description" of patients' lived-experience before and after the program. Interviews and narratives were tape-recorded, transcribed and coded. Qualitative data was subjected to "thematic content analysis" and "contextualized semantic interpretation". Patients compare functional status before and after falling ill, experience loss, stigma and depression, describe health improvements and judge the pulmonary rehabilitation's efficacy. Giving voice to chronically-ill patients, as individuals, is needed. To reduce clinical conflicts, health professionals should encourage illness narratives and value their patients' lived-experience.

  18. Adverse drug reactions of haloperidol used in critically ill children for the treatment of delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaans, E.; Slooff, V.; Van Puijenbroek, E.; Jessurun, N.; De Hoog, M.; Tibboel, D.; De Wildt, S.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As delirium in critically ill children is increasingly recognized, more children are treated with the antipsychotic drug haloperidol. However, little is known about its safety in this context. The objective of this study was to investigate the incidence and nature of adverse events assoc

  19. Place of Child Care and Medicated Respiratory Illness among Young American Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presser, Harriet B.

    1988-01-01

    Study based on Child Health Supplement to 1981 National Health Interview Survey showed higher prevalence of medicated respiratory illness among children under age five when they were cared for outside the home. For children under age three, prevalence was highest in child care centers, lower in other homes, and lowest in own home. (Author/NB)

  20. Online support for children of parents suffering from mental illness : A case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Louisa M.; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2015-01-01

    From epidemiologic research, we know that children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) have an elevated risk of developing a serious mental disorder. Aside from studies based on risk and resilience, there has been little research on the children's own perceptions. The aim of this study was to e

  1. Listening to Older Adult Parents of Adult Children with Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Judith R.

    2012-01-01

    This article uses qualitative research and narrative analysis to examine the experience of women age 55 and older who are parents caring for adult children with mental illness. Knowledge about the conflicts of older parents with dependent children is underdeveloped. In this study, analysis of women's stories about parenting in later life reveal…

  2. Electrographic status epilepticus in children with critical illness: Epidemiology and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abend, Nicholas S

    2015-08-01

    Electrographic seizures and electrographic status epilepticus are common in children with critical illness with acute encephalopathy, leading to increasing use of continuous EEG monitoring. Many children with electrographic status epilepticus have no associated clinical signs, so EEG monitoring is required for seizure identification. Further, there is increasing evidence that high seizure burdens, often classified as electrographic status epilepticus, are associated with worse outcomes. This review discusses the incidence of electrographic status epilepticus, risk factors for electrographic status epilepticus, and associations between electrographic status epilepticus and outcomes, and it summarizes recent guidelines and consensus statements addressing EEG monitoring in children with critical illness. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  3. Prevalence of menopause, chronic illnesses and life style of middle aged women in Karachi, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Saleem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available : Objectives: To determine the prevalence of menopause, chronic illnesses and lifestyle of middle aged women in Karachi, Pakistan. Design: A Cross Sectional survey was conducted among women of 40-60 years living in socio-economically different areas of Karachi. Information was gathered on their current menstrual status, age at menopause, body mass index, exercise habits, weekly recall of food consumed and chronic illnesses. These variables were also examined according to the socio economic status of the area where women reside. Results: A total of 1764 women in age group 40-60 years were interviewed. The prevalence of menopausal women in this age group was 39.3 percent (%. The mean age at menopause was 45.2 (±3.8 years. Only seven percent of women were doing some kind of exercise and approximately eighty percent had their Body Mass Index ≥ 23 kg/m2 according to Asian Standard. Approximately 31 percent (% of women reported eating any type of meat at least four times a week, of these most were from higher income area. Majority consumed meat less than three times a week. Similar pattern was observed for consumption of fruits and milk. Approximately 36 percent (% of women reported diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardio vascular heart disease and arthritis. Conclusion: The sedentary life style, obesity and chronic illnesses are highly prevalent and are serious emerging public health problem for 40-60 years old women of Karachi. We recommend that awareness about balanced diet, exercise and healthy eating habits should be inculcated in women early in life, where possible through schools and media. Health policies and public health messages should be formulated according to the various stages of life cycle of women, so that women can prepare themselves for the next stage of life.

  4. Genetic associations with viral respiratory illnesses and asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loisel, D A; Du, G; Ahluwalia, T S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viral respiratory infections can cause acute wheezing illnesses in children and exacerbations of asthma. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify variation in genes with known antiviral and pro-inflammatory functions to identify specific associations with more severe viral respiratory illnesses...... and the risk of virus-induced exacerbations during the peak fall season. METHODS: The associations between genetic variation at 326 SNPs in 63 candidate genes and 10 phenotypes related to viral respiratory infection and asthma control were examined in 226 children enrolled in the RhinoGen study. Replication...... of asthma control phenotypes was performed in 2128 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC). Significant associations in RhinoGen were further validated using virus-induced wheezing illness and asthma phenotypes in an independent sample of 122 children enrolled...

  5. A study of person-environment fit among the chronically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulton, C J

    1979-01-01

    The ecological perspective is gaining acceptance in social work thinking. This approach focuses on the interaction of people and situations. An important ecological concept is person-environment fit; that is, the congruency between people needs, capacities, and aspirations and the resources demands and opportunities in their environment. The study described in this article explored the empirical manifestations of this concept among a group of chronically ill persons. The results suggested that there are several categories of person-environment fit that are important to people. The concept also appears to have potential usefulness for research on social work practice.

  6. Feasibility of a transition intervention aimed at adolescents with chronic illness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanghøj, Signe; Boisen, Kirsten A; Schmiegelow, Kjeld;

    2017-01-01

    intervention aimed at adolescents with chronic illness focusing on declines, drop-outs, no-shows and advantages and disadvantages of participating. METHODS: We invited 236 adolescents (12-20 years) with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to participate in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) transition...... and being too busy. Advantages of participating were stated as 'participating without parents', 'trust and confidentiality', 'being able to set the agenda' and 'responsiveness'. Disadvantages were 'unclear aim of the study', 'meeting others with JIA', 'too few conversations' and 'transport issues...

  7. Hope and fatigue in chronic illness: The role of perceived stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jameson K; Sirois, Fuschia M

    2016-04-01

    Fatigue is a debilitating symptom of chronic illness that is deleteriously affected by perceived stress, a process particularly relevant to inflammatory disease. Hopefulness, a goal-based motivational construct, may beneficially influence stress and fatigue, yet little research has examined these associations. We assessed the relation between hope and fatigue, and the mediating effect of stress, in individuals with fibromyalgia, arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Covarying age, sex, and pain, stress partially mediated the association between hope and fatigue; those with greater hope reported less stress and consequent fatigue. Therapeutically, bolstering hope may allow proactive management of stressors, resulting in less fatigue.

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Zangeneh Kamali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods: We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (±3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (±1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (±15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (±24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  9. Feeding practices for infants and young children during and after common illness. Evidence from South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguayo, Víctor M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Global evidence shows that children's growth deteriorates rapidly during/after illness if foods and feeding practices do not meet the additional nutrient requirements associated with illness/convalescence. To inform policies and programmes, we conducted a review of the literature published from 1990 to 2014 to document how children 0–23 months old are fed during/after common childhood illnesses. The review indicates that infant and young child feeding (IYCF) during common childhood illnesses is far from optimal. When sick, most children continue to be breastfed, but few are breastfed more frequently, as recommended. Restriction/withdrawal of complementary foods during illness is frequent because of children's anorexia (perceived/real), poor awareness of caregivers' about the feeding needs of sick children, traditional beliefs/behaviours and/or suboptimal counselling and support by health workers. As a result, many children are fed lower quantities of complementary foods and/or are fed less frequently when they are sick. Mothers/caregivers often turn to family/community elders and traditional/non‐qualified practitioners to seek advice on how to feed their sick children. Thus, traditional beliefs and behaviours guide the use of ‘special’ feeding practices, foods and diets for sick children. A significant proportion of mothers/caregivers turn to the primary health care system for support but receive little or no advice. Building the knowledge, skills and capacity of community health workers and primary health care practitioners to provide mothers/caregivers with accurate and timely information, counselling and support on IYCF during and after common childhood illnesses, combined with large‐scale communication programmes to address traditional beliefs and norms that may be harmful, is an urgent priority to reduce the high burden of child stunting in South Asia. PMID:26840205

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of mental illness in mentally retarded children: a developmental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosen, A

    1989-01-01

    Attempts have been made in recent years to discover the roots of psychiatric disorders in mentally retarded children by employing a developmental approach in which the child, not the handicap, is brought more clearly into focus. This paper provides a brief overview of the developmental model that has proven useful for the author in the psychiatric diagnosis of mentally retarded children. Application of this model to the treatment of mentally ill-mentally retarded children is also addressed.

  11. The Future of Psychotherapy for Mentally Ill Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Given striking advances in translational developmental neuroscience and its convergence with developmental psychopathology and developmental epidemiology, it is now clear that mental illnesses are best thought of as neurodevelopmental disorders. This simple fact has enormous implications for the nature and organization of psychotherapy…

  12. Aggressive Children With Mental Illness: A Conceptual Model of Family-Level Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sporer, Karyn

    2016-04-13

    The purpose of this research was to examine how families adapt and respond to an aggressive child with mental illness. This article presents findings from a qualitative study of four families, which were selected as typifying the experiences of a larger sample of 14 families; each family included a child with mental illness and a history of violent behavior. The analysis revealed a five-stage pattern in how families perceived and responded to victimization and their child or sibling's mental illness. The study suggests that families with a violent child with mental illness and other healthy children cannot live through episodes of violence without removing the child with mental illness from the home or suffering considerable damage to the family. The article concludes with recommendations for mental health practitioners and family intervention specialists.

  13. The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness in primary school children in Kuala Lumpur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, B H; Henry, R L

    1991-03-01

    The effects of indoor environmental factors on respiratory illness were studied in 15017-12 year old school children in Kuala Lumpur. Exposure to mosquito coil smoke for at least three nights a week was independently associated with asthma and persistent wheeze. Passive smoking, defined as sharing a bedroom with an adult smoker, was independently associated with a chest illness in the past year. No relationships were found between exposure to kerosene stoves, wood stoves, fumigation mat mosquito repellents or aerosol insecticides and respiratory illness. Host factors predictive of at least one respiratory outcome included family history of chest illness, history of allergy, male sex, hospitalization in the neonatal period and low paternal education. With 95% confidence, avoidance of regular exposure to mosquito coil smoke and passive smoking could reduce the prevalences of persistent wheeze, asthma and chest illness by up to 29%. Measurements of lung function confirmed the validity of questions pertaining to wheezing and asthma in the study questionnaire.

  14. LIFE QUALITY IN CASES WITH CHRONICAL DEGENERATIVE ILLNESS OF LOCOMOTIVE SYSTEM REGARDING SEX, AGE AND OVERWEIGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munevera Bećarević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbances of muscle and skeleton system are related to pain, functional damages and inability to work. Measure of life quality offers a sequence of data on illness influence on everyday functioning. The aim of this paper is evaluation of life quality in cases with degenerative illnesses of locomotive system and influence of sex, age, weist and BMI on life quality. Epidemiologic research was conducted on 71 tested subjects with diagnosis of chronical degenerative reumatical illness. Tested subject were measured weist values, BMI was determined and all of them fulfilled EQ5D questionnaire for life quality assessment. According to VAS scale their health condition was evaluated. Life quality of tested subjects was decreased especially in department of depression and increased concern (2.30 – 2.57 as well as pain and discomfort (2.11 – 2.31. We didn't determine statistically significant sex influence (p> 0,05, age, (p> 0,05 weist values (p> 0,05 or BMI (p> 0,05 our tested subjects life quality. According to VAS scale health condition of tested subjects is low (6, 76 ± 1,04.

  15. Hand sanitiser provision for reducing illness absences in primary school children: a cluster randomised trial.

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    Patricia Priest

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The potential for transmission of infectious diseases offered by the school environment are likely to be an important contributor to the rates of infectious disease experienced by children. This study aimed to test whether the addition of hand sanitiser in primary school classrooms compared with usual hand hygiene would reduce illness absences in primary school children in New Zealand. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This parallel-group cluster randomised trial took place in 68 primary schools, where schools were allocated using restricted randomisation (1:1 ratio to the intervention or control group. All children (aged 5 to 11 y in attendance at participating schools received an in-class hand hygiene education session. Schools in the intervention group were provided with alcohol-based hand sanitiser dispensers in classrooms for the winter school terms (27 April to 25 September 2009. Control schools received only the hand hygiene education session. The primary outcome was the number of absence episodes due to any illness among 2,443 follow-up children whose caregivers were telephoned after each absence from school. Secondary outcomes measured among follow-up children were the number of absence episodes due to specific illness (respiratory or gastrointestinal, length of illness and illness absence episodes, and number of episodes where at least one other member of the household became ill subsequently (child or adult. We also examined whether provision of sanitiser was associated with experience of a skin reaction. The number of absences for any reason and the length of the absence episode were measured in all primary school children enrolled at the schools. Children, school administrative staff, and the school liaison research assistants were not blind to group allocation. Outcome assessors of follow-up children were blind to group allocation. Of the 1,301 and 1,142 follow-up children in the hand sanitiser and control groups, respectively, the

  16. Use of the Internet for Health Information by the Chronically Ill

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    Todd H. Wagner

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Chronic conditions are among the leading causes of death and disability in the United States. The Internet is a source of health information and advice for individuals with chronic conditions and shows promise for helping individuals manage their conditions and improve their quality of life. Methods We assessed Internet use for health information by people who had one or more of five common chronic conditions. We conducted a national survey of adults aged 21 and older, then analyzed data from 1980 respondents who had Internet access and who reported that they had hypertension, diabetes, cancer, heart problems, and/or depression. Results Adjusted rates for any Internet use for health information ranged from 33.8% (heart problems only to 52.0% (diabetes only. A sizable minority of respondents — particularly individuals with diabetes — reported that the Internet helped them to manage their condition themselves, and 7.9% said information on the Internet led them to seek care from a different doctor. Conclusion Use of the Internet for health information by chronically ill patients is moderate. Self-reported effects on choice of treatment or provider are small but noteworthy.

  17. Nursing care gestion of chronically ill elderly people. Policlinico 2, year 2007

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    Liudmila Carbonell Sanamé

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive prospective study was made to those patients aged more than 60 years who are attended in the Policlinico 2 “Leonilda Tamayo Matos” in Isla de la Juventud during the year 2007. The study population was 1254 and 700 chronically ill elderly people were taken as representative sample, using a simple random sampling. The Mini Mental State Examination and a satisfaction survey was made to old people, all these with their informed consent. The main variables to study were: sex, age, race, civil state, educational level, work, assistance to the Grandparent’s Circle and satisfaction level. There exists a feminine predominance (61% over male, as well as the age group from 60 to 64 years old. Mixed race is the most common one (43%, followed by black (35%. 43% of these elders have secondary studies, and 64% of them are retired. The assistance to the Grandparent’s Circle is good, 338 of all the elders studied (48.2% assist to it. The results were expressed with real numbers and percentages, and were represented in bar and pie charts. There exists a predominance of arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the elders studied. The quality of the nursing cares to the chronically ill old people of the policlinic 2 in 2007 was good.

  18. [Prevention and management of refeeding syndrome in patients with chronic critical illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Fan, Chaogang

    2016-07-01

    Nutritional support is an important means to treat the patients with chronic critical illness for commonly associated malnutrition. Refeeding syndrome is a serious complication during the process, mainly manifested as severe electrolyte with hypophosphataemia being the most common. Refeeding syndrome is not uncommon but it is often ignored. In our future clinical work, we need to recognize this chinical situation and use preventative and treatment measures. According to NICE clinical nutrition guideline, we discussed the risk factors, treatment methods and preventive measures of refeeding syndrome in patients with chronic critical illness. We argued that for patients with high risk refeeding syndrome, nutritional support treatment should be initially low calorie and slowly increased to complete requirement. Circulation capacity should be recovered, fluid balance must be closely monitored and supplement of vitamins, microelement, electrolytes should be noted. After the emergence of refeeding syndrome, we should reduce or even stop the calorie intake, give an active treatment for electrolyte disorder, provide vitamin B, and maintain the functions of multiple organs.

  19. Theory of planned behavior and adherence in chronic illness: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Antonia; Brandes, Kim; Mullan, Barbara; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-08-01

    Social-cognitive models such as the theory of planned behavior have demonstrated efficacy in predicting behavior, but few studies have examined the theory as a predictor of treatment adherence in chronic illness. We tested the efficacy of the theory for predicting adherence to treatment in chronic illness across multiple studies. A database search identified 27 studies, meeting inclusion criteria. Averaged intercorrelations among theory variables were computed corrected for sampling error using random-effects meta-analysis. Path-analysis using the meta-analytically derived correlations was used to test theory hypotheses and effects of moderators. The theory explained 33 and 9 % of the variance in intention and adherence behavior respectively. Theoretically consistent patterns of effects among the attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, intention and behavior constructs were found with small-to-medium effect sizes. Effect sizes were invariant across behavior and measurement type. Although results support theory predictions, effect sizes were small, particularly for the intention-behavior relationship.

  20. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  1. Chronic illness and multimorbidity among problem drug users: a comparative cross sectional pilot study in primary care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Walter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although multimorbidity has important implications for patient care in general practice, limited research has examined chronic illness and health service utilisation among problem drug users. This study aimed to determine chronic illness prevalence and health service utilisation among problem drug users attending primary care for methadone treatment, to compare these rates with matched \\'controls\\' and to develop and pilot test a valid study instrument. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of patients attending three large urban general practices in Dublin, Ireland for methadone treatment was conducted, and this sample was compared with a control group matched by practice, age, gender and General Medical Services (GMS) status. RESULTS: Data were collected on 114 patients. Fifty-seven patients were on methadone treatment, of whom 52(91%) had at least one chronic illness (other then substance use) and 39(68%) were prescribed at least one regular medication. Frequent utilisation of primary care services and secondary care services in the previous six months was observed among patients on methadone treatment and controls, although the former had significantly higher chronic illness prevalence and primary care contact rates. The study instrument facilitated data collection that was feasible and with minimal inter-observer variation. CONCLUSION: Multimorbidity is common among problem drug users attending general practice for methadone treatment. Primary care may therefore have an important role in primary and secondary prevention of chronic illnesses among this population. This study offers a feasible study instrument for further work on this issue. (238 words).

  2. A shared respite--The meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Årestedt, Liselott; Benzein, Eva; Persson, Carina; Rämgård, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Living with chronic illness is a family affair that involves ongoing changes and challenges in everyday life. When life changes, the environment is important for family health and well-being. The relation between a place and a family is rarely described, and therefore the aim of this study was to explore the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness. A qualitative design was chosen. Data were collected by photovoice combined with narrative family research interviews with 10 families living with chronic illness. A phenomenological hermeneutic analysis was used to interpret the data. The results showed that the meaning of place for family well-being in families living with chronic illness can be described as "a shared respite." This main theme included three subthemes: "a place for relief," "a place for reflection," and "a place for re-creation." These results were further understood by means of the concept place security. Feeling well means having place security in these families. Through knowledge about the meaning of place for family well-being, health care personnel can stimulate families living with chronic illness to find respite in places that contribute to well-being, both in familiar and new places.

  3. Cross-cultural differences in children's concepts of health and illness

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    Evely Boruchovitch

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In spite of general agreement that cross-cultural research is needed in the health area, most existing investigations of children's development of health and illness-related concepts have involved samples from developed countries. The study examined the development of the concepts of health and illness as a function of subject's age, socio-economic status (SES, gender and grade level in a Brazilian sample of 96 elementary and junior high school students. METHODS: Subjects were interviewed individually and their ideas of health and illness were assessed through open-ended questions. Participants' answers were transcribed verbatim and subjected to content analysis. RESULTS: Chi-square analyses revealed significant age, school grade and SES-related differences in participants' concepts of health and illness. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The themes employed by subjects to define both health and illness were broadly consistent with those found by previous research. The study showed a predictable relationship between subject's age and school grade level and increasingly more highly differentiated and multidimensional concepts of health and illness. This investigation suggests that, for the most part, cross-cultural similarities in children's concepts of health and illness may be more striking than the differences.

  4. Utility of CT-compatible EEG electrodes in critically ill children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abend, Nicholas S. [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); CHOP Neurology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dlugos, Dennis J. [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zhu, Xiaowei; Schwartz, Erin S. [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Electroencephalographic monitoring is being used with increasing frequency in critically ill children who may require frequent and sometimes urgent brain CT scans. Standard metallic disk EEG electrodes commonly produce substantial imaging artifact, and they must be removed and later reapplied when CT scans are indicated. To determine whether conductive plastic electrodes caused artifact that limited CT interpretation. We describe a retrospective cohort of 13 consecutive critically ill children who underwent 17 CT scans with conductive plastic electrodes during 1 year. CT images were evaluated by a pediatric neuroradiologist for artifact presence, type and severity. All CT scans had excellent quality images without artifact that impaired CT interpretation except for one scan in which improper wire placement resulted in artifact. Conductive plastic electrodes do not cause artifact limiting CT scan interpretation and may be used in critically ill children to permit concurrent electroencephalographic monitoring and CT imaging. (orig.)

  5. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O'Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-04-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen's d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were non-adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p < 0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p = 0.001), to have reported low income (p = 0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p = 0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p = 0.011; Cohen's d = 0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p = 0.001; Cohen's d = 0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p < 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36-0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications.

  6. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Illness and Medication Beliefs are Associated with Medication Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauskopf, Katherine; Federman, Alex D; Kale, Minal S; Sigel, Keith M; Martynenko, Melissa; O’Conor, Rachel; Wolf, Michael S; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Almost half of patients with COPD do not adhere to their medications. Illness and medication beliefs are important determinants of adherence in other chronic diseases. Using the framework of the Common Sense Model of Self Regulation (CSM), we determined associations between potentially modifiable beliefs and adherence to COPD medications in a cohort of English- and Spanish-speaking adults with COPD from New York and Chicago. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Adherence Report Scale. Illness and medication beliefs along CSM domains were evaluated using the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and the Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analysis (with Cohen’s d effect sizes) and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationship between illness and medication beliefs with adherence. The study included 188 participants (47% Black, 13% Hispanics); 109 (58%) were adherent. Non-adherent participants were younger (p<0.001), more likely to be Black or Hispanic (p=0.001), to have reported low income (p=0.02), and had fewer years of formal education (p=0.002). In unadjusted comparisons, non-adherent participants reported being more concerned about their COPD (p=0.011; Cohen’s d=0.43), more emotionally affected by the disease (p=0.001; Cohen’s d=0.54), and had greater concerns about COPD medications (p<0.001, Cohen’s d=0.81). In adjusted analyses, concerns about COPD medications independently predicted non-adherence (odds ratio: 0.52, 95% confidence interval: 0.36–0.75). In this cohort of urban minority adults, concerns about medications were associated with non-adherence. Future work should explore interventions to influence patient adherence by addressing concerns about the safety profile and long-term effects of COPD medications. PMID:24960306

  7. [Mental health of children, adolescents and young adults--part 1: prevalence, illness persistence, adversities, service use, treatment delay and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, M; Bock, T; Naber, D; Löwe, B; Schulte-Markwort, M; Schäfer, I; Gumz, A; Degkwitz, P; Schulte, B; König, H H; Konnopka, A; Bauer, M; Bechdolf, A; Correll, C; Juckel, G; Klosterkötter, J; Leopold, K; Pfennig, A; Karow, A

    2013-11-01

    Numerous birth-control studies, epidemiological studies, and observational studies have investigated mental health and health care in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, treatment delay and course of illness. Moreover, the impact of the burden of illness, of deficits of present health care systems, and the efficacy and effectiveness of early intervention services on mental health were evaluated. According to these data, most mental disorders start during childhood, adolescence and early adulthood. Many children, adolescents and young adults are exposed to single or multiple adversities, which increase the risk for (early) manifestations of mental diseases as well as for their chronicity. Early-onset mental disorders often persist into adulthood. Service use by children, adolescents and young adults is low, even lower than for adult patients. Moreover, there is often a long delay between onset of illness and first adequate treatment with a variety of linked consequences for a poorer psychosocial prognosis. This leads to a large burden of illness with respect to disability and costs. As a consequence several countries have implemented so-called "early intervention services" at the interface of child and adolescent and adult psychiatry. Emerging studies show that these health-care structures are effective and efficient. Part 1 of the present review summarises the current state of mental health in childhood, adolescence and early adulthood, including prevalence, age at onset, adversities, illness persistence, service use, and treatment delay with consequences.

  8. Socio-economic status and quality of life in children with chronic disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didsbury, Madeleine S; Kim, Siah; Medway, Meredith M; Tong, Allison; McTaggart, Steven J; Walker, Amanda M; White, Sarah; Mackie, Fiona E; Kara, Tonya; Craig, Jonathan C; Wong, Germaine

    2016-12-01

    Reduced quality of life (QoL) is a known consequence of chronic disease in children, and this association may be more evident in those who are socio-economically disadvantaged. The aims of this systematic review were to assess the association between socio-economic disadvantage and QoL among children with chronic disease, and to identify the specific socio-economic factors that are most influential. MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO were searched to March 2015. Observational studies that reported the association between at least one measure of social disadvantage in caregivers and at least one QoL measure in children and young people (age 2-21 years) with a debilitating non-communicable childhood disease (asthma, chronic kidney disease, type 1 diabetes mellitus and epilepsy) were eligible. A total of 30 studies involving 6957 patients were included (asthma (six studies, n = 576), chronic kidney disease (four studies, n = 796), epilepsy (14 studies, n = 2121), type 1 diabetes mellitus (six studies, n = 3464)). A total of 22 (73%) studies reported a statistically significant association between at least one socio-economic determinant and QoL. Parental education, occupation, marital status, income and health insurance coverage were associated with reduced QoL in children with chronic disease. The quality of the included studies varied widely and there was a high risk of reporting bias. Children with chronic disease from lower socio-economic backgrounds experience reduced QoL compared with their wealthier counterparts. Initiatives to improve access to and usage of medical and psychological services by children and their families who are socio-economically disadvantaged may help to mitigate the disparities and improve outcomes in children with chronic illnesses.

  9. ENDOSCOPIC AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC DYSPEPSIA IN A RURAL MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN MELMARUVATHUR- TAMILNADU

    OpenAIRE

    Padma K; Sumathi S.; Dinakaran Nagendram; Kannan C

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic pain abdomen and dyspepsia is the most common presenting symptoms in the Paediatric Outpatient Department (OPD) after respiratory illnesses. It is increasing alarmingly both in the paediatric and adult population. We, therefore carried out a cross-sectional study among children with chronic dyspepsia aged between 5 to 15 years attending Paediatric OPD in a rural medical college hospital, Melmaruvathur, Tamilnadu, South India. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the ga...

  10. Screen-based behaviour in school-aged children with long-term illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husarova, Daniela; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Blinka, Lukas; Sevcikova, Anna; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence is lacking on the screen-based behaviour of adolescents with a chronic condition. The aim of our study was to analyse differences in screen-based behaviour of adolescents by long-term illness, asthma and learning disabilities. METHODS: We used data from the cross-sectional Healt

  11. A conceptual model of psychosomatic illness in children. Family organization and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuchin, S; Baker, L; Rosman, B L; Liebman, R; Milman, L; Todd, T C

    1975-08-01

    Linear and open systems (multiple feedback) models of psychosomatic illness in children are contrasted in terms of their implications for cause and treatment. An open systems family model is presented that describes three necessary (but not independently sufficient) conditions for the development and maintenance of severe psychosomatic problems in children: (1) a certain type of family organization that encourages somatization; (2) involvement of the child in parental conflict; and (3) physiological vulnerability. Predisposition for psychosomatic illness, symptom choice, and maintenance are discussed within this conceptual framework. We report on family therapy strategies based on this model and the results of family treatment with 48 cases of "brittle" diabetes, psychosomatic asthma, and anorexia nervosa.

  12. Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans report symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness one year after deployment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M. McAndrew, PhD

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many Veterans returning from service in Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation Enduring Freedom (OIF/OEF experience chronic pain. What is not known is whether for some OIF/OEF Veterans this pain is part of a larger condition of diffuse multisystem symptoms consistent with chronic multisymptom illness (CMI. We use data from a prospective longitudinal study of OIF/OEF Veterans to determine the frequency of CMI. We found that 1 yr after deployment, 49.5% of OIF/OEF Veterans met criteria for mild to moderate CMI and 10.8% met criteria for severe CMI. Over 90% of Veterans with chronic pain met criteria for CMI. CMI was not completely accounted for either by posttraumatic stress disorder or by predeployment levels of physical symptoms. Veterans with symptoms consistent with CMI reported significantly worse physical health function than Veterans who did not report symptoms consistent with CMI. This study suggests that the presence of CMI should be considered in the evaluation of OIF/OEF Veterans. Further, it suggests that the pain management for these Veterans may need to be tailored to take CMI into consideration.

  13. The relationships between depression and other outcomes of chronic illness caregiving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirovec Mary M

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many caregivers with chronically ill relatives suffer from depression. However, the relationship of depression to other outcomes of chronic caregiving remains unclear. This study tested a hypothesized model which proposed that hours of care, stressful life events, social support, age and gender would predict caregivers' outcomes through perceived caregiver stress. Depression was expected to mediate the relationship between perceived stress and outcomes of chronic caregiving (physical function, self-esteem, and marital satisfaction. Methods The sample for this secondary data analysis consisted of 236 and 271 subjects from the Americans' Changing Lives, Wave 1, 1986, and Wave 2, 1989, data sets. Measures were constructed from the original study. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model, and an exploratory structural modeling method, specification search, was used to develop a data-derived model. Cross-validation was used to verify the paths among variables. Results Hours of care, age, and gender predicted caregivers' outcomes directly or through perceived caregiver stress (p Conclusion Depression predicted psychological outcomes. Whether depression predicts physical health outcomes needs to be further explored.

  14. Passive smoking, as measured by hair nicotine, and severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses among children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Delaimy WK

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the association between passive smoking and the severity of acute lower respiratory illnesses (ALRI among 351 children aged 3–27 months admitted to hospital. A total of 297 children provided hair samples, which were analysed for hair nicotine levels as an indicator of passive smoking. A severity of illness grading system was developed by using clinical and management criteria used by the medical staff at hospital. The OR for children with more severe illness being exposed to higher nicotine levels was 1.2, 95% CI: 0.57–2.58 when using dichotomised respiratory severity levels and upper versus lower nicotine quartile levels. In an ordinal logistic regression model, the OR of more severe illness being associated with higher nicotine levels was 1.07 (95% CI: 0.92–1.25. When analysis was limited to the more severe cases, the OR of the least severe category compared to the most severe category, in relation to nicotine levels in hair, was 1.79 (95% CI: 0.5–6.30. The ordinal logistic regression of this group of severely-ill children (OR 1.1 (95% CI: 0.94–1.29 was not substantially different from the overall study subjects. Conclusion In general, children with more severe illness tended to have higher levels of nicotine in their hair, although the results were within the limit of chance. Possible explanations of our results include environmental tobacco smoke (ETS being an initiator of ALRI rather than a risk to severity, exposure levels of ETS were too low to demonstrate an effect on severity, or the power of this study was not high enough to detect an association.

  15. Illness Symptoms Experienced by Children Exposed to Benzene After a Flaring Incident at the BP Refinery Facility in Texas City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Mark A; Reddy, G Kesava

    2016-10-01

    Objective To evaluate the illness symptoms experienced by children who were exposed to benzene following a flaring incident at the BP refinery in Texas City, Texas. Methods A total of 641 children, aged 5 year (P = .04). Conversely, urinary phenol levels were significantly lower in children 5 years (P = .00). Conclusion Together, these findings reveal that children exposed to benzene experience a range of illness symptoms and an altered profile of urinary phenol indicating their vulnerability to potentially increased health complications.

  16. Describing and analysing primary health care system support for chronic illness care in Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory – use of the Chronic Care Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Allison

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indigenous Australians experience disproportionately high prevalence of, and morbidity and mortality from chronic illness such as diabetes, renal disease and cardiovascular disease. Improving the understanding of how Indigenous primary care systems are organised to deliver chronic illness care will inform efforts to improve the quality of care for Indigenous people. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Indigenous communities in Australia's Northern Territory. Using the Chronic Care Model as a framework, we carried out a mail-out survey to collect information on material, financial and human resources relating to chronic illness care in participating health centres. Follow up face-to-face interviews with health centre staff were conducted to identify successes and difficulties in the systems in relation to providing chronic illness care to community members. Results Participating health centres had distinct areas of strength and weakness in each component of systems: 1 organisational influence – strengthened by inclusion of chronic illness goals in business plans, appointment of designated chronic disease coordinators and introduction of external clinical audits, but weakened by lack of training in disease prevention and health promotion and limited access to Medicare funding; 2 community linkages – facilitated by working together with community organisations (e.g. local stores and running community-based programs (e.g. "health week", but detracted by a shortage of staff especially of Aboriginal health workers working in the community; 3 self management – promoted through patient education and goal setting with clients, but impeded by limited focus on family and community-based activities due to understaffing; 4 decision support – facilitated by distribution of clinical guidelines and their integration with daily care, but limited by inadequate access to and support from specialists; 5 delivery system

  17. Prediction of exacerbation chronic bronchopulmonary diseases in children with influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Afanaseva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective: To develop a method for predicting exacerbation of chronic illness in children with asthma and cystic fibrosis, patients with influenza, based on the study of the dynamics of cytokines. Materials and methods: Were examined 52 patients with bronchial asthma and 45 children with cystic fibrosis at the age from 1 year to 12 years, located in infectious pulmonary Department at the planned treatment of underlying pathology, in which influenza was in-hospital infection. Control group observations included 40 patients with the flu, without concomitant pulmonary disease. The etiology of viral infection was established by detection of viral RNA in nasopharyngeal swabs by PCR. Among the influenza viruses were identified influenza АH1N1, АH3N2, influenza B, and in 2009–2010 the predominant antigen was the pandemic influenza virus АH1N1pdm09. Determination of the concentration of serum interleukins IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, ТNF-α, IFN-γ was performed in the 1st and 3rd day of hospitalization cytokines by the solid-phase immune-enzyme assay. Analysis of the results performed using statistical package SPSS 17.0 EN for Windows. Results: The flu caused the aggravation associated bronchopulmonary pathology in 2/3 of children, as MV patients, and patients with BA (65,4%-66,7%, respectively. With an increase of the ratio of IL-4 / IFN-γ and IL-10/IFN-γ, at least 5-6 times, influenza can be considered a trigger of exacerbation of chronic bronchopulmonary pathologies that require amplification of the therapy of bronchial asthma and of сystic fibrosis. The growth of prognostic coefficients in 2-3 times allows using for treatment of influenza in these patients only antiviral agents. Conclusion: The study has shown a method for predicting exacerbation of bronchial asthma and cystic fibrosis in children at an early stage of influenza by calculating the ratio of IL-4/IFN-γ and IL-10/IFN-γ in children aged from 1 year to 12 years. 

  18. The Other Side of Caring: Adult Children with Mental Illness as Supports to Their Mothers in Later Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Jan Steven

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the role of adult children with serious mental illness as a source of support to their aging parents. Most mothers reported that their mentally-ill children provided at least some ongoing help with daily living tasks. The adult child's assistance related significantly to lower levels of maternal subjective burden. (RJM)

  19. Imaging chronic renal disease and renal transplant in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmichael, Jim; Easty, Marina [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    At Great Ormond Street Hospital we have the highest number of paediatric renal transplant patients in Europe, taking cases from across the United Kingdom and abroad. Our caseload includes many children with rare complicating medical problems and chronic renal failure related morbidity. This review aims to provide an overview of our experience of imaging children with chronic renal failure and transplants. (orig.)

  20. Caring for family members with chronic physical illness: A critical review of caregiver literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebrack Brad

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article reviews 19 studies (1987–2004 on quality of life for family caregivers helping those with chronic physical illness. Here we explore the concepts of and instruments used to measure caregivers' quality of life. We were particularly interested in understanding stress-related variables and documenting factors influencing quality of life based on family stress theory. Findings show that various positive and negative terms equated with quality of life were used to measure them. Results indicate that stress-related variables as possible predictors influencing caregivers' quality of life include: patient and caregiver characteristics, stressors, stress appraisal, stress coping methods, and social support. Our recommendations touch upon applying theory for intervention, developing measurement, making operable the concepts for measuring, and the need for longitudinal and comprehensive study.

  1. Peer victimization and subjective health among students reporting disability or chronic illness in 11 Western countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sentenac, Mariane; Gavin, Aoife; Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To compare the strength of the association between peer victimization at school and subjective health according to the disability or chronic illness (D/CI) status of students across countries. METHODS: This study used data from 55 030 students aged 11, 13 and 15 years from 11 countries...... victimization and poor subjective health according to the D/CI status. RESULTS: Overall, 13.5% of the students reported having been bullied at least two or three times a month. The percentage of victims was significantly higher among those reporting D/CI than among others in all countries studied. Victims...... of bullying were more likely to report poor self-rated health, low life satisfaction and multiple health complaints. However, there were no differences in the associations between peer victimization and subjective health indicators according to the D/CI status. CONCLUSIONS: In all countries studied, students...

  2. [HIGH-RISK CHRONICALLY ILL PATIENTS: DIAGNOSTICS, RESULTS AND NURSING INTERVENTIONS UPON DISCHARGE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez López, Constancio; Martinez de Pinillos, Rafael López; Pereira Torres, Ana Isabel; San Pedro, Ana Isabel Castro; Heras Agudo, Dolores; Robledo González, Ascensión; Olmo Alonso, Carmen; Trujillo Orcha, Natalia

    2015-10-01

    It is after the implementation of the new nursing evaluation/ planning care registers (PCE) in the medical record and the updating of the document/circuit of the All-clear Ensuing Care Report (ICCA) with NANDA, NOC, NIC (NNN) in the first months of the year 2013, that we are contemplating the fulfillment of a descriptive/cross-section study so as to know diagnostics, results and nursing interventions upon discharge of high-risk chronically ill patients and qualitatively in medical hospitalization units and in palliative care. The results obtained at a quantitative level, with an implementation degree of 83 and 94 per cent, respectively, are extremely encouraging. Regarding the quality of care planning, we have identified for the first time in our hospital both the NANDA, the NOC and NIC with the prevalence degree in the units studied.

  3. Acute HIV illness following blood transfusion in three African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebunders, R; Greenberg, A E; Francis, H; Kabote, N; Izaley, L; Nguyen-Dinh, P; Quinn, T C; Van der Groen, G; Curran, J W; Piot, P

    1988-04-01

    Three children are described in whom pre-transfusion samples were HIV-seronegative and post-transfusional samples, obtained within 1 week after transfusion, were HIV-seropositive. Two of them developed a transient fever within 1 week of receiving the blood transfusion, and a transient generalized skin eruption which lasted for about 2 weeks. All three developed persistent generalized lymphadenopathy. One child developed a lumbar herpes zoster 7 months after transfusion. IgM Western blots demonstrated the presence of antibodies to protein bands p17, p24 and p55 in all three children. These three case reports suggest that children who receive a seropositive blood transfusion are at high risk for developing acute manifestations of HIV infection.

  4. Latex Allergy, a Special Risk for Patients with Chronic Illness and Health Care Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Zafer Caliskaner

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural rubber latex allergy is a new illness whose prevalence has reached epidemic proportions in highly exposed populations such as health care workers and who has chronic illness. After anaphylactic type reactions due to latex has been shown as case reports. The major risk factors in latex are intense exposure to latex allergens (surgical gloves, catheters, etc, atopy, hand eczema, female gender, history of multiple operations and dental interventions. An association between latex allergy and allergy to various fruits (banana, kiwi, avocado, pineapple, etc has been reported. Latex allergy is responsible for a wide spectrum of clinical symptoms ranging from a mild dermatitis to severe anaphylaxis. In this report, we present that latex related systemic allergic reactions cases; the first one is 24 years old nurse woman who is working at the blood bank in our hospital and the other one is 32 years old woman patient who has repeatative medical examination, and in vitro fertilisation therapy plan and suffered for systemic allergic reaction due to latex gloves which was used in her last concha operations. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(3.000: 265-268

  5. Migraine in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Prevalence, potential mechanisms, and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakib eRayhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of headache subtypes in Gulf War Illness and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome compared to controls. Background: Migraines are reported in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS. Approximately, 25% of the military personnel who served in the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War have developed Gulf War Illness (GWI. Symptoms in GWI share considerable overlap with CFS, including headache complaints. The type and prevalence of headaches in GWI have not been adequately assessed.Methods: 50 GWI, 39 CFS and 45 controls were examined. Participants had structured headache evaluations based on the 2004 International Headache Society criteria. All subjects had history and physical examinations, measurements of systemic hyperalgesia (dolorimetry, assessments for exclusionary indicators, fatigue and symptom related questionnaires. Results: Migraines were detected in 64% of GWI (odds ratio, 11.6, [±95% CI, 4.1 to 32.5] and 82% of CFS subjects (odds ratio, 22.5, [±95% CI, 7.8 to 64.8] compared to only 13% of controls. There was a predominance of females in the CFS compared to GWI and controls. However, gender did not influence migraine status (x2= 2.7; P = 0.101. Measures of fatigue, pain, and other ancillary criteria were comparable between GWI and CFS subjects with and without headache. Conclusion: Results validate previous findings of migraine in CFS and confirms similar increased prevalence in GWI compared to controls. This suggests GWI and CFS subjects share pathophysiological mechanisms that underlie migraine attacks and contribute to the extensive overlap of symptom constructs and disease pathophysiology. The high migraine prevalence warrants the inclusion of a structured headache evaluation that coincides with clinical assessments of GWI and CFS diagnosis.

  6. Influences of Maternal Mental Illness on Psychological Outcomes for Adolescent Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyserman, Daphna; Bybee, Deborah; Mowbray, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Explores the effects of maternal psychiatric symptoms and community functioning on child outcomes in a diverse sample of seriously mentally ill women caring for their teenaged children. In hierarchical multiple regression, for youth depression, we find effects for parenting style and maternal mental health; for youth anxiety and efficacy, effects…

  7. Nutritional Assessment of Critically Ill Children: the search for practical tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Hulst (Jessie)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractCritically ill children are at risk of deteriorating nutritional status when admitted to an intensive care unit. This may lead to malnutrition, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. While adequate feeding is essential for complete recovery and normal functional outc

  8. Intervention programs for children whose parents have a mental illness: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reupert, A.E.; Cuff, R.; Drost, L.; Foster, K.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Santvoort, F. van

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify and describe intervention programs to improve outcomes for children whose parents have a mental illness. Data sources: Grey and black literature was sourced from (i) three previous reviews/scoping studies, (ii) PsycINFO and MEDLINE searches of English, German and Dutch papers,

  9. A Bibliography of Children's and Young Adult's Books about Illness Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothern, Nancy B.

    This bibliography presents a list of approximately 360 works of children's and young adult's literature that deal with illness issues or issues connected with adverse life conditions such as various forms of child abuse, alcoholism, AIDS, blindness, cancer, death, handicaps, suicide, and surgery. The bibliography is divided into 42 sections, each…

  10. Effects of preventive family service coordination for parents with mental illnesses and their children, a RCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansink, H.J.; Janssens, J.M.A.M.; Hoencamp, E.; Middelkoop, B.J.C.; Hosman, C.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) are at increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, especially when parenting is compromised by multiple risk factors. Due to fragmented services, these families often do not get the support they need. Can coordination between services, as de

  11. Effectiveness of LISTEN on loneliness, neuroimmunological stress response, psychosocial functioning, quality of life, and physical health measures of chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurie A. Theeke

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: LISTEN can effectively diminish loneliness and decrease the systolic blood pressure in community-dwelling, chronically ill, older adults. Results indicate that this population, if left with untreated loneliness, may experience functional impairment over a period as short as 4 months. Further studies on LISTEN are needed with larger samples, in varied populations, and over longer periods of time to assess the long-term effects of diminishing loneliness in multiple chronic conditions.

  12. Conducta del enfermo ante el dolor crónico Illness behavior in chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Lavielle

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Describir la "conducta de enfermedad" en pacientes con dolor crónico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Durante el año 2000 se realizaron entrevistas semiestructuradas a 53 pacientes en una institución del tercer nivel de atención. Allí se exploró su interpretación y respuesta inicial al dolor crónico y prácticas subsecuentes hasta sentirse satisfechos con el diagnóstico recibido. RESULTADOS: La conducta de enfermedad estuvo determinada por la intensidad, discapacidad y creencias de las causas del dolor, recomendaciones de las redes de apoyo, la calidad y satisfacción con los sistemas de atención. En términos de la toma de decisión, la primera opción fue acudir al sector popular, y consultar al médico general, para finalmente acudir a un tercer nivel de atención ("con el especialista". CONCLUSIONES: La conducta de enfermedad es un proceso en el que se utilizan los diferentes sectores de la atención por parte de los mismos sujetos y que es determinado por el resultado de la atención brindada.OBJECTIVE: To describe the illness behaviour in patients with chronic pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We conducted semi-structured interviews to 53 patients during 2000, in a tertiary care center. We explored their initial interpretations, responses and subsequent practices to chronic pain, until they received a diagnosis that satisfied them. RESULTS: Illness behaviour was determined by pain intensity and disability; beliefs regarding pain causes, trust in social networks, and quality and satisfaction with the health care systems. In terms of the decision to seek care, the first option was to go to the popular sector, followed by consulting a general physician, and as last resort, to go to a tertiary care center ("with a specialist". CONCLUSIONS: Illness behaviour should be conceptualized as a process, which combines the use of different health care sectors by the same subjects, as a result of care provided sequentially by each previous sector.

  13. Models of care for late-life depression of the medically ill: examples from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avari, Jimmy N; Alexopoulos, George S

    2015-05-01

    Depression worsens most treatment outcomes in medically ill older adults. Chronic medical illnesses weaken and demoralize patients and compromise their ability to adhere to treatments requiring consistency and effort. Acute medical illnesses create a psychosocial storm that finds patients and their ecosystem unprepared. We describe two intervention models that can be used to target and personalize treatment in depressed, chronically, or acutely medically ill older adults. The Personalized Adherence Intervention for Depression and COPD (PID-C) is a model intervention for depressed patients with chronic medical illnesses. It targets patient-specific barriers to treatment engagement and aims to shift the balance in favor of treatment participation. PID-C led to higher remission rates of depression, reduction in depressive symptoms, and reduction in dyspnea-related disability. The addition of problem-solving training enables patients to use resources available to them and hopefully improve their outcomes. Ecosystem-focused therapy (EFT) is a model intervention for depression developing in the context of an acute medical event. It was developed for patients with poststroke depression (PSD) and targets five areas, part of the "psychosocial storm" originating from the patient's sudden disability and the resulting change in the patient's needs and family's life. A preliminary study suggests that EFT is feasible and efficacious in reducing depressive symptoms and signs and disability in PSD.

  14. Prescribing Antidepressants and Benzodiazepines in the Netherlands: Is Chronic Physical Illness Involved?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Th. M. van Eijk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we assessed differences in new and repeat prescriptions of psycho-tropics between patients receiving prescriptions for drugs to treat a common chronic disease and people without such prescriptions. The study used the databases of two Dutch health insurance companies (3 million people. We selected all Dutch men and women aged 45 and older who were registered for six consecutive years (1999–2004. Our analyses both found a consistent relation between psycho-tropics on the one hand and physical illness on the other. People with multi-morbidity were prescribed these drugs most often, especially men and those younger than 65. Epidemiological studies showed a prevalence of depression among people with multi-morbidity to be twice as high as among people without such conditions. According to recent guidelines non-drug treatment may be the first therapy option for patients with non severe depression. If prescribed for a long time, benzodiazepine prescriptions are especially known to be addictive. Our data raise the question to what extent patients with a chronic physical disease suffering from co-occurring mental problems are prescribed psycho-tropics in accord with the guidelines that also advise mental support in case of non severe mental problems. Further research can answer this important question.

  15. Associations between neighbourhood social capital, health literacy and self-rated health among people with chronic illness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waverijn, G.; Heijmans, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Groenewegen, P.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy skills are important for health and self-management for people with chronic illness. Neighborhood social capital can provide resources, such as access to information and informal social control over unhealthy behavior. The benefit of these resources, and the access people have to the

  16. The Longitudinal Relationship Between Satisfaction with Transitional Care and Social and Emotional Quality of Life Among Chronically Ill Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); H.M. Sonneveld (Henk); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis study aimed to identify the relationship between satisfaction with transitional care and quality of life of chronically ill adolescents over time. This longitudinal study included adolescents with type I diabetes, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), and neuromuscular disorders (NMD

  17. Childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood: mental health and socioeconomic status as explanatory factors and buffers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Mock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typically adverse consequences of childhood trauma. The results suggest mental health and socioeconomic status partially explain the association of childhood trauma with chronic illness in adulthood, with mental health showing a stronger effect. In addition, an analysis of the interactions suggested higher socioeconomic status is a potential protective factor for those with a history of trauma. Results also suggest cumulative disadvantage following trauma may lead to chronic illness and suggest the need for public health expenditures on resources such as counseling and income supports to prevent or reduce psychological harm and chronic illness resulting from traumatic events.

  18. Associations Between Neighborhood Social Capital, Health Literacy, and Self-Rated Health Among People With Chronic Illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waverijn, Geeke; Heijmans, Monique; Spreeuwenberg, Peter; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy skills are important for health and self-management for people with chronic illness. Neighborhood social capital can provide resources, such as access to information and informal social control over unhealthy behavior. The benefit of these resources, and the access people have to the

  19. Playing with Moon Sand: A Narrative Inquiry into a Teacher's Experiences Teaching Alongside a Student with a Chronic Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Beth; Murphy, M. Shaun

    2016-01-01

    This paper inquires into the experiences of an early childhood educator named Claire who taught a young girl with a chronic illness at East Willows Elementary School, a western Canadian elementary school. Using narrative inquiry as the methodology, Claire's experiences in her curriculum making alongside Madeline a young girl with Turner syndrome…

  20. Nutritional Needs of the Child with a Handicap or Chronic Illness. Manual II: Clinical Nutrition. Presentations from a National Interdisciplinary Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekvall, Shirley M.; Wheby, Elizabeth A.

    The following papers were presented at a symposium on clinical nutrition for the child who is chronically ill or handicapped: (1) "Food Allergy"; (2) "Anemia and the Chronically Ill or Handicapped Child"; (3) "Nutrition and Neurotransmitters--Clinical Implications"; (4) "The Importance of Lipid Type in the Diet after Burn Injury"; (5) "Advances of…

  1. Health-related quality of life and mental health problems after a disaster: are chronically ill survivors more vulnerable to health problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, B. van den; Velden, P.G. van der; Yzermans, C.J.; Stellato, R.K.; Grievink, L.

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that the chronically ill are at higher risk for reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL) and for mental health problems. A combination with traumatic events might increase this risk. This longitudinal study among 1216 survivors of a disaster examines whether chronically ill s

  2. Health-related quality of life and mental health problems after a disaster: Are chronically ill survivors more vulnerable to health problems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, Bellis van den; Velden, Peter G van der; Yzermans, C Joris; Stellato, Rebecca K; Grievink, Linda

    2006-01-01

    Studies have shown that the chronically ill are at higher risk for reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL) and for mental health problems. A combination with traumatic events might increase this risk. This longitudinal study among 1216 survivors of a disaster examines whether chronically ill s

  3. Teaching children about mental health and illness: a school nurse health education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desocio, Janiece; Stember, Lisa; Schrinsky, Joanne

    2006-04-01

    A mental health education program designed by school nurses for children ages 10- 12 was developed in 2000-2001 and expanded with broader distribution in 2004-2005. Six classroom sessions, each 45 minutes in length, provided information and activities to increase children's awareness of mental health and illness. Education program content included facts about the brain's connection to mental health, information about healthy ways to manage stress, resources and activities to promote mental health, common mental health problems experienced by children, and how to seek help for mental health problems. Classes included a combination of didactic presentation and open discussion, encouraging students to ask questions and allowing the school nurse to correct misinformation. Analysis of pre- and posttests from 370 elementary and middle school students revealed statistically significant improvements in their knowledge of mental health and mental illness.

  4. Changing concepts of health and illness among children among primary school age in Western Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onyango Ouma, W.; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun; Aagaard-Hansen, J.

    2004-01-01

    The article examines changes in children?s concepts of health and illness following an action-oriented health education intervention in Bondo District of Western Kenya. The study is a feasibility study exploring a specific educational approach and it combines elements of health education research...... and anthropological research. Students? actions and their active participation were key elements in the intervention. Data showed that children had acquired new concepts of health, some of which incorporated elements of the old ones. More action-oriented health concepts were identified and a general change from...... an external locus of control towards an internal locus of control was found. The study concludes that students can modify and broaden their concepts of health and illness through action-oriented health education. Key factors are the development of students? ownership through active and participatory teaching...

  5. Interferon Status and Choice of Interferons Inducers in Frequently Ill Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Savenkovа

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature data on the study of interferon status in children. Own results of the survey group of frequently ill children (FIC have shown insufficient production of IFN alpha and gamma-IFN, humoral immunity. It was revealed that 66% of the group FIC has only failure of interferon system, and 34% of FIC has violations of humoral immunity in combination with interferon system failure. At the same time, all children suffering occasionally was detected only insufficiency of interferon system and humoral immunity was within normal limits. Based on the study of individual sensitivity of white blood cells justifies the choice of interferons inducers.

  6. Needs, expectations and consequences for children growing up in a family where the parent has a mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Izabela; Zabłocka-Żytka, Lidia; Ryan, Peter; Poma, Stefano Zanone; Joronen, Katja; Viganò, Giovanni; Simpson, Wendy; Paavilainen, Eija; Scherbaum, Norbert; Smith, Martin; Dawson, Ian

    2016-08-01

    The lack of pan-European guidelines for empowering children of parents with mental illness led to the EU project CAMILLE - Empowerment of Children and Adolescents of Mentally Ill Parents through Training of Professionals working with children and adolescents. The aim of this initial task in the project was to analyse needs, expectations and consequences for children with respect to living with a parent with mental illness from the perspective of professionals and family members. This qualitative research was conducted in England, Finland, Germany, Italy, Norway, Poland and Scotland with 96 professionals, parents with mental illness, adult children and partners of parents with mental illness. A framework analysis method was used. Results of the study highlighted that the main consequences described for children of parental mental illness were role reversal; emotional and behavioural problems; lack of parent's attention and stigma. The main needs of these children were described as emotional support, security and multidisciplinary help. Implications for practice are that professionals working with parents with mental illness should be aware of the specific consequences for the children and encourage parents in their parental role; multi-agency collaboration is necessary; schools should provide counselling and prevent stigma.

  7. Characteristics of patients with influenza-like illness, severe acture respiratory illness, and laboratory-confirmed influenza at a major children's hospital in Angola, 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Yolanda; Oliveira, Erika; Vasconcelos, Jocelyne; Cohen, Adam L; Francisco, Moises

    2012-12-15

    There are no published data on influenza trends in Angola, where pneumonia is a leading cause of death among young children. This study aims to describe the seasonal trends, types, and subtypes of influenza virus recovered from patients with respiratory illness who were admitted to the major children's hospital in Angola from May 2009 through April 2011. Nasal and oral swabs were collected from patients seen in the outpatient clinic with influenza-like illness (ILI) or hospitalized with severe acute respiratory illness (SARI) and tested for influenza virus by polymerase chain reaction assays. Of 691 samples collected, 334 (48%) were from case patients with ILI, and 357 (52%) were from case patients with SARI. Most (86%) of these children were Angola.

  8. Caida de mollera among children of Mexican migrant workers: implications for the study of folk illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, R D; Bustillo, M

    1998-06-01

    Information about the folk illness caida de mollera was collected from Mexican and Mexican American migrant mothers who had treated their children for the illness, and from physicians in a clinic that served this population. These physicians believed that the vast majority of the sets of symptoms were worthy of medical attention and could be life threatening if not treated. This research report concurs with other studies that suggest that although Mexican folk illnesses are conceptualized to have folk-social and psychological causes, they are also seen to have biological causes and physiological symptoms that can be treated by biomedical methods. This report outlines a model for understanding aspects of folk illnesses that includes folk vs. biomedical ideas about disease, causes vs. symptoms, and psychological vs. physiological aspects of sickness. It also suggests that the kinds of questions anthropologists ask about these illnesses may need to be modified--shifting away from questions about treatments of causes and refocusing on those about the treatment of physiological symptoms--if we are to more fully understand home approaches to the management of these illnesses.

  9. Genotyping of human parechoviruses in Iranian young children with aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Pooneh; Naser, Hakimeh Mahdian; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Sohrabi, Amir; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Motamedirad, Mahdieh; Bahramali, Golnaz; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-12-01

    Human parechoviruses (HPeV) are classified into 14 genotypes. HPeV1 and HPeV2 are the most prevalent genotypes in young children, which have been associated with mild to severe diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the involvement of HPeVs in aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness in Iran. Viral RNA was extracted from 148 cerebrospinal fluid samples from children meningitis and/or sepsis-like illness. Specific HPeV, HEV real-time PCR and HPeV typing were done to identify the infection rate of these viruses. HPeV and HEV were detected in 64 (43.24 %), 31 (20.94 %) of 148 patients with 10 (6.75 %) coinfection. VP1/VP3 junction region was successfully sequenced from 12 of the HPeV-positive specimens, and all of them were identified as HPeV1. HPeV was more prevalent than HEV in both aseptic meningitis and sepsis-like illness, so further studies are needed to understand the disease burden of HPeV infections, and clinical manifestations especially in specific illnesses of possible viral etiology. Direct detection of these viruses leads to reduce hospitalization and use of antibiotic, which are often followed by other complications in neonates and young children.

  10. Children with Rare Chronic Skin Diseases: Hemangiomas and Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila Dove; Miller, Cynthia Dieterich

    The paper reports on studies involving children having the rare chronic skin diseases of hemangiomas and epidermolysis bullosa (characterized by easy blistering). One study compared the self-concept and psychosocial development of young (mean age 46 months) children (N=19) with hemangiomas with 19 children without hemangiomas. Findings indicated…

  11. Care in the home for seriously ill children with complex needs: A narrative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Cynthia; Glass, Nel; Ford, Rosemary

    2015-12-01

    This article reviews contemporary literature on home care of the seriously ill child with complex care needs and the sick child/parent dyad. The literature search revealed three major themes, namely the increasing acuity of child illness, the evolving role of the parent as care provider, and the health professional as care provider. While there is much known about the complexity of care of children and the role of family in that care, little is known about what families require in terms of support and sustenance during the long years of care provision.

  12. Strategic approaches to enhanced health service delivery for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic illness: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspin Clive

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic illness confront multiple challenges that contribute to their poor health outcomes, and to the health disparities that exist in Australian society. This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to care and support for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic illness. Methods Face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with diabetes, chronic heart failure or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n-16 and family carers (n = 3. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and the transcripts were analysed using content analysis. Recurrent themes were identified and these were used to inform the key findings of the study. Results Participants reported both negative and positive influences that affected their health and well-being. Among the negative influences, they identified poor access to culturally appropriate health services, dislocation from cultural support systems, exposure to racism, poor communication with health care professionals and economic hardship. As a counter to these, participants pointed to cultural and traditional knowledge as well as insights from their own experiences. Participants said that while they often felt overwhelmed and confused by the burden of chronic illness, they drew strength from being part of an Aboriginal community, having regular and ongoing access to primary health care, and being well-connected to a supportive family network. Within this context, elders played an important role in increasing people’s awareness of the impact of chronic illness on people and communities. Conclusions Our study indicated that non-Indigenous health services struggled to meet the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with chronic illness. To address their complex needs, health services could gain considerably by recognising that Aboriginal and Torres Strait

  13. Chronic physical illness in early life and risk of chronic widespread and regional pain at age 68: evidence from the 1946 British birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthuri, Stella G; Kuh, Diana; Bendayan, Rebecca; Macfarlane, Gary J; Cooper, Rachel

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the associations between serious illness in earlier life and risk of pain in old age using data from a large nationally representative British birth cohort, the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD). Serious illness was defined as any experience of illness before age 25 requiring hospital admission of ≥28 days. Pain was self-reported at age 68, with chronic widespread pain (CWP) defined according to American College of Rheumatology criteria. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test associations of serious illness in early life with CWP, chronic regional pain (CRP), and other pain, with no pain as the referent category. Adjustment was made for sex, socioeconomic position, adult health status, health behaviours, and psychosocial factors. Of 2401 NSHD participants with complete data, 10.5% reported CWP (13.2% of women and 7.7% of men), 30.2% reported CRP, and 14.8% other pain. Compared with those with no history of serious illness, those who experienced serious illness in early life had a higher likelihood of CWP (relative risk ratio [RRR] = 1.62 [95% CI: 1.21-2.17]) and of CRP (RRR = 1.25 [95% CI: 1.01-1.54]) after adjusting for sex. In fully adjusted models, serious illness in early life remained associated with CWP (RRR = 1.43 [95% CI: 1.05-1.95]), but associations with CRP were attenuated (RRR = 1.19 [95% CI: 0.96-1.48]). There were no associations with other pain. These findings suggest that those who have experienced serious illness in earlier life may require more support than others to minimise their risk of CWP in later life.

  14. Risk factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses among children in Kabul, Afghanistan: a prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Aluisio

    Full Text Available Childhood diarrheal illnesses are a major public health problem. In low-income settings data on disease burden and factors associated with diarrheal illnesses are poorly defined, precluding effective prevention programs. This study explores factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses among children in Kabul, Afghanistan.A cohort of 1-11 month old infants was followed for 18 months from 2007-2009. Data on diarrheal episodes were gathered through active and passive surveillance. Information on child health, socioeconomics, water and sanitation, and hygiene behaviors was collected. Factors associated with recurrent diarrheal illnesses were analyzed using random effects recurrent events regression models.3,045 children were enrolled and 2,511 (82% completed 18-month follow-up. There were 14,998 episodes of diarrheal disease over 4,200 child-years (3.51 episodes/child-year, 95%CI 3.40-3.62. Risk of diarrheal illness during the winter season was 63% lower than the summer season (HR = 0.37, 95%CI 0.35-0.39, P<0.001. Soap for hand washing was available in 72% of households and 11.9% had toilets with septic/canalization. Half of all mothers reported using soap for hand washing. In multivariate analysis diarrheal illness was lower among children born to mothers with post-primary education (aHR = 0.79, 95%CI 0.69-0.91, p = 0.001, from households where maternal hand washing with soap was reported (aHR = 0.83, 95%CI 0.74-0.92, p<0.001 and with improved sanitation facilities (aHR = 0.76, 95%CI 0.63-0.93, p = 0.006. Malnourished children from impoverished households had significantly increased risks for recurrent disease [(aHR = 1.15, 95%CI 1.03-1.29, p = 0.016 and (aHR = 1.20, 95%CI 1.05-1.37, p = 0.006 respectively].Maternal hand washing and improved sanitation facilities were protective, and represent important prevention points among public health endeavors. The discrepancy between soap availability and utilization suggests barriers to access and

  15. Gut Microbial Translocation in Critically Ill Children and Effects of Supplementation with Pre- and Pro Biotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Papoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial translocation as a direct cause of sepsis is an attractive hypothesis that presupposes that in specific situations bacteria cross the intestinal barrier, enter the systemic circulation, and cause a systemic inflammatory response syndrome. Critically ill children are at increased risk for bacterial translocation, particularly in the early postnatal age. Predisposing factors include intestinal obstruction, obstructive jaundice, intra-abdominal hypertension, intestinal ischemia/reperfusion injury and secondary ileus, and immaturity of the intestinal barrier per se. Despite good evidence from experimental studies to support the theory of bacterial translocation as a cause of sepsis, there is little evidence in human studies to confirm that translocation is directly correlated to bloodstream infections in critically ill children. This paper provides an overview of the gut microflora and its significance, a focus on the mechanisms employed by bacteria to gain access to the systemic circulation, and how critical illness creates a hostile environment in the gut and alters the microflora favoring the growth of pathogens that promote bacterial translocation. It also covers treatment with pre- and pro biotics during critical illness to restore the balance of microbial communities in a beneficial way with positive effects on intestinal permeability and bacterial translocation.

  16. Puppy Love, Adolescence, and Chronic Illness: The Importance of Pets for Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashby F. Walker PhD

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of animal-companion ties to well-being are consistently documented, yet few studies use patient-centered methodologies to examine how youth living with chronic illnesses rely on domestic pets for support. Youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D aged 12 to 19 years (N=40 completed surveys involving a prompt to take five photos of “what diabetes means to you,” with an accompanying narrative. Content analysis was conducted for photos/narratives and numeric variables analyzed including socio-economic status (SES: measured by total household income and years of parental education and HbA1C. More than half of the youth participants took pictures of coping mechanisms, including pictures of their pets. In fact, pictures of pets outnumbered pictures of people three to one. Pet depictions were captured by youth from all SES levels. Youth with T1D identify pets as an important source of support. More research is needed to understand how pets may offset disease burden for youth with T1D.

  17. Towards a wireless patient: chronic illness, scarce care and technological innovation in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Carl; Finch, Tracy; Mair, Frances; Mort, Maggie

    2005-10-01

    'Modernization' is a key health policy objective in the UK. It extends across a range of public service delivery and organizational contexts, and also means there are radical changes in perspective on professional behaviour and practice. New information and communications technologies have been seen as one of the key mechanisms by which these changes can be engendered. In particular, massive investment in information technologies promises the rapid distribution and deployment of patient-centred information across internal organizational boundaries. While the National Health Service (NHS) sits on the edge of a pound sterling 6 billion investment in electronic patient records, other technologies find their status as innovative vehicles for professional behaviour change and service delivery in question. In this paper, we consider the ways that telemedicine and telehealthcare systems have been constructed first as a field of technological innovation, and more recently, as management solutions to problems around the distribution of health care. We use NHS responses to chronic illness as a medium for understanding these shifts. In particular, we draw attention to the shifting definitions of 'innovation' and to the ways that these shifts define a move away from notions of technological advance towards management control.

  18. Is liver biopsy mandatory in children with chronic hepatitis C?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Liver biopsy is considered the most accurate means to estimate the necroinflammatory activity and the extent of fibrosis. However, histology evaluation is an invasive procedure associated with risk to the patient, risk of sampling error and diagnostic inconsistencies due to inter- and intra-observer error. On the basis of histological studies performed so far, chronic hepatitis C in children appears morphologically benign in the majority of cases.At the Pediatric Liver Unit of our university, a total of 67 children with chronic hep, atitis C underwent liver biopsy.Liver biopsy was repeated 5.5 years after the initial histological evaluation in 21 children. On a total number of 88 liver biopsies, micronodular cirrhosis was detected only in one genotype 1b-infected obese child. Since liver histology investigation of a child with chronic hepatitis C has few chances to highlight severe lesions, we question how liver biopsy helps in the management of children with chronic hepatitis C.

  19. High prevalence of autoimmune urticaria in children with chronic urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Luigia; Francavilla, Ruggiero; Miniello, Vito L;

    2004-01-01

    The etiology of chronic urticaria (CU) in childhood often remains unrecognized. Recently, in adults it has been shown that approximately 40% of patients with CU have autoimmune urticaria (AU); however, no data are available in children....

  20. Chronic Respiratory Diseases of School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, John P.

    1976-01-01

    The author examines the problems of chronic respiratory disease in school-age children from a medical viewpoint, including recognition and diagnosis, commonly encountered diseases, their effect on participation in physical exercise, emotional factors, medication, and emergency care. (MB)

  1. PERSISTENT INFECTION IN FREQUENT AND PROLONGED ILL CHILDREN, POSSIBILITIES OF ETIOPATHOGENETIC THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of the etiologic diagnosis and therapy of 243 frequent and prolonged ill children aged from 1 to 17 years. Microbiological, serological and molecular biological methods for the determination of bacterial agents, respiratory chlamydia and mycoplasma, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus type 6 and cytomegalovirus were used. The dominant role of the active persistence of herpesviruses was shown (87%); bacterial pathogens were identified rarely, mainly in association wit...

  2. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy for children under five

    OpenAIRE

    Gera, Tarun; Shah, Dheeraj; Garner, Paul; Richardson, Marty; Sachdev, Harshpal S

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 7.5 million children younger than age five living in low- and middle-income countries die every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy to reduce mortality and morbidity and to improve quality of care by improving the delivery of a variety of curative and preventive medical and behavioral interventions at health facilities, at home, and in the community. Objectives To evaluate the effects of progra...

  3. Performance of the PEdiatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 score in critically ill children requiring plasma transfusions

    OpenAIRE

    Karam, Oliver; Duhamel, Alain; Stanworth, Simon J; Leteurtre,Stéphane; ,; Butt, Warwick; Delzoppo, Carmel; Bain, Kym; Erickson, Simon; Smalley, Nathan; Dorofaeff, Tavey; Long, Debbie; Wiseman, Greg; Clénent de Cléty, Stéphan; Berghe, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Organ dysfunction scores, based on physiological parameters, have been created to describe organ failure. In a general pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) population, the PEdiatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction-2 score (PELOD-2) score had both a good discrimination and calibration, allowing to describe the clinical outcome of critically ill children throughout their stay. This score is increasingly used in clinical trials in specific subpopulation. Our objective was to assess the per...

  4. What is chronic cough in children?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia eIOAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cough reflex is modulated throughout growth and development. Cough – but not expiration reflex – appears to be absent at birth, but increases with maturation. Thus, acute cough is the most frequent respiratory symptom during the first few years of life. Later on, the pubertal development seems to play a significant role in changing of the cough threshold during childhood and adolescence resulting in sex-related differences in cough reflex sensitivity in adulthood. Asthma is the major cause of chronic cough in children. Prolonged acute cough is usually related to the long-lasting effects of a previous viral airway infection or to the particular entity called protracted bacterial bronchitis. Cough pointers and type may orient towards specific aetiologies, such as barking cough in croup or tracheomalacia, paroxystic whooping cough in Pertussis. Cough is productive in protracted bacterial bronchitis, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Cough is usually associated with wheeze or dyspnea on exertion in asthma; however, it may be the sole symptom in cough variant asthma. Thus, paediatric cough has particularities differentiating it from adult cough, so the approach and management should be developmentally specific.

  5. The stigma of mental illness in children and adolescents: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Anya; Kostaki, Evgenia; Kyriakopoulos, Marinos

    2016-09-30

    One in ten children and adolescents suffer with mental health difficulties at any given time, yet less than one third seek treatment. Untreated mental illness predisposes to longstanding individual difficulties and presents a great public health burden. Large scale initiatives to reduce stigmatization of mental illness, identified as a key deterrent to treatment, have been disappointing. This indicates the need for a clearer understanding of the stigmatizing processes faced by young people, so that more effective interventions are employed. A systematic review of the literature, assessing public stigma and self-stigma (i.e. internalized public stigma) specifically in children and adolescents with mental health difficulties (YP-MHD), was conducted. Forty-two studies were identified, confirming that stigmatization of YP-MHD is a universal and disabling problem, present amongst both children and adults. There was some variation by diagnosis and gender, and stigmatization was for the most part unaffected by labelling. Self-stigmatization led to more secrecy and an avoidance of interventions. The findings confirm that stigmatization of mental illness is poorly understood due to a lack of research and methodological discrepancies between existing studies. Implications for the findings are discussed, and suggestions made for future research.

  6. Diarrheal Illness among Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Program Participants in Miami, Florida: Implications for Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davila, Evelyn P.; Trepka, Mary Jo; Newman, Frederick L.; Huffman, Fatma G.; Dixon, Zisca

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess risk factors for diarrheal illness among clients of a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) clinic in Miami, FL. Design: A cross-sectional survey with questions about demographics, food safety practices, and diarrheal illness. Setting: WIC clinic operated by the Miami-Dade County Health…

  7. Chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fazelifarsani, Soulmaz; Souverein, Patrick C.; Van Der Vorst, Marja M.J.; Knibbe, Catherijne A.J.; De Boer, Anthonius; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Limited quantitative data exist on the burden of chronic comorbidities in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Such knowledge is necessary for the development of guidelines and prevention programs. Objectives: To determine the incidence of chronic comorbidities in childre

  8. Understanding Parental Grief as a Response to Mental Illness: Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzo, Jeanine A.; Harvey, Pat

    2008-01-01

    Parents who are raising children with mental illness struggle with feelings of grief and loss. Kubler-Ross' (1969) stages of grieving (denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance) are examined as experienced by parents raising children with chronic mental illness. Practice implications for social workers who are working with children and…

  9. The impact of poverty, chronic illnesses, and health insurance status on out-of-pocket health care expenditures in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyun; Richardson, Virginia

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to examine poverty, chronic illnesses, health insurance, and health care expenditures, within the context of a political economy of aging perspective. Subsamples of 1,773 older adults from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey were selected for analyses. The results showed that chronic illnesses influenced out-of-pocket health care costs. Older persons with more than one health insurance spent less on out-of-pocket health care costs. The results have implications for health care social workers concerned with the growing costs of chronic illnesses, implementing integrated care, and advocating for extending public health insurance coverage especially for our most impoverished older adults.

  10. An exploratory study of the personal health records adoption model in the older adult with chronic illness

    OpenAIRE

    Logue, Melanie D.; Effken, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite international efforts moving toward integrated care using health information technologies and the potential of electronic PHRs to help us better coordinate patient-centered care, PHR adoption in the United States remains low among patients who have been offered free access to them from private-sector companies. If older adult stand to benefit from the use of PHRs for its usefulness in self-managing chronic illness, why have they not been more readily adopted? Since the chro...

  11. An exploratory study of the personal health records adoption model in the older adult with chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D Logue

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite international efforts moving toward integrated care using health information technologies and the potential of electronic PHRs to help us better coordinate patient-centered care, PHR adoption in the United States remains low among patients who have been offered free access to them from private-sector companies. If older adult stand to benefit from the use of PHRs for its usefulness in self-managing chronic illness, why have they not been more readily adopted? Since the chronically ill older adult has unique circumstances that impact their decision to participate in self-directed care, a theoretical framework to help understand factors that influence the adoption of PHRs is important. Here we describe the results of an exploratory study that provided an initial test of such a framework.Methods The study used a descriptive survey methodology with 38 older adults. The survey questionnaire asked about the personal barriers and facilitators associated with personal health record adoption and included items measuring each of the PHRAM’s four interacting factors (environmental factors, personal factors, technology factors, and self-management, and the resulting behavioural outcome.Results Younger seniors had a more positive attitude toward computers, knew what health resources were available on the internet, agreed that they had the resources in place to use PHRs, and would be more influenced by a family member than a healthcare provider to use them. Conversely, older seniors reported less confidence in their ability to use Internet-based PHRs and did not perceive that they had the resources in place to use them.Conclusions The results of this study indicated that personal, environmental, technology, chronic illness, and behavioral factors operated concurrently as personal barriers and/or facilitators to the adoption of PHRs among the older adult with chronic illness. These factors cannot be isolated because the person commonly

  12. Is non-thyroidal illness syndrome a predictor for prolonged weaning in intubated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Yasar, Zehra; Kirakli, Cenk; Cimen, Pınar; Ucar, Zeynep Zeren; Talay, Fahrettin; Tibet, Gultekin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-thyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) is considered to be associated with adverse outcomes in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. In this study, we evaluated the association between NTIS and prolonged weaning in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients admitted to the ICU. Materials and methods: In total, 125 patients with COPD admitted to our ICU who underwent invasive mechanical ventilation (MV) were enrolled. We collected each patient’s baseline characteristics i...

  13. Childhood Trauma and Chronic Illness in Adulthood: Mental Health and Socioeconomic Status as Explanatory Factors and Buffers

    OpenAIRE

    Mock, Steven E.; Susan M Arai

    2011-01-01

    Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typic...

  14. Using pRIFLE criteria for acute kidney injury in critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Amalia C. Saragih

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI in critically ill children and its mortality rate is high. The lack of a uniform definition for AKI leads to failure in determining kidney injury, delayed treatment, and the inability to generalize research results. Objectives To evaluate the pediatric RIFLE (pRIFLE criteria (risk for renal dysfunction, injury to the kidney, failure of kidney function, loss of kidney function, and end-stage renal disease for diagnosing and following the clinical course of AKI in critically ill children. We also aimed to compare AKI severity on days 1 and 3 of pediatric intensive care unit (PICUu stay in critically ill pediatric patients. Methods This prospective cohort study was performed in PICU patients. Urine output (UOP, serum creatinine (SCr, and glomerular filtration rate on days 1 and 3 of PICU stay were recorded. Classification of AKI was determined according to pRIFLE criteria. We also recorded subjects’ immune status, pediatric logistic organ dysfunction (PELOD score, admission diagnosis, the use of vasoactive medications, diuretics, and ventilators, as well as PICU length of stay and mortality. Results Forty patients were enrolled in this study. AKI was found in 13 patients (33%. A comparison of AKI severity on day 1 and day 3 revealed no statistically significant differences for attainment of pRIFLE criteria by urine output only (pRIFLE UOP; P=0.087 and by both UOP and SCr (pRIFLECr+UOP; P=0.577. However, attainment of pRIFLE criteria by SCr only (pRIFLECr was significantly improved between days 1 and 3 (P=0.026. There was no statistically significant difference in mortality or length of stay between subjects with AKI and those without AKI. Conclusion The pRIFLE criteria is feasible for use in diagnosing and following the clinical course of AKI in critically ill children.[Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:32-6.

  15. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds. Mother…

  16. Social Competence and Temperament in Children with Chronic Orthopaedic Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmurlu, Bilge; Yavuz, H. Melis

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate social competence in children with orthopaedic disability and its concurrent relations to child's temperament, health condition, and maternal warmth. Participants were 68 Turkish children (mean = 5.94 years) with chronic orthopaedic disability and their mothers coming from disadvantaged backgrounds.…

  17. Report on Honduras: ripples in the pond--the financial crisis and remittances to chronically ill patients in Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piette, John D; Mendoza-Avelares, Milton O; Chess, Laura; Milton, Evan C; Matiz Reyes, Armando; Rodriguez-Saldaña, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. financial crisis has affected employment opportunities for Latino immigrants, and this could affect their ability to send financial assistance, or "remittances", to chronically ill family members in their home country. In a cross-sectional survey of 624 chronically ill adults conducted in Honduras between June and August 2009, respondents reported their receipt of remittances, health service use, and cost-related access barriers. Fifty-four percent of respondents reported relatives living outside the country, and of this group, 66 percent (37% of the overall sample) received remittances. Seventy-four percent of respondents receiving remittances reported a decrease over the prior year, mostly due to job losses among their relatives abroad. Respondents reporting reductions in remittances received significantly less per month, on average, than those without a reduction (US $170 vs. $234; p = 0.01). In multivariate models, respondents experiencing a reduction in remittances used fewer health services and medications due to cost concerns. Remittance payments from relatives resident in the United States are a major source of income for chronically ill individuals in Latin America. Most recipients of remittances reported a reduction during the financial downturn that affected their access to care.

  18. "Because somebody cared about me. That's how it changed things": homeless, chronically ill patients' perspectives on case management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Case management programs for chronically ill, homeless people improve health and resource utilization by linking patients with case managers focused on improving management of medical and psychosocial problems. Little is known about participants' perspectives on case management interventions. METHODS: This qualitative study used in-depth, one-on-one interviews to understand the impact of a case management program from the perspective of participants. A standardized interview guide with open-ended questions explored experiences with the case management program and feelings about readiness to leave the program. RESULTS: FOUR RECURRENT THEMES EMERGED: (1 Participants described profound social isolation prior to case management program enrollment; (2 Participants perceived that caring personal relationships with case managers were key to the program; (3 Participants valued assistance with navigating medical and social systems; and (4 Participants perceived that their health improved through both the interpersonal and the practical aspects of case management. CONCLUSIONS: Chronically ill, homeless people enrolled in a case management program perceived that social support from case managers resulted in improved health. Programs for this population should consider explicitly including comprehensive social support interventions. Further research on case management should explore the impact of different types of social support on outcomes for homeless chronically ill patients.

  19. Prevalence of Chronic Illness and Health Seeking Behaviour in Malaysian Population: Results from the Third National Health Morbidity Survey (NHMS III) 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amal, N M; Paramesarvathy, R; Tee, G H; Gurpreet, K; Karuthan, C

    2011-03-01

    The third National Health Morbidity Survey was conducted in 2006 on a nationally representative sample of population in Malaysia in order to obtain community-based data and information on the prevalence of chronic illness. Of 57,500 eligible respondents 56710 (98.6%) participated in the study. Estimated overall prevalence of chronic illness in the Malaysian population within a recall period of one year was 15.5% (95% CI 15.1% - 15.9%). Chronic illness was reported significantly higher among the females, 16.8% (16.3 - 17.3). The most common chronic illness was hypertension (7.9%, 7.6 - 8.2), followed by diabetes mellitus (4.0%, 3.8 - 4.2) and highest reported by the Indians (19.7%, 18.4 - 21.0). Among the respondents who had sought treatment for chronic illness from government health facilities, Malays (65.8%) and those with monthly household income of less than RM400 (76.6%) were the highest. Chinese (44.5%) and those with household income of RM5000 and above (54.3%) were the highest groups who sought treatment from the private health facilities. Most of the respondents reported mild illness was the main reason for not seeking treatment for their chronic illness. It is hoped that the results of this survey will help the Ministry of Health Malaysia to enhance health programmes and planning resource allocation in order to improve health status of the population.

  20. Violence by Parents Against Their Children: Reporting of Maltreatment Suspicions, Child Protection, and Risk in Mental Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Miranda; Friedman, Susan Hatters

    2016-12-01

    Psychiatrists are mandated to report suspicions of child abuse in America. Potential for harm to children should be considered when one is treating parents who are at risk. Although it is the commonly held wisdom that mental illness itself is a major risk factor for child abuse, there are methodologic issues with studies purporting to demonstrate this. Rather, the risk from an individual parent must be considered. Substance abuse and personality disorder pose a separate risk than serious mental illness. Violence risk from mental illness is dynamic, rather than static. When severe mental illness is well-treated, the risk is decreased. However, these families are in need of social support.

  1. Quality of Life as Medicine: A Pilot Studyof Patients with Chronic Illness and Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An intensive 5-day quality-of-life (QoL session was constructed based on a psychosomatic model. The session was comprised of teaching on philosophy of life, psychotherapy, and body therapy. The three elements were put together in such a way that they mutually supported each other. The synergy attained was considerable. The pilot study demonstrated that in the course of only 1 week, patients had time to revise essential life-denying views and to integrate important, unfinished life events involving negative feelings. Consequently, the patients became more present in the body’s blocked-off areas and subjectively healthier. Nineteen persons with chronic illness and pain (fibromyalgia, chronic tiredness, whiplash, mild depression, and problems involving pain in arms and legs including osteoarthritis, and unemployed for 5–7 years attended the course. In the week before and after the 5-day course, the participants completed the validated SEQOL (Self-Evaluation of Quality of Life Questionnaire including questions on self-evaluated health and the unvalidated “Self-Evaluation of Working-Life Quality Questionnaire” (SEQWL. This pilot study was without a control group or clinical control. As far as diagnoses were concerned, the group was inhomogeneous. Common for the group was a low QoL, poor quality of working life QWL, and numerous health problems. The study showed an 11.2% improvement in QoL (p < 0.05, a 6.3% improvement in QWL (p < 0.05, and a 12.0% improvement in self-perceived physical health (p = 0.08. There was a 17.3% improvement in self-perceived psychological health (p < 0.05 and satisfaction with health in general improved by 21.4% (p < 0.05. Symptoms like pain were almost halved and several of the participants were free of pain for the first time in years. In conclusion it seemed that the combination of training in philosophy of life, psychotherapy, and body therapy can give patients a large, fast, and efficient improvement in QoL, QWL

  2. Health Status of Healthcare Professionals Working in an Institute for Chronically Ill Psychiatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagyváradi Katalin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several research works in the related international literature on sociology and health sciences deal with the state of health in one selected population. In these studies, the chosen sample is often connected with special jobs, especially with healthcare professionals and their working conditions. These studies predominantly examine the self-rated subjective health status using questionnaires. There are others that assess the state of health based not only on self-rated subjective indicators, but also using objective data gained by measuring. Considering the international experiences, we chose a special population in our research – healthcare professionals working in an institute for chronically ill psychiatric patients. Our choice was influenced by the fact that we wanted to include their unique working conditions when exploring and assessing their health status. Moreover, our approach was to assess the objective state of health alongside the subjective factors, as our hypothesis was that the majority of the indicators presumably coincided. The data were collected with the help of three questionnaires and some indicators of the objective health statuses were measured. The findings were processed using the SPSS 17.0 mathematical-statistical software package. Following the descriptive statistics, we applied hierarchic cluster-analysis based on results of the WHOQOLD-BREF26 life-quality questionnaire, the WHO WBI-5 Well Being Index, and on the body composition analysis. The results show the objective and subjective health status of population and the factors that influenced it; the working conditions and the interpersonal contacts in the workplace. The conclusion was that in the examined population the subjective and objective health status doesn’t coincide.

  3. Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Renal Failure on Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; Hassan, Mona Mamdouh; Bazaraa, Hafez Mahmoud; Ahmed, Hany Fathy; Mahmoud Badr, Ahmed Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Growth retardation is still an important manifestation of children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The aim of this study is to evaluate the growth in relation to nutritional status in Egyptian children with CRF on hemodialysis.Subjects and Methods: The study included 30 Egyptian children above the age of six years on regular haemodialysis at the Haemodialysis Unit of the Centre of Pediatric Nephrology and Transplantation of Cairo University. Anthropometry, biochemical pa...

  4. Disturbed skin barrier in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited data on skin lesions in children with end-stage renal failure. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the skin barrier in children with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of xerosis, its severity, as well as its link selected demographic factors, were examined. Methods The study included 103 children: 72 with CKD stages 3–5 (38 on conservative treatment and 34 on dialysis) and 31 patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enur...

  5. Plasma bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein concentrations in critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H R; Doughty, L A; Wedel, N; White, M; Nelson, B J; Havrilla, N; Carcillo, J A

    1995-12-01

    Bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) is a neutrophil azurophilic granule component that is bactericidal towards Gram-negative bacteria and inhibits lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammatory responses. We conducted a prospective study to measure plasma BPI concentrations in 36 critically ill children with and without the sepsis syndrome. Plasma BPI concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 452 ng/ml. Patients with the sepsis syndrome had higher median plasma BPI concentrations than critically ill controls (5.1 vs. 1.8 ng/ml, P = 0.006). Patients with organ system failure had higher median plasma BPI concentrations than those with no organ system failure (4.5 vs. 1.3 ng/ml, P = 0.001). Plasma BPI concentrations were positively associated with pediatric risk of mortality score (P = 0.03, rs = 0.4). These data provide the first clinical insights regarding the role of endogenous BPI production in critically ill children and suggest that BPI may play an important role in host defenses.

  6. The influence of frailty syndrome on acceptance of illness in elderly patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Uchmanowicz I

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Izabella Uchmanowicz,1 Beata Jankowska-Polanska,1 Mariusz Chabowski,2 Bartosz Uchmanowicz,1 Andrzej M Fal3 1Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 2Division of Nursing in Surgical Procedures, Department of Clinical Nursing, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 3Department of Healthcare Organisation and Economics, National Institute of Public Health, National Institute of Hygiene, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: COPD is one of the most debilitating diseases. Frailty syndrome and advanced age may decrease the acceptance of illness, quality of life, and worsen health conditions in these patients, as well as lead to an increase in health care expenses. The aim of the study was to assess how the level of frailty affects the acceptance of illness in elderly patients with COPD. We also aimed to evaluate the associations between sociodemographic and clinical factors and the level of acceptance of illness, anxiety, and frailty in this group of patients. The study included 102 COPD patients with a mean age of 63.2 (standard deviation =6.5 years and grades I (3%, II (37%, III (52%, and IV (8% by Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease. The Polish versions of the Acceptance of Illness Scale and Tilburg frailty indicator were used. Frailty syndrome was found in 77 (75.5% patients, with an average score of 7.42 (standard deviation =2.24. Coexisting diseases such as hypertension (46.07%, coronary artery disease (32.35%, heart failure (28.43%, diabetes (18.63%, and heart arrhythmia (9.8% were found among the subjects. The overall level of acceptance of illness was 20.6 (standard deviation =7.62. A lower level of acceptance of illness was associated with a higher level of frailty, especially in the physical and social domain. Elderly patients with severe COPD are more prone to frailty and decreased acceptance of their disease in comparison to patients with other chronic diseases

  7. The Dutch health insurance reform: switching between insurers, a comparison between the general population and the chronically ill and disabled

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    Groenewegen Peter P

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On 1 January 2006 a number of far-reaching changes in the Dutch health insurance system came into effect. In the new system of managed competition consumer mobility plays an important role. Consumers are free to change their insurer and insurance plan every year. The idea is that consumers who are not satisfied with the premium or quality of care provided will opt for a different insurer. This would force insurers to strive for good prices and quality of care. Internationally, the Dutch changes are under the attention of both policy makers and researchers. Questions answered in this article relate to switching behaviour, reasons for switching, and differences between population categories. Methods Postal questionnaires were sent to 1516 members of the Dutch Health Care Consumer Panel and to 3757 members of the National Panel of the Chronically ill and Disabled (NPCD in April 2006. The questionnaire was returned by 1198 members of the Consumer Panel (response 79% and by 3211 members of the NPCD (response 86%. Among other things, questions were asked about choices for a health insurer and insurance plan and the reasons for this choice. Results Young and healthy people switch insurer more often than elderly or people in bad health. The chronically ill and disabled do not switch less often than the general population when both populations are comparable on age, sex and education. For the general population, premium is more important than content, while the chronically ill and disabled value content of the insurance package as well. However, quality of care is not important for either group as a reason for switching. Conclusion There is increased mobility in the new system for both the general population and the chronically ill and disabled. This however is not based on quality of care. If reasons for switching are unrelated to the quality of care, it is hard to believe that switching influences the quality of care. As yet there

  8. Peginterferon Treatment In Children: A Review Of Chronic Hepatitis B And Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment

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    Makbule EREN

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite of extensive blood product screening and national immunization programs, chronic hepatitis B and C infections continues to be a global problem with high mortality, morbidity and economic impact. Even though acquisition of these infections mostly occurs in childhood, major problems appear in adulthood. Cirrhosis and HCC are two major expected late events related to chronic hepatitis B and C infections. Rarely, children may also face these complications. To avoid these complications and increase the life expectancy in adults treatment of these two type infections should be started in childhood with appropriate patient selection. In contrast to children, adults are luckier in terms of treatment alternatives. They have the chance to use more potent antivirals with higher genetic barrier and pegylated form of interferons. Recently, the use of pegylated interferon and ribavirin combinations has been approved in children in Chronic HCV infection. However, chronic hepatitis B treatment in children is still dependent on the use of one type antiviral drug and conventional interferon. Treatment in early ages with an antiviral agent that has limited genetic barrier may block the chance of treatment or reduce the response rate in adulthood in chronic hepatitis B infection. This burden indicates the necessity of new therapeutic modalities in children. In this term pegylated interferons may be one of the optiones. In this article we aimed to reviewe the efficacy and safety of conventional and pegylated interferons, for the treatment of Hepatitis C and B infections in children.

  9. Medication cost problems among chronically ill adults in the US: did the financial crisis make a bad situation even worse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piette JD

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available John D Piette1, Ann Marie Rosland1, Maria J Silveira1, Rodney Hayward1, Colleen A McHorney21Ann Arbor VA Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2US Outcomes Research, Merck and Co, Inc, North Wales, PA, USAAbstract: A national internet survey was conducted between March and April 2009 among 27,302 US participants in the Harris Interactive Chronic Illness Panel. Respondents reported behaviors related to cost-related medication non-adherence (CRN and the impacts of medication costs on other aspects of their daily lives. Among respondents aged 40–64 and looking for work, 66% reported CRN in 2008, and 41% did not fill a prescription due to cost pressures. More than half of respondents aged 40–64 and nearly two-thirds of those in this group who were looking for work or disabled reported other impacts of medication costs, such as cutting back on basic needs or increasing credit card debt. More than one-third of respondents aged 65+ who were working or looking for work reported CRN. Regardless of age or employment status, roughly half of respondents reporting medication cost hardship said that these problems had become more frequent in 2008 than before the economic recession. These data show that many chronically ill patients, particularly those looking for work or disabled, reported greater medication cost problems since the economic crisis began. Given links between CRN and worse health, the financial downturn may have had significant health consequences for adults with chronic illness.Keywords: medication adherence, cost-of-care, access to care, chronic disease

  10. Development of an intervention for children with a mild intellectual disability of parents with a mental illness (COPMI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemersma, I.; Santvoort, F. van; Vermaes, I.P.R.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To date no intervention is available for children with mild intellectual disabilities (ID) of parents with a mental illness or substance use disorder, despite the strong relation between parental psychopathology and ID in children. Moreover, research has shown that mild ID combined with parenta

  11. Self-expressed strengths and resources of children of parents with a mental illness : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drost, Louisa M.; Krieke, van der Lian; Sytema, Sjoerd; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the strengths children reported to have acquired while coping with their parents illness, and the external factors these children indicated had facilitated their coping process. A systematic literature search was conducted of peer-reviewed papers that focu

  12. A course on the transition to adult care of patients with childhood-onset chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagood, James S; Lenker, Claire V; Thrasher, Staci

    2005-04-01

    Children with special health care needs born today have a 90% chance of surviving into adulthood, making their transition to adult systems of care an issue that will affect almost all physicians. However, many adult generalists and specialists are not familiar with the management of chronic diseases that begin in childhood. While the public health system has made transition to appropriate adult care a priority, and many specialty organizations have endorsed this concept, there are no published studies addressing how the concept of transition can be taught to medical students or residents. The authors describe a one-week course for medical students, begun in 2001 at their institution, that addresses the transition for youth with special health care needs, emphasizing patient and family-centered care, cultural competence, and decision making in end-of-life issues. Cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disease with increasing life expectancy, is used as the model for the course. Involvement of interdisciplinary faculty, interviews with youth with special health care needs and family caregivers, readings from academic and nonacademic literature, and group discussions are presented as teaching methods. Key insights based on experience with the course are the need to include the voices of patients and families, the use of faculty from various professions and specialties to model interdisciplinary care, and the insight that problems specific to transition offer into contemporary health care financing. Future studies should measure the impact of such courses on students' knowledge of transition issues, and determine essential information required for physicians in practice.

  13. Integrated healthcare for chronically ill. Reflections on the gap between science and practice and how to bridge the gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma van der Vlegel-Brouwer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated care offers an opportunity to address healthcare efficiency and effectiveness concerns and is especially relevant for elderly patients with different chronic illnesses.In current care standards for chronic care focus is often on one disease. The chronic care model (CCM is used as the basis of integrated care programs. It identifies essential components that encourage high-quality chronic disease care, involving the community and health system and including self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Improvements in those interrelated components can produce system reform in which informed, activated patients interact with prepared, proactive practice teams. There is however a lack of research evidence for the impact of the chronic care model as a full model.Integrated care programmes have widely varying definitions and components and failure to recognize these variations leads to inappropriate conclusions about the effectiveness of these programmes and to inappropriate application of research results. It seems important to carefully consider the type and amount of data that are collected within the disease management programmes for several purposes, as well as the methods of data collection.Understanding and changing the behavior of complex dynamic chronic care system requires an appreciation of its key patterns, leverage points and constraints. A different theoretical framework, that embraces complexity, is required. Research should be design-based, context bound and address relationships among agents in order to provide solutions that address locally defined demands and circumstances.

  14. Integrated healthcare for chronically ill. Reflections on the gap between science and practice and how to bridge the gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma van der Vlegel-Brouwer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Integrated care offers an opportunity to address healthcare efficiency and effectiveness concerns and is especially relevant for elderly patients with different chronic illnesses. In current care standards for chronic care focus is often on one disease. The chronic care model (CCM is used as the basis of integrated care programs. It identifies essential components that encourage high-quality chronic disease care, involving the community and health system and including self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Improvements in those interrelated components can produce system reform in which informed, activated patients interact with prepared, proactive practice teams. There is however a lack of research evidence for the impact of the chronic care model as a full model. Integrated care programmes have widely varying definitions and components and failure to recognize these variations leads to inappropriate conclusions about the effectiveness of these programmes and to inappropriate application of research results. It seems important to carefully consider the type and amount of data that are collected within the disease management programmes for several purposes, as well as the methods of data collection. Understanding and changing the behavior of complex dynamic chronic care system requires an appreciation of its key patterns, leverage points and constraints. A different theoretical framework, that embraces complexity, is required. Research should be design-based, context bound and address relationships among agents in order to provide solutions that address locally defined demands and circumstances.

  15. Child neurology: chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Jennifer A; Jeste, Shafali S; Kang, Peter B

    2008-12-01

    Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by patchy demyelination of nerve roots and distal nerves. The course may be monophasic progressive or relapsing-remitting. CIDP is less common in children than in adults. As in adults, children with CIDP present with proximal and distal weakness and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Children are most often brought to medical attention due to gait disturbance and falling. As in adults, immunomodulatory treatment is the mainstay of therapy. Based on the small number of case series available, children with CIDP seem have a more favorable long-term course than adults.

  16. Chronic fatigue syndrome: illness severity, sedentary lifestyle, blood volume and evidence of diminished cardiac function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Barry E; Coryell, Virginia T; Parker, Meela; Martin, Pedro; Laperriere, Arthur; Klimas, Nancy G; Sfakianakis, George N; Bilsker, Martin S

    2009-10-19

    The study examined whether deficits in cardiac output and blood volume in a CFS (chronic fatigue syndrome) cohort were present and linked to illness severity and sedentary lifestyle. Follow-up analyses assessed whether differences in cardiac output levels between CFS and control groups were corrected by controlling for cardiac contractility and TBV (total blood volume). The 146 participants were subdivided into two CFS groups based on symptom severity data, severe (n=30) and non-severe (n=26), and two healthy non-CFS control groups based on physical activity, sedentary (n=58) and non-sedentary (n=32). Controls were matched to CFS participants using age, gender, ethnicity and body mass. Echocardiographic measures indicated that the severe CFS participants had 10.2% lower cardiac volume (i.e. stroke index and end-diastolic volume) and 25.1% lower contractility (velocity of circumferential shortening corrected by heart rate) than the control groups. Dual tag blood volume assessments indicated that the CFS groups had lower TBV, PV (plasma volume) and RBCV (red blood cell volume) than control groups. Of the CFS subjects with a TBV deficit (i.e. > or = 8% below ideal levels), the mean+/-S.D. percentage deficit in TBV, PV and RBCV were -15.4+/-4.0, -13.2+/-5.0 and -19.1+/-6.3% respectively. Lower cardiac volume levels in CFS were substantially corrected by controlling for prevailing TBV deficits, but were not affected by controlling for cardiac contractility levels. Analyses indicated that the TBV deficit explained 91-94% of the group differences in cardiac volume indices. Group differences in cardiac structure were offsetting and, hence, no differences emerged for left ventricular mass index. Therefore the findings indicate that lower cardiac volume levels, displayed primarily by subjects with severe CFS, were not linked to diminished cardiac contractility levels, but were probably a consequence of a co-morbid hypovolaemic condition. Further study is needed to address

  17. Altered food-cue processing in chronically ill and recovered women with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Nicole; Smeets, Paul A M; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Danner, Unna N; van Meer, Floor; Hoek, Hans W; Adan, Roger A H

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a severe mental disorder characterized by food restriction and weight loss. This study aimed to test the model posed by Brooks et al. (2012a,b) that women suffering from chronic AN show decreased food-cue processing activity in brain regions associated with energy balance and food reward (bottom-up; BU) and increased activity in brain regions associated with cognitive control (top-down; TD) when compared with long-term recovered AN (REC) and healthy controls (HC). Three groups of women, 15 AN (mean illness duration 7.8 ± 4.1 years), 14 REC (mean duration of recovery 4.7 ± 2.7 years) and 15 HC viewed alternating blocks of food and non-food images preceded by a short instruction during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), after fasting overnight. Functional region of interests (fROIs) were defined in BU (e.g., striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, hypothalamus, and cerebellum), TD (e.g., medial and lateral prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate), the insula, and visual processing areas (VPA). Food-cue processing activation was extracted from all fROIs and compared between the groups. In addition, functional connectivity between the fROIs was examined by modular partitioning of the correlation matrix of all fROIs. We could not confirm the hypothesis that BU areas are activated to a lesser extent in AN upon visual processing of food images. Among the BU areas the caudate showed higher activation in both patient groups compared to HC. In accordance with Brooks et al.'s model, we did find evidence for increased TD control in AN and REC. The functional connectivity analysis yielded two clusters in HC and REC, but three clusters in AN. In HC, fROIs across BU, TD, and VPA areas clustered; in AN, one cluster span across BU, TD, and insula; one across BU, TD, and VPA areas; and one was confined to the VPA network. In REC, BU, TD, and VPA or VPA and insula clustered. In conclusion, despite weight recovery, neural processing of food

  18. Integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy for children under five

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gera, Tarun; Shah, Dheeraj; Garner, Paul; Richardson, Marty; Sachdev, Harshpal S

    2016-01-01

    Background More than 7.5 million children younger than age five living in low- and middle-income countries die every year. The World Health Organization (WHO) developed the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) strategy to reduce mortality and morbidity and to improve quality of care by improving the delivery of a variety of curative and preventive medical and behavioral interventions at health facilities, at home, and in the community. Objectives To evaluate the effects of programs that implement the IMCI strategy in terms of death, nutritional status, quality of care, coverage with IMCI deliverables, and satisfaction of beneficiaries. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), including the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group Specialised Register; MEDLINE; EMBASE, Ovid; the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), EbscoHost; the Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS), Virtual Health Library (VHL); the WHO Library & Information Networks for Knowledge Database (WHOLIS); the Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index, Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Population Information Online (POPLINE); the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (WHO ICTRP); and the Global Health, Ovid and Health Management, ProQuest database. We performed searches until 30 June 2015 and supplemented these by searching revised bibliographies and by contacting experts to identify ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria We sought to include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled before-after (CBA) studies with at least two intervention and two control sites evaluating the generic IMCI strategy or its adaptation in children younger than age five, and including at minimum efforts to improve health care worker skills for case management. We excluded studies in which IMCI was

  19. Prevention of emotional problems and psychiatric risks in children of parents with a mental illness in the Netherlands: I. The scientific basis to a comprehensive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosman, C.M.H.; Doesum, K.T.M. van; Santvoort, F. van

    2009-01-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness are at significant risk of developing mental disorders and other adverse outcomes at some point in their lives compared to children of healthy parents. During the last 20 years, a comprehensive preventive program for children of parents with a mental illness

  20. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  1. Physical therapists should integrate illness perceptions in their assessment in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain; a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilgen, Paul; Beetsma, Anneke; Neels, Hedwig; Roussel, Nathalie; Nijs, Jo

    2014-06-01

    In the past decade, scientific evidence has shown that the biomedical model falls short in the treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. To understand musculoskeletal pain and a patient's health behavior and beliefs, physical therapists should assess the illness perceptions of their patients. In this quantitative study, we audiotaped the assessments of 19 primary care physical therapists on 27 patients and analyzed if and how illness perceptions were assessed. The Common Sense Model was used as the theoretical framework. We conclude that some of the domains of the Common Sense Model were frequently asked for (identity, causes and consequences), while others (timeline, treatment control, coherence, emotional representation) were used less frequently or seldom mentioned. The overall impression was that the assessments of the physical therapists were still bio-medically oriented in these patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain.

  2. PERSISTENT INFECTION IN FREQUENT AND PROLONGED ILL CHILDREN, POSSIBILITIES OF ETIOPATHOGENETIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Levina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the etiologic diagnosis and therapy of 243 frequent and prolonged ill children aged from 1 to 17 years. Microbiological, serological and molecular biological methods for the determination of bacterial agents, respiratory chlamydia and mycoplasma, Epstein-Barr virus, human herpes virus type 6 and cytomegalovirus were used. The dominant role of the active persistence of herpesviruses was shown (87%; bacterial pathogens were identified rarely, mainly in association with herpesvirus. 96 patients received a medication of recombinant interferon D-2 (VIFERON and then endogenic interferon inductor, 57 patients - recombinant interferon D-2 (VIFERON in conjunction with antibiotic therapy and then bacterial lysates. Treatment of children depending on the diagnosed infections allowed to achieve stable normalization of state in 78% of cases.

  3. Potential oxidative stress in children with chronic constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Fu Zhou; Jian-Guo Lou; Sheng-Li Zhou; Ji-Yue Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential oxidative stress in children with -chronic constipation and to explore its mechanisms.METHODS: Seventy children with chronic constipation and 70 age- and sex-matched healthy children were enrolled in a randomized controlled study. Plasma levels of vitamins C and E, activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase and lipoperoxide level in erythrocytes were determined by spectrophotometry.RESULTS: Compared with healthy children whose vitamin C,vitamin E, superoxide dismutase, catalase and lipoperoxide were 58.35±14.42 μmol/L, 27.15±6.55 μmol/L, 2 206±171U/(g· Hb), 327.3±82.2 K/(g·Hb) and 19.18±4.27 nmol/(g·Hb)respectively, the levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, the activity of superoxide dismutase, and catalase in the children with chronic constipation significantly decreased [46.59±11.51 μmol/L,20.65±4.80 μmol/L, 1943±147 U/(g·Hb) and 269.3±67.8 K/(g·Hb),respectively P<0.01], while the lipoperoxide significantly increased [25.22±5.01 nmol/(g·Hb), P<0.01]. With a prolonged course of disease, the levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, the activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in the children with chronic constipation gradually decreased,while the level of lipoperoxide gradually increased.CONCLUSION: Chronic constipation can cause potential oxidative stress in children.

  4. The determinants of coping with pain in chronically ill geriatric patients – the role of a sense of coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkiewicz, Anna; Basińska, Małgorzata Anna; Felsmann, Mirosława; Banaszkiewicz, Mariola; Marzec, Alicja; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2017-01-01

    Background Given the rising population of the elderly in modern societies, the concern for their good functioning poses a challenge for the 21st century medicine and social services. Senior citizens are at an increased risk of developing chronic conditions, which in turn increase discomfort associated with physiological processes of aging. Sensations of pain have a particular influence on the mentioned discomfort, and pain is prevalent among older people. Therefore, from the perspective of an elderly person and senior care, it is crucial to identify determinants of effective coping with chronic pain. Objectives The aim of the research was to assess the relationship between a sense of coherence (SOC) and pain-coping strategies in chronically ill seniors. A total number of 188 individuals were included in the study, of whom 117 were female subjects and 71 were male subjects, with a mean age of 68.38 (standard deviation [SD] =6.35) years in the studied group. Subjects were sampled based on a diagnosis of a chronic medical illness with chronic pain as one of the major symptoms. Methods The Polish adaptation of the Orientation to Life Questionnaire (SOC-29) to assess an SOC, the Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) to assess pain-coping strategies, and the visual analog scale (VAS) to assess pain intensity were used in the study. Results and conclusion The mean score of respondents’ SOC was 133.44 (SD =24.35). Among most common pain-coping strategies used by the respondents were prayer and hope, and the declaration of coping with pain while redefining pain was the least often used coping strategy in the studied group. Individuals with stronger SOC were less prone to catastrophizing and more often declared that they were coping with and could control and reduce pain.

  5. Developmental Outcomes in Young Children Born to Mothers with West Nile Illness during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirois, Patricia A.; Pridjian, Gabriella; McRae, Scott; Hinckley, Alison F.; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Kissinger, Patricia; Buekens, Pierre; Hayes, Edward B.; O’Leary, Daniel R.; Swan, Kenneth F.; Xiong, Xu; Wesson, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background West Nile virus (WNV) infection is associated with acute morbidity and mortality in adults and children. Information on the effects of maternal WNV illness during pregnancy on early childhood development is limited. This study was designed to examine the relationship between maternal WNV illness during pregnancy and birth and developmental outcomes at age 3 years. Methods Mother-child participants were identified using a national surveillance registry for women with WNV illness during pregnancy. Maternal and infant health data and relevant family characteristics were obtained through medical record reviews and maternal questionnaires. All infants received ophthalmologic examinations. Child development was evaluated at age 3 years using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development–Third Edition (Bayley-III). Results As a group, the children’s (N = 11) birth weight, head circumference, and infant ophthalmologic examination results were within age expectations; one child was born preterm (gestational age 36 weeks). Mean (SD) age at the time of Bayley-III testing was 36.7 (3.8) months. The group’s mean performance on the Bayley-III was at or above age level in all domains, but one child showed a mild delay in the Adaptive domain. The variability observed in this sample (1/53 [1.9%] Domain scores < −2.0 SDs) was consistent with expectations based upon the distribution of Bayley-III Domain scores in the general population. Conclusion Maternal WNV infection does not appear to be associated with global developmental delays in young children. These results are preliminary, however, and require confirmation in future research. PMID:25196266

  6. Illness representations as mediators of the relationship between dispositional optimism and depression in patients with chronic tinnitus: A cross-sectional study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmann, Manja; Scharloo, Margreet; Langguth, Berthold; Kalkouskaya, Natallia; Salewski, Christel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Both dispositional optimism and illness representations are related to psychological health in chronic patients. In a group of chronic tinnitus sufferers, the interplay between these two variables was examined. Specifically, it was tested to what extent the relationship between dispositio

  7. Activating people to address their health care needs: learning from people with lived experience of chronic illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanhope, Victoria; Henwood, Benjamin F

    2014-08-01

    One of the primary goals of health care reform is improving the quality and reducing the costs of care for people with co-morbid mental health and physical health conditions. One strategy is to integrate primary and behavioral health care through care coordination and patient activation. This qualitative study using community based participatory research methods informs the development of integrated care by presenting the perspectives of those with lived experience of chronic illnesses and homelessness. Themes presented include the internal and external barriers to addressing health needs and the key role of peer support in overcoming these barriers.

  8. Double trouble: does co-morbid chronic somatic illness increase risk for recurrence in depression? A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma D Kok

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To perform a systematic review, and if possible a meta-analysis, to establish whether depressed patients with co-morbid chronic somatic illnesses are a high risk "double trouble" group for depressive recurrence. METHOD: The databases PubMed, EMbase and PsycINFO were systematically searched until the 4(th of December 2012 by using MeSH and free text terms. Additionally, reference lists of retrieved publications and treatment guidelines were reviewed, and experts were consulted. Inclusion criteria were: depression had to be measured at least twice during the study with qualified instruments and the chronic somatic illness had to be assessed by self-report or by a medical professional. Information on depressive recurrence was extracted and additionally risk ratios of recurrence were calculated. RESULTS: The search generated four articles that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. These studies showed no differences in recurrence over one- two- three- and 6.5 years of follow-up for a total of 2010 depressed patients of which 694 patients with a co-morbid chronic somatic illness versus 1316 patients without (Study 1: RR = 0.49, 95% CI, 0.17-1.41 at one year follow-up and RR = 1.37, 95% CI, 0.78-2.41 at two year follow-up; Study 2: RR = 0.94, 95% CI, 0.65-1.36 at two year follow-up; Study 3: RR = 1.15, 95% CI, 0.40-3.27 at one year follow-up; RR = 1.07, 95% CI, 0.48-2.42 at two year follow-up and RR = 0.99, 95% CI,0.55-1.77 at 6.5 years follow-up; Study 4: RR = 1.16, 95% CI, 0.86-1.57 at three year follow-up. CONCLUSION: We found no association between a heightened risk for depressive recurrence and co-morbid chronic somatic illnesses. There is a need for more longitudinal studies to justify the current specific treatment advice such as long-term pharmacological maintenance treatment for this presumed "double trouble" group.

  9. ENDOSCOPIC AND HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHANGES IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC DYSPEPSIA IN A RURAL MEDICAL COLLEGE HOSPITAL IN MELMARUVATHUR- TAMILNADU

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    Padma K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Chronic pain abdomen and dyspepsia is the most common presenting symptoms in the Paediatric Outpatient Department (OPD after respiratory illnesses. It is increasing alarmingly both in the paediatric and adult population. We, therefore carried out a cross-sectional study among children with chronic dyspepsia aged between 5 to 15 years attending Paediatric OPD in a rural medical college hospital, Melmaruvathur, Tamilnadu, South India. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the gastroduodenal morbidity in children presenting to the paediatric department of a rural medical college hospital with chronic dyspeptic symptoms. METHODS Forty six children between the age group of 5 to 15 years with chronic dyspeptic symptoms of at least one month duration were evaluated for their symptom profile, epidemiological profile, nutritional status, endoscopic appearance and histopathological changes. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 18. RESULTS Of the 46 children studied, 43% were between the age group of 5-10 years and 70% were female children. Pain abdomen lasting for more than at least one month was the most common finding (93% observed. Other common symptoms in the order of decreasing frequency were early satiety (87%, poor appetite (76%, nausea (57% and not thriving (57%. History of loss of appetite was significantly associated with chronic dyspepsia with an odds ratio of 68.9394 and 95% confidence interval 26.62 to 178.54, p value of <0.0001. Most of the children belonged to lower income group predominantly of a rural background. 33 (72% children had under nutrition as per IAP classification. 10 (30% Grade I, 15 (45% Grade II and eight (24% had Grade III malnutrition. 26 children (57% had abnormal endoscopic findings. Antral mucosal biopsy done showed chronic lymphocytic gastritis in 44 (96% cases. 38 of these 44 (86% were H. pylori positive. H. pylori positivity in chronic dyspepsia was highly statistically significant with a p value of 0

  10. Prevalence and risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding in critically ill children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chookhuan Nithiwathanapong; Sanit Reungrongrat; Nuthapong Ukarapol

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the frequency and the risk factors of stress-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).METHODS: The medical records of children aged between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the PICU between January 2002 and December 2002 were reviewed.Demographic data, indications for PICU admission, principle diagnosis, and basic laboratory investigations were recorded. Previously described factors for stress ulcer bleeding (mechanical ventilation, sepsis, acute respiratory distress syndrome, renal insufficiency, coagulopathy,thrombocytopenia, and intracranial pathology) were used as independent variables in a multivariate analysis.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy of two hundred and five medical records were eligible for review. The most common indication for PICU admission was respiratory failure (48.8%). Twenty-five children received stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis with ranitidine. The incidence of stress ulcer bleeding was 43.5%, in which 5.3% were clinically significant bleeding. Only mechanical ventilation and thrombocytopenia were significantly associated with stress ulcer bleeding using the univariate analysis.The odds ratio and 95% confidence intervals were 5.13(1.86-14.12) and 2.26 (1.07-4.74), respectively. However, the logistic regression analysis showed that mechanicai ventilation was the only significant risk factor with the odds ratio of 14.1.CONCLUSION: The incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding was high in critically ill children. Mechanical ventilation was an important risk factor for gastrointestinal bleeding.

  11. Acute Childhood Illnesses and Health Seeking Behaviour among under five children in a village of Hooghly district, West Bengal

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    Indira Dey (Pal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: – Acute respiratory infections and diarrhoeal diseases are important causes of morbidity in children worldwide. IMNCI component is addressing these two illnesses in a major way and is concentrating on health care practices of community. Objective: – to find out their health seeking behaviour. Methodology: – A community based , cross-sectional study was conducted in the Mollasimla village of Hooghly district of West Bengal using 2 weeks recall for acute illnesses. Results – It was found that 56.8%, 23.8% and 18.9% children suffered from ARI, fever and diarrhea respectively. Overall treatment rate was above 93% and most of the children were treated in hospitals and health centre. Conclusion: – Acute illnesses are still largely prevalent in the rural community. As mothers are the first care givers, they should be made aware of the preventive measures and the need for seeking treatment.

  12. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness

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    Dani-Louise Dixon

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  13. The Role of Human Milk Immunomodulators in Protecting Against Viral Bronchiolitis and Development of Chronic Wheezing Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Dani-Louise

    2015-07-07

    Infants who are breastfed are at an immunological advantage when compared with formula fed infants, evidenced by decreased incidence of infections and diminished propensity for long term conditions, including chronic wheeze and/or asthma. Exclusive breastfeeding reduces the duration of hospital admission, risk of respiratory failure and requirement for supplemental oxygen in infants hospitalised with bronchiolitis suggesting a potentially protective mechanism. This review examines the evidence and potential pathways for protection by immunomodulatory factors in human milk against the most common viral cause of bronchiolitis, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), and subsequent recurrent wheeze in infants. Further investigations into the interplay between respiratory virus infections such as RSV and how they affect, and are affected by, human milk immunomodulators is necessary if we are to gain a true understanding of how breastfeeding protects many infants but not all against infections, and how this relates to long-term protection against conditions such as chronic wheezing illness or asthma.

  14. Cough . 2: Chronic cough in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. de Jongste (Johan); M.D. Shields

    2003-01-01

    textabstractChronic cough is a common problem in childhood. Viral infections are the most prevalent cause, but other rarer disorders should be excluded whenever cough appears unusually severe and/or frequent, and when there is evidence of failure to thrive and growth retardation. T

  15. Cognitive science speaks to the "common-sense" of chronic illness management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventhal, Howard; Leventhal, Elaine A; Breland, Jessica Y

    2011-04-01

    We describe the parallels between findings from cognitive science and neuroscience and Common-Sense Models in four areas: (1) Activation of illness representations by the automatic linkage of symptoms and functional changes with concepts (an integration of declarative and perceptual and procedural knowledge); (2) Action plans for the management of symptoms and disease; (3) Cognitive and behavioral heuristics (executive functions parallel to recent findings in cognitive science) involved in monitoring and modifying automatic control processes; (4) Perceiving and communicating to "other minds" during medical visits to address the declarative and non-declarative (perceptual and procedural) knowledge that comprise a patient's representations of illness and treatment (the transparency of other minds).

  16. Content and quality of websites supporting self-management of chronic breathlessness in advanced illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckett, Tim; Disler, Rebecca; Hosie, Annmarie; Johnson, Miriam; Davidson, Patricia; Currow, David; Sumah, Anthony; Phillips, Jane

    2016-05-26

    Chronic breathlessness is a common, burdensome and distressing symptom in many advanced chronic illnesses. Self-management strategies are essential to optimise treatment, daily functioning and emotional coping. People with chronic illness commonly search the internet for advice on self-management. A review was undertaken in June 2015 to describe the content and quality of online advice on breathlessness self-management, to highlight under-served areas and to identify any unsafe content. Google was searched from Sydney, Australia, using the five most common search terms for breathlessness identified by Google Trends. We also hand-searched the websites of national associations. Websites were included if they were freely available in English and provided practical advice on self-management. Website quality was assessed using the American Medical Association Benchmarks. Readability was assessed using the Flesch-Kincaid grades, with grade 8 considered the maximum acceptable for enabling access. Ninety-one web pages from 44 websites met the inclusion criteria, including 14 national association websites not returned by Google searches. Most websites were generated in the USA (n=28, 64%) and focused on breathing techniques (n=38, 86%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n=27, 61%). No websites were found to offer unsafe advice. Adherence to quality benchmarks ranged from 9% for disclosure to 77% for currency. Fifteen (54%) of 28 written websites required grade ⩾9 reading level. Future development should focus on advice and tools to support goal setting, problem solving and monitoring of breathlessness. National associations are encouraged to improve website visibility and comply with standards for quality and readability.

  17. Correlation of thyroid hormone levels and immune function state with the illness in patients with chronic urticaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yan Sun; Guang-Zhong Yang; Qing-Xiang Li; Yao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the correlation of thyroid hormone level and immune function state with the illness in patients with chronic urticaria.Methods:A total of 54 patients with chronic urticaria treated in our hospital between May 2015 and October 2015 were selected as the chronic urticaria group (CU group) of the study, 50 healthy volunteers receiving physical examination in our hospital during the same period were selected as the negative control group (NC group) of the study, serum was collected to determine the content of immunoglobulins, complements, interleukins, thyroid hormone and autoantibodies.Results: Serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content of CU group were significantly lower than those of NC group while IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content were significantly higher than those of NC group; serum TT3, TT4, FT3, FT4, TSAb, TGAb, TPOAb and TMAb content of CU group were significantly higher than those of NC group, negatively correlated with serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content, and positively correlated with serum IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content;serum TSH content was significantly lower than that of NC group, positively correlated with serum C3, C4 and IL-2 content, and negatively correlated with serum IgG, IgE, IL-4, IL-17, IL-18 and IL-33 content.Conclusions: Thyroid autoantibody synthesis and thyroid hormone release increase in patients with chronic urticaria, and the change of thyroid hormone levels and immune function is closely related to the illness.

  18. Gastrointestinal and respiratory illness in children that do and do not attend child day care centers: a cost-of-illness study.

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    Remko Enserink

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases are major causes of morbidity for young children, particularly for those children attending child day care centers (DCCs. Although both diseases are presumed to cause considerable societal costs for care and treatment of illness, the extent of these costs, and the difference of these costs between children that do and do not attend such centers, is largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: Estimate the societal costs for care and treatment of episodes of gastroenteritis (GE and influenza-like illness (ILI experienced by Dutch children that attend a DCC, compared to children that do not attend a DCC. METHODS: A web-based monthly survey was conducted among households with children aged 0-48 months from October 2012 to October 2013. Households filled-in a questionnaire on the incidence of GE and ILI episodes experienced by their child during the past 4 weeks, on the costs related to care and treatment of these episodes, and on DCC arrangements. Costs and incidence were adjusted for socioeconomic characteristics including education level, nationality and monthly income of parents, number of children in the household, gender and age of the child and month of survey conduct. RESULTS: Children attending a DCC experienced higher rates of GE (aIRR 1.4 [95%CI: 1.2-1.9] and ILI (aIRR: 1.4 [95%CI: 1.2-1.6] compared to children not attending a DCC. The societal costs for care and treatment of an episode of GE and ILI experienced by a DCC-attending child were estimated at €215.45 [€115.69-€315.02] and €196.32 [€161.58-€232.74] respectively, twice as high as for a non-DCC-attending child. The DCC-attributable economic burden of GE and ILI for the Netherlands was estimated at €25 million and €72 million per year. CONCLUSIONS: Although children attending a DCC experience only slightly higher rates of GE and ILI compared to children not attending a DCC, the costs involved per episode are substantially higher.

  19. Clinical and Epidemiological Characterization of Chronic Adenoiditis in Children

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    Daniel Reyes Concepción

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: chronic adenoiditis, which causes the greater number of elective major surgeries in children, is a common disease in Cuba. Objectives to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of chronic adenoiditis in children. Methods: a descriptive study with non-probability sampling was conducted in 98 children with chronic adenoiditis treated at the University Pediatric Hospital of Central Havana, between September 2009 and July 2011. The variables analyzed were age, sex, symptoms, signs and main clinical manifestations, personal medical history, family history, and major environmental and social risk factors. A survey was conducted to identify risk factors. Statistical analysis such as: the mean, relative frequency and frequency tables were performed. Results: highest morbidity was observed in children aged 1 to 9 years. The main features of the disease were nasal obstruction, dental malocclusion, mouth breathing and respiratory infection. The most common risk factors were attendance to day-care centers and exposure to cigarette smoke. Personal and family history of asthma and respiratory allergies was the most frequently found. Conclusion: chronic adenoiditis in pediatric patients is multifactorial in origin, and tends to decrease in the child population older than nine years.

  20. Haemophilus ducreyi causing chronic skin ulceration in children visiting Samoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, James E; Wilson, Elizabeth; Campanella, Silvana; Taylor, Susan L; Roberts, Sally A

    2007-05-15

    Chancroid is a sexually transmitted infection associated with genital ulceration and lymphadenopathy caused by Haemophilus ducreyi. Localized skin infections, in the absence of genital lesions, have not been previously reported. We report 3 cases of lower limb ulceration in children caused by H. ducreyi and postulate that H. ducreyi may be a previously unrecognized cause of chronic skin ulceration.

  1. Prognosis of chronic or recurrent abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, Marieke J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Passchier, Ban; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Chronic abdominal pain (CAP) or recurrent abdominal pain is common in childhood and is rarely associated with organic disease. With modern diagnostic technology, new organic abnormalities are found in children with CAP. Thus far a causal relation between these abnormalities and CAP has n

  2. Prognostic factors for persistence of chronic abdominal pain in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieteling, M.J.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.A.; Lisman-van Leeuwen, Y.; Passchier, J.; Berger, M.Y.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to identify prognostic factors for the persistence of chronic abdominal pain (CAP) in children. Materials and Methods: For this systematic review, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO were searched up to June 2008 for prospective follow-up studies of pediatric CAP as de

  3. Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Maria, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    While governing bodies have mandated that all students have the right to an education, with disabled students treated to the same rights and opportunities as non-disabled students, policymakers do not always agree on what all-inclusive education should look like. "Challenges Surrounding the Education of Children with Chronic Diseases"…

  4. A questionnaire to evaluate the impact of chronic diseases: validated translation and Illness Effects Questionnaire (IEQ reliability study

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    Patrícia Pinto Fonseca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patients' perception about their health condition, mainly involving chronic diseases, has been investigated in many studies and it has been associated to depression, compliance with the treatment, quality of life and prognosis. The Illness Effects Questionnaire (IEQ is a tool which makes the standardized evaluation of patients' perception about their illness possible, so that it is brief and accessible to the different clinical settings. This work aims to begin the transcultural adaptation of the IEQ to Brazil through the validated translation and the reliability study. METHODS: The back-translation method and the test-retest reliability study were used in a sample of 30 adult patients under chronic hemodialysis. The reliability indexes were estimated using the Pearson, Spearman, Weighted Kappa and Cronbach's alpha coefficients. RESULTS: The semantic equivalence was reached through the validated translation. In this study, the reliability indexes obtained were respectively: 0.85 and 0.75 (p < 0.001; 0.68 and 0.92 (p < 0.0001. DISCUSSION: The reliability indexes obtained attest to the stability of responses in both evaluations. Additional procedures are necessary for the transcultural adaptation of the IEQ to be complete. CONCLUSION: The results indicate the translation validity and the reliability of the Brazilian version of the IEQ for the sample studied.

  5. A tool to measure whether business management capacity in general practice impacts on the quality of chronic illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Christine H; Proudfoot, Judith G; Jayasinghe, Upali W; Grimm, Jane; Bubner, Tanya K; Winstanley, Julie; Harris, Mark F; Beilby, Justin J

    2010-11-01

    Our aim was to develop a tool to identify specific features of the business and financial management of practices that facilitate better quality care for chronic illness in primary care. Domains of management were identified, resulting in the development of a structured interview tool that was administered in 97 primary care practices in Australia. Interview items were screened and subjected to factor analysis, subscales identified and the overall model fit determined. The instrument's validity was assessed against another measure of quality of care. Analysis provided a four-factor solution containing 21 items, which explained 42.5% of the variance in the total scores. The factors related to administrative processes, human resources, marketing analysis and business development. All scores increased significantly with practice size. The business development subscale and total score were higher for rural practices. There was a significant correlation between the business development subscale and quality of care. The indicators of business and financial management in the final tool appear to be useful predictors of the quality of care. The instrument may help inform policy regarding the structure of general practice and implementation of a systems approach to chronic illness care. It can provide information to practices about areas for further development.

  6. [Hypnosis for chronic pain of children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Célestin-Lhopiteau, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    A child or adolescent can suffer from chronic pain. Whatever the causes, it can trap the child in a specific process whereby they focus on the pain, fearing that it will appear and experiencing anxiety. Hypno-analgesia and hypnotherapy enable them to escape this process and find within themselves the capacity to face up to the pain. Moreover, these techniques offer them an autonomy which they can use in all areas of their life.

  7. Use of complementary and alternative medicines for children with chronic health conditions in Lagos, Nigeria

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    Senbanjo Idowu O

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is on the increase globally with a high prevalence in children and adults with chronic illnesses. Many studies have evaluated the epidemiology of medicine use for children in developing countries but none has evaluated the use of CAM for children with chronic illnesses. The aim of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence, pattern of use, parental sources of information, perceived benefits, cost, and adverse effects of CAM in children with epilepsy, sickle cell anaemia and asthma in Lagos, Nigeria. Methods Parents of children with epilepsy (122, asthma (78 or sickle cell anaemia (118 who presented consecutively to the paediatric neurology, respiratory and haematology clinics of the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH, Ikeja were interviewed with a structured open- and close-ended questionnaire. The information obtained comprised the demography of both the patients and their parents; past and present treatments received by the patients; the type of CAM, if any, used by the patients; and the sources, cost, benefits and adverse effects of the CAM used. Results A total of 303 CAMs were used by the patients, either alone or in combination witother CAM. CAM was reportedly used by 99 (31% patients (epilepsy -38%, sickle cell anaemia – 36% and asthma – 25%. The majority (84% of these patients were currently using CAM. The use of CAM was stopped six months prior to the study by 16 patients (16%. Biological products were the most frequently used CAMs (58%, followed by alternative medical systems (27% and mind-body interventions (14%. Relations, friends and neighbours had a marked influence on 76% of the parents who used CAM for their children. Eighty-five (86% parents were willing to discuss the use of CAM with their doctors but were not asked. CAM use was associated with adverse reactions in 7.1% of the patients. Conclusion Parental use of CAMs to treat

  8. Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Differential Relationships of the Two Subdomains of Negative Symptoms in Chronically Ill Psychotic Patients.

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    Annemarie P M Stiekema

    Full Text Available Research suggests a two factor structure for negative symptoms in patients with psychotic disorders: social amotivation (SA and expressive deficits (ED. Applying this two-factor structure in clinical settings may provide valuable information with regard to outcomes and to target treatments. We aimed to investigate 1 whether the factor structure is also supported in chronically ill patients with a psychotic disorder and 2 what the relationship is between these factors and functioning (overall functioning and living situation, depressive symptoms and quality of life. 1157 Patients with a psychotic disorder and a duration of illness of 5 years or more were included in the analysis (data selected from the Pharmacotherapy Monitoring Outcome Survey; PHAMOUS. A confirmatory factor analysis was performed using items of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale that were previously identified to reflect negative symptoms (N1-4, N6, G5, G7, G13, G16. Subsequently, regression analysis was performed on outcomes. The results confirmed the distinction between SA (N2, N4, G16 and ED (N1, N3, N6, G5, G7, G13 in chronically ill patients. Both factors were related to worse overall functioning as measured with the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales, ED was uniquely associated with residential living status. Higher scores for SA were associated with more depressive symptoms and worse quality of life. Thus, SA is most strongly related to level of social-emotional functioning, while ED are more related to living situation and thereby are indicative of level of everyday functioning. This subdivision may be useful for research purposes and be a valuable additional tool in clinical practice and treatment development.

  9. Organisational systems and services for children of parents with mental illness and their families: processes of change and sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susanne

    2010-09-01

    Adult mental illness in the community including depression and anxiety has achieved greater public awareness and visibility in recent years and this has also resulted in increased recognition about the widespread impact on dependent children. During the past decade in Australia, policies and specific programs for infants, children and youth in terms of prevention, early intervention and promotion in relation to children of parents with a mental illness ('copmi') have been devised. However, these have generally been disconnected projects, essentially supported only by non-recurrent funding. In more recent years, systematic and interconnected responses involving a wider range of government, non-government and consumer and carer organisations to build sustainability have become the focus. However, little research about change processes affecting the organisational systems serving children of parents with mental illness and their families has been undertaken. This aim of the current study is to describe the enablers and barriers that contribute to change in systems and government and non-government organisations in relation to children of parents with a mental illness in Australia over the past decade, within the context of sustainability. The study involved interviews, focus groups and website and literature searches regarding systems change across Australian states and territories and nationally in relation to the enablers, barriers and future directions. Strategic and intentional processes within organisations, more evolutionary ongoing cross-agency processes and links to sustained changes are key systems change findings. Relevance for change in other health services is highlighted.

  10. 'A tale of two cases:' the health, illness, and physical activity stories of two children living with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, Fiona J; Faulkner, Guy E J

    2014-01-01

    Storytelling is perennial, and central to the human condition. Although illness may shatter identity and one's role and place in the broader social world, narrative may aid in the process of self-reparation. Despite the merits of the narrative approach, it has been underutilized with children who are living with cystic fibrosis (CF). The role that illness narratives may play in influencing CF youths' physical activity also remains poorly investigated. This article drew on the qualitative case study methodological tradition to narrate the stories of two children living with CF at a children's hospital in Canada. The findings beg researchers to consider (a) how children with life-limiting diseases borrow multiple illness narrative types, (b) the role of development in influencing the kinds of stories that children can tell, and (c) the impact of illness narratives on physical activity. By rendering the tales of two CF youth in this study, we respond to Aurthur Frank's call; taking a multiple narrative turn, we listen to stories of a different kind of suffering.

  11. Understanding Children with Asthma: Trouble and Triggers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, JungHa; Wood, Beatrice L.; Cheah, PoAnn

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common illnesses of childhood; in the United States, nearly 9% of children have the condition (Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, 2006). Among children with chronic illnesses, asthma is the most common cause for school absence and hospitalization (Akinbami, 2006). Asthma is a chronic disorder of the…

  12. The Association of Health Literacy with Illness and Medication Beliefs among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minal S Kale

    Full Text Available Low health literacy is associated with low adherence to self-management in many chronic diseases. Additionally, health beliefs are thought to be determinants of self-management behaviors. In this study we sought to determine the association, if any, of health literacy and health beliefs among elderly individuals with COPD.We enrolled a cohort of patients with COPD from two academic urban settings in New York, NY and Chicago, IL. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Using the framework of the Self-Regulation Model, illness and medication beliefs were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ and Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ. Unadjusted analyses, with corresponding Cohen's d effect sizes, and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationships between HL and illness and medication beliefs.We enrolled 235 participants, 29% of whom had low health literacy. Patients with low health literacy were more likely to belong to a racial minority group (p<0.001, not be married (p = 0.006, and to have lower income (p<0.001 or education (p<0.001. In unadjusted analyses, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe they will always have COPD (p = 0.003, Cohen's d = 0.42, and were more likely to be concerned about their illness ((p = 0.04, Cohen's d = 0.17. In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and other health beliefs, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe that they will always have COPD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65-0.94. In addition, the association of low health literacy with expressed concern about medications remained significant (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05-1.37 though the association of low health literacy with belief in the necessity of medications was no longer significant (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82-1.04.In this cohort of urban individuals with COPD, low health literacy was

  13. The Association of Health Literacy with Illness and Medication Beliefs among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, Minal S.; Federman, Alex D.; Krauskopf, Katherine; Wolf, Michael; O’Conor, Rachel; Martynenko, Melissa; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low health literacy is associated with low adherence to self-management in many chronic diseases. Additionally, health beliefs are thought to be determinants of self-management behaviors. In this study we sought to determine the association, if any, of health literacy and health beliefs among elderly individuals with COPD. Methods We enrolled a cohort of patients with COPD from two academic urban settings in New York, NY and Chicago, IL. Health literacy was measured using the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Using the framework of the Self-Regulation Model, illness and medication beliefs were measured with the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (B-IPQ) and Beliefs about Medications Questionnaire (BMQ). Unadjusted analyses, with corresponding Cohen’s d effect sizes, and multiple logistic regression were used to assess the relationships between HL and illness and medication beliefs. Results We enrolled 235 participants, 29% of whom had low health literacy. Patients with low health literacy were more likely to belong to a racial minority group (p<0.001), not be married (p = 0.006), and to have lower income (p<0.001) or education (p<0.001). In unadjusted analyses, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe they will always have COPD (p = 0.003, Cohen’s d = 0.42), and were more likely to be concerned about their illness ((p = 0.04, Cohen’s d = 0.17). In analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors and other health beliefs, patients with low health literacy were less likely to believe that they will always have COPD (odds ratio [OR]: 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.65–0.94). In addition, the association of low health literacy with expressed concern about medications remained significant (OR: 1.20, 95% CI: 1.05–1.37) though the association of low health literacy with belief in the necessity of medications was no longer significant (OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.82–1.04). Conclusions In this cohort of urban

  14. The cost of community-managed viral respiratory illnesses in a cohort of healthy preschool-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Kelly M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute respiratory illnesses (ARIs during childhood are often caused by respiratory viruses, result in significant morbidity, and have associated costs for families and society. Despite their ubiquity, there is a lack of interdisciplinary epidemiologic and economic research that has collected primary impact data, particularly associated with indirect costs, from families during ARIs in children. Methods We conducted a 12-month cohort study in 234 preschool children with impact diary recording and PCR testing of nose-throat swabs for viruses during an ARI. We used applied values to estimate a virus-specific mean cost of ARIs. Results Impact diaries were available for 72% (523/725 of community-managed illnesses between January 2003 and January 2004. The mean cost of ARIs was AU$309 (95% confidence interval $263 to $354. Influenza illnesses had a mean cost of $904, compared with RSV, $304, the next most expensive single-virus illness, although confidence intervals overlapped. Mean carer time away from usual activity per day was two hours for influenza ARIs and between 30 and 45 minutes for all other ARI categories. Conclusion From a societal perspective, community-managed ARIs are a significant cost burden on families and society. The point estimate of the mean cost of community-managed influenza illnesses in healthy preschool aged children is three times greater than those illnesses caused by RSV and other respiratory viruses. Indirect costs, particularly carer time away from usual activity, are the key cost drivers for ARIs in children. The use of parent-collected specimens may enhance ARI surveillance and reduce any potential Hawthorne effect caused by compliance with study procedures. These findings reinforce the need for further integrated epidemiologic and economic research of ARIs in children to allow for comprehensive cost-effectiveness assessments of preventive and therapeutic options.

  15. The importance of illness duration, age at diagosis and the year of diagnosis for labour participation chances of people with chronic illness: results of a nationwide panel-study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Schippers, J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Compared to participation rates among general populations, participation of people with chronic illness in the labour market lags behind. This is undesirable, both from the perspective of individuals' well-being as from a macro-economic perspective for western countries where concerns ex

  16. The Burden of Illness in Patients with Moderate to Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Reza Maleki-Yazdi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: No recent Canadian studies with physician- and spirometry-confirmed diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD that assessed the burden of COPD have been published.

  17. Exciting but exhausting: experiences with participatory research with chronically ill adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staa, A.L. van; Jedeloo, S.; Latour, J.M.; Trappenburg, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescents with chronic conditions are major users of paediatric hospitals, but seldom participate in the evaluation of services or in research. Little is known about the usefulness of the participatory approach in adolescent health research.

  18. Anxiety in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease - Multicenter National Study Results

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    Katarzyna Kiliś-Pstrusińska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chronic medical illness is a significant risk factor for the development of psychiatric disorders. The aims of the study were: to investigate the level of anxiety in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD and to identify factors associated with the presence of that emotional problem. Methods: CKD children on hemodialysis (HD, n=22, peritoneal dialysis (PD, n=20, and on conservative treatment (CT, n=95 were enrolled in the study. We used State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI for adolescents and STAI-C for children. Socio-demographic and physical factors were assessed. Results: There was a significantly higher level of anxiety-state among HD children (8-12 years compared with other groups of participants of the same age and Polish population norms. The level of anxiety among adolescents (13-18 years, both anxiety-state and anxiety-trait, was significantly higher in the HD group compared with other groups, which did not differ among themselves. In the HD adolescents, there was a correlation between the anxiety-state and the duration of the disease as well as with the number of hospitalizations. PD adolescents in the mainstream education had higher levels of anxiety-state and anxiety-trait compared with home schooled patients. Conclusions: Even though children and adolescents with CKD are at risk of developing a variety of emotional disorders, the level of anxiety among the researched group, with the exception of HD patients, was not significantly different than the level of anxiety among healthy subjects. Adolescents on HD who present a high level of anxiety should undergo long-term psychological treatment.

  19. How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part I: The impact of recession and deindustrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Paula; Burström, Bo; Whitehead, Margaret;

    2011-01-01

    Low employment rates of chronically ill and disabled people are of serious concern. Being out of work increases the risk of poverty and social exclusion, which may further damage the health of these groups, exacerbating health inequalities. Macro-level policies have a potentially tremendous impact...... on their employment chances, and these influences urgently need to be understood as the current economic crisis intensifies. In Part I of this two-part study, the authors examine employment trends for people who report a chronic illness or disability, by gender and educational level, in Canada, Denmark, Norway......, Sweden, and the United Kingdom in the context of economic booms and busts and deindustrialization. People with the double burden of chronic illness and low education have become increasingly marginalized from the labor market. Deindustrialization may have played a part in this process. In addition...

  20. Fecal Microbiota and Diet of Children with Chronic Constipation

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    Joyce Gomes de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many factors explain dysbiosis in chronic constipation (CC, such as a low-fiber diet. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of constipated and nonconstipated children and their intake frequencies of food. Methods. This observational study included 79 children (M/F 43/36 aged six to 36 months divided into two groups: cases (39 constipated children and controls (40 nonconstipated children. We used a structured form to collect demographic variables, conducted anthropometric assessment, and collected food intake frequency data. The fecal microbiota of the stool samples was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the fluorophore SYBR® Green. Results. Constipated children had a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus per milligram of stool (p=0.015 than nonconstipated children, but the concentration of Bifidobacterium per milligram of stool (p=0.323 and the intake of fruits, vegetables (p=0.563, and junk food (p=0.093 of the two groups did not differ. Constipated children consumed more dairy products (0.45±0.8; p>0.001, were more frequently delivered via caesarean section (69.2%, were weaned earlier (median: 120; 60Q1–240Q3, and had a family history of constipation (71.8%. Conclusions. Children with CC have a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus in their stools and consume more dairy products.

  1. Fecal Microbiota and Diet of Children with Chronic Constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Joyce Gomes; Motta, Maria Eugênia Farias de Almeida; Beltrão, Monique Ferraz de Sá; Salviano, Taciana Lima; da Silva, Giselia Alves Pontes

    2016-01-01

    Many factors explain dysbiosis in chronic constipation (CC), such as a low-fiber diet. The objective of this study was to compare the fecal microbiota of constipated and nonconstipated children and their intake frequencies of food. Methods. This observational study included 79 children (M/F 43/36) aged six to 36 months divided into two groups: cases (39 constipated children) and controls (40 nonconstipated children). We used a structured form to collect demographic variables, conducted anthropometric assessment, and collected food intake frequency data. The fecal microbiota of the stool samples was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the fluorophore SYBR® Green. Results. Constipated children had a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus per milligram of stool (p = 0.015) than nonconstipated children, but the concentration of Bifidobacterium per milligram of stool (p = 0.323) and the intake of fruits, vegetables (p = 0.563), and junk food (p = 0.093) of the two groups did not differ. Constipated children consumed more dairy products (0.45 ± 0.8; p > 0.001), were more frequently delivered via caesarean section (69.2%), were weaned earlier (median: 120; 60Q1-240Q3), and had a family history of constipation (71.8%). Conclusions. Children with CC have a smaller concentration of Lactobacillus in their stools and consume more dairy products.

  2. The predictive value of the NICE "red traffic lights" in acutely ill children.

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    Evelien Kerkhof

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early recognition and treatment of febrile children with serious infections (SI improves prognosis, however, early detection can be difficult. We aimed to validate the predictive rule-in value of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE most severe alarming signs or symptoms to identify SI in children. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The 16 most severe ("red" features of the NICE traffic light system were validated in seven different primary care and emergency department settings, including 6,260 children presenting with acute illness. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We focussed on the individual predictive value of single red features for SI and their combinations. Results were presented as positive likelihood ratios, sensitivities and specificities. We categorised "general" and "disease-specific" red features. Changes in pre-test probability versus post-test probability for SI were visualised in Fagan nomograms. RESULTS: Almost all red features had rule-in value for SI, but only four individual red features substantially raised the probability of SI in more than one dataset: "does not wake/stay awake", "reduced skin turgor", "non-blanching rash", and "focal neurological signs". The presence of ≥ 3 red features improved prediction of SI but still lacked strong rule-in value as likelihood ratios were below 5. CONCLUSIONS: The rule-in value of the most severe alarming signs or symptoms of the NICE traffic light system for identifying children with SI was limited, even when multiple red features were present. Our study highlights the importance of assessing the predictive value of alarming signs in clinical guidelines prior to widespread implementation in routine practice.

  3. Chronic effects of air pollution on respiratory health in Southern California children: findings from the Southern California Children's Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhanghua; Salam, Muhammad T; Eckel, Sandrah P; Breton, Carrie V; Gilliland, Frank D

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is one of the leading contributors to adverse respiratory health outcomes in urban areas around the world. Children are highly sensitive to the adverse effects of air pollution due to their rapidly growing lungs, incomplete immune and metabolic functions, patterns of ventilation and high levels of outdoor activity. The Children's Health Study (CHS) is a continuing series of longitudinal studies that first began in 1993 and has focused on demonstrating the chronic impacts of air pollution on respiratory illnesses from early childhood through adolescence. A large body of evidence from the CHS has documented that exposures to both regional ambient air and traffic-related pollutants are associated with increased asthma prevalence, new-onset asthma, risk of bronchitis and wheezing, deficits of lung function growth, and airway inflammation. These associations may be modulated by key genes involved in oxidative-nitrosative stress pathways via gene-environment interactions. Despite successful efforts to reduce pollution over the past 40 years, air pollution at the current levels still brings many challenges to public health. To further ameliorate adverse health effects attributable to air pollution, many more toxic pollutants may require regulation and control of motor vehicle emissions and other combustion sources may need to be strengthened. Individual interventions based on personal susceptibility may be needed to protect children's health while control measures are being implemented.

  4. Transfusion of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells is not a risk factor for nosocomial infections in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Judith; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusion of red blood cells is increasingly linked with adverse outcomes in critically ill children. We tested the hypothesis that leukocyte-depleted red blood cell transfusions were independently associated with increased development of bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated p

  5. Relationship between Illness Severity, Social/Familial Variables and Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Anita Landau; Koepke, David

    The study examined the effects of social support and family functioning on illness and adjustment in 70 children and adolescents with sickle cell disease. Four sources of information were used: patient interview and standardized tests; parent interview and standardized tests; teacher interview; and medical records. Results revealed several…

  6. When Parents Have Problems: A Book for Teens and Older Children with an Abusive, Alcoholic, or Mentally Ill Parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan B.

    This book was written for teenagers and older children who have abusive, alcoholic, or mentally ill parents. Emphasis is placed on young people in such situations using their intelligence, understanding that parents are fallible, viewing the future with optimism, facing reality, and seeing the good in other people rather than assuming everyone…

  7. Can a management pathway for chronic cough in children improve clinical outcomes: protocol for a multicentre evaluation

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    Masters IB

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic cough is common and is associated with significant economic and human costs. While cough can be a problematic symptom without serious consequences, it could also reflect a serious underlying illness. Evidence shows that the management of chronic cough in children needs to be improved. Our study tests the hypothesis that the management of chronic cough in children with an evidence-based management pathway is feasible and reliable, and improves clinical outcomes. Methods/Design We are conducting a multicentre randomised controlled trial based in respiratory clinics in 5 major Australian cities. Children (n = 250 fulfilling inclusion criteria (new patients with chronic cough are randomised (allocation concealed to the standardised clinical management pathway (specialist starts clinical pathway within 2 weeks or usual care (existing care until review by specialist at 6 weeks. Cough diary, cough-specific quality of life (QOL and generic QOL are collected at baseline and at 6, 10, 14, 26, and 52 weeks. Children are followed-up for 6 months after diagnosis and cough resolution (with at least monthly contact from study nurses. A random sample from each site will be independently examined to determine adherence to the pathway. Primary outcomes are group differences in QOL and proportion of children that are cough free at week 6. Discussion The clinical management pathway is based on data from Cochrane Reviews combined with collective clinical experience (250 doctor years. This study will provide additional evidence on the optimal management of chronic cough in children. Trial registration ACTRN12607000526471

  8. Chronically ill Canadians’ experiences of being unattached to a family doctor: a qualitative study of marginalized patients in British Columbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unattached patients do not have a regular primary care provider. Initiatives are being developed to increase attachment rates across Canada. Most existing attention paid to patient unattachment has focused on quantifying the problem and health system costs. Our purpose is to qualitatively identify the implications of chronically ill patients’ experiences of unattachment for health policy and planning to provide policy-relevant insights for Canadian attachment initiatives. Methods Three focus groups were conducted with marginalized chronically ill individuals residing in a mid-sized city in British Columbia who are unattached to a family doctor. We use the term marginalized as a descriptor to acknowledge that by virtue of their low socio-economic status and lack of attachment the participants are marginalized in Canada’s health care system Focus groups were structured as an open conversation organized around a series of probing questions. They were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was employed. Results Twenty-six individuals participated in the focus groups. The most common chronic illnesses reported were active drug addiction or recovery (and their associated symptoms, depression, arthritis, and hepatitis C. Participants identified life transitions as being the root cause for not having a family doctor. There was a strong sense that unsuccessful attempts to get a family doctor reflected that they were undesirable patients. Participants wanted to experience having a trusting relationship with a regular family doctor as they believed it would encourage greater honesty and transparency. One of the main health concerns regarding lack of access to a regular family doctor is that participants lacked access to preventative care. Participants were also concerned about having a discontinuous medical record due to unattachment. Conclusions Participants perceived that there are many benefits to be had

  9. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in children with chronic disease in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber Soad

    2006-01-01

    Background : Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an important pathogen in gastrointestinal disorders. Seroprevalence among asymptomatic and chronically diseased children in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia was determined to gain insight into its prevalence. Methods : Serum samples obtained from 1432 children; 543 asymptomatic and 889 chronically diseased children (diabetes, chronic asthma, chronic hemolytic anemia, neurological impairment and Down′s syndrome); were tested by ELIZA for H. pylori IgG...

  10. Use of deferred consent for severely ill children in a multi-centre phase III trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boga Mwamvua

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary participation of a subject in research respects a subject's rights, strengthens its ethical conduct, and is formalized by the informed consent process. Clinical trials of life-saving interventions for medical emergencies often necessitate enrolment of patients where prior written individual informed consent is impossible. Although there are regulations and guidelines on protecting subjects in emergency research, these have been criticised for being limited and unnecessarily restrictive. Across Europe and the United States stringent regulations have resulted in a substantial decline of clinical trials involving emergency interventions. Methods We are conducting a trial of fluid resuscitation in children with hypovolaemic shock in six hospitals across three malaria-endemic African countries. The design is pragmatic as children are enrolled on clinical criteria alone and is being conducted in hospitals with facilities typical of many district hospitals across Africa. The trial aims to inform strategy for managing children with febrile illness and features of shock. In order to develop appropriate consent processes for the trial, we conducted a narrative review of current international recommendations for emergency consent. Results Practical or specific guidance was generally sparse or confusing with few examples in the literature to direct our informed consent process. For a sub-group of children who were critically sick or where parents themselves were otherwise too distressed to consider prior written consent, we opted for a modified form of deferred consent. This included verbal assent from guardians at the point of enrolment, with full written consent obtained after stabilising the child. For children who died prior to full written consent, ethical permission was received to waiver full consent. Conclusions In light of the controversy around guidance and regulations in this area we report how and why we have used a

  11. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hyphantis

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Hyphantis1, Augustina Almyroudi1, Vassiliki Paika1, Panagiota Goulia1, Konstantinos Arvanitakis2,31Department of Psychiatry, Medical School, University of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece; 2Canadian Institute of Psychoanalysis, Mcgill University, Montreal, Canada; 3Departments of Philosophy and Psychiatry, Mcgill University Health Centre, Montreal, CanadaAbstract: Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer’s Iliad whose principal theme is “Achilles’ rage” (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence “Achilles’ heel” has come to mean a person’s principal weakness, we aimed to assess whether “narcissistic rage” has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28, quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF, interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40, hostility (HDHQ, and defense styles (DSQ. Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ “omnipotence” and HDHQ “extraverted hostility”. Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a “normal” mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an “Achilles’ Heel” for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications.Keywords: consultation-liaison psychiatry, psychosomatics, narcissism, physical illness, quality of life, psychological distress, personality

  12. Factors influencing sleep for parents of critically ill hospitalised children: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Robyn; Dhukai, Zahida; Wong, Lily; Parshuram, Christopher

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe factors affecting the sleep of parents of critically ill children and to determine strategies used to improve their sleep. One hundred and eighteen parents of 91 children recruited during their child's paediatric intensive care unit stay responded in writing to open-ended questions assessing their experiences with sleep and eliciting ideas for strategies to promote sleep to be used by parents and provided by hospital staff. Patterns and concepts were coded and organised into themes using a qualitative descriptive approach. Seven themes emerged related to influences on and strategies to improve sleep: (1) the child's condition; (2) being at the bedside or not; (3) difficult thoughts and feelings; (4) changes to usual sleep; (5) caring for self and family; (6) the hospital environment and (7) access to sleep locations. Parents described multiple, often competing, demands that affected their ability to achieve sleep, regardless of location. Many more factors that influenced sleep were described than strategies to improve sleep, highlighting the need for nurses to explore with parents the unique barriers and facilitators to sleep they encounter and to develop and rigorously test interventions to improve sleep.

  13. Effects of preventive family service coordination for parents with mental illnesses and their children, a RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Henny J; Janssens, Jan M A M; Hoencamp, Erik; Middelkoop, Barend J C; Hosman, Clemens M H

    2015-06-01

    Children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI) are at increased risk for developing psychiatric disorders, especially when parenting is compromised by multiple risk factors. Due to fragmented services, these families often do not get the support they need. Can coordination between services, as developed in the Preventive Basic Care Management (PBCM) program, improve parenting and prevent child behavioral problems? This randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) compared the effectiveness of PBCM with a control condition. Ninety-nine outpatients of a community mental health center were randomized to intervention or control. Primary outcomes included parenting quality (assessed by the HOME instrument), parenting skills (parenting skills subscale of FFQ), and parenting stress (PDH). Secondary outcomes are child behavioral problems (SDQ). Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after 9 and 18 months. Effects were analyzed by Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance. Most families were single-parent families belonging to ethnic minorities. The results of the first RCT on effects of PBCM suggest that this intervention is feasible and has a positive effect on parenting skills. There was no evidence for effects on the quality of parenting and parenting stress, nor preventive effects on child behavioral problems. Replication studies in other sites, with more power, including monitoring of the implementation quality and studying a broader palette of child outcomes are needed to confirm the positive effects of PBCM. Long-term prospective studies are needed to investigate if improved parenting skills lead to positive effects in the children in the long run.

  14. Childhood illnesses and malnutrition in under five children in drought affected desert area of western Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu B; Lakshminarayana, J; Fotedar, R; Anand, P K

    2006-03-01

    The study was undertaken to asses the impact of drought on childhood illnesses and nutrition in under five children of rural population using three stage sampling design. The study has been carried out in 24 villages belonging to 6 tehsils of Jodhpur district which was a drought affected desert district of Western Rajasthan in 2003. A total of 914 under five children (0-5 years) could be examined for their childhood illnesses, malnutrition, dietary intake and clinical signs of nutritional deficiency. Childhood illnesses observed at the time of drought were respiratory (7.5 %), gastroentrological (7.5%), and 5.6% fever (viral, malaria and jaundice), higher in males than females. Children suffered from recent and long term malnutrition were 39% and 26% respectively as per National Centre for Health Statistics (NCHS) standards. The extent of malnutrition was significantly higher in females than in males (pmalnutrition (PEM) was observed in 44.4%. Overall mean calorie and protein intake deficit was observed to be very high (76.0 & 54.0 %). The comparison of present drought results with earlier studies in normal and drought conditions showed higher prevalence of PEM and deficiencies of calories & proteins in their diet. Respiratory, gastroentrological and fever were main childhood illnesses observed and were higher in males at the time of drought. PEM, vitamin A & B- complex deficiencies, anemia along with deficit in calories and proteins in their diet was observed higher in present study as compared to non desert areas, which may be due to the harsh environmental conditions in desert areas and paucity in the consumption of daily food intake. Due to inadequate consumption of daily food, the children were suffering from PEM resulting in several childhood illnesses. Effective measures making availability of adequate calories and proteins to all age groups especially to under five children through the ongoing nutrition programs needs to be ensured.

  15. Astronomy for Extremely ill or Traumatically Injured Children and Their Families - IAU OAD Grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, Donald

    2015-08-01

    This grant funded a program for extremely ill or traumatically injured children, their siblings, and family members rlated to the children’s surgery and medical treatments at nearby hospitals. This grant provided an educational family-learning experience and out-of-this world diversion from the stress of being sick or of having a sick family member hospitalized. The families stayed at the four Ronald McDonald Houses (RMHs) of Chicago. The RMHs provide free or low-cost housing in a comfortable, supportive alternative atmosphere where family members sleep, eat, relax and find support from other families in similar situations. Families are kept united when mutual support is as critical as the medical treatment itself. The ill children and their families may stay for a few days or months because of chemotherapy, dialysis, or rehabilitative therapy. Children from 50 states and 50 countries stay the Chicago RMHs and there are 260 RMHs in the US and 65 worldwide.The RMH staff and volunteers were trained to: use optical and solar telescopes; use the Stellarium program to show the night sky, identify objects, and plan observing sessions; use Sky and Telescope or Astronomy Magazine to selected the best nights for observing; conduct simple family oriented demonstrations; demonstrate citizen science/Zooniverse activities; and provide information about science museums and astronomy clubs near their home. The Chicago Astronomical Society (amateur astronomy club) provides ongoing support.I created an Activity Book with demonstrations and participatory hands-on activities including a toilet plunger sundial, making a sundial, creating a scale model of the Solar System (football field or toilet paper), phases and craters of the Moon (Oreo cookie phases, flour/ cocoa crater formation), eclipses, make constellations from chocolate chips in chocolate-chip cookies, crate your own constellation patterns, stellar temperature (images, demonstrations, candy), order images of the stages of

  16. Physicians should increase focus on poor medicine adherence among chronically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Topp, Marie; Ingebrigtsen, Truls Sylvan;

    2014-01-01

    Non-adherence to medicine is common in patients with chronic diseases, contributing to significant worsening of disease, increased mortality and health expenditure. Methods of measuring adherence include self report, prescription refill rates, biomarkers, electronic monitoring and therapeutic out...... treatments to the patient's lifestyle and preferences....

  17. Living with Chronic Kidney Disease : The role of illness perceptions, treatment perceptions and social support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, D.L.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients, particularly patients on dialysis, often experience difficulties with participating in daily activities, including paid work. Restrictions on the quantity or quality of activities, may impede people’ perceived autonomy and self-esteem. This thesis addressed the

  18. 'It just has to click' : Internists' views of: what constitutes productive interactions with chronically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromme, N. M. H.; Ahaus, C. T. B.; Gans, R. O. B.; van de Wiel, H. B. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: According to the Chronic Care Model, productive interactions are crucial to patient outcomes. Despite productive interactions being at the heart of the Model, however, it is unclear what constitutes such an interaction. The aim of this study was to gain a better understanding of physicia

  19. Neurocognitive effects of chronic lead intoxication in Andean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, S A; Buchanan, L H; Rosas, H D; Ortega, F

    1998-09-18

    Lead (Pb) intoxication in children has been associated with neurodevelopmental disabilities which may result in motor and cognitive impairment. We conducted blood lead (PbB) measurements, neurological examinations and cognitive tests on children living in Ecuadorian villages where Pb is used extensively in the glazing of ceramics. Group I consisted of 55 children with a mean PbB level of 48.0 microg/dl (SD: 26.4, range: 9.2-119.1 microg/dl) who received PbB tests and complete neurological examinations. An appreciable number of the children with elevated PbB levels were normal on specific components of the neurological examination. Among the children who showed neurological deficits, higher PbB levels were associated with abnormal tendon reflexes, finger tapping, visual pursuit, size discrimination, draw-a-person, and math calculation skills. Group II consisted of 41 children with a mean PbB level of 47.4 microg/dl (SD: 22.0, range: 6.6-84.7 microg/dl) who were administered Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (RCPM) non-verbal reasoning test. Performance on RCPM was abnormal in 22 (53.7%) of 41 children. Children with abnormal RCPM scores had higher PbB levels (t-test: P=0.030). There was a significant inverse correlation between RCPM scores and PbB levels for children ages 9 years and older (r=-0.618, P=0.011). Males had higher mean PbB levels as a function of age than females (t-test: P=0.037), and more males showed neurocognitive deficits. The results demonstrate a range of neurological responses in children with chronically elevated PbB levels from apparent exceptional neuro-physiological tolerance of PbB intoxication, to some fine motor and cognitive deficits.

  20. Reasons for default from treatment of chronic illnesses in a primary healthcare program in rural Tamil Nadu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennens, Henry R; Ramasamy, Rajkumar; Tenni, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Chronic illnesses are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in rural India. Many patients default from treatment, and exploring their reasons for the same may suggest strategies to improve service accessibility and acceptability. A qualitative study was conducted of 22 patient interviews, six key informant interviews, and two patient focus group discussions for investigating the reasons for default at the KC Patty Primary Health Centre and surrounding villages in Kodaikanal Taluk, Dindigul district, Tamil Nadu. The reasons included money or transport difficulties, frequent travel, feeling healthy, focus on work, fear of scolding from clinic staff, medication side effects, preference for alternative therapy, and depression. Some reasons were only divulged after an extended discussion. Support from families and village-level health workers (VLHWs) were also identified as important. Recommendations include more open and patient communication between health workers and defaulting patients, in addition to recruitment of more VLHWs.

  1. Reasons for default from treatment of chronic illnesses in a primary healthcare program in rural Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry R Jennens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic illnesses are an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in rural India. Many patients default from treatment, and exploring their reasons for the same may suggest strategies to improve service accessibility and acceptability. A qualitative study was conducted of 22 patient interviews, six key informant interviews, and two patient focus group discussions for investigating the reasons for default at the KC Patty Primary Health Centre and surrounding villages in Kodaikanal Taluk, Dindigul district, Tamil Nadu. The reasons included money or transport difficulties, frequent travel, feeling healthy, focus on work, fear of scolding from clinic staff, medication side effects, preference for alternative therapy, and depression. Some reasons were only divulged after an extended discussion. Support from families and village-level health workers (VLHWs were also identified as important. Recommendations include more open and patient communication between health workers and defaulting patients, in addition to recruitment of more VLHWs.

  2. [Frailty in older adults: detection, community-based intervention, and decision-making in the management of chronic illnesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Rodríguez, Tania; Varela-Pinedo, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Physical fragility is defined as "a medical syndrome with multiple causes and factors that contribute to its development and that is characterized by decreased strength and resistance as well as reduced physiological functioning, which increase an individual's vulnerability to functional dependence or death." Different multi-systemic pathophysiological processes are involved in the pathogenesis of frailty syndrome, one of the most important being the loss of muscle mass associated with aging or sarcopenia. Several studies have demonstrated that physical frailty increases with age. Physical exercise is the best form of intervention for preventing and treating frailty. In older adults with chronic illnesses, identifying frailty is very important for decision-making, individualizing management, and considering their values and care preferences.

  3. Adiponectin Potentially Contributes to the Antidepressive Effects of Baduanjin Qigong Exercise in Women With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jessie S M; Li, Ang; Ng, Siu-Man; Ho, Rainbow T H; Xu, Aimin; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Wang, Xiao-Min; So, Kwok-Fai; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2017-03-13

    Our recent study demonstrates that adiponectin signaling plays a significant role in mediating physical exercise-exerted effects on hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepression in mice. Whether the findings can be translated to humans remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Baduanjin Qigong exercise on adiponectin and to evaluate whether adiponectin is involved in the antidepressive effects of Qigong exercise on chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-like illness. This is a randomized, waitlist-controlled trial. One hundred eight female participants were randomly assigned to either Qigong exercise or waitlist groups. Sixteen 1.5-h Qigong lessons were conducted. Outcome measures were taken at three time points. Baseline adiponectin levels were negatively associated with body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and waist/hip ratio in women with CFS-like illness. Compared with the waitlist control, Qigong exercise significantly reduced anxiety and depression symptoms and significantly raised plasma adiponectin levels (median = 0.8 vs. -0.1, p Qigong exercise were associated with decreases in depression scores for the Qigong group (r = -0.38, p = 0.04). Moreover, adjusted linear regression analysis further identified Qigong exercise and change in adiponectin levels as the significant factors accounting for reduction of depression symptoms. Baduanjin Qigong significantly increased adiponectin levels in females with CFS-like illness. Decreases in depression symptoms were associated with increases in adiponectin levels following Qigong exercise, indicating that the potential contribution of adiponectin to Qigong exercise elicited antidepressive effects in human subjects.

  4. Narcissistic rage: The Achilles' heel of the patient with chronic physical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyphantis, Thomas; Almyroudi, Augustina; Paika, Vassiliki; Goulia, Panagiota; Arvanitakis, Konstantinos

    2009-11-03

    Based on the psychoanalytic reading of Homer's Iliad whose principal theme is "Achilles' rage" (the semi-mortal hero invulnerable in all of his body except for his heel, hence "Achilles' heel" has come to mean a person's principal weakness), we aimed to assess whether "narcissistic rage" has an impact on several psychosocial variables in patients with severe physical illness across time. In 878 patients with cancer, rheumatological diseases, multiple sclerosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and glaucoma, we assessed psychological distress (SCL-90 and GHQ-28), quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), interpersonal difficulties (IIP-40), hostility (HDHQ), and defense styles (DSQ). Narcissistic rage comprised DSQ "omnipotence" and HDHQ "extraverted hostility". Hierarchical multiple regressions analyses were performed. We showed that, in patients with disease duration less than one year, narcissistic rage had a minor impact on psychosocial variables studied, indicating that the rage was rather part of a "normal" mourning process. On the contrary, in patients with longer disease duration, increased rates of narcissistic rage had a great impact on all outcome variables, and the opposite was true for patients with low rates of narcissistic rage, indicating that narcissistic rage constitutes actually an "Achilles' Heel" for patients with long-term physical illness. These findings may have important clinical implications.

  5. Religious versus Conventional Psychotherapy for Major Depression in Patients with Chronic Medical Illness: Rationale, Methods, and Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. Koenig

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper (1 reviews the physical and religious barriers to CBT that disabled medically ill-depressed patients face, (2 discusses research on the relationship between religion and depression-induced physiological changes, (3 describes an ongoing randomized clinical trial of religious versus secular CBT in chronically ill patients with mild-to-moderate major depression designed to (a overcome physical and religious barriers to CBT and (b compare the efficacy of religious versus secular CBT in relieving depression and improving immune and endocrine functions, and (4 presents preliminary results that illustrate the technical difficulties that have been encountered in implementing this trial. CBT is being delivered remotely via instant messaging, telephone, or Skype, and Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu versions of religious CBT are being developed. The preliminary results described here are particular to the technologies employed in this study and are not results from the CBT clinical trial whose findings will be published in the future after the study ends and data are analyzed. The ultimate goal is to determine if a psychotherapy delivered remotely that integrates patients’ religious resources improves depression more quickly than a therapy that ignores them, and whether religious CBT is more effective than conventional CBT in reversing depression-induced physiological changes.

  6. From Body to Mind and Spirit: Qigong Exercise for Bereaved Persons with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bereavement may bring negative impacts on the mind, body, and spiritual well-being of grieving persons. Some bereaved persons with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- illness experience a dual burden of distress. This study investigated the effects of bereavement on CFS-like illness by comparing bereaved and nonbereaved participants. It also adopted a random group design to investigate the effectiveness of Qigong on improving the well-being of bereaved participants. The Qigong intervention comprised 10 group sessions delivered twice a week for 5 weeks and home-practice for at least three times a week lasting 15–30 minutes each. The participants’ fatigue, anxiety, and depression, quality of life (QoL, and spiritual well-being were measured at baseline and 3 months after treatment. The bereaved participants experienced significantly greater mental fatigue (16.09 versus 14.44, p=0.017 and lower physical QoL (34.02 versus 37.17, p=0.011 than their nonbereaved counterparts. After 3 months, the mental fatigue (−8 versus −4, p=0.010 and physical fatigue (−10 versus −5, p=0.007 experienced by intervention group had declined significantly, and improvements on their spirituality (14 versus −2, p=0.013 and psychological QoL (8.91 versus 0.69, p=0.002 scores exceeded those of the control group.

  7. Chronic pain associated with the Chikungunya Fever: long lasting burden of an acute illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallel Radhouane

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is responsible for major epidemics worldwide. Autochthonous cases were recently reported in several European countries. Acute infection is thought to be monophasic. However reports on chronic pain related to CHIKV infection have been made. In particular, the fact that many of these patients do not respond well to usual analgesics suggests that the nature of chronic pain may be not only nociceptive but also neuropathic. Neuropathic pain syndromes require specific treatment and the identification of neuropathic characteristics (NC in a pain syndrome is a major step towards pain control. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study at the end of the major two-wave outbreak lasting 17 months in Réunion Island. We assessed pain in 106 patients seeking general practitioners with confirmed infection with the CHIK virus, and evaluated its impact on quality of life (QoL. Results The mean intensity of pain on the visual-analogical scale (VAS was 5.8 ± 2.1, and its mean duration was 89 ± 2 days. Fifty-six patients fulfilled the definition of chronic pain. Pain had NC in 18.9% according to the DN4 questionnaire. Conversely, about two thirds (65% of patients with NC had chronic pain. The average pain intensity was similar between patients with or without NC (6.0 ± 1.7 vs 6.1 ± 2.0. However, the total score of the Short Form-McGill Pain Questionnaire (SF-MPQ(15.5 ± 5.2 vs 11.6 ± 5.2; p Conclusions There exists a specific chronic pain condition associated to CHIKV. Pain with NC seems to be associated with more aggressive clinical picture, more intense impact in QoL and more challenging pharmacological treatment.

  8. Life threatening illness and hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, A; Forrest, G C; Woolley, H; Baum, J D

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken of 25 families and their 26 ill children attending the first children's hospice in the United Kingdom. The study examined the family's perceptions of the care offered and the impact of chronic and life threatening illness. Eighteen (72%) of the families felt they had been well supported by the hospice and valued the family like atmosphere, perceiving the staff to be friendly, approachable, and helpful. The actual nature of hospice care, in an environment with other terminally ill children, was, however, considered a drawback for a few families. A number of families still had unmet needs, notably appropriate child minding when away from the hospice. The impact of chronic life threatening illness on the families was substantial. The parents (particularly the mothers), the index children, and their siblings all experienced much higher levels of psychological symptomatology than would have been expected from normal samples. While families felt greatly helped over symptom control, a proportion remained very worried about certain symptoms, particularly breathlessness, seizures, and pain. A high proportion of families were experiencing financial and employment difficulties as a result of their children's illnesses. PMID:2730123

  9. Self-management of chronic illness: the role of 'habit' versus reflective factors in exercise and medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L Alison; Cohen, Joshua; Burns, Edith; Abrams, Jessica; Renninger, Steffi

    2016-12-01

    Non-adherence to health behaviors required for chronic illness self-management is pervasive. Advancing health-behavior theory to include behavioral initiation and maintenance factors, including reflective (e.g., belief- and feedback-based) and automatic (e.g., habit-based) mechanisms of adherence to different treatment-related behaviors could improve non-adherence prediction and intervention efforts. To test behavioral initiation and maintenance factors from an extended common sense self-regulation theoretical framework for predicting medication adherence and physical activity among patients with Type 2 diabetes. Patients (n = 133) in an in-person (n = 80) or online (n = 53) version of the study reported treatment-related (1) barriers, (2) beliefs and experiential feedback (reflective mechanisms of treatment-initiation and short-term repetition), and (3) habit strength (automatic mechanism of treatment-maintenance) for taking medication and engaging in regular physical activity at baseline. Behaviors were assessed via self-reports (n = 133) and objectively (electronic monitoring pill bottles, accelerometers; n = 80) in the subsequent month. Treatment-specific barriers and habit strength predicted self-reported and objective adherence for both behaviors. Beliefs were inconsistently related to behavior, even when habits were "weak". Experiential feedback from behavior was not related to adherence. Among patients with Type 2 diabetes diagnosis, medication and physical activity adherence were better predicted by their degree of automatic behavioral repetition than their beliefs/experiences with the treatment-actions. Habit strength should be an intervention target for chronic illness self-management; assessing it in practice settings may effectively detect non-adherence to existing treatment-regimens. However, future research and further refining of CS-SRM theory regarding the processes required for such habit development are needed.

  10. Growth in Very Young Children Undergoing Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azocar, Marta; Borzych, Dagmara; Watson, Alan R.; Büscher, Anja; Edefonti, Alberto; Bilge, Ilmay; Askenazi, David; Leozappa, Giovanna; Gonzales, Claudia; van Hoeck, Koen; Secker, Donna; Zurowska, Aleksandra; Rönnholm, Kai; Bouts, Antonia H. M.; Stewart, Heather; Ariceta, Gema; Ranchin, Bruno; Warady, Bradley A.; Schaefer, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Very young children with chronic kidney disease often have difficulty maintaining adequate nutrition, which contributes to the high prevalence of short stature in this population. Characteristics of the dialysis prescription and supplemental feeding via a nasogastric (NG) tube or gastrostomy may improve growth, but this is not well understood. Here, we analyzed data from 153 children in 18 countries who commenced chronic peritoneal dialysis at <24 months of age. From diagnosis to last observation, 57 patients were fed on demand, 54 by NG tube, and 10 by gastrostomy; 26 switched from NG to gastrostomy; and 6 returned from NG to demand feeding. North American and European centers accounted for nearly all feeding by gastrostomy. Standardized body mass index (BMI) uniformly decreased during periods of demand feeding and increased during NG and gastrostomy feeding. Changes in BMI demonstrated significant regional variation: 26% of North American children were obese and 50% of Turkish children were malnourished at last observation (P < 0.005). Body length decreased sharply during the first 6 to 12 months of life and then tended to stabilize. Time fed by gastrostomy significantly associated with higher lengths over time (P < 0.001), but adjustment for baseline length attenuated this effect. In addition, the use of biocompatible peritoneal dialysate and administration of growth hormone independently associated with improved length, even after adjusting for regional factors. In summary, growth and nutritional status vary regionally in very young children treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis. The use of gastrostomy feeding, biocompatible dialysis fluid, and growth hormone therapy associate with improved linear growth. PMID:22021715

  11. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  12. Caregivers' Experiences of Pathways to Care for Seriously Ill Children in Cape Town, South Africa: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline H D Jones

    Full Text Available Understanding caregivers' experiences of care can identify barriers to timely and good quality care, and support the improvement of services. We aimed to explore caregivers' experiences and perceptions of pathways to care, from first access through various levels of health service, for seriously ill and injured children in Cape Town, South Africa, in order to identify areas for improvement.Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with primary caregivers of children who were admitted to paediatric intensive care or died in the health system prior to intensive care admission. Interviews explored caregivers' experiences from when their child first became ill, through each level of health care to paediatric intensive care or death. A maximum variation sample of transcripts was purposively sampled from a larger cohort study based on demographic characteristics, child diagnosis, and outcome at 30 days; and analysed using the method of constant comparison.Of the 282 caregivers who were interviewed in the larger cohort study, 45 interviews were included in this qualitative analysis. Some caregivers employed 'tactics' to gain quicker access to care, including bypassing lower levels of care, and negotiating or demanding to see a healthcare professional ahead of other patients. It was sometimes unclear how to access emergency care within facilities; and non-medical personnel informally judged illness severity and helped or hindered quicker access. Caregivers commonly misconceived ambulances to be slow to arrive, and were concerned when ambulance transfers were seemingly not prioritised by illness severity. Communication was often good, but some caregivers experienced language difficulties and/or criticism.Interventions to improve child health care could be based on: reorganising the reception of seriously ill children and making the emergency route within healthcare facilities clear; promoting caregivers' use of ambulances and prioritising

  13. Do healthy school meals affect illness, allergies and school attendance in 8- to 11-year-old children?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Rikke Pilmann; Lauritzen, Lotte; Ritz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives:A nutritionally adequate diet in childhood is important for health and resistance of allergies and infections. This study explored the effects of school meals rich in fish, vegetables and fibre on school attendance, asthma, allergies and illness in 797 Danish 8- to 11-year-o......, allergies, illness or well-being in 8- to 11-year-old children. The slight increase in occurrence of headaches seems to be related to the physical eating environment.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 10 December 2014; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2014.263....

  14. [Care of the chronically ill: strategic challenge, macro-management and health policies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Picard, Patricia; Fuster-Culebras, Juli

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic diseases is increasing, with the patients who suffer from them having greater need for healthcare. This fact forces a redirection in the health system, currently focused on the acute diseases, to achieve an efficient care. For this reason, it is necessary to work at all levels, starting with political decisions. These decisions should be based on the technical and scientific evidence available. Health planning is essential to establish care strategies, defining the actions to ensure the coordination and continuity of care, and also the redefinition of professional roles, where primary care nurses assume more competencies, becoming key professionals in the care of the chronic patient. The new model should include the professionalization of the management of health services. Information and communication technologies will play an important role in the development of strategies, but considering them as the tools that they are, allowing for the patient to be the focus of attention, and ensuring the privacy and the confidentiality.

  15. Daily Interpersonal Events in Pain Patients: Applying Action Theory to Chronic Illness

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Action theory proposes that individuals actively shape and then respond to their environments, highlighting the role of stable person characteristics in the development and maintenance of life’s interpersonal difficulties. In this study, we adopted the action perspective in our examination of the daily lives of chronic pain patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our evaluation of patients’ daily diary reports indicated that individuals played a more prominent role in shaping their positive versu...

  16. Medical Transport of Children with Complex Chronic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Lerner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most notable trends in child health has been the increase in the number of children with special health care needs, including those with complex chronic conditions. Care of these children accounts for a growing fraction of health care resources. We examine recent developments in health care, especially with regard to medical transport and prehospital care, that have emerged to adapt to this remarkable demographic trend. One such development is the focus on care coordination, including the dissemination of the patient-centered medical home concept. In the prehospital setting, the need for greater coordination has catalyzed the development of the emergency information form. Training programs for prehospital providers now incorporate specific modules for children with complex conditions. Another notable trend is the shift to a family-centered model of care. We explore efforts toward regionalization of care, including the development of specialized pediatric transport teams, and conclude with recommendations for a research agenda.

  17. Effects of qigong exercise on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome-like illness: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jessie S M; Ho, Rainbow T H; Wang, Chong-Wen; Yuen, Lai Ping; Sham, Jonathan S T; Chan, Cecilia L W

    2013-01-01

    Background. Anxiety/depressive symptoms are common in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS-) like illness. Qigong as a modality of complementary and alternative therapy has been increasingly applied by patients with chronic illnesses, but little is known about the effect of Qigong on anxiety/depressive symptoms of the patients with CFS-like illness. Purpose. To investigate the effects of Qigong on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in patients with CFS-illness. Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven participants who met the diagnostic criteria for CFS-like illness were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of Qigong training twice a week for 5 consecutive weeks, followed by home-based practice for 12 weeks. Fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Results. Total fatigue score [F(1,135) = 13.888, P Qigong group compared to controls. The anxiety score was not significantly improved in the Qigong group. Conclusion. Qigong may not only reduce the fatigue symptoms, but also has antidepressive effect for patients with CFS-like illness. Trial registration HKCTR-1200.

  18. Effects of Qigong Exercise on Fatigue, Anxiety, and Depressive Symptoms of Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome-Like Illness: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie S. M. Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anxiety/depressive symptoms are common in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome- (CFS- like illness. Qigong as a modality of complementary and alternative therapy has been increasingly applied by patients with chronic illnesses, but little is known about the effect of Qigong on anxiety/depressive symptoms of the patients with CFS-like illness. Purpose. To investigate the effects of Qigong on fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in patients with CFS-illness. Methods. One hundred and thirty-seven participants who met the diagnostic criteria for CFS-like illness were randomly assigned to either an intervention group or a waitlist control group. Participants in the intervention group received 10 sessions of Qigong training twice a week for 5 consecutive weeks, followed by home-based practice for 12 weeks. Fatigue, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were assessed at baseline and postintervention. Results. Total fatigue score [F1,135=13.888, P<0.001], physical fatigue score [F1,135=20.852, P<0.001] and depression score [F1,135=9.918, P=0.002] were significantly improved and mental fatigue score [F1,135=3.902, P=0.050] was marginally significantly improved in the Qigong group compared to controls. The anxiety score was not significantly improved in the Qigong group. Conclusion. Qigong may not only reduce the fatigue symptoms, but also has antidepressive effect for patients with CFS-like illness. Trial registration HKCTR-1200.

  19. Etiology and Outcome of Chronic Kidney Disease in Iranian Children

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    Neamatollah Ataei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the significant geographical and ethnical differences in pattern of incidence, etiology and outcome of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the present study aimed to assess the etiology and outcome of CKD in Iranian children. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study etiology and outcome of 372 children aged 3 months to 18 years with CKD was studied during the period 1991 –2014. Children (186 boys, 186 girls with Stage 3 to 5 CKDs, defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2body surface area, were identified. Results Etiology was congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in 125 (33.60%, cystic/ hereditary/ congenital diseases in 91 (24.46%, glomerulopathy in 73(19.62%, and cause unknown in 71 (19.09% patients. Forty-eight (13.22% were on conservative treatment, 174(47.93% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD with chronic hemodialysis, 24 (6.61% were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sixty-eight (18.74% underwent on renal transplant which was successful in 52 (14.33% patients but was associated with abnormal renal function in 16(4.41% children. Finally, 49 (13.50% patients died. Conclusion A large number of children developed CKD secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Planning for screening, early detection and instituting timely treatment of preventable causes could lead to a lower incidence of CKD in this group of children.

  20. Better health, less spending: Redesigning the transition from pediatric to adult healthcare for youth with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaks, Yana; Bensen, Rachel; Steidtmann, Dana; Wang, Thomas D; Platchek, Terry S; Zulman, Donna M; Malcolm, Elizabeth; Milstein, Arnold

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYA) with serious chronic illnesses face costly and dangerous gaps in care as they transition from pediatric to adult health systems. New, financially sustainable approaches to transition are needed to close these gaps. We designed a new transition model for adolescents and young adults with a variety of serious chronic conditions. Our explicit goal was to build a model that would improve the value of care for youth 15-25 years of age undergoing this transition. The design process incorporated a review, analysis, and synthesis of relevant clinical and health services research; stakeholder interviews; and observations of high-performing healthcare systems. We identified three major categories of solutions for a safer and lower cost transition to adult care: (1) building and supporting self-management during the critical transition; (2) engaging receiving care; and (3) providing checklist-driven guide services during the transition. We propose that implementation of a program with these interventions would have a positive impact on all three domains of the triple aim - improving health, improving the experience of care, and reducing per capita healthcare cost. The transition model provides a general framework as well as suggestions for specific interventions. Pilot tests to assess the model's ease of implementation, clinical effects, and financial impact are currently underway.

  1. Mycotoxins and Antifungal Drug Interactions: Implications in the Treatment of Illnesses Due to Indoor Chronic Toxigenic Mold Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to toxigenic molds in water-damaged buildings is an indoor environmental health problem to which escalating health and property insurance costs are raising a statewide concern in recent times. This paper reviews the structural and functional properties of mycotoxins produced by toxigenic molds and their interactive health implications with antifungal drugs. Fundamental bases of pathophysiological, neurodevelopmental, and cellular mechanisms of mycotoxic effects are evaluated. It is most likely that the interactions of mycotoxins with antifungal drugs may, at least in part, contribute to the observable persistent illnesses, antifungal drug resistance, and allergic reactions in patients exposed to chronic toxigenic molds. Safe dose level of mycotoxin in humans is not clear. Hence, the safety regulations in place at the moment remain inconclusive, precautionary, and arbitrary. Since some of the antifungal drugs are derived from molds, and since they have structural and functional groups similar to those of mycotoxins, the knowledge of their interactions are important in enhancing preventive measures.

  2. Mineral Requirements in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Decreased oral intake or impaired function / structure in the gut, such as hypertension port associated with atrophic changes in the protein nutrition - calories can lead to micronutrient deficiencies.This paper examines the status of micronutrients in chronic liver disease in children.   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"” minerals””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 3 related articles have been found.   Results: In chronic liver disease changes in micronutrient metabolism lead to changes in the daily requirements, such that in certain circumstances intake increasing or decreasing  is needed. Low serum calcium and phosphate concentrations are often the reflection of malabsorption-induced bone disease that is unresponsive to vitamin D store normalization. Iron is usually deficient in children with CLD and supplementation frequently needed. The origin of iron deficiency is multifactorial and includes ongoing losses, inadequate intakes, serial blood draws and malabsorption secondary to hypertensive enteropathy. Zinc plays an important role in cognitive function, appetite and taste, immune function, wound healing, and protein metabolism. Low plasma zinc levels are frequent in children with chronic cholestasis, but unfortunately plasma concentrations are not reflective of total body zinc status. Copper and manganese, unlike other minerals, are increased in CLD, because they are normally excreted through bile. Parenteral nutrition in cholestatic patients can induce manganese intoxication and accumulation in basal ganglia.   Conclusion:  In fants with CLD are prone to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Mineral state should be evaluated, treated and reevaluated, until sufficient daily requirement achieved. Poster  Presentation, N 33  

  3. Modern Models of Psychosocial Adaptation to Chronic Illness and Disability as Viewed through the Prism of Lewin's Field Theory: A Comparative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livneh, Hanoch; Bishop, Malachy; Anctil, Tina M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we describe how four recent models of psychosocial adaptation to chronic illness and disability (CID) could be fruitfully conceptualized and compared by resorting to the general framework of Lewin's field theory--a theory frequently regarded as a precursor and the primary impetus to the development of the field of…

  4. Perceived quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: a cross-sectional study in primary care on the role of illness perceptions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weldam, S.W.M.; Lammers, J.W.J.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Schuurmans, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous research has shown that in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients, it is important to consider not only physical functioning and complaints but also psychological factors, such as illness perceptions, to explain differences in Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL

  5. Perceived quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients : A cross-sectional study in primary care on the role of illness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weldam, Saskia Wm; Lammers, Jan Willem J; Heijmans, Monique J W M; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous research has shown that in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients, it is important to consider not only physical functioning and complaints but also psychological factors, such as illness perceptions, to explain differences in Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL

  6. Preferences and experiences of chronically ill and disabled patients regarding shared decision-making: does the type of care to be decided upon matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Rijken, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (1) To describe the importance chronically ill and disabled patients attach to involvement in decision-making when various care types are considered, and (2) to analyse the degree to which these patients are involved in shared decision-making (SDM) regarding these care types, and whether

  7. Web-based, self-management enhancing interventions with e-diaries and personalized feedback for persons with chronic illness: a tale of three studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, A.A.G.; Eide, H.; Kristjánsdóttir, O.B.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Chronic illness places high demands on patients. Interventions supporting self-management and providing personalized feedback might help patients to gain new perspectives and enhance use of constructive self-management strategies. We developed three comparable web-based CBT-grounded inter

  8. Web-based, self-management enhancing interventions with e-diaries and personalized feedback for persons with chronic illness: A tale of three studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nes, A.A.; Eide, H.; Kristjansdottir, O.B.; Dulmen, S. van

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic illness places high demands on patients. Interventions supporting self-management and providing personalized feedback might help patients to gain new perspectives and enhance use of constructive self-management strategies. We developed three comparable web-based CBT-grounded inter

  9. Individualized Health Care Plans: Supporting Children With Chronic Conditions in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Amanda F.; Hughes, Mary-alayne

    2016-01-01

    Due to the major advances in technology and the sciences, advances in the medical treatment options for children with chronic conditions are being made at an astonishing rate. In the health care field, "children with chronic conditions" is a generic phrase that typically refers to children with physical, developmental, behavioral, or…

  10. Children's experiences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME): a systematic review and meta-ethnography of qualitative studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslow, Roxanne M; Harris, Sarah; Broughton, Jessica; Alattas, Adla; Crawley, Esther; Haywood, Kirstie; Shaw, Alison

    2017-01-01

    Objective To synthesis the qualitative studies of children's experiences of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME). Design Systematic review and meta-ethnography. Background CFS/ME is an important disabling illness, with uncertain cause and prognosis. As a result, children with CFS/ME can find themselves living with greater uncertainty and stigma, exacerbating the impact of the condition. There is a growing body of qualitative research in CFS/ME, yet there has been no attempt to systematically synthesis the studies involving children. Methods Studies exploring the experiences of children diagnosed with CFS/ME, published or unpublished, using qualitative methods were eligible. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases were searched as well as grey literature, reference lists and contacting authors. Quality assessment was done independently using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklist. Studies were synthesised using techniques of meta-ethnography. Results Ten studies involving 82 children with CFS/ME aged 8–18 were included. Our synthesis describes four third-order constructs within children's experiences: (1) disruption and loss: physical, social and the self; (2) barriers to coping: suspension in uncertainty, problems with diagnosis and disbelief; (3) facilitators to coping: reducing uncertainty, credible illness narratives, diagnosis and supportive relationships and (4) hope, personal growth and recovery. CFS/ME introduces profound biographical disruption through its effects on children's ability to socialise, perform school and therefore how they see their future. Unfamiliarity of the condition, problems with diagnosis and felt stigma prevent children from forming a new illness identity. Children adopt coping strategies such as building credible explanations for their illness. Conclusions Physical, social, emotional and self-dimensions of life should be included when treating and measuring outcomes from healthcare in

  11. How to Do in Persistent Diarrhea of Children?: Concepts and Treatments of Chronic Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kun Song; Kang, Dong Soo; Yu, JeeSuk; Chang, Young Pyo; Park, Woo Sung

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is defined as passing watery stools that lasts for more than 2 weeks. Persistent diarrhea belongs to chronic diarrhea and is a chronic episode of diarrhea of infectious etiology. The etiology of chronic diarrhea is varied. It is important to consider the child's age and clinical manifestations with alarm signals for an application of proper treatments to children with chronic diarrhea. Vicious cycle is present in chronic diarrhea and nutritional rehabilitation can break the v...

  12. Assessment of Chronic Illness Care with the German version of the ACIC in different primary care settings in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoller Marco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland the extent to which patients with chronic illnesses receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model (CCM is unknown. Methods According to guidelines we translated the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC into German (G-ACIC. We tested the instrument in different primary care settings and compared subscales with the original testing. Results Difficulties encountered during the translation process consisted in the difference of health care settings in Switzerland and USA. However initial testing showed the G-ACIC to be a suitable instrument. The average ACIC subscale scores in Swiss managed care (MC-, group (GP- and single handed practices (SP were higher for MC practices than for group- and single handed practices: Organization of the healthcare delivery system: MC mean (m = 6.80 (SD 1.55, GP m = 5.42 (SD 0.99, SP m = 4.60 (SD 2.07; community linkages: MC m = 4.19 (SD 1.47, GP m = 4.83 (SD 1.81, SP m = 3.10 (SD 2.12; self-management support: MC m = 4.96 (SD 1.13, GP m = 4.73 (SD 1.40, SP m = 4.43 (SD 1.34; decision support: MC m = 4.75 (SD 1.06; GP m = 4.20 (SD 0.87, SP m = 3.25 (SD 1.59; delivery system design: MC m = 5.98 (SD 1.61, GP m = 5.05 (SD 2.05, SP m = 3.86 (SD 1.51 and clinical information systems: MC m = 4.34 (SD = 2.49, GP m = 2.06 (SD 1.35, SP m = 3.20 (SD 1.57. Conclusions The G-ACIC is applicable and useful for comparing different health care settings in German speaking countries. Managed care organizations seem to implement the different components of the CCM in a greater extend than group and single handed practices. However, much room exists for further improvement.

  13. Building equity in chronic disease management in Thailand: a whole-system provincial trial of systematic, pro-active chronic illness care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanitkun, N; Batterham, R; Vichathai, C; Leetongin, G; Osborne, R H

    2011-03-01

    Thailand has a history of implementing innovative and proactive policies to address the health needs of its population. Since 1962 Thailand has implemented initiatives that led to it having a health system characterized by a primary care focus, decentralization and mechanisms to maximize equity and universal access to basic care at the local level. Thai health structures initially evolved to meet challenges including infectious and developmental diseases and later HIV. Early in the 21st century chronic illness rapidly became the greatest cause of morbidity and mortality and the question has arisen how Thailand can adapt its strong health system to deal with the new epidemics. This article describes an effort to reorient provincial health services to meet the needs of the increasing number of people with diabetes and heart disease. It describes measures taken to build on the equity-promoting elements of the Thai health system. The project included; a situational analysis, development and implementation of a chronic disease self-management intervention implemented by nurses and alignment of provincial health services. The self-management intervention is currently being evaluated within a clustered randomized control trial. The evaluation has been developed to fit with the focus on equity in relation to both selection criteria and the outcomes that are being assessed.

  14. Smell and taste function in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Jessica E; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Kainer, Gad

    2010-08-01

    Loss of appetite and poor growth are common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and changes in smell and/or taste function may be responsible, but the hypothesis has not been proven. This aims of this prospective age- and gender-controlled study were to determine whether: (1) changes in smell and taste function occur in children with CKD; (2) smell or taste dysfunction are associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); (3) there is an association between smell or taste loss and body mass index (BMI). The study cohort consisted of 72 children of whom 20 were CKD stage 3-5 patients, 12 were CKD stage 2 patients, 20 were clinical controls (CC) and 20 were healthy children (HC). The CKD patients and clinical controls were recruited from Sydney Children's Hospital and The Children's Hospital, Westmead, and healthy controls were recruited from a local school. Scores for each group from taste and smell chemosensory function tests were compared, and their relationship with renal function and BMI investigated. The CKD stage 3-5 group had a significantly lower taste identification score (85.6%, P children in the CKD stage 3-5 group exhibiting taste loss. Decreased taste function was associated with decreased eGFR (r = 0.43, P 0.9). Odour identification scores were not different; however, there was a positive relationship with BMI (r = 0.427, P = 0.006). We conclude that a loss of taste can occur in children with CKD and that when it occurs, it worsens as eGFR declines and is found early in kidney disease.

  15. Familia y enfermedad crónica pediátrica Family and chronic paediatric illness

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    C. Grau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad pediátrica es siempre un problema familiar. La hospitalización, los tratamientos y las secuelas constituyen un desafío para la familia. En este trabajo describimos las alteraciones estructurales, procesuales y emocionales que se producen en la dinámica familiar. Consideramos que la intervención del niño enfermo debe hacerse siempre en el contexto familiar y proponemos un modelo de intervención multidimensional centrado en la singularidad de las familias y en sus necesidades, en los apoyos disponibles en su entorno natural, en el desarrollo de las competencias y de la resiliencia y en la organización de servicios centrados en el usuario y coordinados con todos los servicios que ofrece la comunidad.Pediatric illnesses are always a family problem. Hospitalization, treatments and their long term consequences constitute a challenge for the family. In this paper, we describe the structural, procedural and emotional alterations that affect the family dynamic. We argue that the child should be treated within the family context and propose a multi-dimensional intervention model centered on the family’s singularities and specific needs, the support available in their environment, the development of capacities and resilience, and also the organization of user-centered services that are coordinated with all the services provided by the community.

  16. Vaccine administration in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Susanna; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Prada, Elisabetta; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-20

    Pediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) on conservative treatment, on dialysis, and those with renal transplantation are at a higher risk for infectious diseases as the result of impaired immune responses against infectious agents. Infections in these patients can have drastic consequences for disease morbidity and mortality. Immunization is a crucial preventive strategy for disease management in this pediatric population. However, vaccination coverage among children with CKD remains low due to safety concerns and doubts about vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. In this study, we reviewed why children with CKD are at higher risk of infections, the importance of vaccinations among these children, barriers to vaccinations, and recommend the best vaccination schedules. Overall, vaccines have acceptable immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety profiles in children with CKD. However, in some cases, the protective antibody levels induced by vaccines and the benefits and risks of booster vaccine doses must be individually managed. Furthermore, close contacts and household members of these children should complete age-appropriate vaccination schedules to increase the child's indirect protection.

  17. [The diagnostic of chronic infection Helicobacter pylori in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereschenko, S Yu; Olkhovskiy, I A

    2014-02-01

    The epidemiological studies testify an extremely high prevalence of chronic infection of children with Helicobacter pylori in Russia. The affection consists from 50% to 80% depending on region and age of examined children. The currently in force recommendations "Maastricht IV" concerning diagnostic and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection adult patients are applied not in its fullness to children adolescent population. At the same time recently published joint conciliatory document of the European and North American associations of pediatric gastroenterologists is oriented to populations with low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and particular profile of drug resistance. Hence, an urgent need exists to develop modern local algorithm concerning diagnostic, treatment and control of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection among children and adolescents in Russia. The review presents analysis of admissibility of application in Russia's conditions of the international conciliatory documents concerning diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The data from conciliatory document of the European (ESPGHAN) and North American (NASPGHAN) associations of pediatric gastroenterologists, particular orginal research studies and one's own clinical experience were used. The advantages and shortcomings of actual methods of laboratory diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection are discussed. The approaches to application of particular diagnostic methods are considered. The enhanced indications to detection of infection and implementation of eradication therapy are proposed.

  18. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care: integrating disease management competencies into primary care to improve composite diabetes quality measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Joe; DaSilva, Karen; Marshall, Richard

    2008-02-01

    The increasing prevalence of chronic illnesses in the United States requires a fundamental redesign of the primary care delivery system's structure and processes in order to meet the changing needs and expectations of patients. Population management, systems-based practice, and planned chronic illness care are 3 potential processes that can be integrated into primary care and are compatible with the Chronic Care Model. In 2003, Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates, a multispecialty ambulatory physician group practice based in Boston, Massachusetts, began implementing all 3 processes across its primary care practices. From 2004 to 2006, the overall diabetes composite quality measures improved from 51% to 58% for screening (HgA1c x 2, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure in 12 months) and from 13% to 17% for intermediate outcomes (HgA1c system integrated these disease management functions into the front lines of primary care and the positive impact of those changes on overall diabetes quality of care.

  19. Measurement of the glucocorticoid receptor: relevance to the diagnosis of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rahul; Muraskas, Jonathan; Janusek, Linda Witek; Mathews, Herbert

    2014-08-01

    Diagnosis and management of critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency (CIRCI) in children continues to remain difficult and controversial in that no consensus for either exists among pediatric critical care physicians. Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency is defined as a corticosteroid response that is inadequate for the severity of the illness experienced by the patient. Critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency manifests as an insufficient corticosteroid mediated down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines, due to either corticosteroid tissue resistance and/or inadequate circulating levels of cortisol. The tissue resistance is likely due to alterations in the functionality of the intracellular receptor for corticosteroids, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). This article details the role of the GR during critical illness with a focus upon the measurement of the GR, as a potentially important means by which to clinically assess the level of corticosteroid tissue-resistant in patients suspected of CIRCI. Measurement of the GR may be particularly useful as a means by which to determine the judicious administration of steroids, maximizing their therapeutic potential, whereas minimizing the morbidity that can be associated with their use.

  20. Health behaviour changes after diagnosis of chronic illness among Canadians aged 50 or older.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, Jason T; Huguet, Nathalie; Ramage-Morin, Pamela L; McCarthy, Michael J; Bernier, Julie; Kaplan, Mark S; McFarland, Bentson H

    2012-12-01

    Changes in health behaviours (smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and fruit and vegetable consumption) after diagnosis of chronic health conditions (heart disease, cancer, stroke, respiratory disease, and diabetes) were examined among Canadians aged 50 or older. Results from 12 years of longitudinal data from the Canadian National Population Health Survey indicated relatively modest changes in behaviour. Although significant decreases in smoking were observed among all groups except those with respiratory disease, at least 75% of smokers did not quit. No significant changes emerged in the percentage meeting physical activity recommendations, except those with diabetes, or in excessive alcohol consumption, except those with diabetes and respiratory disease. The percentage reporting the recommended minimum fruit and vegetable intake did not increase significantly among any group.

  1. Social living mitigates the costs of a chronic illness in a cooperative carnivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almberg, Emily S.; Cross, Paul C.; Dobson, Andrew P.; Smith, Douglas W.; Metz, Matthew C; Stahler, Daniel R.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Infection risk is assumed to increase with social group size, and thus be a cost of group living. We assess infection risk and costs with respect to group size using data from an epidemic of sarcoptic mange (Sarcoptes scabiei) among grey wolves (Canis lupus). We demonstrate that group size does not predict infection risk and that individual costs of infection, in terms of reduced survival, can be entirely offset by having sufficient numbers of pack-mates. Infected individuals experience increased mortality hazards with increasing proportions of infected pack-mates, but healthy individuals remain unaffected. The social support of group hunting and territory defence are two possible mechanisms mediating infection costs. This is likely a common phenomenon among other social species and chronic infections, but difficult to detect in systems where infection status cannot be measured continuously over time.

  2. Modelling management of chronic illness in everyday life: A common-sense approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Leventhal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Commonsense Model of Self-Regulation (CSM has a history of over 50 years as a theoretical framework that explicates the processes by which individuals form cognitive, affective, and behavioral representations of health threats. This article summarizes the major components of individuals' "commonsense models", the underlying assumptions of the CSM as a theory of dynamic behavior change, and the major empirical evidence that have developed these aspects of the CSM since its inception. We also discuss ongoing changes to the theory itself as well as its use in medical practice for optimizing patients' self-management of chronic health threats. The final section focuses on future directions for the theory and its application.

  3. Epidemiology of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children and Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaddourah, Ahmad; Basu, Rajit K; Bagshaw, Sean M; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2017-01-05

    mortality, among critically ill children and young adults. (Funded by the Pediatric Nephrology Center of Excellence at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and others; AWARE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01987921 .).

  4. Modern going near setting of medical physical culture taking into account etiology, type, form, degree and clinical displays of scoliotic illness for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Peshkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Authors in the article are consider the basic going near setting of medical physical culture at scoliostic illness of І–ІІ degree for children taking into account a type, form, etiology, degree and clinical displays. Purpose: to describe the modern going near setting of medical physical culture taking into account etiology, type, form, degree and clinical displays of scoliostic illness for children. Material and Methods: analysis of the modern special literature on issue of physical rehabilitation of children at scoliostic illness; analysis of medical cards. Results: description of scoliosis is given on an etiologic sign, form, type, degrees and clinical displays. The features of methods of medical physical culture are presented taking into account the afore-named signs of scoliotic illness. Conclusions: setting of facilities and forms of medical physical culture at scoliotic illness depends on etiology, form and type of scoliosis, degree and clinical displays of disease

  5. Relationship Between Beta Cell Dysfunction and Severity of Disease Among Critically Ill Children: A STROBE-Compliant Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping-Ping; Lu, Xiu-Lan; Xiao, Zheng-Hui; Qiu, Jun; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2016-05-01

    Although beta cell dysfunction has been proved to predict prognosis among humans and animals, its prediction on severity of disease remains unclear among children. The present study was aimed to examine the relationship between beta cell dysfunction and severity of disease among critically ill children.This prospective study included 1146 critically ill children, who were admitted to Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of Hunan Children's Hospital from November 2011 to August 2013. Information on characteristics, laboratory tests, and prognostic outcomes was collected. Homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, evaluating beta cell function, was used to divide all participants into 4 groups: HOMA-β = 100% (group I, n = 339), 80% ≤ HOMA-β Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) III score, incidence of organ damage, septic shock, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), mechanical ventilation (MV) and mortality. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the risk of developing poor outcomes among patients in different HOMA-β groups, with group I as the reference group.Among 1146 children, incidence of HOMA-β insulin declined with the decrement of HOMA-β (P interval) for developing septic shock was 2.17 (0.59, 8.02), 2.94 (2.18, 6.46), and 2.76 (1.18, 6.46) among patients in group II, III, and IV, respectively.Beta cell dysfunction reflected the severity of disease among critically ill children. Therefore, assessment of beta cell function is critically important to reduce incidence of adverse events in PICU.

  6. Hospital malnutrition and inflammatory response in critically ill children and adolescents admitted to a tertiary intensive care unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Critical illness has a major impact on the nutritional status of both children and adults. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the incidence of hospital malnutrition at a pediatric tertiary intensive care unit (PICU). Serum concentrations of IL-6 in subgroups of well-nourished and malnourished patients were also evaluated in an attempt to identify those with a potential nutritional risk. METHODS: A total of 1077 patients were enrolled. Nutritional status was evaluated by Z-score (...

  7. [Systemic immunological response in children with chronic gingivitis and gastro-intestinal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, E G

    2014-01-01

    Study of the immune system mechanisms in chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastrointestinal pathology was performed in 102 children (49 with chronic gastritis and duodenitis and 53 with no signs of gastrointestinal pathology). Forty-eight children with healthy periodontium constituted control group. Generalized chronic catarrhal gingivitis in children with gastroduodenal pathology is characterized by intense humoral response by simultaneous T-cell immunity suppression. Detection of high serum titers of circulating immune complexes in patients with chronic catarrhal gingivitis suggests a role of immune response in the pathogenesis of periodontal disease increases with concomitant diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Treatment Preferences for CAM in Children with Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie C. I. Tsao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls (mean age = 14.5 years ± 2.4; range = 8–18 years presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80% were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy, pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  9. Treatment Preferences for CAM in children with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Jennie C I; Meldrum, Marcia; Kim, Su C; Jacob, Margaret C; Zeltzer, Lonnie K

    2007-09-01

    CAM therapies have become increasingly popular in pediatric populations. Yet, little is known about children's preferences for CAM. This study examined treatment preferences in chronic pediatric pain patients offered a choice of CAM therapies for their pain. Participants were 129 children (94 girls) (mean age = 14.5 years +/- 2.4; range = 8-18 years) presenting at a multidisciplinary, tertiary clinic specializing in pediatric chronic pain. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the relationships between CAM treatment preferences and patient's sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, as well as their self-reported level of functioning. Over 60% of patients elected to try at least one CAM approach for pain. The most popular CAM therapies were biofeedback, yoga and hypnosis; the least popular were art therapy and energy healing, with craniosacral, acupuncture and massage being intermediate. Patients with a diagnosis of fibromyalgia (80%) were the most likely to try CAM versus those with other pain diagnoses. In multivariate analyses, pain duration emerged as a significant predictor of CAM preferences. For mind-based approaches (i.e. hypnosis, biofeedback and art therapy), pain duration and limitations in family activities were both significant predictors. When given a choice of CAM therapies, this sample of children with chronic pain, irrespective of pain diagnosis, preferred non-invasive approaches that enhanced relaxation and increased somatic control. Longer duration of pain and greater impairment in functioning, particularly during family activities increased the likelihood that such patients agreed to engage in CAM treatments, especially those that were categorized as mind-based modalities.

  10. Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China

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    Liu Wen-Kuan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human bocavirus (HBoV is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI and gastrointestinal illness. Our study is the first to analyze the characteristics of HBoV-positive samples from ARTI patients with a wide age distribution from Guangzhou, southern China. Methods Throat swabs (n=2811 were collected and analyzed from children and adults with ARTI over a 13-month period. The HBoV complete genome from a 60 year-old female patient isolate was also determined. Results HBoV DNA was detected in 65/2811 (2.3% samples, of which 61/1797 were from children (Mycoplasma pneumoniae had the highest frequency of 16.9% (11/65. Upper and lower respiratory tract illness were common symptoms, with 19/65 (29.2% patients diagnosed with pneumonia by chest radiography. All four adult patients had systemic influenza-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome revealed a close relationship with other HBoVs, and a more distant relationship with HBoV2 and HBoV3. Conclusions HBoV was detected from children and adults with ARTI from Guangzhou, southern China. Elderly people were also susceptive to HBoV. A single lineage of HBoV was detected among a wide age distribution of patients with ARTI.

  11. X-ray changes of children with chronic renal insufficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponhold, W.; Balzar, E. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kinderklinik)

    1983-01-01

    The typical changes of renal osteopathy are shown in the X-rays of 7 children with end-stage renal disease treated with chronic intermittent hemodialysis. The exact evaluation of the granular structural changes of the cranium, the evidence of osteomalacia because of the hazy appearance of the vertebrae and the broadening of the sacroilical joints depend highly on subjective judgement and the technical X-ray procedures used. Unmistakable radiological diagnoses can be made when a broadening of the metalphyseal zones, epiphysioloysis as well as characteristic changes in the finder phalanges (acroosteolyses, spiculae, tunnelation) are present.

  12. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  13. Prevalence of chronic rhinosinusitis in children with dyspepsia–A cross sectional study

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    Mwangi Beatrice

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Chronic rhinosinusitis was diagnosed in more than 40% of children with dyspepsia. The odds of CRS being present in children diagnosed to have GERD increases significantly as demonstrated in this study.

  14. Effects of sulfasalazine treatment on serum immunoglobulin levels in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, MAJ; Fiselier, TJW; Franssen, MJAN; ten Cate, R; van Suijlekom-Smit, LWA; Wulffraat, NM; van Luijk, WHJ; Oostveen, JCM; Kuis, W; Dijkmans, BAC; van Soesbergen, RM

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the effects of sulfasalazine (SSZ) treatment on serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels in 6 children with oligoarticular- or polyarticular onset juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). None of the children who developed dysimmunoglobulinemia during treatment showed clinical symptoms of th

  15. Specific features of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy in children

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    A. L. Kurenkov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP is an autoimmune peripheral neuropathy that affects both adults and children. The basis for the paper is the analysis of 5 cases of CIDP in children (3 girls and 2 boys aged 5 to 17 years, followed up for 3 to 6 years. The types of its clinical picture and electromyographic changes at different disease stages are considered in detail. The course of the disease is traced during therapy with corticosteroids and intravenous human immunoglobulin and plasmapheresis. The results of the authors’ observations are compared with those of investigations conducted by other authors. The consideration of the diagnosis of CIDP and its treatment options focuses on that the international standards must be necessarily met to minimize errors in its differential diagnosis and management of these patients, and to make the prognosis for the disease.

  16. Hypophosphatemia in critically ill children Hipofosfatemia em crianças gravemente doentes

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    Fernanda Souza de Menezes

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review clinical studies on hypophosphatemia in pediatric intensive care unit patients with a view to verifying prevalence and risk factors associated with this disorder. We searched the computerized bibliographic databases Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and LILACS to identify eligible studies. Search terms included critically ill, pediatric intensive care, trauma, sepsis, infectious diseases, malnutrition, inflammatory response, surgery, starvation, respiratory failure, diuretic, steroid, antiacid therapy, mechanical ventilation. The search period covered those clinical trials published from January 1990 to January 2004. Studies concerning endocrinological disorders, genetic syndromes, rickets, renal diseases, anorexia nervosa, alcohol abuse, and prematurity were not included in this review. Out of 27 studies retrieved, only 8 involved pediatric patients, and most of these were case reports. One clinical trial and one retrospective study were identified. The prevalence of hypophosphatemia exceeded 50%. The commonly associated factors in most patients with hypophosphatemia were refeeding syndrome, malnutrition, sepsis, trauma, and diuretic and steroid therapy. Given the high prevalence, clinical manifestations, and multiple risk factors, the early identification of this disorder in critically ill children is crucial for adequate replacement therapy and also to avoid complications.Este estudo objetivou realizar revisão da literatura para verificar prevalência, fatores de risco e condições clínicas associadas à hipofosfatemia em crianças gravemente doentes. Para a pesquisa foram utilizadas as bases de dados Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Lilacs abrangendo estudos clínicos publicados de janeiro de 1990 a janeiro de 2004. Os termos utilizados para pesquisa foram: critically ill, pediatric intensive care, trauma, sepsis, infectious diseases, malnutrition, inflammatory response, surgery, starvation

  17. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

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    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  18. A Review of School Reintegration Programs for Children with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevatt, Frances F.; Heffer, Robert W.; Lowe, Patricia A.

    2000-01-01

    Descriptive articles on school reintegration programs for children with cancer are reviewed to synthesize the information of best practices for program development. Suggestions are given for school psychologists working with chronically ill children. (Author/JDM)

  19. Clinical manifestations of Helicobacter-associated chronic gastroduodenitis in children with giardiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolnyk, S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the nature of the clinical course of chronic gastroduodenitis (CGD) in children with giardiasis invasion. Patients and methods. A complex clinical, instrumental and laboratory examination of children in the age 7–18 years with Helicobacter-associated chronic gastroduodenitis is conducted. The first group consisted of 62 children with CGD without giardiasis invasion, the second group consisted of 43 children with CGD and giardiasis. Results. In the presence of giardiasis...

  20. Chronic cervical lymphadenopathy in children: Role of ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To assess the usefulness of ultrasonography in the differentiation of causes of chronic cervical lymphadenopathy in children. Materials and Methods: Children with palpable cervical lymph nodes were included. An ultrasonographic examination was performed to delineate multiple lymph nodes, irregular margins, tendency towards fusion, internal echos, the presence of strong echoes and echogenic thin layer. Results: The total number of patients was 120. Echogenic thin layer and strong internal echoes were specific for tuberculosis. Long axis to short axis (L/S ratio was more than 2 in most of the tubercular nodes (85.71%. Hilus was present in 50 (73.53% tubercular lymphadenitis, 12 (40% lymphoma and 10 (62.5% cases with metastatic lymph nodes. Hypoechoic center was present in 60 (88.24% tubercular lymphadenitis cases followed by 62.5% metastatic and 60% malignant lymphoma cases. Conclusions: Ultrasonography is a non-invasive tool for lymph nodal evaluation in children. It may be used to differentiate cervical lymphadenopathy with different etiologies in children. When correlated clinically, it may avoid biopsy in a patient.

  1. Chronic cervical lymphadenopathy in children: Role of ultrasonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anand; Kureel, Shiv N.; Pandey, Jigyasa; Wakhlu, Ashish; Rawat, Jiledar; Singh, Tej Bali

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To assess the usefulness of ultrasonography in the differentiation of causes of chronic cervical lymphadenopathy in children. Materials and Methods: Children with palpable cervical lymph nodes were included. An ultrasonographic examination was performed to delineate multiple lymph nodes, irregular margins, tendency towards fusion, internal echos, the presence of strong echoes and echogenic thin layer. Results: The total number of patients was 120. Echogenic thin layer and strong internal echoes were specific for tuberculosis. Long axis to short axis (L/S) ratio was more than 2 in most of the tubercular nodes (85.71%). Hilus was present in 50 (73.53%) tubercular lymphadenitis, 12 (40%) lymphoma and 10 (62.5%) cases with metastatic lymph nodes. Hypoechoic center was present in 60 (88.24%) tubercular lymphadenitis cases followed by 62.5% metastatic and 60% malignant lymphoma cases. Conclusions: Ultrasonography is a non-invasive tool for lymph nodal evaluation in children. It may be used to differentiate cervical lymphadenopathy with different etiologies in children. When correlated clinically, it may avoid biopsy in a patient. PMID:22529549

  2. Hepcidin levels in children with chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cakir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: We aimed to analyze serum hepcidin level in children with chronic liver disease (CLD and its relationship with serum cytokines level, liver function tests, hepatic iron content, and liver fibrosis. Patients and Methods: The study included 34 children with CLD, and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy children. Serum hepcidin, ferritin, iron level, interleukin-6 (IL-6, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β , total oxidant status (TOS, and antioxidant status (TAS were studied in all patients and in the control group. Liver iron content (LIC was measured from the liver biopsy specimen. Results: Serum ferritin levels were higher in patients with CLD than control group (100.1 ± 98.2 ng/mL vs 50.5 ± 32.2 ng/mL, P = 0.016. No significant difference was found in hepcidin levels. Hepcidin levels in children with CLD was positively correlated with ferritin (r = 0.75, P = 0.001, pediatric end-stage liver disease (PELD score (r = 0.56, P = 0.001, TAS (r = 0.42,P = 0.02, but negatively correlated with albumin level (r = −0.45,P = 0.008. Transferrin saturation and hepcidin:ferritin ratio were significantly low in patients with severe fibrosis compared with patients with mild/without fibrosis (15.5 ± 5.5 vs 34.3 ± 30.1, P = 0.017 and 1 ± 0.5 vs 1.9 ± 1.4,P = 0.04, respectively. Conclusion: Serum hepcidin levels in children with CLD reflect both liver functions and TAS, and severe fibrosis is associated with low hepcidin:ferritin ratio in children with CLD.

  3. Growth assessment in Egyptian infants and children with chronic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ei-Deeb, Marwa T; Hamid, Dalia H Abdel

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the various growth parameters among patients presenting with chronic diarrhea and highlight the most common causes of chronic diarrhea among a sample of Egyptian infants and children. This cross-sectional study included 146 patients with chronic diarrhea. They were 87 males and 59 females, with age ranging between 2 and 198 months and a mean age of 27.3 +/- 34.5 months. Each patient was subjected to medical history taking including age of onset and duration of diarrhea, consistency of stools, presence of blood and mucus, vomiting with or without hematemesis, fever, allergic manifestations and family history of atopy. Dietetic history included milk feeding during the first 6 months and age of weaning and age of introduction of cow's milk products. Anthropometric measurements included weight and height and weight for height were assessed and z-scores were calculated using software WHO anthro v3.2.2. Laboratory investigations included stool analysis and culture, CBC and all other investigations necessary for diagnosis of the definite cause including RAST for specific IgE against cow's milk proteins, serology for celiac disease (anti-gliadin and anti tTG), Breath hydrogen test, endoscopy (colonoscopy or esophago-gastrodudenoscopy) and histopathologic assessment of endoscopic biopsies. CMA was diagnosed on basis of withdrawal and open re-challenge technique. Causes included chronic infections (40.4%), CMA (34.9%), celiac disease (10.3%), inflammatory bowel disease (6.8%) and lactose intolerance (3.4%). Rare causes were chronic non-specific diarrhea (1.3%), cystic fibrosis (0.7%), post-surgery short bowel syndrome (0.7%), neuroblastoma (0.7%) and IBS (0.7%).78.7% of patients enrolled in the study had a low WFA z-score (Infants with CMA had the lowest mean value of WFH z-score (-2.26 +/- 1.78).

  4. The measurement of fatigue in chronic illness: a systematic review of unidimensional and multidimensional fatigue measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Fatigue is a common symptom associated with a wide range of chronic diseases. A large number of instruments have been developed to measure fatigue. An assessment regarding the reliability, validity, and utility of fatigue measures is time-consuming for the clinician and researcher, and few reviews exist on which to draw such information. The aim of this article is to present a critical review of fatigue measures, the populations in which the scales have been used, and the extent to which the psychometric properties of each instrument have been evaluated to provide clinicians and researchers with information on which to base decisions. Seven databases were searched for all articles that measured fatigue and offered an insight into the psychometric properties of the scales used over the period 1980-2007. Criteria for judging the "ideal" measure were developed to encompass scale usability, clinical/research utility, and the robustness of psychometric properties. Twenty-two fatigue measures met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. A further 17 measures met some of the criteria, but have not been tested beyond initial development, and are reviewed briefly at the end of the article. The review did not identify any instrument that met all the criteria of an ideal instrument. However, a small number of short instruments demonstrated good psychometric properties (Fatigue Severity Scale [FSS], Fatigue Impact Scale [FIS], and Brief Fatigue Inventory [BFI]), and three comprehensive instruments demonstrated the same (Fatigue Symptom Inventory [FSI], Multidimensional Assessment of Fatigue [MAF], and Multidimensional Fatigue Symptom Inventory [MFSI]). Only four measures (BFI, FSS, FSI, and MAF) demonstrated the ability to detect change over time. The clinician and researcher also should consider the populations in which the scale has been used previously to assess its validity with their own patient group, and assess the content of a scale to ensure that the key qualitative

  5. Human Development in the Context of Aging and Chronic Illness: The Role of Attachment in Alzheimer's Disease and Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Lore K.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines two illness trajectories, Alzheimer's disease and stroke, to illustrate emerging changes in human development over each course of illness and the increasing importance of attachment behavior among ill elders and their family members. Argues that attachment links ailing older people to their environment, and that attachment is vital if…

  6. Fabricated or Induced Illness in Children: A Narrative Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazenbatt, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Although child maltreatment due to abuse or neglect is pervasive within our society, less is known about fabricated or induced illness by carers (FII), which is considered to be a rare form of child abuse. FII occurs when a caregiver (in 93% of cases, the mother) misrepresents the child as ill either by fabricating, or much more rarely, producing…

  7. The accuracy of clinical symptoms and signs for the diagnosis of serious bacterial infection in young febrile children: prospective cohort study of 15 781 febrile illnesses

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, Jonathan C.; Williams, Gabrielle J; Jones, Mike; Codarini, Miriam; Macaskill, Petra; Hayen, Andrew; Irwig, Les; Fitzgerald, Dominic A; Isaacs, David; McCaskill, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate current processes by which young children presenting with a febrile illness but suspected of having serious bacterial infection are diagnosed and treated, and to develop and test a multivariable model to distinguish serious bacterial infections from self limiting non-bacterial illnesses. Design Two year prospective cohort study. Setting The emergency department of The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, Australia. Participants Children aged less than 5 years pres...

  8. Quality of life and affective well-being in middle-aged and older people with chronic medical illnesses: a cross-sectional population based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wikman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been considerable research into the impact of chronic illness on health-related quality of life. However, few studies have assessed the impact of different chronic conditions on general quality of life (QOL. The objective of this paper was to compare general (rather than health-related QOL and affective well-being in middle aged and older people across eight chronic illnesses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This population-based, cross-sectional study involved 11,523 individuals aged 50 years and older, taking part in wave 1 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. General QOL was assessed using the CASP-19, happiness was evaluated using two items drawn from the GHQ-12, and depression was measured with the CES-D. Analysis of covariance and logistic regression, adjusting for age, gender and wealth, were performed. General QOL was most impaired in people with stroke (mean 37.56, CI 36.73-38.39, and least in those reporting cancer (mean 41.78, CI 41.12-42.44, respectively, compared with no illness (mean 44.15, CI 43.92-44.39. Stroke (mean 3.65, CI 3.58-3.73 was also associated with the greatest reduction in positive well-being whereas diabetes (mean 3.81, CI 3.76-3.86 and cancer were least affected (3.85, CI 3.79-3.91, compared with no illness (mean 3.97, CI 3.95-4.00. Depression was significantly elevated in all conditions, but was most common in chronic lung disease (OR 3.04, CI 2.56-3.61, with more modest elevations in those with osteoarthritis (OR 2.08, CI 1.84-2.34 or cancer (OR 2.07, CI 1.69-2.54. Multiple co-morbidities were associated with greater decrements in QOL and affective well-being. CONCLUSION: The presence of chronic illness is associated with impairments in broader aspects of QOL and affective well-being, but different conditions vary in their impact. Further longitudinal work is needed to establish the temporal links between chronic illness and impairments in QOL and affective well-being.

  9. Use of Methadone for Prevention of Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Sonia A; McGloin, Rumi; Pitfield, Alexander F; Carr, Roxane R

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are commonly administered to critically ill children for analgesia and sedation, but many patients experience opioid withdrawal upon discontinuation. The authors’ institution developed a protocol for using methadone to prevent opioid withdrawal in children who have received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives The primary objectives were to determine if opioids were tapered according to the protocol and to determine the conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone that was used. Secondary objectives were to describe the methadone dosage used and the clinical outcomes, to evaluate adjustments to methadone dosing, and to report the incidence of adverse effects. Methods A retrospective analysis of charts was conducted for pediatric patients who had received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer followed by methadone in the PICU between May 2008 and August 2009. Validated scoring systems (the Withdrawal Assessment Tool and the State Behavioral Scale) were used to assess symptoms of withdrawal and degree of sedation, respectively. Results Forty-three patients were included in the study, with median age of 8 months (range 0.25–201 months). For 31 patients (72%), the protocol was not used, and there were no patients for whom the protocol was followed to completion. The median duration of weaning was 10 days (range 0–91 days). The conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone was 1:0.78 for anticipated 5-day weaning and 1:0.98 for anticipated 10-day weaning. During the first 10 days of weaning, 18 patients (42%) experienced withdrawal symptoms. The methadone dose was increased for 11 (26%) of the 43 patients. Patients were sedated for a median of 1 day (range 0–9 days), were comfortable for a median of 6.5 days (range 1–64 days), and were agitated for a median of 2.5 days (range 0–23 days). Naloxone was required for 2 patients. Conclusions

  10. [Empowerment and power: their relationship in the proces of caring for the chronically ill in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba Bellera, Lydia; Boixadera Vendrell, Mireia; Buendía Surroca, Carmen; Martorell Poveda, Maria Antònia; Piñeiro Méndez, Pilar; Zamora Sánchez, Juan José

    2014-06-01

    The concepts of "power" and "empowerment" are used in various disciplines, both political and social. Now are these terms frequently in the field of health. Our goal is to know its meaning as a synonym of expressions: "energy", "force", "domain", "vigour", "power", "capacity", "authority" and "control", which have been always within our practice nurse's own lexicon. Semantically analyzing them will help us in the understanding of its nuance. The literature review facilitates their understanding and allows us to link these words within the management of care. In this way we can propose diagnoses, interventions and outcomes specifically related to these concepts, which will help us optimize the efficiency in the management of care plans. The purpose of various collective nurses from different institutions is that the person is able to not generate dependencies and have the option of choosing your own lifestyle according to their culture and environment, independently or with the help. Generate knowledge is to generate power. The person should be educated and informed, to be expert and active and taking action to help control and minimize the progression of your health problem chronic and its possible complications. We are in the process of reformulation of the health system, whether it is private or public, and is necessary to know the power of the various actors involved in the management of the care to us. Each of these main actors--person ill, family/caregiver or nurse--has to know what is his role in this process.

  11. Technologically-assisted behaviour change: a systematic review of studies of novel technologies for the management of chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Benjamin A; Vowles, Kevin E; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher; Mountain, Gail A

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to investigate the use of technology in achieving behaviour change in chronic illness. The areas reviewed were: (1) methods employed to adapt traditional therapy from a face-to-face medium to a computer-assisted platform; (2) targets of behaviour change; and (3) level of human (e.g. therapist) involvement. The initial literature search produced 2032 articles. A total of 45 articles reporting 33 separate interventions met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were reviewed in detail. The majority of interventions reported a theoretical basis, with many arising from a cognitive-behavioural framework. There was a wide range of therapy content. Therapist involvement was reported in 73% of the interventions. A common problem was high participant attrition, which may have been related to reduced levels of human interaction. Instigating successful behaviour change through technological interventions poses many difficulties. However, there are potential benefits of delivering therapy in this way. For people with long-term health conditions, technological self-management systems could provide a practical method of understanding and monitoring their condition, as well as therapeutic guidance to alter maladaptive behaviour.

  12. Liver steatosis in children with chronic hepatitis B and C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorska-Śpiewak, Maria; Kowalik-Mikołajewska, Barbara; Aniszewska, Małgorzata; Pluta, Magdalena; Walewska-Zielecka, Bożena; Marczyńska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Only scarce data on liver steatosis in children with chronic hepatitis B and C (CHB and CHC) are available. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, predictors, and impact of hepatic steatosis on children with CHB and CHC. A total of 78 patients aged 11.5 ± 3.4 years were included: 30 (38%) had CHB, and 48 (62%) had CHC. Steatosis was scored on a 5-point scale, as follows: absent; minimal (≤5% hepatocytes affected), mild (6–33%), moderate (34–66%), and severe (>66%). Stepwise logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with steatosis and moderate-to-severe steatosis. Steatosis was observed in 4/30 (13%) patients with CHB and 13/48 (27%) patients with CHC (P = 0.17). Moderate-to-severe steatosis was observed in 6/78 (8%) patients: 1/30 (3%) had CHB and 5/48 (10%) had CHC (P = 0.40). The body mass index (BMI) z-score was positively associated with the presence of steatosis in children with CHB (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02–10.64). In CHC, steatosis occurred more frequently in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 3 compared with other genotypes (P = 0.002). In patients with non-3 genotype hepatitis C virus, steatosis was associated with the stage of fibrosis (OR = 3.35, 95% CI: 1.01–11.07) and inversely associated with the duration of infection (OR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55–0.97). Moderate-to-severe steatosis was positively associated with the BMI z-score (OR = 3.62, 95% CI: 1.22–10.75) and stage of fibrosis (OR = 3.89, 95% CI: 1.05–14.47). Steatosis is a common finding in children with chronic viral hepatitis. It is associated with metabolic factors in CHB, whereas in patients with CHC, metabolic and viral factors may have a combined effect, leading to more advanced grades of steatosis in children with higher BMI z-scores. Moderate-to-severe steatosis is a predictor of advanced fibrosis in children with CHC. PMID:28099338

  13. Improving Communication About Serious Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-07

    Critical Illness; Chronic Disease; Terminal Care; Palliative Care; Communication; Advance Care Planning; Neoplasm Metastasis; Lung Neoplasms; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Heart Failure; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic

  14. Continuity of care for children with complex chronic health conditions: parents' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaw Nicola

    2009-12-01

    , institutional structures and practices, provider attitudes, and, on occasion, parent preferences and judgments, were all found to create barriers to "seamless" management and provision of care continuity across providers, settings, and sectors. Conclusions These findings add new perspectives to the understanding of continuity within chronically ill children's health care. They are relevant to contemporary initiatives to improve continuity of services to children with special health care needs, demonstrate the need for parental support of their important role in maintaining continuity, and suggest avenues for further research.

  15. Nutritional assessment in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Mantan, Mukta; Sethi, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Growth failure is a major problem in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the onset of the condition in infancy is more likely to have an adverse impact on growth than its development in later childhood. This study was aimed to assess nutritional intake and anthropometry of children presenting with CKD in a developing country. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (1-18 years) with CKD visiting the outpatient services were enrolled. The age of onset, cause of CKD, and anthropometry were recorded. Dietary intakes from three 24 h dietary recall (2 mid-week and 1 weekend day) were recorded. A blood sample was taken from all subjects for biochemical parameters. A total of 45 children (forty males and five females) with CKD underwent nutritional assessment. The median age at assessment was 108 months (13-167). Twenty-seven (60%) subjects had CKD stage 1, 2, or 3 while the remaining 40% had CKD stage 4 or 5. Of the 45 children, 27 (60%) had moderate to severe malnutrition at assessment. The mean weight and height (standard deviation scores) were -2.77 ± 2.07 and -2.30 ± 1.38, respectively. The prevalence of growth retardation was much higher in late stages of CKD; the difference was statistically significant (P iron (mean 48.9% deficit); deficient in calcium (mean -22.2%) and had excess phosphates (mean 18.3%). There was a progressive decrease in intake of nutrients in advanced stages of CKD. There was a high prevalence of malnutrition (60%) in children with CKD, especially in higher stages of CKD. An appropriate dietary assessment and nutritional counseling should be planned for all patients with CKD to prevent complications associated with malnutrition and anemia.

  16. Relationship between energy expenditure, nutritional status and clinical severity before starting enteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrán, Marta; López-Herce, Jesús; Mencía, Santiago; Urbano, Javier; Solana, Maria José; García, Ana; Carrillo, Angel

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the relationship between energy expenditure (EE), biochemical and anthropometric nutritional status and severity scales in critically ill children. We performed a prospective observational study in forty-six critically ill children. The following variables were recorded before starting nutrition: age, sex, diagnosis, weight, height, risk of mortality according to the Paediatric Risk Score of Mortality (PRISM), the Revised Paediatric Index of Mortality (PIM2) and the Paediatric Logistic Organ Dysfunction (PELOD) scales, laboratory parameters (albumin, total proteins, prealbumin, transferrin, retinol-binding protein, cholesterol and TAG, and nitrogen balance) and EE measured by indirect calorimetry. The results showed that there was no relationship between EE and clinical severity evaluated using the PRISM, PIM2 and PELOD scales or with the anthropometric nutritional status or biochemical alterations. Finally, it was concluded that neither nutritional status nor clinical severity is related to EE. Therefore, EE must be measured individually in each critically ill child using indirect calorimetry.

  17. Lamivudine therapy for children with chronic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Liberek; Anna Szaflarska-Poplawska; Maria Korzon; Gra(z)yna (L)uczak; Magdalena Góra-G(e)bka; Ewa (L)o(s)-Rycharska; Wanda Bako; Mieczyslawa Czerwionka-Szaflarska

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness and side-effects of lamivudine therapy for children with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) who fail to respond to or have contraindications to intefferon-α (IFN-α) therapy.METHODS: Fifty-nine children with CHB were treated with 100 mg lamivudine tablets given orally once daily for 12 mo. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity was evaluated monthly during the therapy and every 3 months after its discontinuation. HBe antigen, antiHBe antibodies, HBV DNA level in serum were evaluated at baseline and every six months during and after the lamivudine therapy. Sustained viral response (SVR) to lamivudine therapy was defined as permanent (not shorter than 6 mo after the end of the therapy), namely ALT activity normalization, seroconversion of HBeAg to anti-HBe antibodies, and undetectable viral HBV-DNA in serum (lower than 200 copies per mL). The analysis of the side-effects of the lamivudine treatment was based upon interviews with the patients and their parents using a questionnaire concerning subjective and objective symptoms, clinical examinations, and laboratory tests performed during clinical visits monthly during the therapy, and every 3 mo after the therapy. RESULTS: ALT normalisation occurred in 47 (79.7%)patients between the first and 11th mo of treatment (mean 4.4±2.95 mo, median 4.0 mo), and in 18 (30.5%) of them after 2 mo of the therapy. There was no correlation between the time of ALT normalization and the children's age, the age of HBV infection, the duration of HBV infection, inflammation activity score (grading), staging,ALT activity before treatment, serum HBV DNA level,and lamivudnie dose per kg of body weight. HBeAg/anti HBe seroconversion was achieved in 27.1% of cases.The higher rate of seroconversion was connected with lower serum HBV DNA level and longer duration of HBV infection. There was no connection between HBeAg/anti HBeAb seroconversion and the children's age, age of HBV infection, grading, staging, ALT activity

  18. Aflatoxin exposure may contribute to chronic hepatomegaly in Kenyan school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Yun Yun; Wilson, Shona; Mwatha, Joseph K;

    2012-01-01

    Presentation with a firm type of chronic hepatomegaly of multifactorial etiology is common among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa.......Presentation with a firm type of chronic hepatomegaly of multifactorial etiology is common among school-age children in sub-Saharan Africa....

  19. Comparison between children and adolescents with and without chronic benign pain: consultation rate and pain characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.C. van Eekelen; C.W. Perquin (Christel); J.A.M. Hunfeld (Joke); A.A.J.M. Hazebroek-Kampschreur (Alice); L.W.A. van Suijlekom-Smit (Lisette); B.W. Koes (Bart); J. Passchier (Jan); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of the study was to determine whether children with chronic benign pain are in contact with their general practitioner (GP) more frequently than those without chronic benign pain. A random sample of children and adolescents aged between 0 and 18 years of age was

  20. The role of illness perception and emotions on quality of life in fibromyalgia compared with other chronic pain conditions The role of illness perception and emotions on quality of life in fibromyalgia compared with other chronic pain conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sgnaolin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMs is a chronic widespread pain condition that can negatively impact on all aspects of patient’s life. The purpose of this study was: first, to evaluate illness perception (IP, quality of life (QoL and affective-emotive variables (EAV of patients with FM; and second, to compare these variables to different pain conditions. Methods: Consecutive 34 women (mean age 47.4±8.3 years affected by FM were enrolled for the study from December 2009 to May 2011. IP was evaluated by means of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, QoL through Nottigham Health Profile and EAV through the Beck Depression Inventory. Scores were compared with rheumatoid arthritis (RA (n=20; mean age 53±12.8 years and low back pain (LBP (n=20; 51.3±7.8 years groups. Results: FM patients scored higher than RA and LBP groups on IP (Identity scale mean: FM=8.8±2.3, AR=5.5±3.3, LBP=4.1±2.9; Kruskal-Wallis=24.42. Moreover FM patients show higher EAV (mean FM=21±9.6, AR=8.9±5.6, LBP=14.9±6.5; Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z=2.17 and QoL (Pain scale mean: FM=74.2±24.1; AR=35.7±19.9; LBP=56.5±20.4; Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z=2.27; Energy scale mean: FM=86.2±28.5; AR=46.8±35.4; LBP=61.6 ±63.7; Kolmogorov-Smirnov Z=1.98 than RA group. Conclusions: Our study highlighted dysfunctional IP, low QoL, high EAV scores in FM patients and the significant relations between these variables. Research results provided support for relevance of a multidisciplinary approach to the management of FM, including psychological interventions, according to a biopsychosocial perspective.Objective: Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMs is a chronic widespread pain condition that can negatively impact on all aspects of patient’s life. The purposes of this study were: i to evaluate illness perception (IP, quality of life (QoL and affective-emotive variables (EAV of patients with FM; and ii to compare these variables to different pain conditions. Methods: Consecutive 34 women (mean age

  1. Effects of chronic illness on daily life and barriers to self-care for older women: A mixed-methods exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restorick Roberts, Amy; Betts Adams, Kathryn; Beckette Warner, Camille

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the subjective experience of living with chronic illness and identified barriers to self-care. Community-dwelling older women with chronic illness completed an initial (N = 138) and follow-up mailed survey 6 months later (N = 130). On average, participants reported four comorbid health conditions and the corresponding physical pain, activities curtailed or relinquished, and time and energy focused on managing health. Only 34% of participants practiced all 10 key self-care behaviors. Reported barriers to self-management included pain, lack of financial resources, and worry. In the regression analysis, having more depressive symptoms was a significant predictor of challenges with self-care behaviors.

  2. The Shared Decision Making Frontier: a Feasibility and Usability Study for Managing Non-Critical Chronic Illness by Combining Behavioural & Decision Theory with Online Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Amina; Van Woensel, William; Abidi, Samina Raza

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine if shared decisions for managing non-critical chronic illness, made through an online biomedical technology intervention, us feasible and usable. The technology intervention incorporates behavioural and decision theories to increase patient engagement, and ultimately long term adherence to health behaviour change. We devised the iheart web intervention as a "proof of concept" in five phases. The implementation incorporates the Vaadin web application framework, Drools, EclipseLink and a MySQL database. Two-thirds of the study participants favoured the technology intervention, based on Likert-scale questions from a post-study questionnaire. Qualitative analysis of think aloud feedback, video screen captures and open-ended questions from the post-study questionnaire uncovered six main areas or themes for improvement. We conclude that online shared decisions for managing a non-critical chronic illness are feasible and usable through the iheart web intervention.

  3. Cost-of-illness analysis of patients with chronic hand eczema in routine care in Germany: focus on the impact of occupational disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diepgen, Thomas L; Purwins, Sandra; Posthumus, Jan; Kuessner, Daniel; John, Swen M; Augustin, Matthias

    2013-09-04

    Chronic hand eczema places a heavy burden on patients, often affecting their ability to work. This paper compares the cost-of-illness and treatment approaches for patients with refractory chronic hand eczema, in relation to whether the disease was occupational or unrelated to work factors. Data from 2 surveys, comprising 310 patients with chronic hand eczema insured by German statutory health insurance (SHI) (including work-impaired patients, work-unaffected patients and non-working patients) and known work-related chronic hand eczema insured by occupational health insurance (OHI). Annual healthcare costs of managing work-impaired patients (SHI) and patients with work-related chronic hand eczema (OHI) were €3,164 and €3,309, respectively, approximately double the costs of managing non-working and work-unaffected (SHI) patients. This analysis shows that the costs associated with chronic hand eczema are affected by the correlation of chronic hand eczema with work, with costs being higher for occupational patients with chronic hand eczema.

  4. Swedish District Nurses' experiences on the use of information and communication technology for supporting people with serious chronic illness living at home--a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Carina; Skär, Lisa; Söderberg, Siv

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this case study was to describe two District Nurses' (DN) experiences of using information and communication technology (ICT) to communicate with chronically ill people in their homes. An electronic messaging program via computers and mobile phones with an Internet connection was used, enabling DNs and the ill people to exchange messages to and from anywhere. The program comprised different virtual rooms, and communication was via text messages. The DNs in this study used the program two to four times each week from November 2003 to March 2004. Semi-structured interviews were performed before, during and after the implementation of the new technology and were analysed using thematic content analysis. The results showed that the DNs felt that the technology increased accessibility to nursing care through a more direct communication with the ill person meaning that a more trusting relationship could be created. The DNs also experienced that the use of ICT saved working time. This study indicates that the use of ICT for communication allowed the DN to better support a chronically ill person at home leading to improved home nursing care. This method of communication cannot replace physical presence, but can be seen as a complement to nursing care at home.

  5. Health implications of chronic hepatosplenomegaly in Kenyan school-aged children chronically exposed to malarial infections and Schistosoma mansoni

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Shona; Vennervald, Birgitte J; Kadzo, Hilda;

    2010-01-01

    with hepatosplenomegaly. Children who presented with hepatosplenomegaly had the lowest height-for-age Z-scores. This study shows that hepatosplenomegaly associated with chronic exposure to malaria and schistosomiasis is not a benign symptom amongst school-aged children but has potential long-term health consequences.......Hepatosplenomegaly among school-aged children in sub-Saharan Africa is highly prevalent. Two of the more common aetiological agents of hepatosplenomegaly, namely chronic exposure to malaria and Schistosoma mansoni infection, can result in similar clinical presentation, with the liver and spleen...... investigated in a study area where children were chronically exposed to malaria throughout while S. mansoni transmission was geographically restricted. Hepatosplenomegaly was associated with increased portal vein diameters, with enlargement of the spleen rather than the liver being more closely associated...

  6. Life memories and the ability to act: the meaning of autonomy and participation for older people when living with chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, Maria; Pöder, Ulrika; Mamhidir, Anna-Greta; Nilsson, Annika; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about how older people living with chronic illness describe the meaning of autonomy and participation, indicating a risk for reduced autonomy and participation in their everyday life. The purpose of this study was to describe the meaning of autonomy and participation among older people living with chronic illness in accordance with their lived experience. The design was descriptive with a phenomenological approach guided by Giorgi's descriptive phenomenological psychological method. Purposive sampling was used, and 16 older people living with chronic illness who lived in an ordinary home participated in individual interviews. The findings showed that the meaning of autonomy and participation among the older people emerged when it was challenged and evoked emotional considerations of the lived experience of having a chronic illness. It involved living a life apart, yet still being someone who is able, trustworthy and given responsibility--still being seen and acknowledged. The meaning of autonomy and participation was derived through life memories and used by the older people in everyday life for adjustment or adaption to the present life and the future. Our conclusion is that autonomy and participation were considered in relation to older people's life memories in the past, in their present situation and also their future wishes. Ability or disability is of less importance than the meaning of everyday life among older people. We suggest using fewer labels for limitations in everyday life when caring for older people and more use of the phrase 'ability to act' in different ways, based on older people's descriptions of the meaning of autonomy and participation.

  7. CHRONIC URTICARIAL IN CHILDHOOD. IMMUNE PATHOLOGY OF CHRONIC URTICARIAL IN CHILDREN (PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Sinelnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This section of our review article deals with prevalence, genetic factors, and some immune mechanisms of chronic urticaria in children. In any form of chronic urticaria, the main pathogenetic role is ascribed to mast cells and basophiles. Increased production of cyto- and chemokines, e.g., CCL2, CХCL8, IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-13, IL-17, is observed during chronic inflammatory reactions typical to this disease. Activation of mast cells and basophiles proceeds via specific receptors on the target cell membranes. Autoimmune urticaria is of special importance. In this disorder, autoantibodies are directed against IgE or FCεRIα, thus causing histamine release, due to cross-linking of α-chains of high-affinity IgE receptor, or binding of IgE fixed on the mast cells. Degranulation of basophils is followed by occurrence of activation molecules (СD203с, CD63. Some workers presumet that association between СD203с expression and positive autologous serum skin test may be a sign of autoimmune process. Increased expression of CD40L ligand on the surface of activated T cells suggests enhanced signaling for B cell activation and production of autoantibodies.

  8. [Chronic diseases in children and adolescents: a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Martha Cristina Nunes; Gomes, Romeu; Calheiros de Sá, Miriam Ribeiro

    2014-07-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze papers published between 2003 and 2011 that focus on discussions regarding chronic conditions or chronic diseases in children and adolescents. It combines a methodological review of the literature and thematic analysis of content in order to identify the elements that characterize chronic diseases in children and adolescents and the specificities generated by these chronic conditions. The review of the literature resulted in a description of the series of articles identified by year of publication, country of origin, type of study, population and the chronic condition addressed. Thematic content analysis generated two core themes: Definition of chronic disease and Ways of handling chronic disease in children and teenagers. The main conclusion reached is that the age transitions when a disease is diagnosed and treated since childhood involve transformations that include changes in health facilities, discharge processes, decision making and networking that include family, hospital, school and institutions that guarantee the child's rights.

  9. How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part I: The impact of recession and deindustrialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Paula; Burström, Bo; Whitehead, Margaret; Diderichsen, Finn; Dahl, Espen; Barr, Ben; Nylén, Lotta; Chen, Wen-Hao; Thielen, Karsten; van der Wel, Kjetil A; Clayton, Stephen; Uppal, Sharanjit

    2011-01-01

    Low employment rates of chronically ill and disabled people are of serious concern. Being out of work increases the risk of poverty and social exclusion, which may further damage the health of these groups, exacerbating health inequalities. Macro-level policies have a potentially tremendous impact on their employment chances, and these influences urgently need to be understood as the current economic crisis intensifies. In Part I of this two-part study, the authors examine employment trends for people who report a chronic illness or disability, by gender and educational level, in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom in the context of economic booms and busts and deindustrialization. People with the double burden of chronic illness and low education have become increasingly marginalized from the labor market. Deindustrialization may have played a part in this process. In addition, periods of high unemployment have sparked a downward trend in employment for already marginalized groups who did not feel the benefits when the economy improved. Norway and Sweden have been better able to protect the employment of these groups than the United Kingdom and Canada. These contextual differences suggest that other macro-level factors, such as active and passive labor market polices, may be important, as examined in part II.

  10. [The Technology Acceptance Model and Its Application in a Telehealth Program for the Elderly With Chronic Illnesses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chi-Ping

    2015-06-01

    Many technology developments hold the potential to improve the quality of life of people and make life easier and more comfortable. New technologies have been well accepted by most people. Information sharing in particular is a major catalyst of change in our current technology-based society. Technology has widely innovated life and drastically changed lifestyles. The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), a model developed to address the rapid advances in computer technology, is used to explain and predict user acceptance of new information technology. In the past, businesses have used the TAM as an assessment tool to predict user acceptance when introducing new technology products. They have also used external factors in the model to influence user perceptions and beliefs and to ensure the successful spread of new technologies. Informatization plays a critical role in healthcare services. Due to the rapid aging of populations and upward trends in the incidence of chronic illness, requirements for long-term care have increased in both quality and quantity. Therefore, there has been an increased emphasis on integrating healthcare and information technology. However, most elderly are significantly less adept at technology use than the general population. Therefore, we reexamined the effect that the essential concepts in a TAM exerted on technology acceptance. In the present study, the technology acceptance experience with regard to telehealth of the elderly was used as an example to explain how the revised technology acceptance model (TAM 2) may be effectively applied to enhance the understanding of technology care among nurses. The results may serve as a reference for future research on healthcare-technology use in long-term care or in elderly populations.

  11. Reliability and validity of the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative care (FACIT-Pal) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Bakitas, Marie; Hegel, Mark T; Hanscom, Brett; Hull, Jay; Ahles, Tim A

    2009-01-01

    The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) system provides a general, multidimensional measure of health-related quality of life (FACT-G) that can be augmented with disease or symptom-specific subscales. The 19-item palliative care subscale of the FACIT system has undergone little psychometric evaluation to date. The aim of this paper is to report the internal consistency, factor structure, and construct validity of the instrument using the palliative care subscale (FACIT-Pal). Two hundred fifty-six persons with advanced cancer in a randomized trial testing a palliative care psychoeducational intervention completed the 46-item FACIT-Pal at baseline. Internal consistency was greater than 0.74 for all subscales and the total score. Seventeen of the 19 palliative care subscale items loaded onto the four-factor solution of the established core measure (FACT-G). As hypothesized, total scores were correlated with measures of symptom intensity (r=-0.73, P<0.001) and depression (r=-0.75, P<0.001). The FACIT-Pal was able to discriminate between participants who died within three months of completing the baseline and participants who lived for at least one year after completing the baseline assessment (t=-4.05, P<0.001). The functional well-being subscale discriminated between participants who had a Karnofsky performance score of 70 and below and participants with a Karnofsky performance score of 80 and above (t=3.40, P<0.001). The findings support the internal consistency reliability and validity of the FACIT-Pal as a measure of health-related quality of life for persons with advanced cancer.

  12. Monitoring physical functioning as the sixth vital sign: evaluating patient and practice engagement in chronic illness care in a primary care setting--a quasi-experimental design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richardson Julie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, one in three adults or almost 9 million people report having a chronic condition. Over two thirds of total deaths result from cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and respiratory illness and 77% of persons ≥65 years have at least one chronic condition. Persons with chronic disease are at risk for functional decline; as a result, there is an increased awareness of the significance of functional status as an important health outcome. The purpose of this study was to determine whether patients who receive a multi-component rehabilitation intervention, including online monitoring of function with feedback and self-management workshops, showed less functional decline than case matched controls who did not receive this intervention. In addition, we wanted to determine whether capacity building initiatives within the Family Health Team promote a collaborative approach to Chronic Disease Management. Methods A population-based multi-component rehabilitation intervention delivered to persons with chronic illnesses (≥ 44 yrs (n = 60 was compared to a group of age and sex matched controls (n = 60 with chronic illnesses receiving usual care within a primary healthcare setting. The population-based intervention consisted of four main components: (1 function-based individual assessment and action planning, (2 rehabilitation self-management workshops, (3 on-line self-assessment of function and (4 organizational capacity building. T-tests and chi-square tests were used for continuous and categorical variables respectively in baseline comparison between groups. Results Two MANOVA showed significant between group differences in patient reported physical functioning (Λ = 0.88, F = (2.86 = 5.97. p = 0.004 and for the physical performance measures collectively as the dependent variable (Λ = 0.80, F = (6.93 = 3.68. p = 0.0025. There were no within group differences for the capacity measures. Conclusion It is feasible to monitor

  13. Clinical Peculiarities of Recurrent and Chronic Bronchitis in Children (Part 1)

    OpenAIRE

    Makian, M. V.; Harhaun, V. A.; Maidannyk, V. H.

    2015-01-01

    Subjective manifestations in children with recurrent and chronic bronchitis were the subject of the research.The objective of the research was to evaluate the main clinical manifestations of recurrent and chronic bronchitis, analyze risk factors and preconditions for their occurence in children.Materials and methods of research. The comprehensive clinical and anamnestic examination of 120 children with bronchopulmonary pathology at the age of 3 to 18 (average age was 10.5±1.1 years) was condu...

  14. The determinants of chronic bronchitis in Aboriginal children and youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Alomgir; Konrad, Stephanie; Dosman, James A; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; McCrosky, Jesse; Pahwa, Punam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is limited knowledge concerning chronic bronchitis (CB) in Canadian Aboriginal peoples. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence (crude and adjusted) of CB and its associated risk factors in Canadian Aboriginal children and youth six to 14 years of age. METHODS: Data from the cross-sectional Aboriginal Peoples Survey were analyzed in the present study. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors influencing the prevalence of CB among Aboriginal children and youth. The balanced repeated replication method was used to compute standard errors of regression coefficients to account for clustering inherent in the study design. The outcome of interest was based on the question: “Have you been told by a doctor, nurse or other health professional that you have chronic bronchitis?” Demographics, environment and population characteristics (predisposing and enabling resources) were tested for an association with CB. RESULTS: The prevalence of CB was 3.1% for boys and 2.8% for girls. Other significant risk factors of CB were age (OR 1.38 [95% CI 1.24 to 1.52] for 12 to 14 year olds versus six to eight year olds), income (OR 2.28 [95% CI 2.02 to 2.59] for income category <$25,000/year versus ≥$85,000/year), allergies (OR 1.96 [95% CI 1.78 to 2.16] for having allergies versus no allergies), asthma (OR 7.61 [ 95% CI 6.91 to 8.37] for having asthma versus no asthma) and location of residence (rural/urban and geographical location). A significant two-way interaction between sex and body mass index indicated that the relationship between the prevalence of CB and body mass index was modified by sex. DISCUSSION: The prevalence of CB was related to well-known risk factors among adults, including older age and lower annual income. PMID:23248806

  15. Hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease: pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadtstein, Charlotte; Schaefer, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is very common in children with all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While fluid overload and activation of the renin-angiotensin system have long been recognized as crucial pathophysiological pathways, sympathetic hyperactivation, endothelial dysfunction and chronic hyperparathyroidism have more recently been identified as important factors contributing to CKD-associated hypertension. Moreover, several drugs commonly administered in CKD, such as erythropoietin, glucocorticoids and cyclosporine A, independently raise blood pressure in a dose-dependent fashion. Because of the deleterious consequences of hypertension on the progression of renal disease and cardiovascular outcomes, an active screening approach should be adapted in patients with all stages of CKD. Before one starts antihypertensive treatment, non-pharmacological options should be explored. In hemodialysis patients a low salt diet, low dialysate sodium and stricter dialysis towards dry weight can often achieve adequate blood pressure control. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are first-line therapy for patients with proteinuria, due to their additional anti-proteinuric properties. Diuretics are a useful alternative for non-proteinuric patients or as an add-on to renin-angiotensin system blockade. Multiple drug therapy is often needed to maintain blood pressure below the 90th percentile target, but adequate blood pressure control is essential for better renal and cardiovascular long-term outcomes.

  16. Management of chronic hemophilic synovitis in children by phonophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saraf S

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physical cascades in hemophilia like hemarthrosis and its sequelae like chronic synovitis can be managed better by repeated factor transfusions or radiotherapy or injectable rifampicin, however, the non-availability and high cost of these modalities of therapy prompted us to look into other innovative methods, which could be effective and economical. Methods: Drug induced pulse ultrasound therapy (phonophoresis using Betamethasone ointment was used in patients of chronic hemophilic synovitis on alternate day for an average duration of six minutes. Ten to 15 such sittings were given during the course of treatment. The objective parameters for the evaluation of results included changes in the degree of swelling, range of movements, frequency of joint bleed and joint tenderness. Subjective assessment was the grading of response by the patient viz. significant, moderate or poor. Results: The study included 21 patients of synovitis knee (24 knees in children of 6-15 yrs. As per Caviglia classification, four knees were graded gr. I, thirteen as gr. II and seven as gr. III. There was significant reduction in the joint swelling. The range of movements also increased satisfactorily with decrease in the frequency of joint bleed in the follow up. Results were adjudged as good in nine, fair in nine and poor in six; response being better in grade I and grade II. Conclusion: Low dose pulse ultrasound does not produce heat, rather changes permeability of membrane, and reduces pain and hematoma. The introduction of local steroidal drug with ultrasound further helps in the colloidochemical action. Phonophoresis relies on perturbation of the tissues encouraging absorption of the drug. Phonophoresis using betamethasone showed significantly good results in short term follow up in chronic hemophilic synovitis of knee. This modality of treatment can be valuable in developing countries where factor replacement is a problem and other modalities of

  17. How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part II: The impact of active and passive labor market policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, Paula; Nylén, Lotta; Thielen, Karsten;

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigate three hypotheses on the influence of labor market deregulation, decommodification, and investment in active labor market policies on the employment of chronically ill and disabled people. The study explores the interaction between employment, chronic illness, and educational...... level for men and women in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, countries with advanced social welfare systems and universal health care but with varying types of active and passive labor market policies. People with chronic illness were found to fare better in employment terms...... men, and Danish women. Hypotheses on the disincentive effects of tighter employment regulation or more generous welfare benefits were not supported. The hypothesis that greater investments in active labor market policies may improve the employment of chronically ill people was partially supported...

  18. Growth retardation in children with chronic renal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in the management of children with chronic renal disease (CRD, growth retardation remains its most visible comorbid condition. Growth retardation has adverse impact on morbidity and mortality rates, quality of life and education, and in adult patients on job family life, and independent leaving accomodation. Pathophysiology of impaired growth in CRD is complex and still not fully understood. The following complications are: anorexia, malnutrition, inflammation, decreased residual renal function, dialysis frequency and adequacy, renal anemia, metabolic acidosis, fluid/electrolyte imbalance, renal osteodistrophy, growth hormone (GH and insulin-like growth factor -1 (IGF-1 resistance. Malnutrition is most frequent and most important factor contributing to the degree of growth retardation in infancy. The degree of renal dysfunction is the major determinant of variability in growth from third year of age until puberty onset, while in puberty hypergonadotropic hypogonadism has negative effect. The main factors that influence growth after renal transplantation are the age of the recipient and glucocorticoid drugs dosage with negative effect and allograft function with positive effect. In order to improve growth in children with CRD it is necessary to include: diet with optimal caloric intake, correction of fluid/ electrolyte imbalance, correction of acidosis, renal osteodistrophy and anemia. If growth velocity is insufficient to normalize growth, it is necessary to start recombinant human GH (rhGH therapy at 0.05 mg/kg per day (0.35 mg/kg per week or 28 IU/m2 per week administered by subcutaneous injection.

  19. Residual Renal Function in Children Treated with Chronic Peritoneal Dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Roszkowska-Blaim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual renal function (RRF in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD receiving renal replacement therapy is defined as the ability of native kidneys to eliminate water and uremic toxins. Preserved RRF improves survival and quality of life in adult ESRD patients treated with peritoneal dialysis. In children, RRF was shown not only to help preserve adequacy of renal replacement therapy but also to accelerate growth rate, improve nutrition and blood pressure control, reduce the risk of adverse myocardial changes, facilitate treatment of anemia and calcium-phosphorus balance abnormalities, and result in reduced serum and dialysate fluid levels of advanced glycation end-products. Factors contributing to RRF loss in children treated with peritoneal dialysis include the underlying renal disease such as hemolytic-uremic syndrome and hereditary nephropathy, small urine volume, severe proteinuria at the initiation of renal replacement therapy, and hypertension. Several approaches can be suggested to decrease the rate of RRF loss in pediatric patients treated with chronic peritoneal dialysis: potentially nephrotoxic drugs (e.g., aminoglycosides, episodes of hypotension, and uncontrolled hypertension should be avoided, urinary tract infections should be treated promptly, and loop diuretics may be used to increase salt and water excretion.

  20. MRI and ultrasound in children with juvenile chronic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamer, S.; Sebag, G.H

    2000-02-01

    In this era of advancing imaging technology, a knowledge of the relative values of available imaging techniques is necessary to optimize the management of children with juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA). After clinical examination, plain films remain the initial investigation. The need for radiation protection must be a priority in children with JCA. Conventional radiographs allow grouping of the various arthritides (on the base of the distribution and pattern of joint space changes) and staging of disease progression. Ultrasound (US) is very sensitive in the detection of joint effusions, especially in the hip, and guides fluid aspiration. US and Doppler can be used for the evaluation of synovial hypertrophy and activity. Arthrography and to a certain extent nuclear studies have been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI can demonstrate articular cartilage, joint effusion, synovial hypertrophy, cortical and medullary bone, cartilage and bone perfusion, and fibrocartilaginous structures (menisci and ligaments). Contrast enhanced MRI is the most sensitive modality to determine whether an arthritic condition is present. However, it does not assist in establishing a specific diagnosis. MRI determines accurately the activity and the extent of the disease and is particularly useful in the early detection of articular damage. Finally, MRI is of major importance in the evaluation of response to local therapy (especially steroids) and the detection of complications.