WorldWideScience

Sample records for chronic wound healing

  1. New trends in healing chronic wounds

    OpenAIRE

    KREJSKOVÁ, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Basic theoretical bases As a chronic wound is called a secondarily healing wound which despite adequate therapy does not tend to heal for a period of 6-9 weeks. The cause of the chronic wound occurrence and its transformation into an acute wound can be infection, influence of associated diseases, skin top layer microtraumatization or skin necrosis cavity. Among the most frequent types of chronic wounds there are aligned venous ulcerations, arterial rodent ulcers, decubitus ulcers and neuropat...

  2. Engineered Biopolymeric Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Laura E; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Skin regeneration requires the coordinated integration of concomitant biological and molecular events in the extracellular wound environment during overlapping phases of inflammation, proliferation, and matrix remodeling. This process is highly efficient during normal wound healing. However, chronic wounds fail to progress through the ordered and reparative wound healing process and are unable to heal, requiring long-term treatment at high costs. There are many advanced skin substitutes, which mostly comprise bioactive dressings containing mammalian derived matrix components, and/or human cells, in clinical use. However, it is presently hypothesized that no treatment significantly outperforms the others. To address this unmet challenge, recent research has focused on developing innovative acellular biopolymeric scaffolds as more efficacious wound healing therapies. These biomaterial-based skin substitutes are precisely engineered and fine-tuned to recapitulate aspects of the wound healing milieu and target specific events in the wound healing cascade to facilitate complete skin repair with restored function and tissue integrity. This mini-review will provide a brief overview of chronic wound healing and current skin substitute treatment strategies while focusing on recent engineering approaches that regenerate skin using synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds. We discuss key polymeric scaffold design criteria, including degradation, biocompatibility, and microstructure, and how they translate to inductive microenvironments that stimulate cell infiltration and vascularization to enhance chronic wound healing. As healthcare moves toward precision medicine-based strategies, the potential and therapeutic implications of synthetic, biopolymeric scaffolds as tunable treatment modalities for chronic wounds will be considered. PMID:27547189

  3. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. PMID:26979353

  4. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  5. Wound healing and treating wounds: Differential diagnosis and evaluation of chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Laurel M; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    Wounds are an excellent example of how the field of dermatology represents a cross-section of many medical disciplines. For instance, wounds may be caused by trauma, vascular insufficiency, and underlying medical conditions, such as diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatologic and inflammatory disease. This continuing medical education article provides an overview of wound healing and the pathophysiology of chronic wounds and reviews the broad differential diagnosis of chronic wounds. It also describes the initial steps necessary in evaluating a chronic wound and determining its underlying etiology.

  6. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  7. NeutroPhase® in chronic non-healing wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, John; Varilla, Randell; Rocas, Thomas Allandale; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Najafi, Azar; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Najafi, Ramin (Ron); Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, and pressure ulcers are serious unmet medical needs that affect a patient’s morbidity and mortality. Common pathogens observed in chronic non-healing wounds are Staphylococcus including MRSA, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Serratia spp. Topical and systemically administered antibiotics do not adequately decrease the level of bacteria or the associated biofilm in chronic granulating wounds and the use of sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can lead to resistant phenotypes. Furthermore, topical antiseptics may not be fully effective and can actually impede wound healing. We show 5 representative examples from our more than 30 clinical case studies using NeutroPhase® as an irrigation solution with chronic non-healing wounds with and without the technique of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). NeutroPhase® is pure 0.01% hypochlorous acid (i.e. >97% relative molar distribution of active chlorine species as HOCl) in a 0.9% saline solution at pH 4-5 and is stored in glass containers. NovaBay has three FDA cleared 510(k)s. Patients showed a profound improvement and marked accelerated rates of wound healing using NeutroPhase® with and without NPWT. NeutroPhase® was non-toxic to living tissues. PMID:23272294

  8. NeutroPhase(®) in chronic non-healing wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, John; Varilla, Randell; Rocas, Thomas Allandale; Debabov, Dmitri; Wang, Lu; Najafi, Azar; Rani, Suriani Abdul; Najafi, Ramin Ron; Anderson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds, such as venous stasis ulcers, diabetic ulcers, and pressure ulcers are serious unmet medical needs that affect a patient's morbidity and mortality. Common pathogens observed in chronic non-healing wounds are Staphylococcus including MRSA, Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, and Serratia spp. Topical and systemically administered antibiotics do not adequately decrease the level of bacteria or the associated biofilm in chronic granulating wounds and the use of sub-lethal concentrations of antibiotics can lead to resistant phenotypes. Furthermore, topical antiseptics may not be fully effective and can actually impede wound healing. We show 5 representative examples from our more than 30 clinical case studies using NeutroPhase(®) as an irrigation solution with chronic non-healing wounds with and without the technique of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). NeutroPhase(®) is pure 0.01% hypochlorous acid (i.e. >97% relative molar distribution of active chlorine species as HOCl) in a 0.9% saline solution at pH 4-5 and is stored in glass containers. NovaBay has three FDA cleared 510(k)s. Patients showed a profound improvement and marked accelerated rates of wound healing using NeutroPhase(®) with and without NPWT. NeutroPhase(®) was non-toxic to living tissues. PMID:23272294

  9. Recent advances on the association of apoptosis in chronic non healing diabetic wound

    OpenAIRE

    Arya, Awadhesh K; Tripathi, Richik; Kumar, Santosh; Tripathi, Kamlakar

    2014-01-01

    Generally, wounds are of two categories, such as chronic and acute. Chronic wounds takes time to heal when compared to the acute wounds. Chronic wounds include vasculitis, non healing ulcer, pyoderma gangrenosum, and diseases that cause ischemia. Chronic wounds are rapidly increasing among the elderly population with dysfunctional valves in their lower extremity deep veins, ulcer, neuropathic foot and pressure ulcers. The process of the healing of wounds has several steps with the involvement...

  10. State-of-the-art wound healing: skin substitutes for chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, George

    2014-01-01

    The care of chronic wounds represents an important and evolving area of dermatology. With a rising prevalence of chronic wounds bearing notable effects on patient morbidity including amputations, appropriate and effective intervention to treat these debilitating wounds can make a significant clinical impact. In recent years, several advanced bioactive wound dressings have been developed to specifically treat chronic nonhealing wounds. These wound dressings encompass a wide range of products containing synthetic matrix scaffolds, animal-derived matrices, and human tissue. With several of these wound dressings, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated improvement in wound healing; furthermore, cost-effectiveness studies have suggested that these products may reduce the overall cost of treating a chronic wound. Familiarity with these products and their appropriate use may be helpful to dermatologists treating chronic wounds.

  11. Why chronic wounds will not heal: a novel hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Moller, K.; Jensen, P.O.;

    2008-01-01

    The present paper presents a hypothesis aimed at explaining why venous leg ulcers, pressure ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers develop into a chronic state. We propose that the lack of proper wound healing is at least in part caused by inefficient eradication of infecting, opportunistic pathogens...

  12. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  13. Recent advances on the association of apoptosis in chronic non healing diabetic wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Awadhesh; K; Arya; Richik; Tripathi; Santosh; Kumar; Kamlakar; Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Generally, wounds are of two categories, such as chronic and acute. Chronic wounds takes time to heal when compared to the acute wounds. Chronic wounds include vasculitis, non healing ulcer, pyoderma gangrenosum, and diseases that cause ischemia. Chronic wounds are rapidly increasing among the elderly population with dysfunctional valves in their lower extremity deep veins, ulcer, neuropathic foot and pressure ulcers. The process of the healing of wounds has several steps with the involvement of immune cells and several other cell types. There are many evidences supporting the hypothesis that apoptosis of immune cells is involved in the wound healing process by ending inflammatory condition. It is also involved in the resolution of various phases of tissue repair. During final steps of wound healing most of the endothelial cells, macrophagesand myofibroblasts undergo apoptosis or exit from the wound, leaving a mass that contains few cells and consists mostly of collagen and other extracellular matrix proteins to provide strength to the healing tissue. This review discusses the various phases of wound healing both in the chronic and acute wounds especially during diabetes mellitus and thus support the hypothesis that the oxidative stress, apoptosis, connexins and other molecules involved in the regulation of chronic wound healing in diabetes mellitus and gives proper understanding of the mechanisms controlling apoptosis and tissue repair during diabetes and may eventually develop therapeutic modalities to fasten the healing process in diabetic patients.

  14. Chemokines as Therapeutic Targets to Improve Healing Efficiency of Chronic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Satish, Latha

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Impaired wound healing leading to chronic wounds is an important clinical problem that needs immediate attention to develop new effective therapies. Members of the chemokine family seem to be attractive and amenable to stimulate the healing process in chronic wounds. Targeting specific chemokines and/or their receptors has the potential to modify chronic inflammation to acute inflammation, which will hasten the healing process.

  15. The role of nurses in the care of chronic wounds by using alternative methods and materials of moist wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    SKŘÍŠOVSKÁ, Martina

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor?s thesis deals with the actual classification of wounds and the issue of the chronic wound treatment. In the preface of the theoretical part of the thesis, the term wound is defined and the wounds are subcategorized in the terms of their pathological traumatological origin. In the next chapters, the process of the wound healing is analysed from molecular biological aspect, the terms acute and chronic wound are defined and newly introduces the term non-healing wound for the chron...

  16. Redox mechanisms in hepatic chronic wound healing and fibrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novo Erica

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS generated within cells or, more generally, in a tissue environment, may easily turn into a source of cell and tissue injury. Aerobic organisms have developed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms and strategies to carefully control the generation of ROS and other oxidative stress-related radical or non-radical reactive intermediates (that is, to maintain redox homeostasis, as well as to 'make use' of these molecules under physiological conditions as tools to modulate signal transduction, gene expression and cellular functional responses (that is, redox signalling. However, a derangement in redox homeostasis, resulting in sustained levels of oxidative stress and related mediators, can play a significant role in the pathogenesis of major human diseases characterized by chronic inflammation, chronic activation of wound healing and tissue fibrogenesis. This review has been designed to first offer a critical introduction to current knowledge in the field of redox research in order to introduce readers to the complexity of redox signalling and redox homeostasis. This will include ready-to-use key information and concepts on ROS, free radicals and oxidative stress-related reactive intermediates and reactions, sources of ROS in mammalian cells and tissues, antioxidant defences, redox sensors and, more generally, the major principles of redox signalling and redox-dependent transcriptional regulation of mammalian cells. This information will serve as a basis of knowledge to introduce the role of ROS and other oxidative stress-related intermediates in contributing to essential events, such as the induction of cell death, the perpetuation of chronic inflammatory responses, fibrogenesis and much more, with a major focus on hepatic chronic wound healing and liver fibrogenesis.

  17. Diabetes and wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Svendsen, Rikke; Irakunda, Gloire; Knudsen List, Karoline Cecilie; Sønderstup-Jensen, Marie; Hölmich Rosca, Mette Maria

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease where the glucose level in the blood is high, due to either insulin resistance, impaired insulin sensitivity or no insulin production. The high glucose level causes several complications, one of them being an impaired wound healing process, which might lead to chronic wounds, ulcers. Several factors play a role in the development of ulcers, and recent research indicates that microRNA might play a significant role in skin development and wound healing. The purpose of this...

  18. Activity of mesenchymal stem cells in therapies for chronic skin wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Nuschke, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Chronic or non-healing skin wounds present an ongoing challenge in advanced wound care, particularly as the number of patients increases while technology aimed at stimulating wound healing in these cases remains inefficient. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have proved to be an attractive cell type for various cell therapies due to their ability to differentiate into various cell lineages, multiple donor tissue types, and relative resilience in ex-vivo expansion, as well as immunomodulatory effe...

  19. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of repair in acute and chronic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, P.; Nunan, R

    2015-01-01

    Summary A considerable understanding of the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning healthy acute wound healing has been gleaned from studying various animal models, and we are now unravelling the mechanisms that lead to chronic wounds and pathological healing including fibrosis. A small cut will normally heal in days through tight orchestration of cell migration and appropriate levels of inflammation, innervation and angiogenesis. Major surgeries may take several weeks to ...

  20. Optimizing Technology Use for Chronic Lower-Extremity Wound Healing: A Consensus Document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Raj; Margolis, David J; Shukla, Vijay; Akita, Sadanori; Lazarides, Miltos; Piaggesi, Alberto; Falanga, Vincent; Teot, Luc; Xie, Ting; Bing, Fu Xiao; Romanelli, Marco; Attinger, Chris; Han, Chun Mao; Lu, Shuliang; Meaume, Sylvie; Xu, Zhangrong; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2016-06-01

    Innovations in technology are used in managing chronic wounds. Despite the wide range of technologies available, healing of chronic wounds remains variable. In this paper, the authors offer an evidence based approach to the use of technology for diagnosis and management based on the concept of standardised care.

  1. Platelet-Rich Plasma Combined With Skin Substitute for Chronic Wound Healing: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Knox, Rebecca L.; Hunt, Allen R.; Collins, John C.; DeSmet, Marie; Barnes, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary management of chronic wounds focuses on improving natural healing and individualization of treatment. Incorporating multiple therapies has become increasingly common. Of interest are autologous growth factors, which are especially important in chronic wound healing and may contribute to tissue formation and epithelialization. Autologous platelet concentrate or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a concentration of at least five autologous growth factors and has been shown to accelerate...

  2. Development of a wound healing index for patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D; Fife, Caroline E; Smout, Randall J; Barrett, Ryan S; Thomson, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials in wound care generalize poorly because they exclude patients with significant comorbid conditions. Research using real-world wound care patients is hindered by lack of validated methods to stratify patients according to severity of underlying illnesses. We developed a comprehensive stratification system for patients with wounds that predicts healing likelihood. Complete medical record data on 50,967 wounds from the United States Wound Registry were assigned a clear outcome (healed, amputated, etc.). Factors known to be associated with healing were evaluated using logistic regression models. Significant variables (p wound type. Some variables predicted significantly in nearly all models: wound size, wound age, number of wounds, evidence of bioburden, tissue type exposed (Wagner grade or stage), being nonambulatory, and requiring hospitalization during the course of care. Variables significant in some models included renal failure, renal transplant, malnutrition, autoimmune disease, and cardiovascular disease. All models validated well when applied to the holdout sample. The "Wound Healing Index" can validly predict likelihood of wound healing among real-world patients and can facilitate comparative effectiveness research to identify patients needing advanced therapeutics.

  3. Cell Therapy for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    You, Hi-Jin; Han, Seung-Kyu

    2014-01-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include utilization of the safest and least invasive methods with goals of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced wound healing technology has triggered the use of cells to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of this review is to provide information on clinically available cell-based treatment options for healing of acute and chronic wounds. Compared with a variety of conventional methods, such as skin...

  4. Innovation and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  5. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  6. Effective Delivery of Doxycycline and Epidermal Growth Factor for Expedited Healing of Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhilash

    The problems and high medical costs associated with chronic wounds necessitate an economical bioactive wound dressing. A new strategy was investigated to inhibit MMP-9 proteases and to release epidermal growth factor (EGF) to enhance healing. Doxycycline (DOX) and EGF were encapsulated on polyacrylic acid modified polyurethane film (PAA-PU) using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly. The number of bilayers tuned the concentration of DOX and EGF released over time with over 94% bioactivity of EGF retained over 4 days. A simple wound model in which MMP-9 proteases were added to cell culture containing fibroblast cells demonstrated that DOX inhibited the proteases providing a protective environment for the released EGF to stimulate cell migration and proliferation at a faster healing rate. In the presence of DOX, only small amounts of the highly bioactive EGF are sufficient to close the wound. Results show that this is new and promising bioactive dressing for effective wound management.

  7. Acute and chronic wound fluids inversely influence adipose-derived stem cell function: molecular insights into impaired wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenen, Paola; Spanholtz, Timo A; Maegele, Marc; Stürmer, Ewa; Brockamp, Thomas; Neugebauer, Edmund; Thamm, Oliver C

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process that requires a well-orchestrated interaction of mediators as well as resident and infiltrating cells. In this context, mesenchymal stem cells play a crucial role as they are attracted to the wound site and influence tissue regeneration by various mechanisms. In chronic wounds, these processes are disturbed. In a comparative approach, adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) were treated with acute and chronic wound fluids (AWF and CWF, respectively). Proliferation and migration were investigated using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test and transwell migration assay. Gene expression changes were analysed using quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. AWF had a significantly stronger chemotactic impact on ASC than CWF (77·5% versus 59·8% migrated cells). While proliferation was stimulated by AWF up to 136·3%, CWF had a negative effect on proliferation over time (80·3%). Expression of b-FGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 was strongly induced by CWF compared with a mild induction by AWF. These results give an insight into impaired ASC function in chronic wounds. The detected effect of CWF on proliferation and migration of ASC might be one reason for an insufficient healing process in chronic wounds.

  8. Acute and impaired wound healing: pathophysiology and current methods for drug delivery, part 1: normal and chronic wounds: biology, causes, and approaches to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N; Hamblin, Michael R; Herman, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians' understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that initiate cellular and tissue responses after injury, which may be impeded during chronic wound healing.

  9. Acute and Impaired Wound Healing: Pathophysiology and Current Methods for Drug Delivery, Part 1: Normal and Chronic Wounds: Biology, Causes, and Approaches to Care

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana N Demidova-Rice; Michael R Hamblin; Herman, Ira M.

    2012-01-01

    This is the first installment of 2 articles that discuss the biology and pathophysiology of wound healing, review the role that growth factors play in this process, and describe current ways of growth factor delivery into the wound bed. Part 1 discusses the latest advances in clinicians’ understanding of the control points that regulate wound healing. Importantly, biological similarities and differences between acute and chronic wounds are considered, including the signaling pathways that ini...

  10. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC-MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined levels of

  11. Chemical Composition and Anti-Candidiasis Mediated Wound Healing Property of Cymbopogon nardus Essential Oil on Chronic Diabetic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandimalla, Raghuram; Kalita, Sanjeeb; Choudhury, Bhaswati; Dash, Suvakanta; Kalita, Kasturi; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    Poor wound healing is one of the major complication of diabetic patients which arises due to different factors like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, vascular insufficiency and microbial infections. Candidiasis of diabetic wounds is a difficult to treat condition and potentially can lead to organ amputation. There are a few number of medications available in market to treat this chronic condition; which demands for alternative treatment options. In traditional system of medicine like Ayurveda, essential oil extracted from leaves of Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae) has been using for the treatment of microbial infections, inflammation and pain. In this regard, we have evaluated anti-Candida and anti-inflammatory activity mediated wound healing property of C. nardus essential oil (EO-CN) on candidiasis of diabetic wounds. EO-CN was obtained through hydro-distillation and subjected to Gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) analysis for chemical profiling. Anti-Candida activity of EO-CN was tested against Candida albicans, C. glabrata and C. tropicalis by in vitro zone of inhibition and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays. Anti-candidiasis ability of EO-CN was evaluated on C. albicans infected diabetic wounds of mice through measuring candida load on the 7th, 14th, and 21st day of treatment. Further progression in wound healing was confirmed by measuring the inflammatory marker levels and histopathology of wounded tissues on last day of EO-CN treatment. A total of 95 compounds were identified through GC–MS analysis, with major compounds like citral, 2,6-octadienal-, 3,7-dimethyl-, geranyl acetate, citronellal, geraniol, and citronellol. In vitro test results demonstrated strong anti-Candida activity of EO-CN with a MIC value of 25 μg/ml against C. albicans, 50 μg/ml against C. glabrata and C. tropicalis. EO-CN treatment resulted in significant reduction of candida load on diabetic wounds. Acceleration in wound healing was indicated by declined

  12. Chemokine Regulation of Angiogenesis During Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Bodnar, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis plays a critical role in wound healing. A defect in the formation of a neovasculature induces ulcer formation. One of the challenges faced by the clinician when devising strategies to promote healing of chronic wounds is the initiation of angiogenesis and the formation of a stable vasculature to support tissue regeneration. Understanding the molecular factors regulating angiogenesis during wound healing will lead to better therapies for healing chronic wounds.

  13. In Vitro Studies of Bacterial Cellulose and Magnetic Nanoparticles Smart Nanocomposites for Efficient Chronic Wounds Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca Galateanu; Mihaela-Cristina Bunea; Paul Stanescu; Eugenia Vasile; Angela Casarica; Horia Iovu; Anca Hermenean; Catalin Zaharia; Marieta Costache

    2015-01-01

    The quality of life of patients with chronic wounds can be extremely poor and, therefore, over the past decades, great efforts have been made to develop efficient strategies to improve the healing process and the social impact associated with these conditions. Cell based therapy, as a modern tissue engineering strategy, involves the design of 3D cell-scaffold bioconstructs obtained by preseeding drug loaded scaffolds with undifferentiated cells in order to achieve in situ functional de novo t...

  14. Chitosan-aluminum monostearate composite sponge dressing containing asiaticoside for wound healing and angiogenesis promotion in chronic wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai; Yodkhum, Kotchamon; Charoenteeraboon, Juree; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2015-05-01

    There are many factors that delay healing in chronic wounds including lowering level of growth factors and increasing exudate level comprising high amount of tissue destructive enzymes. Asiaticoside possesses interesting wound healing and angiogenic activities that are employed to stimulate tissue regeneration in wound healing application. This study attempted to develop chitosan-aluminum monostearate (Alst) composite sponge containing asiaticoside for use as an absorbent medical dressing in chronic wound. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was used to enhance homogeneity of asiaticoside in the polymer composite matrix. The sponge dressings were prepared by lyophilization and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT). Functional group interaction, crystallinity, and morphology of the prepared sponges were investigated using FT-IR, PXRD, and SEM, respectively. Physicochemical properties, porosity, hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties and mechanical property, were evaluated. Wound dressing properties, water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), fluid absorbency, oxygen permeation (OP), and bio-adhesive property, were investigated. In vitro asiaticoside release study was conducted using immersion method. Cytotoxicity was studied in normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK). Angiogenic activity of asiaticoside was evaluated using chick-chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. FT-IR and PXRD results revealed the amidation after DHT to enhance the crystallinity of the prepared sponges. The prepared sponges had high porosity comprising high Alst-loaded amount that exhibited more compact structure. Alst enhanced hydrophobicity therefore it reduced the fluid absorption and WVTR together with bio-adhesion of the prepared sponge dressings. Porosity of all sponges was more than 85% therefore resulting in their high OP. Enhancing hydrophobicity of the material by Alst and more homogeneity caused by NMP eventually retarded the asiaticoside release for 7 days. The

  15. Radiotherapy and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devalia, Haresh L; Mansfield, Lucy

    2008-03-01

    This review article discusses basic radiation physics and effects of radiation on wounds. It examines various postulated hypothesis on the role of circulatory decrease and radiation-induced direct cellular damage. The new concept related to the radiation pathogenesis proposes that there is a cascade of cytokines initiated immediately after the radiation. Sustained activation of myofibroblasts in the wound accounts for its chronicity. Recent advances highlight that transforming growth factor beta1 is the master switch in pathogenesis of radiation fibrosis. This articles overviews its role and summarises the available evidences related to radiation damage. The goal of this article was to provide its modern understanding, as future research will concentrate on antagonising the effects of cytokines to promote wound healing. PMID:18081782

  16. Topical application of Katupila (Securinega leucopyrus) in Dushta Vrana (chronic wound) showing excellent healing effect: A case study

    OpenAIRE

    Ajmeer, Ahamed Shahan; Dudhamal, Tukaram S.; Gupta, Sanjay Kumar; Mahanta, Vyasadeva

    2014-01-01

    Securinega leucopyrus (Willd.) Muell. is known as Humari in India, Katupila in Sri Lanka and Spinous fluggea in English. It is a desert climatic plant used topically in paste form for healing of chronic and non-healing wounds. Application of Katupila Kalka (paste) is used commonly in the management of acute as well as chronic wounds in Sri Lanka as a folklore medicine. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of herbal paste of Katupila in the treatment of Dushta Vrana (chronic wound). I...

  17. Wearable light management system for light stimulated healing of large area chronic wounds (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallweit, David; Mayer, Jan; Fricke, Sören; Schnieper, Marc; Ferrini, Rolando

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wounds represent a significant burden to patients, health care professionals, and health care systems, affecting over 40 million patients and creating costs of approximately 40 billion € annually. We will present a medical device for photo-stimulated wound care based on a wearable large area flexible and disposable light management system consisting of a waveguide with incorporated micro- and nanometer scale optical structures for efficient light in-coupling, waveguiding and homogeneous illumination of large area wounds. The working principle of this innovative device is based on the therapeutic effects of visible light to facilitate the self-healing process of chronic wounds. On the one hand, light exposure in the red (656nm) induces growth of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in deeper layers of the skin. On the other hand, blue light (453nm) is known to have antibacterial effects predominately at the surface layers of the skin. In order to be compliant with medical requirements the system will consist of two elements: a disposable wound dressing with embedded flexible optical waveguides for the light management and illumination of the wound area, and a non-disposable compact module containing the light sources, a controller, a rechargeable battery, and a data transmission unit. In particular, we will report on the developed light management system. Finally, as a proof-of-concept, a demonstrator will be presented and its performances will be reported to demonstrate the potential of this innovative device.

  18. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, S; DiPietro, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutane...

  19. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2010: chap. 7. Richardson M. Acute wounds: an overview of the physiological healing process. Nursing Times . 2004; 100(4): 50. Von Der Heyde RL, Evans RB. Wound classification ...

  20. Chitosan–aluminum monostearate composite sponge dressing containing asiaticoside for wound healing and angiogenesis promotion in chronic wound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phaechamud, Thawatchai, E-mail: thawatchaienator@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakorn Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Yodkhum, Kotchamon, E-mail: marskotchamon@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakorn Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Charoenteeraboon, Juree, E-mail: juree@su.ac.th [Department of Biopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Silpakorn University, Nakorn Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Tabata, Yasuhiko, E-mail: yasuhiko@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biomaterials, Field of tissue engineering, Institute for Frontier Medical Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    There are many factors that delay healing in chronic wounds including lowering level of growth factors and increasing exudate level comprising high amount of tissue destructive enzymes. Asiaticoside possesses interesting wound healing and angiogenic activities that are employed to stimulate tissue regeneration in wound healing application. This study attempted to develop chitosan–aluminum monostearate (Alst) composite sponge containing asiaticoside for use as an absorbent medical dressing in chronic wound. N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) was used to enhance homogeneity of asiaticoside in the polymer composite matrix. The sponge dressings were prepared by lyophilization and dehydrothermal treatment (DHT). Functional group interaction, crystallinity, and morphology of the prepared sponges were investigated using FT-IR, PXRD, and SEM, respectively. Physicochemical properties, porosity, hydrophilic/hydrophobic properties and mechanical property, were evaluated. Wound dressing properties, water vapor transmission rate (WVTR), fluid absorbency, oxygen permeation (OP), and bio-adhesive property, were investigated. In vitro asiaticoside release study was conducted using immersion method. Cytotoxicity was studied in normal human dermal fibroblast (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocyte (NHEK). Angiogenic activity of asiaticoside was evaluated using chick-chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. FT-IR and PXRD results revealed the amidation after DHT to enhance the crystallinity of the prepared sponges. The prepared sponges had high porosity comprising high Alst-loaded amount that exhibited more compact structure. Alst enhanced hydrophobicity therefore it reduced the fluid absorption and WVTR together with bio-adhesion of the prepared sponge dressings. Porosity of all sponges was more than 85% therefore resulting in their high OP. Enhancing hydrophobicity of the material by Alst and more homogeneity caused by NMP eventually retarded the asiaticoside release for 7 days

  1. The Use of Amnion-Derived Cellular Cytokine Solution to Improve Healing in Acute and Chronic Wound Models

    OpenAIRE

    Franz, Michael G.; Payne, Wyatt G.; Xing, Liyu; Naidu, D. K; Salas, R. E; Marshall, Vivienne S.; Trumpower, C. J; Smith, Charlotte A; Steed, David L.; Robson, M. C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Growth factors demonstrate mixed results improving wound healing. Amnion-derived multipotent cells release physiologic levels of growth factors and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. This solution was tested in models of acute and chronic wound healing. Methods: Acute model: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent laparotomy incisions. The midline fascia was primed with phosphate-buffered saline, unconditioned media, or amnion-derived cellular cytokine suspension prior to incision. Bre...

  2. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature. Researchers have traditionally focused on angiogenesis but defects in vasculogenesis are increasingly recognized to impact diseases including wound healing. A more comprehensive understanding of vasculogenic cytokine networks may facilitate the development of novel strategies to treat recalcitrant wounds. Further, the clinical success of endothelial progenitor cell-based therapies will depend not only on the delivery of the cells themselves but also on the appropriate cytokine milieu to promote tissue regeneration. This paper will highlight major cytokines involved in vasculogenesis within the context of cutaneous wound healing.

  3. Smoking, Chronic Wound Healing, and Implications for Evidence-Based Practice

    OpenAIRE

    McDaniel, Jodi C.; Browning, Kristine K.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic wounds are rising in prevalence and creating significant socioeconomic burdens for patients and healthcare systems worldwide. Therefore, it is now more important than ever that clinicians follow evidence-based guidelines for wound care when developing personalized treatment plans for their patients with chronic wounds. Evidence-based guidelines for treating venous leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers, and pressure ulcers, the 3 main categories of chronic wounds, focus primarily on biologi...

  4. A STUDY OF NEGATIVE PRESSURE WOUND THERAPY: VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE IN CHRONIC NON-HEALING ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhamotharan Senraman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This study evaluates the advantage of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy-Vacuum Assisted Closure over Conventional Dressing in the management of chronic non-healing ulcers. METHODS From June 2014 to June 2015, 50 patients were selected (25 cases and 25 controls. After wound debridement, VAC dressing is applied. Pre VAC and post VAC culture and sensitivity is taken. Dressing is given for 72 hours and intermittent suction is given for 10 mins. in an hour, daily for 12 hours with negative pressure ranging from 100 to 125 mmHg. Rest of the time drain of the VAC dressing is connected to the Romovac suction drain. Doppler study to assess the vascularity of the limb before the procedure and X-ray is taken to rule out osteomyelitis. Control group patients are given conventional dressings. RESULTS The gender, age and ulcer distributions were almost equal in the case and control groups and were found to be statistically insignificant. Duration of hospital stay in days was found to be statistically significant between groups. Majority (52% of cases left hospital within 3 weeks’ time, while a major chunk (88% of control population stayed more than 3 weeks. VAC dressing shows better results in patients with normal Doppler study. VAC dressing have better results in patients with 48% undergoing split skin grafting and less rate (8% of amputation as against none undergoing split skin grafting and 24% needing amputation in the control group. Patients with sterile pre-VAC culture were not turning unsterile after VAC, but 90% unsterile turns sterile after VAC. CONCLUSION NPWT is a novel technique for managing an open wound by submitting the wound either to intermittent or continuous subatmospheric pressure. Here, we did a study to study the advantage of vacuum assisted closure over conventional dressing in the management of chronic non-healing ulcers and concluded that VAC decreases hospital stay, improves pus culture sterility, has better result in

  5. Novel advancements in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reza Ghaderi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining skin integrity is vital in humans and animals to protect the organisms against dehydration, bleeding, and ingress of microorganisms. In order to do this, in Man and other evolved animals a sophisticated mechanism of wound healing occurs. At first the gap is quickly filled with a thin layer of fibrinous exudate, re-epithelialized, and rapidly replaced by new matrix. It is obvious that the speed of wound healing depends upon many factors such as the size of the wound, blood supply to the area, presence or absence of foreign bodies and microorganisms, age, health and nutritional status of the patient of the patient. Acute and chronic wounds care has extremely changed in recent years. Recenly, some traditional medications honey and other herbal medications( and new procedures are available that can be used to accelerate the healing of skin wounds.In the present article the most novel advances made in wound care and management in recent years were reviewed.

  6. A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF VACUUM-ASSISTED CLOSURE VERSUS STANDARD THERAPY OF CHRONIC NON-HEALING WOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghupathy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The application of controlled levels of negative pressure has been shown to accelerate debridement and promote healing in many different types of wounds. The optimum level of negative pressure appears to be around 125 mmHg below ambient and there is evidence that this is most effective if applied in a cyclical fashion of five minutes on and two minutes off. It is believed that the negative pressure assists with removal of interstitial fluid, decreasing localised oedema and increasing blood flow. This in turn decreases tissue bacterial levels. Additionally, mechanical deformation of cells is thought to result in protein and matrix molecule synthesis, which increases the rate of cell proliferation. Despite the significant costs involved, the technique is said to compare favourably in financial terms with conventional treatments in the management of difficult to heal wounds. METHODS VAC therapy using facilities available in government. RESULTS Study group of 20 members with 98-100% graft uptake for most used VAC therapy of 1 to 2 settings. CONCLUSION Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is a therapeutic technique using a vacuum dressing to promote healing in acute or chronic wounds and enhance healing of second and third degree burns. The therapy involves the controlled application of subatmospheric pressure to the local wound environment using a sealed wound dressing connected to a vacuum pump. The use of this technique in wound management increased dramatically over the 1990s and 2000s and a large number of studies have been published examining NPWT. NPWT appears to be useful for diabetic wound and management of the open abdomen (Laparotomy, but further research is required for other wound types, always superior to normal saline dressing.

  7. Healing Invisible Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Erica J.

    2010-01-01

    As many as 9 in 10 justice-involved youth are affected by traumatic childhood experiences. According to "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense," between 75 and 93 percent of youth currently incarcerated in the justice system have had at least one traumatic experience, including sexual abuse, war,…

  8. Phytochemicals in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Thangapazham, Rajesh L.; Sharad, Shashwat; Radha K. Maheshwari

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Traditional therapies, including the use of dietary components for wound healing and skin regeneration, are very common in Asian countries such as China and India. The increasing evidence of health-protective benefits of phytochemicals, components derived from plants is generating a lot of interest, warranting further scientific evaluation and mechanistic studies.

  9. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  10. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Giles T. S. Kirby; Stuart J. Mills; Cowin, Allison J.; Smith, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase...

  11. Chronic wound management and research

    OpenAIRE

    Romanelli M

    2014-01-01

    Marco Romanelli Wound Healing Research Unit, Division of Dermatology, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyI would like to share with you a new open access peer-reviewed journal – Chronic Wound Care Management and Research, published by Dove Medical Press. Chronic Wound Care Management and Research is an international, peer-reviewed, open-access online journal publishing original research, case reports, reviews, editorials, and commentaries on the management of chronic wounds and...

  12. Assessment and documentation of non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient health care facilities in the Czech Republic: an evaluation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorná, Andrea; Leaper, David

    2015-04-01

    The foundation of health care management of patients with non-healing, chronic wounds needs accurate evaluation followed by the selection of an appropriate therapeutic strategy. Assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in clinical practice in the Czech Republic is not standardised. The aim of this study was to analyse the methods being used to assess non-healing, chronic wounds in inpatient facilities in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out at 77 inpatient medical facilities (8 university/faculty hospitals, 63 hospitals and 6 long- term hospitals) across all regions of the Czech Republic. A mixed model was used for the research (participatory observation including creation of field notes and content analysis of documents for documentation and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data). The results of this research have corroborated the suspicion of inconsistencies in procedures used by general nurses for assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds. However, the situation was found to be more positive with regard to evaluation of basic/fundamental parameters of a wound (e.g. size, depth and location of a wound) compared with the evaluation of more specific parameters (e.g. exudate or signs of infection). This included not only the number of observed variables, but also the action taken. Both were significantly improved when a consultant for wound healing was present (P = 0·047). The same applied to facilities possessing a certificate of quality issued by the Czech Wound Management Association (P = 0·010). In conclusion, an effective strategy for wound management depends on the method and scope of the assessment of non-healing, chronic wounds in place in clinical practice in observed facilities; improvement may be expected following the general introduction of a 'non-healing, chronic wound assessment' algorithm.

  13. Immunodepletion of high-abundant proteins from acute and chronic wound fluids to elucidate low-abundant regulators in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chojnacki Caroline

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of wound healing consists of several well distinguishable and finely tuned phases. For most of these phases specific proteins have been characterized, although the underlying mechanisms of regulation are not yet fully understood. It is an open question as to whether deficits in wound healing can be traced back to chronic illnesses such as diabetes mellitus. Previous research efforts in this field focus largely on a restricted set of marker proteins due to the limitations detection by antibodies imposes. For mechanistic purposes the elucidation of differences in acute and chronic wounds can be addressed by a less restricted proteome study. Mass spectrometric (MS methods, e.g. multi dimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT, are well suitable for this complex theme of interest. The human wound fluid proteome is extremely complex, as is human plasma. Therefore, high-abundant proteins often mask the mass spectrometric detection of lower-abundant ones, which makes a depletion step of such predominant proteins inevitable. Findings In this study a commercially available immunodepletion kit was evaluated for the detection of low-abundant proteins from wound fluids. The dynamic range of the entire workflow was significantly increased to 5-6 orders of magnitude, which makes low-abundant regulatory proteins involved in wound healing accessible for MS detection. Conclusion The depletion of abundant proteins is absolutely necessary in order to analyze highly complex protein mixtures such as wound fluids using mass spectrometry. For this the used immunodepletion kit is a first but important step in order to represent the entire dynamic range of highly complex protein mixtures in the future.

  14. Cotton Study: Albumin Binding and its Effect on Elastase Activity in the Chronic Non-Healing Wound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, N.; Goheen, S.

    2005-01-01

    Cotton, as it is used in wound dressings is composed of nearly pure cellulose. During the wound-healing process, cotton is exposed to various blood components including water, salts, cells, and blood proteins. Albumin is the most prominent protein in blood. Elastase is an enzyme secreted by white blood cells and takes an active role in tissue reconstruction. In the chronic non-healing wound, elastase is often over-expressed such that this enzyme digests tissue and growth factors, and interferes with the normal healing process. Our goal is to design a cotton wound dressing that will sequester elastase or assist in reducing elastase activity in the presence of other blood proteins such as albumin. The ability of cotton and various cotton derivatives to sequester elastase and albumin has been studied by examining the adsorption of these two proteins separately. We undertook the present work to confirm the binding of albumin to cotton and to quantify the activity of elastase in the presence of various derivatives of cotton. We previously observed a slight increase in elastase activity when exposed to cotton. We also observed a continuous accumulation of albumin on cotton using high-performance liquid chromatography methods. In the present study, we used an open-column-absorption technique coupled with a colorimetric protein assay to confirm losses of albumin to cotton. We have also confirmed increased elastase activity after exposure to cotton. The results are discussed in relation to the porosity of cotton and the use of cotton for treating chronic non-healing wounds.

  15. 循环纤维细胞与慢性创面愈合%Circulating fibrocytes and chronic wound healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲍济洪; 杨靖; 陈斌

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Circulating fibrocytes originated from the peripheral blood are a fibroblast-like cel subpopulation of leukocytes. Circulating fibrocytes play an essential role in wound repair by secreting extracel ular matrix proteins and cytokines, initiating antigen-specific immunity, accelerating wound contraction as wel as promoting angiogenesis. However, the potential role for improving chronic wound healing and its mechanism is stil unclear. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the biological features of circulating fibrocytes and its potential role and mechanism in accelerating chronic wound healing. METHODS:A computer-based search of CNKI database from 2000 to 2014, PubMed database from 1994 to 2014 and Foreign Medical Journal Ful-Text Service database from 2000 to 2014 was performed using“circulating fibrocytes, non-healing wounds, diabetic foot ulcer, wound healing, cel therapy”in Chinese and English as the keywords to retrieve articles related to circulating fibrocytes, refractory mechanism of chronic wound healing and cel therapy for chronic wounds. Total y 54 articles meeting the inclusive criteria were included in result analysis. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Cel therapy with circulating fibrocytes is a safe and effective treatment for improving wound healing and has been used to repair various chronic wounds in the recent decades. Circulating fibrocytes are a distinct subpopulation of fibroblast-like leukocytes in the peripheral blood. It is able to migrate into wound sites at the early stage of wound repair and plays an active role in the wound healing process by secreting extracel ular matrix proteins, cytokines, presenting antigens, contracting wound and promoting neovascularization. Recently, it has been proved in animal experiments that circulating fibrocytes can accelerate chronic wound healing, especial y diabetic chronic wound.%背景:循环纤维细胞是近些年来在外周血液发现的具有成纤维细胞特性的一种白细胞亚群,由于具有

  16. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Jumaat Mohd. Yussof

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth factors initiate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation. Inflammation is followed by the proliferation of fibroblasts, which lay down the extracellular matrix. Simultaneously, various white cells and other connective tissue cells release both the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the tissue inhibitors of these metalloproteinases (TIMPs. MMPs remove damaged structural proteins such as collagen, while the fibroblasts lay down fresh extracellular matrix proteins. Fluid collected from acute, healing wounds contains growth factors, and stimulates fibroblast proliferation, but fluid collected from chronic, nonhealing wounds does not. Fibroblasts from chronic wounds do not respond to chronic wound fluid, probably because the fibroblasts of these wounds have lost the receptors that respond to cytokines and growth factors. Nonhealing wounds contain high levels of IL1, IL6, and MMPs, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio. Clinical examination of wounds inconsistently predicts which wounds will heal when procedures like secondary closure are planned. Surgeons therefore hope that these chemicals can be used as biomarkers of wounds which have impaired ability to heal. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will help the healing of chronic, nonhealing wounds.

  17. Biomarkers for wound healing and their evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Maheshwari, A; Chandra, A

    2016-01-01

    A biological marker (biomarker) is a substance used as an indicator of biological state. Advances in genomics, proteomics and molecular pathology have generated many candidate biomarkers with potential clinical value. Research has identified several cellular events and mediators associated with wound healing that can serve as biomarkers. Macrophages, neutrophils, fibroblasts and platelets release cytokines molecules including TNF-α, interleukins (ILs) and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) holds the greatest importance. As a result, various white cells and connective tissue cells release both matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Studies have demonstrated that IL-1, IL-6, and MMPs, levels above normal, and an abnormally high MMP/TIMP ratio are often present in non-healing wounds. Clinical examination of wounds for these mediators could predict which wounds will heal and which will not, suggesting use of these chemicals as biomarkers of wound healing. There is also evidence that the application of growth factors like PDGF will alleviate the recuperating process of chronic, non-healing wounds. Finding a specific biomarker for wound healing status would be a breakthrough in this field and helping treat impaired wound healing.

  18. Biologic Therapeutics and Molecular Profiling to Optimize Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Menke, Marie N.; Menke, Nathan B.; Boardman, Cecelia H.; Diegelmann, Robert F

    2008-01-01

    Non-healing wounds represent a significant cause of morbidity and mortality for a large portion of the adult population. Wounds that fail to heal are entrapped in a self-sustaining cycle of chronic inflammation leading to the destruction of the extracellular matrix. Among cancer patients, malnutrition, radiation, physical dehabilitation, chemotherapy, and the malignancy itself increase the likelihood of chronic wound formation, and these co-morbidity factors inhibit the normal wound healing p...

  19. WOUND HEALING IN DIABETIC ULCER

    OpenAIRE

    Ida Bagus Putra Pramana; Ketut Putu Yasa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of wound healing is a complex mechanism and involves a variety of cells. Injury is defined as a disruption of normal structure and function. Various types of growth factors and cytokines such as platelet derived growth factor and transforming growth factor beta involved in the mechanism of wound healing. There are four phases of wound healing mechanisms : hemostasis, inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling. Diabetic ulcers is one major complication, occurring in 15% of patie...

  20. Advances in the research of promoting healing of chronic wound with platelet-rich plasma%富血小板血浆促进慢性创面愈合研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宸; 章宏伟

    2014-01-01

    Normal wound healing is a well-orchestrated process of inflammatory response,cell proliferation,and tissue remodeling.However,this orderly and precise process is impaired in chronic wounds.A series of complicated pathogenic factors,including enhanced inflammatory response,poor cell proliferation,restrained angiogenesis,restricted collagen deposition,and infection,contribute to the failure of healing of chronic wound.The application of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored as a treatment for chronic wounds as it can balance wound microenvironment for promoting wound healing.PRP can modulate the inflammatory mediators,growth factors,and cytokines,etc.to correct abnormal biological events and disorderly molecular environment of cell migration and proliferation,and thus promote wound healing appropriately.Yet,the mechanism of PRP in promoting healing of chronic wound is still not elaborated,and the clinical application of PRP needs to be standardized as soon as possible.

  1. General concept of wound healing, revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theddeus O.H. Prasetyono

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a transition of processes which is also recognized as one of the most complex processes in human physiology. Complex series of reactions and interactions among cells and mediators take place in the healing process of wound involving cellular and molecular events. The inflammatory phase is naturally intended to remove devitalized tissue and prevent invasive infection. The proliferative phase is characterized by the formation of granulation tissue within the wound bed, composed of new capillary network, fibroblast, and macrophages in a loose arrangement of supporting structure. This second phase lasts from day 8 to 21 after the injury is also the phase for epithelialisation. The natural period of proliferative phase is a reflection for us in treating wound to reach the goal which ultimately defines as closed wound. The final maturation phase is also characterized by the balancing between deposition of collagen and its degradation. There are at least three prerequisites which are ideal local conditions for the nature of wound to go on a normal process of healing i.e. 1 all tissue involved in the wound and surrounding should be vital, 2 no foreign bodies in the wound, and 3 free from excessive contamination/infection. The author formulated a step ladder of thinking in regards of healing intentions covering all acute and chronic wounds. Regarding the “hierarchy” of healing intention, the fi rst and ideal choice to heal wounds is by primary intention followed by tertiary intention and lastly the secondary intention. (Med J Indones 2009;18:206-14Key words: inflammatory mediator, epithelialisation, growth factor, wound healing

  2. Murine models of human wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jerry S; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-01-01

    In vivo wound healing experiments remain the most predictive models for studying human wound healing, allowing an accurate representation of the complete wound healing environment including various cell types, environmental cues, and paracrine interactions. Small animals are economical, easy to maintain, and allow researchers to take advantage of the numerous transgenic strains that have been developed to investigate the specific mechanisms involved in wound healing and regeneration. Here we describe three reproducible murine wound healing models that recapitulate the human wound healing process.

  3. PA01.24. A literature study on the medicinal preparations mentioned in Sri Lankan indigenous medicine for chronic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Karandugoda, K.K.I.E.; Perera, B.S.R.; Pushpakumara, A.A.J.; ,

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic wounds are a challenge to the modern medical science since there is no proper medication to correct this imbalance as to stimulate and enhance the growth of healthy granulation tissue making the wound fill up. When Sri Lankan traditional medicine is concerned it has been strewn with a large number of medicinal formulas for wound healing especially for granulation tissue formation. The primary intention of this study was to collect these formulas and analyse them to come up wi...

  4. Wound Healing Devices Brief Vignettes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Caesar A.; Hare, Marc A.; Perdrizet, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The demand for wound care therapies is increasing. New wound care products and devices are marketed at a dizzying rate. Practitioners must make informed decisions about the use of medical devices for wound healing therapy. This paper provides updated evidence and recommendations based on a review of recent publications.

  5. Amniotic membrane is a potential regenerative option for chronic non-healing wounds: a report of five cases receiving dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrugala, Andrew; Sui, Audrey; Plummer, Malgorzata; Altman, Igor; Papineau, Elaine; Frandsen, Devn; Hill, Danielle; Ennis, William J

    2016-08-01

    A case series of five patients with a total of six chronic non-healing wounds (>30 day duration) were non-randomly selected to evaluate the performance, safety and handling properties of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, an amniotic membrane scaffolding product. The patients had lower extremity wounds that had previously failed standard of care within a university outpatient/inpatient wound healing programme. Five wounds treated with dehydrated amnion/chorion membrane allograft showed a mean 43% area reduction from baseline (51% median) at 3 weeks into treatment and completely healed with a 64-day median time to closure (SD ±27·6 days). One wound worsened at 3 weeks and was found to have a complete central vein obstruction that was treated with long-term mild compression but still eventually healed at 6 months. Removing this outlier, the four responding wounds had a 72% mean and 69% median change in area from baseline, at the 3 week point. All five patients received only one application of dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft, and there were no adverse events. The product was easy to use, administer and handle. In summary, dehydrated human amnion/chorion membrane allograft appears to be a safe, effective and easy to use therapy for chronic non-healing wounds. This study describes the details of these clinical cases and provides an overview of the current evidence on the use of amniotic tissue in clinical practice. PMID:25974156

  6. Regenerative Medicine: Charting a New Course in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Geoffrey C Gurtner; Chapman, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a prevalent and costly problem in the United States. Improved treatments are needed to heal these wounds and prevent serious complications such as infection and amputation.

  7. Stem Cells for Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giles T. S. Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimum healing of a cutaneous wound involves a well-orchestrated cascade of biological and molecular processes involving cell migration, proliferation, extracellular matrix deposition, and remodelling. When the normal biological process fails for any reason, this healing process can stall resulting in chronic wounds. Wounds are a growing clinical burden on healthcare systems and with an aging population as well as increasing incidences of obesity and diabetes, this problem is set to increase. Cell therapies may be the solution. A range of cell based approaches have begun to cross the rift from bench to bedside and the supporting data suggests that the appropriate administration of stem cells can accelerate wound healing. This review examines the main cell types explored for cutaneous wound healing with a focus on clinical use. The literature overwhelmingly suggests that cell therapies can help to heal cutaneous wounds when used appropriately but we are at risk of clinical use outpacing the evidence. There is a need, now more than ever, for standardised methods of cell characterisation and delivery, as well as randomised clinical trials.

  8. New insights into microRNAs in skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahs, Fatima; Bi, Xinling; Yu, Fu-Shin; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Chronic wounds are a major burden to overall healthcare cost and patient morbidity. Chronic wounds affect a large portion of the US, and billions of healthcare dollars are spent in their treatment and management. microRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding double-stranded RNAs that post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Studies have identified miRNAs involved in all three phases of wound healing including inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Some miRNAs have been demonstrated in vitro with primary keratinocyte wound healing model and in vivo with mouse wound healing model through regulation of miRNA expression to affect the wound healing process. This review updates the current miRNAs involved in wound healing and discusses the future therapeutic implications and research directions.

  9. What is New in Wound Healing?

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Senthil; WONG, Peng Foo; LEAPER, David John

    2004-01-01

    Wound biology is complex. Wounds which were until recently seen only as defects in tissues are now increasingly interpreted in cellular and molecular terms. Growth factors, cytokines, proteases and adhesion molecules which participate in wound healing are discussed in this article. From a clinical perspective, conceptual shifts of importance, including moist wound healing, wound bed preparation and wound assessment, are presented. The frontiers of therapeutics employed in wound healing contin...

  10. Wound Healing in Patients With Impaired Kidney Function

    OpenAIRE

    Maroz, Natallia; Simman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Renal impairment has long been known to affect wound healing. However, information on differences in the spectrum of wound healing depending on the type of renal insufficiency is limited. Acute kidney injury (AKI) may be observed with different wound types. On one hand, it follows acute traumatic conditions such as crush injury, burns, and post-surgical wounds, and on the other hand, it arises as simultaneous targeting of skin and kidneys by autoimmune-mediated vasculitis. Chronic kidney dise...

  11. Investigating the role of acellular skin substitutes in wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Greaves, Nicholas Stuart

    2015-01-01

    After cutaneous injury, wound healing is an essential process that restores barrier and homeostatic function to the skin. Tissue restoration is classically grouped into four phases, involving the dynamic, regulated and sequential interaction of multiple cells types, effector molecules and extracellular matrix components. While most wounds heal in a timely fashion, local and systemic factors can prevent wound resolution resulting in chronic wound formation. Examples include diabetic and venous...

  12. Connexins in wound healing; perspectives in diabetic patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, D. L.; Thrasivoulou, C.; Phillips, A. R.

    2012-01-01

    Skin lesions are common events and we have evolved to rapidly heal them in order to maintain homeostasis and prevent infection and sepsis. Most acute wounds heal without issue, but as we get older our bodies become compromised by poor blood circulation and conditions such as diabetes, leading to slower healing. This can result in stalled or hard-to-heal chronic wounds. Currently about 2% of the Western population develop a chronic wound and this figure will rise as the population ages and dia...

  13. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  14. Progress in corneal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubimov, Alexander V; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-11-01

    Corneal wound healing is a complex process involving cell death, migration, proliferation, differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Many similarities are observed in the healing processes of corneal epithelial, stromal and endothelial cells, as well as cell-specific differences. Corneal epithelial healing largely depends on limbal stem cells and remodeling of the basement membrane. During stromal healing, keratocytes get transformed to motile and contractile myofibroblasts largely due to activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) system. Endothelial cells heal mostly by migration and spreading, with cell proliferation playing a secondary role. In the last decade, many aspects of wound healing process in different parts of the cornea have been elucidated, and some new therapeutic approaches have emerged. The concept of limbal stem cells received rigorous experimental corroboration, with new markers uncovered and new treatment options including gene and microRNA therapy tested in experimental systems. Transplantation of limbal stem cell-enriched cultures for efficient re-epithelialization in stem cell deficiency and corneal injuries has become reality in clinical setting. Mediators and course of events during stromal healing have been detailed, and new treatment regimens including gene (decorin) and stem cell therapy for excessive healing have been designed. This is a very important advance given the popularity of various refractive surgeries entailing stromal wound healing. Successful surgical ways of replacing the diseased endothelium have been clinically tested, and new approaches to accelerate endothelial healing and suppress endothelial-mesenchymal transformation have been proposed including Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor eye drops and gene therapy to activate TGF-β inhibitor SMAD7. Promising new technologies with potential for corneal wound healing manipulation including microRNA, induced pluripotent stem cells to generate corneal

  15. Photobiomodulation in promoting wound healing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffler, Damien P

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse methods being applied to induce wound healing, many wounds remain recalcitrant to all treatments. Photobiomodulation involves inducing wound healing by illuminating wounds with light emitting diodes or lasers. While used on different animal models, in vitro, and clinically, wound healing is induced by many different wavelengths and powers with no optimal set of parameters yet being identified. While data suggest that simultaneous multiple wavelength illumination is more efficacious than single wavelengths, the optimal single and multiple wavelengths must be better defined to induce more reliable and extensive healing of different wound types. This review focuses on studies in which specific wavelengths induce wound healing and on their mechanisms of action.

  16. Detection of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA in actively healing human wounds treated with recombinant PDGF-BB and absence of PDGF in chronic nonhealing wounds.

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, G F; Tarpley, J. E.; Tseng, J; Bready, J; Chang, D.; Kenney, W C; Rudolph, R; Robson, M. C.; Vande Berg, J.; Reid, P.

    1995-01-01

    Some human chronic dermal wounds treated with recombinant platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rPDGF-BB) show increased healing coupled with fibroblast activation and granulation tissue formation. To determine whether endogenous PDGF is associated with healing and nonhealing dermal ulcer phenotypes, we developed monoclonal antibodies capable of recognizing the three isoforms of PDGF, AA, AB, and BB dimers, and capable of discriminating between two alternatively spliced A chain transcripts. We d...

  17. Advanced Therapeutic Dressings for Effective Wound Healing--A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boateng, Joshua; Catanzano, Ovidio

    2015-11-01

    Advanced therapeutic dressings that take active part in wound healing to achieve rapid and complete healing of chronic wounds is of current research interest. There is a desire for novel strategies to achieve expeditious wound healing because of the enormous financial burden worldwide. This paper reviews the current state of wound healing and wound management products, with emphasis on the demand for more advanced forms of wound therapy and some of the current challenges and driving forces behind this demand. The paper reviews information mainly from peer-reviewed literature and other publicly available sources such as the US FDA. A major focus is the treatment of chronic wounds including amputations, diabetic and leg ulcers, pressure sores, and surgical and traumatic wounds (e.g., accidents and burns) where patient immunity is low and the risk of infections and complications are high. The main dressings include medicated moist dressings, tissue-engineered substitutes, biomaterials-based biological dressings, biological and naturally derived dressings, medicated sutures, and various combinations of the above classes. Finally, the review briefly discusses possible prospects of advanced wound healing including some of the emerging physical approaches such as hyperbaric oxygen, negative pressure wound therapy and laser wound healing, in routine clinical care.

  18. Potential of oncostatin M to accelerate diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Soo Hye; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2014-08-01

    Oncostatin M (OSM) is a multifunctional cytokine found in a variety of pathologic conditions, which leads to excessive collagen deposition. Current studies demonstrate that OSM is also a mitogen for fibroblasts and has an anti-inflammatory action. It was therefore hypothesised that OSM may play an important role in healing of chronic wounds that usually involve decreased fibroblast function and persist in the inflammatory stage for a long time. In a previous in vitro study, the authors showed that OSM increased wound healing activities of diabetic dermal fibroblasts. However, wound healing in vivo is a complex process involving multiple factors. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of OSM on diabetic wound healing in vivo. Five diabetic mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness round wounds were created on the back of each mouse (total 20 wounds). OSM was applied on the two left-side wounds (n = 10) and phosphate-buffered saline was applied on the two right-side wounds (n = 10). After 10 days, unhealed wound areas of the OSM and control groups were compared using the stereoimage optical topometer system. Also, epithelialisation, wound contraction and reduction in wound volume in each group were compared. The OSM-treated group showed superior results in all of the tested parameters. In particular, the unhealed wound area and the reduction in wound volume demonstrated statistically significant differences (P healing of diabetic wounds.

  19. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuses...

  20. Vasculogenic Cytokines in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Victor W.; Crawford, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent a growing healthcare burden that particularly afflicts aged, diabetic, vasculopathic, and obese patients. Studies have shown that nonhealing wounds are characterized by dysregulated cytokine networks that impair blood vessel formation. Two distinct forms of neovascularization have been described: vasculogenesis (driven by bone-marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells) and angiogenesis (local endothelial cell sprouting from existing vasculature). Researc...

  1. Effects of Aloe vera cream on chronic anal fissure pain, wound healing and hemorrhaging upon defection: a prospective double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, N; Khademloo, M; Vosoughi, K; Assadpour, S

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that promotes wound healing in burn injuries. A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of a topical cream containing 0.5% Aloe vera juice powder in the treatment of chronic anal fissures. The aloe cream was applied by the patients to the wound site 3 times per day for 6 weeks following the instructions of a physician. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before treatment and at the end of each week of treatment. Wound healing and the amount and severity of bleeding were examined and evaluated before and at the end of each week of treatment. There were statistically significant differences in chronic anal fissure pain, hemorrhaging upon defection and wound healing before and at the end of the first week of treatment also in comparison with control group (p aloe vera juice was an effective treatment for chronic anal fissures. This is a promising result indicating that further comparative studies are justified.

  2. Effects of Aloe vera cream on chronic anal fissure pain, wound healing and hemorrhaging upon defection: a prospective double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, N; Khademloo, M; Vosoughi, K; Assadpour, S

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that promotes wound healing in burn injuries. A prospective clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of a topical cream containing 0.5% Aloe vera juice powder in the treatment of chronic anal fissures. The aloe cream was applied by the patients to the wound site 3 times per day for 6 weeks following the instructions of a physician. Pain was assessed with a visual analog scale before treatment and at the end of each week of treatment. Wound healing and the amount and severity of bleeding were examined and evaluated before and at the end of each week of treatment. There were statistically significant differences in chronic anal fissure pain, hemorrhaging upon defection and wound healing before and at the end of the first week of treatment also in comparison with control group (p aloe vera juice was an effective treatment for chronic anal fissures. This is a promising result indicating that further comparative studies are justified. PMID:24763890

  3. Secretome of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Enhances Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mildner, Michael; Hacker, Stefan; Haider, Thomas; Gschwandtner, Maria; Werba, Gregor; Barresi, Caterina; Zimmermann, Matthias; Golabi, Bahar; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2013-01-01

    Non-healing skin ulcers are often resistant to most common therapies. Treatment with growth factors has been demonstrated to improve closure of chronic wounds. Here we investigate whether lyophilized culture supernatant of freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is able to enhance wound healing. PBMC from healthy human individuals were prepared and cultured for 24 hours. Supernatants were collected, dialyzed and lyophilized (SECPBMC). Six mm punch biopsy wounds were set on ...

  4. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  5. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing.

  6. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joseph C; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E

    2016-06-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  7. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by Rochal Industries. The scientists/engineers at Rochal have participated in commercializing products in the field of ophthalmology, including rigid gas permeable contact lenses, soft hydrogel contact lenses, silicone hydrogel contact lenses, contact lens care solutions and cleaners, intraocular lens materials, intraocular controlled drug delivery, topical/intraocular anesthesia, and in the field of wound care, as non-stinging, spray-on liquid bandages to protect skin from moisture and body fluids and medical adhesive-related skin injuries. Current areas of entrepreneurial activity at Rochal Industries pertain to the development of new classes of biomaterials for wound healing, primarily in regard to microbial infection, chronic wound care, burn injuries and surgical procedures, with emphasis on innovation in product creation, which include cell-compatible substrates/scaffolds for wound healing, antimicrobial materials for opportunistic pathogens and biofilm reduction, necrotic wound debridement, scar remediation, treatment of diabetic ulcers, amelioration of pressure ulcers, amelioration of neuropathic pain and adjuvants for skin tissue substitutes. PMID:27047680

  8. Influence of oxygen on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Oxygen has an important role in normal wound healing. This article reviews the evidence concerning the role of oxygen in wound healing and its influence on the different stages of wound healing. The evidence reviewed has demonstrated that improving oxygenation may be helpful in limiting wound infection, although there is a lack of good quality studies on the role of oxygen in the proliferative phase and in reepithelialisation. Overall, the relationship between oxygen and wound healing is complex. Knowledge of this aspect is important as many treatment modalities for refractory wounds are based on these principles.

  9. The external microenvironment of healing skin wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Carla R; Nuutila, Kristo; Lee, Cameron Cy;

    2015-01-01

    The skin wound microenvironment can be divided into two main components that influence healing: the external wound microenvironment, which is outside the wound surface; and the internal wound microenvironment, underneath the surface, to which the cells within the wound are exposed. Treatment...

  10. Advances in Wound Healing: A Review of Current Wound Healing Products

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Patrick S.; Gregory R.D. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Successful wound care involves optimizing patient local and systemic conditions in conjunction with an ideal wound healing environment. Many different products have been developed to influence this wound environment to provide a pathogen-free, protected, and moist area for healing to occur. Newer products are currently being used to replace or augment various substrates in the wound healing cascade. This review of the current state of the art in wound-healing products looks at the latest appl...

  11. 银离子敷料促慢性创面愈合效应%Silver ion dressing effects on healing of chronic wound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘韬; 徐海栋

    2013-01-01

    背景:银离子敷料应用的理论基础是湿性愈合理论,利用创面的湿润环境减少组织坏死、加速新生上皮形成、减轻治疗过程中病患的疼痛、强化各种生长因子对伤口内组织细胞的修复,因此具有抗感染、促进创面肉芽形成、上皮增生的作用,有利于慢性创面的愈合。  目的:对比观察银离子敷料与常规消毒敷料在慢性创面治疗中的作用。  方法:选择解放军南京军区南京总医院汤山分院住院的慢性创面未愈合患者40例,采用随机数字表法分两组治疗,在预防及控制感染、改善组织循环等常规处理后,试验组给予银离子敷料换药处理,对照组采用常规消毒敷料换药。于治疗前及治疗后7,14,21 d进行创面分泌物细菌培养,观察创面愈合情况,以疼痛目测类比评分评估疼痛感。  结果与结论:与对照组比较,试验组创面细菌检出率明显降低(P0.05)。两组均未发生任何不良反应。结果表明银离子敷料在慢性创面治疗中的作用明确,可有效抗菌,促进创面肉芽、上皮增生,促进创面愈合,减轻病患治疗过程中的痛苦且无不良反应。%BACKGROUND:Silver ion dressing can reduce tissue necrosis, accelerate the epithelial formation, relieve the patient’s pain during the treatment, and strengthen various growth factors for wound repair, which is based on the theory of wet healing theory. It has obvious advantages for chronic wound healing, such as anti-infection and promoting wound granulation and epithelial hyperplasia. OBJECTIVE:To observe the efficacy of silver ion dressing used in healing of chronic wound. METHODS:A total of 40 patients who had chronic wounds were selected from Tangshan Branch Hospital of Nanjing General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command. Al cases were divided into two groups. The treatment group was treated with silver ion dressing, and the control group

  12. BURN WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF Euphorbia hirta

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiprakash, B.; Chandramohan,; Reddy, D. Narishma

    2006-01-01

    The Ethanolic extract of whole plant of Euphorbia hirta was screened for burn wound healing activity in rats as 2% W/W cream. The study was carried out based on the assessment of percentage reduction in original wound. It showed significant burn wound healing activity.

  13. Diabetes induces stable intrinsic changes to myeloid cells that contribute to chronic inflammation during wound healing in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline Bannon; Sally Wood; Terry Restivo; Laura Campbell; Hardman, Matthew J.; Mace, Kimberly A

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute inflammation in response to injury is a tightly regulated process by which subsets of leukocytes are recruited to the injured tissue and undergo behavioural changes that are essential for effective tissue repair and regeneration. The diabetic wound environment is characterised by excessive and prolonged inflammation that is linked to poor progression of healing and, in humans, the development of diabetic foot ulcers. However, the underlying mechanisms contributing to excessive i...

  14. Cellular and genetic analysis of wound healing in Drosophila larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Galko

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available To establish a genetic system to study postembryonic wound healing, we characterized epidermal wound healing in Drosophila larvae. Following puncture wounding, larvae begin to bleed but within an hour a plug forms in the wound gap. Over the next couple of hours the outer part of the plug melanizes to form a scab, and epidermal cells surrounding the plug orient toward it and then fuse to form a syncytium. Subsequently, more-peripheral cells orient toward and fuse with the central syncytium. During this time, the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway is activated in a gradient emanating out from the wound, and the epidermal cells spread along or through the wound plug to reestablish a continuous epithelium and its basal lamina and apical cuticle lining. Inactivation of the JNK pathway inhibits epidermal spreading and reepithelialization but does not affect scab formation or other wound healing responses. Conversely, mutations that block scab formation, and a scabless wounding procedure, provide evidence that the scab stabilizes the wound site but is not required to initiate other wound responses. However, in the absence of a scab, the JNK pathway is hyperinduced, reepithelialization initiates but is not always completed, and a chronic wound ensues. The results demonstrate that the cellular responses of wound healing are under separate genetic control, and that the responses are coordinated by multiple signals emanating from the wound site, including a negative feedback signal between scab formation and the JNK pathway. Cell biological and molecular parallels to vertebrate wound healing lead us to speculate that wound healing is an ancient response that has diversified during evolution.

  15. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth C Klein; Somes Chandra Guha

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2...

  16. A Novel Three-Dimensional Wound Healing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo J. Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a well-orchestrated process, with various cells and growth factors coming into the wound bed at a specific time to influence the healing. Understanding the wound healing process is essential to generating wound healing products that help with hard-to-heal acute wounds and chronic wounds. The 2D scratch assay whereby a wound is created by scratching a confluent layer of cells on a 2D substrate is well established and used extensively but it has a major limitation—it lacks the complexity of the 3D wound healing environment. Established 3D wound healing models also have many limitations. In this paper, we present a novel 3D wound healing model that closely mimics the skin wound environment to study the cell migration of fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Three major components that exist in the wound environment are introduced in this new model: collagen, fibrin, and human foreskin fibroblasts. The novel 3D model consists of a defect, representing the actual wound, created by using a biopsy punch in a 3D collagen construct. The defect is then filled with collagen or with various solutions of fibrinogen and thrombin that polymerize into a 3D fibrin clot. Fibroblasts are then added on top of the collagen and their migration into the fibrin—or collagen—filled defect is followed for nine days. Our data clearly shows that fibroblasts migrate on both collagen and fibrin defects, though slightly faster on collagen defects than on fibrin defects. This paper shows the visibility of the model by introducing a defect filled with fibrin in a 3D collagen construct, thus mimicking a wound. Ongoing work examines keratinocyte migration on the defects of a 3D construct, which consists of collagen-containing fibroblasts. The model is also used to determine the effects of various growth factors, delivered in the wound defects, on fibroblasts’ and keratinocytes’ migration into the defects. Thus this novel 3D wound healing model provides a more

  17. WOUND IMAGE ANALYSIS CLASSIFIER FOR EFFICIENT TRACKING OF WOUND HEALING STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sundeep Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wounds are evolved by increase in number of damage tissues. The traditional way of assessing the wound healing status is to periodic measure of the area covered by the wound. This technique is tedious to measure and periodic assessment is cumbersome. Basically healing status of the wound can be classified as contact methods and non contact methods. The purpose of this research work is to accurately assess the healing status of the wound .To accurately assess the wound, capturing of the wound images are the first task to be performed. There are various tools like the photographic wound assessment tool (PWAT to acquire efficient wound images. Since the characteristics of different types of wounds (venous, pressure, diabetic, and arterial ulcers vary markedly, determining the reliability and validity of using the PWAT to assess wound appearance for both chronic pressure ulcers and leg ulcers due to vascular insufficiency is important. Segmenting the area of the wound from the wound image using efficient segmentation techniques and preprocessing the segmented wound to reduce the noise using efficient filters and efficient denoising techniques. Efficient classifiers are needed to classify the wound images. One among the classifiers are the Wound Image Analysis Classifier (WIAC. Experimental evaluation has been made on comparing various classifiers like SVM, KNN, WIAC.

  18. Wound Image Analysis Classifier for Efficient Tracking of Wound Healing Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sundeep Kumar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Wounds are evolved by increase in number of damage tissues. The traditional way of assessing the wound healing status is to periodic measure of the area covered by the wound. This technique is tedious to measure and periodic assessment is cumbersome. Basically healing status of the wound can be classified as contact methods and non contact methods. The purpose of this research work is to accurately assess the healing status of the wound .To accurately assess the wound, capturing of the wound images are the first task to be performed. There are various tools like the photographic wound assessment tool (PWAT to acquire efficient wound images. Since the characteristics of different types of wounds (venous, pressure, diabetic, and arterial ulcers vary markedly, determining the reliability and validity of using the PWAT to assess wound appearance for both chronic pressure ulcers and leg ulcers due to vascular insufficiency is important. Segmenting the area of the wound from the wound image using efficient segmentation techniques and preprocessing the segmented wound to reduce the noise using efficient filters and efficient denoising techniques. Efficient classifiers are needed to classify the wound images. One among the classifiers are the Wound Image Analysis Classifier (WIAC. Experimental evaluation has been made on comparing various classifiers like SVM, KNN, WIAC.

  19. Bioelectrical Impedance Assessment of Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Lukaski, Henry C.; Moore, Micheal

    2012-01-01

    Objective assessment of wound healing is fundamental to evaluate therapeutic and nutritional interventions and to identify complications. Despite availability of many techniques to monitor wounds, there is a need for a safe, practical, accurate, and effective method. A new method is localized bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) that noninvasively provides information describing cellular changes that occur during healing and signal complications to wound healing. This article describes the ...

  20. Adenosine receptor agonists for promotion of dermal wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Valls, María D.; Cronstein, Bruce N.; Montesinos, M. Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex process that involves a well coordinated, highly regulated series of events including inflammation, tissue formation, revascularization and tissue remodeling. However, this orderly sequence is impaired in certain pathophysiological conditions such as diabetes mellitus, venous insufficiency, chronic glucocorticoid use, aging and malnutrition. Together with proper wound care, promotion of the healing process is the primary objective in the management of ch...

  1. Clinical Application of Growth Factors and Cytokines in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of non-healing wounds (e.g. pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted a nonline search of Medline and Pub Medical and crit...

  2. PLATELET-RICH PLASMA (PRP AND ITS APPLICATION IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC AND HARD-TO-HEAL SKIN WOUNDS. A Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetan Sokolov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years various methods are being applied in the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP during treatment in different orthopedic disease. They allow improvement of local biological condition and regeneration of different types of tissues. PRP is a modern treatment strategy with worldwide recognition. There is a high concentration of platelet growth factors in small amounts of plasma. PRP and its various forms have become one of the best methods to support the healing process of various tissues. PRP is used in regenerative medicine, because it provides two of three components (growth factors and scaffolds necessary for complete tissue regeneration. The particular reason for the appearance of lesions is important in order to select an appropriate treatment method and technical application. PRP may be used for treatment of various chronic and hard-to-heal cutaneous wounds, especially when standard conventional therapy is not good enough and surgical treatment is not possible. It reduces the duration, cost of treatment and the hospital stay. There is reduction of wound pain after starting the treatment, reduced risk of blood-borne disease transmission, wound healing is restored, and local immunity is activated.

  3. Fibromodulin Enhances Angiogenesis during Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Zheng, PhD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Altogether, we demonstrated that in addition to reducing scar formation, FMOD also promotes angiogenesis. As blood vessels organize and regulate wound healing, its potent angiogenic properties will further expand the clinical application of FMOD for cutaneous healing of poorly vascularized wounds.

  4. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  5. News in wound healing and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Finn; Jørgensen, Bo; Karlsmark, Tonny

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Nonhealing wounds are a significant problem in the healthcare system all over the world. The present review focuses on some recent developments and promising clinical progresses in wound management. RECENT FINDINGS: New findings have increased our knowledge in several wound areas......-TNFalpha) and Lactobacillus plantarum cultures have also been successfully used in hard to heal, atypical wounds. Knowledge on influencing factors as smoking and biofilm on the healing process has also been improved. Smoking results in delayed healing and increased risk of postoperative infection, whereas the role of biofilm...... is still at an exploratory level. Organizing models for optimal wound management are constantly being developed and refined. SUMMARY: Recent knowledge on the importance of new dressing materials containing active substances, new treatments for atypical wounds, influencing factors on the healing process...

  6. Physics of Wound Healing I: Energy Considerations

    CERN Document Server

    Apell, S Peter; Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Pizziconi, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many components and interrelated processes on a microscopic level. This paper addresses a macroscopic view on wound healing based on an energy conservation argument coupled with a general scaling of the metabolic rate with body mass M as M^{\\gamma} where 0 <{\\gamma}<1. Our three main findings are 1) the wound healing rate peaks at a value determined by {\\gamma} alone, suggesting a concept of wound acceleration to monitor the status of a wound. 2) We find that the time-scale for wound healing is a factor 1/(1 -{\\gamma}) longer than the average internal timescale for producing new material filling the wound cavity in corresondence with that it usually takes weeks rather than days to heal a wound. 3) The model gives a prediction for the maximum wound mass which can be generated in terms of measurable quantities related to wound status. We compare our model predictions to experimental results for a range of different wound conditions (healthy, lean, diabetic and obses...

  7. Evaluation of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the management of chronic nonhealing ulcer and role of periwound transcutaneous oximetry as a predictor of wound healing response: A randomized prospective controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbjot Kaur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT is a treatment option for chronic nonhealing wounds. Transcutaneous oximetry (TCOM is used for wound assessment. We undertook a randomized prospective controlled trial to evaluate the role of HBOT in healing of chronic nonhealing wounds and to determine whether TCOM predicts healing. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in 30 consenting patients with nonhealing ulcer. The patients were randomized into group HT (receiving HBOT in addition to conventional treatment and group CT (receiving only conventional treatment. Duration of treatment in both the groups was 30 days. Wound ulcer was analyzed based on size of the wound, exudates, presence of granulation tissue, and wound tissue scoring. Tissue oxygenation (TcPO 2 was measured on 0, 10 th , 20 th , and 30 th day. Results: There was 59% reduction in wound area in group HT and 26% increase in wound area in group CT. Ten patients in group HT showed improvement in wound score as compared to five patients in group CT. Complete healing was seen in three patients in group HT as compared to none in group CT. Surgical debridement was required in 6 patients in group HT and 10 patients in group CT. One patient in group HT required amputation as compared to five patients in group CT. A positive correlation was found between TcPO 2 value and various markers of wound healing. Conclusion: HBOT has a definitive adjunctive role in the management of chronic nonhealing ulcers. It decreases the amputation rate and improves patient outcome. Periwound TcPO 2 may be used as a predictor of response to HBOT and has a positive correlation with wound healing.

  8. Wound healing properties of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nilesh; Jain, U K; Pathak, A K

    2009-04-01

    The studies on excision wound healing model reveals significant wound healing activity of the methanolic leaf extract (simple ointment 5%) of "Artocarpus heterophyllus" ham which is comparable with standard (Betadine). In the excision model, the period of epithelization, of the extract treated group was found to be higher than the controlgroup and slightly lesser than standard treated group of animals on the up to 16(th) post wounding day. PMID:22557331

  9. Wound healing properties of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Nilesh; Jain, U.K.; A. K. Pathak

    2009-01-01

    The studies on excision wound healing model reveals significant wound healing activity of the methanolic leaf extract (simple ointment 5%) of “Artocarpus heterophyllus” ham which is comparable with standard (Betadine). In the excision model, the period of epithelization, of the extract treated group was found to be higher than the controlgroup and slightly lesser than standard treated group of animals on the up to 16th post wounding day.

  10. Wound Healing and Indigenous Drugs: Role as Antioxidants: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Somashekar Shetty

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional medicine, especially herbal medicine has recently been receiving heightened interest all over the world. Man from the very beginning has been aware of the health problems and has been taking care of health through diet and drugs for which plants were used extensively. Molecular oxygen plays a central role in the pathogenesis and therapy of chronic wounds. When reactive oxygen species are overproduced, oxidative stress results in detrimental cytotoxic effects causing delayed wound healing. Therefore, elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS could be an important strategy to improve healing of chronic wounds. Currently therapeutic strategies targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS by antioxidants are being introduced into the treatment of chronic wounds. Natural compounds from medicinal plants having antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities are used as therapeutic agents. Indian medicinal plants with these activities have been identified and their antioxidant and immunomodulatory effects have been reviewed.

  11. Exercise, Obesity, and Cutaneous Wound Healing: Evidence from Rodent and Human Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Pence, Brandt D.; Jeffrey A Woods

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Impaired cutaneous wound healing is a major health concern. Obesity has been shown in a number of studies to impair wound healing, and chronic nonhealing wounds in obesity and diabetes are a major cause of limb amputations in the United States.

  12. What Is New in the Understanding of Non Healing Wounds Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    H. Trøstrup; T. Bjarnsholt; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Høiby, N; Moser, C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a growing socioeconomic problem in the western world. Knowledge on recalcitrant wounds relies on in vitro studies or clinical observations, and there is emerging evidence on the clinical impact of bacterial biofilm on skin healing. Chronic wounds are locked in the inflammatory state of wound healing, and there are multiple explanations for this arrest with the theory of exaggerated proteolysis as the most commonly accepted. Previously, there has not been enough focus on the...

  13. The Role of Iron in the Skin & Cutaneous Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Anne Wright

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this review article we discuss current knowledge about iron in the skin and the cutaneous wound healing process. Iron plays a key role in both oxidative stress and photo-induced skin damage. The main causes of oxidative stress in the skin include reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in the skin by ultraviolet (UVA 320-400 nm portion of the ultraviolet spectrum and biologically available iron. We also discuss the relationships between iron deficiency, anaemia and cutaneous wound healing. Studies looking at this fall into two distinct groups. Early studies investigated the effect of anaemia on wound healing using a variety of experimental methodology to establish anaemia or iron deficiency and focused on wound-strength rather than effect on macroscopic healing or re-epithelialisation. More recent animal studies have investigated novel treatments aimed at correcting the effects of systemic iron deficiency and localised iron overload. Iron overload is associated with local cutaneous iron deposition, which has numerous deleterious effects in chronic venous disease and hereditary haemochromatosis. Iron plays a key role in chronic ulceration and conditions such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA and Lupus Erythematosus are associated with both anaemia of chronic disease and dysregulation of local cutaneous iron haemostasis. Iron is a potential therapeutic target in the skin by application of topical iron chelators and novel pharmacological agents, and in delayed cutaneous wound healing by treatment of iron deficiency or underlying systemic inflammation.

  14. Estrogen modulates cutaneous wound healing by downregulating macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    OpenAIRE

    Ashcroft, Gillian S.; Stuart J. Mills; Lei, Kejian; Gibbons, Linda; Jeong, Moon-Jin; Taniguchi, Marisu; Burow, Matthew; Horan, Michael A.; Wahl, Sharon M.; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2003-01-01

    Characteristic of both chronic wounds and acute wounds that fail to heal are excessive leukocytosis and reduced matrix deposition. Estrogen is a major regulator of wound repair that can reverse age-related impaired wound healing in human and animal models, characterized by a dampened inflammatory response and increased matrix deposited at the wound site. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a candidate proinflammatory cytokine involved in the hormonal regulation of inflammation. We...

  15. [Interdisciplinary treatment concepts in chronic wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coerper, S; Kerber, A; Schäffer, M; Becker, H D

    1998-01-01

    Interdisciplinary concepts for the treatment of chronic wounds are mandatory because of the multifactorial reasons causing ulceration. This is a report on 6 years' experience at the wound care unit in Tübingen. Patients with chronic wounds (mainly diabetic, venous, and ischemic ulcers) were treated primarily as outpatients according to a standardised and interdisciplinary wound care protocol. Quality control was guaranteed by a standardised wound documentation system. The evaluation of this data demonstrates an overall healing rate of 69% within 52 weeks (mean). Before patients were referred to Tübingen, unsuccessful therapy was characterised by a mean wound duration of 35 weeks. The results presented justify this interdisciplinary wound care unit. PMID:9931704

  16. Mast Cells Regulate Wound Healing in Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellechea, Ana; Leal, Ermelindo C; Kafanas, Antonios; Auster, Michael E; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Ostrovsky, Yana; Tecilazich, Francesco; Baltzis, Dimitrios; Zheng, Yongjun; Carvalho, Eugénia; Zabolotny, Janice M; Weng, Zuyi; Petra, Anastasia; Patel, Arti; Panagiotidou, Smaro; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Theoharides, Theoharis C; Veves, Aristidis

    2016-07-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a severe complication of diabetes that lacks effective treatment. Mast cells (MCs) contribute to wound healing, but their role in diabetes skin complications is poorly understood. Here we show that the number of degranulated MCs is increased in unwounded forearm and foot skin of patients with diabetes and in unwounded dorsal skin of diabetic mice (P diabetic mice. Pretreatment with the MC degranulation inhibitor disodium cromoglycate rescues diabetes-associated wound-healing impairment in mice and shifts macrophages to the regenerative M2 phenotype (P diabetic mice deficient in MCs have delayed wound healing compared with their wild-type (WT) controls, implying that some MC mediator is needed for proper healing. MCs are a major source of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mouse skin, but the level of VEGF is reduced in diabetic mouse skin, and its release from human MCs is reduced in hyperglycemic conditions. Topical treatment with the MC trigger substance P does not affect wound healing in MC-deficient mice, but improves it in WT mice. In conclusion, the presence of nondegranulated MCs in unwounded skin is required for proper wound healing, and therapies inhibiting MC degranulation could improve wound healing in diabetes. PMID:27207516

  17. Wound healing of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro Iizuka; Shiho Konno

    2011-01-01

    The intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) form a selective permeability barrier separating luminal content from underlying tissues. Upon injury, the intestinal epithelium undergoes a wound healing process. Intestinal wound healing is dependent on the balance of three cellular events;restitution, proliferation, and differentiation of epithelial cells adjacent to the wounded area. Previous studies have shown that various regulatory peptides, including growth factors and cytokines, modulate intestinal epithelial wound healing. Recent studies have revealed that novel factors, which include toll-like receptors (TLRs), regulatory peptides, particular dietary factors, and some gastroprotective agents, also modulate intestinal epithelial wound repair. Among these factors, the activation of TLRs by commensal bacteria is suggested to play an essential role in the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Recent studies suggest that mutations and dysregulation of TLRs could be major contributing factors in the predisposition and perpetuation of inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, studies have shown that specific signaling pathways are involved in IEC wound repair. In this review, we summarize the function of IECs, the process of intestinal epithelial wound healing, and the functions and mechanisms of the various factors that contribute to gut homeostasis and intestinal epithelial wound healing.

  18. Foxo1 Inhibits Diabetic Mucosal Wound Healing but Enhances Healing of Normoglycemic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Fanxing; Othman, Badr; Lim, Jason; Batres, Angelika; Ponugoti, Bhaskar; Zhang, Chenying; Yi, Leah; Liu, Jian; Tian, Chen; Hameedaldeen, Alhassan; Alsadun, Sarah; Tarapore, Rohinton; Graves, Dana T.

    2014-01-01

    Re-epithelialization is an important part in mucosal wound healing. Surprisingly little is known about the impact of diabetes on the molecular events of mucosal healing. We examined the role of the transcription factor forkhead box O1 (Foxo1) in oral wounds of diabetic and normoglycemic mice with keratinocyte-specific Foxo1 deletion. Diabetic mucosal wounds had significantly delayed healing with reduced cell migration and proliferation. Foxo1 deletion rescued the negative impact of diabetes o...

  19. Biosurgery in wound healing--the renaissance of maggot therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, U; Karte, K; Herold, C; Looks, A

    2000-07-01

    Chronic wounds are a challenge for modern health care. A basic principle of treatment is the removal of sloughy, necrotic, devitalized tissue to prevent wound infection and delayed healing. Biosurgery (syn. maggot or larval therapy) is a promising adjunct to the whole spectrum of topical treatment methods, in particular for debridement. The term 'biosurgery' describes the use of living maggots on wounds to remove devitalized tissue, decrease the risk of infection and improve wound healing. The present paper gives a brief review of history, entomology, biochemistry and medical indications of biosurgery and the practical handling of maggots. We also provide some clinical data from the literature and our own experience in a wound care unit. Biosurgery is an effective and safe treatment option for debridement and disinfection. PMID:11204517

  20. The effects of grounding (earthing on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oschman JL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available James L Oschman,1 Gaétan Chevalier,2 Richard Brown3 1Nature’s Own Research Association, Dover, NH, USA; 2Developmental and Cell Biology Department, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA; 3Human Physiology Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, USA Abstract: Multi-disciplinary research has revealed that electrically conductive contact of the human body with the surface of the Earth (grounding or earthing produces intriguing effects on physiology and health. Such effects relate to inflammation, immune responses, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this report is two-fold: to 1 inform researchers about what appears to be a new perspective to the study of inflammation, and 2 alert researchers that the length of time and degree (resistance to ground of grounding of experimental animals is an important but usually overlooked factor that can influence outcomes of studies of inflammation, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. Specifically, grounding an organism produces measurable differences in the concentrations of white blood cells, cytokines, and other molecules involved in the inflammatory response. We present several hypotheses to explain observed effects, based on current research results and our understanding of the electronic aspects of cell and tissue physiology, cell biology, biophysics, and biochemistry. An experimental injury to muscles, known as delayed onset muscle soreness, has been used to monitor the immune response under grounded versus ungrounded conditions. Grounding reduces pain and alters the numbers of circulating neutrophils and lymphocytes, and also affects various circulating chemical factors related to inflammation. Keywords: chronic inflammation, immune system, wound repair, white blood cells, macrophages, autoimmune disorders

  1. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilang Yang

    Full Text Available Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds.

  2. Compromised Wound Healing in Ischemic Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peilang; Pei, Qing; Yu, Tianyi; Chang, Qingxuan; Wang, Di; Gao, Min; Zhang, Xiong; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia is one of the main epidemic factors and characteristics of diabetic chronic wounds, and exerts a profound effect on wound healing. To explore the mechanism of and the cure for diabetic impaired wound healing, we established a type 2 diabetic rat model. We used an 8 weeks high fat diet (HFD) feeding regimen followed by multiple injections of streptozotocin (STZ) at a dose of 10mg/kg to induce Wister rat to develop type 2 diabetes. Metabolic characteristics were assessed at the 5th week after the STZ injections to confirm the establishment of diabetes mellitus on the rodent model. A bipedicle flap, with length to width ratio 1.5, was performed on the back of the rat to make the flap area ischemic. Closure of excisional wounds on this bipedicle flap and related physiological and pathological changes were studied using histological, immunohistochemical, real time PCR and protein immunoblot approaches. Our results demonstrated that a combination of HFD feeding and a low dose of STZ is capable of inducing the rats to develop type 2 diabetes with noticeable insulin resistance, persistent hyperglycemia, moderate degree of insulinemia, as well as high serum cholesterol and high triglyceride levels. The excision wounds on the ischemic double pedicle flap showed deteriorative healing features comparing with non-ischemic diabetic wounds, including: delayed healing, exorbitant wound inflammatory response, excessive and prolonged ROS production and excessive production of MMPs. Our study suggested that HFD feeding combined with STZ injection could induce type 2 diabetes in rat. Our ischemic diabetic wound model is suitable for the investigation of human diabetic related wound repair; especically for diabetic chronic wounds. PMID:27028201

  3. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here.

  4. Cold plasma inactivation of chronic wound bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Nasir, N; Lee, B K; Yap, S S; Thong, K L; Yap, S L

    2016-09-01

    Cold plasma is partly ionized non-thermal plasma generated at atmospheric pressure. It has been recognized as an alternative approach in medicine for sterilization of wounds, promotion of wound healing, topical treatment of skin diseases with microbial involvement and treatment of cancer. Cold plasma used in wound therapy inhibits microbes in chronic wound due to its antiseptic effects, while promoting healing by stimulation of cell proliferation and migration of wound relating skin cells. In this study, two types of plasma systems are employed to generate cold plasma: a parallel plate dielectric barrier discharge and a capillary-guided corona discharge. Parameters such as applied voltage, discharge frequency, treatment time and the flow of the carrier gas influence the cold plasma chemistry and therefore change the composition and concentration of plasma species that react with the target sample. Chronic wound that fails to heal often infected by multidrug resistant organisms makes them recalcitrant to healing. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) are two common bacteria in infected and clinically non-infected wounds. The efficacies of the cold plasma generated by the two designs on the inactivation of three different isolates of MRSA and four isolates of P. aeruginosa are reported here. PMID:27046340

  5. Therapeutic touch for healing acute wounds

    OpenAIRE

    O'Mathuna, Donal; Ashford, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic Touch (TT) is an alternative therapy that has gained popularity over the past two decades for helping wounds to heal. Practitioners enter ameditative state and pass their hands above the patient’s body to find and correct any imbalances in the patient’s ’life energy’ or chi. Scientific instruments have been unable to detect this energy. The effect of TT on wound healing has been expounded in anecdotal publications. Objectives To identify and review all relevant...

  6. Wound healing following radiation therapy: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy may interrupt normal wound healing mechanisms. Changes in vasculature, effects on fibroblasts, and varying levels of regulatory growth factors result in the potential for altered wound healing whether radiation is given before or after surgery. Surgical factors, such as incision size, as well as radiation parameters, including dose and fractionation, are important considerations in developing overall treatment plans. Experience suggests that certain practical measures may diminish the risk of morbidity, and investigations are ongoing

  7. Citric Acid Treatment of Chronic Wounds in Animals

    OpenAIRE

    B.S. Nagoba,; B.J. Wadher and S.P. Selkar

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wound infections in animals not responding to conventional treatment modality are the important cause of morbidity. Infection is responsible for delayed wound healing. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop simple and effective treatment modality by using citric acid as a sole antimicrobial agent to control chronic wound infections in animals. Thirty eight cases of chronic wounds not responding to conventional treatment modalities were divided into two groups. Each group...

  8. Chronic Wounds, Biofilms and Use of Medicinal Larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Cowan, Linda J.; Joyce K. Stechmiller; Priscilla Phillips; Qingping Yang; Gregory Schultz

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are a significant health problem in the United States, with annual associated costs exceeding $20 billion annually. Traditional wound care consists of surgical debridement, manual irrigation, moisture retentive dressings, and topical and/or systemic antimicrobial therapy. However, despite progress in the science of wound healing, the prevalence and incidence of chronic wounds and their complications are escalating. The presence & complexity of bacterial biofilms in chronic wo...

  9. Modern wound care - practical aspects of non-interventional topical treatment of patients with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissemond, Joachim; Augustin, Matthias; Eming, Sabine A; Goerge, Tobias; Horn, Thomas; Karrer, Sigrid; Schumann, Hauke; Stücker, Markus

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of patients with chronic wounds is becoming increasingly complex. It was therefore the aim of the members of the working group for wound healing (AGW) of the German Society of Dermatology (DDG) to report on the currently relevant aspects of non-interventional, topical wound treatment for daily practice. -Beside necessary procedures, such as wound cleansing and débridement, we describe commonly used wound dressings, their indications and practical use. Modern antiseptics, which are currently used in wound therapy, usually contain polyhexanide or octenidine. Physical methods, such as negative-pressure treatment, are also interesting options. It is always important to objectify and adequately treat pain symptoms which often affect these patients. Modern moist wound therapy may promote healing, reduce complications, and improve the quality of life in patients with chronic wounds. Together with the improvement of the underlying causes, modern wound therapy is an important aspect in the overall treatment regime for patients with chronic wounds.

  10. Curcumin as a wound healing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbik, Dania; Ghadiri, Maliheh; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2014-10-22

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a popular Indian spice that has been used for centuries in herbal medicines for the treatment of a variety of ailments such as rheumatism, diabetic ulcers, anorexia, cough and sinusitis. Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the main curcuminoid present in turmeric and responsible for its yellow color. Curcumin has been shown to possess significant anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-carcinogenic, anti-mutagenic, anti-coagulant and anti-infective effects. Curcumin has also been shown to have significant wound healing properties. It acts on various stages of the natural wound healing process to hasten healing. This review summarizes and discusses recently published papers on the effects of curcumin on skin wound healing. The highlighted studies in the review provide evidence of the ability of curcumin to reduce the body's natural response to cutaneous wounds such as inflammation and oxidation. The recent literature on the wound healing properties of curcumin also provides evidence for its ability to enhance granulation tissue formation, collagen deposition, tissue remodeling and wound contraction. It has become evident that optimizing the topical application of curcumin through altering its formulation is essential to ensure the maximum therapeutical effects of curcumin on skin wounds. PMID:25200875

  11. Chitosan-shelled oxygen-loaded nanodroplets abrogate hypoxia dysregulation of human keratinocyte gelatinases and inhibitors: New insights for chronic wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadjavi, Amina [Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Magnetto, Chiara [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Torino (Italy); Panariti, Alice [Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università di Milano Bicocca, Monza (Italy); Argenziano, Monica [Dipartimento di Scienza e Tecnologia del Farmaco, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Gulino, Giulia Rossana [Dipartimento di Oncologia, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Rivolta, Ilaria [Dipartimento di Scienze della Salute, Università di Milano Bicocca, Monza (Italy); Cavalli, Roberta [Dipartimento di Scienza e Tecnologia del Farmaco, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Giribaldi, Giuliana [Dipartimento di Oncologia, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Guiot, Caterina [Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Prato, Mauro, E-mail: mauro.prato@unito.it [Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze della Sanità Pubblica e Pediatriche, Università di Torino, Torino (Italy)

    2015-08-01

    Background: : In chronic wounds, efficient epithelial tissue repair is hampered by hypoxia, and balances between the molecules involved in matrix turn-over such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are seriously impaired. Intriguingly, new oxygenating nanocarriers such as 2H,3H-decafluoropentane-based oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs) might effectively target chronic wounds. Objective: : To investigate hypoxia and chitosan-shelled OLN effects on MMP/TIMP production by human keratinocytes. Methods: : HaCaT cells were treated for 24 h with 10% v/v OLNs both in normoxia or hypoxia. Cytotoxicity and cell viability were measured through biochemical assays; cellular uptake by confocal microscopy; and MMP and TIMP production by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or gelatin zymography. Results: : Normoxic HaCaT cells constitutively released MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Hypoxia strongly impaired MMP/TIMP balances by reducing MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-2, without affecting TIMP-1 release. After cellular uptake by keratinocytes, nontoxic OLNs abrogated all hypoxia effects on MMP/TIMP secretion, restoring physiological balances. OLN abilities were specifically dependent on time-sustained oxygen diffusion from OLN core. Conclusion: : Chitosan-shelled OLNs effectively counteract hypoxia-dependent dysregulation of MMP/TIMP balances in human keratinocytes. Therefore, topical administration of exogenous oxygen, properly encapsulated in nanodroplet formulations, might be a promising adjuvant approach to promote healing processes in hypoxic wounds. - Highlights: • Hypoxia impairs MMP9/TIMP1 and MMP2/TIMP2 balances in HaCaT human keratinocytes. • Chitosan-shelled oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNs) are internalised by HaCaT cells. • OLNs are not toxic to HaCaT cells. • OLNs effectively counteract hypoxia effects on MMP/TIMP balances in HaCaT cells. • OLNs appear as promising and cost-effective therapeutic tools for hypoxic

  12. Persistent Inflammation and Angiogenesis during Wound Healing in K14-directed Hoxb13 Transgenic Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic, non-healing wounds and inadequate tissue repair characterized by excessive fibrosis continue to have a major negative impact on health and quality of life. Understanding the molecular events required for adequate healing, including the transcriptional control of wound repair, will be important for the development of future therapies. We previously showed that loss of Hoxb13 from murine skin results in enhanced cutaneous wound healing, suggesting that Hoxb13 has a negative effect on w...

  13. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińczuk, Joanna; Taradaj, Jakub; Dymarek, Robert; Sopel, Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study. PMID:27413744

  14. Mechanoregulation of Wound Healing and Skin Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Rosińczuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic and clinical studies on mechanobiology of cells and tissues point to the importance of mechanical forces in the process of skin regeneration and wound healing. These studies result in the development of new therapies that use mechanical force which supports effective healing. A better understanding of mechanobiology will make it possible to develop biomaterials with appropriate physical and chemical properties used to treat poorly healing wounds. In addition, it will make it possible to design devices precisely controlling wound mechanics and to individualize a therapy depending on the type, size, and anatomical location of the wound in specific patients, which will increase the clinical efficiency of the therapy. Linking mechanobiology with the science of biomaterials and nanotechnology will enable in the near future precise interference in abnormal cell signaling responsible for the proliferation, differentiation, cell death, and restoration of the biological balance. The objective of this study is to point to the importance of mechanobiology in regeneration of skin damage and wound healing. The study describes the influence of rigidity of extracellular matrix and special restrictions on cell physiology. The study also defines how and what mechanical changes influence tissue regeneration and wound healing. The influence of mechanical signals in the process of proliferation, differentiation, and skin regeneration is tagged in the study.

  15. p38 MAPK inhibition reduces diabetes-induced impairment of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Medicherla, Satyanarayana; Wadsworth, Scott; Cullen, Breda; Silcock, Derek; Ma, Jing Y; Mangadu, Ruban; Kerr, Irene; Chakravarty, Sarvajit; Luedtke, Gregory L; Dugar, Sundeep; Protter, Andrew A.; Higgins, Linda S

    2009-01-01

    In healthy tissue, a wound initiates an inflammatory response characterized by the presence of a hematoma, infiltration of inflammatory cells into the wound and, eventually, wound healing. In pathological conditions like diabetes mellitus, wound healing is impaired by the presence of chronic nonresolving inflammation. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors have demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects, primarily by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory cytokines and regulati...

  16. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Nkemcho Ojeh; Irena Pastar; Marjana Tomic-Canic; Olivera Stojadinovic

    2015-01-01

    The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular...

  17. Total Particulate Matter and Wound Healing: An in vivo Study with Histological Insights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SOHAIL EJAZ; MUHAMMAD ASHRAF; MUHAMMAD NAWAZ; CHAE WOONG LIM

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Wound healing in the skin is a multifarious orchestration of cellular processes and cigarette smoking may be a cause for delayed wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate the plausible association between exposures of cigarette total particulate matter (TPM) and wound healing. Methods An in vivo wound healing model of mice was established for determination of assorted events of wound healing, dermal matrix regeneration, re-epithelialization, and neovascularization. A total of 72 adult mice, separated in eight groups, were exposed to TPM for 12 days. Results A highly considerable diminution in wound closure (P<0.001) was pragmatic among all TPM-treated mice from day 6 to day 8 post-wounding. Histological investigations unveiled a noteworthy impede in the outcome of re-epithelialization, dermal matrix regeneration and maturation of collagen bundles among all TPM-exposed wounds. Delayed commencement of neovascularization was pragmatic among all TPM-treated mice, on day 12 post wounding. Abbot curve, angular spectrum, and other different parameters of 3D surface behavior of wounds revealed a very highly significant reduction (P<0.001) in angiogenesis on days 6 and 8 post-wounding, which points that application of TPM instigates extensive delay in trigging the progression of angiogenesis, resulting in delayed onset of wound healing. Conclusion Our annotations validate the damaging effects of TPM on wound healing and excessive use of TPM may lead to the production of chronic wounds and oral ulcers.

  18. Gallic Acid Promotes Wound Healing in Normal and Hyperglucidic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Joo Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin is the outermost layer of the human body that is constantly exposed to environmental stressors, such as UV radiation and toxic chemicals, and is susceptible to mechanical wounding and injury. The ability of the skin to repair injuries is paramount for survival and it is disrupted in a spectrum of disorders leading to skin pathologies. Diabetic patients often suffer from chronic, impaired wound healing, which facilitate bacterial infections and necessitate amputation. Here, we studied the effects of gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; a plant-derived polyphenolic compound on would healing in normal and hyperglucidic conditions, to mimic diabetes, in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Our study reveals that GA is a potential antioxidant that directly upregulates the expression of antioxidant genes. In addition, GA accelerated cell migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in both normal and hyperglucidic conditions. Further, GA treatment activated factors known to be hallmarks of wound healing, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAK, c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK, and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk, underpinning the beneficial role of GA in wound repair. Therefore, our results demonstrate that GA might be a viable wound healing agent and a potential intervention to treat wounds resulting from metabolic complications.

  19. Gallic Acid Promotes Wound Healing in Normal and Hyperglucidic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong Joo; Moh, Sang Hyun; Son, Dong Hwee; You, Seunghoon; Kinyua, Ann W; Ko, Chang Mann; Song, Miyoung; Yeo, Jinhee; Choi, Yun-Hee; Kim, Ki Woo

    2016-01-01

    Skin is the outermost layer of the human body that is constantly exposed to environmental stressors, such as UV radiation and toxic chemicals, and is susceptible to mechanical wounding and injury. The ability of the skin to repair injuries is paramount for survival and it is disrupted in a spectrum of disorders leading to skin pathologies. Diabetic patients often suffer from chronic, impaired wound healing, which facilitate bacterial infections and necessitate amputation. Here, we studied the effects of gallic acid (GA, 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid; a plant-derived polyphenolic compound) on would healing in normal and hyperglucidic conditions, to mimic diabetes, in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Our study reveals that GA is a potential antioxidant that directly upregulates the expression of antioxidant genes. In addition, GA accelerated cell migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in both normal and hyperglucidic conditions. Further, GA treatment activated factors known to be hallmarks of wound healing, such as focal adhesion kinases (FAK), c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk), underpinning the beneficial role of GA in wound repair. Therefore, our results demonstrate that GA might be a viable wound healing agent and a potential intervention to treat wounds resulting from metabolic complications. PMID:27399667

  20. Maggot debridement therapy in chronic wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, NG; Leung, GKK; Chan, DCW; Fong, DHF; Leung, JYY

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To review the current evidence on the mechanism of actions and clinical applications of maggot debridement therapy. Data sources: Literature search of PubMed and Medline was performed up to January 2007. Study selection: Original and major review articles related to maggot debridement therapy were reviewed. Key words used in the literature search were 'maggot debridement therapy', 'wound healing', and 'chronic wound management'. Data extraction: All relevant English and Chinese art...

  1. Angiogenesis is induced and wound size is reduced by electrical stimulation in an acute wound healing model in human skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Ud-Din

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is critical for wound healing. Insufficient angiogenesis can result in impaired wound healing and chronic wound formation. Electrical stimulation (ES has been shown to enhance angiogenesis. We previously showed that ES enhanced angiogenesis in acute wounds at one time point (day 14. The aim of this study was to further evaluate the role of ES in affecting angiogenesis during the acute phase of cutaneous wound healing over multiple time points. We compared the angiogenic response to wounding in 40 healthy volunteers (divided into two groups and randomised, treated with ES (post-ES and compared them to secondary intention wound healing (control. Biopsy time points monitored were days 0, 3, 7, 10, 14. Objective non-invasive measures and H&E analysis were performed in addition to immunohistochemistry (IHC and Western blotting (WB. Wound volume was significantly reduced on D7, 10 and 14 post-ES (p = 0.003, p = 0.002, p0.05 on day 14 in VEGF-A expression post-ES compared to controls. Furthermore, organisation of granulation tissue was improved on day 14 post-ES. This randomised controlled trial has shown that ES enhanced wound healing by reduced wound dimensions and increased VEGF-A and PLGF expression in acute cutaneous wounds, which further substantiates the role of ES in up-regulating angiogenesis as observed over multiple time points. This therapeutic approach may have potential application for clinical management of delayed and chronic wounds.

  2. [Enhance the connotation of establishment of wound healing department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu-liang

    2012-02-01

    Following the development of social economy, the acceleration of aging problem, and the changes in disease spectrum, the incidence of various chronic wound diseases increased significantly, and it has become one of the most frequently encountered diseases that affect the people's health. The contradiction between the increase of medical need of wound diseases and the insufficiency of the medical service in our country is becoming increasingly conspicuous. Wound healing department, as a new cross subject that has emerged as the times require, needs to be perfected in its diagnostic and treatment strategies and methods. At present time, how to explore the new theory and pathologic mechanism of various chronic wounds, in order to establish the clinical guidelines in diagnosis and treatment that conform to national conditions of our country, and to establish efficient clinical pathway and medical-seeking model have become serious challenges to the establishment of wound healing department in our country. Thus, it is imperative for us to enhance the connotation of establishment of wound healing department. For this purpose, this article mainly elaborates on three aspects, including "enriching traditional diagnostic system with new theory and new technology", "improving treatment effect by ameliorating traditional methods and absorbing new technology from relating subspecialty", "establishing a new medical-seeking model by applying digital technology and vertically integrating medical resources". PMID:22490530

  3. Nutrient support of the healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N A; Muller, M J; Herndon, D N

    1994-05-01

    Wound healing is a series of complex physicochemical interactions that require various micronutrients at every step. In the critically ill or severely injured patient, wound healing is impaired by the protein-catabolic, hypermetabolic response to stress. The hypothalamus responds to cytokine stimulation by increasing the thermoregulatory set-point and by augmenting elaboration of stress hormones (catecholamines, cortisol, and glucagon). In turn, the stress hormones induce thermogenic futile substrate cycling, lipolysis, and proteolysis. Increased glucose production results at the expense of skeletal muscle degradation, producing amino acid substrate for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Nutritional support of the hypermetabolic state is an essential part of ensuring efficient wound healing in these patients. Protein catabolism cannot be reversed by increased amino acid availability alone, due partly to a defect in amino acid transport. This defect can be reversed by anabolic agents, such as growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-1. Growth hormone treatment dramatically improves wound healing in severely burned children. Supplementation with protein and vitamins, specifically arginine and vitamins A, B, and C, provides optimum nutrient support of the healing wound. PMID:7922445

  4. Evaluation of acute and sub-chronic toxicity of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new phytotherapeutic drug for wound healing in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, an herbal formulation containing Melilotus officinalis extract, is a novel compound being developed for treatment of chronic wounds, particularly diabetic foot ulcers. The purpose of this study was to investigate toxicological, pharmacological, and pathomorphological effects of I.M. and I.P. administration of Semelil in animals."nThe acute toxicity parameters of Semelil diluted in normal saline (1:10 or 1:5 were determined after a single injection into BALB/c mice and Wistar rats in two steps. First, the LD50 was approximately assessed and then the precise lethal dose indices were estimated by the probit-analysis method. Specific single-dose effects of Semelil were monitored for clinical signs of toxicity, including general state of the animals, changes in their behavior, hematological and biochemical parameters for 14 days after drug administration. Then, subacute-chronic toxicity was evaluated in rats treated with Semelil for 3 months. "nIn acute toxicity study, the calculated LD50 for drug diluted at 1:5 was in the range of 44-52 ml/kg. The adverse effects at drug doses close to the LD50 included depressed mood, narcosis, and sleep. No adverse pharmacological or toxicological effects of the drug diluted at 1:10 and administered in the single-dose (25-50 ml/kg body wt. or chronically (daily doses of 0.07 and 0.21 ml/kg body wt. were noted. Thus, the animal studies demonstrated a favorable safety profile for the phytotherapeutic Semelil.

  5. A wound healing model with sonographic monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, K; Winkler, K; el-Gammal, S; Altmeyer, P

    1993-05-01

    The methods used hitherto for quantification of skin repair processes only allow an examiner a two-dimensional assessment of superficial wound healing. With the recent advent of high frequency B-scan ultrasonography in dermatology it has become possible to follow the course of healing and evaluate the healing processes in deeper layers of the skin. In this investigation 80 patients received cryosurgery for treatment of basal cell carcinomas on the face or neck region. As the size of cryosurgical defects can be precisely controlled they are potentially useful as standardized wound healing models. The course of wound healing after cryosurgery using a digital ultrasound scanner (DUB 20, Taberna pro medicum, Lüneburg, Germany) was monitored. The usable depth of penetration of the echo signal is approximately 7 mm. The lateral resolution is approximately 200 microns, the axial resolution approximately 80 microns. The cryolesion and the repair processes were examined ultrasonographically and clinically over a period of at least 3 weeks or until the wound had completely healed. The depth of invasion and lateral extent of the basal cell carcinoma as well as the size of the induced cryolesion can be determined by ultrasound. The exudative phase after cryosurgery, with developing oedema and necrosis, can be quantified on the basis of the reduced reflectivity in the corium. The repair processes taking place in the region of necrosis can be visualized in the ultrasound scan. The ultrasonically monitored wound healing model which we have demonstrated is particularly suitable for investigating the efficacy of drugs which promote healing.

  6. Modern therapy of chronic wounds with respect to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Descriptions of wound care techniques have been found in some of the oldest archeological findings and chronic wounds have been threading man thousands of years. However, only in the last few decades substantial progress has been made in understanding the cellular and biochemical processes relevant in normal healing. Pathophysiology: Wound healing is a complex process involving a variety of different cells, proteins, chemoattractants, proteinases and growth factors. The normal repair process is a coordinated cellular and biochemical event and can be characterized by 3 different healing phases (inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phase). Certain pathophysiologic conditions and metabolic disorders alter this preprogrammed course, leading to delayed healing or chronic nonhealing wounds. Disturbance of wound healing after radiation: Especially irradiation can complicate tissue repair and surgical wound healing. Therefore this article will review the basic understanding of the wound healing process and the knowledge of modern surgical and conservative wound therapy from a surgical point of view, which is essential to surpass pathophysiological situations and avoid chronic wounds. (orig.)

  7. Survey of Wound-Healing Centers and Wound Care Units in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yufeng; Xia, Lei; Jia, Lijing; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the Chinese experience of establishing hospital-based wound care centers over 15 years. A total of 69 wound-healing centers (WHCs) and wound care units (WCUs) were involved. Questionnaires were diverged to the principal directors of these sites; data extracted for this study included origin, year of establishment, medical staff, degree of hospitals, wound etiology, wound-healing rate, hospital stay, and outcomes data. The period of data extraction was defined as before and after 1 year of the establishment of WHCs and WCUs. The earliest WHC was established in 1999, and from 2010 the speeds of establishing WHCs and WCUs rapidly increased. The majority of WHCs were divisions of burn departments, and all WHCs came from departments of outpatient dressing rooms. Full-time multidisciplinary employees of WHCs differed greatly to WCUs. Types of wound and outcomes vary with those of centers reported from Western countries and the United States. Improvement in wound healing caused by the establishment of WHCs and WCUs in China occurred without doubt. Some advices include the following: rearrange and reorganize the distribution of WHCs and WCUs; enact and generalize Chinese guidelines for chronic wounds; utilize medical resources reasonably; improve multidisciplinary medical staff team; draw up and change some medical and public policies and regulations.

  8. Citric Acid Treatment of Chronic Wounds in Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.S. Nagoba,

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wound infections in animals not responding to conventional treatment modality are the important cause of morbidity. Infection is responsible for delayed wound healing. In the present study, an attempt was made to develop simple and effective treatment modality by using citric acid as a sole antimicrobial agent to control chronic wound infections in animals. Thirty eight cases of chronic wounds not responding to conventional treatment modalities were divided into two groups. Each group included 19 cases. In group 1, 3% citric acid solution and in group 2, 5% citric acid solution was used for local application to find out its efficacy in the treatment of chronic wound infections in animals. Citric acid was found effective in the control of all 38 cases in 7 to 20 applications. In group 1, the wounds healed in 10-20 applications. In group 2, the wounds healed in 7-15 applications. Citric acid treatment was found most effective and economical approach for the successful treatment of chronic infected wounds in animals not responding to conventional antibiotic treatment and local wound care. These results suggest that when healing of chronic wounds in animals is a matter of great concern, the value of topical agents like citric acid should not be forgotten.

  9. The effects of caffeine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Sawaya, Andrew; Yin, Natalie; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-10-01

    The purine alkaloid caffeine is a major component of many beverages such as coffee and tea. Caffeine and its metabolites theobromine and xanthine have been shown to have antioxidant properties. Caffeine can also act as adenosine-receptor antagonist. Although it has been shown that adenosine and antioxidants promote wound healing, the effect of caffeine on wound healing is currently unknown. To investigate the effects of caffeine on processes involved in epithelialisation, we used primary human keratinocytes, HaCaT cell line and ex vivo model of human skin. First, we tested the effects of caffeine on cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration, processes essential for normal wound epithelialisation and closure. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) proliferation assay to test the effects of seven different caffeine doses ranging from 0·1 to 5 mM. We found that caffeine restricted cell proliferation of keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, scratch wound assays performed on keratinocyte monolayers indicated dose-dependent delays in cell migration. Interestingly, adhesion and differentiation remained unaffected in monolayer cultures treated with various doses of caffeine. Using a human ex vivo wound healing model, we tested topical application of caffeine and found that it impedes epithelialisation, confirming in vitro data. We conclude that caffeine, which is known to have antioxidant properties, impedes keratinocyte proliferation and migration, suggesting that it may have an inhibitory effect on wound healing and epithelialisation. Therefore, our findings are more in support of a role for caffeine as adenosine-receptor antagonist that would negate the effect of adenosine in promoting wound healing.

  10. Self-assembling peptide nanofiber scaffolds accelerate wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Schneider

    Full Text Available Cutaneous wound repair regenerates skin integrity, but a chronic failure to heal results in compromised tissue function and increased morbidity. To address this, we have used an integrated approach, using nanobiotechnology to augment the rate of wound reepithelialization by combining self-assembling peptide (SAP nanofiber scaffold and Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF. This SAP bioscaffold was tested in a bioengineered Human Skin Equivalent (HSE tissue model that enabled wound reepithelialization to be monitored in a tissue that recapitulates molecular and cellular mechanisms of repair known to occur in human skin. We found that SAP underwent molecular self-assembly to form unique 3D structures that stably covered the surface of the wound, suggesting that this scaffold may serve as a viable wound dressing. We measured the rates of release of EGF from the SAP scaffold and determined that EGF was only released when the scaffold was in direct contact with the HSE. By measuring the length of the epithelial tongue during wound reepithelialization, we found that SAP scaffolds containing EGF accelerated the rate of wound coverage by 5 fold when compared to controls without scaffolds and by 3.5 fold when compared to the scaffold without EGF. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrated that biomaterials composed of a biofunctionalized peptidic scaffold have many properties that are well-suited for the treatment of cutaneous wounds including wound coverage, functionalization with bioactive molecules, localized growth factor release and activation of wound repair.

  11. DIABETIC WOUND HEALING MANAGEMENT- A PEER REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Harshavardhan Pathapati; T.E. Gopala Krishna Murthy; B. Ramanaiah; Davu Srinivas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes is a metabolic disorder mainly impairs the body glucose utilization capacity due to this perforcely repressing the immuno-dysfunction (decreases chemotaxis, phagocytosis and intracellular killing actions) and collagen synthesis which are essential in wound debridement management of diabetic patients. Delayed wound healing is considered as one of the most repulsive disabling and costly complication of diabetes. People with diabetes have extenuated circulation, poor resista...

  12. 碱性成纤维细胞生长因子加速慢性难愈合创面愈合%Healing of chronic cutaneous wounds by topical treatment with basic fibroblast growth factor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付小兵; 沈祖尧; 郭振荣; 张明良; 盛志勇

    2002-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical application of recombinant bovine basic fibroblast growth factor (rbFGF) on the healing of chronic cutaneous wounds. Methods Twenty-eight patients with thirty-three chronic cutaneous wounds resulting from trauma, diabetes mellitus, pressure sore and radiation injuries were enrolled in this prospective, open-label crossover trial. Prior to treatment with rbFGF, all wounds failed to heal with conventional therapies within 4 weeks. All wounds were locally treated with rbFGF at a dose of 150?AU/cm2. Healing time and the quality of wounds were used to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment.Results Healing of all chronic wounds was expedited. During the study, eighteen wounds completely healed within 2 weeks, four healed within 3 weeks, and another eight completely healed within 4 weeks. Only three wounds failed to heal within 4 weeks, but healed at 30, 40 and 42 days after treatment with rbFGF. Thus, compared with conventional therapies, the effective rate of rbFGF treatment within 4 weeks was 90.9%. Histological assessment showed more abundant capillary sprouts or tubes and that fibroblasts were differentiated in wounds treated with rbFGF. No adverse side effects related to basic fibroblast growth factor were observed.Conclusions Our results indicate that rbFGF could be used to accelerate healing in chronic wounds. It is our belief that this may be a more effective method of chronic wound management.%目的 观察重组中碱性成纤维细胞生长因子(rbFGF)对慢性难愈合创面(溃疡)的促修复作用并探讨其促修复机制。方法 本组28例共33个慢性难愈合创面,其中创伤性溃疡12例(13个创面)、压迫性溃疡9例(13个创面),糖尿病溃疡4例,放射性溃疡3例。所有创面经清创后用rbFGF治疗(150?AU/cm2创面,每天1次)。结果 所有经rbFGF治疗的创面都产生了明显的愈合,其中2周内愈合为18例,2-3周内愈合为4

  13. Cellular events and biomarkers of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Jumaat Mohd Yussof; Effat Omar; Pai, Dinker R.; Suneet Sood

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have identified several of the cellular events associated with wound healing. Platelets, neutrophils, macrophages, and fibroblasts primarily contribute to the process. They release cytokines including interleukins (ILs) and TNF-α, and growth factors, of which platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is perhaps the most important. The cytokines and growth factors manipulate the inflammatory phase of healing. Cytokines are chemotactic for white cells and fibroblasts, while the growth f...

  14. Roles of Antioxidative Enzymes in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Toshihiro Kurahashi; Junichi Fujii

    2015-01-01

    Since skin is the first barrier separating the body from the external environment, impaired wound healing can be life threatening to living organisms. Delayed healing processes are observed in animals under certain circumstances, such as advanced age, diabetes, and immunosuppression, but the underlying mechanisms of the abnormality remain elusive. Redox homeostasis is defined as the balance between the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in which antioxidative enzymes pla...

  15. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  16. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care. [1] It is a snapshot of a patient′s total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors. [2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT, as used at our institution (CAMC, and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society may vary widely from country to country and payment system. [3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons. [1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise.

  17. Nutrition and Chronic Wounds: Improving Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnar, Joseph A; Vlad, Lucian G; Gumus, Tuna

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing awareness that chronic wound healing is very dependent on the patient's nutritional status, but there are no clearly established and accepted assessment protocols or interventions in clinical practice. Much of the data used as guidelines for chronic wound patients are extrapolated from acutely wounded trauma patients, but the 2 groups are very different patient populations. While most trauma patients are young, healthy, and well-nourished before injury, the chronic wound patient is usually old, with comorbidities and frequently malnourished. We suggest the assumption that all geriatric wound patients are malnourished until proved otherwise. Evaluation should include complete history and physical and a formal nutritional evaluation should be obtained. Laboratory studies can be used in conjunction with this clinical information to confirm the assessment. While extensive studies are available in relation to prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers and perioperative nutrition, less is known of the effect of nutritional deficits and supplementation of the diabetic foot ulcer and venous stasis ulcer patient. This does not necessarily mean that nutritional support of these patients is not helpful. In the pursuit of wound healing, we provide systemic support of cardiac and pulmonary function and cessation of smoking, improve vascular inflow, improve venous outflow, decrease edema, and treat with hyperbaric oxygen. If we address all of these other conditions, why would we not wish to support the most basic of organismal needs in the form of nutrition? PMID:27556777

  18. Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve. PMID:26022525

  19. Wound Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  20. Wound healing and hyper-hydration - a counter intuitive model

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cutting, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Winters seminal work in the 1960s relating to providing an optimal level of moisture to aid wound healing (granulation and re-epithelialisation) has been the single most effective advance in wound care over many decades. As such the development of advanced wound dressings that manage the fluidic wound environment have provided significant benefits in terms of healing to both patient and clinician. Although moist wound healing provides the guiding management principle confusion may arise betwe...

  1. [Translation medicine in wound healing: successful cases and personal deliberation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobing

    2014-02-01

    Local wound care is the key step in wound management, and it is affected by many factors. The innovation and translation application of some new theories and skills may help accelerate local wound healing velocity and improve wound healing quality. In this paper, the translation medicine in wound healing, such as debridement, dressings, and tissue engineering products, are reviewed. In the meantime, personal consideration concerning their successful and future development is given. PMID:24684981

  2. Wound healing property of paroxetine in immunosuppressed albino rats

    OpenAIRE

    Dwajani S; Ranjana Gurumurthy

    2013-01-01

    Background: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the wound healing activity of Paroxetine in different wound models in wistar rats and to study its effects on dexamethasone suppressed wound healing. Methods: For assessment of wound healing activity, excision and incision wound models were used. Group I was assigned as control, orally, Group II received Paroxetine, i.p, Group III received Dexamethasone intramuscularly (i.m) and Group IV received Dexamethasone i.m and Paroxetine, i....

  3. Cold temperature delays wound healing in postharvest sugarbeet roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots s...

  4. Mucopolysaccharides from psyllium involved in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhof, W; Das, P K; Middelkoop, E; Verschoor, J; Storey, L; Regnier, C

    2001-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharides derived from the husk of psyllium (Plantago ovata) have properties beneficial for wound cleansing and wound healing. Recent studies indicate that these mucopolysaccharides also limit scar formation. Our in vitro and in vivo studies aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved, e.g., fluid absorption, bacterial adherence and in vitro stimulatory effects on macrophages, which are pivotal in wound healing. The mucopolysaccharides contained in a sachet (Askina Cavity) or in a hydrocolloid mixture (Askina Hydro) were found to have a gradual and sustained absorbency over a period of 7 days, amounting to 4-6 times their weight in water. The swelling index was 9 mm after 312 h. Adherence of wound bacteria to the mucopolysaccharides started after 2 h and was more pronounced after 3 h. Semiquantitative measurements of bacterial adherence used centrifugation and subsequent optical density determinations of supernatant. These confirmed the strong adherence potential of psyllium particles. Lactic acid dehydrogenase staining of pretreated cultured human skin explants did not reveal toxicity of the mucopolysaccharides derived from psyllium husk. Langerhans' cell migration from the epidermis was negligible and interleukin-1 beta expression in the explants was not significant, supporting the very low allergenic potential of psyllium. The characteristics of mucopolysaccharide granulate derived from psyllium husk in Askina Cavity and Askina Hydro related to fluid absorption, bacterial adherence, biocompatibility, stimulation of macrophages, irritancy response and allergenicity showed an optimal profile, supporting the good clinical performance of wound healing products containing psyllium husk. PMID:11951574

  5. Regenerative Medicine: Charting a New Course in Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Chapman, Mary Ann

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Chronic wounds are a prevalent and costly problem in the United States. Improved treatments are needed to heal these wounds and prevent serious complications such as infection and amputation. Recent Advances: In wound healing, as in other areas of medicine, technologies that have the potential to regenerate as opposed to repair tissue are gaining ground. These include customizable nanofiber matrices incorporating novel materials; a variety of autologous and allogeneic cell types at various stages of differentiation (e.g., pluripotent, terminally differentiated); peptides; proteins; small molecules; RNA inhibitors; and gene therapies. Critical Issues: Wound healing is a logical target for regenerative medicine due to the accessibility and structure of skin, the regenerative nature of healing, the lack of good limb salvage treatments, and the current use of cell therapies. However, more extensive knowledge of pathophysiologic targets is needed to inform regenerative strategies, and new technologies must demonstrate value in terms of outcomes and related health economic measures to achieve successful market access and penetration. Future Directions: Due to similarities in cell pathways and developmental mechanisms, regenerative technologies developed in one therapeutic area may be applicable to others. Approaches that proceed from human genomic or other big data sources to models are becoming increasingly common and will likely suggest novel therapeutic avenues. To fully capitalize on the advances in regenerative medicine, studies must demonstrate the value of new therapies in identified patient populations, and sponsors must work with regulatory agencies to develop appropriate dossiers supporting timely approval. PMID:27366592

  6. Skin wound healing and phytomedicine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazyar, Nader; Yaghoobi, Reza; Rafiee, Esmail; Mehrabian, Abolfath; Feily, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Skin integrity is restored by a physiological process aimed at repairing the damaged tissues. The healing process proceeds in four phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation and remodeling. Phytomedicine presents remedies, which possess significant pharmacological effects. It is popular amongst the general population in regions all over the world. Phytotherapeutic agents have been largely used for cutaneous wound healing. These include Aloe vera, mimosa, grape vine, Echinacea, chamomile, ginseng, green tea, jojoba, tea tree oil, rosemary, lemon, soybean, comfrey, papaya, oat, garlic, ginkgo, olive oil and ocimum. Phytotherapy may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention on cutaneous wounds. This article provides a review of the common beneficial medicinal plants in the management of skin wounds with an attempt to explain their mechanisms.

  7. The Role of Neuromediators and Innervation in Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mohammed; Baguneid, Mohamed; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2016-06-15

    The skin is densely innervated with an intricate network of cutaneous nerves, neuromediators and specific receptors which influence a variety of physiological and disease processes. There is emerging evidence that cutaneous innervation may play an important role in mediating wound healing. This review aims to comprehensively examine the evidence that signifies the role of innervation during the overlapping stages of cutaneous wound healing. Numerous neuropeptides that are secreted by the sensory and autonomic nerve fibres play an essential part during the distinct phases of wound healing. Delayed wound healing in diabetes and fetal cutaneous regeneration following wounding further highlights the pivotal role skin innervation and its associated neuromediators play in wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms via which cutaneous innervation modulates wound healing in both the adult and fetus will provide opportunities to develop therapeutic devices which could manipulate skin innervation to aid wound healing. PMID:26676806

  8. Desarrollo de un índice de medida de la evolución hacia la cicatrización de las heridas crónicas Development of a wound healing index for chronic wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Restrepo-Medrano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: revisar sistemáticamente la literatura sobre instrumentos de medida de la cicatrización. Adaptar y/o desarrollar una escala de medida de la evolución hacia la cicatrización de todo tipo de heridas crónicas. Material y método: el Estudio se lleva a cabo en dos fases: Fase 1: Revisión sistemática de la literatura en las principales bases de datos de ciencias de la salud (MEDLINE, CINAHL, CUIDEN, SCIELO, LILACS, COCHRANE, IME desde el inicio de las bases de datos hasta el año 2009. Las palabras incluidas en la estrategia de búsqueda fueron: instrument, tool, ulcer, chronic wound, healing, assessment, validation, reliability, así como las mismas en español, con sus correspondientes formulaciones booleanas utilizando AND, OR y el término de truncamiento para algunas de ellas. La búsqueda se llevó a cabo inicialmente en los tesauros y si la palabra no existía en texto libre. No se tuvo en cuenta para la inclusión el diseño del estudio. Se utilizó el sistema GRADE para evaluar la calidad de las publicaciones. Fase 2: Estudio Delphi modificado con un grupo de expertos en heridas crónicas, para llegar al consenso sobre las variables que pudieran medir la dimensión "evolución hacia la cicatrización". En la primera ronda se partió con todas las variables de la herida y el paciente encontradas en los diferentes instrumentos de la revisión sistemática. En la segunda ronda se enviaron los ítems que habían obtenido mayor puntuación. Finalmente, se envió la versión final y se preguntó a los expertos que puntuaran en una escala del 1 al 4 para obtener el índice de validez de contenido (CVI. Aquellas variables que hubieran obtenido un CVI superior al 80% fueron incluidas. Resultados: la revisión sistemática revela un número de ocho instrumentos de medida de cicatrización recogidos en 20 artículos (10 artículos sobre el PUSH, tres del PSST, uno de DESIGN, uno de PWAT, uno de la Escala Sessing, uno de la Escala

  9. Endogenous N-acyl taurines regulate skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasso, Oscar; Pontis, Silvia; Armirotti, Andrea; Cardinali, Giorgia; Kovacs, Daniela; Migliore, Marco; Summa, Maria; Moreno-Sanz, Guillermo; Picardo, Mauro; Piomelli, Daniele

    2016-07-26

    The intracellular serine amidase, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), degrades a heterogeneous family of lipid-derived bioactive molecules that include amides of long-chain fatty acids with taurine [N-acyl-taurines (NATs)]. The physiological functions of the NATs are unknown. Here we show that genetic or pharmacological disruption of FAAH activity accelerates skin wound healing in mice and stimulates motogenesis of human keratinocytes and differentiation of human fibroblasts in primary cultures. Using untargeted and targeted lipidomics strategies, we identify two long-chain saturated NATs-N-tetracosanoyl-taurine [NAT(24:0)] and N-eicosanoyl-taurine [NAT(20:0)]-as primary substrates for FAAH in mouse skin, and show that the levels of these substances sharply decrease at the margins of a freshly inflicted wound to increase again as healing begins. Additionally, we demonstrate that local administration of synthetic NATs accelerates wound closure in mice and stimulates repair-associated responses in primary cultures of human keratinocytes and fibroblasts, through a mechanism that involves tyrosine phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and an increase in intracellular calcium levels, under the permissive control of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptors. The results point to FAAH-regulated NAT signaling as an unprecedented lipid-based mechanism of wound-healing control in mammalian skin, which might be targeted for chronic wound therapy. PMID:27412859

  10. Current management of wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F; Karlsmark, T

    2009-01-01

    While the understanding of wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades the improvements in clinical treatment has occurred to a minor degree. During the last years, however, new trends and initiatives have been launched, and we will continue to attain new information...

  11. Tumour endothelial marker-8 in wound healing and its impact on the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheila C.; Lin YE; Sanders, Andrew J.; Ruge, Fiona; HARDING, KEITH G.; Jiang, Wen G

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wound management represents a significant burden on healthcare systems and negatively impacts on the quality of patient life. New strategies to understand and identify wounds that will not heal in a normal manner are required. Tumour endothelial marker-8 (TEM-8) has been implicated in the wound healing and angiogenesis processes. TEM-8 expression was examined at the transcript level in a cohort of acute (n=10) and chronic (n=14) wounds and in normal skin (n=10). Protein analysis of TE...

  12. A comprehensive review of advanced biopolymeric wound healing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Naeema; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Du Toit, Lisa C; Pillay, Viness

    2014-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that involves the mediation of many initiators effective during the healing process such as cytokines, macrophages and fibroblasts. In addition, the defence mechanism of the body undergoes a step-by-step but continuous process known as the wound healing cascade to ensure optimal healing. Thus, when designing a wound healing system or dressing, it is pivotal that key factors such as optimal gaseous exchange, a moist wound environment, prevention of microbial activity and absorption of exudates are considered. A variety of wound dressings are available, however, not all meet the specific requirements of an ideal wound healing system to consider every aspect within the wound healing cascade. Recent research has focussed on the development of smart polymeric materials. Combining biopolymers that are crucial for wound healing may provide opportunities to synthesise matrices that are inductive to cells and that stimulate and trigger target cell responses crucial to the wound healing process. This review therefore outlines the processes involved in skin regeneration, optimal management and care required for wound treatment. It also assimilates, explores and discusses wound healing drug-delivery systems and nanotechnologies utilised for enhanced wound healing applications. PMID:24985412

  13. [Pathophysiological aspects of wound healing in normal and diabetic foot].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, N V; Lyundup, A V; Lubimov, R O; Melnichenko, G A; Nikolenko, V N

    2014-01-01

    The main cause of long-term healing of ulcers in patients with diabetic foot is considered to be direct mechanical damage when walking due to reduced sensitivity to due to neuropathy, hyperglycemia, infection and peripheral artery disease. These factors determine the standard approaches to the treatment of diabeticfoot, which include: offloading, glycemic control, debridement of ulcers, antibiotic therapy and revascularization. Recently, however, disturbances in the healing process of the skin in diabetes recognized an additional factor affecting the timing of healing patients with diabetic foot. Improved understanding and correction of cellular, molecular and biochemical abnormalities in chronic wound in combination with standard of care for affords new ground for solving the problem of ulcer healing in diabetes.

  14. Engineered human vascularized constructs accelerate diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-I; Cho, Hongkwan; Papa, Arianne E; Burke, Jacqueline A; Chan, Xin Yi; Duh, Elia J; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is emerging as a promising approach for chronic diabetic wounds, but strategies for optimizing both cellular differentiation and delivery remain as major obstacles. Here, we study bioengineered vascularized constructs as a therapeutic modality for diabetic wound healing. We developed a wound model in immunodeficient rodent and treated it with engineered vascularized constructs from endothelial progenitors or early vascular cells-derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) reprogrammed either from healthy donor or type-1 diabetic patient. We found that all vascularized constructs expedited wound closure and reperfusion, with endothelial progenitor constructs having the earliest maximum closure rate followed closely by healthy and diabetic hiPSC-derivative constructs. This was accompanied by rapid granulation layer formation and regression in all vascularized construct groups. Macrophage infiltration into the hydrogel matrix occurred during early stages of healing, seeming to facilitate rapid neovascularization of the wound that could then better persist in the vascularized constructs. Blood perfusion of the human vasculature could be detected after three days, indicating rapid integration with the host vasculature. Overall, we propose a potential therapeutic strategy using allograft or autologous vascularized constructs to treat type-1 diabetic wounds. This approach highlights the unprecedented prospects of designing patient-specific stem cell therapy. PMID:27328431

  15. Acceleration of diabetic wound healing using a novel protease-anti-protease combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming; Nguyen, Trung T; Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Gooyit, Major; Mobashery, Shahriar; Chang, Mayland

    2015-12-01

    Nonhealing chronic wounds are major complications of diabetes resulting in >70,000 annual lower-limb amputations in the United States alone. The reasons the diabetic wound is recalcitrant to healing are not fully understood, and there are limited therapeutic agents that could accelerate or facilitate its repair. We previously identified two active forms of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-8 and MMP-9, in the wounds of db/db mice. We argued that the former might play a role in the body's response to wound healing and that the latter is the pathological consequence of the disease with detrimental effects. Here we demonstrate that the use of compound ND-336, a novel highly selective inhibitor of gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) and MMP-14, accelerates diabetic wound healing by lowering inflammation and by enhancing angiogenesis and re-epithelialization of the wound, thereby reversing the pathological condition. The detrimental role of MMP-9 in the pathology of diabetic wounds was confirmed further by the study of diabetic MMP-9-knockout mice, which exhibited wounds more prone to healing. Furthermore, topical administration of active recombinant MMP-8 also accelerated diabetic wound healing as a consequence of complete re-epithelialization, diminished inflammation, and enhanced angiogenesis. The combined topical application of ND-336 (a small molecule) and the active recombinant MMP-8 (an enzyme) enhanced healing even more, in a strategy that holds considerable promise in healing of diabetic wounds.

  16. Wound healing Agents from Medicinal Plants:A Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShivaniRawat; Ramandeep Singh; Preeti Thakur; SatinderKaur; AlokSemwal

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a review of plants identified from various ethno botanical surveys and folklore medicinal survey with Wound healing activity. Wound is defined as the disruption of the cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Wound may be produced by physical, chemical, thermal, microbial or immunological insult to the tissues. The process of wound healing consists of integrated cellular and biochemical events leading to re-establishment of structural and functional integrity with regain of strength in injured tissues.This review discuss about Wound healing potential of plants, its botanicalname, Common name, family, part used and references, which are helpful for researcher to development new Wound healing formulations for human use.

  17. MONITORING EPIDERMAL WOUND HEALING IN HUMANS BY OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrom, M.; Larsen, H. F.; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette Rahbek;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive monitoring of wound healing is warranted. Opticalcoherence tomography (OCT) enables instant visualization of the epidermis andupper dermis. We have studied the healing of uniform epidermal wounds inhumans using OCT. Methods: Thirty-two, 16 females and 16 males, non...... (baseline), and post-wounding days 2 and4. Full-thickness skin biopsies (12 mm 3 3 mm) of the 60 wounds were excised andprocessed for routine histology. In two volunteers, wound healing was followed over14 days by OCT and transepidermal water loss. Data were analyzed in linear mixedmod els for repeated...... thickness during human epidermal wound healing....

  18. Wound healing activity of Elaeis guineensis leaf extract ointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Sreenivasan; Logeswaran, Selvarasoo; Latha, Lachimanan Yoga

    2012-01-01

    Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  19. The Use of Biologic Scaffolds in the Treatment of Chronic Nonhealing Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Neill J.; Badylak, Stephen F.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Injuries to the skin as a result of illness or injury, particularly chronic nonhealing wounds, present a major healthcare problem. Traditional wound care approaches attempt to control the underlying causes, such as infection and ischemia, while the application of wound dressings aims to modify a poorly healing wound environment into a microenvironment more closely resembling an acute wound allowing the body to heal the wound naturally.

  20. Chitosan-alginate membranes accelerate wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Guilherme Ferreira; Frade, Marco Andrey Cipriani; Andrade, Thiago Antônio Moretti; Leite, Marcel Nani; Bueno, Cecilia Zorzi; Moraes, Ângela Maria; Ribeiro-Paes, João Tadeu

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of chitosan-alginate membrane to accelerate wound healing in experimental cutaneous wounds. Two wounds were performed in Wistar rats by punching (1.5 cm diameter), treated with membranes moistened with saline solution (CAM group) or with saline only (SL group). After 2, 7, 14, and 21 days of surgery, five rats of each group were euthanized and reepithelialization was evaluated. The wounds/scars were harvested for histological, flow cytometry, neutrophil infiltrate, and hydroxyproline analysis. CAM group presented higher inflammatory cells recruitment as compared to SL group on 2(nd) day. On the 7(th) day, CAM group showed higher CD11b(+) level and lower of neutrophils than SL group. The CAM group presented higher CD4(+) cells influx than SL group on 2(nd) day, but it decreased during the follow up and became lower on 14(th) and 21(st) days. Higher fibroplasia was noticed on days 7 and 14 as well as higher collagenesis on 21(st) in the CAM group in comparison to SL group. CAM group showed faster reepithelialization on 7(th) day than SL group, although similar in other days. In conclusion, chitosan-alginate membrane modulated the inflammatory phase, stimulated fibroplasia and collagenesis, accelerating wound healing process in rats.

  1. Quantifying cell behaviors during embryonic wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, David; Ma, Xiaoyan; Crews, Sarah; Lynch, Holley; McCleery, W. Tyler; Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-03-01

    During embryogenesis, internal forces induce motions in cells leading to widespread motion in tissues. We previously developed laser hole-drilling as a consistent, repeatable way to probe such epithelial mechanics. The initial recoil (less than 30s) gives information about physical properties (elasticity, force) of cells surrounding the wound, but the long-term healing process (tens of minutes) shows how cells adjust their behavior in response to stimuli. To study this biofeedback in many cells through time, we developed tools to quantify statistics of individual cells. By combining watershed segmentation with a powerful and efficient user interaction system, we overcome problems that arise in any automatic segmentation from poor image quality. We analyzed cell area, perimeter, aspect ratio, and orientation relative to wound for a wide variety of laser cuts in dorsal closure. We quantified statistics for different regions as well, i.e. cells near to and distant from the wound. Regional differences give a distribution of wound-induced changes, whose spatial localization provides clues into the physical/chemical signals that modulate the wound healing response. Supported by the Human Frontier Science Program (RGP0021/2007 C).

  2. Improvement of wound healing by water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA in patients with chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs including evaluation using infrared thermography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann, Gerd

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA is a special form of heat radiation with a high tissue-penetration and with a low thermal burden to the surface of the skin. wIRA is able to improve essential and energetically meaningful factors of wound healing by thermal and non-thermal effects. Aim of the study: prospective study (primarily planned randomised, controlled, blinded, de facto with one exception only one cohort possible using wIRA in the treatment of patients with recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs with thermographic follow-up. Methods: 10 patients (5 males, 5 females, median age 62 years with 11 recalcitrant chronic venous stasis ulcers of the lower legs were treated with water-filtered infrared-A and visible light irradiation (wIRA(+VIS, Hydrosun® radiator type 501, 10 mm water cuvette, water-filtered spectrum 550–1400 nm or visible light irradiation (VIS; only possible in one patient. The uncovered wounds of the patients were irradiated two to five times per week for 30 minutes at a standard distance of 25 cm (approximately 140 mW/cm2 wIRA and approximately 45 mW/cm2 VIS. Treatment continued for a period of up to 2 months (typically until closure or nearly closure of the ulcer. The main variable of interest was “percent change of ulcer size over time” including complete wound closure. Additional variables of interest were thermographic image analysis, patient’s feeling of pain in the wound, amount of pain medication, assessment of the effect of the irradiation (by patient and by clinical investigator, assessment of feeling of the wound area (by patient, assessment of wound healing (by clinical investigator and assessment of the cosmetic state (by patient and by clinical investigator. For these assessments visual analogue scales (VAS were used. Results: The study showed a complete or nearly complete healing of lower leg ulcers in 7 patients and a clear reduction of ulcer size in another 2 of 10

  3. Effects of glutamine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesici, Ugur; Kesici, Sevgi; Ulusoy, Hulya; Yucesan, Fulya; Turkmen, Aygen U; Besir, Ahmet; Tuna, Verda

    2015-06-01

    Studies reporting the need for replacing amino acids such as glutamine (Gln), hydroxymethyl butyrate (HMB) and arginine (Arg) to accelerate wound healing are available in the literature. The primary objective of this study was to present the effects of Gln on tissue hydroxyproline (OHP) levels in wound healing. This study was conducted on 30 female Sprague Dawley rats with a mean weight of 230 ± 20 g. Secondary wounds were formed by excising 2 × 1 cm skin subcutaneous tissue on the back of the rats. The rats were divided into three equal groups. Group C (Control): the group received 1 ml/day isotonic solution by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group A (Abound): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln, 0·052 g/kg/day/ml HMB and 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Arg by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. Group R (Resource): the group received 0·3 g/kg/day/ml Gln by gastric gavage after secondary wound was formed. The OHP levels of the tissues obtained from the upper half region on the 8th day and the lower half region on the 21st day from the same rats in the groups were examined. Statistical analysis was performed using the statistics program SPSS version 17.0. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to the OHP measurements on the 8th and 21st days (8th day: F = 0·068, P = 0·935 > 0·05; 21st day: F = 0·018, P = 0·983 > 0·05). The increase in mean OHP levels on the 8th and 21st days within each group was found to be statistically significant (F = 1146·34, P = 0·000 wound healing negatively and who do not have large tissue loss at critical level, Gln, Arg and HMB support would not be required to accelerate secondary wound healing.

  4. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    OpenAIRE

    P F Builders; Kabele-Toge, B.; M Builders; Chindo, B. A.; Patricia A Anwunobi; Yetunde C Isimi

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chr...

  5. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma Gel on Wound Healing: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Marissa J Carter; Fylling, Carelyn P.; Parnell, Laura K.S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Autologous platelet rich plasma is an advanced wound therapy used in hard-to-heal acute and chronic wounds. To better understand the use and clinical outcomes of the therapy, a systematic review of the published literature in cutaneous wounds was performed. Methods: Electronic and hand searches for randomized controlled trials and comparative group studies using platelet rich plasma therapy in cutaneous wounds and published over the last 10 years was conducted. Eligible studies com...

  6. Does maggot therapy promote wound healing? The clinical and cellular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigam, Y; Morgan, C

    2016-05-01

    The larvae of Lucillia sericata, or maggots of the green-bottle fly, are used worldwide to help debride chronic, necrotic and infected wounds. Whilst there is abundant clinical and scientific evidence to support the role of maggots for debriding and disinfecting wounds, not so much emphasis has been placed on their role in stimulating wound healing. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that maggots and their externalized secretions may also promote wound healing in stubborn, recalcitrant chronic ulcers. There are a growing number of clinical reports which support the observation that wounds which have been exposed to a course of maggot debridement therapy also show earlier healing and closure end-points. In addition, recent pre-clinical laboratory studies also indicate that maggot secretions can promote important cellular processes which explain this increased healing activity. Such processes include activation of fibroblast migration, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels) within the wound bed, and an enhanced production of growth factors within the wound environment. Thus, in this review, we summarize the clinical evidence which links maggots and improved wound healing, and we précis recent scientific studies which examine and identify the role of maggots, particularly individual components of maggot secretions, on specific cellular aspects of wound healing.

  7. What Is New in the Understanding of Non Healing Wounds Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Trøstrup

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are a growing socioeconomic problem in the western world. Knowledge on recalcitrant wounds relies on in vitro studies or clinical observations, and there is emerging evidence on the clinical impact of bacterial biofilm on skin healing. Chronic wounds are locked in the inflammatory state of wound healing, and there are multiple explanations for this arrest with the theory of exaggerated proteolysis as the most commonly accepted. Previously, there has not been enough focus on the different etiologies of chronic wounds compared to acute, healing wounds. There is an urgent need to group chronic wounds by its cause when searching for possible diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Good wound management should therefore consist of recognition of basic wound etiology, irrigation, and debridement in order to reduce microbial and necrotic load, frequently changed dressings, and appropriate antimicrobial and antibiofilm strategies based on precise diagnosis. Representative sampling is required for diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of wounds. The present review aims at describing the impact of biofilm infections on wounds in relation to diagnosing, treatment strategies, including experimentally adjuvant approaches and animal models.

  8. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  9. Matrix metalloproteinases in impaired wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    auf dem Keller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Fabio Sabino, Ulrich auf dem Keller Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland Abstract: Cutaneous wound healing is a complex tissue response that requires a coordinated interplay of multiple cells in orchestrated biological processes to finally re-establish the skin's barrier function upon injury. Proteolytic enzymes and in particular matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to all phas...

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy: a tool being developed for the noninvasive monitoring of wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Wound care and management accounted for over 1.8 million hospital discharges in 2009. The complex nature of wound physiology involves hundreds of overlapping processes that we have only begun to understand over the past three decades. The management of wounds remains a significant challenge for inexperienced clinicians. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjective. Some wounds fail to close, or dehisce, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. An understanding of the molecular environment of acute and chronic wounds throughout the wound-healing process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the patient's outcome. Pathologic alterations of wounds are accompanied by fundamental changes in the molecular environment that can be analyzed by vibrational spectroscopy. Vibrational spectroscopy, specifically Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, offers the capability to accurately detect and identify the various molecules that compose the extracellular matrix during wound healing in their native state. The identified changes might provide the objective markers of wound healing, which can then be integrated with clinical characteristics to guide the management of wounds.

  11. Effect of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Joon Chul; Choi, Rak-Jun; Han, Seung-Kyu; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2015-04-01

    In covering wounds, efforts should include use of the safest and least invasive methods with a goal of achieving optimal functional and cosmetic outcome. The recent development of advanced technology in wound healing has triggered the use of cells and/or biological dermis to improve wound healing conditions. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effects of fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis on wound healing efficacy.Ten nude mice were used in this study. Four full-thickness 6-mm punch wounds were created on the dorsal surface of each mouse (total, 40 wounds). The wounds were randomly assigned to one of the following 4 treatments: topical application of Dulbecco phosphate-buffered saline (control), human fibroblasts (FB), artificial dermis (AD), and human fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis (AD with FB). On the 14th day after treatment, wound healing rate and wound contraction, which are the 2 main factors determining wound healing efficacy, were evaluated using a stereoimage optical topometer system, histomorphological analysis, and immunohistochemistry.The results of the stereoimage optical topometer system demonstrated that the FB group did not have significant influence on wound healing rate and wound contraction. The AD group showed reduced wound contraction, but wound healing was delayed. The AD with FB group showed decreased wound contraction without significantly delayed wound healing. Histomorphological analysis exhibited that more normal skin structure was regenerated in the AD with FB group. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that the AD group and the AD with FB group produced less α-smooth muscle actin than the control group, but this was not shown in the FB group.Fibroblast-seeded artificial dermis may minimize wound contraction without significantly delaying wound healing in the treatment of skin and soft tissue defects.

  12. Wound Healing Activity of Elaeis guineensis Leaf Extract Ointment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenivasan Sasidharan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Elaeis guineensis of the Arecaceae family is widely used in the traditional medicine of societies in West Africa for treating various ailments. To validate the ethnotherapeutic claims of the plant in skin diseases, wound healing activity was studied. The results showed that E. guineensis leaf extract had potent wound healing capacity as evident from the better wound closure (P < 0.05, improved tissue regeneration at the wound site, and supporting histopathological parameters pertaining to wound healing. Matrix metalloproteinases expression correlated well with the results thus confirming efficacy of E. guineensis in the treatment of the wound. E. guineensis accelerated wound healing in rats, thus supporting its traditional use. The result of this study suggested that, used efficiently, oil palm leaf extract is a renewable resource with wound healing properties.

  13. Changes of anabolic processes at the cellular and molecular level in chronic wounds under topical negative pressure can be revealed by transcriptome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Leffler, Mareike; Derrick, Kathleen L.; McNulty, Amy; Malsiner, Caye; Dragu, Adrian; Horch, Raymund E.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Chronic wounds – as defined by the World Union of Wound Healing Societies (WUWHS) – are a considerable worldwide health care expense and impair quality of life. In order for chronic wounds to heal, these wounds must be transformed to a more acute state to begin the healing process. Topical negative pressure (TNP) with reticulated open cell foam (ROCF) is known to promote healing in certain types of chronic wounds. However, little is known about changes at the cellular or molecular le...

  14. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saini NK; Singhal M; Srivastava B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the potential wound healing activity of Tecomaria capensis leaves extract (TCLE) using different models in rats.(a) Excision wound model,(b) Incision wound model and (c) Dead space wound model.TCLE (100,300,1 000 and 2 000 mg.kg-1) was given to rats to observe acute toxicity.No toxicity was found in animals till 14 days.TCLE 5% and 10% ointment were applied topically in excision wound model and incision wound model.TCLE 200 and 400 mg·kg-1 were given orally in dead space wound model.It improved healing in excision wound model,increased breaking strength of tissue in incision wound model,and increased granuloma breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in dead space wound model.These results showed that TCLE presents significant wound healing activity.

  15. The Efficacy of Gelam Honey Dressing towards Excisional Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mui Koon Tan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey is one of the oldest substances used in wound management. Efficacy of Gelam honey in wound healing was evaluated in this paper. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups of 24 rats each (untreated group, saline group, Intrasite Gel group, and Gelam honey group with 2 cm by 2 cm full thickness, excisional wound created on neck area. Wounds were dressed topically according to groups. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 5, 10, and 15 of treatments. Wounds were then processed for macroscopic and histological observations. Gelam-honey-dressed wounds healed earlier (day 13 than untreated and saline treated groups, as did wounds treated with Intrasite Gel. Honey-treated wounds exhibited less scab and only thin scar formations. Histological features demonstrated positive effects of Gelam honey on the wounds. This paper showed that Gelam honey dressing on excisional wound accelerated the process of wound healing.

  16. Complement deficiency promotes cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafail, Stavros; Kourtzelis, Ioannis; Foukas, Periklis G; Markiewski, Maciej M; DeAngelis, Robert A; Guariento, Mara; Ricklin, Daniel; Grice, Elizabeth A; Lambris, John D

    2015-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex homeostatic response to injury that engages numerous cellular activities, processes, and cell-to-cell interactions. The complement system, an intricate network of proteins with important roles in immune surveillance and homeostasis, has been implicated in many physiological processes; however, its role in wound healing remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employ a murine model of excisional cutaneous wound healing and show that C3(-/-) mice exhibit accelerated early stages of wound healing. Reconstitution of C3(-/-) mice with serum from C3(+/+) mice or purified human C3 abrogated the accelerated wound-healing phenotype. Wound histology of C3(-/-) mice revealed a reduction in inflammatory infiltrate compared with C3(+/+) mice. C3 deficiency also resulted in increased accumulation of mast cells and advanced angiogenesis. We further show that mice deficient in the downstream complement effector C5 exhibit a similar wound-healing phenotype, which is recapitulated in C5aR1(-/-) mice, but not C3aR(-/-) or C5aR2(-/-) mice. Taken together, these data suggest that C5a signaling through C5aR may in part play a pivotal role in recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells to the wound environment, which in turn could delay the early stages of cutaneous wound healing. These findings also suggest a previously underappreciated role for complement in wound healing, and may have therapeutic implications for conditions of delayed wound healing.

  17. Monitoring wound healing by multiphoton tomography/endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; Kaatz, Martin; Hipler, Christina; Zens, Katharina; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2015-02-01

    Certified clinical multiphoton tomographs are employed to perform rapid label-free high-resolution in vivo histology. Novel tomographs include a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm for autofluorescence and SHG imaging as well as rigid two-photon GRIN microendoscope. Mitochondrial fluorescent NAD(P)H, fluorescent elastin, keratin, and melanin as well as SHG-active collagen can be imaged with submicron resolution in human skin. The system was employed to study the healing of chronic wounds (venous leg ulcer) and acute wounds (curettage of actinic or seborrheic keratosis) on a subcellular level. Furthermore, a flexible sterile foil as interface between wound and focusing optic was tested.

  18. [Stem cells and growth factors in wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuła, Michał; Langa, Paulina; Kosikowska, Paulina; Trzonkowski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process which depends on the presence of various types of cells, growth factors, cytokines and the elements of extracellular matrix. A wound is a portal of entry for numerous pathogens, therefore during the evolution wound healing process has formed very early, being critical for the survival of every individual. Stem cells, which give rise to their early descendants progenitor cells and subsequently differentiated cells, play a specific role in the process of wound healing. Among the most important cells which take part in wound healing the following cells need to be distinguished: epidermal stem cells, dermal precursor of fibroblasts, adipose-derived stem cells as well as bone marrow cells. The activity of these cells is strictly regulated by various growth factors, inter alia epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor (TGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Any disorders in functioning of stem cells and biological activity of growth factors may lead to the defects in wound healing, for instance delayed wound healing or creation of hypertrophic scars. Therefore, knowledge concerning the mechanisms of wound healing is extremely essential from clinical point of view. In this review the current state of the knowledge of the role of stem cells and growth factors in the process of wound healing has been presented. Moreover, some clinical aspects of wound healing as well as the possibility of the therapy based on stem cells and growth factors have included.

  19. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eunkyo [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Min [Research Institute of Health Sciences, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, In-Kyung [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yunsook [Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung-Hyun, E-mail: jjhkim@cau.ac.kr [Department of Home Economics Education, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. {yields} Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. {yields} These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-{kappa}B and TNF-{alpha} expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results

  20. Effects of genistein on early-stage cutaneous wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We examine the effect of genistein on cutaneous wound healing. → Genistein enhanced wound closure during the early stage of wound healing. → These genistein effects on wound closure were induced by reduction of oxidative stress through increasing antioxidant capacity and modulation of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. -- Abstract: Wound healing occurs in three sequential phases: hemostasis and inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. Inflammation, the earliest phase, is considered a critical period for wound healing because immune cells remove damaged tissues, foreign debris, and remaining dead tissue. Wound healing would be delayed without inflammation, and this phase is affected by antioxidation capacity. Therefore, we hypothesized that genistein, which has an antioxidant effect, might modulate the wound healing process by altering the inflammatory response. After three days of acclimation, mice were divided into three groups: control, 0.025% genistein, and 0.1% genistein. After two weeks of an experimental diet, skin wounds were induced. Wounded skin areas were imaged, and the healing rate calculated. To measure lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme expression and activity, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, skin and liver tissues were harvested at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Genistein did not affect body weight. The rate of wound closure in mice fed genistein was significantly faster than in the control group during the early stage of wound healing, especially in first three days. Cu, Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expression in wound skin tissue in the 0.1% genistein group was lower than in the control group. However, CAT expression did not differ among groups. We also found that genistein modulated NF-κB and TNF-α expression during the early stage of wound healing. The genistein group had significantly lower hepatic lipid peroxidation and higher SOD, CAT, and GPx activities than the control group. These results suggest that genistein

  1. Application of laser scan microscopy in vivo for wound healing characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the advancing age of the population, wound healing disturbances are becoming increasingly important in clinical routine. The development of wound healing creams and lotions as well as therapy control require an objective evaluation of the wound healing process, which represents the destruction of the barrier. Therefore, transepidermal water loss measurements are often carried out. These measurements have the disadvantage that they are disturbed by the interstitial fluid, which is located on the surface of chronic wounds and also by water components of the creams and lotions. Additionally, the TEWL measurements are very sensitive to temperature changes and to the anxiety of the volunteers. In the present study, in vivo laser scanning microscopy was used to analyze the reepithelialization and barrier recovery of standardized wounds produced by the suction blister technique. It was demonstrated that this non-invasive, on-line spectroscopic method allows the evaluation of the wound healing process, without any disturbances. It was found that the wound healing starts not only from the edges of the wound, but also out of the hair follicles. The in vivo laser scanning microscopy is well suited to evaluate the efficacy of wound healing creams and for therapy control

  2. Impaired cutaneous wound healing in mice lacking tetranectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iba, Kousuke; Hatakeyama, Naoko; Kojima, Takashi;

    2009-01-01

    disruption of the tetranectin gene to elucidate the biological function of tetranectin. In this study, we showed that wound healing was markedly delayed in tetranectin-null mice compared with wild-type mice. A single full-thickness incision was made in the dorsal skin. By 14 days after the incision......, the wounds fully healed in all wild-type mice based on the macroscopic closure; in contrast, the progress of wound healing in the tetranectin null mice appeared to be impaired. In histological analysis, wounds of wild-type mice showed complete reepithelialization and healed by 14 days after the incision....... However, those of tetranectin-null mice never showed complete reepithelialization at 14 days. At 21 days after the injury, the wound healed and was covered with an epidermis. These results supported the fact that tetranectin may play a role in the wound healing process....

  3. Complements and the Wound Healing Cascade: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex pathway of regulated reactions and cellular infiltrates. The mechanisms at play have been thoroughly studied but there is much still to learn. The health care system in the USA alone spends on average 9 billion dollars annually on treating of wounds. To help reduce patient morbidity and mortality related to abnormal or prolonged skin healing, an updated review and understanding of wound healing is essential. Recent works have helped shape the multistep process in wound healing and introduced various growth factors that can augment this process. The complement cascade has been shown to have a role in inflammation and has only recently been shown to augment wound healing. In this review, we have outlined the biology of wound healing and discussed the use of growth factors and the role of complements in this intricate pathway.

  4. Wound care matrices for chronic leg ulcers: role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sano H

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Hitomi Sano,1 Sachio Kouraba,2 Rei Ogawa11Department of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery, Nippon Medical School, Tokyo, Japan; 2Sapporo Wound Care and Anti-Aging Laboratory, Sapporo, JapanAbstract: Chronic leg ulcers are a significant health care concern. Although deep wounds are usually treated by flap transfers, the operation is invasive and associates with serious complications. Skin grafts may be a less invasive means of covering wounds. However, skin grafts cannot survive on deep defects unless high-quality granulation tissue can first be generated in the defects. Technologies that generate high-quality granulation tissue are needed. One possibility is to use wound care matrices, which are bioengineered skin and soft tissue substitutes. Because they all support the healing process by providing a premade extracellular matrix material, these matrices can be termed “extracellular matrix replacement therapies”. The matrix promotes wound healing by acting as a scaffold for regeneration, attracting host cytokines to the wound, stimulating wound epithelialization and angiogenesis, and providing the wound bed with bioactive components. This therapy has lasting benefits as it not only helps large skin defects to be closed with thin skin grafts or patch grafts but also restores cosmetic appearance and proper function. In particular, since it acts as a layer that slides over the subcutaneous fascia, it provides skin elasticity, tear resistance, and texture. Several therapies and products employing wound care matrices for wound management have been developed recently. Some of these can be applied in combination with negative pressure wound therapy or beneficial materials that promote wound healing and can be incorporated into the matrix. To date, the clinical studies on these approaches suggest that wound care matrices promote spontaneous wound healing or can be used to facilitate skin grafting, thereby avoiding the need to use

  5. Mechanical compression attenuates normal human bronchial epithelial wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malavia Nikita

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway narrowing associated with chronic asthma results in the transmission of injurious compressive forces to the bronchial epithelium and promotes the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and the denudation of the bronchial epithelium. While the individual effects of compression or denudation are well characterized, there is no data to elucidate how these cells respond to the application of mechanical compression in the presence of a compromised epithelial layer. Methods Accordingly, differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to one of four conditions: 1 unperturbed control cells, 2 single scrape wound only, 3 static compression (6 hours of 30 cmH2O, and 4 6 hours of static compression after a scrape wound. Following treatment, wound closure rate was recorded, media was assayed for mediator content and the cytoskeletal network was fluorescently labeled. Results We found that mechanical compression and scrape injury increase TGF-β2 and endothelin-1 secretion, while EGF content in the media is attenuated with both injury modes. The application of compression after a pre-existing scrape wound augmented these observations, and also decreased PGE2 media content. Compression stimulated depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton and significantly attenuated wound healing. Closure rate was partially restored with the addition of exogenous PGE2, but not EGF. Conclusion Our results suggest that mechanical compression reduces the capacity of the bronchial epithelium to close wounds, and is, in part, mediated by PGE2 and a compromised cytoskeleton.

  6. [Local treatment of chronic skin wounds in a Swiss out-patient wound centre 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Marc; Tanner, Daniel; Hunziker, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In Switzerland around 30,000 patients suffer from chronic skin wounds. Appropriate topical wound care along with treatment of the causes of the wounds enables to heal a lot of these patients and to avoid secondary disease such as infections. Thereby, the final goal of wound care is stable reepithelisation. Based on experience with chronic leg ulcers mainly in our out-patient wound centre, we give a survey of the wound dressings we actually use and discuss their wound-phase adapted application. Furthermore, we address the two tissue engineering products reimbursed in Switzerland, Apligraf and EpiDex, as well as the biological matrix product Oasis. The crucial question, which treatment options will be offered in future to the wound patients by our health regulatory and insurance systems, is open to debate.

  7. Hemostatic and Wound Healing Properties of Chromolaena odorata Leaf Extract

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Joon Baek; Wandee Gritsanapan; Kyung-Won Min; Jason Liggett; Xiaobo Zhang; Hataichanok Pandith

    2013-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Siam weed) extract has been used to stop bleeding and in wound healing in many tropical countries. However, its detailed mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms by which Siam weed extract (SWE) affected hemostatic and wound healing activities. SWE promoted Balb/c 3T3 fibroblast cell migration and proliferation. Subsequently, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the accelerating wound healing enzyme,...

  8. Inflammation and Neuropeptides: The Connection in Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Leena; Nabzdyk, Christoph; Andersen, Nicholas D.; LoGerfo, Frank W; Veves, Aristidis

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the interaction between neuropeptides and inflammatory mediators as it pertains to diabetic wound healing. Abnormal wound healing is a major complication of both type I and type II diabetes and is the most frequent cause of non-traumatic lower limb amputation. Wound healing requires the orchestrated integration of complex biological and molecular events. Inflammation, proliferation and migration of cells followed by angiogenesis and re-epithelization ...

  9. Microbial Symbionts Accelerate Wound Healing via the Neuropeptide Hormone Oxytocin

    OpenAIRE

    Theofilos Poutahidis; Kearney, Sean M.; Tatiana Levkovich; Peimin Qi; Varian, Bernard J.; Lakritz, Jessica R; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Antonis Chatzigiagkos; Eric J Alm; Erdman, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobaci...

  10. Tumors: Wounds that do not heal--Redux

    OpenAIRE

    Dvorak, Harold F.

    2015-01-01

    Similarities between tumors and the inflammatory response associated with wound healing have been recognized for more than 150 years and continue to intrigue. Some years ago, based on our then recent discovery of vascular permeability factor (VPF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), I suggested that tumors behaved as wounds that do not heal. More particularly, I proposed that tumors co-opted the wound healing response in order to induce the stroma they required for maintenance and grow...

  11. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  12. Case 5: non-healing traumatic wound colonised with MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Deborah

    2016-03-01

    A traumatic wound colonised with MRSA failed to respond to topical antimicrobial dressings. Following the combined use of octenilin Wound Gel and octenilin Wound Irrigation Solution, the MRSA was removed in 4 weeks, the necrotic tissue was debrided and the wound started healing. PMID:26949849

  13. Clinical application of growth factors and cytokines in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Stephan; Brem, Harold; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex and dynamic biological process that involves the coordinated efforts of multiple cell types and is executed and regulated by numerous growth factors and cytokines. There has been a drive in the past two decades to study the therapeutic effects of various growth factors in the clinical management of nonhealing wounds (e.g., pressure ulcers, chronic venous ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers). For this review, we conducted an online search of Medline/PubMed and critically analyzed the literature regarding the role of growth factors and cytokines in the management of these wounds. We focused on currently approved therapies, emerging therapies, and future research possibilities. In this review, we discuss four growth factors and cytokines currently being used on and off label for the healing of wounds. These include granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, platelet-derived growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. While the clinical results of using growth factors and cytokines are encouraging, many studies involved a small sample size and are disparate in measured endpoints. Therefore, further research is required to provide definitive evidence of efficacy.

  14. Stem Cell-Based Therapeutics to Improve Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Michael S.; Tripp Leavitt; Samir Malhotra; Dominik Duscher; Pollhammer, Michael S.; Walmsley, Graham G.; Zeshaan N. Maan; Alexander T. M. Cheung; Manfred Schmidt; Georg M. Huemer; Longaker, Michael T.; Peter Lorenz, H.

    2015-01-01

    Issues surrounding wound healing have garnered deep scientific interest as well as booming financial markets invested in novel wound therapies. Much progress has been made in the field, but it is unsurprising to find that recent successes reveal new challenges to be addressed. With regard to wound healing, large tissue deficits, recalcitrant wounds, and pathological scar formation remain but a few of our most pressing challenges. Stem cell-based therapies have been heralded as a promising mea...

  15. Effects of isoniazid and niacin on experimental wound-healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinreich, Jürgen; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Bilali, Erol;

    2010-01-01

    There is a need for effective treatments of ischemic wounds. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that systemic administration of isoniazid or niacin can enhance wound healing in ischemic as well as nonischemic tissues.......There is a need for effective treatments of ischemic wounds. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that systemic administration of isoniazid or niacin can enhance wound healing in ischemic as well as nonischemic tissues....

  16. A novel strategy for the treatment of chronic wounds based on the topical administration of rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles: In vitro bioactivity and in vivo effectiveness in healing-impaired db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainza, Garazi; Pastor, Marta; Aguirre, José Javier; Villullas, Silvia; Pedraz, José Luis; Hernandez, Rosa Maria; Igartua, Manoli

    2014-07-10

    Lipid nanoparticles are currently receiving increasing interest because they permit the topical administration of proteins, such as recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF), in a sustained and effective manner. Because chronic wounds have become a major healthcare burden, the topical administration of rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles, namely solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and nanostructured lipid carries (NLC), appears to be an interesting and suitable strategy for the treatment of chronic wounds. Both rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles were prepared through the emulsification-ultrasonication method; however, the NLC-rhEGF preparation did not require the use of any organic solvents. The characterisation of the nanoparticles (NP) revealed that the encapsulation efficiency (EE) of NLC-rhEGF was significantly greater than obtained with SLN-rhEGF. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that gamma sterilisation is a suitable process for the final sterilisation because no loss in activity was observed after the sterilisation process. In addition, the proliferation assays revealed that the bioactivity of the nanoformulations was even higher than that of free rhEGF. Finally, the effectiveness of the rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles was assayed in a full-thickness wound model in db/db mice. The data demonstrated that four topical administrations of SLN-rhEGF and NLC-rhEGF significantly improved healing in terms of wound closure, restoration of the inflammatory process, and re-epithelisation grade. In addition, the data did not reveal any differences in the in vivo effectiveness between the different rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles. Overall, these findings demonstrate the promising potential of rhEGF-loaded lipid nanoparticles, particularly NLC-rhEGF, for the promotion of faster and more effective healing and suggest their future application for the treatment of chronic wounds.

  17. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 Fails to Stimulate Wound Healing and Impairs Its Signal Transduction in an Aged Ischemic Ulcer Model : Importance of Oxygen and Age

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liancun; Xia, Yu-Ping; Roth, Sanford I.; Gruskin, Elliott; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Clinical trials of exogenous growth factors in treating chronic wounds have been less successful than expected. One possible explanation is that most studies used animal models of acute wounds in young animals, whereas most chronic wounds occur in elderly patients with tissue ischemia. We described an animal model of age- and ischemia-impaired wound healing and analyzed the wound-healing response as well as the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 effect in this model. Rabbits of increasing ag...

  18. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob Günther; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding......). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3......, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least...

  19. Managing painful chronic wounds: the Wound Pain Management Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Patricia; Fogh, Karsten; Glynn, Chris;

    2007-01-01

    document persistent wound pain and not to develop a treatment and monitoring strategy to improve the lives of persons with chronic wounds. Unless wound pain is optimally managed, patient suffering and costs to health care systems will increase. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr......Chronic wound pain is not well understood and the literature is limited. Six of 10 patients venous leg ulcer experience pain with their ulcer, and similar trends are observed for other chronic wounds. Chronic wound pain can lead to depression and the feeling of constant tiredness. Pain related...... to the wound should be handled as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management together with addressing the cause. Management of pain in chronic wounds depends on proper assessment, reporting and documenting patient experiences of pain. Assessment should be based on six critical dimensions...

  20. Wound healing properties and kill kinetics of Clerodendron splendens G. Don, a Ghanaian wound healing plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Y Gbedema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of our general objective of investigating indigenous plants used in wound healing in Ghana, we hereby report our findings from some in vitro and in vivo studies related to wound healing activities of Clerodendron splendens G. Don (Verbanaceae. Methanolic extract of the aerial parts of the plant was tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus faecalis, Micrococcus flavus, as well as resistant strains of Staph. aureus SA1199B, RN4220 and XU212, Gram negative bacteria (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteous mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Candida albicans using the micro-well dilution method. Survivor-time studies of the microorganisms, radical scavenging activity using 2,2′-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH and various in vivo wound healing activity studies were also conducted on the extract. The extract exhibited biostatic action against all the test microorganisms with a Minimum Inhibition Concentration (MIC ranging between 64 and 512 μg/ml and a free radical scavenging property with an IC 50 value of 103.2 μg/ml. The results of the in vivo wound healing tests showed that upon application of C. splendens ointment, there was a reduction in the epithelization period from 26.7 days (control to 13.6 days along with a marked decrease in the scar area from 54.2 mm 2 (control to 25.2 mm 2 . Significant increase in the tensile strength and hydroxyproline content were also observed as compared to the control and was comparable to nitrofurazone. The above results appear to justify the traditional use of C. splendens in wound healing and treatment of skin infections in Ghana.

  1. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J.

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the healthcare, and allowing overcoming some limitations associated to the modern products and therapies, such as the high costs, the long manufacturing times, and the increase in the bacterial resistance. This article gives a general overview about the recent advances in traditional therapies for skin wound healing, focusing on the therapeutic activity, action mechanisms, and clinical trials of the most commonly used natural compounds. New insights in the combination of traditional products with modern treatments and future challenges in the field are also highlighted. Recent Advances: Natural compounds have been used in skin wound care for many years due to their therapeutic activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and cell-stimulating properties. The clinical efficacy of these compounds has been investigated through in vitro and in vivo trials using both animal models and humans. Besides the important progress regarding the development of novel extraction methods, purification procedures, quality control assessment, and treatment protocols, the exact mechanisms of action, side effects, and safety of these compounds need further research. Critical Issues: The repair of skin lesions is one of the most complex biological processes in humans, occurring throughout an orchestrated cascade of overlapping biochemical and cellular events. To stimulate the regeneration process and prevent the wound to fail the healing, traditional therapies and natural products have been used

  2. A small peptide with potential ability to promote wound healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Tang

    Full Text Available Wound-healing represents a major health burden, such as diabetes-induced skin ulcers and burning. Many works are being tried to find ideal clinical wound-healing biomaterials. Especially, small molecules with low cost and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (i.e. transforming growth factor beta, TGF-β are excellent candidates. In this study, a small peptide (tiger17, c[WCKPKPKPRCH-NH2] containing only 11 amino acid residues was designed and proved to be a potent wound healer. It showed strong wound healing-promoting activity in a murine model of full thickness dermal wound. Tiger17 exerted significant effects on three stages of wound healing progresses including (1 the induction of macrophages recruitment to wound site at inflammatory reaction stage; (2 the promotion of the migration and proliferation both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, leading to reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation; and (3 tissue remodeling phase, by promoting the release of transforming TGF-β1 and interleukin 6 (IL-6 in murine macrophages and activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK signaling pathways. Considering its easy production, store and transfer and function to promote production of endogenous wound healing agents (TGF-β, tiger17 might be an exciting biomaterial or template for the development of novel wound-healing agents.

  3. Effects of Dermal Multipotent Cell Transplantation on Skin Wound Healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiChunmeng; ChengTianmin; SuYongping; RanXinze; MaiYue; QuJifu; LouShufen; XuHui; LuoChengji

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that dermis contains adult multipotent stem cells. To investigate the effects of dermis-derived multipotent cells on wound healing, we transplanted a clonal population of dermis-derived multipotent cells (termed as DMCs) by topical and systemic application into the skin wound of rats with simple wounds and rats with combined wound and radiation injury. Our results suggest that both topical and systemic transplantation of DMCs accelerate the healing process in rats with a simple wound; the promoting effect by topical transplantation occurs earlier than systemic transplantation. However, systemic transplantation of DMCs promotes the healing process in irradiated rats, while topical transplantation of DMCs fails. Further studies on the mechanisms of DMCs to promote wound healing indicate that the supernatant of DMCs could promote the proliferation of fibroblasts and epidermal cells; DMCs expressed transcripts of a serics of cytokincs and cxtraccllular matrix molecules, including VEGF, PDGF, HGF, TGF-β, ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and Fibronectin, which were closely related to the wound healing by DNA microarray analysis. The implanted DMCs can engraft into recipient skin wounded tissues after transplantation by the FISH analysis with Y-chromosome-specific probe. Systemic transplantation of DMCs also promotes the recovery of peripheral white blood cells in irradiated rats. These results demonstrate the different effects of DMCs on wound healing in nonirradiated and irradiated rats and illustrate the importance of optimizing wound healing via the topical or systemic transplantation of stem cells.

  4. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B. E.

    2015-01-01

    to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound...... healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died......Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study...

  5. Influence of Helium-Neon Laser Photostimulation on Excision Wound Healing in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Nayak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of laser photostimulation is now accepted generally but the laser light facilitates wound healing and tissue repair remains poorly understood. So we have examined the hypothesis that the laser photo stimulation can enhances the collagen production in excision wounds using excision wound model in Wister rat model. The circular wounds were created on the dorsum of the back of the animals. The animals were divided into two groups. The experimental group (n = 12 wound was treated with 632.8 nm He-Ne laser at a dose of 2.1J cm-2 for five days a week until the complete healing. The control group was sham irradiated. The parameters studied were wound area, period of epithelization and hydroxyproline. Significant increase in the hydroxyproline content (p<0.001 and reduction in the wound size (p<0.001 was observed in study group when compared to controls. The significant epithelization (p<0.001 was noticed. The experimental wounds were, on average, fully healed by the 15th day, whereas the control group healed, on average by 22nd day. Wound contraction together with the hydroxyproline and experimental observations suggested that low intensity Helium-Neon laser photo stimulation facilitates the tissue repair process by accelerating collagen production in chronic wounds.

  6. Wound healing and all-cause mortality in 958 wound patients treated in home care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarchi, Kian; Martinussen, Torben; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2015-09-01

    Skin wounds are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Data are, however, not readily available for benchmarking, to allow prognostic evaluation, and to suggest when involvement of wound-healing experts is indicated. We, therefore, conducted an observational cohort study to investigate wound healing and all-cause mortality associated with different types of skin wounds. Consecutive skin wound patients who received wound care by home-care nurses from January 2010 to December 2011 in a district in Eastern Denmark were included in this study. Patients were followed until wound healing, death, or the end of follow-up on December 2012. In total, 958 consecutive patients received wound care by home-care nurses, corresponding to a 1-year prevalence of 1.2% of the total population in the district. During the study, wound healing was achieved in 511 (53.3%), whereas 90 (9.4%) died. During the first 3 weeks of therapy, healing was most likely to occur in surgical wounds (surgical vs. other wounds: adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.50-3.23), while from 3 weeks to 3 months of therapy, cancer wounds, and pressure ulcers were least likely to heal (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 0.12, 0.03-0.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 0.44, 0.27-0.74). Cancer wounds and pressure ulcers were further associated with a three times increased probability of mortality compared with other wounds (cancer vs. other wounds: AHR 3.19, 1.35-7.50; pressure vs. other wounds: AHR 2.91, 1.56-5.42). In summary, the wound type was found to be a significant predictor of healing and mortality with cancer wounds and pressure ulcers being associated with poor prognosis.

  7. Cutaneous wound healing in aging small mammals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Joo; Mustoe, Thomas; Clark, Richard A F

    2015-01-01

    As the elderly population grows, so do the clinical and socioeconomic burdens of nonhealing cutaneous wounds, the majority of which are seen among persons over 60 years of age. Human studies on how aging effects wound healing will always be the gold standard, but studies have ethical and practical hurdles. Choosing an animal model is dictated by costs and animal lifespan that preclude large animal use. Here, we review the current literature on how aging effects cutaneous wound healing in small animal models and, when possible, compare healing across studies. Using a literature search of MEDLINE/PubMed databases, studies were limited to those that utilized full-thickness wounds and compared the wound-healing parameters of wound closure, reepithelialization, granulation tissue fill, and tensile strength between young and aged cohorts. Overall, wound closure, reepithelialization, and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased with aging across different strains of mice and rats. Aging in mice was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but greater tensile strength later in the wound healing process. Similarly, aging in rats was associated with lower tensile strength early in the wound healing process, but no significant tensile strength difference between young and old rats later in healing wounds. From studies in New Zealand White rabbits, we found that reepithelialization and granulation tissue fill were delayed or decreased overall with aging. While similarities and differences in key wound healing parameters were noted between different strains and species, the comparability across the studies was highly questionable, highlighted by wide variability in experimental design and reporting. In future studies, standardized experimental design and reporting would help to establish comparable study groups, and advance the overall knowledge base, facilitating the translatability of animal data to the human clinical condition.

  8. Stem Cells in Skin Wound Healing: Are We There Yet?

    OpenAIRE

    Cerqueira, Mariana Teixeira; Pirraco, Rogério Pedro; Marques, Alexandra Pinto

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Cutaneous wound healing is a serious problem worldwide that affects patients with various wound types, resulting from burns, traumatic injuries, and diabetes. Despite the wide range of clinically available skin substitutes and the different therapeutic alternatives, delayed healing and scarring are often observed.

  9. Amniotic membrane can be a valid source for wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ElHeneidy H

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hossam ElHeneidy,1 Eman Omran,1 Ahmed Halwagy,1 Hesham Al-Inany,1 Mirvat Al-Ansary,2 Amr Gad3 1Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, 3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: Amniotic membrane (AM can promote proper epithelialization with suppression of excessive fibrosis by creating a supportive milieu for regeneration of chronic ulcer bed.Objective: The objective of this study is to investigate whether AM scaffold can modulate the healing of a wound by promoting tissue reconstruction rather than promoting scar tissue formation.Subjects and methods: AM was obtained and prepared and then applied to patients with chronic leg ulcers who were randomly divided into two different groups. Group I (control group included eleven patients in whom ulcers were treated with conventional wound dressings that were changed daily for 8 weeks. Group II (study group included 14 patients in whom the AM was placed in contact with the ulcer and held in place with a secondary dressing, which was changed daily. Follow-up was done to detect healing rate and detection of ulcer size, assessment of pain, and to take ulcer images (days 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, 45, and 60.Results: In group I, all ulcers showed no reduction in their size, and ulcer floor remained the same. Healthy granulations were present in two ulcers (18.2% and absent in nine ulcers (81.8%. There was no improvement of pain level in the eleven ulcers. In group II, complete healing of 14 ulcers occurred in 14–60 days with a mean of 33.3±14.7; healing rate range was 0.064–2.22 and the mean 0.896±0.646 cm2/day. Healthy granulations were present in 13 ulcers (92.9% and absent in one ulcer (7.1%. Three ulcers (21.4% were of mild severity (grade 1 ulcers while eleven ulcers (78.6% were of moderate severity (grade 2 ulcers. The healing rate was faster in ulcers of mild severity (1.7±0.438 cm2/day in comparison to ulcers of moderate

  10. [Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) promotes wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, R; Hoffmann, G; Hoffmann, R

    2014-11-01

    Water-filtered infrared-A (wIRA) is a special form of heat radiation with high tissue penetration and low thermal load to the skin surface which promotes the healing of acute and chronic wounds both by thermal and thermic as well as by non-thermal and non-thermic effects. Water-filtered infrared-A increases tissue temperature (+ 2.7 °C at a tissue depth of 2 cm), tissue oxygen partial pressure (+ 32 % at a tissue depth of 2 cm) and tissue perfusion. These three factors are decisive for a sufficient supply of tissue with energy and oxygen and consequently also for wound healing and infection defense. Water-filtered infrared-A promotes normal as well as disturbed wound healing by diminishing inflammation and exudation, by promotion of infection defense and regeneration, and by alleviation of pain. These effects have been proven in a total of seven prospective studies (of these six randomized controlled studies) with most of the effects having an evidence level of Ia or Ib. The additional cases of complicated courses of wound healing presented in this article illustrate the proven effects of wIRA. Not only in the 6 presented cases wIRA turned the complicated courses of wound healing for the better and facilitated the healing of the wounds after varying total times of irradiation (in the 6 cases 51-550 h) and after variable times of wound care and mostly after transplantation of split skin grafts. In complicated courses of wound healing wIRA does not replace consultation and, when indicated, treatment by an experienced plastic surgeon and by a surgeon specialized in septic surgery. With these limitations wIRA can be recommended as a valuable complement for the treatment of acute as well as of chronic wounds.

  11. Effects of Low-Intensity Laser Irradiation on Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The effects of low-intensity 630 nm semiconductor laser irradiation at 3.6 J/cm2 (LISL on wound healing in diabetic rats were studied in this paper. Methods. 36 diabetic rats with dorsal cutaneous excisional wounds were divided into three LISL groups and a control group randomly. The three LISL groups were irradiated with LISL at 5, 10, and 20 mW/cm2 five times a week for two weeks, respectively. The process of wound healing was assessed by assessing blood glucose, calculating percentage of wound closure, histopathological evaluation, and immunohistochemical quantification. Results. Blood glucose of all groups remained at similar levels throughout the experiment. LISL could obviously promote wound contraction, fibroblasts proliferation, and collagen synthesis, alter bFGF and TGF-β1 expression, and reduce inflammatory reaction in the early and middle phases of chronic wound-healing process. However, LISL could not shorten cicatrization time, and the treatment effects were not sensitive to illuminate parameters in the later phase of the experiment. Conclusions. LISL might have auxiliary effects in the early and middle phases of wound healing in STZ-induced diabetic rats, but the reciprocity rule might not hold. The wound-healing process of early-phase diabetes rats shows typical characteristics of self-limited disease.

  12. 局部高渗环境对慢性创伤性窦道的治疗效果分析%Analysis of curative effect on local hypertonic environment improves healing of chronic traumatic wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱颉; 罗自通; 曹亿; 于萌蕾; 曾兵; 彭吉才; 黄都平

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of hypertonic saline and isotonic saline solutions on the healing of chronic traumatic wounds. Methods Between March 2011 and March 2014, sixty-two patients with chronic traumatic wounds were randomized to 2 groups. Thirty-one cases were treated with 28%sodium chloride medical fiber/polyester non-woven dressing (group A) and the other 31 cases , with 0.9% sodium chloride medical gauze (group B). Series of wound cultures were performed, wound conditions were assessed, and the timing of wound healing and adverse reactions were recorded. Results The average healing time in group A was 18.6 days. The average healing time for group B patients was 22.5 days (P<0.05). No obvious adverse effects were observed in either group. Wound cultures showed that 80% of the patients with positive pre-treatment cultures became negative after 3 days of hypertonic saline treatment whereas only 10% turned negative in group B. Conclusion Local hypertonic environment may significantly reduce bacteria load in chronic wounds and improve wound healing.%目的:局部高渗引流及普通引流方法的比较,分析高渗环境下引流对慢性窦道的治疗效果。方法慢性创伤性窦道病例62例进行随机分成2组,其中31例伤口窦道内使用28%高渗氯化钠纤维/聚酯无纺布敷料进行引流,31例使用0.9%氯化钠纱条进行引流观察治疗效果及不良反应。结果28%高渗氯化钠纤维/聚酯无纺布敷料治疗组(高渗引流组)平均痊愈时间18.6天,0.9%氯化钠纱条组(等渗引流组)平均痊愈时间22.5天,两组慢性创面窦道痊愈时间差异有显著统计学意义(P<0.05);高渗引流组患者创面细菌培养阳性例数也明显低于等渗引流组。结论局部高渗压环境引流可显著抑制慢性创伤性窦道细菌微生物被膜的形成,对慢性窦道的愈合有显著的效果。

  13. Healing times and prediction of wound healing in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimny, S; Pfohl, M

    2005-02-01

    Time line of wound healing and prediction of healing times in diabetic foot ulcers is an important issue. Usually, the percentage of wounds healed within a defined period is used for characterization of wound healing. R=sqrtA/pi (R, radius; A, planimetric wound area; pi, constant 3.14), and the wound radius reduction was 0.39 mm/week which was previously established. The initial average wound area was 96.9+/-13.1 mm2 (mean+/-SEM), and 3.61+/-1.6 mm 2 after ten weeks with an average healing time of 75.9 (95 %-CI 71-81) days. Using the equation mentioned above and the calculated weekly wound radius reduction, the predicted healing time in the test group was 86.9 (95 %-CI 73-101) days. The predicted and the observed healing times were significantly correlated with each other (r=0.55, p=0.0002). Providing standard care, the time needed for wound healing can reliably be predicted in neuropathic diabetic foot ulcers. This may be a useful tool in daily clinical practice to predict wound healing and recognize ulcers who do not respond adequately to the treatment. PMID:15772900

  14. Local Treatment of Chronic Wounds in Patients With Peripheral Vascular Disease, Chronic Venous Insufficiency, and Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruettermann, Mike; Maier-Hasselmann, Andreas; Nink-Grebe, Brigitte; Burckhardt, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Background: A chronic wound is defined as an area where the skin is not intact that fails to heal within eight weeks. Such wounds usually develop on the lower limbs as a complication of diabetes, venous insufficiency, or inadequate arterial perfusion. Most of the roughly 45 000 limb amputations perf

  15. Potential dermal wound healing agent in Blechnum orientale Linn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yau

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blechnum orientale Linn. (Blechnaceae is used ethnomedicinally to treat wounds, boils, blisters or abscesses and sores, stomach pain and urinary bladder complaints. The aim of the study was to validate the ethnotherapeutic claim and to evaluate the effects of B. orientale water extract on wound healing activity. Methods Water extract of B. orientale was used. Excision wound healing activity was examined on Sprague-Dawley rats, dressed with 1% and 2% of the water extract. Control groups were dressed with the base cream (vehicle group, negative control and 10% povidone-iodine (positive control respectively. Healing was assessed based on contraction of wound size, mean epithelisation time, hydroxyproline content and histopathological examinations. Statistical analyses were performed using one way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD test. Results Wound healing study revealed significant reduction in wound size and mean epithelisation time, and higher collagen synthesis in the 2% extract-treated group compared to the vehicle group. These findings were supported by histolopathological examinations of healed wound sections which showed greater tissue regeneration, more fibroblasts and angiogenesis in the 2% extract-treated group. Conclusions The ethnotherapeutic use of this fern is validated. The water extract of B. orientale is a potential candidate for the treatment of dermal wounds. Synergistic effects of both strong antioxidant and antibacterial activities in the extract are deduced to have accelerated the wound repair at the proliferative phase of the healing process.

  16. Wound Healing Effects of Curcumin: A Short Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Silvia; Manayi, Azadeh; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed F; Sureda, Antoni; Hajheydari, Zohreh; Gortzi, Olga; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Seyed M

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex process that consists of several phases that range from coagulation, inflammation, accumulation of radical substances, to proliferation, formation of fibrous tissues and collagen, contraction of wound with formation of granulation tissue and scar. Since antiquity, vegetable substances have been used as phytotherapeutic agents for wound healing, and more recently natural substances of vegetable origin have been studied with the attempt to show their beneficial effect on wound treatment. Curcumin, the most active component of rhizome of Curcuma longa L. (common name: turmeric), has been studied for many years due to its bio-functional properties, especially antioxidant, radical scavenger, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities, which play a crucial role in the wound healing process. Moreover, curcumin stimulated the production of the growth factors involved in the wound healing process, and so curcumin also accelerated the management of wound restoration. The aim of the present review is collecting and evaluating the literature data regarding curcumin properties potentially relevant for wound healing. Moreover, the investigations on the wound healing effects of curcumin are reported. In order to produce a more complete picture, the chemistry and sources of curcumin are also discussed. PMID:27640646

  17. Honey for Wound Healing, Ulcers, and Burns; Data Supporting Its Use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Al-Waili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds. The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey

  18. Chitosan-based dressings loaded with neurotensin—an efficient strategy to improve early diabetic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Liane I. F.; Dias, Ana M. A.; Ermelindo C. Leal; Carvalho, Lina; Sousa, Hermínio C. de; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2014-01-01

    One important complication of diabetes mellitus is chronic, non-healing diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). This study aims to develop and use dressings based on chitosan derivatives for the sustained delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. Three different derivatives, namely N-carboxymethyl chitosan, 5-methyl pyrrolidinone chitosan (MPC) and N-succinyl chitosan, are presented as potential biomaterials for wound healing applications. Our ...

  19. [IMPACT OF BIOFILM ON HEALING AND A METHOD FOR IDENTIFYING IT IN THE WOUND].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrlin, Jasenka

    2016-03-01

    The skin microbiome is the aggregate of microorganisms that reside on the surface and in deep layers of the skin. Skin is colonized by bacteria, fungi, viruses and mites, maintaining a balance. Disruption in the ecosystem results in skin infections. Chronic wounds in diabetics, elderly and immobile individuals are at risk of skin organisms to invade and become pathogenic upon breach of the skin barrier. The bacteria of the skin microbiome may contribute to delayed healing and persistent inflammation. Staphylococcus epidermidis is an invasive skin organism that causes infection, i.e. hospital acquired infection (HAl) on medical devices and form biofilm. At the most basic level, biofilm can be described as bacteria embedded in a thick, slimy barrier of sugars and proteins. The biofilm barrier protects the microorganisms from external threats. Biofilms provide a reservoir of potentially infectious microorganisms that are resistant to antimicrobial agents, and their importance in the failure of medical devices and chronic inflammatory condition is increasingly being recognized. Particular research interest exists in the association of biofilms with wound infection and non-healing, i.e. chronic wounds. There is now strong evidence that biofilm is present in the majority of chronic wounds. Specialized microscopic techniques used since 2008 have allowed several research groups to demonstrate that 60% to 90% of chronic wounds have biofilm versus only 6% of acute wounds. While many studies confirm that chronic wounds often contain a polymicrobial flora, controversy remains with regard to whether these organisms directly contribute to non-healing. It seems most likely that individual bacteria themselves are not directly responsible for non-healing wounds. Rather, there is direct correlation between the presence of four or more distinct bacterial species in a wound and non-healing, suggesting that mixed microbial populations are the cause of pathology. The most reliable

  20. Cutaneous Wound Healing After Treatment with Plant-Derived Human Recombinant Collagen Flowable Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Sigal; Amzel, Tal; Harel-Adar, Tamar; Tamir, Eran; Grynspan, Frida; Shoseyov, Oded

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds, particularly diabetic ulcers, represent a main public health concern with significant costs. Ulcers often harbor an additional obstacle in the form of tunneled or undermined wounds, requiring treatments that can reach the entire wound tunnel, because bioengineered grafts are typically available only in a sheet form. While collagen is considered a suitable biodegradable scaffold material, it is usually extracted from animal and human cadaveric sources, and accompanied by potential allergic and infectious risks. The purpose of this study was to test the performance of a flowable gel made of human recombinant type I collagen (rhCollagen) produced in transgenic tobacco plants, indicated for the treatment of acute, chronic, and tunneled wounds. The performance of the rhCollagen flowable gel was tested in an acute full-thickness cutaneous wound-healing rat model and compared to saline treatment and two commercial flowable gel control products made of bovine collagen and cadaver human skin collagen. When compared to the three control groups, the rhCollagen-based gel accelerated wound closure and triggered a significant jumpstart to the healing process, accompanied by enhanced re-epithelialization. In a cutaneous full-thickness wound pig model, the rhCollagen-based flowable gel induced accelerated wound healing compared to a commercial product made of bovine tendon collagen. By day 21 post-treatment, 95% wound closure was observed with the rhCollagen product compared to 68% closure in wounds treated with the reference product. Moreover, rhCollagen treatment induced an early angiogenic response and induced a significantly lower inflammatory response than in the control group. In summary, rhCollagen flowable gel proved to be efficacious in animal wound models and is expected to be capable of reducing the healing time of human wounds. PMID:23259631

  1. The importance of hydration in wound healing: reinvigorating the clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ousey, K; Cutting, K F; Rogers, A A; Rippon, M G

    2016-03-01

    Balancing skin hydration levels is important as any disruption in skin integrity will result in disturbance of the dermal water balance. The discovery that a moist environment actively supports the healing response when compared with a dry environment highlights the importance of water and good hydration levels for optimal healing. The benefits of 'wet' or 'hyper-hydrated' wound healing appear similar to those offered by moist over a dry environment. This suggests that the presence of free water may not be detrimental to healing, but any adverse effects of wound fluid on tissues is more likely related to the biological components contained within chronic wound exudate, for example elevated protease levels. Appropriate dressings applied to wounds must not only be able to absorb the exudate, but also retain this excess fluid together with its protease solutes, while concurrently preventing desiccation. This is particularly important in the case of chronic wounds where peri-wound skin barrier properties are compromised and there is increased permeation across the injured skin. This review discusses the importance of appropriate levels of hydration in skin, with a particular focus on the need for optimal hydration levels for effective healing. Declaration of interest: This paper was supported by Paul Hartmann Ltd. The authors have provided consultative services to Paul Hartmann Ltd.

  2. Blockade of glucocorticoid receptors improves cutaneous wound healing in stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Taís Fontoura; de Castro Pires, Taiza; Monte-Alto-Costa, Andréa

    2016-02-01

    Stress is an important condition of modern life. The successful wound healing requires the execution of three major overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling, and stress can disturb this process. Chronic stress impairs wound healing through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and the glucocorticoids (GCs) hormones have been shown to delay wound closure. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a GC receptor antagonist (RU486) treatment on cutaneous healing in chronically stressed mice. Male mice were submitted to rotational stress, whereas control animals were not subjected to stress. Stressed and control animals were treated with RU486. A full-thickness excisional lesion was generated, and seven days later, lesions were recovered. The RU486 treatment improves wound healing since contraction takes place earlier in RU486-treated in comparison to non-treated mice, and the RU486 treatment also improves the angiogenesis in Stress+RU486 mice when compared to stressed animals. The Stress+RU486 group showed a decrease in inflammatory cell infiltration and in hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression; meanwhile, there was an increase in myofibroblasts quantity. In conclusion, blockade of GC receptors with RU486 partially ameliorates stress-impaired wound healing, suggesting that stress inhibits healing through more than one functional pathway.

  3. EFFECT OF TASPINE ON WOUND HEALING AND FIBROBLAST PROLIFERATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Yalin; He Langchong; Chen Fang

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the effect and mechanism of taspine on wound healing and fibroblast proliferation. Methods The effect of taspine on skin wound was observed in vivo. The different concentration of taspine hydrochloride was added to L929 fibroblast cultivated in vitro, and lactate dehydrogenase was detected and MTT method was applied to observe effect of taspine on fibroblast proliferation. Results The local application of taspine 3 mg/Ml and 1.5 mg/mL accelerated the healing of skin wounded. In vitro, 0.01~0.5 μg/mL of taspine hydrochloride showed no effect on the change of lactate dehydrogenase activity and fibroblast proliferation. Conclusion Taspine is a kind of active alkaloid from leontice robustum which can enhance wound healing, its mechanism on wound healing is not by means of accelerating the proliferation of fibroblast, other mechanisms are necessary for being further studied.

  4. Collective cell migration: Implications for wound healing and cancer invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic morphogenesis, wound repair and cancer invasion, cells often migrate collectively via tight cell-cell junctions, a process named collective migration. During such migration, cells move as coherent groups, large cell sheets, strands or tubes rather than individually. One unexpected finding regarding collective cell migration is that being a "multicellular structure" enables cells to better respond to chemical and physical cues, when compared with isolated cells. This is important because epithelial cells heal wounds via the migration of large sheets of cells with tight intercellular connections. Recent studies have gained some mechanistic insights that will benefit the clinical understanding of wound healing in general. In this review, we will briefly introduce the role of collective cell migration in wound healing, regeneration and cancer invasion and discuss its underlying mechanisms as well as implications for wound healing.

  5. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    N Dashti; Ansari, M.; M. Shabani; S Vardasti; Mirsalehian, A.; MH Noori Mughehi; Hatmi ZN

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ), the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with ni...

  6. WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF ETHANOL EXTRACT OF PSEUDARTHRIA VISCIDA LINN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vijayabaskaran

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The wound healing activity of topically applied ethanol extract of Pseudarthria viscida was evaluated in wistar rat by excision wound model for a period of 12 days. The extract was prepared as ointment form (5 and 10% w/w and applied on Wistar rats. Neomycin ointment 0.5%w/w was used as standard drug. The healing of the wound was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialisation, skin breaking strength. Both the ointments (5% and 10% w/w of Pseudarthria viscida extract promoted the wound-healing activity significantly when compared to the standard drug. High rate of wound contraction, decrease the period for epithelialisation, high skin breaking strength were observed in animals treated with 10% w/w extract ointment when compared to the control group of animals. So ethanol extract of Pseudarthria viscida in the form of 10% ointment promote wound-healing activity better than the former concentration, 5%. The result obtained from this study indicates that ethanol extract of Pseudarthria viscida accelerates the wound healing process by decreasing the surface area of the wound.

  7. A Systematic Review of the Wound-Healing Effects of Monoterpenes and Iridoid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana S.S. Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for more effective and lower cost therapeutic approaches for wound healing remains a challenge for modern medicine. In the search for new therapeutic options, plants and their metabolites are a great source of novel biomolecules. Among their constituents, the monoterpenes represent 90% of essential oils, and have a variety of structures with several activities such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and wound healing. Based on that, and also due to the lack of reviews concerning the wound-healing activity of monoterpenes, we performed this systematic review—which provides an overview of their characteristics and mechanisms of action. In this search, the terms “terpenes”, “monoterpenes”, “wound healing” and “wound closure techniques” were used to retrieve articles published in LILACS, PUBMED and EMBASE until May 2013. Seven papers were found concerning the potential wound healing effect of five compouds (three monoterpenes and two iridoid derivatives in preclinical studies. Among the products used for wound care, the films were the most studied pharmaceutical form. Monoterpenes are a class of compounds of great diversity of biological activities and therapeutic potential. The data reviewed here suggest that monoterpenes, although poorly studied in this context, are promising compounds for the treatment of chronic wound conditions.

  8. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrulea, V; Ostafe, V; Borchard, G; Jordan, O

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo and clinical applications in wound healing are described. PMID:26614560

  9. Visual effects of β-­glucans on wound healing in fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Jacob; Ljungqvist, Martin Georg; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær;

    2011-01-01

    Introduction B-glucans are diverse polysaccharides that occur naturally in plants, fungi and bacteria. B-glucans have been shown to have an immunostimulatory effect1. In addition, B-glucans have been found to increase wound tensile strength and collagen synthesis2. This is likely to affect...... the filet quality3. With multispectral imaging we investigate the effect of adding B-glucans to the water during healing of open wounds in fish. Multispectral imaging is used in human diagnostic medicine for evaluating fx proriasis and chronic diabetic wounds, but has not yet been applied to wounds in fish...

  10. Gene expression profiling of cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the sequence of events leading to wound repair has been described at the cellular and, to a limited extent, at the protein level this process has yet to be fully elucidated. Genome wide transcriptional analysis tools promise to further define the global picture of this complex progression of events. Study Design This study was part of a placebo-controlled double-blind clinical trial in which basal cell carcinomas were treated topically with an immunomodifier – toll-like receptor 7 agonist: imiquimod. The fourteen patients with basal cell carcinoma in the placebo arm of the trial received placebo treatment consisting solely of vehicle cream. A skin punch biopsy was obtained immediately before treatment and at the end of the placebo treatment (after 2, 4 or 8 days. 17.5K cDNA microarrays were utilized to profile the biopsy material. Results Four gene signatures whose expression changed relative to baseline (before wound induction by the pre-treatment biopsy were identified. The largest group was comprised predominantly of inflammatory genes whose expression was increased throughout the study. Two additional signatures were observed which included preferentially pro-inflammatory genes in the early post-treatment biopsies (2 days after pre-treatment biopsies and repair and angiogenesis genes in the later (4 to 8 days biopsies. The fourth and smallest set of genes was down-regulated throughout the study. Early in wound healing the expression of markers of both M1 and M2 macrophages were increased, but later M2 markers predominated. Conclusion The initial response to a cutaneous wound induces powerful transcriptional activation of pro-inflammatory stimuli which may alert the host defense. Subsequently and in the absence of infection, inflammation subsides and it is replaced by angiogenesis and remodeling. Understanding this transition which may be driven by a change from a mixed macrophage population to predominately M2

  11. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Lei(Beijing Institute of Petrochemical Technology, Beijing, 102617, People's Republic of China); Kai-yang LV; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Zhu, Shi-hui

    2014-01-01

    Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT) refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical us...

  12. Chronic Wounds, Biofilms and Use of Medicinal Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J. Cowan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are a significant health problem in the United States, with annual associated costs exceeding $20 billion annually. Traditional wound care consists of surgical debridement, manual irrigation, moisture retentive dressings, and topical and/or systemic antimicrobial therapy. However, despite progress in the science of wound healing, the prevalence and incidence of chronic wounds and their complications are escalating. The presence & complexity of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds has recently been recognized as a key aspect of non-healing wounds. Bacterial biofilms are sessile colonies of polymicrobial organisms (bacteria, fungus, etc. enclosed within a self-produced exopolymeric matrix that provides high levels of tolerance to host defenses, antibiotics and antiseptics. Thus, there is a need for alternative therapies to reduce biofilms in chronic wounds. In this report, we present initial findings from in vitro experiments which show that larval debridement therapy with disinfected blow fly larvae (Phaenicia sericata reduced total CFUs (6-logs of planktonic and mature biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus grown on dermal pig skin explants by 5-logs after 24 hours of exposure, and eliminated biofilms (no measurable CFUs after 48 hours of exposure.

  13. Fibroblast-specific upregulation of Flightless I impairs wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher T; Waters, James M; Jackson, Jessica E; Arkell, Ruth M; Cowin, Allison J

    2015-09-01

    The cytoskeletal protein Flightless (Flii) is a negative regulator of wound healing. Upregulation of Flii is associated with impaired migration, proliferation and adhesion of both fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Importantly, Flii translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in response to wounding in fibroblasts but not keratinocytes. This cell-specific nuclear translocation of Flii suggests that Flii may directly regulate gene expression in fibroblasts, providing one potential mechanism of action for Flii in the wound healing response. To determine whether the tissue-specific upregulation of Flii in fibroblasts was important for the observed inhibitory effects of Flii on wound healing, an inducible fibroblast-specific Flii overexpressing mouse model was generated. The inducible ROSA26 system allowed the overexpression of Flii in a temporal and tissue-specific manner in response to tamoxifen treatment. Wound healing in the inducible mice was impaired, with wounds at day 7 postwounding significantly larger than those from non-inducible controls. There was also reduced collagen maturation, increased myofibroblast infiltration and elevated inflammation. The impaired healing response was similar in magnitude to that observed in mice with non-tissue-specific upregulation of Flii suggesting that fibroblast-derived Flii may have an important role in the wound healing response.

  14. Wound Healing Potential of Formulated Extract from Hibiscus Sabdariffa Calyx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P F Builders

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing agents support the natural healing process, reduce trauma and likelihood of secondary infections and hasten wound closure. The wound healing activities of water in oil cream of the methanol extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae was evaluated in rats with superficial skin excision wounds. Antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Echerichia coli were determined. The total flavonoid content, antioxidant properties and thin layer chromatographic fingerprints of the extract were also evaluated. The extract demonstrated antioxidant properties with a total flavonoid content of 12.30±0.09 mg/g. Six reproducible spots were obtained using methanol:water (95:5 as the mobile phase. The extract showed no antimicrobial activity on the selected microorganisms, which are known to infect and retard wound healing. Creams containing H. sabdariffa extract showed significant (P<0.05 and concentration dependent wound healing activities. There was also evidence of synergism with creams containing a combination of gentamicin and H. sabdariffa extract. This study, thus, provides evidence of the wound healing potentials of the formulated extract of the calyces of H. sabdariffa and synergism when co-formulated with gentamicin.

  15. Coacervate delivery of HB-EGF accelerates healing of type 2 diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Noah R; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic ulcers pose a significant challenge as a number of underlying deficiencies prevent natural healing. In pursuit of a regenerative wound therapy, we developed a heparin-based coacervate delivery system that provides controlled release of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like growth factor (HB-EGF) within the wound bed. In this study, we used a polygenic type 2 diabetic mouse model to evaluate the capacity of HB-EGF coacervate to overcome the deficiencies of diabetic wound healing. In full-thickness excisional wounds on NONcNZO10 diabetic mice, HB-EGF coacervate enhanced the proliferation and migration of epidermal keratinocytes, leading to accelerated epithelialization. Furthermore, increased collagen deposition within the wound bed led to faster wound contraction and greater wound vascularization. Additionally, in vitro assays demonstrated that HB-EGF released from the coacervate successfully increased migration of diabetic human keratinocytes. The multifunctional role of HB-EGF in the healing process and its enhanced efficacy when delivered by the coacervate make it a promising therapy for diabetic wounds.

  16. The effects of topical oxygen therapy on equine distal limb dermal wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Alexandra K; Alcott, Cody J; Schleining, Jennifer A; Safayi, Sina; Zaback, Peter C; Hostetter, Jesse M; Reinertson, Eric L

    2014-12-01

    Topical oxygen therapy (TOT) has been used in human medicine to promote healing in chronic wounds. To test the efficacy and safety of TOT in horses, an experimental wound model was created by making 1 standardized dermal wound on each limb of 4 healthy horses (n = 16). Each wound was fitted with an oxygen delivery cannula and covered with a bandage. One limb of each front and hind pair was randomly assigned to the treatment group (fitted with an oxygen concentrator device), with the contralateral limb assigned to the control group (no device). Wound area, epithelial area, and contraction were measured every 3 to 4 d. Biopsy samples and culture swabs were taken on days 16 and 32 to evaluate angiogenesis, fibroplasia, epithelial hyperplasia, inflammation and bacterial growth. Mean healing time in treated wounds (45 d, range: 38 to 52 d) was not significantly different from that in the paired control wounds (50 d, range: 38 to 62 d). Topical oxygen therapy had little effect on dermal wound healing in this experimental wound model in healthy horses.

  17. An audit to assess the perspectives of U.S. wound care specialists regarding the importance of proteases in wound healing and wound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robert J; Cullen, Breda; Nisbet, Lorraine T

    2013-12-01

    Chronic wounds represent an aberrant biochemistry that creates a toxic proteolytic milieu which can be detrimental to the healing process. Rebalancing the wound microenvironment and addressing elevated protease activity (EPA) could therefore help facilitate healing. To understand how clinicians currently diagnose and manage excessive proteolytic activity, 183 survey responses from US wound specialists were collated and analysed to find out their perceptions on the role of proteases. The majority of respondents (>98%) believed proteases were important in wound healing and that a point-of-care (POC) protease test could be useful. This study yielded a low response rate (7.1%, n = 183); however, there were adequate data to draw significant conclusions. Specialists perceived that fibrin, slough, granulation tissue and rolled wound edges could indicate EPA. About 43% of respondents, however, failed to give a correct response when asked to review photographs to determine if excessive protease activity was present, and the perceived visual signs for EPA did not correlate with the wounds that had EPA; no statistical differences between professions were observed. Respondents chose debridement, wound cleansing and advanced therapies as important in reducing excessive protease activity. It was concluded that specialists have a need for POC diagnostic tests. On the basis of the responses to wound photos, it was determined that there were no visual cues clinicians could use in determining excessive protease activity. Additional research is recommended to evaluate the efficacy of a POC diagnostic test for protease activity and the treatments and therapies applied when EPA is found.

  18. [The wound care center in surgery: an interdisciplinary concept for diagnostic and treatment of chronic wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coerper, S; Schäffer, M; Enderle, M; Schott, U; Köveker, G; Becker, H D

    1999-04-01

    In Germany there is no standardized wound care for patients with chronic wounds in specialized centers. We have established a wound care unit for the past 6 years. The principal concept of therapy was characterized by standardized local surgery, moist wound dressings and concomitant treatment of the underlying disease. We performed local therapy, coordinated the interdisciplinary treatment and developed a new wound documentation system for quality control. We established a close network, integrating general practitioners and home care organizations to realize a mainly outpatient treatment supported by short hospital therapy. Exclusive outpatient treatment was performed in 42% of all patients. According to our prospective data, we achieved an improvement in wound care: 69% of the wounds resistant to therapy for a mean of 30 months healed within 12 months after therapy according to our protocol. Our data strongly supported the importance of local surgery: neither wound depth nor wound infection had any influence on the healing rate, presumably due to radical excisional debridement of necrotic tissue. The presented data justify on medical and economic grounds the establishment of such wound care centers in Germany. PMID:10354850

  19. New Guar Biopolymer Silver Nanocomposites for Wound Healing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runa Ghosh Auddy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an innate physiological response that helps restore cellular and anatomic continuity of a tissue. Selective biodegradable and biocompatible polymer materials have provided useful scaffolds for wound healing and assisted cellular messaging. In the present study, guar gum, a polymeric galactomannan, was intrinsically modified to a new cationic biopolymer guar gum alkylamine (GGAA for wound healing applications. Biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles (Agnp were further impregnated in GGAA for extended evaluations in punch wound models in rodents. SEM studies showed silver nanoparticles well dispersed in the new guar matrix with a particle size of ~18 nm. In wound healing experiments, faster healing and improved cosmetic appearance were observed in the new nanobiomaterial treated group compared to commercially available silver alginate cream. The total protein, DNA, and hydroxyproline contents of the wound tissues were also significantly higher in the treated group as compared with the silver alginate cream (P<0.05. Silver nanoparticles exerted positive effects because of their antimicrobial properties. The nanobiomaterial was observed to promote wound closure by inducing proliferation and migration of the keratinocytes at the wound site. The derivatized guar gum matrix additionally provided a hydrated surface necessary for cell proliferation.

  20. Muscle wound healing in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J G; Andersen, E W; Ersbøll, B K; Nielsen, M E

    2016-01-01

    We followed the progression of healing of deep excisional biopsy punch wounds over the course of 365 days in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) by monitoring visual wound healing and gene expression in the healing muscle at regular intervals (1, 3, 7, 14, 38 and 100 days post-wounding). In addition, we performed muscle texture analysis one year after wound infliction. The selected genes have all previously been investigated in relation to vertebrate wound healing, but only few specifically in fish. The selected genes were interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and -β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -9 and -13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), fibronectin (FN), tenascin-C (TN-C), prolyl 4-hydroxylase α1-chain (P4Hα1), lysyl oxidase (LOX), collagen type I α1-chain (ColIα1), CD41 and CD163. Wound healing progressed slowly in the presented study, which is at least partially due to the low temperature of about 8.5 °C during the first 100 days. The inflammation phase lasted more than 14 days, and the genes relating to production and remodeling of new extracellular matrix (ECM) exhibited a delayed but prolonged upregulation starting 1-2 weeks post-wounding and lasting until at least 100 days post-wounding. The gene expression patterns and histology reveal limited capacity for muscle regeneration in rainbow trout, and muscle texture analyses one year after wound infliction confirm that wounds heal with fibrosis. At 100 dpw epidermis had fully regenerated, and dermis partially regenerated. Scales had not regenerated even after one year. CD163 is a marker of "wound healing"-type M2c macrophages in mammals. M2 macrophage markers are as yet poorly described in fish. The pattern of CD163 expression in the present study is consistent with the expected timing of presence of M2c macrophages in the wound. CD163 may thus potentially prove a valuable marker of M2 macrophages - or a subset hereof - in fish. We subjected a group of fish to

  1. Therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in cutaneous wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry S Chen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in wound care, many wounds never heal and become chronic problems that result in significant morbidity and mortality to the patient. Cellular therapy for cutaneous wounds has recently come under investigation as a potential treatment modality for impaired wound healing. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a promising source of adult progenitor cells for cytotherapy as they are easy to isolate and expand and have been shown to differentiate into various cell lineages. Early studies have demonstrated that MSCs may enhance epithelialization, granulation tissue formation, and neovascularization resulting in accelerated wound closure. It is currently unclear if these effects are mediated through cellular differentiation or by secretion of cytokines and growth factors. This review discusses the proposed biological contributions of MSCs to cutaneous repair and their clinical potential in cell-based therapies.

  2. Wound healing activity of Abroma augusta in Wistar rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shanbhag T; Dattachaudhuri A; Shenoy S; Bairy KL

    2009-01-01

    Objective:The study was undertaken to evaluate the wound healing profile of alcoholic extract of Abroma au-gusta and its effect on dexamethasone suppressed wound healing in Wistar rats.Methods:An alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta was prepared.Three models were used -incision,excision and dead space wound models. Four groups of animals were used for each model.They were administered 2% gum acacia (orally),alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta (orally),dexamethasone (intramuscularly)and combination of Abroma augusta (o-rally)with dexamethasone (intramuscularly)respectively.The parameters studied included breaking strength of incision wound,period of epithelization and wound contraction rate in the excision wound,breaking strength,dry weight and hydroxyproline content of granulation tissue in dead space wound.Results:The breaking strength of incision wound of Abroma augusta treated group was significantly increased (P <0.001) while that of dexamethasone treated animals was significantly decreased (P <0.001)as compared to control. Coadministration of dexamethasone and Abroma augusta significantly reversed the dexamethasone suppressed wound healing in incision wound model (P <0.001).Animals treated with both dexamethasone and Abroma augusta also showed significant (P <0.004)increase in the breaking strength of granulation tissue in the dead space wound and a significant (P <0.011)reduction in the period of epithelization in the excision wound as compared to rats treated with dexamethasone alone.The rate of wound contraction was not significantly altered in any of the groups.Conclusion:The alcoholic extract of Abroma augusta was found to reverse dexametha-sone suppressed wound healing.

  3. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates cutaneous wound healing in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Grochot-Przeczek

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, a cytoprotective, pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory enzyme, is strongly induced in injured tissues. Our aim was to clarify its role in cutaneous wound healing. In wild type mice, maximal expression of HO-1 in the skin was observed on the 2(nd and 3(rd days after wounding. Inhibition of HO-1 by tin protoporphyrin-IX resulted in retardation of wound closure. Healing was also delayed in HO-1 deficient mice, where lack of HO-1 could lead to complete suppression of reepithelialization and to formation of extensive skin lesions, accompanied by impaired neovascularization. Experiments performed in transgenic mice bearing HO-1 under control of keratin 14 promoter showed that increased level of HO-1 in keratinocytes is enough to improve the neovascularization and hasten the closure of wounds. Importantly, induction of HO-1 in wounded skin was relatively weak and delayed in diabetic (db/db mice, in which also angiogenesis and wound closure were impaired. In such animals local delivery of HO-1 transgene using adenoviral vectors accelerated the wound healing and increased the vascularization. In summary, induction of HO-1 is necessary for efficient wound closure and neovascularization. Impaired wound healing in diabetic mice may be associated with delayed HO-1 upregulation and can be improved by HO-1 gene transfer.

  4. Adult Stem Cell Therapies for Wound Healing: Biomaterials and Computational Models

    OpenAIRE

    Tartarini, Daniele; Mele, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    The increased incidence of diabetes and tumors, associated with global demographic issues (aging and life styles), has pointed out the importance to develop new strategies for the effective management of skin wounds. Individuals affected by these diseases are in fact highly exposed to the risk of delayed healing of the injured tissue that typically leads to a pathological inflammatory state and consequently to chronic wounds. Therapies based on stem cells (SCs) have been proposed for the trea...

  5. Cells and Tissue Interactions with Glycated Collagen and their Relevance to Delayed Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    LIAO, HUIJUAN; Zakhaleva, Julia; Chen, Weiliam

    2009-01-01

    Dermal accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) has increasingly been implicated as the underlying cause of delayed diabetic wound healing. Devising an in vitro model to adequately mimic glycated tissues will facilitate investigation into the mechanism of glycation in conjunction with exploration of new approaches or improvement of current therapies for treating diabetic chronic wounds. Collagen matrices were artificially glycated and the presence of AGEs was demonstrated by imm...

  6. The Effect of Nitric Oxide Donor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dashti

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is characterized by a nitric oxide deficiency at the wound site. Diabetes is a factor that influences all stages of wound healing. In animals with acute experimental diabetes induced by streptozotocin (STZ, the early inflammatory responses after wounding is impaired, fibroblast and endothelial cell proliferation is reduced as well as accumulation of reparative collagen and gain in wound breaking strenght. This study investigated whether exogenous nitric oxide supplimentation with nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate could reverse impaired healing in diabetes. The results suggest nitric oxide donor DETA NONOate can reverse impaired healing associated with diabetes (P<0.001 and urinary nitrate (NO-3 output may reflect the extent of repair in this wound model (P<0.001.

  7. MicroRNAs as regulators of cutaneous wound healing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wing-Fu Lai; Parco M Siu

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, and have displayed important roles in areas spanning from embryonic development to skin physiology. Despite this, till now little is known about the significance of miRNAs in cutaneous wound healing. In this mini-review, we discuss the existing evidence on the roles of miRNAs in physiological processes relevant to cutaneous wound healing, followed by a highlight of the prospects and challenges of future development of miRNA-based wound therapies. With existing technologies of nucleic acid transfer and miRNA modulation, it is anticipated that once the roles of miRNAs in wound healing have been clarified, there will be a vast new vista of opportunities brought up for development of miRNA-targeted therapies for wound care.

  8. [A telemedicine consultation in the framework of a wound and wound healing network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier-Bonnet, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    I: n Languedoc-Roussillon, the Domoplaies telemedicine project provides support to nurses experiencing difficulties with the treatment of a wound at home or in a health institute. Thanks to new communication and information technologies, doctors and nurses with expertise in wounds and wound healing can offer individualised care management. PMID:27633698

  9. Glucocorticoid dynamics and impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Bitar, M S

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine corticosterone dynamics and its role in the pathogenesis of impaired wound healing in diabetes mellitus (DM). The streptozotocin-treated rat was used as an animal model for type I DM. A linear skin incision and subcutaneously implanted polyvinyl alcohol sponge disks were considered as wound-healing models. The data regarding corticosterone dynamics revealed diabetes-related increments in plasma corticosterone concentrations at various time intervals...

  10. Wound healing after radiation therapy: Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation therapy is an established modality in the treatment of head and neck cancer patients. Compromised wound healing in irradiated tissues is a common and challenging clinical problem. The pathophysiology and underlying cellular mechanisms including the complex interaction of cytokines and growth factors are still not understood completely. In this review, the current state of research regarding the pathomechanisms of compromised wound healing in irradiated tissues is presented. Current and possible future treatment strategies are critically reviewed

  11. Chitosan as a starting material for wound healing applications

    OpenAIRE

    Patrulea, Viorica; Ostafe, V.; Borchard, Gerrit; Jordan, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan and its derivatives have attracted great attention due to their properties beneficial for application to wound healing. The main focus of the present review is to summarize studies involving chitosan and its derivatives, especially N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (TMC), N,O-carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and O-carboxymethyl-N,N,N-trimethyl-chitosan (CMTMC), used to accelerate wound healing. Moreover, formulation strategies for chitosan and its derivatives, as well as their in vitro, in vivo a...

  12. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: a complication of wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Chadwick; Rebecca Heath; Mamta Shah

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutan...

  13. Biofilm delays wound healing: A review of the evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Metcalf, Daniel G.; Philip G Bowler

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm is the predominant mode of life for bacteria and today it is implicated in numerous human diseases. A growing body of scientific and clinical evidence now exists regarding the presence of biofilm in wounds. This review summarizes the clinical experiences and in vivo evidence that implicate biofilm in delayed wound healing. The various mechanisms by which biofilm may impede healing are highlighted, including impaired epithelialization and granulation tissue formation, and reduced susce...

  14. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato)

    OpenAIRE

    Madhav Sonkamble; Vandana Panda

    2011-01-01

    Background: Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested ...

  15. Multigenerational Epigenetic Adaptation of the Hepatic Wound-Healing Response

    OpenAIRE

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K.; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R.; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L.; Anstee, Quentin M.; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M.; Mann, Derek A.; Mann, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    We asked if ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound-healing. We discovered that male rats with a history of liver damage transmit epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound-healing through male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was reduced generation of liver myofibroblasts, increased hepatic expression of antifibrogenic PPAR-γ and decreased expression of profibrogenic TGF-β1. Remodelling of DNA methylation and histo...

  16. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing. PMID:26677006

  17. EVALUATION OF WOUND HEALING ACTIVITY OF HELIOTROPIUM INDICUM LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenoy Ashoka M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Present study is about the wound healing activity of ethanol and aqueous extracts of H.indicum leaves in wistar rats. Three wound models viz incision, excision and dead space wound were used in this study. The biophysical parameters studied were breaking strength in case of incision wounds and granulation tissue dry weight, breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in dead space wound model. In excision wound model, rate of contraction and number of days for epithelialization and also the granulation tissue formed on day 4, 8 and 12 were used to estimate some biochemical parameters like protein, DNA, collagen and lipid peroxides. For tropical application, 2% w/w sodium alginate ointment was prepared with 5% of aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaves. For oral administration 1% gum tragacanth suspension with 500mg/ml of extract was used. In excision and incision wound models, the control groups of animals were left untreated and in dead space wound model the animals were treated with 1 ml of 1% gum tragacanth per Kg, body weight orally.Aqueous and ethanol leaf extracts induced significant wound-healing activity against all the wound models studied. High rate of wound contraction, decrease in the period for epithelialisation, high skin breaking strength and granulation strength, increase in dry granulation tissue weight were observed in treated animals when compared to the control group of animals. There was significant increase in hydroxyproline, protein, collagen contents and decrease in lipid peroxide level in treated animals. Results of the study confirmed the prominent wound healing activity of the test extracts. Ethanol extract of H.indicum possesses better wound healing property compared to the aqueous extract.

  18. The modern concept of wound healing in glaucoma surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Petrov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-operative wound healing is one of the key-factors, defining success of filtrating surgery in late post-operative period. Wound healing is a physiological response directed at tissue structure reconstruction and function restoration, performed by several interacting cellular pathways. Surgical trauma leads to plasma proteins penetration to the filtration zone, as well as coagulation pathway and complement activation. The process of wound healing can be divided into three interconnected stages: inflammation, proliferation and scar remodeling. Inflammation is a protective response to tissue damage, that helps preserve its structure and cellular functions. It is characterized by neutrophil and monocyte arrival at the wound site. Neutrophils phagocytose the wound infecting bacteria and clean the wound site. Macrofages aid wound cleansing, participate in phagocytosis and produce a range of factors, necessary for new tissue formation. Proliferation stage consists of reepithelization and granulation tissue formation, which is accompanied by growth factors release. The growth factors stimulate the extracellular matrix formation and fibroblast proliferation. The last stage of the wound healing process is characterized by extracellular matrix remodeling with wound debridement achieved by a simultaneous synthesis and destruction of certain matrix components, cell differentiation, maturation and apoptosis. Apoptosis disturbance prolongs the fibroblast cell life and promotes excessive scarring. Three growth factors are thought to play a pivotal role in tissue healing and scarring transforming growth factor β, connective tissue growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor. The article contains a review of their isoforms, role in wound healing and the possibility of their inhibition to alter the process. Matrix metalloproteinases are a protein family that can digest extracellular matrix components. Due to their influence on the tenon’s capsule

  19. Microbial symbionts accelerate wound healing via the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theofilos Poutahidis

    Full Text Available Wound healing capability is inextricably linked with diverse aspects of physical fitness ranging from recovery after minor injuries and surgery to diabetes and some types of cancer. Impact of the microbiome upon the mammalian wound healing process is poorly understood. We discover that supplementing the gut microbiome with lactic acid microbes in drinking water accelerates the wound-healing process to occur in half the time required for matched control animals. Further, we find that Lactobacillus reuteri enhances wound-healing properties through up-regulation of the neuropeptide hormone oxytocin, a factor integral in social bonding and reproduction, by a vagus nerve-mediated pathway. Bacteria-triggered oxytocin serves to activate host CD4+Foxp3+CD25+ immune T regulatory cells conveying transplantable wound healing capacity to naive Rag2-deficient animals. This study determined oxytocin to be a novel component of a multi-directional gut microbe-brain-immune axis, with wound-healing capability as a previously unrecognized output of this axis. We also provide experimental evidence to support long-standing medical traditions associating diet, social practices, and the immune system with efficient recovery after injury, sustained good health, and longevity.

  20. Wound healing and hyper-hydration: a counterintuitive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rippon, M G; Ousey, K; Cutting, K F

    2016-02-01

    Winter's seminal work in the 1960s relating to providing an optimal level of moisture to aid wound healing (granulation and re-epithelialisation) has been the single most effective advance in wound care over many decades. As such the development of advanced wound dressings that manage the fluidic wound environment have provided significant benefits in terms of healing to both patient and clinician. Although moist wound healing provides the guiding management principle, confusion may arise between what is deemed to be an adequate level of tissue hydration and the risk of developing maceration. In addition, the counter-intuitive model 'hyper-hydration' of tissue appears to frustrate the moist wound healing approach and advocate a course of intervention whereby tissue is hydrated beyond what is a normally acceptable therapeutic level. This paper discusses tissue hydration, the cause and effect of maceration and distinguishes these from hyper-hydration of tissue. The rationale is to provide the clinician with a knowledge base that allows optimisation of treatment and outcomes and explains the reasoning behind wound healing using hyper-hydration. Declaration of interest: K. Cutting is a Clinical Research Consultant to the medical device and biotechnology industry. M. Rippon is Visiting Clinical Research Fellow, University of Huddersfield and K. Ousey provides consultancy for a range of companies through the University of Huddersfield including consultancy services for Paul Hartmann Ltd on HydroTherapy products.

  1. Effect of 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung Yong; Han, Song-Iy; Bae, Chun Sik; Cho, Hoon; Lim, Sung Chul

    2015-06-01

    PGE2 is an important mediator of wound healing. It is degraded and inactivated by 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH). Various growth factors, type IV collagen, TIMP-2 and PGE2 are important mediators of inflammation involving wound healing. Overproduction of TGF-β and suppression of PGE2 are found in excessive wound scarring. If we make the condition downregulating growth factors and upregulating PGE2, the wound will have a positive effect which results in little scar formation after healing. TD88 is a 15-PGDH inhibitor based on thiazolinedione structure. We evaluated the effect of TD88 on wound healing. In 10 guinea pigs (4 control and 6 experimental groups), we made four 1cm diameter-sized circular skin defects on each back. TD88 and vehicle were applicated on the wound twice a day for 4 days in the experimental and control groups, respectively. Tissue samples were harvested for qPCR and histomorphometric analyses on the 2nd and 4th day after treatment. Histomorphometric analysis showed significant reepithelization in the experimental group. qPCR analysis showed significant decrease of PDGF, CTGF and TIMP-2, but significant increase of type IV collagen in the experimental group. Taken together TD88 could be a good effector on wound healing, especially in the aspects of prevention of scarring.

  2. The Efficacy of Gelam Honey Dressing towards Excisional Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Mui Koon Tan; Durriyyah Sharifah Hasan Adli; Mohd Amzari Tumiran; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Kamaruddin Mohd Yusoff

    2012-01-01

    Honey is one of the oldest substances used in wound management. Efficacy of Gelam honey in wound healing was evaluated in this paper. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups of 24 rats each (untreated group, saline group, Intrasite Gel group, and Gelam honey group) with 2 cm by 2 cm full thickness, excisional wound created on neck area. Wounds were dressed topically according to groups. Rats were sacrificed on days 1, 5, 10, and 15 of treatments. Wounds were then processed ...

  3. Effect of an oily calcium hydroxide suspension on early wound healing after nonsurgical periodontal therapy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kasaj, A.; Willershausen, B.; Berakdar, M.; Tekyatan, H.; Sculean, A.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate clinically the effect of an oily calcium hydroxide suspension on early wound healing after nonsurgical periodontal therapy. A total of 19 patients with chronic periodontitis were enrolled in the study. Each subject had three sites in each of two contr

  4. Preparation of cellulose-based sponges for wound dressing and healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazlauske, J.; Dutschk, V.; Liesiene, J.; Dörfel, A.; Vignaesh Sankaran, M.

    2013-01-01

    For healing of chronic or burn wounds, polymeric sponges have been recently applied. Due to a high absorption capacity, noncitotoxicity and good swelling capabilities, for their production natural polymers are often used. In this study, macroporous regenerated cellulose was evaluated as a matrix for

  5. Nitric oxide: a newly discovered function on wound healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-dong LUO; Alex F CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Wound healing impairment represents a particularly challenging clinical problem to which no efficacious treatment regimens currently exist. The factors ensuring appropriate intercellular communication during wound repair are not completely understood. Although protein-type mediators are well-established players in this process, emerging evidence from both animal and human studies indicates that nitric oxide (NO) plays a key role in wound repair. The beneficial effects of NO on wound repair may be attributed to its functional influences on angiogenesis,inflammation, cell proliferation, matrix deposition, and remodeling. Recent findings from in vitro and in vivo studies of NO on wound repair are summarized in this review. The unveiled novel mechanisms support the use of NO-containing agents and/or NO synthase gene therapy as new therapeutic regimens for impaired wound healing.

  6. Applicability of confocal laser scanning microscopy for evaluation and monitoring of cutaneous wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange-Asschenfeldt, Susanne; Bob, Adrienne; Terhorst, Dorothea; Ulrich, Martina; Fluhr, Joachim; Mendez, Gil; Roewert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    There is a high demand for noninvasive imaging techniques for wound assessment. In vivo reflectance confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) represents an innovative optical technique for noninvasive evaluation of normal and diseased skin in vivo at near cellular resolution. This study was designed to test the feasibility of CLSM for noninvasive analysis of cutaneous wound healing in 15 patients (7 male/8 female), including acute and chronic, superficial and deep dermal skin wounds. A commercially available CLSM system was used for the assessment of wound bed and wound margins in order to obtain descriptive cellular and morphological parameters of cutaneous wound repair noninvasively and over time. CLSM was able to visualize features of cutaneous wound repair in epidermal and superficial dermal wounds, including aspects of inflammation, neovascularisation, and tissue remodelling in vivo. Limitations include the lack of mechanic fixation of the optical system on moist surfaces restricting the analysis of chronic skin wounds to the wound margins, as well as a limited optical resolution in areas of significant slough formation. By describing CLSM features of cutaneous inflammation, vascularisation, and epithelialisation, the findings of this study support the role of CLSM in modern wound research and management.

  7. Cell-cycle regulatory proteins in human wound healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Grøn, Birgitte; Dabelsteen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    Proper healing of mucosal wounds requires careful orchestration of epithelial cell migration and proliferation. To elucidate the molecular basis of the lack of cellular proliferation in the migrating 'epithelial tongue' during the re-epithelialization of oral mucosal wounds, the expression of cel...

  8. Wound healing angiogenesis: The clinical implications of a simple mathematical model

    KAUST Repository

    Flegg, Jennifer A.

    2012-05-01

    Nonhealing wounds are a major burden for health care systems worldwide. In addition, a patient who suffers from this type of wound usually has a reduced quality of life. While the wound healing process is undoubtedly complex, in this paper we develop a deterministic mathematical model, formulated as a system of partial differential equations, that focusses on an important aspect of successful healing: oxygen supply to the wound bed by a combination of diffusion from the surrounding unwounded tissue and delivery from newly formed blood vessels. While the model equations can be solved numerically, the emphasis here is on the use of asymptotic methods to establish conditions under which new blood vessel growth can be initiated and wound-bed angiogenesis can progress. These conditions are given in terms of key model parameters including the rate of oxygen supply and its rate of consumption in the wound. We use our model to discuss the clinical use of treatments such as hyperbaric oxygen therapy, wound bed debridement, and revascularisation therapy that have the potential to initiate healing in chronic, stalled wounds. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Proliferation of Keratinocytes Induced by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on a Chitosan Scaffold and Its Role in Wound Healing, a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Gomathysankar, Sankaralakshmi; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2014-01-01

    In the field of tissue engineering and reconstruction, the development of efficient biomaterial is in high demand to achieve uncomplicated wound healing. Chronic wounds and excessive scarring are the major complications of tissue repair and, as this inadequate healing continues to increase, novel therapies and treatments for dysfunctional skin repair and reconstruction are important. This paper reviews the various aspects of the complications related to wound healing and focuses on chitosan b...

  10. Electrospun 3D Fibrous Scaffolds for Chronic Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizhi Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds are difficult to heal spontaneously largely due to the corrupted extracellular matrix (ECM where cell ingrowth is obstructed. Thus, the objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional (3D biodegradable scaffold mimicking native ECM to replace the missing or dysfunctional ECM, which may be an essential strategy for wound healing. The 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA were successfully fabricated by liquid-collecting electrospinning, with 5~20 µm interconnected pores. Surface modification with the native ECM component aims at providing biological recognition for cell growth. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs successfully infiltrated into scaffolds at a depth of ~1400 µm after seven days of culturing, and showed significant progressive proliferation on scaffolds immobilized with collagen type I. In vivo models showed that chronic wounds treated with scaffolds had a faster healing rate. These results indicate that the 3D fibrous scaffolds may be a potential wound dressing for chronic wound repair.

  11. Wound healing evaluation of sodium fucidate-loaded polyvinylalcohol/sodium carboxymethylcellulose-based wound dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Soo-Jeong; Oh, Dong Hoon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Li, Dong Xun; Yong, Chul Soon; Choi, Han-Gon

    2010-07-01

    The cross-linked hydrogel films containing sodium fucidate were previously reported to be prepared polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium carboxymethylcellulose (Na-CMC) using the freeze-thawing method and their physicochemical property was investigated. For the development of novel sodium fucidate-loaded wound dressing, here its in vivo wound healing test and histopathology were performed compared with the conventional ointment product. In wound healing test, the sodium fucidate-loaded composed of 2.5% PVA, 1.125% Na-CMC and 0.2% drug showed faster healing of the wound made in rat dorsum than the hydrogel without drug, indicating the potential healing effect of sodium fucidate. Furthermore, from the histological examination, the healing effect of sodium fucidate-loaded hydrogel was greater than that of the conventional ointment product and hydrogel without drug, since it might gave an adequate level of moisture and build up the exudates on the wound area. Thus, the sodium fucidate-loaded wound dressing composed of 5% PVA, 1.125% Na-CMC and 0.2% drug is a potential wound dressing with excellent wound healing.

  12. Identification of the critical therapeutic entity in secreted Hsp90α that promotes wound healing in newly re-standardized healthy and diabetic pig models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn O'Brien

    Full Text Available Chronic and non-healing skin wounds represent a significant clinical, economic and social problem worldwide. Currently, there are few effective treatments. Lack of well-defined animal models to investigate wound healing mechanisms and furthermore to identify new and more effective therapeutic agents still remains a major challenge. Pig skin wound healing is close to humans. However, standardized pig wound healing models with demonstrated validity for testing new wound healing candidates are unavailable. Here we report a systematic evaluation and establishment of both acute and diabetic wound healing models in pigs, including wound-creating pattern for drug treatment versus control, measurements of diabetic parameters and the time for detecting delayed wound healing. We find that treatment and control wounds should be on the opposite and corresponding sides of a pig. We demonstrate a strong correlation between duration of diabetic conditions and the length of delay in wound closure. Using these new models, we narrow down the minimum therapeutic entity of secreted Hsp90α to a 27-amino acid peptide, called fragment-8 (F-8. In addition, results of histochemistry and immunohistochemistry analyses reveal more organized epidermis and dermis in Hsp90α-healed wounds than the control. Finally, Hsp90α uses a similar signaling mechanism to promote migration of isolated pig and human keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. This is the first report that shows standardized pig models for acute and diabetic wound healing studies and proves its usefulness with both an approved drug and a new therapeutic agent.

  13. A review of maggot debridement therapy to treat chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Sarah

    This literature review aims to clarify whether using maggot debridement therapy (MDT) for the removal of devitalized and infected tissue in chronic wounds is a valuable tool for healing. To undertake a literature review, the British Nursing Index, Ovid-Medline and the CINAHL databases were searched from January 1960 to June 2010 using the following terms: maggot debridement therapy, chronic wounds, granulation, infection, and cost-effective. The evidence suggests that MDT is more effective than other methods of debridement for wound bed preparation, although it has not been proven to eliminate problems associated with recurrent infections. This therapy has also not been proven to accelerate the healing process; however, more research needs to be undertaken into this and the cost-effectiveness of treatment.

  14. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Chadwick

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options.

  15. Neurolaena lobata L. promotes wound healing in Sprague Dawley rats

    OpenAIRE

    Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Ramlogan, Surrin; Chalapathi Rao, AV; Maharaj, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Background: The leaves of the Neurolaena lobata (Asteraceae) plant are used to control diabetes and heal wounds and infections. Aim: The ethanolic extract of N. lobata leaf was evaluated for its ability to heal inflicted wounds in rats using the excision wound model. Materials and Methods: Animals were divided into three groups of six each. Test group animals were treated topically with an ethanolic extract of N. lobata (1:1 with petroleum jelly, 100 mg/kg/day). Standard and control group ani...

  16. CURRENT STATE OF CHRONIC WOUND CARE IN KAZAKHSTAN: FOCUS ON TOPICAL TREATMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alma Akhmetova; Timur Saliev; Gulsim Kulsharova; Talgat Nurgozhin; Sergey Mikhalovsky

    2015-01-01

    Background — The presence of chronic hard-to-heal wounds significantly affects patients’ quality of life causing pain, discomfort, decrease of mobility and consequently leads to social isolation and depression. This type of wound is more prevalent among older population. It has been estimated that up to 1-2% of the world population have this condition. The treatment of hard-to-heal wounds is expensive and long-term process, and, stresses healthcare systems of every country. Unfortunately, lim...

  17. Experimental study on influence of chronic stress on skin wound healing and skin graft survival time in mice%慢性应激对小鼠创面愈合及移植皮片存活时间影响的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨震; 亓发芝; 曹小曼; 潘思璇

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the influence of chronic stress on skin wound healing and skin graft survival time in mice. Methods In the study on skin wound healing,a full-thickness dermal wound on the hack of the female C57 BL/6J mice was made, then the mice were randomly divided into simple wound group and wound plus chronic stress group. The chronic stress was given in the latter group. The wound healing conditions of two groups were observed. Meanwhile, the female C57BL/6J mice were grafted with skin donated from the female BALB/C mice,and randomly divided into,the simple skin graft group and the skin graft plus chronic stress group. The chronic stress was given in the latter group. The skin graft survival time of two groups were observed. Re-sults Compared with simple wound group, the healing speed of the wound plus chronic stress group was notably lower, and the difference was significant (P0.05). Conclusion Chronic stress may delay wound healing. But there is no certain conclusion that whether chronic stress impact on skin graft survival time. We need further investigation.%目的 探讨慢性应激对小鼠创面愈合及移植皮片存活时间的影响.方法 在C57BL/6J小鼠背部形成创面,术后将小鼠随机分到单纯创面组和慢性应激创面组,慢性应激创面组给予慢性刺激,观察两组创面愈合伤口情况;同时取BALB/C小鼠背部皮肤移植于C57BL/6J小鼠创面,术后将小鼠随机分到单纯移植组和慢性应激植皮组2个组,观察移植皮片存活情况.结果 与单纯创面组相比,慢性应激创面组创面残余面积较大[第10天时分别为(20.33±0.38)%,(33.55±7.02)%],差异有显著性(P0.05).结论 慢性应激能够延缓创面愈合,而慢性应激对皮片移植影响则不明确,需要进一步研究.

  18. Growth factors, silver dressings and negative pressure wound therapy in the management of hard-to-heal postoperative wounds in obstetrics and gynecology: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Stanirowski, Paweł Jan; Wnuk, Anna; Cendrowski, Krzysztof; Sawicki, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The last two decades witnessed the development of numerous innovative regimens for the management of patients with abnormally healing and infected wounds. Growth factors, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) and antiseptic dressings containing silver are examples of methods with best documented efficacy, being widely used in the treatment of acute and chronic post-traumatic wounds, burns and ulcers of various etiology. As far as obstetrics and gynecology are concerned, prevention an...

  19. Wound healing potential of Pterocarpus santalinus linn: a pharmacological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Tuhin Kanti; Maity, Lakshmi Narayan; Mukherjee, Biswapati

    2004-09-01

    The need for new therapeutics for wound healing has encouraged the drive to examine the nature and value of plant products. Ayurveda, the Indian traditional system of medicine, mentions the values of medicinal plants for wound healing. One of these is Pterocarpus santalinus. This article describes a pharmacological study to evaluate its toxicity as well as wound-healing potential in animal studies. Powder made from the wood of the P. santalinus tree was used to make up an ointment in a petroleum jelly base. No toxic effects were observed in 72 hours. Studies were done on punch and burn wound models on normal and diabetic rats using the test ointment, untreated and vehicle controls, and standard therapy. Physical and biochemical measurements were made. The test ointment-treated wounds healed significantly faster. On healing, collagenesis and biochemical measurements yielded supportive data. These studies permit the conclusion that the P. santalinus ointment is safe and effective in treating acute wounds in animal models. PMID:15866805

  20. Role of Topical Cream Extract Garlic (Allium sativum) in Wound Healing Fibroblasts Judging from the Strain Wistar Rats with Acute Injury Models

    OpenAIRE

    Zaenal Zaenal; Suryani As???ad; Veni Hadju; Agussalim Bukhari

    2016-01-01

    Wound will cause problems if handled poorly, causing chronic wounds. Garlic (Allium sativum) is a typical plant of the tropics, including Indonesia, the tubers are often used in traditional medicine, among them to heal wound. This laboratory experimental study using randomized designs Post Test Control Group aims to determine the effect of the use of Topical Cream Extract garlic (Allium sativum) on wound healing in topical administration, with a view histopathologic consisting of fibroblasts...

  1. Wound Healing and Cancer Stem Cells: Inflammation as a Driver of Treatment Resistance in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Kimberly M; Opdenaker, Lynn M; Flynn, Daniel; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between wound healing and cancer has long been recognized. The mechanisms that regulate wound healing have been shown to promote transformation and growth of malignant cells. In addition, chronic inflammation has been associated with malignant transformation in many tissues. Recently, pathways involved in inflammation and wound healing have been reported to enhance cancer stem cell (CSC) populations. These cells, which are highly resistant to current treatments, are capable of repopulating the tumor after treatment, causing local and systemic recurrences. In this review, we highlight proinflammatory cytokines and developmental pathways involved in tissue repair, whose deregulation in the tumor microenvironment may promote growth and survival of CSCs. We propose that the addition of anti-inflammatory agents to current treatment regimens may slow the growth of CSCs and improve therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25674014

  2. Clinical efficacy of dressings for treatment of heavily exuding chronic wounds

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    Wieg

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia Wiegand, Jörg Tittelbach, Uta-Christina Hipler, Peter Elsner Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany Abstract: The treatment of chronic ulcers is a complex issue and presents an increasing problem for caregivers everywhere. This is especially true in Germany, where more than 4 million chronic wounds are treated each year. Therapeutic decisions must be patient-centered and reflect wound etiology, localization, and healing status. The practice of using the same wound dressing during the entire healing period is no longer reasonable. Instead, multiple types of dressings may be needed for a single wound over its healing trajectory. Selection of the most appropriate dressing should be based on wound phase, depth, signs of infection, and level of exudate. Moisture balance is critical in wound care; dryness will hamper epithelial cell migration while excessive generation of fluid causes maceration at the wound margins. Hence, exudate management is a key issue in chronic wound therapy, particularly given that exudate from chronic wounds has a composition different from that of acute wound fluid. Several studies have shown that exudates from non-healing wounds contain significantly elevated levels of protease activity, increased formation of free radicals, and abundant amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, while concentrations of growth factors and protease inhibitors are markedly decreased. Application of dressings that remove and sequester excess amounts of wound fluid may not only help in restoring the correct balance of moisture, but also support the wound healing process by preventing tissue deterioration caused by abundant protease activity. Several types of dressings, such as hydrogels, hydrocolloids, alginates, hydrofibers, foams, and superabsorbent dressings, are reviewed here and evaluated with regard to their efficacy for highly exuding wounds. Keywords: chronic wounds, exuding, dressings, clinical efficacy 

  3. The effects of cancer and cancer therapies on wound healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on experimental evidence in rodents, most of the antineoplastic agents will affect wound healing. With most of the agents, this impairment is not sufficient to produce increased morbidity based on the clinical reports in humans. Radiation therapy appears to inhibit healing in both experimental animals and during clinical trials. In spite of this, it is reported that wounds in animals will heal when they are receiving radiation therapy after surgery. Based on the information presented here and experience at the University of Missouri, the decision to use adjuvant therapy should depend on the surgery performed. With a single incision that had no increased tension, there should be no hesitation to use adjuvant therapy. If removal of the tumor required reconstructive surgery, no radiation or chemotherapy should be used until the wound has healed. 30 references

  4. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  5. Stem Cells in Skin Regeneration, Wound Healing, and Their Clinical Applications

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    Nkemcho Ojeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the body and has an array of functions. Skin compartments, epidermis, and hair follicles house stem cells that are indispensable for skin homeostasis and regeneration. These stem cells also contribute to wound repair, resulting in restoration of tissue integrity and function of damaged tissue. Unsuccessful wound healing processes often lead to non-healing wounds. Chronic wounds are caused by depletion of stem cells and a variety of other cellular and molecular mechanisms, many of which are still poorly understood. Current chronic wound therapies are limited, so the search to develop better therapeutic strategies is ongoing. Adult stem cells are gaining recognition as potential candidates for numerous skin pathologies. In this review, we will discuss epidermal and other stem cells present in the skin, and highlight some of the therapeutic applications of epidermal stem cells and other adult stem cells as tools for cell/scaffold-based therapies for non-healing wounds and other skin disorders. We will also discuss emerging concepts and offer some perspectives on how skin tissue-engineered products can be optimized to provide efficacious therapy in cutaneous repair and regeneration.

  6. Wound healing activity of the leaves of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (Moraceae on ex-vivo porcine skin wound healing model

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    K Periyanayagam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To prescreen the ex- vivo wound healing activity of flavonoid rich fraction of ethyl acetate extract of the leaves of Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. Family Moraceae using porcine skin wound healing model (PSWHM along with  phytochemical, XRF, HPTLC analysis. The aim of this present study is to provide pharmacological validation to the traditional claim for wound healing activity of Artocarpus heterophyllus leaves. Method: Total phenolic content by UV spectral methods and ursolic acid content by HPTLC, trace elements by X-ray fluorescence were determined.  The wound healing effect of the ethyl acetate extract of the leaves of A.heterophyllus (EAAH was evaluated using ex- vivo porcine skin wound healing model - a novel organ culture model system for evaluation of drugs in cell-cell junction in the wound healing process. Results: Total phenolic content by UV method, HPTLC determination of ursolic acid content of EAAH was found to be 376.5mg/g GAE, 134mg/g respectively. XRF study showed the presence of calcium (39.4%, potassium (29.6%, magnesium (2.06%, Iron (0.99%, sulphur (1.83%, zinc (0.083%, strontium (0.23%, manganese (0.13% and aluminium (0.005%.   Histopathological evaluation showed all treated wounds were sound with no signs of apoptosis, necrosis or bacterial contamination and no toxicity of the tested concentrations of EAAH of the leaves. Morphology of the wound margins, epidermis and dermis layer were found to be normal. Epidermal migration or keratinocyte migration distances from the edges of each wound were measured, normalized with the PBS control group and expressed as mean%. The result clearly showed EAAH (1.5% promoted statistically significant wound healing effect is comparable to the standard drug Mupirocin. Conclusion: This study indicates that the ethyl acetate extract of the leaves of A.heterophyllus possesses potential wound healing activity on ex-vivo porcine skin wound healing model. Wound healing

  7. The Role of MicroRNA-146a in the Pathogenesis of the Diabetic Wound-Healing Impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Junwang; Wu, Wenjie; Zhang, Liping; Dorset-Martin, Wanda; Morris, Michael W.; Mitchell, Marc E.; Liechty, Kenneth W.

    2012-01-01

    The impairment in diabetic wound healing represents a significant clinical problem. Chronic inflammation is thought to play a central role in the pathogenesis of this impairment. We have previously shown that treatment of diabetic murine wounds with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can improve healing, but the mechanisms are not completely defined. MicroRNA-146a (miR-146a) has been implicated in regulation of the immune and inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that abnormal miRNA-146a express...

  8. Clinical challenges of chronic wounds: searching for an optimal animal model to recapitulate their complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nunan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficient healing of a skin wound is something that most of us take for granted but is essential for surviving day-to-day knocks and cuts, and is absolutely relied on clinically whenever a patient receives surgical intervention. However, the management of a chronic wound – defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months – has become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world, and it is a problem that will only escalate with the increasing incidence of conditions that impede wound healing, such as diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Despite being clinically and molecularly heterogeneous, all chronic wounds are generally assigned to one of three major clinical categories: leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers or pressure ulcers. Although we have gleaned much knowledge about the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin healthy, acute wound healing from various animal models, we have learned much less about chronic wound repair pathology from these models. This might largely be because the animal models being used in this field of research have failed to recapitulate the clinical features of chronic wounds. In this Clinical Puzzle article, we discuss the clinical complexity of chronic wounds and describe the best currently available models for investigating chronic wound pathology. We also assess how such models could be optimised to become more useful tools for uncovering pathological mechanisms and potential therapeutic treatments.

  9. Effects of Silk Sericin on Incision Wound Healing in a Dorsal Skin Flap Wound Healing Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Ersel, Murat; Uyanikgil, Yigit; AKARCA, Funda Karbek; OZCETE, Enver; Altunci, Yusuf Ali; Karabey, Fatih; Cavusoglu, Turker; Meral, Ayfer; Yigitturk, Gurkan; Cetin, Emel Oyku

    2016-01-01

    Background The wound healing process is complex and still poorly understood. Sericin is a silk protein synthesized by silk worms (Bombyx mori). The objective of this study was to evaluate in vivo wound healing effects of a sericin-containing gel formulation in an incision wound model in rats. Material/Methods Twenty-eight Wistar-Albino rats were divided into 4 groups (n=7). No intervention or treatment was applied to the Intact control group. For other groups, a dorsal skin flap (9×3 cm) was ...

  10. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

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    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  11. The Micrograft Concept for Wound Healing: Strategies and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Atanu; Bharara, Manish; Hurst, Craig; David G. Armstrong; Rilo, Horacio

    2010-01-01

    The standard of care for wound coverage is to use an autologous skin graft. However, large or chronic wounds become an exceptionally challenging problem especially when donor sites are limited. It is important that the clinician be aware of various treatment modalities for wound care and incorporate those methods appropriately in the proper clinical context. This report reviews an alternative to traditional meshed skin grafting for wound coverage: micrografting. The physiological concept of m...

  12. Hevin plays a pivotal role in corneal wound healing.

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    Shyam S Chaurasia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hevin is a matricellular protein involved in tissue repair and remodeling via interaction with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM proteins. In this study, we examined the functional role of hevin using a corneal stromal wound healing model achieved by an excimer laser-induced irregular phototherapeutic keratectomy (IrrPTK in hevin-null (hevin(-/- mice. We also investigated the effects of exogenous supplementation of recombinant human hevin (rhHevin to rescue the stromal cellular components damaged by the excimer laser. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wild type (WT and hevin (-/- mice were divided into three groups at 4 time points- 1, 2, 3 and 4 weeks. Group I served as naïve without any treatment. Group II received epithelial debridement and underwent IrrPTK using excimer laser. Group III received topical application of rhHevin after IrrPTK surgery for 3 days. Eyes were analyzed for corneal haze and matrix remodeling components using slit lamp biomicroscopy, in vivo confocal microscopy, light microscopy (LM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, immunohistochemistry (IHC and western blotting (WB. IHC showed upregulation of hevin in IrrPTK-injured WT mice. Hevin (-/- mice developed corneal haze as early as 1-2 weeks post IrrPTK-treatment compared to the WT group, which peaked at 3-4 weeks. They also exhibited accumulation of inflammatory cells, fibrotic components of ECM proteins and vascularized corneas as seen by IHC and WB. LM and TEM showed activated keratocytes (myofibroblasts, inflammatory debris and vascular tissues in the stroma. Exogenous application of rhHevin for 3 days reinstated inflammatory index of the corneal stroma similar to WT mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hevin is transiently expressed in the IrrPTK-injured corneas and loss of hevin predisposes them to aberrant wound healing. Hevin (-/- mice develop early corneal haze characterized by severe chronic inflammation and stromal fibrosis that can be rescued

  13. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60 %) with median age of 52.5 years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n = 8) or other soft tissue wounds (n = 6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62 days (range 6-559). Majority received 10 mg/kg (n = 11) and nine (64.3 %) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6 mg (range 1-16 mg) for median of 473 days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29 days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47 days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5 %) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50 %) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75 %) patients; median delay was 70 days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72 days (range 6-559). Five (83.3 %) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50 %) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3 %) and restarted in two (median delay 48 days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation. PMID:26298437

  14. Wound healing activity of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato

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    Madhav Sonkamble

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ipomoea batatas (L. Lam. from the family Convolvulaceae is the world’s sixth largest food crop. The tubers of Ipomoea batatas commonly known as sweet potato are consumed as a vegetable globally. The tubers contain high levels of polyphenols such as anthocyanins and phenolic acids and vitamins A, B and C, which impart a potent antioxidant activity that can translate well to show wound healing effects. To check their effects on wound healing, the peels and peel bandage were tested on various injury models in rats in the present study.Methods: The methanolic extracts of the peels and peel bandage of Ipomoea batatas tubers (sweet potato were screened for wound healing by excision and incision wound models on Wistar rats. Three types of gel formulations were prepared, viz., gel containing 3.0% (w/w peel extract, gel containing 6.0% (w/w peel extract and gel containing 10% (w/w peel extract. Betadine (5% w/w povidone iodine cream was used as a reference standard. In the incision wound model, Tensile strength of the skin was measured. Epithelization time, wound contraction, hydroxyproline content of the scab, and ascorbic acid and malondialdehyde content of the plasma were determined in the excision wound model.Results: In the incision wound model, high tensile strength of the wounded skin was observed in animals treated with the peel extract gels and the peel bandage when compared with wounded control animals. The increase in tensile strength indicates the promotion of collagen fibers and that the disrupted wound surfaces are being firmly knit by collagen. In the excision wound model, significant wound closure was observed on the 4th day in rats treated with all three gel formulations when compared with the wounded control rats. A significant increase inFunctional Foods in Health and Disease 2011; 10:403-415hydroxyproline and ascorbic acid content in the gel-treated animals and a significant decrease in malondialdehyde content in the

  15. Irradiation at 660 nm modulates different genes central to wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houreld, Nicolette N.

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a highly orchestrated process and involves a wide variety of cellular components, chemokines and growth factors. Laser irradiation has influenced gene expression and release of various growth factors, cytokines and extracellular matrix proteins involved in wound healing. This study aimed to determine the expression profile of genes involved in wound healing in wounded and diabetic wounded fibroblast cells in response to irradiation at a wavelength of 660 nm. Human skin fibroblast cells (WS1) were irradiated with a diode laser (wavelength 660 nm; fluence 5 J/cm2; power output 100 mW; power density 11 mW/cm2; spot size 9.1 cm2; exposure duration 7 min 35 s). Total RNA was isolated and 1 μg reverse transcribed into cDNA which was used as a template in real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Eighty four genes involved in wound healing (extracellular matrix and cell adhesion; inflammatory cytokines and chemokines; growth factors; and signal transduction) were evaluated in wounded and diabetic wounded cell models. Forty eight hours post-irradiation, 6 genes were significantly upregulated and 8 genes were down-regulated in irradiated wounded cells, whereas 1 gene was up-regulated and 33 genes down-regulated in irradiated diabetic wounded cells. Irradiation of stressed fibroblast cells to a wavelength of 660 nm and a fluence of 5 J/cm2 modulated the expression of different genes involved in wound healing in different cell models. Modulation of these genes leads to the effects of laser irradiation seen both in vivo and in vitro, and facilitates the wound healing process.

  16. Lumican binds ALK5 to promote epithelium wound healing.

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    Osamu Yamanaka

    Full Text Available Lumican (Lum, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP family member, has multiple matricellular functions both as an extracellular matrix component and as a matrikine regulating cell proliferation, gene expression and wound healing. To date, no cell surface receptor has been identified to mediate the matrikine functions of Lum. This study aimed to identify a perspective receptor that mediates Lum effects on promoting wound healing. Transforming growth factor-β receptor 1 (ALK5 was identified as a potential Lum-interacting protein through in silico molecular docking and molecular dynamics. This finding was verified by biochemical pull-down assays. Moreover, the Lum function on wound healing was abrogated by an ALK5-specific chemical inhibitor as well as by ALK5 shRNAi. Finally, we demonstrated that eukaryote-specific post-translational modifications are not required for the wound healing activity of Lum, as recombinant GST-Lum fusion proteins purified from E. coli and a chemically synthesized LumC13 peptide (the last C-terminal 13 amino acids of Lum have similar effects on wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

  17. [The incidence of wound healing disorders in heart surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, D; Krakor, R; Widera, R; Lindenau, K F

    1992-01-01

    In a five-year retrospective study we investigated the wound infection rate after median sternotomy in 2805 adult patients on whom elective surgery had been performed with extracorporeal circulation. On the basis of 14,700 apparently relevant data from 101 patients with wound healing disturbances at the sternotomy site, both the significance of predisposing risk profiles and the prevalence of nosocomial pathogens were evaluated. The control group was formed by 100 patients selected at random. The results were checked for statistical significance using the X2 test for alternative characters; the significance level was set at alpha = 5%. The infection rate observed in our group was 3.6%, which was assigned to 5 internally defined degrees of severity. Cases of healing by second intention were caused to 93% by coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Factors leading to a decrease in oxygenation of the wound area (low-output syndrome, rethoracotomy), diabetes, obesity and the duration of wound drainage were accompanied by a significantly more frequent occurrence of wound healing disturbances. On the other hand, perfusion-technical parameters, operation duration, revascularisation techniques (IMA/ACVB), pulmonary conditioned hypoxemias and the end-of-year desinfection usual in our clinic had no influence on wound healing. Seasonal fluctuation of the epidermal microclimate appear to be responsible for the prevalence and virulence of the pathogen strains in the clinic environment. The preventive measures used in cardiosurgical clinics do not yet represent a fully developed prophylaxis against exposure to nosocomial pathogens.

  18. Biochemical association of metabolic profile and microbiome in chronic pressure ulcer wounds.

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    Mary Cloud B Ammons

    Full Text Available Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment.

  19. Raman spectroscopy and the spectral correlation index for predicting wound healing outcome: towards in vivo application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adam G.; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2016-03-01

    Combat wounds are sometimes confounded by healing complications that are not as prevalent in civilian wounds due to their high energy etiology. One complication of wound healing is dehiscence, where a surgically closed wound reopens after closure. This complication can have serious consequences for the patient, but knowledge about the molecular composition of the wound bed beyond what is readily visible may help clinicians mitigate these complications. It is necessary to develop techniques that can be used in vivo to assess and predict wound healing pointof- care so that care-takers can decide the best way to make informed clinical decisions regarding their patient's healing. Raman spectroscopy is a perfect candidate for predicting wound healing due to its ability to provide a detailed molecular fingerprint of the wound bed noninvasively. Here, we study the spectral correlation index, a measure of orthogonality, with ten reference tissue components to stratify wounds based on how they heal. We analyze these indexes over time to show the modulation of these tissue components over the wound healing process. Results show that qualitative observation of the spectra cannot reveal major differences between the dehisced and normal healing wounds, but the spectral correlation index can. Analysis of the spectral correlations across the wound healing process demonstrates the changes throughout the wound healing process, showing that early differences in tissue components may portend wound healing. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy coupled with the spectral correlation index presents as a possible point-of-care tool for enabling discrimination of wounds with impaired healing.

  20. Substance P Promotes Wound Healing in Diabetes by Modulating Inflammation and Macrophage Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Leal, Ermelindo C.; Carvalho, Eugénia; Tellechea, Ana; Kafanas, Antonios; Tecilazich, Francesco; Kearney, Cathal; Kuchibhotla, Sarada; Auster, Michael E.; Kokkotou, Efi; Mooney, David J.; LoGerfo, Frank W; Pradhan-Nabzdyk, Leena; Veves, Aristidis

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration is a major complication of diabetes. Substance P (SP) is involved in wound healing, but its effect in diabetic skin wounds is unclear. We examined the effect of exogenous SP delivery on diabetic mouse and rabbit wounds. We also studied the impact of deficiency in SP or its receptor, neurokinin-1 receptor, on wound healing in mouse models. SP treatment improved wound healing in mice and rabbits, whereas the absence of SP or its receptor impaired wound progression in mi...

  1. Comparative Study of Wound Healing Activity of Topical and Oral Ocimum Sanctum Linn in Albino Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Asha, B.; Nagabhushan, A.; G. H. Shashikala

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Ocimum sanctum, when given orally in one of the studies showed wound healing property. Since majority of the agents tried for wound healing are topical, the present study was planned to compare the oral and topical Ocimum sanctum for wound healing property. Methods: Excision and incision resutured wound models in albino rats were used to study complete epithelisation time, wound contraction, histopathological study and tensile strength of the wounds. Results: The animals were di...

  2. [Advances in the effects of pH value of micro-environment on wound healing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ruirui; Li, Na; Wei, Li

    2016-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is affected by lots of endogenous and exogenous factors. Researches have confirmed that acid environment could prevent wound infection and accelerate wound healing by inhibiting bacteria proliferation, promoting oxygen release, affecting keratinocyte proliferation and migration, etc. In this article, we review the literature to identify the potential relationship between the pH value of wound micro-environment and the progress of wound healing, and summarize the clinical application of variation of pH value of micro-environment in wound healing, thereby to provide new treatment strategy for wound healing.

  3. Vitamin C promotes wound healing through novel pleiotropic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Bassem M; Fisher, Bernard J; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Ward, Susan; Wayne, Jennifer S; Brophy, Donald F; Fowler, Alpha A; Yager, Dorne R; Natarajan, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin C (VitC) or ascorbic acid (AscA), a cofactor for collagen synthesis and a primary antioxidant, is rapidly consumed post-wounding. Parenteral VitC administration suppresses pro-inflammatory responses while promoting anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution effects in human/murine sepsis. We hypothesised that VitC could promote wound healing by altering the inflammatory, proliferative and remodelling phases of wound healing. Mice unable to synthesise VitC (Gulo(-/-) ) were used in this study. VitC was provided in the water (sufficient), withheld from another group (deficient) and supplemented by daily intra-peritoneal infusion (200 mg/kg, deficient + AscA) in a third group. Full thickness excisional wounds (6 mm) were created and tissue collected on days 7 and 14 for histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blotting. Human neonatal dermal fibroblasts (HnDFs) were used to assess effects of In conclusion, VitC favorably on proliferation. Histological analysis showed improved wound matrix deposition and organisation in sufficient and deficient +AscA mice. Wounds from VitC sufficient and deficient + AscA mice had reduced expression of pro-inflammatory mediators and higher expression of wound healing mediators. Supplementation of HnDF with AscA induced the expression of self-renewal genes and promoted fibroblast proliferation. VitC favourably impacts the spatiotemporal expression of transcripts associated with early resolution of inflammation and tissue remodelling. PMID:26290474

  4. Hyaluronidase modulates inflammatory response and accelerates the cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronza, Marcio; Caetano, Guilherme F; Leite, Marcel N; Bitencourt, Claudia S; Paula-Silva, Francisco W G; Andrade, Thiago A M; Frade, Marco A C; Merfort, Irmgard; Faccioli, Lúcia H

    2014-01-01

    Hyaluronidases are enzymes that degrade hyaluronan an important constituent of the extracellular matrix. They have been used as a spreading agent, improving the absorption of drugs and facilitating the subcutaneous infusion of fluids. Here, we investigated the influence of bovine testes hyaluronidase (HYAL) during cutaneous wound healing in in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated in the wound scratch assay that HYAL increased the migration and proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro at low concentration, e.g. 0.1 U HYAL enhanced the cell number by 20%. HYAL presented faster and higher reepithelialization in in vivo full-thickness excisional wounds generated on adult Wistar rats back skin already in the early phase at 2nd day post operatory compared to vehicle-control group. Wound closured area observed in the 16 U and 32 U HYAL treated rats reached 38% and 46% compared to 19% in the controls, respectively. Histological and biochemical analyses supported the clinical observations and showed that HYAL treated wounds exhibited increased granulation tissue, diminished edema formation and regulated the inflammatory response by modulating the release of pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines, growth factor and eicosanoids mediators. Moreover, HYAL increased gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) γ and PPAR β/δ, the collagen content in the early stages of healing processes as well as angiogenesis. Altogether these data revealed that HYAL accelerates wound healing processes and might be beneficial for treating wound disorders. PMID:25393024

  5. Evaluation of In Vivo Wound Healing Activity of Bacopa monniera on Different Wound Model in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, S; Gautam, M. K.; Shalini Goel; V Purohit; SHARMA, H; Goel, R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried whole plant of Bacopa monniera (BME) was studied on wound models in rats. BME (25 mg/kg) was administered orally, once daily for 10 days (incision and dead space wound models) or for 21 days or more (excision wound model) in rats. BME was studied for its in vitro antimicrobial and in vivo wound breaking strength, WBS (incision model), rate of contraction, period of epithelization, histology of skin (excision model), granulation tissue free...

  6. Advances in research on mechanisms of the effect of negative pressure wound treatment in wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei LI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative pressure wound treatment (NPWT refers to apply a highly porous material between the wound and a semipermeable membrane, and it is then connected to a suction apparatus, leading to a minimal deformation of wound, resulting in promoting cell proliferation and wound repair. These devices may significantly expedite wound healing, facilitate the formation of granulation tissue, and reduce the complexity of subsequent reconstructive operations. In recent years, along with wide clinical use, the therapeutic effect of NPWT has been recognized, but the mechanism of its clinical effect still needs further research. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.08.15

  7. Immune and vascular dysfunction in diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A S; Antonsen, E L

    2016-07-01

    The diminished capacity for wound healing in patients with diabetes contributes to morbidity through ulceration and recurrent infections, loss of function and decreased workplace productivity, increased hospitalisation rates, and rising health-care costs. These are due to diabetes' effects on signalling molecules, cellular cascades, different cell populations, and the vasculature. The function of multiple immune system components including cellular response, blood factors, and vascular tone are all negatively impacted by diabetes. The purpose of this paper is to review the current understanding of immune and vascular dysfunction contributing to impaired wound healing mechanisms in the diabetic population. Normal wound healing mechanisms are reviewed followed by diabetic aberrations to immune and inflammatory function and atherogenesis and angiopathy. PMID:27410470

  8. Wound healing activity of flower extract of Calendula officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, Korengath C; Kuttan, Ramadasan

    2009-01-01

    The effects of oral and topical application of Calendula officinalis flower extract on excision wounds made in rats were checked. The parameters assessed were the days needed for re-epithelization and percentage of wound closure. The hydroxy proline and hexosamine content in the granuloma tissue of the wound was also measured. The percentage of wound closure was 90.0% in the extract-treated group, whereas the control group showed only 51.1% on the eighth day of wounding (p < .01). The days needed for re-epithelization were 17.7 for the control animals; extract treatment at a dose of 20 or 100 mg/kg b.wt reduced the period to 14 and 13 days, respectively. A significant increase was observed in the hydroxy proline and hexosamine content in the extract-treated group compared with the untreated animals. The data indicate potent wound healing activity ofC. officinalis extract. PMID:19601397

  9. Wound Healing and Infection in Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention.......To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention....

  10. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias;

    2012-01-01

    -37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However...

  11. A novel model of chronic wounds: importance of redox imbalance and biofilm-forming bacteria for establishment of chronicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Dhall

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds have a large impact on health, affecting ∼6.5 M people and costing ∼$25B/year in the US alone. We previously discovered that a genetically modified mouse model displays impaired healing similar to problematic wounds in humans and that sometimes the wounds become chronic. Here we show how and why these impaired wounds become chronic, describe a way whereby we can drive impaired wounds to chronicity at will and propose that the same processes are involved in chronic wound development in humans. We hypothesize that exacerbated levels of oxidative stress are critical for initiation of chronicity. We show that, very early after injury, wounds with impaired healing contain elevated levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and, much like in humans, these levels increase with age. Moreover, the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes is not elevated, leading to buildup of oxidative stress in the wound environment. To induce chronicity, we exacerbated the redox imbalance by further inhibiting the antioxidant enzymes and by infecting the wounds with biofilm-forming bacteria isolated from the chronic wounds that developed naturally in these mice. These wounds do not re-epithelialize, the granulation tissue lacks vascularization and interstitial collagen fibers, they contain an antibiotic-resistant mixed bioflora with biofilm-forming capacity, and they stay open for several weeks. These findings are highly significant because they show for the first time that chronic wounds can be generated in an animal model effectively and consistently. The availability of such a model will significantly propel the field forward because it can be used to develop strategies to regain redox balance that may result in inhibition of biofilm formation and result in restoration of healthy wound tissue. Furthermore, the model can lead to the understanding of other fundamental mechanisms of chronic wound development that can potentially lead to novel therapies.

  12. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugate, Karen K; Ribeiro, Wellington S; Lulai, Edward C; Deckard, Edward L; Finger, Fernando L

    2016-01-01

    Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12°C for 28 days. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 days and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6°C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 days after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 days storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12°C than at 6°C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12°C, but not at 6°C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12°C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12°C than at 6°C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12°C, and over 28 days, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6°C than in roots stored at 12°C. The data indicate that storage at 6°C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12°C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled too quickly. PMID

  13. Cold Temperature Delays Wound Healing in Postharvest Sugarbeet Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Klotz Fugate

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Storage temperature affects the rate and extent of wound-healing in a number of root and tuber crops. The effect of storage temperature on wound-healing in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L. roots, however, is largely unknown. Wound-healing of sugarbeet roots was investigated using surface-abraded roots stored at 6 and 12 °C for 28 d. Surface abrasions are common injuries of stored roots, and the storage temperatures used are typical of freshly harvested or rapidly cooled roots. Transpiration rate from the wounded surface and root weight loss were used to quantify wound healing. At 12 °C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface declined within 14 d and wounded roots lost weight at a rate similar to unwounded controls. At 6 °C, transpiration rate from the wounded surface did not decline in the 28 d after injury, and wounded roots lost 44% more weight than controls after 28 d storage. Melanin formation, lignification, and suberization occurred more rapidly at 12 °C than at 6 °C, and a continuous layer of lignified and suberized cells developed at 12 °C, but not at 6 °C. Examination of enzyme activities involved in melanin, lignin, and suberin formation indicated that differences in melanin formation at 6 and 12 °C were related to differences in polyphenol oxidase activity, although no relationships between suberin or lignin formation and phenylalanine ammonia lyase or peroxidase activity were evident. Wound-induced respiration was initially greater at 12 °C than at 6 °C. However, with continued storage, respiration rate of wounded roots declined more rapidly at 12 °C, and over 28 d, the increase in respiration due to injury was 52% greater in roots stored at 6 °C than in roots stored at 12 °C. The data indicate that storage at 6 °C severely slowed and impaired wound-healing of surface-abraded sugarbeet roots relative to roots stored at 12 °C and suggest that postharvest losses may be accelerated if freshly harvested roots are cooled

  14. Split-Thickness Skin Grafts Remain the Gold Standard for the Closure of Large Acute and Chronic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Simman, Richard; Phavixay, Laemthong

    2012-01-01

    Healing large chronic and acute wounds is a challenging task for wound care providers. It requires numerous visits and frequent dressing changes and often involves expensive therapeutic modalities. Our primary and ultimate goal is to heal these wounds as quickly as possible. In a prepared wound bed, covered with granulation tissue and free of infection, skin graft is the gold standard procedure to achieve this goal. One should keep in mind that not all patients are good candidates for surgery.

  15. Remodeling of skin nerve fibers during burn wound healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongqiang Feng; Xia Li; Rui Zhang; Yu Liu; Tingting Leng; Yibing Wang

    2010-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a complex sequence of processes.Recent studies have revealed that skin reinnervation may have an impact on physiological wound repair.Few studies have addressed the process of reinnervation and morphological changes in regenerated nerve fibers.The regeneration of neurites during full-thickness burn wound healing was determined by immunofluorescent staining using an anti-neurofilament protein monoclonal antibody,and three-dimensional morphology was observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope.Morphology and the volume fraction of collagen and nerve fibers were measured.Skin reinnervation increased during wound healing,peaked during the proliferative scar stage,and then decreased to lower levels during the maturation period.The results from the skin nerve fibers correlated with those from collagen using semi-quantitative analysis.Disintegration and fragmentation were observed frequently in samples from the proliferative stage,and seldom occurred during the maturation stage.There was a remodeling process of regenerated nerve fibers during wound healing,which comprised changed innervation density and topical morphology.The mechanism of remodeling for nerve fibers requires further investigation.

  16. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Shibnath Ghatak; Maytin, Edward V.; Mack, Judith A.; Vincent C. Hascall; Ilia Atanelishvili; Ricardo Moreno Rodriguez; Markwald, Roger R.; Suniti Misra

    2015-01-01

    A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM) production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis). In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelia...

  17. Biliary wound healing, ductular reactions, and IL-6/gp130 signaling in the development of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A J Demetris; John G Lunz Ⅲ; Susan Specht; Isao Nozaki

    2006-01-01

    Basic and translational wound healing research in the biliary tree lag significantly behind similar studies on the skin and gastrointestinal tract. This is at least partly attributable to lack of easy access to the biliary tract for study. But clinical relevance, more interest in biliary epithelial cell (BEC) pathophysiology, and widespread availability of BEC cultures are factors reversing this trend. In the extra-hepatic biliary tree, ineffectual wound healing,scarring and stricture development are pressing issues.In the smallest intra-hepatic bile ducts either impaired BEC proliferation or an exuberant response can contribute to liver disease. Chronic inflammation and persistent wound healing reactions in large and small bile ducts often lead to liver cancer. General concepts of wound healing as they apply to the biliary tract, importance of cellular processes dependent on IL-6/gp130/STAT3 signaling pathways, unanswered questions, and future directions are discussed.

  18. Endocytosis-dependent coordination of multiple actin regulators is required for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Yutaka; Coulson-Gilmer, Camilla; Millard, Tom H

    2015-08-01

    The ability to heal wounds efficiently is essential for life. After wounding of an epithelium, the cells bordering the wound form dynamic actin protrusions and/or a contractile actomyosin cable, and these actin structures drive wound closure. Despite their importance in wound healing, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the assembly of these actin structures at wound edges are not well understood. In this paper, using Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we demonstrate that Diaphanous, SCAR, and WASp play distinct but overlapping roles in regulating actin assembly during wound healing. Moreover, we show that endocytosis is essential for wound edge actin assembly and wound closure. We identify adherens junctions (AJs) as a key target of endocytosis during wound healing and propose that endocytic remodeling of AJs is required to form "signaling centers" along the wound edge that control actin assembly. We conclude that coordination of actin assembly, AJ remodeling, and membrane traffic is required for the construction of a motile leading edge during wound healing.

  19. Wound healing and the effect of pineal gland and melatonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Drobnik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex phenomenon that is controlled by local and general regulatory mechanisms. The aim of the paper is to analyze recently-published data devoted to the regulation of wound repair by melatonin. The effect of melatonin has been reported in different wound types healed with various mechanisms. The action of the pineal indoleamine is dependent on the used dose, time of application and target organ. Moreover, melatonin influences different phases of wound repair such as inflammation, by regulating the release of inflammatory mediators, cell proliferation and migration, by influencing angiogenesis, and the proliferation of fibroblasts, as well as the synthesis phase, by regulating collagen and glycosaminoglycan accumulation in the wounded milieu. Thus, healing of the skin wound, myocardial infarction, bone fractures and gastric ulcer is influenced by melatonin. In patients with low levels of melatonin (elderly or β-blocker treated patients, its regulatory effects are expected to be impaired. Thus, the need for melatonin supplementation in those patients is postulated in the study. [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(1.000: 3-14

  20. Zinc, copper, and selenium tissue levels and their relation to subcutaneous abscess, minor surgery, and wound healing in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirastschijski, Ursula; Martin Moreno, Alicia; Jorgensen, Lars N;

    2013-01-01

    Trace element involvement in wounds left to heal by secondary intention needs clarification. We have previously reported faster healing of wounds following acute surgery compared with elective excision of pilonidal sinus disease. The effect of topical zinc on the closure of the excisional wounds...... was mediocre compared with placebo. In contrast, parenteral zinc, copper, and selenium combined appear effective for wound healing in humans. We have investigated zinc, copper, and selenium with respect to (a) impact of acute versus chronic pilonidal sinus and (b) regional concentrations within granulating...... wounds treated topically with placebo or zinc in 42 (33 males) pilonidal disease patients. Baseline serum and skin concentrations of copper correlated (r S = 0.351, p = 0.033, n = 37), but not of zinc or selenium. Patients with abscesses had elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and copper levels (+29...

  1. ROLE OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE (VAC - IN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lokanadha Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Large, complicated wounds pose a significant surgical problem. Negative pressure wound therapy is one of several methods enabling to obtain better treatment results in case of open infected wounds.1,2 The use of negative pressure therapy enables to obtain a reduction in the number of bacteria which significantly reduces the number of complications.3,4,5 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the Role of VAC in wound healing in Orthopaedics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The cases presented in this study are those who were admitted in King George Hospital in the time period from January 2014 to August 2015. This is a prospective interventional study. In this study, 15 patients were assigned to the study group (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy- NPWT based on their willingness for undergoing treatment. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS 12 males and 3 females are involved in the study. There is decrease in the mean wound area from 64 cm2 to 38 cm2 . There is decrease in the duration of hospital stay. Finally, wound is closed by SSG or secondary suturing. DISCUSSION NPWT is known to reduce bacterial counts, although they remain colonised with organisms. Wounds covered with NPW dressing are completely isolated from the environment, thereby reduces cross infection. In our series, we had 73.3% (11 cases excellent results and 26.7% (4 cases good results and no poor results. As interpretation with results, VAC therapy is effective mode of adjuvant therapy for the management of infected wounds. CONCLUSION VAC has been proven to be a reliable method of treating a variety of infected wounds. It greatly increases the rate of granulation tissue formation and lowers bacterial counts to accelerate wound healing. It can be used as a temporary dressing to prepare wounds optimally prior to closure or as a definitive treatment for nonsurgical and surgical wounds. VAC is now being used in a multitude of clinical settings, including the treatment of surgical wounds, infected wounds

  2. The chronic wound in early neurological rehabilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Rollnik, Jens Dieter; Wolff, Brigitte; Bertomeu-Knopp, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wounds, especially decubitus ulcers, present a substantial problem in early neurological rehabilitation. Although many of these problem wounds are avoidable through appropriate nursing care (positioning techniques), a cross-sectional examination of our group of patients revealed a prevalence of chronic wounds of 9.2%. This chiefly included older (average age ca. 65 years), severely affected patients (average early-rehabilitation Barthel's total index of -208.0 (± 47.7) points), i.e., ...

  3. Proresolution therapy for the treatment of delayed healing of diabetic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunan; Zhang, Michael J; Hellmann, Jason; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are emerging global epidemics associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation. A characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes is delayed wound healing, which increases the risk of recurrent infections, tissue necrosis, and limb amputation. In health, inflammation is actively resolved by endogenous mediators, such as the resolvins. D-series resolvins are generated from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and promote macrophage-mediated clearance of microbes and apoptotic cells. However, it is not clear how type 2 diabetes affects the resolution of inflammation. Here, we report that resolution of acute peritonitis is delayed in obese diabetic (db/db) mice. Altered resolution was associated with decreased apoptotic cell and Fc receptor-mediated macrophage clearance. Treatment with resolvin D1 (RvD1) enhanced resolution of peritonitis, decreased accumulation of apoptotic thymocytes in diabetic mice, and stimulated diabetic macrophage phagocytosis. Conversion of DHA to monohydroxydocosanoids, markers of resolvin biosynthesis, was attenuated in diabetic wounds, and local application of RvD1 accelerated wound closure and decreased accumulation of apoptotic cells and macrophages in the wounds. These findings support the notion that diabetes impairs resolution of wound healing and demonstrate that stimulating resolution with proresolving lipid mediators could be a novel approach to treating chronic, nonhealing wounds in patients with diabetes.

  4. Contact dermatitis presenting as non-healing wound: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Leelavathi M; Le YY; Tohid H; Hasliza AH

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Topical antiseptics are commonly used in the management of minor wounds, burns, and infected skin. These agents are widely used by health professionals and are often self-prescribed by patients as they are easily available over-the-counter. This case illustrates a 73 year old man who presented with a non-healing wound on his right forearm for 4 weeks. The wound started from an insect bite and progressively enlarged with increasing pruritus and burning sensation. Clinically an ill-def...

  5. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte Rønø

    Full Text Available The fibrinolytic activity of plasmin plays a fundamental role in resolution of blood clots and clearance of extravascular deposited fibrin in damaged tissues. These vital functions of plasmin are exploited by malignant cells to accelerate tumor growth and facilitate metastases. Mice lacking functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency or if this gender effect is restricted to skin cancer. To investigate this, we tested the effect of gender on plasmin dependent immune cell migration, accumulation of hepatic fibrin depositions, skin composition, and skin wound healing. Gender did not affect immune cell migration or hepatic fibrin accumulation in neither wildtype nor plasmin deficient mice, and the existing differences in skin composition between males and females were unaffected by plasmin deficiency. In contrast, gender had a marked effect on the ability of plasmin deficient mice to heal skin wounds, which was seen as an accelerated wound closure in female versus male plasmin deficient mice. Further studies showed that this gender effect could not be reversed by ovariectomy, suggesting that female sex-hormones did not mediate the accelerated skin wound healing in plasmin deficient female mice. Histological examination of healed wounds revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show that the gender dependent effect of plasmin deficiency is tissue specific and may be secondary to already established differences between genders, such as skin

  6. Skin wound healing in different aged Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotti, Evelina; Malagoli, Davide; Franchini, Antonella

    2013-08-01

    Xenopus froglets can perfectly heal skin wounds without scarring. To explore whether this capacity is maintained as development proceeds, we examined the cellular responses during the repair of skin injury in 8- and 15-month-old Xenopus laevis. The morphology and sequence of healing phases (i.e., inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling) were independent of age, while the timing was delayed in older frogs. At the beginning of postinjury, wound re-epithelialization occurred in form of a thin epithelium followed by a multilayered epidermis containing cells with apoptotic patterns and keratinocytes stained by anti-inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) antibody. The inflammatory response, early activated by recruitment of blood cells immunoreactive to anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, iNOS, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, persisted over time. The dermis repaired by a granulation tissue with extensive angiogenesis, inflammatory cells, fibroblasts, and anti-α-SMA positive myofibroblasts. As the healing progressed, wounded areas displayed vascular regression, decrease in cellularity, and rearrangement of provisional matrix. The epidermis restored to a prewound morphology while granulation tissue was replaced by a fibrous tissue in a scar-like pattern. The quantitative PCR analysis demonstrated an up-regulated expression of Xenopus suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (XSOCS-3) and Xenopus transforming growth factor-β2 (XTGF-β2) soon after wounding and peak levels were detected when granulation tissue was well developed with a large number of inflammatory cells. The findings indicate that X. laevis skin wound healing occurred by a combination of regeneration (in epidermis) and repair (in dermis) and, in contrast to froglet scarless wound healing, the growth to a more mature adult stage is associated with a decrease in regenerative capacity with scar-like tissue formation.

  7. Scar-Free Embryonic Wound Healing and the Prevention of Scarring Following Wound Healing in the Adult

    OpenAIRE

    McCallion, R. L.; Ferguson, M W J

    1997-01-01

    The development of scarring following accidental injury or surgery is an important clinical problem, often resulting in adverse effects on frowth and function, as well as an undersirable cosmetic appearance. Adult wound healing and scar formation are characterised by acute inflammation, wound contraction and disordered collagen deposition. Similar processes may also be involved in the progression of fibrotic disease states such as pulmonary fibrosis and hepatic cirrhosis. A major clinical obj...

  8. Stan scheller: the forerunner of clinical studies on using propolis for poor and chronic nonhealing wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharzewski, M; Kubacka, S; Urbanek, T; Wilemska-Kucharzewska, K; Morawiec, T

    2013-01-01

    For hundreds of years poor and chronic nonhealing wounds have constituted a serious problem to medicine. What is more, treating such wounds is an expensive let alone a long-lasting process. The following paper describes Professor Scheller's achievements in using propolis for poor and chronic non-healing wounds. The authors' intention was to present the results connected with the use of the ethanolic extract propolis, in the treatment of patients suffering from burns, venous crural ulceration, local sacral bone pressure ulcers, suppurative osteitis and arthritis, suppurative postoperative local wound complications, and infected traumatic wounds.

  9. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  10. Silk sericin ameliorates wound healing and its clinical efficacy in burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramwit, Pornanong; Palapinyo, Sirinoot; Srichana, Teerapol; Chottanapund, Suthat; Muangman, Pornprom

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silk sericin, a protein from silkworm cocoon, on scratch wound healing in vitro. For applicable result in clinical use, we also study the efficacy of sericin added to a standard antimicrobial cream, silver zinc sulfadiazine, for open wound care in the treatment of second-degree burn wounds. In vitro scratch assays show that sericin at concentration 100 μg/mL can promote the migration of fibroblast L929 cells similar to epidermal growth factor (positive control) at 100 μg/mL. After 1 day of treatment, the length of scratch in wounds treated with sericin was significantly shorter than the length of negative control wounds (culture medium without sericin). For clinical study, a total of 29 patients with 65 burn wounds which covered no less than 15 % of total body surface area were randomly assigned to either control (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine cream) or treatment (wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream) group in this randomized, double-blind, standard-controlled study. The results showed that the average time to reach 70 % re-epithelialization of the burned surface and complete healing in the treatment group was significantly shorter, approximately 5-7 days, than in the control group. Regarding time for complete healing, control wounds took approximately 29.28 ± 9.27 days, while wounds treated with silver zinc sulfadiazine with added sericin cream took approximately 22.42 ± 6.33 days, (p = 0.001). No infection or severe reaction was found in any wounds. This is the first clinical study to show that silk sericin is safe and beneficial for burn wound treatment when it is added to silver sulfadiazine cream. PMID:23748948

  11. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas; Madani, Seyyed Abdollah; Abediankenari, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes.

  12. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Abbas Hashemi; Seyyed Abdollah Madani; Saied Abediankenari

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, mor...

  13. Recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor accelerates wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, G S; Davidson, J M; Buckley, A; Sommer, A; Woodward, S C; Aquino, A M; Barbour, R; Demetriou, A A

    1988-07-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) stimulates extracellular matrix metabolism, growth, and movement of mesodermally derived cells. We have previously shown that collagen content in polyvinyl alcohol sponges increased after bFGF treatment. We hypothesized that bFGF-treated incisional wounds would heal more rapidly. After intraperitoneal pentobarbital anesthesia, male, 200- to 250-g, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 27) each underwent two sets of paired, transverse, dorsal incisions closed with steel sutures. On Day 3 postwounding, 0.4 ml of bFGF (recombinant, 400 ng. Synergen) or normal saline was injected into one of each paired incisions. Animals were killed with ether on postwounding Days 5, 6, and 7 and their dorsal pelts were excised. Fresh or formalin-fixed wound strips were subjected to tensile strength measurements using a tensiometer. Breaking energy was calculated. Wound collagen content (hydroxyproline) was measured in wound-edge samples following hydrolysis using high-performance liquid chromatography. There was an overall significant increase in fresh wound tensile strength (13.7 +/- 1.06 vs 19.1 +/- 1.99 g/mm, P less than 0.01) and wound breaking energy (476 +/- 47 vs 747 +/- 76 mm2, P less than 0.001) in bFGF-treated incisions. There was an increase in wound collagen content which was not statistically significant and there was no difference in fixed incisional tensile strength. Histologic examination showed better organization and maturation in bFGF wounds. Recombinant bFGF accelerates normal rat wound healing. This may be due to earlier accumulation of collagen and fibroblasts and/or to greater collagen crosslinking in bFGF-treated wounds. PMID:3392988

  14. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile Nastuta, Andrei; Topala, Ionut; Grigoras, Constantin; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe

    2011-03-01

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  15. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastuta, Andrei Vasile; Topala, Ionut; Pohoata, Valentin; Popa, Gheorghe [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol No. 11, 700506, Iasi (Romania); Grigoras, Constantin, E-mail: andrei.nastuta@uaic.ro [Physiopathology Department, Grigore T. Popa University of Medicine and Pharmacy, 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2011-03-16

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  16. Stimulation of wound healing by helium atmospheric pressure plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New experiments using atmospheric pressure plasma have found large application in treatment of living cells or tissues, wound healing, cancerous cell apoptosis, blood coagulation on wounds, bone tissue modification, sterilization and decontamination. In this study an atmospheric pressure plasma jet generated using a cylindrical dielectric-barrier discharge was applied for treatment of burned wounds on Wistar rats' skin. The low temperature plasma jet works in helium and is driven by high voltage pulses. Oxygen and nitrogen based impurities are identified in the jet by emission spectroscopy. This paper analyses the natural epithelization of the rats' skin wounds and two methods of assisted epithelization, a classical one using polyurethane wound dressing and a new one using daily atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of wounds. Systemic and local medical data, such as haematological, biochemical and histological parameters, were monitored during entire period of study. Increased oxidative stress was observed for plasma treated wound. This result can be related to the presence in the plasma volume of active species, such as O and OH radicals. Both methods, wound dressing and plasma-assisted epithelization, provided positive medical results related to the recovery process of burned wounds. The dynamics of the skin regeneration process was modified: the epidermis re-epitelization was accelerated, while the recovery of superficial dermis was slowed down.

  17. The heme-heme oxygenase system in wound healing; implications for scar formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.; Scharstuhl, A.; Tyrrell, R.M.; Hoff, J.W. von den; Jozkowicz, A.; Dulak, J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process requiring the concerted action of keratinocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Here, we review the literature on normal wound healing and the pathological forms of wound healing, such as hypertrophic or excessive scar formation, with special e

  18. Hemostatic and Wound Healing Properties of Chromolaena odorata Leaf Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandith, Hataichanok; Zhang, Xiaobo; Liggett, Jason; Min, Kyung-Won; Gritsanapan, Wandee; Baek, Seung Joon

    2013-01-01

    Chromolaena odorata (L.) King and Robinson (Siam weed) extract has been used to stop bleeding and in wound healing in many tropical countries. However, its detailed mechanisms have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms by which Siam weed extract (SWE) affected hemostatic and wound healing activities. SWE promoted Balb/c 3T3 fibroblast cell migration and proliferation. Subsequently, we found that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the accelerating wound healing enzyme, was increased at the transcriptional and translational levels by SWE treatments. The HO-1 promoter analyzed with luciferase assay was also increased by treatment of SWE in a dose-dependent manner. This induction may be mediated by several kinase pathways including MEK, p38MAPK, AKT, and JNK. Quantitative real-time PCR using undifferentiated promonocytic cell lines revealed that thromboxane synthase (TXS), a potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator, was increased and MMP-9, an anti platelet aggregator, was decreased in the presence of SWE. Our studies presented that SWE accelerated hemostatic and wound healing activities by altering the expression of genes, including HO-1, TXS, and MMP-9. PMID:23984087

  19. Hypercalcemia Leads to Delayed Corneal Wound Healing in Ovariectomized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Noriaki; Ogata, Fumihiko; Kawasaki, Naohito; Ito, Yoshimasa; Funakami, Yoshinori; Okamoto, Norio; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia is often observed in postmenopausal women as well as in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism or malignant tumors. In this study, we investigated the relationship between calcium ion (Ca(2+)) levels in lacrimal fluid and the rate of corneal wound healing in hypercalcemia using ovariectomized (OVX) rat debrided corneal epithelium. We also determined the effects of Ca(2+) levels on cell adhesion, proliferation and viability in a human cornea epithelial cell line (HCE-T). The calcium content in bones of OVX rats decreased after ovariectomy. Moreover, the Ca(2+) content in the blood of OVX rats was increased 1 month after ovariectomy, and decreased. The Ca(2+) content in the lacrimal fluid of OVX rats was also increased after ovariectomy, and then decreased similarly as in blood. Corneal wound healing in OVX rats was delayed in comparison with Sham rats (control rats), and a close relationship was observed between the Ca(2+) levels in lacrimal fluid and the rate of corneal wound healing in Sham and OVX rats (y=-0.7863x+8.785, R=0.78, n=25). In addition, an enhancement in Ca(2+) levels caused a decrease in the viability in HCE-T cells. It is possible that enhanced Ca(2+) levels in lacrimal fluid may cause a decrease in the viability of corneal epithelial cells, resulting in a delay in corneal wound healing. These findings provide significant information that can be used to design further studies aimed at reducing corneal damage of patients with hypercalcemia.

  20. Putting on the brakes: Bacterial impediment of wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Kimberly M; Stella, Nicholas A; Hunt, Kristin M; Romanowski, Eric G; Liu, Xinyu; Klarlund, Jes K; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2015-01-01

    The epithelium provides a crucial barrier to infection, and its integrity requires efficient wound healing. Bacterial cells and secretomes from a subset of tested species of bacteria inhibited human and porcine corneal epithelial cell migration in vitro and ex vivo. Secretomes from 95% of Serratia marcescens, 71% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 29% of Staphylococcus aureus strains, and other bacterial species inhibited epithelial cell migration. Migration of human foreskin fibroblasts was also inhibited by S. marcescens secretomes indicating that the effect is not cornea specific. Transposon mutagenesis implicated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core biosynthetic genes as being required to inhibit corneal epithelial cell migration. LPS depletion of S. marcescens secretomes with polymyxin B agarose rendered secretomes unable to inhibit epithelial cell migration. Purified LPS from S. marcescens, but not from Escherichia coli or S. marcescens strains with mutations in the waaG and waaC genes, inhibited epithelial cell migration in vitro and wound healing ex vivo. Together these data suggest that S. marcescens LPS is sufficient for inhibition of epithelial wound healing. This study presents a novel host-pathogen interaction with implications for infections where bacteria impact wound healing and provides evidence that secreted LPS is a key factor in the inhibitory mechanism.

  1. Targeting connexin 43 in diabetic wound healing: Future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajpai S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The unknown mechanisms of impaired tissue repair in diabetes mellitus are making this disease a serious clinical problem for the physicians worldwide. The lacuna in the knowledge of the etiology of diabetic wounds necessitates more focused research in order to develop new targeting tools with higher efficacy for their effective management. Gap-junction proteins, connexins, have shown some promising results in the process of diabetic wound healing. Till now the role of connexins has been implicated in peripheral neuropathy, deafness, skin disorders, cataract, germ cell development and treatment of cancer. Recent findings have revealed that gap junctions play a key role in normal as well as diabetic wound healing. The purpose of this review is to provide the information related to etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation of diabetic wounds and to analyze the role of connexin 43 (Cx43 in the diabetic wound healing process. The current control strategies and the future research challenges have also been discussed briefly in this review.

  2. Regenerative Medicine: Novel Approach in Burn Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zare

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Context Burn wounds of the skin require a long period to healing, which very often is incomplete, with functional and esthetic consequences for the patients. Stem cells in the traumatized tissue represent the promoters of the healing process and are a primary focus for regenerative medicine, which aims to find and use the triggers for the activation of stem cells of sin tissue. Evidence Acquisition At present, tissue engineering, composite epithelial autografts, multipotent stem cells and combined gene delivery with stem cell therapy are the approaches used in regenerative medicine. Alongside, the development of 3D scaffolds or matrices is a promising adjunct, as studies investigate the multiple uses of these supports for wound repair. Results Application of cells to the burn wound could be performed, either by the bedside, as a non-invasive procedure, or in the operating room, with the use of a matrix, scaffold or dermal substitute. Cell spraying, although under use in clinical setting, is not yet supported by conclusive data. Magnetic resonance imaging, optical imaging and positron emission tomography are currently used to assess the viability and location of stem cells, after transplantation. Conclusions Stem cell therapies in wound care may lessen the morbidities associated with wound healing. An ideal method for the effective administration of stem cells for burn patients has not yet been elucidated. Further comparison of the local and systemic effects in burn patients, associated with each route of stem cell delivery, needs to be performed.

  3. The effects of Ankaferd, a hemostatic agent, on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Özbaysar Sezgin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: There have been a lot of topical and systemic agents to provide an ideal scar formation and to decrease the periods of wound healing process by affecting the factors of healing (inflammatory cells, thrombocytes, extracellular matrix etc.. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ankaferd on wound healing. Materials and Methods: Wounds were created with 8 mm punch biopsy knots on the back of 32 rats which were separated into 4 groups of 9 rats. No treatment was done in group D which was the control group while group A received topical Ankaferd treatment twice a day; group B treated with silver sulfadiazine twice a day, and group C put on base cream, which did not include any active agent, twice a day. The rats were followed for 15 days macroscopically and examined histopathologically on days 0., 3., 7., and 15. by taking biopsy specimens. Result: At the end of our study, it was detected that Ankaferd accelerated the healing process in comparison to control and base cream groups according to the macroscopic and histopathologic results. Additionally, similar to this situation, it was observed that the healing process in silver sulfadiazine group was faster than in control and base cream groups. Conclusion: More experimental and clinical studies in larger populations are needed to prove and confirm its efficacy.

  4. A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, W D; Cooley, B C; Shen, W; Gittlesohn, A M; Rock, J A

    1987-11-01

    A rat uterine horn model of genital tract wound healing is described. Healing was reflected by acquisition of strength and elasticity, measured by burst strength (BS) and extensibility (EX), respectively. A tensiometer (Instron Corp., Canton, MA) was used to assess these characteristics in castrated and estrogen-supplemented or nonsupplemented animals. While the horn weights (HW), BS, and EX of contralateral horns were not significantly different, the intra-animal variation of HW was 7.2%, BS was 17.7% and EX was 38.2%. In a second experiment, one uterine horn was divided and anastomosed, and the animal given estrogen supplementation or a placebo pellet. Estrogen administration was found to increase BS and EX of anastomosed horns prior to 14 days, but had no beneficial effect at 21 or 42 days. The data suggest that estrogen may be required for optimal early healing of genital tract wounds.

  5. Aspectos celulares da cicatrização Cellular aspects of wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo José de Mendonça

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available O processo cicatricial compreende uma sequência de eventos moleculares e celulares que interagem para que ocorra a restauração do tecido lesado. Desde o extravasamento de plasma, com a coagulação e agregação plaquetária até a reepitelização e remodelagem do tecido lesado o organismo age tentando restaurar a funcionalidade tecidual. Assim, este trabalho abrange os diversos aspectos celulares envolvidos no processo cicatricial, bem como os principais medicamentos utilizados no tratamento de patologias relacionadas às deficiências na cicatrização. São abordados também, os aspectos econômicos referentes, sobretudo, às feridas crônicas de pés diabéticos.Wound healing is a dynamic interactive process that involves a sequence of molecular and cellular events. Recent advances in cellular and molecular biology have greatly expanded our understanding of the biological process involved in wound repair and tissue regeneration. From plasma extravasation, with coagulation and platelet aggregation, to reepithelialization and remodeling of injured tissue, the organism acts by trying to restore functionality tissue. Thus, the present study encompasses several cellular aspects involved in the wound healing process, as well as the main drugs used in treating the pathology related to wound healing complications. Economic aspects are also addressed, mainly related to chronic wounds of diabetic feet.

  6. Different wound healing properties of dermis, adipose, and gingiva mesenchymal stromal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Boink; L.J. van den Broek; S. Roffel; K. Nazmi; J.G.M. Bolscher; A. Gefen; E.C.I. Veerman; S. Gibbs

    2016-01-01

    Oral wounds heal faster and with better scar quality than skin wounds. Deep skin wounds where adipose tissue is exposed, have a greater risk of forming hypertrophic scars. Differences in wound healing and final scar quality might be related to differences in mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their

  7. Influence of hydrophilic polymers on functional properties and wound healing efficacy of hydrocolloid based wound dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sung Giu; Yousaf, Abid Mehmood; Kim, Kyeong Soo; Kim, Dong Wuk; Kim, Dong Shik; Kim, Jin Ki; Yong, Chul Soon; Youn, Yu Seok; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different hydrophilic polymers on the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of hydrocolloid wound dressings (HCDs) in order to provide an appropriate composition for a hydrocolloid wound dressing system. In this study, the HCDs were prepared with styrene-isoprene-styrene copolymer (SIS) and polyisobutylene (PIB) as the base using a hot melting method. Additionally, numerous SIS/PIB-based HCDs were prepared with six hydrophilic polymers, and their wound dressing properties were assessed. Finally, the wound healing efficacy of the selected formulations was compared to a commercial wound dressing. The swelling ratio, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths of HCDs were increased in the order of sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer=HPMC>PVA=PVP, sodium alginate>sodium CMC=poloxamer>PVA>HPMC=PVP and sodium alginate≥PVA>PVP=HPMC=sodium CMC>poloxamer, respectively. Among the hydrophilic polymers tested, sodium alginate most enhanced the swelling capacity, bioadhesive force and mechanical strengths. Thus, the hydrophilic polymers played great role in the swelling, bioadhesion and mechanical strength of SIS/PIB-based HCDs. The HCD formulation composed of PIB, SIS, liquid paraffin and sodium alginate at the weight ratio of 20/25/12/43 gave better wound dressing properties and more excellent wound healing efficacy than the commercial wound dressing. Therefore, the novel HCD formulation could be a promising hydrocolloid system for wound dressings. PMID:26851354

  8. Healing the Hidden Wounds of Racial Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Kenneth V.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines racial trauma and highlights strategies for healing and transformation to support the disproportionate number of children and youth of color who fail in school and become trapped in the pipelines of treatment, social service, and justice systems. The difficulty in meeting the needs of these children and youth is failing to…

  9. Endothelial Dysfunction and Diabetes: Effects on Angiogenesis, Vascular Remodeling, and Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Gopi Krishna Kolluru; Bir, Shyamal C.; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by inappropriate hyperglycemia due to lack of or resistance to insulin. Patients with DM are frequently afflicted with ischemic vascular disease or wound healing defect. It is well known that type 2 DM causes amplification of the atherosclerotic process, endothelial cell dysfunction, glycosylation of extracellular matrix proteins, and vascular denervation. These complications ultimately lead to impairment of neovascularizati...

  10. Proresolution Therapy for the Treatment of Delayed Healing of Diabetic Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yunan; Zhang, Michael J; Hellmann, Jason; Kosuri, Madhavi; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Spite, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are emerging global epidemics associated with chronic, low-grade inflammation. A characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes is delayed wound healing, which increases the risk of recurrent infections, tissue necrosis, and limb amputation. In health, inflammation is actively resolved by endogenous mediators, such as the resolvins. D-series resolvins are generated from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and promote macrophage-mediated clearance of microbes and apoptotic cells....

  11. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing.

  12. Faster Wound Healing With Topical Negative Pressure Therapy in Difficult-to-Heal Wounds: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, E.H. de; Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Kuppevelt, D.H. van; Goor, H. van; Schoonhoven, L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : A randomized clinical trial was conducted to determine the effectiveness and safety of topical negative pressure therapy in patients with difficult-to-heal wounds. METHODS: : A total of 24 patients were randomly assigned to either treatment with topical negative pressure therapy or trea

  13. Some wounds are hard to heal: an interesting presentation of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, N; Walkden, G; Akbar, S

    2012-05-01

    A 17-year-old female patient was admitted for an elective mini laparotomy and cystectomy of the right ovary for the treatment of chronic supra-pubic abdominal pain. The procedure went without complication and she was discharged the next day. She was re-admitted a month later as an acute case with wound dehiscence. HIV serology, thyroid function, immunoglobulin, protein electrophoresis and electrolyte levels were all normal. There were no obvious signs of infection and the bacterial swabs failed to culture an organism. Despite conservative measures with regular dressing, oral antibiotics and input from the tissue viability team the wound failed to epithelialise. The wound was debrided and re-sutured a total of three times and the patient received 24 days of intravenous antibiotics. After input from various teams a diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome was made, allowing for appropriate management and wound healing. PMID:22584739

  14. New pathogenic mechanisms in diabetic wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Sunkari, Vivekananda

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) represent one of the most feared and invalidating complication of diabetes with high financial pressure for the healthcare system. For the moment there is no specific therapy available and it has become a priority to develop novel rational therapeutic strategies based on new pathophysiological mechanisms. Our focus was therefore to delineate relevant pathogenic pathways specifically deregulated in diabetes that could contribute to the defective wound ...

  15. Grand challenge in Biomaterials-wound healing

    OpenAIRE

    Salamone, Joseph C.; Salamone, Ann Beal; Swindle-Reilly, Katelyn; Leung, Kelly Xiaoyu-Chen; McMahon, Rebecca E.

    2016-01-01

    Providing improved health care for wound, burn and surgical patients is a major goal for enhancing patient well-being, in addition to reducing the high cost of current health care treatment. The introduction of new and novel biomaterials and biomedical devices is anticipated to have a profound effect on the future improvement of many deleterious health issues. This publication will discuss the development of novel non-stinging liquid adhesive bandages in healthcare applications developed by R...

  16. Traditional Therapies for Skin Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Rúben F.; Bártolo, Paulo J

    2016-01-01

    Significance: The regeneration of healthy and functional skin remains a huge challenge due to its multilayer structure and the presence of different cell types within the extracellular matrix in an organized way. Despite recent advances in wound care products, traditional therapies based on natural origin compounds, such as plant extracts, honey, and larvae, are interesting alternatives. These therapies offer new possibilities for the treatment of skin diseases, enhancing the access to the he...

  17. Propolis: a new frontier for wound healing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Simona; Ranzato, Elia

    2015-01-01

    Propolis is a resin produced by honeybees by mixing wax, pollen, salivary secretions, and collected natural resins. The precise composition of propolis varies with the source, and over 300 chemical components belonging to the flavonoids, terpenes, and phenolic acids have been identified in propolis. Moreover, its chemical composition is subjected to the geographical location, botanical origin, and bee species. Propolis and its compounds have been the focus of many works due to their antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity; however, it is now recognized that propolis also possesses regenerative properties. There is an increasing interest in the healing potential of natural products, considering the availability and low cost of these products. Propolis contains a huge number of compounds that explicate some biological effects that speeds up the healing process and is widely used in folk remedies. This review aims to condense the results on the mechanism of activity of propolis and its compounds.

  18. Influence of surgical sutures on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Siniša

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical data on closing and suturing of surgical wounds describe a wide range of various suture materials. The choice of the surgical catgut, i.e. the type and diameter, depends on the locality, characteristics and condition of the tissue to be treated. From the standpoint of oral-surgical practice the following clinical parameters are of outstanding importance with respect to the selection of suture material: accumulation of soft deposits on the sutures, score of the adjacent soft tissues and dehiscence of the operative wound. Our prospective clinical study included 150 patients distributed into three groups of 50 subjects. The surgical procedure performed on each patient involved resection (apicotomy of the tooth root end in the intercanine sector of the upper jaw. The following suture materials were applied: Black Silc 5-0, Nylon 5-0 and Vicryl 5-0. The effects of the selected sutures were evaluated according to the wound dehiscence. The effects of the applied sutures were recorded on Days 2, 5 and 7 after the surgery. The comparison of cited parameters of the investigated materials after suturing the oral mucosa revealed that none of the used material was ideal; however, a certain advantage might be given to the synthetic monofilament suture materials.

  19. Wound Healing of Cutaneous Sulfur Mustard Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, John S.; Chilcott, Robert P.; Rice, Paul; Milner, Stephen M.; Hurst, Charles G.; Maliner, Beverly I.

    2005-01-01

    Sulfur mustard is an alkylating chemical warfare agent that primarily affects the eyes, skin, and airways. Sulfur mustard injuries can take several months to heal, necessitate lengthy hospitalizations, and result in significant cosmetic and/or functional deficits. Historically, blister aspiration and/or deroofing (epidermal removal), physical debridement, irrigation, topical antibiotics, and sterile dressings have been the main courses of action in the medical management of cutaneous sulfur m...

  20. Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Falgout, Leo; Lee, Woosik; Jung, Sung-Young; Poon, Emily; Lee, Jung Woo; Na, Ilyoun; Geisler, Amelia; Sadhwani, Divya; Zhang, Yihui; Su, Yewang; Wang, Xiaoqi; Liu, Zhuangjian; Xia, Jing; Cheng, Huanyu; Webb, R Chad; Bonifas, Andrew P; Won, Philip; Jeong, Jae-Woong; Jang, Kyung-In; Song, Young Min; Nardone, Beatrice; Nodzenski, Michael; Fan, Jonathan A; Huang, Yonggang; West, Dennis P; Paller, Amy S; Alam, Murad; Yeo, Woon-Hong; Rogers, John A

    2014-10-01

    Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. Here, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of "epidermal" electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. The results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management.

  1. Development of honey hydrogel dressing for enhanced wound healing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Norimah [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: norimah@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Ainul Hafiza, A.H.; Zohdi, Rozaini M. [Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Bakar, Md Zuki A. [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2007-11-15

    Radiation at 25 and 50 kGy showed no effect on the acidic pH of the local honey, Gelam, and its antimicrobial property against Staphylococcus aureus but significantly reduced the viscosity. Honey stored up to 2 years at room temperature retained all the properties studied. Radiation sterilized Gelam honey significantly stimulated the rate of burn wound healing in Sprague-Dawley rats as demonstrated by the increased rate of wound contraction and gross appearance. Gelam honey attenuates wound inflammation; and re-epithelialization was well advanced compared to the treatment using silver sulphadiazine (SSD) cream. To enhance further the use of honey in wound treatment and for easy handling, Gelam honey was incorporated into our hydrogel dressing formulation, which was then cross-linked and sterilized using electron beam at 25 kGy. Hydrogel with 6% of honey was selected based on the physical appearance.

  2. Roles of Proteoglycans and Glycosaminoglycans in Wound Healing and Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibnath Ghatak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A wound is a type of injury that damages living tissues. In this review, we will be referring mainly to healing responses in the organs including skin and the lungs. Fibrosis is a process of dysregulated extracellular matrix (ECM production that leads to a dense and functionally abnormal connective tissue compartment (dermis. In tissues such as the skin, the repair of the dermis after wounding requires not only the fibroblasts that produce the ECM molecules, but also the overlying epithelial layer (keratinocytes, the endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells of the blood vessel and white blood cells such as neutrophils and macrophages, which together orchestrate the cytokine-mediated signaling and paracrine interactions that are required to regulate the proper extent and timing of the repair process. This review will focus on the importance of extracellular molecules in the microenvironment, primarily the proteoglycans and glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, and their roles in wound healing. First, we will briefly summarize the physiological, cellular, and biochemical elements of wound healing, including the importance of cytokine cross-talk between cell types. Second, we will discuss the role of proteoglycans and hyaluronan in regulating these processes. Finally, approaches that utilize these concepts as potential therapies for fibrosis are discussed.

  3. A review of herbal medicines in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maver, Tina; Maver, Uroš; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Smrke, Dragica M; Kreft, Samo

    2015-07-01

    Herbs have been integral to both traditional and non-traditional forms of medicine dating back at least 5000 years. The enduring popularity of herbal medicines may be explained by the perception that herbs cause minimal unwanted side effects. More recently, scientists increasingly rely on modern scientific methods and evidence-based medicine to prove efficacy of herbal medicines and focus on better understanding of mechanisms of their action. However, information concerning quantitative human health benefits of herbal medicines is still rare or dispersed, limiting their proper valuation. Preparations from traditional medicinal plants are often used for wound healing purposes covering a broad area of different skin-related diseases. Herbal medicines in wound management involve disinfection, debridement, and provision of a suitable environment for aiding the natural course of healing. Here we report on 22 plants used as wound healing agents in traditional medicine around the world. The aim of this review is therefore to review herbal medicines, which pose great potential for effective treatment of minor wounds.

  4. Laser therapy in wound healing associated with diabetes mellitus - Review*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, Raquel Gomes; Batista, Keila de Nazaré Madureira

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the results of a literature review on the application of low intensity laser therapy on the healing of wounds associated diabetes mellitus in the last 10 years. Objective To determine the most effective parameter in healing wounds related to diabetes mellitus, as well as the most widely used type of laser. Methodology consisted of bibliographic searching the databases Bireme, SciELO, PubMed/Medline and Lilacs by using the keywords related to the topic. Were selected from these keywords, papers discussing the use of laser on wounds associated with diabetes, published in the period 2005-2014, in Portuguese or English. Results After analyzing the research, 12 studies consistent with the theme were selected. Conclusion Based on this review, the studies that showed more satisfactory results in healing diabetic wounds were those who applied energy densities in the range of 3-5 J/cm2, power densities equal to or below 0.2 W/cm2 and continuous emission. The He-Ne laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used more often. PMID:27579745

  5. Nanoparticles Encapsulated with LL37 and Serpin A1 Promotes Wound Healing and Synergistically Enhances Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumakia, Miral; Ho, Emmanuel A

    2016-07-01

    Wound care is a serious healthcare concern, often complicated by prolonged inflammation and bacterial infection, which contributes significantly to mortality and morbidity. Agents commonly used to treat chronic wound infections are limited due to toxicity of the therapy, multifactorial etiology of chronic wounds, deep skin infections, lack of sustained controlled delivery of drugs, and development of drug resistance. LL37 is an endogenous host defense peptide possessing antimicrobial activity and is involved in the modulation of wound healing. Serpin A1 (A1) is an elastase inhibitor and has been shown to demonstrate wound-healing properties. Hence, our goal was to develop a topical combination nanomedicine for the controlled sustained delivery of LL37 and A1 at precise synergistic ratio combinations that will significantly promote wound closure, reduce bacterial contamination, and enhance anti-inflammatory activity. We have successfully developed the first solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) formulation that can simultaneously deliver LL37 and A1 at specific ratios resulting in accelerated wound healing by promoting wound closure in BJ fibroblast cells and keratinocytes as well as synergistically enhancing antibacterial activity against S. aureus and E. coli in comparison to LL37 or A1 alone. PMID:27182713

  6. Bacterial cellulose nanofibrillar patch as a wound healing platform of tympanic membrane perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangho; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Subeom; Lim, Ki Taek; Seonwoo, Hoon; Kim, Yeonju; Hong, Byung Hee; Choung, Yun-Hoon; Chung, Jong Hoon

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC)-based biomaterials on medical device platforms have gained significant interest for tissue-engineered scaffolds or engraftment materials in regenerative medicine. In particular, BC has an ultrafine and highly pure nanofibril network structure and can be used as an efficient wound-healing platform since cell migration into a wound site is strongly meditated by the structural properties of the extracellular matrix. Here, the fabrication of a nanofibrillar patch by using BC and its application as a new wound-healing platform for traumatic tympanic membrane (TM) perforation is reported. TM perforation is a very common clinical problem worldwide and presents as conductive hearing loss and chronic perforations. The BC nanofibrillar patch can be synthesized from Gluconacetobacter xylinus; it is found that the patch contained a network of nanofibrils and is transparent. The thickness of the BC nanofibrillar patch is found to be approximately 10.33 ± 0.58 μm, and the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the BC nanofibrillar patch are 11.85 ± 2.43 and 11.90 ± 0.48 MPa, respectively, satisfying the requirements of an ideal wound-healing platform for TM regeneration. In vitro studies involving TM cells show that TM cell proliferation and migration are stimulated under the guidance of the BC nanofibrillar patch. In vivo animal studies demonstrate that the BC nanofibrillar patch promotes the rate of TM healing as well as aids in the recovery of TM function. These data demonstrate that the BC nanofibrillar patch is a useful wound-healing platform for TM perforation.

  7. Topical 5-azacytidine accelerates skin wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Fabiana S; de-Souza, Gabriela F; Nascimento, Lucas F; Arantes, Eva L; Pedro, Rafael M; Vitorino, Daniele C; Nunez, Carla E; Melo Lima, Maria H; Velloso, Lício A; Araújo, Eliana P

    2014-01-01

    The development of new methods to improve skin wound healing may affect the outcomes of a number of medical conditions. Here, we evaluate the molecular and clinical effects of topical 5-azacytidine on wound healing in rats. 5-Azacytidine decreases the expression of follistatin-1, which negatively regulates activins. Activins, in turn, promote cell growth in different tissues, including the skin. Eight-week-old male Wistar rats were submitted to 8.0-mm punch-wounding in the dorsal region. After 3 days, rats were randomly assigned to receive either a control treatment or the topical application of a solution containing 5-azacytidine (10 mM) once per day. Photo documentation and sample collection were performed on days 5, 9, and 15. Overall, 5-azacytidine promoted a significant acceleration of complete wound healing (99.7% ± 0.7.0 vs. 71.2% ± 2.8 on day 15; n = 10; p < 0.01), accompanied by up to threefold reduction in follistatin expression. Histological examination of the skin revealed efficient reepithelization and cell proliferation, as evaluated by the BrdU incorporation method. 5-Azacytidine treatment also resulted in increased gene expression of transforming growth factor-beta and the keratinocyte markers involucrin and cytokeratin, as well as decreased expression of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-10. Lastly, when recombinant follistatin was applied to the skin in parallel with topical 5-azacytidine, most of the beneficial effects of the drug were lost. Thus, 5-azacytidine acts, at least in part through the follistatin/activin pathway, to improve skin wound healing in rodents. PMID:25039304

  8. Quantitative analysis of the cellular inflammatory response against biofilm bacteria in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fazli, Mustafa; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus;

    2011-01-01

    counting on the tissue sections from wounds containing either Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. The P. aeruginosa-containing wounds had significantly higher numbers of neutrophils accumulated compared with the S. aureus-containing wounds. These results are discussed in relation...... to the wound. One such stimulus might be the presence of bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds. In the present study, biopsy specimens from chronic venous leg ulcers were investigated for the detection of bacteria using peptide nucleic acid-based fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) and confocal laser...... to the hypothesis that the presence of P. aeruginosa biofilms in chronic wounds may be one of the main factors leading to a persistent inflammatory response and impaired wound healing....

  9. Evaluation of In Vivo Wound Healing Activity of Bacopa monniera on Different Wound Model in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Murthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing effects of 50% ethanol extract of dried whole plant of Bacopa monniera (BME was studied on wound models in rats. BME (25 mg/kg was administered orally, once daily for 10 days (incision and dead space wound models or for 21 days or more (excision wound model in rats. BME was studied for its in vitro antimicrobial and in vivo wound breaking strength, WBS (incision model, rate of contraction, period of epithelization, histology of skin (excision model, granulation tissue free radicals (nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation, antioxidants (catalase, superoxide dismutase, and reduced glutathione, acute inflammatory marker (myeloperoxidase, connective tissue markers (hydroxyproline, hexosamine, and hexuronic acid, and deep connective tissue histology (dead space wound. BME showed antimicrobial activity against skin pathogens, enhanced WBS, rate of contraction, skin collagen tissue formation, and early epithelization period with low scar area indicating enhanced healing. Healing effect was further substantiated by decreased free radicals and myeloperoxidase and enhanced antioxidants and connective tissue markers with histological evidence of more collagen formation in skin and deeper connective tissues. BME decreased myeloperoxidase and free radical generated tissue damage, promoting antioxidant status, faster collagen deposition, other connective tissue constituent formation, and antibacterial activity.

  10. Contact dermatitis presenting as non-healing wound: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelavathi M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Topical antiseptics are commonly used in the management of minor wounds, burns, and infected skin. These agents are widely used by health professionals and are often self-prescribed by patients as they are easily available over-the-counter. This case illustrates a 73 year old man who presented with a non-healing wound on his right forearm for 4 weeks. The wound started from an insect bite and progressively enlarged with increasing pruritus and burning sensation. Clinically an ill-defined ulcer with surrounding erythema and erosion was noted. There was a yellow crust overlying the center of the ulcer and the periphery was scaly. Further inquiry revealed history of self treatment with a yellow solution to clean his wound for 3 weeks. Patient was provisionally diagnosed to have allergic contact dermatitis secondary to acriflavine. Topical acriflavine was stopped and the ulcer resolved after treatment with non-occlusive saline dressing. Skin patch test which is the gold standard for detection and confirmation of contact dermatitis showed a positive reaction (2+ to acriflavine. Acriflavine is widely used as a topical antiseptic agent in this part of the world. Hence, primary care physicians managing a large variety of poorly healing wounds should consider the possibility of contact allergy in recalcitrant cases, not responding to conventional treatment. Patient education is an important aspect of management as this would help curb the incidence of future contact allergies.

  11. Crosstalk between platelets and PBMC: New evidence in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nami, Niccolò; Feci, Luca; Napoliello, Luca; Giordano, Antonio; Lorenzini, Sauro; Galeazzi, Mauro; Rubegni, Pietro; Fimiani, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-derived products have proven useful in accelerating healing processes and tissue regeneration. However, despite their widespread use in clinical practice, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been completely clarified. Recent studies show that interaction between platelet gel (PG) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) can result in activation of PBMC and production of several cytokines involved in wound healing and tissue repair. The aim of our study was to analyze whether crosstalk between platelets and PBMC can influence wound healing by modulating release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. Cultures of PBMC alone and co-cultures with autologous PG of 24 healthy volunteers were incubated under normoxia for 24 h. VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 concentration and expression were then analyzed in supernatants by ELISA and by real-time RT-PCR. We observed a down-regulation of VEGF and bFGF release and an up-regulation of IL-10 release in co-cultures of PBMC and PG. Platelets are not only important in the early stages of the healing process (clot formation, direct release of growth factors), but also can influence the whole process of tissue regeneration by modulating synthesis and release of VEGF, bFGF and IL-10 by PBMC. These effects could give platelets a new key role in the control of healing processes and provide insights into the clinical success of platelet-derived products in many medical fields. PMID:26030799

  12. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study

    OpenAIRE

    Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei; Amir-Abbas Farshid; Siamak Kazemi-Darabadi; Reza Baradar-Jalili

    2013-01-01

    Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg-1, IV) was used for di...

  13. Gene Expression of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines and Neuropeptides in Diabetic Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Pradhan, Leena; Cai, Xuemei; Wu, Szuhuei; Andersen, Nicholas D.; Martin, Michelle; Malek, Junaid; Guthrie, Patrick; Veves, Aristidis; LoGerfo, Frank W

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between neuropeptides and cytokines and its role in cutaneous wound healing is becoming evident. The goal of the present study is to investigate the impact of diabetes on peripheral cytokine and neuropeptide expression and their role in diabetic wound healing. To achieve this goal, the effect of diabetes on wound healing along with the role of inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secreted in the wound microenvironment and neuropeptides, ...

  14. Effect of topically applied Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute porcine wounds: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Partlow, Jessica; Blikslager, Anthony; Matthews, Charles; Law, Mac; Daniels, Joshua; Baker, Rose; Labens, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Background Normal wound healing progresses through a series of interdependent physiological events: inflammation, angiogenesis, re-epithelialization, granulation tissue formation and extracellular matrix remodeling. Alterations in this process as well as the bacterial type and load on a wound may alter the wound healing rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of topical Saccharomyces boulardii on the healing of acute cutaneous wounds, using a prospective, controlled, experi...

  15. Relationship between Post-kidney Transplantation Antithymocyte Globulin Therapy and Wound Healing Complications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background: Wound healing disorders are probably the most common post-transplantation surgical complications. It is thought that wound healing disturbance occurs due to antiproliferative effects of immunosuppressive drugs. On the other hand, success of transplantation is dependent on immunosuppressive therapies. Antihuman thymocyte globulin (ATG) has been widely used as induction therapy but the impact of this treatment on wound healing is not fully understood. Objective: To investigate wound...

  16. The Use of Stem Cells in Burn Wound Healing: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Fadi Ghieh; Rosalyn Jurjus; Amir Ibrahim; Alice Gerges Geagea; Hisham Daouk; Bassel El Baba; Sana Chams; Michel Matar; Wadih Zein; Abdo Jurjus

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound healing involves a series of complex processes which are subject to intensive investigations to improve the outcomes, in particular, the healing time and the quality of the scar. Burn injuries, especially severe ones, are proving to have devastating effects on the affected patients. Stem cells have been recently applied in the field to promote superior healing of the wounds. Not only have stem cells been shown to promote better and faster healing of the burn wounds, but also they h...

  17. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Arndt

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) changes gene expression of key molecules of the wound healing machinery and improves wound healing in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Stephanie; Unger, Petra; Wacker, Eva; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Heinlin, Julia; Li, Yang-Fang; Thomas, Hubertus M; Morfill, Gregor E; Zimmermann, Julia L; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Karrer, Sigrid

    2013-01-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) has the potential to interact with tissue or cells leading to fast, painless and efficient disinfection and furthermore has positive effects on wound healing and tissue regeneration. For clinical implementation it is necessary to examine how CAP improves wound healing and which molecular changes occur after the CAP treatment. In the present study we used the second generation MicroPlaSter ß® in analogy to the current clinical standard (2 min treatment time) in order to determine molecular changes induced by CAP using in vitro cell culture studies with human fibroblasts and an in vivo mouse skin wound healing model. Our in vitro analysis revealed that the CAP treatment induces the expression of important key genes crucial for the wound healing response like IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, TGF-ß1, TGF-ß2, and promotes the production of collagen type I and alpha-SMA. Scratch wound healing assays showed improved cell migration, whereas cell proliferation analyzed by XTT method, and the apoptotic machinery analyzed by protein array technology, was not altered by CAP in dermal fibroblasts. An in vivo wound healing model confirmed that the CAP treatment affects above mentioned genes involved in wound healing, tissue injury and repair. Additionally, we observed that the CAP treatment improves wound healing in mice, no relevant side effects were detected. We suggest that improved wound healing might be due to the activation of a specified panel of cytokines and growth factors by CAP. In summary, our in vitro human and in vivo animal data suggest that the 2 min treatment with the MicroPlaSter ß® is an effective technique for activating wound healing relevant molecules in dermal fibroblasts leading to improved wound healing, whereas the mechanisms which contribute to these observed effects have to be further investigated.

  19. Targeting Imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1 Receptor Antagonist Ameliorates Delayed Epithelium Wound Healing in Diabetic Mouse Corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chenxi; Gao, Nan; Sun, Haijing; Yin, Jia; Lee, Patrick; Zhou, Li; Fan, Xianqun; Yu, Fu-Shin

    2016-06-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus often develop corneal complications and delayed wound healing. How diabetes might alter acute inflammatory responses to tissue injury, leading to delayed wound healing, remains mostly elusive. Using a streptozotocin-induced type I diabetes mellitus mice and corneal epithelium-debridement wound model, we discovered that although wounding induced marked expression of IL-1β and the secreted form of IL-1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1Ra), diabetes suppressed the expressions of sIL-1Ra but not IL-1β in healing epithelia and both in whole cornea. In normoglycemic mice, IL-1β or sIL-1Ra blockade delayed wound healing and influenced each other's expression. In diabetic mice, in addition to delayed reepithelization, diabetes weakened phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt signaling, caused cell apoptosis, diminished cell proliferation, suppressed neutrophil and natural killer cell infiltrations, and impaired sensory nerve reinnervation in healing mouse corneas. Local administration of recombinant IL-1Ra partially, but significantly, reversed these pathological changes in the diabetic corneas. CXCL10 was a downstream chemokine of IL-1β-IL-1Ra, and exogenous CXCL10 alleviated delayed wound healing in the diabetic, but attenuated it in the normal corneas. In conclusion, the suppressed early innate/inflammatory responses instigated by the imbalance between IL-1β and IL-1Ra is an underlying cause for delayed wound healing in the diabetic corneas. Local application of IL-1Ra accelerates reepithelialization and may be used to treat chronic corneal and potential skin wounds of diabetic patients. PMID:27109611

  20. Negative pressure wound therapy promotes vessel destabilization and maturation at various stages of wound healing and thus influences wound prognosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Zhanjun; SHOU, KANGQUAN; LI, ZONGHUAN; Jian, Chao; QI, BAIWEN; Yu, Aixi

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been observed to accelerate the wound healing process in humans through promoting angiogenesis. However, the potential biological effect and relevant molecular mechanisms, including microvessel destabilization, regression and endothelial cell proliferation in the early stage (1–3 days), and the neovascular stabilization and maturation in the later stage (7–15 days), have yet to be fully elucidated. The current study aimed to research the potential ef...

  1. A test of reactive scope: Reducing reactive scope causes delayed wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuRant, S E; Arciniega, M L; Bauer, C M; Romero, L M

    2016-09-15

    Reactive scope predicts that all animals have an adaptive ability to respond to stressors in their environment, termed reactive homeostasis, and that only when an animal's response to stressful stimuli exceeds a certain threshold (homeostatic overload) will stress have pathological effects. While this framework has successfully helped interpret effects of stressors on wildlife, no study has designed an experiment to directly test this framework. This study was designed to expose house sparrows (Passer domesticus) to treatments that would result in varying ranges of reactive homeostasis during chronic stress, which based on the reactive scope model should cause birds with the lowest reactive homeostasis range to exhibit signs of pathology during a subsequent challenge. To modulate the reactive homeostasis range, we altered allostatic load of birds by exposing them to chronic stress while either elevating, blocking, or not manipulating corticosterone. After concluding chronic stress treatments, birds were exposed to the subsequent challenge of a superficial wound. Individuals treated with corticosterone during chronic stress (high allostatic load) experienced the most pathology, including both weight loss and slower wound healing. Unmanipulated birds (medium allostatic load) also experienced weight loss but had normal healing rates, while birds with blocked corticosterone (low allostatic load) had minimal weight loss and normal healing rates. Our results indicate that increased allostatic load reduces the reactive homeostasis range, thereby causing individuals to cross the homeostatic overload threshold sooner, and thus support the reactive scope framework.

  2. Corneal wound healing is compromised by immunoproteasome deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah A Ferrington

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed roles for immunoproteasome in regulating cell processes essential for maintaining homeostasis and in responding to stress and injury. The current study investigates how the absence of immunoproteasome affects the corneal epithelium under normal and stressed conditions by comparing corneas from wildtype (WT mice and those deficient in two immunoproteasome catalytic subunits (lmp7(-/-/mecl-1(-/-, L7M1. Immunoproteasome expression was confirmed in WT epithelial cells and in cells of the immune system that were present in the cornea. More apoptotic cells were found in both corneal explant cultures and uninjured corneas of L7M1 compared to WT mice. Following mechanical debridement, L7M1 corneas displayed delayed wound healing, including delayed re-epithelialization and re-establishment of the epithelial barrier, as well as altered inflammatory cytokine production compared to WT mice. These results suggest that immunoproteasome plays an important role in corneal homeostasis and wound healing.

  3. Wound Healing and Indigenous Drugs: Role as Antioxidants: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    B Somashekar Shetty

    2013-01-01

    Traditional medicine, especially herbal medicine has recently been receiving heightened interest all over the world. Man from the very beginning has been aware of the health problems and has been taking care of health through diet and drugs for which plants were used extensively. Molecular oxygen plays a central role in the pathogenesis and therapy of chronic wounds. When reactive oxygen species are overproduced, oxidative stress results in detrimental cytotoxic effects causing delayed wound ...

  4. Hyperglycemia-Induced Changes in Hyaluronan Contribute to Impaired Skin Wound Healing in Diabetes: Review and Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sajina Shakya; Yan Wang; Mack, Judith A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Ulcers and chronic wounds are a particularly common problem in diabetics and are associated with hyperglycemia. In this targeted review, we summarize evidence suggesting that defective wound healing in diabetics is causally linked, at least in part, to hyperglycemia-induced changes in the status of hyaluronan (HA) that resides in the pericellular coat (glycocalyx) of endothelial cells of small cutaneous blood vessels. Potential mechanisms through which exposure to high glucose levels causes a...

  5. Hydrogels of natural origin in wound healing : formulation devolopment

    OpenAIRE

    Engesland, André

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogels made of chitosan has a well-established place in drug delivery for the skin. Our particular interest were hydrogels for wound healing. Hydrogels from low, medium and high molecular weight were prepared in different concentrations for texture and release characterization incorporating liposomes and chloramphenicol as a model drug. A method for comparing viscosity between gels was established with a Texture analyser and back-extrusion method. The method proved to be able to distin...

  6. Cutaneous wound healing: recruiting developmental pathways for regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Bielefeld, Kirsten A.; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Alman, Benjamin A.

    2012-01-01

    Following a skin injury, the damaged tissue is repaired through the coordinated biological actions that constitute the cutaneous healing response. In mammals, repaired skin is not identical to intact uninjured skin, however, and this disparity may be caused by differences in the mechanisms that regulate postnatal cutaneous wound repair compared to embryonic skin development. Improving our understanding of the molecular pathways that are involved in these processes is essential to generate new...

  7. Silver Nanoparticles as Real Topical Bullets for Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Gunasekaran, Thirumurugan; Nigusse, Tadele; Dhanaraju, Magharla Dasaratha

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology is on the threshold of providing a host of new materials and approaches, revolutionizing the medical and pharmaceutical fields. Several areas of medical care are already profiting from the advantage that nanotechnology offers. Recently, silver nanoparticles are attracting interest for a clinical application because of its potential biological properties such as antibacterial activity, anti-inflammatory effects, and wound healing efficacy, which could be exploited in developing ...

  8. Wound healing: a new perspective on glucosylated tetrahydrocurcumin

    OpenAIRE

    Bhaskar Rao A; Prasad E.; Deepthi SS; Haritha V; Ramakrishna.S,; Madhusudan K; Surekha MV; Venkata Rao YSR

    2015-01-01

    Adari Bhaskar Rao,1 Ernala Prasad,1 Seelam Siva Deepthi,1 Vennapusa Haritha,1 Sistla Ramakrishna,1 Kuncha Madhusudan,1 Mullapudi Venkata Surekha,2 Yerramilli Sri Rama Venkata Rao3 1Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, 2Pathology Division, National Institute of Nutrition, 3Ashian Herbex Ltd, Hyderabad, AP, India Abstract: Wound healing represents a dynamic set of coordinated ...

  9. Jaundice and wound healing: a tissue-culture study.

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, M.; Elliot, P.; Ellis, H.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of jaundice on wound healing have been studied by growing fibroblasts, in vitro, in normal culture media, in culture media to which bilirubin has been added, and in culture media containing sera from jaundiced patients. It has been found that the addition of bilirubin to the culture media causes morphological changes in the fibroblasts, and impairs the growth of cells. The addition of jaundiced human sera to the culture also causes similar changes.

  10. Chitosan green tea polyphenol complex as a released control compound for wound healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Yao; WANG Hong-wei; Thirupathi Karuppanapandian; Wook Kim

    2010-01-01

    Objective: In recent years, oxidative stress has been implicated in a variety °enerative pro-cess and diseases, including acute and chronic inflamma-tory conditions such as wound healing.Green tea polyphe-nols have shown anti-oxidant property.The present study discussed the application of chitosan green tea polyphenol complex on the wound healing.Methods: The wound healing effect ofchitosan green tea polyphenol complex was studied in ten-week-old healthy male Sherman rats weighing 150-180 g by two wound models.The rats were randomly chosen and divided into four groups (n=5), administered with distilled water in Group A as con-trol group, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in Group B, chitosan-EGCG complex in Group C and chitosan-green tea polyphenols complex in Group D, respectively.In rats'incision wound model, two straight paravertebral inci-sions were made and skin tensile strength was measured using continuous water flow technology on the 10th day.In rats'excision wound model, wound contraction and pe-riod of epithelization were measured.The polyphenols re-lease from the complex was continuously monitored by an elution technique in aqueous solution at different pH val-ues (pH=4, 5, 6, 7).Results: The treatment groups showed significantly enhanced the breaking strength in incision wound (328±4.5) g and (421±18.5) g compared with control (264±16.7) g.In the excision wound model, the wound contraction percentage in treatment groups was relatively increased during the re-covery period.Respectively, the percentage of wound contraction ranged from 47.60%±2.15% on day 4 to 107.98% ±1.26% on day 16 compared with control group (8.46%±5.42% to 59.80%±4.47%).The complex demonstrated a gradual in-crease in the release rate from the initial stage and slow increase at different pH values.The release rate approxi-mated 0.6-0.7 in the complex and remained stable 6 hours after injury, which may be the end of the release process.Conclusions: In our study, chitosan

  11. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Garth A.; Zhao, Alice G.; Usui, Marcia; Underwood, Robert A.; Nguyen, Hung D.; Beyenal, Haluk; Pulcini, Elinor; Agostinho, Alessandra; Bernstein, Hans C.; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John; Williamson, Kerry S.; Franklin, Michael J.; Stewart, Philip S.

    2016-01-07

    Polymicrobial biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms may impede wound healing. In this study, we used oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro-cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo in a diabetic (db/db) mouse model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens. The results show that oxygen levels within both euthanized and live mouse wounds had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 19 to 61% oxygen partial pressure, compared to atmospheric oxygen levels. The oxygen gradients in the mouse wounds were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo scabs. No oxygen gradients were observed for heat-killed scabs, suggesting that active metabolism by the viable bacteria contributed to the reduced oxygen partial pressure of the wounds. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse wounds, we performed transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds using Affymetrix microarrays. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results indicated that the bacteria within the wounds also experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that the metabolic activities of bacteria in biofilms act as oxygen sinks in chronic wounds and that the depletion of oxygen contributes to the

  12. Diabetic cornea wounds produce significantly weaker electric signals that may contribute to impaired healing

    OpenAIRE

    Yunyun Shen; Trisha Pfluger; Fernando Ferreira; Jiebing Liang; Navedo, Manuel F.; Qunli Zeng; Brian Reid; Min Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Wounds naturally produce electric signals which serve as powerful cues that stimulate and guide cell migration during wound healing. In diabetic patients, impaired wound healing is one of the most challenging complications in diabetes management. A fundamental gap in knowledge is whether diabetic wounds have abnormal electric signaling. Here we used a vibrating probe to demonstrate that diabetic corneas produced significantly weaker wound electric signals than the normal cornea. This was conf...

  13. Electrospun nanofibers as dressings for chronic wound care: advances, challenges, and future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrigo, Martina; McArthur, Sally L; Kingshott, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Chronic non-healing wounds show delayed and incomplete healing processes and in turn expose patients to a high risk of infection. Treatment currently focuses on dressings that prevent microbial infiltration and keep a balanced moisture and gas exchange environment. Antibacterial delivery from dressings has existed for some time, with responsive systems now aiming to trigger release only if infection occurs. Simultaneously, approaches that stimulate cell proliferation in the wound and encourage healing have been developed. Interestingly, few dressings appear capable of simultaneously impairing or treating infection and encouraging cell proliferation/wound healing. Electrospinning is a simple, cost-effective, and reproducible process that can utilize both synthetic and natural polymers to address these specific wound challenges. Electrospun meshes provide high-surface area, micro-porosity, and the ability to load drugs or other biomolecules into the fibers. Electrospun materials have been used as scaffolds for tissue engineering for a number of years, but there is surprisingly little literature on the interactions of fibers with bacteria and co-cultures of cells and bacteria. This Review examines the literature and data available on electrospun wound dressings and the research that is required to develop smart multifunctional wound dressings capable of treating infection and healing chronic wounds.

  14. Wound healing potential of Althaea officinalis flower mucilage in rabbit full thickness wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robab; Valizadeh; Ali; Asghar; Hemmati; Gholamreza; Houshmand; Sara; Bayat; Mohammad; Bahadoram

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and practically demonstrate the in fluence of Althaea officinalis flower mucilage as a plant known in Iran’s and other Middle Eastern countries’ traditional medicine for its wound healing properties.Methods: Animals were divided into 6 groups of 5 cases including a non-treated group as the negative control group receiving no treatment, a group treated with eucerin as the positive control group, a phenytoin 1% group as a standard group treated topically with phenytoin 1% hand-made ointment, and treatment groups treated with hand-made Althaea officinalis flower mucilage(AFM) ointment in a eucerin base with different concentrations(5%, 10%, 15%).Results: Among the treatment groups, the AFM 15% ointment showed the best result.Wound healing duration was reduced by the surface application of these groups. Wound closure was completed on Days 14 and 15 in the AFM 15% ointment and phenytoin 1%groups, respectively. No significant difference was observed in healing period between these groups.Conclusions: In conclusion, AFM 15% ointment was found to reduce wound healing time without any significant difference with the phenytoin 1% ointment. The authors suggest increased AFM effectiveness in when combined with phenytoin or other effectual plants.

  15. Wound healing potential of Althaea ofifcinalis lfower mucilage in rabbit full thickness wounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robab Valizadeh; Ali Asghar Hemmati; Gholamreza Houshmand; Sara Bayat; Mohammad Bahadoram

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate and practically demonstrate the influence of Althaea ofifcinalis flower mucilage as a plant known in Iran’s and other Middle Eastern countries’ traditional medicine for its wound healing properties. Methods:Animals were divided into 6 groups of 5 cases including a non-treated group as the negative control group receiving no treatment, a group treated with eucerin as the positive control group, a phenytoin 1%group as a standard group treated topically with phenytoin 1%hand-made ointment, and treatment groups treated with hand-made Althaea ofifcinalis flower mucilage (AFM) ointment in a eucerin base with different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%). Results:Among the treatment groups, the AFM 15%ointment showed the best result. Wound healing duration was reduced by the surface application of these groups. Wound closure was completed on Days 14 and 15 in the AFM 15% ointment and phenytoin 1% groups, respectively. No significant difference was observed in healing period between these groups. Conclusions:In conclusion, AFM 15%ointment was found to reduce wound healing time without any significant difference with the phenytoin 1% ointment. The authors suggest increased AFM effectiveness in when combined with phenytoin or other effectual plants.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm aggravates skin inflammatory response in BALB/c mice in a novel chronic wound model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Thomsen, Kim; Christophersen, Lars J;

    2013-01-01

    Chronic wounds are presumed to persist in the inflammatory state, preventing healing. Emerging evidence indicates a clinical impact of bacterial biofilms in soft tissues, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms. To further investigate this, we developed a chronic PA biofilm wound infection...

  17. Bioinspired porous membranes containing polymer nanoparticles for wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana M; Mattu, Clara; Ranzato, Elia; Ciardelli, Gianluca

    2014-12-01

    Skin damages covering a surface larger than 4 cm(2) require a regenerative strategy based on the use of appropriate wound dressing supports to facilitate the rapid tissue replacement and efficient self-healing of the lost or damaged tissue. In the present work, A novel biomimetic approach is proposed for the design of a therapeutic porous construct made of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). Biomimicry of ECM was achieved by immobilization of type I collagen through a two-step plasma treatment for wound healing. Anti-inflammatory (indomethacin)-containing polymeric nanoparticles (nps) were loaded within the porous membranes in order to minimize undesired cell response caused by post-operative inflammation. The biological response to the scaffold was analyzed by using human keratinocytes cell cultures. In this work, a promising biomimetic construct for wound healing and soft tissue regeneration with drug-release properties was fabricated since it shows (i) proper porosity, pore size, and mechanical properties, (ii) biomimicry of ECM, and (iii) therapeutic potential. PMID:24522948

  18. Using Light to Treat Mucositis and Help Wounds Heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Robert W.; Martin, Todd S.; Kirk, Charles

    2008-01-01

    A continuing program of research and development is focusing on the use of controlled illumination by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to treat mucositis and to accelerate healing of wounds. The basic idea is to illuminate the affected area of a patient with light of an intensity, duration, and wavelength (or combination of wavelengths) chosen to produce a therapeutic effect while generating only a minimal amount of heat. This method of treatment was originally intended for treating the mucositis that is a common complication of chemotherapy and radiation therapy for cancer. It is now also under consideration as a means to accelerate the healing of wounds and possibly also to treat exposure to chemical and radioactive warfare agents. Radiation therapy and many chemotherapeutic drugs often damage the mucosal linings of the mouth and gastrointestinal tract, leading to mouth ulcers (oral mucositis), nausea, and diarrhea. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy is currently the standard of care for ischemic, hypoxic, infected, and otherwise slowlyhealing problem wounds, including those of oral mucositis. Hyperbaric-oxygen therapy increases such cellular activities as collagen production and angiogenesis, leading to an increased rate of healing. Biostimulation by use of laser light has also been found to be effective in treating mucositis. For hyperbaricoxygen treatment, a patient must remain inside a hyperbaric chamber for an extended time. Laser treatment is limited by laser-wavelength capabilities and by narrowness of laser beams, and usually entails the generation of significant amounts of heat.

  19. Recent advances in topical wound care

    OpenAIRE

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-01-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound,...

  20. Clinical efficacy of dressings for treatment of heavily exuding chronic wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Cornelia; Hipler,Uta-Christina; Elsner, Peter; Tittelbach,Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia Wiegand, Jörg Tittelbach, Uta-Christina Hipler, Peter Elsner Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany Abstract: The treatment of chronic ulcers is a complex issue and presents an increasing problem for caregivers everywhere. This is especially true in Germany, where more than 4 million chronic wounds are treated each year. Therapeutic decisions must be patient-centered and reflect wound etiology, localization, and healing status. The practice of us...

  1. Clinical efficacy of dressings for treatment of heavily exuding chronic wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wieg; C.; Tittelbach J; Hipler UC; Elsner P

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia Wiegand, Jörg Tittelbach, Uta-Christina Hipler, Peter Elsner Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Jena, Jena, Germany Abstract: The treatment of chronic ulcers is a complex issue and presents an increasing problem for caregivers everywhere. This is especially true in Germany, where more than 4 million chronic wounds are treated each year. Therapeutic decisions must be patient-centered and reflect wound etiology, localization, and healing status. The practice of using ...

  2. A new generation of topical chronic wound treatments containing specific MMP inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Shrivastava R; Cucuat N; Rousse M; Weig; T; Neto P; Janicot C; Shrivastava C

    2014-01-01

    Ravi Shrivastava, Nathalie Cucuat, Monika Rousse, Thomas Weigand, Pedro Neto, Claire Janicot, Christiane Shrivastava VITROBIO Research Institute, Issoire, France Purpose: Incidence of chronic wounds is constantly rising worldwide, but all currently available treatments are intended either to provide symptomatic relief or to assist cicatrization to some extent, but not to directly stimulate cellular growth. Physiologically, chronic wound healing simply requires cell growth to fill the injured...

  3. Maggot debridement therapy as primary tool to treat chronic wound of animals

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayata Choudhary; Mukesh Choudhary; Sunanda Pandey; Chauhan, Vandip D.; Hasnani, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is a safe, effective, and controlled method of healing of chronic wounds by debridement and disinfection. In this therapy live, sterile maggots of green bottle fly, Lucilia (Phaenicia) sericata are used, as they prefer necrotic tissues over healthy for feeding. Since centuries, MDT is used in human beings to treat chronic wounds. Lately, MDT came out as a potent medical aid in animals. In animals, although, this therapy is still limited and clinical studies ar...

  4. Surgical Approaches to Create Murine Models of Human Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor W. Wong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound repair is a complex biologic process which becomes abnormal in numerous disease states. Although in vitro models have been important in identifying critical repair pathways in specific cell populations, in vivo models are necessary to obtain a more comprehensive and pertinent understanding of human wound healing. The laboratory mouse has long been the most common animal research tool and numerous transgenic strains and models have been developed to help researchers study the molecular pathways involved in wound repair and regeneration. This paper aims to highlight common surgical mouse models of cutaneous disease and to provide investigators with a better understanding of the benefits and limitations of these models for translational applications.

  5. Highly Absorbent Antibacterial Hemostatic Dressing for Healing Severe Hemorrhagic Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ting Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To accelerate healing of severe hemorrhagic wounds, a novel highly absorbent hemostatic dressing composed of a Tencel®/absorbent-cotton/polylactic acid nonwoven base and chitosan/nanosilver antibacterial agent was fabricated by using a nonwoven processing technique and a freeze-drying technique. This study is the first to investigate the wicking and water-absorbing properties of a nonwoven base by measuring the vertical wicking height and water absorption ratio. Moreover, blood agglutination and hemostatic second tests were conducted to evaluate the hemostatic performance of the resultant wound dressing. The blending ratio of fibers, areal weight, punching density, and fiber orientation, all significantly influenced the vertical moisture wicking property. However, only the first two parameters markedly affected the water absorption ratio. After the nonwoven base absorbed blood, scanning electron microscope (SEM observation showed that erythrocytes were trapped between the fibrin/clot network and nonwoven fibers when coagulation pathways were activated. Prothrombin time (PT and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT blood agglutination of the resultant dressing decreased to 14.34 and 50.94 s, respectively. In the femoral artery of the rate bleeding model, hemostatic time was saved by 87.2% compared with that of cotton cloth. Therefore, the resultant antibacterial wound dressing demonstrated greater water and blood absorption, as well as hemostatic performance, than the commercially available cotton cloth, especially for healing severe hemorrhagic wounds.

  6. Wound Healing Activity of Topical Application Forms Based on Ayurveda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hema Sharma Datta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Indian medicine—Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P < .01, higher collagen content (P < .05 and better skin breaking strength (P < .01 as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations.

  7. Wound healing activity of topical application forms based on ayurveda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Hema Sharma; Mitra, Shankar Kumar; Patwardhan, Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    The traditional Indian medicine-Ayurveda, describes various herbs, fats, oils and minerals with anti-aging as well as wound healing properties. With aging, numerous changes occur in skin, including decrease in tissue cell regeneration, decrease in collagen content, loss of skin elasticity and mechanical strength. We prepared five topical anti-aging formulations using cow ghee, flax seed oil, Phyllanthus emblica fruits, Shorea robusta resin, Yashada bhasma as study materials. For preliminary efficacy evaluation of the anti-aging activity we chose excision and incision wound healing animal models and studied the parameters including wound contraction, collagen content and skin breaking strength which in turn is indicative of the tissue cell regeneration capacity, collagenation capacity and mechanical strength of skin. The group treated with the formulations containing Yashada bhasma along with Shorea robusta resin and flax seed oil showed significantly better wound contraction (P skin breaking strength (P < .01) as compared to control group; thus proposing them to be effective prospective anti-aging formulations. PMID:19252191

  8. Epithelial restitution and wound healing in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Sturm; Axel U Dignass

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the intestinal mucosa. The mucosal epithelium of the alimentary tract constitutes a key element of the mucosal barrier to a broad spectrum of deleterious substances present within the intestinal lumen including bacterial microorganisms, various dietary factors, gastrointestinal secretory products and drugs. In addition, this mucosal barrier can be disturbed in the course of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases. Fortunately, the integrity of the gastrointestinal surface epithelium is rapidly reestablished even after extensive destruction. Rapid resealing of the epithelial barrier following injuries is accomplished by a process termed epithelial restitution, followed by more delayed mechanisms of epithelial wound healing including increased epithelial cell proliferation and epithelial cell differentiation. Restitution of the intestinal surface epithelium is modulated by a range of highly divergent factors among them a broad spectrum of structurally distinct regulatory peptides, variously described as growth factors or cytokines. Several regulatory peptide factors act from the basolateral site of the epithelial surface and enhance epithelial cell restitution through TGF-β-dependent pathways. In contrast, members of the trefoil factor family (TFF peptides) appear to stimulate epithelial restitution in conjunction with mucin glycoproteins through a TGF-β-independent mechanism from the apical site of the intestinal epithelium. In addition,a number of other peptide molecules like extracellular matrix factors and blood clotting factors and also nonpeptide molecules including phospholipids, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), adenine nucleotides, trace elements and pharmacological agents modulate intestinal epithelial repair mechanisms. Repeated damage and injury of the intestinal surface are key features of various intestinal disorders including inflammatory bowel diseases

  9. The role of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor in diabetic wound healing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J.N. Verkleij; J.J.T.H. Roelofs; S.R. Havik; J.C.M. Meijers; P.F. Marx

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: One of the major complications in patients with diabetes mellitus is impaired wound healing. The fibrinolytic system is involved in parts of the wound healing process and deficiency of thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor (TAFI) results in delayed wound closure. Moreover, levels

  10. How photons modulate wound healing via the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Mary

    2009-02-01

    The immune system is a diverse group of cells that recognize and attack foreign substances, pathogenic organisms and cancer cells. It also produces inflammation, an essential component of the wound healing process and, following the resolution of inflammation, plays a crucial role in the control of granulation tissue formation. Granulation tissue is the precursor of scar tissue. Injured skin and mucous membranes generally heal rapidly. However, some wounds are either slow to heal or fail to heal while in others overgrowth of scar tissue occurs, resulting in the production of either hypertophic or keloid scars. The modulation of wound healing in such conditions is clinically important and may even be vital. Evidence will be presented that phototherapy can modulate wound healing, and that changes induced in the immune system, in particular the secretion of soluble protein mediators including cytokines, may be involved in this modulation. The immune system has peripheral and deep components. The former, being located mainly in the skin and mucous membranes, are readily accessible to photons, which can affect them directly. The components of the immune system are linked by lymphatic vessels and blood vessels, which include many capillaries located in the sub-epithelial connective tissues of the skin and mucous membranes. The superficial location of these capillaries provides the immune cells and molecules in transit through them with ready access to photons. When these cells and molecules, some modified by exposure to photons, reach susceptible cells such as lymphocytes in the deeper parts of the immune system and cells of injured tissues, they can modify their activity. In addition to having direct effects on peripheral cells, photons can thus also produce indirect effects on cells too distant for the photons to reach them. For example, cytokines released from peripheral macrophages in response to the direct action of photons can be transported to and affect other

  11. Advances in the research of the role of mesenchymal stem cell in wound healing%间充质干细胞在创面愈合中的作用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玲英; 柴家科; 郁永辉; 侯玉森

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complicated process,which generally takes three overlapping phases:inflammation,proliferation,and remodeling.If wounds complicated by severe trauma,diabetes,vascular dysfunction disease,or a massive burn injury failed to pass through the three normal phases of healing,they might end up as chronic and refractory wounds.Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play different important roles in the regulation of all the phases of wound healing.MSCs can be recruited into wound and differentiated into wound repair cells,as well as promote wound healing by exerting functions like anti-inflammation,anti-apoptosis,and neovascularization.This review focuses on the role and mechanism of MSCs in each phase of the wound healing process.

  12. A mathematical model for fibro-proliferative wound healing disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, L; Sherratt, J A; Maini, P K

    1996-07-01

    The normal process of dermal wound healing fails in some cases, due to fibro-proliferative disorders such as keloid and hypertrophic scars. These types of abnormal healing may be regarded as pathologically excessive responses to wounding in terms of fibroblastic cell profiles and their inflammatory growth-factor mediators. Biologically, these conditions are poorly understood and current medical treatments are thus unreliable. In this paper, the authors apply an existing deterministic mathematical model for fibroplasia and wound contraction in adult mammalian dermis (Olsen et al., J. theor. Biol. 177, 113-128, 1995) to investigate key clinical problems concerning these healing disorders. A caricature model is proposed which retains the fundamental cellular and chemical components of the full model, in order to analyse the spatiotemporal dynamics of the initiation, progression, cessation and regression of fibro-contractive diseases in relation to normal healing. This model accounts for fibroblastic cell migration, proliferation and death and growth-factor diffusion, production by cells and tissue removal/decay. Explicit results are obtained in terms of the model processes and parameters. The rate of cellular production of the chemical is shown to be critical to the development of a stable pathological state. Further, cessation and/or regression of the disease depend on appropriate spatiotemporally varying forms for this production rate, which can be understood in terms of the bistability of the normal dermal and pathological steady states-a central property of the model, which is evident from stability and bifurcation analyses. The work predicts novel, biologically realistic and testable pathogenic and control mechanisms, the understanding of which will lead toward more effective strategies for clinical therapy of fibro-proliferative disorders.

  13. Heme Oxygenase-1 Promotes Delayed Wound Healing in Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ying Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic ulcers are one of the most serious and costly chronic complications for diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress may play an important role in diabetes and its complications. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of heme oxygenase-1 on wound closure in diabetic rats. Diabetic wound model was prepared by making an incision with full thickness in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Wounds from diabetic rats were treated with 10% hemin ointment for 21 days. Increase of HO-1 protein expression enhanced anti-inflammation and antioxidant in diabetic rats. Furthermore, HO-1 increased the levels of VEGF and ICAM-1 and expressions of CBS and CSE protein. In summary, HO-1 promoted the wound closure by augmenting anti-inflammation, antioxidant, and angiogenesis in diabetic rats.

  14. Analysis of the chronic wound microbiota of 2,963 patients by 16S rDNA pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolcott, Randall D; Hanson, John D; Rees, Eric J; Koenig, Lawrence D; Phillips, Caleb D; Wolcott, Richard A; Cox, Stephen B; White, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    The extent to which microorganisms impair wound healing is an ongoing controversy in the management of chronic wounds. Because the high diversity and extreme variability of the microbiota between individual chronic wounds lead to inconsistent findings in small cohort studies, evaluation of a large number of chronic wounds using identical sequencing and bioinformatics methods is necessary for clinicians to be able to select appropriate empiric therapies. In this study, we utilized 16S rDNA pyrosequencing to analyze the composition of the bacterial communities present in samples obtained from patients with chronic diabetic foot ulcers (N = 910), venous leg ulcers (N = 916), decubitus ulcers (N = 767), and nonhealing surgical wounds (N = 370). The wound samples contained a high proportion of Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas species in 63 and 25% of all wounds, respectively; however, a high prevalence of anaerobic bacteria and bacteria traditionally considered commensalistic was also observed. Our results suggest that neither patient demographics nor wound type influenced the bacterial composition of the chronic wound microbiome. Collectively, these findings indicate that empiric antibiotic selection need not be based on nor altered for wound type. Furthermore, the results provide a much clearer understanding of chronic wound microbiota in general; clinical application of this new knowledge over time may help in its translation to improved wound healing outcomes. PMID:26463872

  15. Skin wound healing in MMP2-deficient and MMP2 / plasminogen double-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøssing, Signe; Rønø, Birgitte; Hald, Andreas;

    2010-01-01

    During healing of incisional skin wounds, migrating keratinocytes dissect their way under the crust to re-epithelialize the wounded area. The efficiency of this tissue remodelling process depends on the concomitant activity of several extracellular proteases, including members of the plasminogen...... activation (PA) system and the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family. Treatment with the broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, galardin, delays wound healing in wildtype mice and completely arrest wound healing in plasminogen (Plg)-deficient mice, indicating a functional overlap between plasmin- and galardin......-sensitive MMPs during wound healing. To address whether MMP2 is accountable for the galardin-induced healing deficiency in wildtype and Plg-deficient mice, incisional skin wounds were generated in MMP2 single-deficient mice and in MMP2/Plg double-deficient mice and followed until healed. Alternatively, tissue...

  16. COLLAGEN DRESSING: A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF COLLAGEN SHEET AS A BIOLOGICAL DRESSING AND ITS ROLE IN THE CHRONIC NON-HEALING WOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ramula

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Collagen is the most abundantly present connective tissue. In higher animals, primarily as extracellular insoluble fibres and the fibres account for large part of organic mass of skin, tendon, blood vessel, bone teeth, cornea and vitreous humour. Collagen also provides the framework of parenchymal organs and basement membrane. The collagens constitute a family of proteins selected during evolution for the execution of several (mainly structural functions. During the process of evolution of multicellular organisms, a family of structural proteins was selected by both environmental influences and the functional requirements of the animal organism and developed to acquire varying degrees of rigidity, elasticity and strength. These proteins are known collectively as collagen and the chief examples among its various types are present in the skin, bone, cartilage, smooth muscle and basal lamina. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body representing 30% of its dry weight. The collagens are produced by several cell types and are distinguishable by their molecular compositions, morphologic characteristics, distribution, functions and pathologies. More than 20 types of collagen have been identified and designated with Roman numerals; the most important of these are listed in Table 5–3. They are classified into the following four categories according to their structure and general functions. METHODS Collagen dressing with facilities available in government setup. RESULTS The overall healing rate with collagen sheet is 70.14% within a relatively short period. CONCLUSION Collagen dressing is superior to conventional dressing.

  17. Clinical experimental study of Arnebia Root oil in increasing FGF expression and promoting wound surface healing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effection of Arnebia Root oil on the FGF expression in wound surface and the ability to promote wound surface healing. Methods:24 wound surfaces of patients were divided into two groups. Experimental group was treated by Arnebia Root oil and the control was treated by petrolatum gauze. Histology, histochemistry, electron microscope methods and healing rate measurement were used to show the FGF expression and wound healing process. Results:Endogenous FGF were expressed in both of the groups, in which of the experimental group was higher than that of the control group, the wound surface healing rate of experimental group was also higher and paralleled with FGF expression. Conclusion:Arnebia Root oil has effects to promote FGF expression and enhances wound surface repair. The wound healing mechanism between the action of Arnebia Root oil and function of FGF need further investigating.

  18. Effects of the Four-Herb Compound ANBP on Wound Healing Promotion in Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qian; He, Wen-Jun; Chen, Li; Hao, Hao-Jie; Liu, Jie-Jie; Dong, Liang; Tong, Chuan; Li, Mei-Rong; Zhou, Zhong-Zhi; Han, Wei-Dong; Fu, Xiao-Bing

    2015-12-01

    Wound healing is a troublesome problem in diabetic patients. Besides, there is also an increased risk of postsurgical wound complications for diabetic patient. It has been revealed that traditional Chinese medicine may promote healing and inhibit scar formation, while the changes of morphology and physiology of wounds on such medicine treatment still remain elusive. In this study, we first used the ultralow temperature preparation method to produce mixed superfine powder from Agrimonia pilosa (A), Nelumbo nucifera (N), Boswellia carteri (B), and Pollen typhae (P), named as ANBP. Applying ANBP on 40 streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic C57BL/6 mice (4-6 weeks, 20 ± 2 g), we observed that the wound healing process was accelerated and the wound healing time was shortened (14 days, P wound healing, promote vascularization, and inhibit inflammation, suggesting the potential clinic application of ANBP for diabetes mellitus and refractory wounds.

  19. Profibrinolytic effects of metalloproteinases during skin wound healing in the absence of plasminogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kirsty A; Almholt, Kasper; Ploug, Michael;

    2008-01-01

    Genetic ablation of plasminogen (Plg) and pharmacological inhibition of metalloproteinase activity by galardin delay skin wound healing in mice, whereas the combined inhibition of these two enzyme systems completely prevents healing. In this study, the impact of plasmin and metalloproteinases...... as profibrinolytic enzymes has been investigated by comparing skin wound healing in the absence and presence of fibrin. Plg deficiency impairs skin wound healing kinetics, but this delay is only partially restored in the absence of fibrin. This suggests that plasmin-mediated fibrinolysis is the primary......, but not the exclusive, requirement for healing of wounds in these mice. In addition, we observe that lack of fibrin reduces Plg activation significantly during wound healing. The profibrinolytic role of metalloproteinases is revealed by the finding that lack of fibrin partially restores the otherwise arrested healing...

  20. Sustained Release of Cx43 Antisense Oligodeoxynucleotides from Coated Collagen Scaffolds Promotes Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Daniel J; Soon, Allyson; Thrasivoulou, Christopher; Phillips, Anthony R J; Jayasinghe, Suwan N; Becker, David L

    2016-07-01

    Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeting the mRNA of the gap junction protein Cx43 promote tissue repair in a variety of different wounds. Delivery of the antisense drug has most often been achieved by a thermoreversible hydrogel, Pluronic F-127, which is very effective in the short term but does not allow for sustained delivery over several days. For chronic wounds that take a long time to heal, repeated dosing with the drug may be desirable but is not always compatible with conventional treatments such as the weekly changing of compression bandages on venous leg ulcers. Here the coating of collagen scaffolds with antisense oligonucleotides is investigated and a way to provide protection of the oligodeoxynucleotide drug is found in conjunction with sustained release over a 7 d period. This approach significantly reduces the normal foreign body reaction to the scaffold, which induces an increase of Cx43 protein and an inhibition of healing. As a result of the antisense integration into the scaffold, inflammation is reduced with the rate of wound healing and contracture is significantly improved. This coated scaffold approach may be very useful for treating venous leg ulcers and also for providing a sustained release of any other types of oligonucleotide drugs that are being developed. PMID:27253638

  1. [THE ROLE OF ANTISEPTICS AND STRATEGY OF BIOFILM REMOVAL IN CHRONIC WOUND].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2016-03-01

    Chronic wound does not heal within the expected time frame because it remains in the inflammation phase of healing. The reason for this is the presence of necrotic tissue and a large number of microorganisms, primarily bacteria that secrete the biofilm, along with ischemia, hypoxia and edema. Biofilm is present in 90% of chronic wounds and 6% of the acute ones. Biofilm is a corporative association of microbes which adhere to the surface of the wound, guided by quorum sensing molecules. The association is surrounded by a moisturizing matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (slime) which protect the microbes from the impact of antibiotics, antiseptics, macro-organism defense and stress. Biofilm is the primary cause of the wound chronicity because it causes permanent inflammation, delayed granulation tissue formation and migration of epithelium cells, thus providing a reservoir of microbes that lead to infection of the chronic wound. The aim of good clinical practice is to enable healing of a chronic wound within the expected time frame. In order to achieve this aim, it is necessary to reduce and thoroughly remove the biofilm from the wound and prevent its reappearance. This is achieved by the application of active anti-biofilm compounds and procedures that disintegrate the quorum sensing molecules, degrade the extracellular polymeric substances and block adherence to the surfaces. Recent researches have shown that the application of antiseptics is effective in the prevention of infection and is a support to targeted treatment. However, the fact is that only some antiseptics are applicable to chronic wounds and can have an impact on biofilms of the primary infective agents such as Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective antiseptics are octenidine dihydrochloride, polyhexanides, povidone and cadexomer iodine, nanocrystal silver and Manuka-type honey. Immobile biofilm is a persistent problem of chronic and chronic infected

  2. Otostegia persica extraction on healing process of burn wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ganjali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate if the methanolic extract of the Otostegia persica can accelerating healing process of burn wound because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. METHODS:Forty eight male Wistar rats were randomized into three study groups of 16 rats each. Burn wounds were created on dorsal part of shaved rats using a metal rod. In group I the burn wound was left without any treatment. Group was treated with topical silver sulfadiazine pomade. In group III, ointment containing the OP extract was administered. Skin biopsies were harvested from burn area on the 3rd, 5th, 14th and 21st days after burn and examined histologically. RESULTS: Re-epithelialization in the control group and in group II was lower than in group III. Re-epithelialization in groups II and III was significantly different from that in the control group. On the 5th day of the experiment, we assessed lower inflammation in the burn area compared to control group. This means that the inflammation was suppressed by methanolic extract of OP. From day 5 to 14; the fibroblast proliferation peaked and was associated with increased collagen accumulation. It was obvious that angiogenesis improved more in the groups II and III, which facilitated re-epithelialisation. CONCLUSION:Methanolic extract of Otostegia persica exhibited significant healing activity when topically applied on rats. OP is an effective treatment for saving the burn site.

  3. Diazoxide accelerates wound healing by improving EPC function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhang-Peng; Xin, Ru-Juan; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Guo-Jun; Deng, Ya-Ping; Li, Dong-Jie; Shen, Fu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell dysfunction is the primary cause of microvascular complications in diabetes. Diazoxide enables beta cells to rest by reversibly suppressing glucose-induced insulin secretion by opening ATP-sensitive K+ channels in the beta cells. This study investigated the role of diazoxide in wound healing in mice with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes and explored the possible mechanisms of its effect. Compared to the controls, mice with STZ-induced diabetes exhibited significantly impaired wound healing. Diazoxide treatment (30 mg/kg/d, intragastrically) for 28 days accelerated wound closure and stimulated angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) increased significantly in the diazoxide-treated diabetic mice. The adhesion, migration, and tube formation abilities of bone marrow (BM)-EPCs were impaired by diabetes, and these impairments were improved by diazoxide treatment. The expression of both p53 and TSP-1 increased in diabetic mice compared to that in the controls, and these increases were inhibited significantly by diazoxide treatment. In vitro, diazoxide treatment improved the impaired BM-EPC function and diminished the increased expression of p53 and TSP-1 in cultured BM-EPCs caused by high glucose levels. We conclude that diazoxide improved BM-EPC function in mice with STZ-induced diabetes, possibly via a p53- and TSP-1-dependent pathway. PMID:27100489

  4. Effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana do Socorro da Silva Dias Andrade

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To gather and clarify the actual effects of low-level laser therapy on wound healing and its most effective ways of application in human and veterinary medicine. METHODS: We searched original articles published in journals between the years 2000 and 2011, in Spanish, English, French and Portuguese languages, belonging to the following databases: Lilacs, Medline, PubMed and Bireme; Tey should contain the methodological description of the experimental design and parameters used. RESULTS: doses ranging from 3 to 6 J/cm2 appear to be more effective and doses 10 above J/cm2 are associated with deleterious effects. The wavelengths ranging from 632.8 to 1000 nm remain as those that provide more satisfactory results in the wound healing process. CONCLUSION: Low-level laser can be safely applied to accelerate the resolution of cutaneous wounds, although this fact is closely related to the election of parameters such as dose, time of exposure and wavelength.

  5. Effects of minoxidil gel on burn wound healing in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaeli, Payam; Karamouzian, Mohammad; Rohani, Shohreh; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Ghalekhani, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Minoxidil has been reported to inhibit in-vitro fibroblast proliferation and lysyl hydroxylase activity, a key enzyme in collagen biosynthesis. These in-vitro effects proposed minoxidil to be a potential antifibrotic agent. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of minoxidil gel on wound healing procedure in a second-degree burn model in rats. Wistar rats were anesthetized and a second-degree burn was induced on the back of Wistar rats using a heated 2 cm diameter metal plate. Experimental groups received 2% or 5% topical minoxidil gel, dexpanthenol or sliver sulfadiazine. Histological parameters including collagen content, angiogenesis, number of preserved follicles and necrosis along with tensile strength of burn wound area were assessed on days 3, 7, 14 and 21 post-injury.Microscopic evaluation of specimens collected from sample animals were consistent and showed a second-degree burn. Main histological findings regarding minoxidil topical usage showed that collagen content and tensile strength of burned area did not differ between groups. However, minoxidil increased the number and diameter of blood vessels significantly compared with other groups.Although minoxidil improved the process of wound-healing, our results did not support the proposed idea of its usage as an antifibrotic agent. However, to reject its possible effects as an antifibrotic agent, more objective animal models should be developed and studied. PMID:24734077

  6. Wound healing suppressant effect of vincristine reversed by vitamin A: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatadri T.V.; Afzal Khan A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Use of antineoplastic drugs pre and postoperatively have shown to adversely affect the healing of surgical wounds. Vincristine is an antineoplastic drug with a wide range of antitumor activity. Prior studies have demonstrated that vincristine impairs skin wound healing. Methods: In this study we investigated the effect of vitamin A on vincristine induced suppression of healing in two wound models, viz: incision and dead space in rats. Hydroxyproline (measure of collagen) was es...

  7. Manganese superoxide dismutase expression in endothelial progenitor cells accelerates wound healing in diabetic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Marrotte, Eric J.; Chen, Dan-Dan; Hakim, Jeffrey S.; Chen, Alex F.

    2010-01-01

    Amputation as a result of impaired wound healing is a serious complication of diabetes. Inadequate angiogenesis contributes to poor wound healing in diabetic patients. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) normally augment angiogenesis and wound repair but are functionally impaired in diabetics. Here we report that decreased expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in EPCs contributes to impaired would healing in a mouse model of type 2 diabetes. A decreased frequency of circulating...

  8. Neurotensin-loaded collagen dressings reduce inflammation and improve wound healing in diabetic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liane I. F. Moura; Dias, Ana M. A.; Suesca, Edward; Casadiegos, Sergio; Leal, Ermelindo C.; Fontanilla, Marta R.; Carvalho, Lina; Sousa, Hermínio C. de; Carvalho, Eugénia

    2014-01-01

    Impaired wound healing is an important clinical problem in diabetes mellitus and results in failure to completely heal diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs), which may lead to lower extremity amputations. In the present study, collagen based dressings were prepared to be applied as support for the delivery of neurotensin (NT), a neuropeptide that acts as an inflammatory modulator in wound healing. The performance of NT alone and NT–loaded collagen matrices to treat wounds in streptozotocin (STZ) diabet...

  9. The Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases in Diabetic Wound Healing in relation to Photobiomodulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Matabi Ayuk; Heidi Abrahamse; Nicolette Nadene Houreld

    2016-01-01

    The integration of several cellular responses initiates the process of wound healing. Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an integral role in wound healing. Their main function is degradation, by removal of damaged extracellular matrix (ECM) during the inflammatory phase, breakdown of the capillary basement membrane for angiogenesis and cell migration during the proliferation phase, and contraction and remodelling of tissue in the remodelling phase. For effective healing to occur, all wound...

  10. Whey protein enhances normal inflammatory responses during cutaneous wound healing in diabetic rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ebaid Hossam; Salem Amir; Sayed Abdalla; Metwalli Ali

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Prolonged wound healing is a complication of diabetes that contributes to mortality. Impaired wound healing occurs as a consequence of excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Whey protein (WP) is able to reduce the oxygen radicals and increase the levels of the antioxidant glutathione. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether dietary supplementation with WP could enhance normal inflammatory responses during wound healing in diabetic rats. Animals we...

  11. Formulation and Evaluation of Neomycin Sulphate Ointment containing Natural Wound Healing Agent Curcuma longa

    OpenAIRE

    Akanksha D; Vikas G; Neetesh K. J; Shailendra S; Neelam B; Dinesh K. J

    2014-01-01

    Present investigation was to develop novel ointment formulation in combination of natural wound healing agent curcuma longa, which is reported to possess wound healing and anti-bacterial activities. Combination of neomycin sulphate and curcuma longa is good rational, where curcuma longa produces synergistic wound healing effect with neomycin sulphate. Formulations containing fixed concentration (0.5 %) of neomycin sulphate and 3 %, 4 % and 5 % of curcuma longa were prepared. To assess the eff...

  12. Microencapsulated equine mesenchymal stromal cells promote cutaneous wound healing in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Bussche, Leen; Harman, Rebecca M.; Syracuse, Bethany A; Plante, Eric L; Lu, Yen-Chun; Curtis, Theresa M; Ma, Minglin; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The prevalence of impaired cutaneous wound healing is high and treatment is difficult and often ineffective, leading to negative social and economic impacts for our society. Innovative treatments to improve cutaneous wound healing by promoting complete tissue regeneration are therefore urgently needed. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been reported to provide paracrine signals that promote wound healing, but (i) how they exert their effects on target cells is unclear and (ii...

  13. The Combination of Three Natural Compounds Effectively Prevented Lung Carcinogenesis by Optimal Wound Healing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linxin Liu

    Full Text Available The tumor stroma has been described as "normal wound healing gone awry". We explored whether the restoration of a wound healing-like microenvironment may facilitate tumor healing. Firstly, we screened three natural compounds (shikonin, notoginsenoside R1 and aconitine from wound healing agents and evaluated the efficacies of wound healing microenvironment for limiting single agent-elicited carcinogenesis and two-stage carcinogenesis. The results showed that three compounds used alone could promote wound healing but had unfavorable efficacy to exert wound healing, and that the combination of three compounds made up treatment disadvantage of a single compound in wound healing and led to optimal wound healing. Although individual treatment with these agents may prevent cancer, they were not effective for the treatment of established tumors. However, combination treatment with these three compounds almost completely prevented urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis and reduced tumor burden. Different from previous studies, we found that urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis was associated with lung injury independent of pulmonary inflammation. LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation did not increase lung carcinogenesis, whereas decreased pulmonary inflammation by macrophage depletion promoted lung carcinogenesis. In addition, urethane damaged wound healing in skin excision wound model, reversed lung carcinogenic efficacy by the combination of three compounds was consistent with skin wound healing. Further, the combination of these three agents reduced the number of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs by inducing cell differentiation, restoration of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC and blockade of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Our results suggest that restoration of a wound healing microenvironment represents an effective strategy for cancer prevention.

  14. Phenotypic overlap between MMP-13 and the plasminogen activation system during wound healing in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Juncker-Jensen, Anna; Lund, Leif R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteolytic degradation of extracellular matrix is a crucial step in the healing of incisional skin wounds. Thus, healing of skin wounds is delayed by either plasminogen-deficiency or by treatment with the broad-spectrum metalloproteinase (MP) inhibitor Galardin alone, while the two perturbations combined completely prevent wound healing. Both urokinase-type plasminogen activator and several matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs), such as MMP-3, -9 and -13, are expressed in the leading-...

  15. Repairing effects of Iran flora on wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Afshar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest and the heaviest organ in the human body which, in addition to its important roles in the protection, waste removal, and contribution to vitamin D synthesis. As an important sensory organ, it can play a major role in the maintenance of homeostasis in the body. Total loss of of the skin integrity can cause harms and diseases that lead to physical disability and even death. Therefore, one of the main problem faced by medical science so far, is the question of .wound healing in the shortest possible time and with minimal side effects. Increasing the wound healing rate leads to positive financial and health results. Thus, several studies on new therapeutic techniques such as use of chemical drugs, herbal medication and homeopathy have been done. Moreover, physical methods such as laser therapy and other treatmentshave been constantly improving. In recent decades, the use of herbal medicine, as an effective method, has been progressing in most countries including Iran. In the traditional medicine of Iran various methods of using plants for the treatment of diseases are common. This is actually justifiable due to the geographic diversity of the flora in Iran. In the present paper the effectivity of the cut healing properties of some medicinal herbs in Iran is discussed.

  16. Evaluation of wound healing activity of ferulic acid in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaisas, Mahesh M; Kshirsagar, Shashank B; Sahane, Rajkumari S

    2014-10-01

    In diabetic patients, there is impairment in angiogenesis, neovascularisation and failure in matrix metalloproteineases (MMPs), keratinocyte and fibroblast functions, which affects wound healing mechanism. Hence, diabetic patients are more prone to infections and ulcers, which finally result in gangrene. Ferulic acid (FA) is a natural antioxidant found in fruits and vegetables, such as tomatoes, rice bran and sweet corn. In this study, wound healing activity of FA was evaluated in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats using excision wound model. FA-treated wounds were found to epithelise faster as compared with diabetic wound control group. The hydroxyproline and hexosamine content increased significantly when compared with diabetic wound control. FA effectively inhibited the lipid peroxidation and elevated the catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and nitric oxide levels along with the increase in the serum zinc and copper levels probably aiding the wound healing process. Hence, the results indicate that FA significantly promotes wound healing in diabetic rats.

  17. A prospective randomised open label study to evaluate the potential of a new silver alginate/carboxymethylcellulose antimicrobial wound dressing to promote wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beele, Hilde; Meuleneire, Frans; Nahuys, Marc; Percival, Steven L

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to observe both the clinical signs and symptoms of wounds at risk of infection, that is critically colonised (biofilm infected) and antimicrobial-performance of an ionic silver alginate/carboxymethylcellulose (SACMC) dressing, in comparison with a non silver calcium alginate fibre (AF) dressing, on chronic venous leg and pressure ulcers. Thirty-six patients with venous or pressure ulcers, considered clinically to be critically colonised (biofilm infected), were randomly chosen to receive either an SACMC dressing or a non silver calcium AF dressing. The efficacy of each wound dressing was evaluated over a 4-week period. The primary study endpoints were prevention of infection and progression to wound healing. The SACMC group showed a statistically significant (P = 0.017) improvement to healing as indicated by a reduction in the surface area of the wound, over the 4-week study period, compared with AF controls. In conclusion, the SACMC dressing showed a greater ability to prevent wounds progressing to infection when compared with the AF control dressing. In addition, the results of this study also showed an improvement in wound healing for SACMC when compared with a non silver dressing. PMID:20529142

  18. Wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of Shorea robusta Gaertn. f. resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, T A; Chandrashekara, H H; Kumar, D; Prasad, R; Gopal, A; Sardar, K K; Tandan, S K; Kumar, D

    2012-04-01

    The ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin (10 and 30 % w/w applied locally in excised and incised wounds) produced a dose-dependent acceleration in wound contraction and increased hydroxyproline content and tensile strength of wounds in rats. The results demonstrate wound healing activity of ethanolic extract of S. robusta resin.

  19. Evidence That Mast Cells Are Not Required for Healing of Splinted Cutaneous Excisional Wounds in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Nauta, Allison C.; Grova, Monica; Montoro, Daniel T.; Zimmermann, Andrew; Tsai, Mindy; Geoffrey C Gurtner; Galli, Stephen J.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is a complex biological process involving the interaction of many cell types to replace lost or damaged tissue. Although the biology of wound healing has been extensively investigated, few studies have focused on the role of mast cells. In this study, we investigated the possible role of mast cells in wound healing by analyzing aspects of cutaneous excisional wound healing in three types of genetically mast cell-deficient mice. We found that C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh , WBB6F1-KitW/W-...

  20. Investigation of wound healing activity of Lantana camara L. in Sprague dawley rats using a burn wound model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Nayak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Lantana camara is used in herbal medicine for the treatment of skin itches, as an antiseptic for wounds, and externally for leprosy and scabies. The objective of our study is to investigate burn wound healing activity of the leaf extract of L.camara in rats. The animals were divided into two groups of 6 each. The test group animals were treated with the ethanol extract of L. camara (100 mg kg-1 day-1 topically and the control group animals were left untreated. Healing was assessed by the rate of wound contraction, period of epithelialization. Antimicrobial activities of the extract against the specific microorganisms were assessed. The extract showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella Pneumoniae and E.coli. Extract treated wounds were healed in about 21 days which is not distinct from the controls. Our data suggest that L.camara has antimicrobial activity but not wound healing promoting activity on burn wound.   Industrial relevance: Extensive work has been done on the L. camara and demonstrated the antimicrobial and fungicidal activity of its chemical constituents. Lantana oil is used for the treatment of skin itches and as an antiseptic for wounds. It has been used in folk medicine for the treatment of cancers, chicken pox, measles, ulcers, swellings, eczema. Our earlier work showed the healing activity on excision wound model. However, there is no data to support the wound healing activity of L. camara on burn wound. Hence, we have conducted the present study to explore the wound healing activity and the antimicrobial activities of L. camara against the specific microorganisms which generally infect burn wound.

  1. Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Wound Healing Properties of Kigelia africana (Lam.) Beneth. and Strophanthus hispidus DC.

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Agyare; Anita Serwaa Dwobeng; Nicholas Agyepong; Yaw Duah Boakye; Kwesi Boadu Mensah; Patrick George Ayande; Martin Adarkwa-Yiadom

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infections of various types of wounds are a challenge to the treatment of wounds and wound healing. The study was to investigate antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of methanol leaf and stem bark extracts of Kigelia africana and methanol leaf and root extracts of Strophanthus hispidus and also to determine wound healing properties of the extracts. The antimicrobial activities of the methanol extracts were determined against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria and a...

  2. Histologic evaluation of wound healing in experimental intestinal anastomoses: effects of antineoplastic agents.

    OpenAIRE

    de Roy van Zuidewijn, D. B.; Schillings, P. H.; Wobbes, T; De Boer, H. H. (Hans)

    1992-01-01

    Histologic evaluation of intestinal wound healing with and without cytostatics was performed in 36 rats. Variables were the relative position of the wound edges in mucosa and muscularis, necrosis, exudate, granulation tissue, granulocytes, macrophages, fibroblasts, restoration of the mucosal epithelium, and repair of the muscularis propria. The relative position of the wound edges in the mucosa and the muscularis in the initial phase of wound healing depended on technique but appeared to impr...

  3. Boron promotes streptozotocin-induced diabetic wound healing: roles in cell proliferation and migration, growth factor expression, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Doğan, Ayşegül; Aydın, Safa; Dülger, Esra Çikler; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2016-06-01

    Acute wounds do not generally require professional treatment modalities and heal in a predictable fashion, but chronic wounds are mainly accompanied with infection and prolonged inflammation, leading to healing impairments and continuous tissue degradation. Although a vast amount of products have been introduced in the market, claiming to provide a better optimization of local and systemic conditions of patients, they do not meet the expectations due to being expensive and not easily accessible, requiring wound care facilities, having patient-specific response, low efficiency, and severe side-effects. In this sense, developing new, safe, self-applicable, effective, and cheap wound care products with broad-range antimicrobial activity is still an attractive area of international research. In the present work, boron derivatives [boric acid and sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (NaB)] were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity, proliferation, migratory, angiogenesis, gene, and growth factor expression promoting effects on dermal cells in vitro. In addition, boron-containing hydrogel formulation was examined for its wound healing promoting potential using full-thickness wound model in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The results revealed that while both boron compounds significantly increased proliferation, migration, vital growth factor, and gene expression levels of dermal cells along with displaying remarkable antimicrobial effects against bacteria, yeast, and fungi, NaB displayed greater antimicrobial properties as well as gene and growth factor expression inductive effects. Animal studies proved that NaB-containing gel formulation enhanced wound healing rate of diabetic animals and histopathological scores. Overall data suggest a potential promising therapeutic option for the management of chronic wounds but further studies are highly warranted to determine signaling pathways and target metabolisms in which boron is involved to elucidate the limitations

  4. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Abbas Hashemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes.

  5. The Review on Properties of Aloe Vera in Healing of Cutaneous Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyyed Abbas; Madani, Seyyed Abdollah; Abediankenari, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of wounds is very important and was subject of different investigations. In this regard, natural substance plays crucial role as complementary medicine. Various studies reported that aloe vera has useful effects on wounds especially cutaneous wounds healing. Therefore in the current review, we examined the effect of aloe vera on cutaneous wound healing and concluded that although aloe vera improves the wound healing as well as other procedures both clinically and experimentally, more studies are still needed to approve the outcomes. PMID:26090436

  6. Telemedicine Supported Chronic Wound Tissue Prediction Using Classification Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chinmay; Gupta, Bharat; Ghosh, Soumya K; Das, Dev K; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2016-03-01

    Telemedicine helps to deliver health services electronically to patients with the advancement of communication systems and health informatics. Chronic wound (CW) detection and its healing rate assessment at remote distance is very much difficult due to unavailability of expert doctors. This problem generally affects older ageing people. So there is a need of better assessment facility to the remote people in telemedicine framework. Here we have proposed a CW tissue prediction and diagnosis under telemedicine framework to classify the tissue types using linear discriminant analysis (LDA). The proposed telemedicine based wound tissue prediction (TWTP) model is able to identify wound tissue and correctly predict the wound status with a good degree of accuracy. The overall performance of the proposed wound tissue prediction methodology has been measured based on ground truth images. The proposed methodology will assist the clinicians to take better decision towards diagnosis of CW in terms of quantitative information of three types of tissue composition at low-resource set-up.

  7. Understanding methods of wound debridement

    OpenAIRE

    Atkin, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    Autolytic debridement describes the body's natural method of wound-bed cleansing, helping it to prepare the wound bed for healing. In acute wounds, autolytic debridement occurs automatically and often does not require intervention, as during the inflammatory stage of a wound, neutrophils and macrophages digest and removes devitalised tissue, cell debris and contaminants, clearing the wound of any cellular barriers to healing. In chronic wounds, by contrast, healing is often delayed, frequentl...

  8. Monitoring combat wound healing by IR hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howle, Chris R.; Spear, Abigail M.; Gazi, Ehsan; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In recent conflicts, battlefield injuries consist largely of extensive soft injuries from blasts and high energy projectiles, including gunshot wounds. Repair of these large, traumatic wounds requires aggressive surgical treatment, including multiple surgical debridements to remove devitalised tissue and to reduce bacterial load. Identifying those patients with wound complications, such as infection and impaired healing, could greatly assist health care teams in providing the most appropriate and personalised care for combat casualties. Candidate technologies to enable this benefit include the fusion of imaging and optical spectroscopy to enable rapid identification of key markers. Hence, a novel system based on IR negative contrast imaging (NCI) is presented that employs an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) source comprising a periodically-poled LiNbO3 (PPLN) crystal. The crystal operates in the shortwave and midwave IR spectral regions (ca. 1.5 - 1.9 μm and 2.4 - 3.8 μm, respectively). Wavelength tuning is achieved by translating the crystal within the pump beam. System size and complexity are minimised by the use of single element detectors and the intracavity OPO design. Images are composed by raster scanning the monochromatic beam over the scene of interest; the reflection and/or absorption of the incident radiation by target materials and their surrounding environment provide a method for spatial location. Initial results using the NCI system to characterise wound biopsies are presented here.

  9. Laser Biostimulation Of Wound Healing In Arteriopatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallarida, G.; Baldoni, F.; Raimondi, G.; Massaro, M.; Peruzzi, G.; Bertolotti, M.; Ferrari, A.; Scudieri, F.

    1981-05-01

    Low-power laser irradiation has been employed in the attempt to accelerate the wound-healing of ischemic cutaneous ulcerations with threatening or manifest gangrene due to arteriosclerosis obliterans of the lower limbs. Irradiation was performed by using a low-power He-Ne gas laser of 6328 Å wavelength and was concentrated at the peripheral zone of the lesions. The preliminary results of the study indicate that laser stimulation might be new approach in the conservative menagement of the ischemic ulcers in patients with severe peripheral obstructive arteriopaties not suited for arterial reconstruction.

  10. Gender affects skin wound healing in plasminogen deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønø, Birgitte; Engelholm, Lars Henning; Lund, Leif Røge;

    2013-01-01

    functional plasmin thus display decreased tumor growth in a variety of cancer models. Interestingly, this role of plasmin has, in regard to skin cancer, been shown to be restricted to male mice. It remains to be clarified whether gender also affects other phenotypic characteristics of plasmin deficiency...... revealed larger amounts of fibrotic scars in the provisional matrix of plasmin deficient male mice compared to female mice. These fibrotic scars correlated to an obstruction of cell infiltration of the granulation tissue, which is a prerequisite for wound healing. In conclusion, the presented data show...

  11. Current state of chronic wound care in Kazakhstan: focus on topical treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Akhmetova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background — The presence of chronic hard-to-heal wounds significantly affects patients’ quality of life causing pain, discomfort, decrease of mobility and consequently leads to social isolation and depression. This type of wound is more prevalent among older population. It has been estimated that up to 1-2% of the world population have this condition. The treatment of hard-to-heal wounds is expensive and long-term process, and, stresses healthcare systems of every country. Unfortunately, limited information is available about the situation with chronic wounds in Kazakhstan as the statistical data on such patients is not monitored and not registered in this country. Methods — The search was conducted by using available electronic sources, including Google Scholar, PubMed, Web of Sciences, Medline, Wiley Online Library, and Cochrane Library databases as well as hard copy versions of peer-reviewed publications in Russian, Kazakh, and English languages. Results — We have identified and analyzed current situation with wound care in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Research has demonstrated a variety of types of treatments utilized in the country, particularly the treatment of the diabetic foot.It also indicates the lack of statistics on wound care. Conclusions — The review highlights the mechanisms of wound healing process, methods for wound care, and encompasses the information available on wound healing in Republic of Kazakhstan. The article emphasizes the necessity of establishing the systemic monitoring of wound care and formation of electronic database. Apart from that, the importance of developing and manufacturing of domestic novel wound treatments have been also stressed out.

  12. The use of a rat model to evaluate the in vivo toxicity and wound healing activity of selected Combretum and Terminalia (Combretaceae) species extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoko, Peter; Picard, Jackie; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2010-10-01

    Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury and several natural products have been shown to accelerate the healing process. The present study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of the topical treatment of acetone leaf extracts of Combretum imberbe, Combretum nelsonii,Combretum albopuntactum and Terminalia sericea based on their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Four circular full-thickness skin wounds were made on the backs of eight anaesthetised Wistar rats using aseptic techniques. The treatments were administrated topically using 10% and 20% concentrations of each extract in aqueous cream in separate treatments. Indications of erythema, exudate, crust formation,swelling and ulceration were used to determine the wound healing process. All of the wounds closed completely within 17 days. Throughout the experiment, a subcutaneous probe was used to determine that the body temperature and body weight of the rats were within the normal range. C. imberbe and C. nelsonii extracts accelerated wound healing, but there was no significant difference in wound contraction using 10% and 20% concentrations of the extracts in cream. The results also showed the potential usefulness of this model to measure accelerating wound healing.The extracts could perhaps overcome defects associated with healing failure in chronic wounds and prevent secondary bacterial and fungal infections.

  13. The use of a rat model to evaluate the in vivo toxicity and wound healing activity of selected Combretum and Terminalia (Combretaceae species extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Masoko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a fundamental response to tissue injury and several natural products have been shown to accelerate the healing process. The present study was undertaken to determine the safety and efficacy of the topical treatment of acetone leaf extracts of Combretum imberbe, Combretum nelsonii,Combretum albopuntactum and Terminalia sericea based on their in vitro antimicrobial activity. Four circular full-thickness skin wounds were made on the backs of eight anaesthetised Wistar rats using aseptic techniques. The treatments were administrated topically using 10% and 20% concentrations of each extract in aqueous cream in separate treatments. Indications of erythema, exudate, crust formation,swelling and ulceration were used to determine the wound healing process. All of the wounds closed completely within 17 days. Throughout the experiment, a subcutaneous probe was used to determine that the body temperature and body weight of the rats were within the normal range. C. imberbe and C. nelsonii extracts accelerated wound healing, but there was no significant difference in wound contraction using 10% and 20% concentrations of the extracts in cream. The results also showed the potential usefulness of this model to measure accelerating wound healing.The extracts could perhaps overcome defects associated with healing failure in chronic wounds and prevent secondary bacterial and fungal infections.

  14. The effect of a silver-containing Hydrofiber dressing on superficial wound bed and bacterial balance of chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Pat; Sibbald, R Gary

    2005-12-01

    The treatment of chronic wounds represents a major cost to society and has a profound effect on the participant's quality of life. Chronic wounds may have an increased bacterial burden that can impair healing without all the clinical signs of infection. Silver dressings may provide an alternative topical method to control bacterial burden. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical improvement in chronic wounds through the effect on wound size, maceration, resolution of surface slough and conversion to healthy granulation during a 4-week application of the silver-containing Hydrofiber dressing. This was a single centre, open-label case series study which included a total of 30 evaluable participants: four with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers, 13 venous stasis ulcers, four pressure ulcers and nine miscellaneous wounds that did not fit any of the previous categories. All participants had adequate vascular supply, indicating the potential to heal. The wounds were stalled or had the signs and symptoms consistent with critical colonisation. The underlying cause of the ulceration was identified and corrected, or the symptoms and signs were treated. This was followed by the application of silver-containing Hydrofiber dressings for a period of 4 weeks. The majority of wounds treated decreased in size (70%) with decreased exudate, decreased purulence and resolution of surface slough (75%). There was an increased quality and quantity of healthy granulation tissue. Unlike some silver dressings, the Hydrofiber and silver combination dressing was unlikely to cause burning and stinging on application. Peri-wound maceration was present in 54% of participants at baseline, and 85% of these resolved with this dressing. A desloughing action was seen in those patients with pre-existing slough at baseline and its removal will lower the bacterial burden of the wound. PMID:16618321

  15. Wound healing activities of different extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and burn wound models: an experimental animal study

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    Somboonwong Juraiporn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of Centella asiatica for incision and burn wounds are not fully understood. Here, we report the wound healing activities of sequential hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and water extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and partial-thickness burn wound models in rats. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into incision and burn wound groups. Each group was stratified into seven subgroups: (1 untreated; (2 NSS-; (3 Tween 20®- (vehicle control; (4 hexane extract-; (5 ethyl acetate extract-; (6 methanol extract-; and (7 aqueous extract-treated groups. The test substances were applied topically once daily. The tensile strength of the incision wound was measured on the seventh day after wound infliction. The general appearance and degree of wound healing of the burn wound were assessed on Days 3, 7, 10 and 14 after burn injury and prior to histopathological evaluation. Results On the seventh day after wound infliction, the tensile strength of incision wound in all extract-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the vehicle control (Tween 20®, but comparable to the NSS-treated group. The degrees of healing in the burn wound with the four extracts were significantly higher than that of the control on Days 3, 10 and 14. Histopathological findings on Day 14 after burn injury revealed prominent fibrinoid necrosis and incomplete epithelialization in the control and untreated groups, whereas fully developed epithelialization and keratinization were observed in all extract-treated groups. Analysis by thin layer chromatography demonstrated that the phyto-constituents β-sitosterol, asiatic acid, and asiaticoside and madecassocide were present in the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts, respectively. Conclusions All extracts of Centella asiatica facilitate the wound healing process in both incision and burn wounds. Asiatic acid in the ethyl acetate extract seemed to

  16. Aseptic tissue necrosis and chronic inflammation after irrigation of penetrating hand wounds using Octenisept®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, T; Vögelin, E

    2012-01-01

    Penetrating hand wounds are common and these are managed by thorough debridement. However, stab wounds without evidence of divided structures are often treated with irrigation using antiseptic substances, antibiotic therapy, and immobilization. Octenisept® (Schülke & Mayr Ltd) is a widely used antiseptic agent for disinfection of acute or chronic wounds. It has a broad spectrum of antiseptic efficacy and has become an antiseptic of first choice in many hospitals. Within a few months, four patients presented to us with chronic inflammation and severe tissue necrosis after irrigation of penetrating hand wounds with Octenisept®. Repeated surgery and debridement was required in all patients. Wound healing was prolonged and patients had persisting oedema. Penetrating hand wounds must not be irrigated with Octenisept®.

  17. Shedding Light on a New Treatment for Diabetic Wound Healing: A Review on Phototherapy

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    Nicolette N. Houreld

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired wound healing is a common complication associated with diabetes with complex pathophysiological underlying mechanisms and often necessitates amputation. With the advancement in laser technology, irradiation of these wounds with low-intensity laser irradiation (LILI or phototherapy, has shown a vast improvement in wound healing. At the correct laser parameters, LILI has shown to increase migration, viability, and proliferation of diabetic cells in vitro; there is a stimulatory effect on the mitochondria with a resulting increase in adenosine triphosphate (ATP. In addition, LILI also has an anti-inflammatory and protective effect on these cells. In light of the ever present threat of diabetic foot ulcers, infection, and amputation, new improved therapies and the fortification of wound healing research deserves better prioritization. In this review we look at the complications associated with diabetic wound healing and the effect of laser irradiation both in vitro and in vivo in diabetic wound healing.

  18. Wound Healing Activity of Rubus sanctus Schreber (Rosaceae): Preclinical Study in Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Süntar, Ipek; Koca, Ufuk; Keleş, Hikmet; Akkol, Esra Küpeli

    2011-01-01

    Young shoots of Rubus species have been used for healing of wounds, infected insect bites and pimples in folk medicine for ages. In order to evaluate the wound healing activity of Rubus sanctus, four different extracts were prepared from the whole aerial parts of the plant by using n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. Incision wound healing model by using tensiometer on rats and excision model on mice were employed to assess the activity. Remarkable wound healing activity was observed with the ointment formulation of the methanol extract at 1% concentration on the mentioned models. The results of histopathological examination also supported the outcome of both incision and excision wound models. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with a reference ointment Madecassol. The experimental data confirmed the ethnobotanical usage of R. sanctus.

  19. Wound Healing Activity of Rubus sanctus Schreber (Rosaceae: Preclinical Study in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ipek Süntar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Young shoots of Rubus species have been used for healing of wounds, infected insect bites and pimples in folk medicine for ages. In order to evaluate the wound healing activity of Rubus sanctus, four different extracts were prepared from the whole aerial parts of the plant by using n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanol, respectively. Incision wound healing model by using tensiometer on rats and excision model on mice were employed to assess the activity. Remarkable wound healing activity was observed with the ointment formulation of the methanol extract at 1% concentration on the mentioned models. The results of histopathological examination also supported the outcome of both incision and excision wound models. The wound healing effect was comparatively evaluated with a reference ointment Madecassol. The experimental data confirmed the ethnobotanical usage of R. sanctus.

  20. Effect of laser-pulse structure and wavelength on wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortune, D. S.; Huang, Shan; Bryant, G. L.; Garrett, C. Gaelyn; Reinisch, Lou

    1998-07-01

    We have investigated wound healing of incisions in the buccal mucosa of a canine model created with the Vanderbilt Free Electron Laser tuned to 6.1, 6.45 and 6.8 microns. We have also used a carbon dioxide laser, continuous wave and with a short-pulse structure (100 microseconds) to access wavelength and pulse structure components to wound healing from laser incisions. The tissue was evaluated histologically and with tensiometry acutely and at post operative days 3, 7, and 14. The data indicate that shorter laser pulse durations create less lateral thermal injury and wounds with greater tensile strength, resulting in earlier wound healing. Wound healing was only slightly dependent upon the wavelength of the laser. These results demonstrate that surgical carbon dioxide lasers with a short-pulse structure of approximately 100 microseconds or less could offer more prompt wound healing while maintaining the advantages of a 10.6 micron wavelength laser.

  1. Healing of excisional wound in alloxan induced diabetic sheep: A planimetric and histopathologic study

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    Farshid Sarrafzadeh-Rezaei

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Healing of skin wound is a multi-factorial and complex process. Proper treatment of diabetic wounds is still a major clinical challenge. Although diabetes mellitus can occur in ruminants, healing of wounds in diabetic ruminants has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate healing of ovine excisional diabetic wound model. Eight 4-month-old Iranian Makoui wethers were equally divided to diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Alloxan monohydrate (60 mg kg-1, IV was used for diabetes induction. In each wether, an excisional wound was created on the dorsum of the animal. Photographs were taken in distinct times for planimetric evaluation. Wound samples were taken on day 21 post-wounding for histopathologic evaluations of epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of new blood vessels. The planimetric study showed slightly delay in wound closure of diabetic animals, however, it was not significantly different from nondiabetic wounds (p ≥ 0.05. Furthermore, epidermal thickness, number of fibroblasts and number of blood vessels were significantly lower in diabetic group (p < 0.05. We concluded that healing of excisional diabetic wounds in sheep may be compromised, as seen in other species. However, contraction rate of these wounds may not be delayed due to metabolic features of ruminants and these animals might go under surgeries without any serious concern. However, healing quality of these wounds may be lower than normal wounds.

  2. A Skin Fixation Method for Decreasing the Influence of Wound Contraction on Wound Healing in a Rat Model

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    Seong Hwan Bae

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The elasticity of the back skin of the rat reduced the tension around woundsduring the wound healing process in that region, and thus activates wound contraction. Theauthors proposed two skin fixation methods using readily available materials to decrease theinfluence of wound contraction on wound healing and designed an experiment to determinetheir effects.Methods The authors made 36 skin wounds on the backs of 18 rats, and they divided theminto three groups. Each group was treated with three different kinds of dressing materials,each with different skin fixing characteristics. Group A was a control group. Group B andgroup C were dressed by the first and the second skin fixation method. We measured the areasof the wounds post-surgically and calculated the wound area reduction rates.Results The two skin fixation methods both reduced the effect of wound contractioncompared to the control group. Each of the two methods had different outcomes in reducingwound contraction.Conclusions The experiment demonstrated significant differences among the wound areasand the wound area reduction rates of the three groups as a result of differences in thedegree of wound contraction. To obtain accurate results from wound healing experiments,appropriate skin fixation methods must be adopted.

  3. Cicatrização de feridas Wound healing

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    Antonio Carlos Ligocki Campos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: A cicatrização de feridas consiste em perfeita e coordenada cascata de eventos que culminam com a reconstituição tecidual. O processo cicatricial é comum a todas as feridas, independe do agente que a causou. O processo de cicatrização é dividido didaticamente em três fases: inflamatória, proliferação ou granulação e remodelamento ou maturação. O colágeno é a proteína mais abundante no corpo humano e também é o principal componente da matriz extracelular dos tecidos. Estrutura-se numa rede densa e dinâmica resultante da sua constante deposição e reabsorção. O tecido cicatricial é resultado da interação entre sua síntese, fixação e degradação. Existem várias maneiras de avaliar a cicatrização das feridas. Os métodos mais utilizados atualmente são a tensiometria, a densitometria e morfometria do colágeno, a imunoistoquímica e, mais recentemente, a dosagem de fatores de crescimento. MÉTODOS: Foram revisadas todas as dissertações de mestrado e teses de doutorado realizadas na linha de pesquisa "Cicatrização de órgãos e tecidos" do programa de Pós-Graduação em Clínica Cirúrgica da Universidade Federal do Paraná. Foi realizada, também, revisão atualizada da literatura internacional no Pubmed e nacional. CONCLUSÃO: A cicatrização é um processo complexo, que começou a ser entendido em maior amplitude nos últimos anos. Recentes pesquisas têm sido direcionadas para atuar na modulação da cicatrização a nível molecular, na tentativa de evitar completamente cicatrizes patológicas.BACKGROUND: The wound healing consists of a perfect and coordinated cascade of events that result in tissue reconstitution. The healing process is common to all wounds, independently of the agent that has caused it. It is divided didactically into three phases: inflammation, proliferation or granulation and remodelation or maturation. The collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body and is

  4. Distribution, organization and ecology of bacteria in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirketerp-Møller, Klaus; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Fazli, Mustafa;

    2008-01-01

    contained P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, PNA FISH revealed the structural organization of bacteria in the samples. It appeared that P. aeruginosa aggregated as microcolonies imbedded in the matrix component alginate, which is a characteristic hallmark of the biofilm mode of growth. The present investigation...... suggests that bacteria present within these wounds tend to be aggregated in microcolonies imbedded in a self-produced matrix, characteristic of the biofilm mode of growth. Additionally, we must conclude that there exists no good correlation between bacteria detected by standard culturing methods and those......Between 1 and 2% of the population in the developed world experiences a nonhealing or chronic wound characterized by an apparent arrest in a stage dominated by inflammatory processes. Lately, research groups have proposed that bacteria might be involved in and contribute to the lack of healing...

  5. Enhancement of wound healing with roots of Ficus racemosa L. in albino rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Krishna Murti; Upendra Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish the wound healing activity of aqueous and ethanolic extract of roots ofFicus racemosa (F. racemosa). Methods: Two models were performed to evaluate the wound healing activity i.e. incision and excision models. In incision model the parameter which was carried out was breaking strength of wounded skin. In excision model percentage wound contraction and period of epithelialization were established for both the extracts. Reference standard drug was povidone iodine ointment for comparison with other groups. Results: From the observation in both two models, aqueous extract of F. racemosa was found to have greater wound healing activity in terms of breaking strength in incision model and percentage wound contraction, period of epithelialization in excision model than that of other groups. Conclusions:In conclusion, our findings suggest that aqueous extract of F. racemosa possesses better wound healing ability than the ethanolic extract.

  6. Potential wound healing activity of the different extract of Typhonium trilobatum in albino rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sourav Kanti Roy; Pratyush Kumar Mishra; Subhangkar Nandy; Rana Datta; Bodhisattwa Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To establish the wound healing activity of methanolic, ethyl acetate and chloroform extracts of plant of Typhonium trilobatum. Methods: Two models were performed to evaluate the wound healing activity i.e. excision and incision models. In incision model the parameter which is carried out was breaking strength of the wounded skin. In excision model the percentage wound contraction and period of epithelialization were established for three extracts. Reference standard drug was povidone iodine ointments for comparison with other groups. Results: From the observation in both two models, methanolic and ethyl acetate extract were found greater wound healing activity than chloroform extract in terms of breaking strength in incision model and percentage wound contraction, period of epithelialization in excision model than that of other groups. Conclusions: The results indicate that the different extracts of Typhonium trilobatum has significant wound healing activity.

  7. Microsensor and transcriptomic signatures of oxygen depletion in biofilms associated with chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Garth A; Ge Zhao, Alice; Usui, Marcia; Underwood, Robert A; Nguyen, Hung; Beyenal, Haluk; deLancey Pulcini, Elinor; Agostinho Hunt, Alessandra; Bernstein, Hans C; Fleckman, Philip; Olerud, John; Williamson, Kerry S; Franklin, Michael J; Stewart, Philip S

    2016-03-01

    Biofilms have been implicated in delayed wound healing, although the mechanisms by which biofilms impair wound healing are poorly understood. Many species of bacteria produce exotoxins and exoenzymes that may inhibit healing. In addition, oxygen consumption by biofilms and by the responding leukocytes, may impede wound healing by depleting the oxygen that is required for healing. In this study, oxygen microsensors to measure oxygen transects through in vitro cultured biofilms, biofilms formed in vivo within scabs from a diabetic (db/db) mouse wound model, and ex vivo human chronic wound specimens was used. The results showed that oxygen levels within mouse scabs had steep gradients that reached minima ranging from 17 to 72 mmHg on live mice and from 6.4 to 1.1 mmHg on euthanized mice. The oxygen gradients in the mouse scabs were similar to those observed for clinical isolates cultured in vitro and for human ex vivo specimens. To characterize the metabolic activities of the bacteria in the mouse scabs, transcriptomics analyses of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms associated with the db/db mice wounds was performed. The results demonstrated that the bacteria expressed genes for metabolic activities associated with cell growth. Interestingly, the transcriptome results also indicated that the bacteria within the wounds experienced oxygen-limitation stress. Among the bacterial genes that were expressed in vivo were genes associated with the Anr-mediated hypoxia-stress response. Other bacterial stress response genes highly expressed in vivo were genes associated with stationary-phase growth, osmotic stress, and RpoH-mediated heat shock stress. Overall, the results supported the hypothesis that bacterial biofilms in chronic wounds promote chronicity by contributing to the maintenance of localized low oxygen tensions, through their metabolic activities and through their recruitment of cells that consume oxygen for host defensive processes. PMID:26748963

  8. Amniotic mesenchymal stem cells enhance wound healing in diabetic NOD/SCID mice through high angiogenic and engraftment capabilities.

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    Sung-Whan Kim

    Full Text Available Although human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (AMMs have been recognised as a promising stem cell resource, their therapeutic potential for wound healing has not been widely investigated. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of AMMs using a diabetic mouse wound model. Quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA results revealed that the angiogenic factors, IGF-1, EGF and IL-8 were markedly upregulated in AMMs when compared with adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMs and dermal fibroblasts. In vitro scratch wound assays also showed that AMM-derived conditioned media (CM significantly accelerated wound closure. Diabetic mice were generated using streptozotocin and wounds were created by skin excision, followed by AMM transplantation. AMM transplantation significantly promoted wound healing and increased re-epithelialization and cellularity. Notably, transplanted AMMs exhibited high engraftment rates and expressed keratinocyte-specific proteins and cytokeratin in the wound area, indicating a direct contribution to cutaneous closure. Taken together, these data suggest that AMMs possess considerable therapeutic potential for chronic wounds through the secretion of angiogenic factors and enhanced engraftment/differentiation capabilities.

  9. Effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju-Hua Ye; Jun-Wu Huang; Hong-Yun Shi

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the promoting effect of ozone water rinse on wound healing in rats with Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection.Methods:Wistar male rats were selected as experimental animals and randomly divided into control group, chlorhexidine group and ozone water group,Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds were made and cleaned with normal saline, chlorhexidine and ozone water respectively; would healing of three groups was observed, wound tissue was collected and contents of inflammatory factors, apoptosis molecules and autophagy markers were detected.Results:Wound healing rates of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were higher than that of control group and wound healing time was shorter than that of control group, wound healing rate of ozone water group was higher than that of chlorhexidine group and wound healing time was shorter than that of chlorhexidine group; TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of chlorhexidine group and ozone water group were lower than those of control group, and TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2, Fas, FasL and Beclin-1 contents and LC3Ⅱ/LC3Ⅰ ratios in wound tissue of ozone water group were lower than those of chlorhexidine group.Conclusions:Compared with normal saline and chlorhexidine, ozone water rinse helps to promote wound healing, improve wound healing rate and shorten wound healing time in rats withPseudomonas aeruginosa infection, and meanwhile it can inhibit cell apoptosis and autophagy in the wounds.

  10. Benefits of oral and topical administration of ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. on skin inflammation and wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Lucas, Sophie; Bisson, Jean-Francois; Duffaud, Anais; Nejdi, Amine; Guerin-Deremaux, Laetitia; Baert, Blandine; Saniez-Degrave, Marie-Helene; Rozan, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    The human body is constantly exposed to the risk of traumatic lesions. Chlorella is a green microalgae enriched with nutrients, vitamins, minerals and chlorophyll. In some communities, Chlorella is a traditional medicinal plant used for the management of inflammation-related diseases. ROQUETTE Chlorella sp. (RCs) was investigated by oral administration (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and cutaneous application (2.5, 5.0 and 10.0%) to evaluate its impact in two dermatological disorder models in mice: skin inflammation and wound healing. For skin inflammation, it was administered during 14 days starting one week before the induction of chronic skin inflammation by repeated cutaneous application of 12-Otetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). For wound healing the microalgae was administered by topical application after scarification of the skin until complete wound healing. Results indicated that oral and topical administrations of the two higher doses of RCs had significant effects on macroscopic score of skin inflammation with an efficient effect on microscopic score with cutaneous application. The microalgae had also efficient effect on healing process and duration of wound healing for both administration routes and particularly at the two highest doses of RCs. These findings suggest that administration of RCs by both oral and topical routes appeared to have beneficial effects on skin lesions. PMID:24965517

  11. Recombinant human erythropoietin stimulates angiogenesis and healing of ischemic skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemi, Michele; Galeano, Mariarosaria; Sturiale, Alessio; Ientile, Riccardo; Crisafulli, Costantino; Parisi, Alessandra; Catania, MariaAntonietta; Calapai, Gioacchino; Impalà, Patrizia; Aloisi, Carmela; Squadrito, Francesco; Altavilla, Domenica; Bitto, Alessandra; Tuccari, Giovanni; Frisina, Nicola

    2004-08-01

    Wound healing in ischemic tissues such as flap margins due to inadequate blood supply is still a source of considerable morbidity in surgical practice. Adequate tissue perfusion is particularly important in wound healing. We investigated the effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) on wound healing in an ischemic skin wound model. Sixty-three Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Normal incisional wound and H-shaped double flaps were used as the wound models. Animals were treated with rHuEPO (400 IU/kg) or its vehicle. Rats were killed on different days (3, 5, and 10 days after skin injury) and the wounded skin tissues were used for immunohistochemistry and for analysis of vascular endothelial growth factor content and collagen content. Tissue transglutaminase immunostaining of histological specimens was used as a vascular marker to determine the level of microvessel density. The results showed a higher level of vascular endothelial growth factor protein and an increased microvessel density in ischemic wounds with rHuEPO treatment than the normal incisional wounds and ischemic control wounds. Collagen content was higher in the incisional wounds and in the ischemic wounds with rHuEPO treatment compared with the ischemic control wounds. Our results suggest that erythropoietin may be an effective therapeutic approach in improving healing in ischemic skin wounds.

  12. Community analysis of chronic wound bacteria using 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing: impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance B Price

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial colonization is hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in the non-healing state of chronic wounds. We characterized wound bacteria from a cohort of chronic wound patients using a 16S rRNA gene-based pyrosequencing approach and assessed the impact of diabetes and antibiotics on chronic wound microbiota. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We prospectively enrolled 24 patients at a referral wound center in Baltimore, MD; sampled patients' wounds by curette; cultured samples under aerobic and anaerobic conditions; and pyrosequenced the 16S rRNA V3 hypervariable region. The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed an average of 10 different bacterial families in wounds--approximately 4 times more than estimated by culture-based analyses. Fastidious anaerobic bacteria belonging to the Clostridiales family XI were among the most prevalent bacteria identified exclusively by 16S rRNA gene-based analyses. Community-scale analyses showed that wound microbiota from antibiotic treated patients were significantly different from untreated patients (p = 0.007 and were characterized by increased Pseudomonadaceae abundance. These analyses also revealed that antibiotic use was associated with decreased Streptococcaceae among diabetics and that Streptococcaceae was more abundant among diabetics as compared to non-diabetics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The 16S rRNA gene-based analyses revealed complex bacterial communities including anaerobic bacteria that may play causative roles in the non-healing state of some chronic wounds. Our data suggest that antimicrobial therapy alters community structure--reducing some bacteria while selecting for others.

  13. Survey of bacterial diversity in chronic wounds using Pyrosequencing, DGGE, and full ribosome shotgun sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolcott Benjamin M

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic wound pathogenic biofilms are host-pathogen environments that colonize and exist as a cohabitation of many bacterial species. These bacterial populations cooperate to promote their own survival and the chronic nature of the infection. Few studies have performed extensive surveys of the bacterial populations that occur within different types of chronic wound biofilms. The use of 3 separate16S-based molecular amplifications followed by pyrosequencing, shotgun Sanger sequencing, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis were utilized to survey the major populations of bacteria that occur in the pathogenic biofilms of three types of chronic wound types: diabetic foot ulcers (D, venous leg ulcers (V, and pressure ulcers (P. Results There are specific major populations of bacteria that were evident in the biofilms of all chronic wound types, including Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia spp. Each of the wound types reveals marked differences in bacterial populations, such as pressure ulcers in which 62% of the populations were identified as obligate anaerobes. There were also populations of bacteria that were identified but not recognized as wound pathogens, such as Abiotrophia para-adiacens and Rhodopseudomonas spp. Results of molecular analyses were also compared to those obtained using traditional culture-based diagnostics. Only in one wound type did culture methods correctly identify the primary bacterial population indicating the need for improved diagnostic methods. Conclusion If clinicians can gain a better understanding of the wound's microbiota, it will give them a greater understanding of the wound's ecology and will allow them to better manage healing of the wound improving the prognosis of patients. This research highlights the necessity to begin evaluating, studying, and treating chronic wound pathogenic biofilms as multi-species entities in

  14. The spleen and skin wound healing in Xenopus adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchini, Antonella; Della Rocca, Annalaura; Bertolotti, Evelina

    2016-07-01

    In most vertebrates, the regenerative capacity to restore lost/damage tissues to original structure and functionality decreases at some time during ontogenesis. To evaluate the role of the acquired immunity in the decline of regenerative potential, we examined the cellular responses elicited in the spleen during skin repair in Xenopus adults. Modifications in the architecture were found to be induced and were remarkable 14 days postinjury when the spleen increased significantly in size. In white pulp, the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths were associated with follicles having central light zones, morphologically similar to germinal centers. With the progress of healing, pigment-containing cells were seen to accumulate in both white and red pulp regions. Moreover, compared to controls, the cells immunoreactive to anti-cytokines (TNF-α, TGF-β1) and -iNOS increased from the first days after wounding. The 14th day, the positive cells formed a dense network of reticular cells in central regions of lymphoid follicles and more frequent reactive leukocytes were detected within the red pulp. A higher number of lymphoid cells immunostained with anti-CD3ε were also observed in the perifollicular zone. The results suggest that the spleen of adult frogs is involved in skin wound healing with the expansion of lymphoid compartments. J. Morphol. 277:888-895, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059432

  15. Multigenerational epigenetic adaptation of the hepatic wound-healing response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybel, Müjdat; Hardy, Timothy; Wong, Yi K; Mathers, John C; Fox, Christopher R; Gackowska, Agata; Oakley, Fiona; Burt, Alastair D; Wilson, Caroline L; Anstee, Quentin M; Barter, Matt J; Masson, Steven; Elsharkawy, Ahmed M; Mann, Derek A; Mann, Jelena

    2012-09-01

    We investigated whether ancestral liver damage leads to heritable reprogramming of hepatic wound healing in male rats. We found that a history of liver damage corresponds with transmission of an epigenetic suppressive adaptation of the fibrogenic component of wound healing to the male F1 and F2 generations. Underlying this adaptation was less generation of liver myofibroblasts, higher hepatic expression of the antifibrogenic factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and lower expression of the profibrogenic factor transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) compared to rats without this adaptation. Remodeling of DNA methylation and histone acetylation underpinned these alterations in gene expression. Sperm from rats with liver fibrosis were enriched for the histone variant H2A.Z and trimethylation of histone H3 at Lys27 (H3K27me3) at PPAR-γ chromatin. These modifications to the sperm chromatin were transmittable by adaptive serum transfer from fibrotic rats to naive rats and similar modifications were induced in mesenchymal stem cells exposed to conditioned media from cultured rat or human myofibroblasts. Thus, it is probable that a myofibroblast-secreted soluble factor stimulates heritable epigenetic signatures in sperm so that the resulting offspring better adapt to future fibrogenic hepatic insults. Adding possible relevance to humans, we found that people with mild liver fibrosis have hypomethylation of the PPARG promoter compared to others with severe fibrosis. PMID:22941276

  16. Healing of partial thickness porcine skin wounds in a liquid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuing, K; Eriksson, E; Liu, P; Miller, D R

    1992-01-01

    This study employs a liquid-tight vinyl chamber for the topical fluid-phase treatment of experimental wounds in pigs. Continuous treatment with normal saline significantly reduced the early progression of tissue destruction in partial thickness burns. Uncovered burns formed a deep layer of necrosis (0.49 +/- 0.004 mm, mean +/- SD) although burn wounds covered with empty chambers demonstrated less necrosis (0.14 +/- 0.01 mm), fluid-treated wounds formed no eschar, and little tissue necrosis could be detected (less than 0.005 mm). Topical treatment with hypertonic dextran increased water flux across burn wounds by 0.24 ml/cm2/24 hr (mean, n = 95) over saline-treated wounds during the first 5 days after wounding. When partial thickness burn and excisional wounds were immersed in isotonic saline until healed, the daily efflux of water, protein, electrolytes, and glucose across the wound surface declined during healing to baseline values found in controls (saline-covered unwounded skin). The declining protein permeability was used as a reproducible, noninvasive, endogenous marker for the return of epithelial barrier function. Saline-treated excisional wounds healed within 8.6 +/- 0.6 days (mean +/- SD, n = 27) and burn wounds within 12.1 +/- 1.4 days (mean +/- SD, n = 15). Healing of fluid-treated wounds occurred without tissue maceration and showed less inflammation and less scar formation than healing of air exposed wounds (no attempt was made to compare rates of healing between air- and fluid-exposed wounds). We consider the fluid-filled chamber a potentially very useful diagnostic, monitoring, and delivery system for wound-healing research and for human wound therapy. PMID:1548868

  17. AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF INTRA- UTERINE HEALING OF FETAL RAT WOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔磊; 张群; 钱云良

    2000-01-01

    Objective In order to investigate the fetal scarless wound healing, we developed an in vivo model to observe the process of wound healing occurring in SD-rat fetus. Methods SD-rat fetuses were given full-thickness incisional wounds in the upper lips under ether anesthesia. Wound specimens were removed successively 12,24,48,72h postwounding (PW) from fetus and 1,3,5,7d PW from adult rats for histological examination. Results In the fetus, re-epithelialization of the skin wound was completed by 24h PW, without apparent acute inflammatory response. Regenerated skin wound with normal architecture and elements was completed by 72h postoperation, indistinguishable from the surrounding normal skin. While in the adult rats, the wounds showed an acute inflammatory response resulting in thickened epithelia and scar formation. Conclusion Fetal wound is characterized by rapid and efficient healing without scar formation followed by real skin regeneration.

  18. Identification of biomarkers for footpad dermatitis development and wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juxing eChen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Footpad dermatitis (FPD is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG. Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30 were used as a positive control (POS to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH. Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G 1 to 5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X, type I α1 collagen, type III α1 collagen, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3, and integrin α1 mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05, while mRNA levels of tenascin C, tumor necrosis factor α, Toll-like receptor 4, vascular endothelial growth factor, and IL-1β were increased (P < 0.03 in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After removing paper sheets (LWH, levels of these parameters returned to levels measured in NEG. In summary, these biomarkers were interrelated with dynamic changes of footpad lesion scores

  19. Identification of Biomarkers for Footpad Dermatitis Development and Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juxing; Tellez, Guillermo; Escobar, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    Footpad dermatitis (FPD) is a type of skin inflammation that causes necrotic lesions on the plantar surface of the footpads in commercial poultry, with significant animal welfare, and economic implications. To identify biomarkers for FPD development and wound healing, a battery cage trial was conducted in which a paper sheet was put on the bottom of cages to hold feces to induce FPD of broilers. Day-of-hatch Ross 308 male broiler chicks were fed a corn-soybean meal diet and assigned to 3 treatments with 8 cages per treatment and 11 birds per cage. Cages without paper sheets were used as a negative control (NEG). Cages with paper sheets during the entire growth period (d 0-30) were used as a positive control (POS) to continually induce FPD. Cages with paper sheets during d 0-13 and without paper sheets during d 14-30 were used to examine the dynamic of FPD development and lesion wound healing (LWH). Footpad lesions were scored to grade (G) 1-5 with no lesion in G1 and most severe lesion in G5. Covering with paper sheets in POS and LWH induced 99% incidence of G3 footpads on d 13. Removing paper sheets from LWH healed footpad lesions by d 30. One representative bird, with lesions most close to pen average lesion score, was chosen to collect footpad skin samples for biomarker analysis. Total collagen protein and mRNA levels of tenascin X (TNX), type I α1 collagen (COL1A1), type III α1 collagen (COL3A1), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3), and integrin α1 (ITGA1) mRNA levels were decreased (P < 0.05), while mRNA levels of tenascin C (TNC), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α, Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-1β, and the ratio of MMP2 to all TIMP were increased (P < 0.03) in G3 footpads in POS and LWH compared to G1 footpads in NEG on d 14. These parameters continued to worsen with development of more severe lesions in POS. After paper sheets were removed (i.e., LWH), levels of these parameters gradually or rapidly

  20. Topical Administration of a Connexin43-based peptide Augments Healing of Chronic Neuropathic Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Grek, Christina L.; Prasad, G.M.; Viswanathan, Vijay; Armstrong, David G.; Gourdie, Robert G.; Ghatnekar, Gautam S.

    2015-01-01

    Nonhealing neuropathic foot ulcers remain a significant problem in individuals with diabetes. The gap-junctional protein connexin43 (Cx43) has roles in dermal wound healing and targeting Cx43 signaling accelerates wound reepithelialization. In a prospective, randomized, multi-center clinical trial we evaluated the efficacy and safety of a peptide mimetic of the C-terminus of Cx43, ACT1, in accelerating the healing of chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) when incorporated into standard of care ...