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Sample records for chronic radiation effects

  1. Effects in Plant Populations Resulting from Chronic Radiation Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, Stanislav A.; Volkova, Polina Yu.; Vasiliyev, Denis V.; Dikareva, Nina S.; Oudalova, Alla A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249032, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    environment activates genetic mechanisms, changing a population's resistance to exposure. However, there are ecological situations in which enhanced resistance has not evolved or has not persisted. Consequently, there are good theoretical and practical reasons for more attention being paid to the mechanisms by which populations becomes more radioresistant and to those situations where radio-adaptation appears not to be taking place. Since radio-adaptation plays an important role in response of populations on radiation exposure, this process needs to be incorporated into management programmes. To this very day, the effects of chronic exposure on living organisms and populations remain poorly explored, and represent a much needed field of research. In spite of the long history of the research, we are still far from complete understanding underlying processes in exposed populations. Neglecting field-collected data in favour of simplified short-term experiments that tend to overestimate adverse effects will obviously have detrimental effect for understanding, predicting, and mitigating consequences of the radiation impact on the environment. Much more is to be elucidated in our understanding before we will be able to give an objective and comprehensive assessment of the biological consequences of chronic, low-level radiation exposures to natural plant and animal populations. (authors)

  2. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

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    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    infectious etiology, which are unexpected due to low doses absorbed in those organs and tissues. To analyze the unexpected results recent findings on strong attributability of stomach, liver and cervix cancers to bacterial and viral infections was taken into account. According to IARC, stomach cancer relative risk associated with helicobacter pillory is 5.6, liver cancer relative risks associated with HBV and HCV are 23 and 17 respectively, cervix cancer relative risk associated with HPV is >100. At the same time association of lung cancer, colon cancer and some other common malignancies with infections is either not established or of low significance. To explain observed effects we suggested that excess mortality due to cancer and non-cancer diseases of infectious etiology is associated with radiation exposure of bone marrow due to Sr-90. Irradiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells damages hematopoiesis and suppresses the immune response. Secondary immune deficiency induced by chronic radiation increases susceptibility to the bacterial and viral infections. Such late effect of radiation exposure can be considered within the concept of deterministic tissue reactions. (Under support of UB RAS project 12-P-2-1033). (authors)

  3. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation.

  4. Effects of Chronic Low-Dose Radiation on Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Mari; Cyou-Nakamine, Hiromasa; Zen, Qin; Zen, Yang; Nansai, Hiroko; Amagasa, Shota; Kanki, Yasuharu; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Kaneki, Kiyomi; Taguchi, Akashi; Kobayashi, Mika; Kaji, Toshiyuki; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Miyagawa, Kiyoshi; Wada, Youichiro; Akimitsu, Nobuyoshi; Sone, Hideko

    2016-01-01

    The effects of chronic low-dose radiation on human health have not been well established. Recent studies have revealed that neural progenitor cells are present not only in the fetal brain but also in the adult brain. Since immature cells are generally more radiosensitive, here we investigated the effects of chronic low-dose radiation on cultured human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) derived from embryonic stem cells. Radiation at low doses of 31, 124 and 496 mGy per 72 h was administered to hNPCs. The effects were estimated by gene expression profiling with microarray analysis as well as morphological analysis. Gene expression was dose-dependently changed by radiation. By thirty-one mGy of radiation, inflammatory pathways involving interferon signaling and cell junctions were altered. DNA repair and cell adhesion molecules were affected by 124 mGy of radiation while DNA synthesis, apoptosis, metabolism, and neural differentiation were all affected by 496 mGy of radiation. These in vitro results suggest that 496 mGy radiation affects the development of neuronal progenitor cells while altered gene expression was observed at a radiation dose lower than 100 mGy. This study would contribute to the elucidation of the clinical and subclinical phenotypes of impaired neuronal development induced by chronic low-dose radiation. PMID:26795421

  5. Protective Effects of Lentinan against T Lymphocytes Injury in Mice under Chronic Radiation Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yong; LI Ming-chun; FU Qing-jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lentinan (LTN) on mice exposed to chronic radiation.Methods Animals were divided into three groups (n =10),they were animals exposed to radiation (Rad),normal control animals (Ctr),and irradiated animals treated with LTN (Rad + LTN).Animal model of chronic radiation stress injury was induced by irradiating mice with 60Co γ-ray for 6 weeks from Monday to Friday consecutively.Before radiation,the mice in Rad + LTN group were ip injected with 0.5 mL LTN (0.01 mg/mL),whereas mice in other groups were injected with 0.9% physiological saline.The effects of LTN treatment on irradiated mice were examined by histological analysis on the spleen.The cell numbers and viability of T lymphocytes,which were isolated from the spleen,were determined by Trypan blue staining.Nitric oxide (NO) production and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion in T lymphocytes were also measured.Results Chronic radiation significantly reduced the body weights and the spleen and thymus indexes,associated with reduced T lymphocytes viability and functions,and elevated NO production.Treatment with LTN significantly normalized the elevated NO production,and attenuated the negative outcomes resulting from radiation mentioned above.Conclusion The results suggest that radioprotective effect of LTN may be contributed by improved T lymphocytes viability and functions via regulating the NO and IL-2 production in T lymphocytes.

  6. Protective Effects of Lentinan against T Lymphocytes Injury in Mice under Chronic Radiation Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Yong; LI; Ming-chun; FU; Qing-jie

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of lentinan (LTN) on mice exposed to chronic radiation. Methods Animals were divided into three groups (n = 10), they were animals exposed to radiation (Rad), normal control animals (Ctr), and irradiated animals treated with LTN (Rad + LTN). Animal model of chronic radiation stress injury was induced by irradiating mice with 60 Co γ-ray for 6 weeks from Monday to Friday consecutively. Before radiation, the mice in Rad + LTN group were ip injected with 0.5 mL LTN (0.01 mg/mL), whereas mice in other groups were injected with 0.9% physiological saline. The effects of LTN treatment on irradiated mice were examined by histological analysis on the spleen. The cell numbers and viability of T lymphocytes, which were isolated from the spleen, were determined by Trypan blue staining. Nitric oxide (NO) production and interleukin-2 (IL-2) secretion in T lymphocytes were also measured. Results Chronic radiation significantly reduced the body weights and the spleen and thymus indexes, associated with reduced T lymphocytes viability and functions, and elevated NO production. Treatment with LTN significantly normalized the elevated NO production, and attenuated the negative outcomes resulting from radiation mentioned above. Conclusion The results suggest that radioprotective effect of LTN may be contributed by improved T lymphocytes viability and functions via regulating the NO and IL-2 production in T lymphocytes.

  7. Chronic radiation syndrome

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    Akleyev, Alexander V. [Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation). Clinical Dept.

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive analysis of chronic radiation syndrome, covering epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathoanatomy, diagnosis and treatment. Based on observations in a unique sample of exposed residents of the Techa riverside villages in the Urals. Casts new light on the condition. Of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in chronic radiation syndrome. This book covers all aspects of chronic radiation syndrome (CRS) based on observations in a unique sample of residents of the Techa riverside villages in the southern Urals who were exposed to radioactive contamination in the 1950s owing to releases of liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak Production Association, which produced plutonium for weapons. In total, 940 cases of CRS were diagnosed in this population and these patients were subjected to detailed analysis. The opening chapters address the definition and classification of CRS, epidemiology and pathogenesis, covering molecular and cellular mechanisms, radioadaptation, and the role of tissue reactions. The pathoanatomy of CRS during the development and recovery stages is discussed for all organ systems. Clinical manifestations of CRS at the different stages are then described in detail and the dynamics of hematopoietic changes are thoroughly examined. In the following chapters, principles of diagnosis (including assessment of the exposure doses to critical organs) and differential diagnosis from a wide range of other conditions are discussed and current and potential treatment options, described. The medical and social rehabilitation of persons with CRS is also covered. This book, which casts new light on the condition, will be of value for all practitioners and researchers with an interest in CRS.

  8. Effects of combined exposure of F344 rats to radiation and chronically inhaled cigarette smoke

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    Finch, G.L.; Nikula, K.J.; Barr, E.B. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Nuclear workers may be exposed to radiation in various forms, such as low-LET {gamma}-irradiation or {alpha}-irradiation from inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} particles. These workers may then have increased risk for lung cancer compared to the general population. Of additional concern is the possibility that interactions between radiation and other carcinogens may increase the risk of cancer induction, compared to the risks from either type of agent alone. An important and common lung carcinogen is cigarette smoke. The purpose of this project is to better determine the combined effects of chronically inhaled cigarette smoke and either inhaled {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} or external, thoracic X-irradiation on the induction of lung cancer in rats. Histologic and dosimetric evaluations of rats in the CS + {sup 239}PuO{sub 2} study continue, and the study of CS + X rays is beginning.

  9. The effects of chronic radiation on reproductive success of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata

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    Harrison, F.L.; Anderson, S.L.

    1988-12-01

    The effects of lifetime exposure to chronic irradiation on reproductive success were assessed for laboratory populations of the polychaete worm Neanthes arenaceodentata. Lifetime exposure was initiated upon the spawning of the P1 female and was terminated upon spawning of the F1 female. Groups of experimental worms received either no radiation (controls) or 0.19, 2.1, or 17 mGy/h. The total dose received by the worms was either background or approximately 0.55, 6.5, or 54 Gy, respectively. The broods from the F1 mated pairs were sacrificed before hatching occurred, and information was obtained on brood size, on the number of normal and abnormal embryos, and on the number of embryos that were living, dying, and dead. The mean number of embryos in the broods from the F1 females exposed to lifetime radiation of 0.19 and 2.1 mGy/h was not significantly different from the mean number of embryos from control females; however, the mean number of embryos was different from those F1 females exposed to 17 mGy/h. There was a significant reduction in the number of live embryos in the broods from the F1 mated pairs that were exposed to the lowest dose rate given, 0.19 mGy/h, as well as those exposed to 2.1 and 17 mGy/h. Also, increased percentages of abnormal embryos were determined in the broods of all the radiation-exposed groups. 39 refs., 10 figs., 15 tabs.

  10. Effects of chronic restraint-induced stress on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsube, Takanori; Wang, Bing; Tanaka, Kaoru; Ninomiya, Yasuharu; Varès, Guillaume; Kawagoshi, Taiki; Shiomi, Naoko; Kubota, Yoshihisa; Liu, Qiang; Morita, Akinori; Nakajima, Tetsuo; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2017-01-01

    Both ionizing radiation (IR) and psychological stress (PS) cause detrimental effects on humans. A recent study showed that chronic restraint-induced PS (CRIPS) diminished the functions of Trp53 and enhanced radiocarcinogenesis in Trp53-heterozygous (Trp53(+/-)) mice. These findings had a marked impact on the academic field as well as the general public, particularly among residents living in areas radioactively contaminated by nuclear accidents. In an attempt to elucidate the modifying effects of CRIPS on radiation-induced health consequences in Trp53 wild-type (Trp53(+/+)) animals, investigations involving multidisciplinary analyses were performed. We herein demonstrated that CRIPS induced changes in the frequency of IR-induced chromosomal aberrations (CAs) in splenocytes. Five-week-old male Trp53(+/+) C57BL/6J mice were restrained for 6h per day for 28 consecutive days, and total body irradiation (TBI) at a dose of 4Gy was performed on the 8th day. Metaphase chromosome spreads prepared from splenocytes at the end of the 28-day restraint regimen were painted with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 3. The results obtained showed that CRIPS alone did not induce CAs, while TBI caused significant increases in CAs, mostly translocations. Translocations appeared at a lower frequency in mice exposed to TBI plus CRIPS than in those exposed to TBI alone. No significant differences were observed in the frequencies of the other types of CAs (insertions, dicentrics, and fragments) visualized with FISH between these experimental groups (TBI+CRIPS vs. TBI). These results suggest that CRIPS does not appear to synergize with the clastogenicity of IR.

  11. Effects of chronic exposure to ionising radiation in the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas

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    Fievet, B.; Devos, A.; Voiseux, C.; Leconte-Pradines, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete' Nucleaire (France); Dallas, L.; Jha, A. [University of Plymouth (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-01

    The Cotentin peninsula (Normandy, France) hosts nuclear industry facilities which operate with controlled discharges of radionuclides in the marine environment. Compared to natural radioactivity, the increase by artificial radionuclides is small but constant. As a consequence, marine species are chronically exposed to low additional doses of ionizing radiation (IR). The effects of chronic exposure to radionuclides were investigated in early stages of development of the Japanese oyster Crassostrea gigas. On the basis of literature, mollusks are expected to be particularly resistant to acute IR (UNSCEAR, 1996. Sources and effects of ionizing radiation. Report to the General Assembly, with Scientific Annex. 86 p). Two different chronic exposure conditions consisted in external ({sup 137}Cs) and internal ({sup 241}Am) irradiation for two weeks. Biological endpoints were analyzed in parallel at both the integrated (growth) and molecular (target stress gene expression) levels. To identify potential biological targets of IR, oysters were first exposed to very high dose rates and radionuclide activities with the perspective to reduce the levels and to derive dose-response curves. Although the initial exposure levels ({sup 137}Cs 30 000 μGy.h{sup -1}; {sup 241}Am 57 000 Bq.L{sup -1}) were many orders of magnitude higher than those encountered in the natural environment, no significant change in the measured parameters was observed. This result was surprising because data from the literature showed that exposure of mussel Mytilus edulis to {sup 3}H at lower doses rates (10-100 μGy.h{sup -1}) induced DNA damage in hemocytes (Jha et al., 2005. Impact of low doses of tritium on the marine mussel, Mytilus edulis: Genotoxic effects and tissue-specific bioconcentration. Mutation Research/Genetic Toxicology and Environmental Mutagenesis 586, 47-57). To understand this apparent discrepancy between those two filtering bivalves, a new experiment was performed to compare the response

  12. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  13. EFFECT OF CHRONIC RADIATION ON PLANT-PATHOGEN INTERACTIONS IN 30-KM CHERNOBYL ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriev A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It was established in pot experiments that infection with powdery mildew (Erysiphe graminis DC. f. sp. tritici Em. Marchal and brown rust (Puccinia triticana Erikss. & Henn. of three wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cultivars ('Mironovskaya 808', 'Polesskay 70', and 'Kiyanka' grown from seeds, collected in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, was 1.5–2.0 times higher than that of plants grown from control seeds. On filed plots in the Chernobyl zone, wheat plant resistance to biotic stress was reduced. At artificial infection with brown rusts, the disease development was enhanced on plots with increased radiation background. One of the mechanisms of declined phytoimmunity potential under the action of low doses of chronic irradiation is evidently a reduced activity of plant proteinase inhibitors. Thus, in wheat and rye (Secale cereale L., cv. ‘Saratovskaya’ kernels, their activity reduced by 35–60% as compared to control. Active form and race formation in the population of the grass stem rust causal agent (Puccinia graminis Pers. was observed in the Chernobyl zone. A “new” population of this fungus with high frequency of more virulent clones than in other Ukraine regions was distinguished. The results obtained independently in greenhouse and field trials performed in the Chernobyl zone demonstrated radiation stress influence on the pathogen–plant system. They indicate a necessity of monitoring the microevolutionary processes occurring in both plants and their pathogens under conditions of technogenic stresses.

  14. Protective Effect of Topically Applied Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri Against Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Chronic Skin Damage in Guinea Pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    迟明亮; 曹鹏利; 于国英; 朱莉; 王跃军; 王春波

    2003-01-01

    Polypeptide from Chlamys farreri (PCF) , a topical polypeptide isolated from Chlamys farreri, was used in this experiment aimed to investigate the photoprotective effect of PCF against chronic skin damage induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation. The chronic ultraviolet-irradiated guinea pig model was established, and visible changes in the skin including wrinkling, sagging and erythema were observed. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) in the dorsal skin were determined using biochemical methods. The results showed:(1)PCF (5 % and 20%) could greatly protect the dorsal skin of guinea pig against wrinkling, sagging and erythema induced by UV radiation in a concentration-dependent manner.(2)PCF could reduce MDA formation in the dorsal skin caused by UV irradiation, while increasing the activities of SOD and GSH-px.(3)The differences among the PCF groups and UV model group were significant (P<0.05, P<0.01). These results indicated that topical application of PCF provided broad solar UV spectrum photoprotection; and that the antioxidant property of PCF might play a role in photoprotection.

  15. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spałek M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mateusz Spałek Department of Radiotherapy I, The Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients’ quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF. RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and

  16. Modeling deterministic effects in hematopoietic system caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation in large human cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, Igor V; Veremeyeva, Galina A; Dimov, Georgy P; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Akleyev, Alexander V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2010-09-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system for humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation allows for quantitative description of the initial hematopoiesis inhibition and subsequent increase in the risks of late stochastic effects such as leukemia. This model describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the three blood cell types (leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets). The model parameters are estimated from the results of other experiments. They include the steady-state numbers of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines for an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood cell line, parameters describing the proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity in respect to cell death and non-lethal cell damages. The dynamic model of hematopoiesis is applied to the data on a subcohort of the Techa River residents with hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950-1956 (which totals to about 3,500 exposed individuals). Among well-described effects observed in these data are the slope values of the dose-effect curves describing the hematopoietic inhibition and the dose rate patterns of the fractions of cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia). The model has been further generalized by inclusion of the component describing the risk of late stochastic effects. The risks of the development of late effects (such as leukemia) in population groups with specific patterns of early reactions in hematopoiesis (such as leukopenia induced by ionizing radiation) are investigated using simulation studies and compared to data.

  17. Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishnu Prasad Nelamangala Ramakrishnaiah; Srinivasan Krishnamachari

    2016-01-01

    Chronic haemorrhagic radiation proctitis(CHRP) is a difficult problem faced by the patients following radiation for pelvic malignancy. There is no standardtreatment for this condition, but many methods of treatment are available. The aim of this study was to review the literature to see whether there is an improvement in the available evidence in comparison with previously published systematic reviews in treating patients with CHRP. The Pub Med/Medline database and Google Scholar search was selectively searched. Studies, which treated patients with rectal bleeding due to chronic radiation proctitis or CHRP, were included. Seventy studies were finally selected out of which 14 were randomized controlled clinical trials. Though these studies could not be compared, it could be seen that there was an improvement in the methodology of the studies. There was an objective assessment of symptoms, signs and an objective assessment of outcomes. But, still, there were only a few studies that looked into the quality of life following treatment of CHRP. To increase recruitment to trials, a national registry of cases with established late radiation toxicity would facilitate the further improvement of such studies. Some of the conclusions that could be reached based on the available evidence are 4% formalin should be the first line treatment for patients with CHRP. Formalin and argon plasma coagulation(APC) are equally effective, but formalin is better for severe disease. Refractory patients, not responding to formalin or APC, need to be referred for hyperbaric oxygen therapy or surgery. Radio-frequency ablation is a promising modality that needs to be studied further in randomized trials.

  18. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay

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    Kumar, P.R. Vivek, E-mail: prvkumar06@gmail.com [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Seshadri, M. [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Jaikrishan, G. [Low Level Radiation Research Laboratory, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, IRE Campus, Beach Road, Kollam 691 001, Kerala (India); Das, Birajalaxmi [Low Level Radiation Research Section, Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bio-Science Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in radio adaptive response studied. • PBMCs of subjects from NLNRA and HLNRA were challenged with gamma radiation. • DNA damage and repair in PBMCs was compared using the alkaline comet assay. • Significant reduction in DNA damage in subjects of high dose group from HLNRA noted. • Probable induction of an in vivo radio adaptive response in subjects from HLNRA. - Abstract: This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year{sup −1}), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N = 43, range 1.07 mSv year{sup −1} to 5.55 mSv year{sup −1}) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year{sup −1} to17.41 mSv year{sup −1}), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from

  19. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Tarun; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    2011-11-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications. This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis.

  20. Endoscopic management of chronic radiation proctitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tarun Rustagi; Hiroshi Mashimo

    2011-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy occurs in 5%-20% of patients following pelvic radiotherapy. Although many cases resolve spontaneously, some lead to chronic symptoms including diarrhea, tenesmus, urgency and persistent rectal bleeding with iron deficiency anemia requiring blood transfusions. Treatments for chronic radiation proctitis remain unsatisfactory and the basis of evidence for various therapies is generally insufficient. There are very few controlled or prospective trials, and comparisons between therapies are limited because of different evaluation methods. Medical treatments, including formalin, topical sucralfate, 5-amino salicylic acid enemas, and short chain fatty acids have been used with limited success. Surgical management is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic therapy using modalities such as the heater probe, neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser, potassium titanyl phosphate laser and bipolar electrocoagulation has been reported to be of some benefit, but with frequent complications. Argon plasma coagulation is touted to be the preferred endoscopic therapy due to its efficacy and safety profile. Newer methods of endoscopic ablation such as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy have been recently described which may afford broader areas of treatment per application, with lower rate of complications.This review will focus on endoscopic ablation therapies, including such newer modalities, for chronic radiation proctitis.

  1. Effect of chronic low dose natural radiation in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: Evaluation of DNA damage and repair using the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P R Vivek; Seshadri, M; Jaikrishan, G; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from inhabitants of Kerala in southwest India, exposed to chronic low dose natural radiation in vivo (>1 mSv year(-1)), respond with a radioadaptive response to a challenging dose of gamma radiation. Toward this goal, PBMCs isolated from 77 subjects from high-level natural radiation areas (HLNRA) and 37 subjects from a nearby normal level natural radiation area (NLNRA) were challenged with 2 Gy and 4 Gy gamma radiation. Subjects from HLNRA were classified based on the mean annual effective dose received, into low dose group (LDG) and high dose group (HDG) with mean annual effective doses of 2.69 mSv (N=43, range 1.07 mSv year(-1) to 5.55 mSv year(-1)) and 9.62 mSv (N = 34, range 6.07 mSv year(-1) to 17.41 mSv year(-1)), respectively. DNA strand breaks and repair kinetics (at 7 min, 15 min and 30 min after 4 Gy) were evaluated using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay. Initial levels of DNA strand breaks observed after either a 2 Gy or a 4 Gy challenging dose were significantly lower in subjects of the HDG from HLNRA compared to subjects of NLNRA (2 Gy, P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P = 0.02) and LDG (2 Gy P = 0.01; 4 Gy, P=0.05). Subjects of HDG from HLNRA showed enhanced rejoining of DNA strand breaks (HDG/NLNRA, P = 0.06) during the early stage of repair (within 7 min). However at later times a similar rate of rejoining of strand breaks was observed across the groups (HDG, LDG and NLNRA). Preliminary results from our study suggest in vivo chronic low-level natural radiation provides an initial exposure that allows an adaptation to a subsequent higher radiation exposure, perhaps through improving DNA repair via an unknown mechanism. Therefore, further investigations would be necessary in this population to understand the biological and health effects of chronic low-level natural radiation exposures.

  2. Combined effect of the environmental factors as ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency on the thyroid gland and the immune condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danyarova, L. [Department of Endocrynology, Research Institute of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2012-07-01

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site was the primary testing venue for the Soviet Union's nuclear weapons. It is located on the steppe in northeast Kazakhstan. The tragic situation of the Semipalatinsk region is an acute and chronic radiation, repeated in big and small doses and a total absence of territorial decontamination, created unique conditions for study of the long term influence of the radiation doses on the health of the population. The Semipalatinsk region of the Republic of Kazakhstan belongs also to an area of moderate and pronounced iodine deficiency. The purpose of the research is to study the prevalence of a thyroid gland pathology and the condition of a cytokine immune link that is likely to be influenced by a combine effect of ionizing radiation and a chronic iodine deficiency. 1100 people passed through the investigation and it appears that 56, 75% of them had a thyroid pathology. Thyroid gland functional condition analysis (TSH, FT3, FT4 a-TG, a-TPO) has shown the prevalence of a subclinical hypothyroidism (33%). 28, 8% resulted in the presence of antibodies to thyroglobulin and the thyroid peroxides, whereas in the areas located further to the nuclear range, the percentage was only 13, 0%

  3. The effect of chronic exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA radiofrequency radiation on the incidence of spontaneous tumors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Regina, Marie; Moros, Eduardo G; Pickard, William F; Straube, William L; Baty, Jack; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether chronic exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation from cellular phones increased the incidence of spontaneous tumors in F344 rats. Eighty male and 80 female rats were randomly placed in each of three irradiation groups. The sham group received no irradiation; the Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) group was exposed to 835.62 MHz FDMA RF radiation; and the Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) group was exposed to 847.74 MHz CDMA RF radiation. Rats were irradiated 4 h per day, 5 days per week over 2 years. The nominal time-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) in the brain for the irradiated animals was 0.85 +/- 0.34 W/kg (mean +/- SD) per time-averaged watt of antenna power. Antennas were driven with a time-averaged power of 1.50 +/- 0.25 W (range). That is, the nominal time-averaged brain SAR was 1.3 +/- 0.5 W/kg (mean +/- SD). This number was an average from several measurement locations inside the brain, and it takes into account changes in animal weight and head position during irradiation. All major organs were evaluated grossly and histologically. The number of tumors, tumor types and incidence of hyperplasia for each organ were recorded. There were no significant differences among final body weights or survival days for either males or females in any group. No significant differences were found between treated and sham-exposed animals for any tumor in any organ. We conclude that chronic exposure to 835.62 MHz FDMA or 847.74 MHz CDMA RF radiation had no significant effect on the incidence of spontaneous tumors in F344 rats.

  4. Is argon plasma coagulation an effective and safe treatment option for patients with chronic radiation proctitis after high doses of radiotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Hortelano

    Full Text Available Introduction: In severe cases refractory to medical treatment, APC appears to be the preferred alternative to control persistent rectal bleeding of patients with chronic radiation proctitis. Although successful outcomes have been demonstrated in patients previously treated with moderate doses of radiotherapy, there is reluctance towards its indication due to the concern of severe adverse events in patients treated with high doses of radiation. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and toxicity of APC in the management of bleeding radiation-induced proctitis in patients treated with high doses of radiation for prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Data from 30 patients were treated with APC due to chronic radiation proctitis, were reviewed retrospectively. All cases had prostate cancer and 9 of them (30 % underwent previous radical prostatectomy. The median dose of conformal 3D External Beam Radiotherapy (EBRT delivered was 74 Gy (range 46-76. Median rectal D1cc and D2cc was 72.5 and 72.4 Gy respectively. Median rectal V70, V60 and V40 was 12, 39.5 and 80 %. Cardiovascular and digestive disease, diabetes, smoking behaviour, lowest haemoglobin and transfusion requirements were recorded. Indications for treatment with APC were anemia and persistent bleeding despite medical treatment. Argon gas flow was set at 1.8 l/min with an electrical power setting of 50 W. Results: Median age of all patients was 69.6 years. The median lowest haemoglobin level was 9.6 g/dL. Median time between completion of radiotherapy and first session of APC was 13 months. Ninety-four therapeutic sessions were performed (median 3 sessions. Median time follow-up was 14.5 months (range 2-61. Complete response with resolved rectal bleeding was achieved in 23 patients (77 %, partial response in 5 (16 % and no control in 2 (6 %. No patients required transfusion following therapy. Two patients developed long-term (> 6 weeks grade 2 rectal ulceration and

  5. Fukushima simulation experiment: assessing the effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal 137Cs radiation exposure on litter size, sex ratio, and biokinetics in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Takashi; Fukumoto, Manabu; Todo, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transgenerational effects of chronic low-dose-rate internal radiation exposure after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, 18 generations of mice were maintained in a radioisotope facility, with free access to drinking water containing 137CsCl (0 and 100 Bq/ml). The 137Cs distribution in the organs of the mice was measured after long-term ad libitum intake of the 137CsCl water. The litter size and the sex ratio of the group ingesting the 137Cs water were compared with those of the control group, for all 18 generations of mice. No significant difference was noted in the litter size or the sex ratio between the mice in the control group and those in the group ingesting the 137Cs water. The fixed internal exposure doses were ∼160 Bq/g and 80 Bq/g in the muscles and other organs, respectively. PMID:26825299

  6. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  7. Radiation effects in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    There is a need to understand and combat potential radiation damage problems in semiconductor devices and circuits. Written by international experts, this book explains the effects of radiation on semiconductor devices, radiation detectors, and electronic devices and components. These contributors explore emerging applications, detector technologies, circuit design techniques, new materials, and innovative system approaches. The text focuses on how the technology is being used rather than the mathematical foundations behind it. It covers CMOS radiation-tolerant circuit implementations, CMOS pr

  8. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaylock, B.G. [SENES Oak Ridge Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Theodorakis, C.W.; Shugart, L.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    1996-12-31

    Natural populations have always been exposed to background levels of ionizing radiation; however, with the event of the nuclear age, studies about the effects of higher-than-background levels of ionizing radiation on individuals or populations of organisms became important. Originally, concern was focused on survival after large, acute radiation doses, and numerous studies document the somatic and genetic effects of acute ionizing radiation. However, there is a growing realization that chronic long-term exposure to higher-than-background levels of environmental radiation is more likely than is large acute exposure. Less than 10% of the literature on ionizing radiation effects deals with chronic long-term effects, and very few studies involve natural populations. In 1977, mosquito fish, Gambusia affinis, were experimentally introduced into a 0,45 ha, decommissioned, radioactive waste pond where the measured dose at the sediment-water interface was 1,150 rad/year. One year later, the fecundity of the population had not changed significantly. Eighteen years later, studies of the fish showed an inverse correlation between DNA strand breakage and fecundity in the contaminated pond. More recent studies have provided evidence that genetic diversity of the fish has increased in the contaminated site. These fish also have a greater prevalence of certain DNA banding patterns. Individuals displaying these banding patterns have a higher fecundity and lower degree of DNA strand breakage than individuals with less common banding patterns. Gambusia affinis has apparently adapted to the high background radiation, successfully surviving for approximately 50 generations. 31 refs, 5 figs.

  9. DNA alterations and effects on growth and reproduction in Daphnia magna during chronic exposure to gamma radiation over three successive generations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parisot, Florian [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul [UMR 5805 EPOC – OASU, Station marine d’Arcachon, Université Bordeaux 1, Arcachon 33120 (France); Plaire, Delphine; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France); Alonzo, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.alonzo@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-ENV/SERIS/LECO, Cadarache, St Paul-lez-Durance 13115 (France)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • We exposed three successive generations of Daphnia magna to chronic gamma radiation. • We examined DNA alterations and effects on survival, growth and reproduction. • DNA alterations were accumulated over a generation and transmitted to the progeny. • Effects on survival and reproduction, and delay in growth increased over generations. - Abstract: This study examined chronic effects of external Cs-137 gamma radiation on Daphnia magna exposed over three successive generations (F0, F1 and F2) to environmentally relevant dose rates (ranging from 0.007 to 35.4 mGy h{sup −1}). Investigated endpoints included survival, growth, reproduction and DNA alterations quantified using random-amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction (RAPD-PCR). Results demonstrated that radiation effects on survival, growth and reproduction increased in severity from generation F0 to generation F2. Mortality after 21 days at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} increased from 20% in F0 to 30% in F2. Growth was affected by a slight reduction in maximum length at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F0 and by reductions of 5 and 13% in growth rate, respectively, at 4.70 and 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F2. Reproduction was affected by a reduction of 19% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} in F0 and by a delay of 1.9 days in brood release as low as 0.070 mGy h{sup −1} in F2. In parallel, DNA alterations became significant at decreasing dose rates over the course of F0 (from 4.70 mGy h{sup −1} at hatching to 0.007 mGy h{sup −1} after ∼21 days) and from F0 to F2 (0.070 mGy h{sup −1} at hatching to 0.007 mGy h{sup −1} after ∼21 days), demonstrating their rapid accumulation in F0 daphnids and their transmission to offspring generations. Transiently more efficient DNA repair leading to some recovery at the organism level was suggested in F1, with no effect on survival, a slight reduction of 12% in 21 day-fecundity at 35.4 mGy h{sup −1} and DNA alterations significant at highest

  10. Evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease on a background of chronic cholecystitis with the combined effect of the running of the alternating magnetic fields and low-intensity laser radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyakova E.S.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the characteristic clinical, instrumental and diagnostic criteria of inflammatory periodontal diseases on the background of chronic cholecystitis with subsequent evaluation of the effectiveness of therapeutic measures using the combined action of the running of an alternating magnetic field and low-intensity helium-neon laser. Application low-intensiti laser radiation and a running variable magnetic field in complex treatment of patients periodontitis with cholecystitis expressed anti-inflammatory action allows to stop quickly inflammatory process in periodontium and to reduce treatment terms

  11. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  12. Injury of the blood-testies barrier after low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Young Hoon; Bae Min Ji; Lee, Chang Geun; Yang, Kwang Mo; Jur, Kyu; Kim, Jong Sun [Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    The systemic effect of radiation increases in proportionally with the dose and dose rate. Little is known concerning the relationships between harmful effects and accumulated dose, which is derived from continuous low-dose rate radiation exposure. Recent our studies show that low-dose-rate chronic radiation exposure (3.49 mGy/h) causes adverse effects in the testis at a dose of 2 Gy (6 mGy/h). However, the mechanism of the low-dose-rate 2 Gy irradiation induced testicular injury remains unclear. The present results indicate that low-dose rate chronic radiation might affect the BTB permeability, possibly by decreasing levels of ZO-1, Occludin-1, and NPC-2. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is a risk of male infertility through BTB impairment even with low-dose-rate radiation if exposure is continuous.

  13. Chronic neuroendocrinological sequelae of radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklar, C.A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Constine, L.S. [Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY (United States)

    1995-03-30

    A variety of neuroendocrine disturbances are observed following treatment with external radiation therapy when the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (HPA) is included in the treatment field. Radiation-induced abnormalities are generally dose dependent and may develop many years after irradiation. Growth hormone deficiency and premature sexual development can occur following doses as low as 18 Gy fractionated radiation and are the most common neuroendocrine problems noted in children. Deficiency of gonadotropins, thyroid stimulating hormone, and adrenocorticotropin are seen primarily in individuals treated with > 40 Gy HPA irradiation. Hyperprolactinemia can be seen following high-dose radiotherapy (>40 Gy), especially among young women. Most neuroendocrine disturbances that develop as a result of HPA irradiation are treatable; patients at risk require long-term endocrine follow-up. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. [Evaluation of the risk of delayed adverse effects of chronic combined exposure to radiation and chemical factors with the purpose to ensure safety in orbital and exploration space missions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirkin, A V; Mukhamedieva, L N; Tatarkin, S V; Barantseva, M Iu

    2012-01-01

    The work had the aim to anatomize the existing issues with providing safety in extended orbital and exploration missions for ensuing estimation of actual values of the total radiation risk for the crew, and risks of other delayed effects of simultaneous exposure to ionizing radiation and chemical pollutants in cabin air, and a number of other stressful factors inevitable in space flight. The flow of chronic experiments for separate and combined studies with reproduction of air makeup and radiation doses in actual orbital and predicted exploration missions is outlined. To set safety limits, new approaches should be applied to the description of gradual norm degradation to pathologies in addition to several generalized quantitative indices of adaptation and straining of the regulatory systems, as well as of effectiveness of the compensatory body reserve against separate and combined exposure.

  15. Behavior, physiology, and energy deposition in rats chronically exposed to 2450-MHz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Andrea, J.A.; Gandhi, O.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program was initiated to determine both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the behavioral and physiological consequences of chronic c-w microwave radiation exposure at 2450 MHz in the laboratory rat. Whole-body average and local SARs at discrete sites within the body of rats and mice were determined experimentally using different exposure systems and analytical techniques. The whole-body average SAR and the distribution of SAR within the body depends on a variety of factors: type of exposure system, polarization of the field, size of the animal, and angle of radiation incident on the body. Three experiments were conducted to determine the effects of chronic exposure to 2450-MHz microwave radiation on several measures of rat behavior and physiology. Groups of rats were exposed intermittently to 2450-MHz radiation at power densities of 0.5 mW/sq. cm. or 2.5 mW/sq. cm. for 90 days.

  16. Radiation effects in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrt, D.; Vogel, W. (Otto-Schott-Inst., Chemische Fakultaet, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ., Jena (Germany))

    1992-03-01

    Glass was produced by man about 4000 years ago. The scientific exploration of glass is very young and closely connected with Jena. Fraunhofer, Goethe, Dobereiner, Abbe, Zeiss and Schott are famous names on this field. Both crystals and glasses are solids. However, there are fundamental differences in their properties and behavior. Glass is a thermodynamically unstable state and has a defect structure compared to the crystal. Glass and its properties are subject to a variety of changes under the influence of high energy radiation. In general, effects extend from the reduction of specific ions to the collapse of the entire network. Ultraviolet and X-ray radiation effects on UV-transmitting glasses will be discussed. (orig.).

  17. Chronic low-dose radiation protects cells from high-dose radiation via increase of AKT expression by NF-{sub k}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyung Sun; Seong, Ki Moon; Kim, Ji Young; Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Nam, Seon Young [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Exposure to low-dose and low-dose rate of ionizing radiation is an important issue in radiation protection. Low-dose ionizing radiation has been observed to elicit distinctly different responses compared to high-dose radiation, in various biological systems including the reproductive, immune, and hematopoietic systems (Liu et al. 2006). Some data were reported that low-dose radiation could initiate beneficial effects by stimulating cell growth, DNA repair, activation of transcription factors and gene expression (Calabrese et al., 2004). Cells exposed to low-dose radiation can develop adaptive resistance to subsequent high-dose radiation induced DNA damage, gene mutation, and cell death. We previously reported that low-dose of ionizing radiation induced cell survival through the activation of AKT (protein kinase B, PKB) pathway (Park et al., 2009). AKT has been shown to be potently activated in response to a wide variety of growth factors and ionizing radiation. Cell survival against ionizing radiation seems to be associated with the activation of AKT pathway via phosphorylation of its downstream nuclear target molecules. In the present study, we examined the effects of chronic low-dose irradiation in human lung fibroblast cells. The aim was to explore the possibility of a low-dose radiation-induced adaptive cellular response against subsequent challenging high-dose irradiation. In the present study, we examined the regulatory mechanism responsible for cellular response induced by chronic low-dose of ionizing radiation in normal human cells. We found that the level of AKT protein was closely associated with cell survival. In addition, NF-{sub k}B activation by chronic low-dose radiation regulates AKT activation via gene expression and acinus expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that chronic low-dose radiation could inhibit the cell death induced by cytotoxic high-dose radiation through the modulation of the level of AKT and acinus proteins via NF-{sub k

  18. Oral cholecalciferol versus ultraviolet radiation B: effect on vitamin D metabolites in patients with chronic pancreatitis and fat malabsorption - a randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich C; Matzen, Peter; Benfield, Thomas Lars Vibe;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) often develop fat malabsorption and are susceptible to hypovitaminosis D.......Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) often develop fat malabsorption and are susceptible to hypovitaminosis D....

  19. Modeling hematopoietic system response caused by chronic exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akushevich, Igor V; Veremeyeva, Galina A; Dimov, Georgy P; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Akleyev, Alexander V; Yashin, Anatoly I

    2011-05-01

    A new model of the hematopoietic system response in humans chronically exposed to ionizing radiation describes the dynamics of the hematopoietic stem cell compartment as well as the dynamics of each of the four blood cell types (lymphocytes, neutrophiles, erythrocytes, and platelets). The required model parameters were estimated based on available results of human and experimental animal studies. They include the steady-state number of hematopoietic stem cells and peripheral blood cell lines in an unexposed organism, amplification parameters for each blood line, parameters describing proliferation and apoptosis, parameters of feedback functions regulating the steady-state numbers, and characteristics of radiosensitivity related to cell death and non-lethal cell damage. The model predictions were tested using data on hematological measurements (e.g., blood counts) performed in 1950-1956 in the Techa River residents chronically exposed to ionizing radiation since 1949. The suggested model of hematopoiesis is capable of describing experimental findings in the Techa River Cohort, including: (1) slopes of the dose-effect curves reflecting the inhibition of hematopoiesis due to chronic ionizing radiation, (2) delay in effect of chronic exposure and accumulated character of the effect, and (3) dose-rate patterns for different cytopenic states (e.g., leukopenia, thrombocytopenia).

  20. Analysis of the Effect of Chronic and Low-Dose Radiation Exposure on Spermatogenic Cells of Male Large Japanese Field Mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takino, Sachio; Yamashiro, Hideaki; Sugano, Yukou; Fujishima, Yohei; Nakata, Akifumi; Kasai, Kosuke; Hayashi, Gohei; Urushihara, Yusuke; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Shinoda, Hisashi; Miura, Tomisato; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2017-02-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect of chronic and low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation on spermatogenic cells of large Japanese field mice ( Apodemus speciosus ) after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP) accident. In March 2014, large Japanese field mice were collected from two sites located in, and one site adjacent to, the FNPP ex-evacuation zone: Tanashio, Murohara and Akogi, respectively. Testes from these animals were analyzed histologically. External dose rate from radiocesium (combined (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in these animals at the sampling sites exhibited 21 μGy/day in Tanashio, 304-365 μGy/day in Murohara and 407-447 μGy/day in Akogi. In the Akogi group, the numbers of spermatogenic cells and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive cells per seminiferous tubule were significantly higher compared to the Tanashio and Murohara groups, respectively. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells tended to be detected at a lower level in the Murohara and Akogi groups compared to the Tanashio group. These results suggest that enhanced spermatogenesis occurred in large Japanese field mice living in and around the FNPP ex-evacuation zone. It remains to be elucidated whether this phenomenon, attributed to chronic exposure to LDR radiation, will benefit or adversely affect large Japanese field mice.

  1. Chronic radiation effects on dental hard tissue (''radiation carries''). Classification and therapeutic strategies; Chronische Strahlenfolgen an den Zahnhartgeweben (''Strahlenkaries''). Klassifikation und Behandlungsansaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetz, K.A.; Brahm, R.; Al-Nawas, B.; Wagner, W. [Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Mainz (Germany); Riesenbeck, D.; Willich, N. [Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie -Radioonkologie, Muenster (Germany); Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Alfried-Krupp-Krankenhaus Essen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin; Doerr, W. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Kutzner, J.; Thelen, M. [Universitaetsklinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie/Strahlentherapie, Mainz (Germany)

    2001-02-01

    Objectives: Since the first description of rapid destruction of dental hard tissues following head and neck radiotherapy 80 years ago, 'radiation caries' is an established clinical finding. The internationally accepted clinical evaluation score RTOG/EORTC however is lacking a classification of this frequent radiogenic alteration. Material and Methods: Medical records, data and images of radiation effects on the teeth of more than 1,500 patients, who underwent periradiotherapeutic care, were analyzed. Macroscopic alterations regarding the grade of late lesions of tooth crowns were used for a classification into 4 grades according to the RTOG/EORTC guidelines. Results: No early radiation effects were found by macroscopic inspection. In the first 90 days following radiotherapy 1/3 of the patients complained of reversible hypersensitivity, which may be related to a temporary hyperemia of the pulp. It was possible to classify radiation caries as a late radiation effect on a graded scale as known from RTOG/EORTC for other organ systems. This is a prerequisite for the integration of radiation caries into the international nomenclature of the RTOG/EORTC classification. Conclusions: The documentation of early radiation effects on dental hard tissues seems to be neglectable. On the other hand the documentation of late radiation effects has a high clinical impact. The identification of an initial lesion at the high-risk areas of the neck and incisal part of the tooth can lead to a successful therapy as a major prerequisite for orofacial rehabilitation. An internationally standardized documentation is a basis for the evaluation of the side effects of radiooncotic therapy as well as the effectiveness of protective and supportive procedures. (orig.) [German] Fragestellung: Die rasche Zahnhartgewebszerstoerung nach einer Kopf-Hals-Bestrahlung wurde bereits vor fast 80 Jahren als 'Strahlenkaries' beschrieben und ist seither als klinischer Befund in der Routine

  2. Analysis of Chronic Radiation Sickness Cases in the Population of the Southern Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    radiation were conducted as part of this study, which is a detailed retrospective review of the effects of exposures resulting from either accidental or...chronic coronary number of segmented neutrophils. The number of insufficiency and cerebrovascular sclerosis in 1972; reticular cells, plasmatic cells...osteomuscular system 4 Heart diseases of pulmonary origin 25 Osteomyelitis 4 Ischemic heart disease 10 Cerebrovascular diseases 12 Trauma 22

  3. Effects of radiation; Effets des radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    The medical consequences of a whole-body irradiation come from the destruction of cells and inflammatory reactions it provokes. The most sensitive organs are the tissues that actively split. The embryo is particularly sensitive, from 200 mSv for the effects on the brain development. The reproduction functions are reached for man from 2000 mSv, the ovary sensitivity is less, the oocytes do not split after the fetus life. For adult the bone marrow outrage leads to the disappearing of blood cells (4000 mSv). The doses from 6000 to 10000 mSv lead the failure of the digestive system and lung. for the upper doses every tissue is reached, particularly by the effects on cells of blood vessels. Important brain dysfunctions appear beyond 10000 mSv. As regards the delayed effects of overexposures the epidemiology brings to light sanitary consequences of the exposure of the population to the ionizing radiations and requires that all the possible factors associated for that purpose are considered. About hereditary effects, it appears that moderate acute radiation exposures of even a relatively large human population must have little impact, in spite of the rate of spontaneous congenital deformations is of the order of 6 %. For the induction of cancers, it is not observed excess for doses lower than 200 mSv for adults and 100 mSv for children (the populations studied are survival people of hiroshima and Nagasaki, patients treated by irradiation, uranium miners, children exposed to radioactive iodine after Chernobylsk accident). To simplify an expression of the risk has been fixed to 5% of induced cancer by Sv for population and 4% by Sv for workers, the different being explained by the demography and the sensitivity of the youngest age groups. As regards the low doses of radiations, a bundle of convergent epidemiological observations notices the absence of effects of the low doses rates. Biological mechanisms, notably of repair are approached, then certain accidents (Goiania

  4. Chronic radiation proctopathy:A practical review of endoscopic treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luciano Lenz; Rachel Rohr; Frank Nakao; Ermelindo Libera; Angelo Ferrari

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation proctopathy(CRP) is a troublesome complication of pelvic radiotherapy. The most common presentation is rectal bleeding. CRP symptoms interfere with daily activities and decrease quality of life. Rectal bleeding management in patients with CRP represents a conundrum for practitioners. Medical therapy is ineffective in general and surgical approach has a high morbidmortality. Endoscopy has a role in the diagnosis,staging and treatment of this disease. Currently available endoscopic modalities are formalin,potassium titanyl phosphate laser,neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser,argon laser,bipolar electrocoagulation(BiCAP),heater probe,band ligation,cryotherapy,radiofrequency ablation and argon plasma coagulation(APC). Among these options,APC is the most promising.

  5. Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Chronic Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Peter; Petersen, Marian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This randomized controlled clinical trial investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on chronic pain. DESIGN: A total of 109 patients with nonspecific chronic pain were randomized to either a standardized mindfulness meditation program (mindfulness-based stress reduction [MBSR...

  6. Radiation effects on structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoniem, N.M.

    1991-06-28

    This report discusses the following topics on the effect radiation has on thermonuclear reactor materials: Atomic Displacements; Microstructure Evolution; Materials Engineering, Mechanics, and Design; Research on Low-Activation Steels; and Research Motivated by Grant Support.

  7. Chronic low-dose-rate ionising radiation affects the hippocampal phosphoproteome in the ApoE−/− Alzheimer mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, Stefan; Janik, Dirk; Barjaktarovic, Zarko

    2017-01-01

    Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days with cumula......Accruing data indicate that radiation-induced consequences resemble pathologies of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer´s. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect on hippocampus of chronic low-dose-rate radiation exposure (1 mGy/day or 20 mGy/day) given over 300 days...... with cumulative doses of 0.3 Gy and 6.0 Gy, respectively. ApoE deficient mutant C57Bl/6 mouse was used as an Alzheimer´s model. Using mass spectrometry, a marked alteration in the phosphoproteome was found at both dose rates. The radiation-induced changes in the phosphoproteome were associated with the control...... that several molecular targets induced by chronic low-dose-rate radiation overlap with those of Alzheimer´s pathology. It may suggest that ionising radiation functions as a contributing risk factor to this neurodegenerative disease....

  8. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  9. Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture on radiation protection and measurements: what makes particle radiation so effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Eleanor A

    2012-11-01

    The scientific basis for the physical and biological effectiveness of particle radiations has emerged from many decades of meticulous basic research. A diverse array of biologically relevant consequences at the molecular, cellular, tissue, and organism level have been reported, but what are the key processes and mechanisms that make particle radiation so effective, and what competing processes define dose dependences? Recent studies have shown that individual genotypes control radiation-regulated genes and pathways in response to radiations of varying ionization density. The fact that densely ionizing radiations can affect different gene families than sparsely ionizing radiations, and that the effects are dose- and time-dependent, has opened up new areas of future research. The complex microenvironment of the stroma and the significant contributions of the immune response have added to our understanding of tissue-specific differences across the linear energy transfer (LET) spectrum. The importance of targeted versus nontargeted effects remains a thorny but elusive and important contributor to chronic low dose radiation effects of variable LET that still needs further research. The induction of cancer is also LET-dependent, suggesting different mechanisms of action across the gradient of ionization density. The focus of this 35th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture is to chronicle the step-by-step acquisition of experimental clues that have refined our understanding of what makes particle radiation so effective, with emphasis on the example of radiation effects on the crystalline lens of the human eye.

  10. Radiation-induced cardiovascular effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapio, Soile

    Recent epidemiological studies indicate that exposure to ionising radiation enhances the risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity in a moderate but significant manner. Our goal is to identify molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease using cellular and mouse models. Two radiation targets are studied in detail: the vascular endothelium that plays a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiac function, and the myocardium, in particular damage to the cardiac mitochondria. Ionising radiation causes immediate and persistent alterations in several biological pathways in the endothelium in a dose- and dose-rate dependent manner. High acute and cumulative doses result in rapid, non-transient remodelling of the endothelial cytoskeleton, as well as increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation of the heart tissue, independent of whether exposure is local or total body. Proteomic and functional changes are observed in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, mitochondrial function (respiration, ROS production etc.), oxidative stress, cellular adhesion, and cellular structure. The transcriptional regulators Akt and PPAR alpha seem to play a central role in the radiation-response of the endothelium and myocardium, respectively. We have recently started co-operation with GSI in Darmstadt to study the effect of heavy ions on the endothelium. Our research will facilitate the identification of biomarkers associated with adverse cardiac effects of ionising radiation and may lead to the development of countermeasures against radiation-induced cardiac damage.

  11. Analysis of reproductive function in persons exposed to chronic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kossenko, M.M.; Ostroumova, E.V.; Vyushkova, O.V. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the reproductive function in individuals exposed to radiation in the riverside villages on the Techa in the Southern Urals. The exposure of the population, numbering 28000, occurred in 1950-1956 as a result of discharges into the river of radioactive wastes from the Mayak facility for processing weapon plutonium. The residents were exposed to chronic radiation, both external and internal. The range of exposure doses to gonads was sufficiently wide: 20-1270 mSv. However, the distribution of doses among the exposed individuals was ununiform, and the proportion of people whose dose was below 120 mGy accounted for 74%. The following characteristics of exposed women were analyzed: menstrual function, outcomes of pregnancy, birth rates, health status for newborns. The analysis of the menstrual function in exposed women showed that in persons exposed in childhood, menarche was registered at the age of 14.3 years, on the average (based on literature sources, menarche is attained at the age of 13 for unexposed population). The mean age at menopause was 47.9 years for exposed women (the respective mean value for Russia is 50.8 years). Pregnancy outcomes were analyzed in 9000 exposed women. The rate of medical and criminal abortions was estimated as 79 per 100 labors. The rate of spontaneous abortions for exposed women was slightly higher, 3.11%, than for controls, 2.30%; these difference, however, were statistically insignificant. The total loss of fetus or neonate (unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy: spontaneous abortions, stillbirths, early neonatal death) was estimated to be 4.58% at zero dose. Exposure to gonads at the dose 1 Sv, estimated using the above-indicated method, yielded 3% of additional unfavorable outcomes of pregnancy. It was shown, based on the analysis of birth rates for the Techa Cohort that they had not undergone any essential changes over the first 25 years of exposure compared to the respective coefficients for

  12. Radiation Effects in Carbon Nanoelectronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory D. Cress

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally investigate the effects of Co-60 irradiation on the electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube and graphene field-effect transistors. We observe significant differences in the radiation response of devices depending on their irradiation environment, and confirm that, under controlled conditions, standard dielectric hardening approaches are applicable to carbon nanoelectronics devices.

  13. Genetic effects of radiation. [Extrapolation of mouse data to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates.

  14. Radiation effects on video imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, G. J.; Bujnosek, J. J.; Jaramillo, S. A.; Walton, R. B.; Martinez, T. M.

    1986-02-01

    Radiation senstivity of several photoconductive, photoemissive, and solid state silicon-based video imagers was measured by analysing stored photo-charge induced by irradiation with continuous and pulsed sources of high energy photons and neutrons. Transient effects as functions of absorbed dose, dose rate, fluences, and ionizing particle energy are presented.

  15. [Radiation situation prognosis for deep space: reactions of water and living systems to chronic low-dose ionizing irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, I B; Tsetlin, V V; Moisa, S S

    2013-01-01

    The authors review the findings of researches into the effects of low-dose ionizing irradiation on diverse biological objects (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger, Spirostomum ambiguum Ehrbg., mesenchymal stem cells from mouse marrow, dry higher plants seeds, blood lymphocytes from pilots and cosmonauts). Model experiments with chronic exposure to ionizing radiation doses comparable with the measurements inside orbital vehicles and estimations for trips through the interplanetary space resulted in morphological disorders (embryonic Japanese quails, Aspergillus niger), radiation hormesis (Aspergillus niger, MSCs from mouse marrow), increase in the seed germination rate, inhibition of Spirostomum spontaneous activity, DNA damages, chromosomal aberrations, and increase of the blood lymphocytes reactivity to additional radiation loading. These facts give grounds to assume that the crucial factor in the radiation outcomes is changes in liquid medium. In other words, during extended orbiting within the magnetosphere region and interplanetary missions ionizing radiation affects primarily liquids of organism and, secondarily, its morphofunctional structures.

  16. Radiation Effects in Refractory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, Steven J.; Wiffen, F. W.

    2004-02-01

    In order to achieve the required low reactor mass per unit electrical power for space reactors, refractory alloys are essential due to their high operating temperature capability that in turn enables high thermal conversion efficiencies. One of the key issues associated with refractory alloys is their performance in a neutron irradiation environment. The available radiation effects data are reviewed for alloys based on Mo, W, Re, Nb and Ta. The largest database is associated with Mo alloys, whereas Re, W and Ta alloys have the least available information. Particular attention is focused on Nb-1Zr, which is a proposed cladding and structural material for the reactor in the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. All of the refractory alloys exhibit qualitatively similar temperature-dependent behavior. At low temperatures up to ~0.3TM, where TM is the melting temperature, the dominant effect of radiation is to produce pronounced radiation hardening and concomitant loss of ductility. The radiation hardening also causes a dramatic decrease in the fracture toughness of the refractory alloys. These low temperature radiation effects occur at relatively low damage levels of ~0.1 displacement per atom, dpa (~2×1024 n/m2, E>0.1 MeV). As a consequence, operation at low temperatures in the presence of neutron irradiation must be avoided for all refractory alloys. At intermediate temperatures (0.3 to 0.6 TM), void swelling and irradiation creep are the dominant effects of irradiation. The amount of volumetric swelling associated with void formation in refractory alloys is generally within engineering design limits (>10 dpa). Very little experimental data exist on irradiation creep of refractory alloys, but data for other body centered cubic alloys suggest that the irradiation creep will produce negligible deformation for near-term space reactor applications.

  17. Alteration of cytokine profiles in mice exposed to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Suk Chul [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Mi [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Yu Mi [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kwanghee [Global Research Lab, BAERI Institute, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cha Soon; Yang, Kwang Hee; Jin, Young-Woo [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Soon [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Haeundae Paik Hospital, Inje University, Busan 612-030 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee Sun, E-mail: hskimdvm@khnp.co.kr [Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., 388-1, Ssangmun-dong, Dobong-gu, Seoul 132-703 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-07-09

    While a high-dose of ionizing radiation is generally harmful and causes damage to living organisms, a low-dose of radiation has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of animal models. To understand the basis for the effect of low-dose radiation in vivo, we examined the cellular and immunological changes evoked in mice exposed to low-dose radiation at very low (0.7 mGy/h) and low (3.95 mGy/h) dose rate for the total dose of 0.2 and 2 Gy, respectively. Mice exposed to low-dose radiation, either at very low- or low-dose rate, demonstrated normal range of body weight and complete blood counts. Likewise, the number and percentage of peripheral lymphocyte populations, CD4{sup +} T, CD8{sup +} T, B, or NK cells, stayed unchanged following irradiation. Nonetheless, the sera from these mice exhibited elevated levels of IL-3, IL-4, leptin, MCP-1, MCP-5, MIP-1{alpha}, thrombopoietin, and VEGF along with slight reduction of IL-12p70, IL-13, IL-17, and IFN-{gamma}. This pattern of cytokine release suggests the stimulation of innate immunity facilitating myeloid differentiation and activation while suppressing pro-inflammatory responses and promoting differentiation of naive T cells into T-helper 2, not T-helper 1, types. Collectively, our data highlight the subtle changes of cytokine milieu by chronic low-dose {gamma}-radiation, which may be associated with the functional benefits observed in various experimental models.

  18. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  19. Radiative effects of tropospheric ionisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. L. Aplin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing evidence that cosmic ray variations may influence clouds and climate, there has been little discussion of the direct radiative effects of atmospheric ionisation. Laboratory experiments show that hydrated molecular cluster-ions, formed in the atmosphere by cosmic rays, absorb in the infra-red continuum at wavelengths of 9–12 μm. The tropospheric magnitude of this effect is estimated: transmittance anomalies from clear sky ion concentrations peak at ~2% at 10 km in the mid-latitudes. A simple isothermal clear sky atmospheric model suggests the integrated effect of the absorption is ~2 Wm−2. The effect appears detectable in existing surface data sets; surface micrometeorological data shows a significant anticorrelation between downwelling infra-red radiation and atmospheric cosmic ray ionisation. This is consistent with the infra-red attenuation observed in laboratory studies of cluster-ion absorption. If atmospheric ionisation from cosmic rays has universally direct radiative effects, then reinterpretation of satellite cloud data may be necessary.

  20. Radiation effects in reconfigurable FPGAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Heather

    2017-04-01

    Field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) are co-processing hardware used in image and signal processing. FPGA are programmed with custom implementations of an algorithm. These algorithms are highly parallel hardware designs that are faster than software implementations. This flexibility and speed has made FPGAs attractive for many space programs that need in situ, high-speed signal processing for data categorization and data compression. Most commercial FPGAs are affected by the space radiation environment, though. Problems with TID has restricted the use of flash-based FPGAs. Static random access memory based FPGAs must be mitigated to suppress errors from single-event upsets. This paper provides a review of radiation effects issues in reconfigurable FPGAs and discusses methods for mitigating these problems. With careful design it is possible to use these components effectively and resiliently.

  1. Cellular Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    8217-- - - .- . - .- ’*-_- - 7 - r - .STUDIES OF EXPOSURE TO AMPLITUDE-MODULATED FIELDS The electromagnetic fields to which naval personnel are exposed tend to...radiation) ,.- Biological effects of electromagnetic fields , 20. ABSTRACT (Contimee an revers side II neceesmv aiId identify by Wek numbe") , .P-Giant...cells of characean algae were examined for electrophysiological sequelae to acute electromagnetic field irradiation at 10 mW/cm Carrier frequencies

  2. Telomere Length in Aged Mayak PA Nuclear Workers Chronically Exposed to Internal Alpha and External Gamma Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherthan, Harry; Sotnik, Natalia; Peper, Michel; Schrock, Gerrit; Azizova, Tamara; Abend, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Telomeres consist of GC-rich DNA repeats and the "shelterin" protein complex that together protect chromosome ends from fusion and degradation. Telomeres shorten with age due to incomplete end replication and upon exposure to environmental and intrinsic stressors. Exposure to ionizing radiation is known to modulate telomere length. However, the response of telomere length in humans chronically exposed to radiation is poorly understood. Here, we studied relative telomere length (RTL) by IQ-FISH to leukocyte nuclei in a group of 100 workers from the plutonium production facility at the Mayak Production Association (PA) who were chronically exposed to alpha-emitting ((239)Pu) radiation and/or gamma (photon) radiation, and 51 local residents serving as controls, with a similar mean age of about 80 years. We applied generalized linear statistical models adjusted for age at biosampling and the second exposure type on a linear scale and observed an age-dependent telomere length reduction. In those individuals with the lowest exposure, a significant reduction of about 20% RTL was observed, both for external gamma radiation (≤1 Gy) and internal alpha radiation (≤0.05-0.1 Gy to the red bone marrow). In highly exposed individuals (>0.1 Gy alpha, 1-1.5 Gy gamma), the RTL was similar to control. Stratification by gender revealed a significant (∼30%) telomere reduction in low-dose-exposed males, which was absent in females. While the gender differences in RTL may reflect different working conditions, lifestyle and/or telomere biology, absence of a dose response in the highly exposed individuals may reflect selection against cells with short telomeres or induction of telomere-protective effects. Our observations suggest that chronic systemic exposure to radiation leads to variable dose-dependent effects on telomere length.

  3. Analysis of chronic radiation exposure at small doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestinina, L.Y. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the late effects of radiation exposure among residents of settlements located on the territory of the East-Urals Radiation Trace (EURT) in the Southern Urals. In 1957 an explosion occurred at the depot of radioactive waste in the Southern Urals. An area of 23000 km{sup 2} was contaminated, with contamination density of over 0.1 Ci/m{sup 2} for {sup 90}Sr. There were 217 populated ares on that territory with total population about 270000. The residents of 22 villages with contamination density of over 4 Ci/km{sup 2} for {sup 90}Sr were evacuated. The times of evacuation differed from 7 to 670 days since the accident, depending on the level of contamination. In 1988-1993 an individualized registry was created at the Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine (URCRM) which included information on the residents of 22 evacuated villages and a proportion of unevacuated residents of the EURT area. Currently, the registry contains data on 30000 residents. Of that number 17000 persons were born before, and 12000 after the accident (including about 9000 offspring of exposed residents evacuated from the EURT, and about 3000 persons who were born after the accident and have been living permanently in the EURT area). Over the 35-year period since the accident the residents have received mean effective doses ranging from 23 to 530 mSv. The mean effective doses received by permanent residents range from 5 to 60 mSv. The cohort of people exposed on the EURT territory was identified based on the information contained in the registry. If a person happened to be in the EURT area at the time of the accident, he/she was considered to be eligible for inclusion in the cohort. Over the 35-year period (from 1957 through 1992) 29.5% of 17872 residents died, and 35% of the original cohort were lost to follow-up for different reasons. To enable an analysis a control group was established which included residents of villages located outside, but close

  4. Environmental Radiation Effects on Mammals A Dynamical Modeling Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    This text is devoted to the theoretical studies of radiation effects on mammals. It uses the framework of developed deterministic mathematical models to investigate the effects of both acute and chronic irradiation in a wide range of doses and dose rates on vital body systems including hematopoiesis, small intestine and humoral immunity, as well as on the development of autoimmune diseases. Thus, these models can contribute to the development of the system and quantitative approaches in radiation biology and ecology. This text is also of practical use. Its modeling studies of the dynamics of granulocytopoiesis and thrombocytopoiesis in humans testify to the efficiency of employment of the developed models in the investigation and prediction of radiation effects on these hematopoietic lines. These models, as well as the properly identified models of other vital body systems, could provide a better understanding of the radiation risks to health. The modeling predictions will enable the implementation of more ef...

  5. Expression of blood serum proteins and lymphocyte differentiation clusters after chronic occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybkina, Valentina L; Azizova, Tamara V; Scherthan, Harry; Meineke, Viktor; Doerr, Harald; Adamova, Galina V; Teplyakova, Olga V; Osovets, Sergey V; Bannikova, Maria V; Zurochka, Alexander V

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to assess effects of chronic occupational exposure on immune status in Mayak workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). The study cohort consists of 77 workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays at total dose from 0.5 to 3.0 Gy (14 individuals) and workers with combined exposure (external gamma-rays at total dose range 0.7-5.1 Gy and internal alpha-radiation from incorporated plutonium with a body burden of 0.3-16.4 kBq). The control group consists of 43 age- and sex-matched individuals who never were exposed to IR, never involved in any cleanup operations following radiation accidents and never resided at contaminated areas. Enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry were used to determine the relative concentration of lymphocytes and proteins. The concentrations of T-lymphocytes, interleukin-8 and immunoglobulins G were decreased in external gamma-exposed workers relative to control. Relative concentrations of NKT-lymphocytes, concentrations of transforming growth factor-β, interferon gamma, immunoglobulins A, immunoglobulins M and matrix proteinase-9 were higher in this group as compared with control. Relative concentrations of T-lymphocytes and concentration of interleukin-8 were decreased, while both the relative and absolute concentration of natural killers, concentration of immunoglobulins A and M and matrix proteinase-9 were increased in workers with combined exposure as compared to control. An inverse linear relation was revealed between absolute concentration of T-lymphocytes, relative and absolute concentration of T-helpers cells, concentration of interferon gamma and total absorbed dose from external gamma-rays in exposed workers. For workers with incorporated plutonium, there was an inverse linear relation of absolute concentration of T-helpers as well as direct linear relation of relative concentration of NKT-lymphocytes to total absorbed red bone marrow dose from internal alpha-radiation. In all, chronic

  6. Effects of radiation on carbapenems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Semra; Polat, Mustafa; Korkmaz, Mustafa

    In the present work, effects of gamma radiation on solid meropenem trihydrate (MPT), which is the active ingredient of carbapenem antibiotics, were investigated by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Irradiated MPT presents an ESR spectrum consisting of many resonance peaks. Heights measured with respect to the spectrum baseline of these resonance peaks were used to explore the evolutions of the radicalic species responsible for the experimental spectrum under different conditions. Variations of the denoted 11 peak heights with microwave power, sample temperature and applied radiation doses and decay of the involved radicalic species at room and at high temperatures were studied. On the basis of the results derived from these studies, a molecular model consisting of the presence of four different radicalic species was proposed, and spectroscopic parameters of these species were calculated through spectrum simulation calculations. The dosimetric potential of MPT was also explored and it was concluded that MPT presents the characteristics of normal and accidental dosimetric materials.

  7. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  8. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Thomé

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to outstanding physicochemical properties, ceramics are key engineering materials in many industrial domains. The evaluation of the damage created in ceramics employed in radiative media is a challenging problem for electronic, space, and nuclear industries. In this latter field, ceramics can be used as immobilization forms for radioactive wastes, inert fuel matrices for actinide transmutation, cladding materials for gas-cooled fission reactors, and structural components for fusion reactors. Information on the radiation stability of nuclear materials may be obtained by simulating the different types of interactions involved during the slowing down of energetic particles with ion beams delivered by various types of accelerators. This paper presents a review of the radiation effects occurring in nuclear ceramics, with an emphasis on recent results concerning the damage accumulation processes. Energetic ions in the KeV-GeV range are used to explore the nuclear collision (at low energy and electronic excitation (at high energy regimes. The recovery by electronic excitation of the damage created by ballistic collisions (SHIBIEC process is also addressed.

  9. RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIMOS,N.

    2007-05-30

    Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

  10. Ionizing radiation exposures in treatments of solid neoplasms are not associated with subsequent increased risks of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Sachs, Rainer K; Gale, Robert Peter; Smith, Mitchell R; Hill, Brian T

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation is not thought to cause chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Challenging this notion are recent data suggesting CLL incidence may be increased by radiation exposure from the atomic bombs (after many decades), uranium mining and nuclear power facility accidents. To assess the effects of therapeutic ionizing radiation for the treatment of solid neoplasms we studied CLL risks in data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program. Specifically, we compared the risks of developing CLL in persons with a 1(st) non-hematologic cancer treated with or without ionizing radiation. We controlled for early detection effects on CLL risk induced by surveillance after 1(st) cancer diagnoses by forming all-time cumulative CLL relative risks (RR). We estimate such CLL RR to be 1.20 (95% confidence interval, 1.17, 1.23) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with ionizing radiation and 1.00 (0.96, 1.05) for persons whose 1(st) cancer was treated with ionizing radiations. These results imply that diagnosis of a solid neoplasm is associated with an increased risk of developing CLL only in persons whose 1(st) cancer was not treated with radiation therapy.

  11. Effects of radiation on laser diodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phifer, Carol Celeste

    2004-09-01

    The effects of ionizing and neutron radiation on the characteristics and performance of laser diodes are reviewed, and the formation mechanisms for nonradiative recombination centers, the primary type of radiation damage in laser diodes, are discussed. Additional topics include the detrimental effects of aluminum in the active (lasing) volume, the transient effects of high-dose-rate pulses of ionizing radiation, and a summary of ways to improve the radiation hardness of laser diodes. Radiation effects on laser diodes emitting in the wavelength region around 808 nm are emphasized.

  12. Applying radiation health effects data to radiation protection policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckerheide, James [Center for Nuclear Technology and Society at WPI, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2000-05-01

    Data from the peer-reviewed scientific literature establish a sound basis to define a low-dose, low-dose-rate, dose-response. These data include human health dose-response studies; immunologically 'whole' animal studies; and cellular and molecular biological studies of complete biological systems for the relevant immunological and physiological responses. Initiatives are required to constructively apply these data to both radiation research and radiation protection policies. First, current low level radiation health effects research must apply existing data to define research projects to integrate and confirm existing dose-response data, with specific emphasis on the biological bases that exist in definitive and reproducible cellular and biological dose-response. Second, dose-response assessment must identify and incorporate all existing substantial and confirmed data, including natural radiation sources, to establish the bases for radiation protection policy for interventions to protect public health and safety. A preliminary assessment of these data is applied to: 1) Specify research that can be constructively applied to describe radiation health effects dose-response. 2) Apply health effects dose-response to radiation and radioactivity applications policies to maximize radiation health effects interventions for occupational applications, medical applications, and other radiation and radioactive materials applications controls to cost-effectively assure public health and safety. An assessment of the proposed revisions to ICRP radiation protection policies is provided that associates the basis for administrative limits with the previous proposal of the US NRC for a 'Below Regulatory Concern' (BRC) policy. This proposal ignores the context of the fact that very low levels of radiation exposure are far within the variations of natural radiation exposures, and therefore can have no gross net consequences. The equivalent failure of the BRC proposal

  13. Radiation safety protocol for high dose 131I therapy of thyroid carcinoma in patients on hemodialysis for chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarresifar, Homayoun; Almodovar, Samuel; Bass, William B; Ojha, Buddhiwardhan

    2007-02-01

    Iodine ablation therapy for thyroid cancer on patients receiving dialysis poses unique radiation safety challenges. Exposure to gamma and beta negative particles by the hemodialysis (HD) staff is a concern that has not been well studied. A 53-y-old male patient on HD for chronic renal failure was scheduled for 131I high dose therapy as treatment for thyroid papillary carcinoma. The patient was on HD every other day, prior to ablation. A high dose of 131I (3,607.5 MBq) was required. The patient was admitted for 131I therapy, and continued HD. Thyroid cancer ablation therapy was administered according to our institutional protocol. New radiation safety measures were developed and implemented in order to give the patient an optimal treatment dose, reduce radiation to the patient (critical organs and whole body), and to protect the HD personnel. This included placing two lead shields between the patient and the HD nurse, and HD monitoring by two alternating nurses to reduce their radiation exposure. Film badges were used to measure radiation exposure to the nursing staff. Dosimetry calculations were obtained to determine radiation absorbed doses by the optic lens, skin, and whole body. Quality control verification for this shielding arrangement proved to be effective in protecting the HD staff against gamma and beta negative radiation from recent 131I high dose therapy. Implementation of this model proved to be an effective and adequate radiation safety protocol for limiting radiation exposure to the HD staff. The patient was given 3607.5 MBq for optimal treatment after HD. Hemodialysis was repeated after approximately 48 and 96 h to remove excess 131I and reduce radiation to the patient.

  14. Radiation effects in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begay, F.; Rosen, L.; Petersen, D.F.; Mason, C.; Travis, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Yazzie, A. [Navajo Nation, Window Rock, AZ (United States). Dept. of History; Isaac, M.C.P.; Seaborg, G.T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Leavitt, C.P. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1999-04-01

    Although the Navajo possess substantial resource wealth-coal, gas, uranium, water-this potential wealth has been translated into limited permanent economic or political power. In fact, wealth or potential for wealth has often made the Navajo the victims of more powerful interests greedy for the assets under limited Navajo control. The primary focus for this education workshop on the radiation effects in the environment is to provide a forum where scientists from the nuclear science and technology community can share their knowledge toward the advancement and diffusion of nuclear science and technology issues for the Navajo public. The scientists will make an attempt to consider the following basic questions; what is science; what is mathematics; what is nuclear radiation? Seven papers are included in this report: Navajo view of radiation; Nuclear energy, national security and international stability; ABC`s of nuclear science; Nuclear medicine: 100 years in the making; Radon in the environment; Bicarbonate leaching of uranium; and Computational methods for subsurface flow and transport. The proceedings of this workshop will be used as a valuable reference materials in future workshops and K-14 classrooms in Navajo communities that need to improve basic understanding of nuclear science and technology issues. Results of the Begay-Stevens research has revealed the existence of strange and mysterious concepts in the Navajo Language of nature. With these research results Begay and Stevens prepared a lecture entitled The Physics of Laser Fusion in the Navajo language. This lecture has been delivered in numerous Navajo schools, and in universities and colleges in the US, Canada, and Alaska.

  15. Environmental Radiation Effects: A Need to Question Old Paradigms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, T.G.; Bedford, J.; Ulsh, B.; Whicker, F. Ward

    2003-03-27

    A historical perspective is given of the current paradigm that does not explicitly protect the environment from radiation, but instead, relies on the concept that if dose limits are set to protect humans then the environment is automatically protected as well. We summarize recent international questioning of this paradigm and briefly present three different frameworks for protecting biota that are being considered by the U.S. DOE, the Canadian government and the International Commission on Radiological Protection. We emphasize that an enhanced collaboration is required between what has traditionally been separated disciplines of radiation biology and radiation ecology if we are going to properly address the current environmental radiation problems. We then summarize results generated from an EMSP grant that allowed us to develop a Low Dose Irradiation Facility that specifically addresses effects of low-level, chronic irradiation on multiple levels of biological organization.

  16. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  17. Studies of adaptive response and mutation induction in MCF-10A cells following exposure to chronic or acute ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesh, Sara Shakeri; Sangsuwan, Traimate; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2015-10-01

    A phenomenon in which exposure to a low adapting dose of radiation makes cells more resistant to the effects of a subsequent high dose exposure is termed radio-adaptive response. Adaptive response could hypothetically reduce the risk of late adverse effects of chronic or acute radiation exposures in humans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of such responses is of relevance for radiation protection as well as for the clinical applications of radiation in medicine. However, due to the variability of responses depending on the model system and radiation condition, there is a need to further study under what conditions adaptive response can be induced. In this study, we analyzed if there is a dose rate dependence for the adapting dose, assuming that the adapting dose induces DNA response/repair pathways that are dose rate dependent. MCF-10A cells were exposed to a 50mGy adapting dose administered acutely (0.40Gy/min) or chronically (1.4mGy/h or 4.1mGy/h) and then irradiated by high acute challenging doses. The endpoints of study include clonogenic cell survival and mutation frequency at X-linked hprt locus. In another series of experiment, cells were exposed to 100mGy and 1Gy at different dose rates (acutely and chronically) and then the mutation frequencies were studied. Adaptive response was absent at the level of clonogenic survival. The mutation frequencies were significantly decreased in the cells pre-exposed to 50mGy at 1.4mGy/h followed by 1Gy acute exposure as challenging dose. Importantly, at single dose exposures (1 Gy or 100mGy), no differences at the level of mutation were found comparing different dose rates.

  18. Spallation radiation effects in materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansur, L.K.; Farrell, K.; Wechsler, M.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Spallation refers to the process whereby particles (chiefly neutrons) are ejected from nuclei upon bombardment by high-energy protons. Spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) use these neutrons for neutron scattering and diffraction research, and SNS`s are proposed as the basis for systems for tritium production and transmutation of nuclear waste. Materials in SNS`s are exposed to the incident proton beam (energies typically about 1000 MeV) and to the spallation neutrons (spectrum of energies extending up to about 1000 MeV). By contrast the fission neutrons in nuclear reactors have an average energy of only about 2 MeV, and the neutrons in fusion reactors would have energies below about 14 MeV. Furthermore, the protons and neutrons in SNS`s for scattering and diffraction research are pulsed at frequencies of about 10 to 60 Hz, from which significant changes in the kinetics of point and extended defects may be expected. In addition, much higher transmutation rates occur in SNS-irradiated materials, On the whole, then, significant differences in microstructural development and macroscopic properties may result upon exposure in SNS systems, as compared with fission and fusion irradiations. In a more general sense, subjecting materials to new radiation environments has almost routinely led to new discoveries. To the extent that data are avaiable, however, the spallation environment appears to increase the degree of damage without introducing totally new effects. The first part of this presentation is an overview of radiation effects in materials, outlining essential concepts and property changes and their physical bases. This background is followed by a description of SNS irradiation environments and the effects on materials of exposure to these environments. A special discussion is given of the selection of target (e.g., liquid mercury), container (e.g., austenitic stainless steel or ferritic/martensitic steel), and structural materials in SNS systems.

  19. Transgenerational accumulation of radiation damage in small mammals chronically exposed to Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabokon, Nadezhda I; Goncharova, R I

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation has been the analysis of the long-term development of biological damage in natural populations of a model mammalian species, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber), which were chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation over 22 animal generations within 10 years following the Chernobyl accident. The time course of the biological end-points (chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and embryonic lethality) was compared with the time course of the whole-body absorbed dose rate from external and internal exposure in the studied populations inhabiting monitoring sites in Belarus with different ground deposition of radionuclides. The yield of chromosome aberrations and, in lesser degree, embryonic lethality was associated with the radionuclide contamination of the monitoring areas in a dose-dependent manner. As a main feature of the long-term development of biological damage under low dose rate irradiation, permanently elevated levels of chromosome aberrations and an increasing frequency of embryonic lethality have developed over 22 animal generations. This contrasts with the assumption that the biological damage would gradually disappear since in the same period of time the whole-body absorbed dose rate decreased exponentially with a half-value time of about 2.5-3 years. Furthermore, gravid females were captured, and their offspring, born and grown up under contamination-free laboratory conditions, showed the same enhanced level of chromosome aberrations. Therefore the authors suggest that, along with the biological damage attributable to the individual exposure of each animal, the observed cellular and systemic effects reflect the transgenerational transmission and accumulation, via genetic and/or epigenetic pathways, of damage attributable to the chronic low-dose rate exposure of the preceding generations of animals. They also suggest that the level of the accumulated transmissible damage in the investigated

  20. Response of shortgrass Plains vegetation to chronic and seasonally administered gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraley, L. Jr.

    1971-08-01

    In order to determine the effect of radiation on the structure of native shortgrass plains vegetation, an 8750 Ci 137Cs source was installed on the Central Plains Experimental Range near Nunn, Colorado; The experimental area was divided into 6 treatment sectors, a control, 2 sectors for chronic exposure (irradiation initiated April 1969 and continuing as of August 1971), and one each for spring, summer and late fall seasonal semi-acute (30 day), exposures which were administered during April, July and December, 1969, respectively. Community structure was measured by coefficient of community and diversity index. Yield was determined by clipping plots in September 1970 and visual estimates in September 1969 and 1970 for the grass-sedge component of the vegetation. Individual species sensitivity was determined by density data recorded in April, June and September of 1969 and 1970 and by a phenological index recorded at weekly intervals during the 1969 and 1970 growing seasons. The response of the vegetation was similar whether determined by coefficient of community or diversity with diversity being a more sensitive measure of effects. In the chronically exposed sectors, the exposure rate which resulted in a 50 per cent reduction in these 2 parameters (CC50 or D50) was still decreasing the second growing season and was approximately 18 R/hr for the CC50 as of June 1970 and 10 R/hr for the D50 as of September 1970. For the seasonally exposed sectors, the late fall period (December, 1969) was the most sensitive, summer (July, 1969) the least sensitive and spring (April, 1969) intermediate with CC50 and D50 values of 195 and 90, 240 and 222, and 120 and 74 R/hr for the spring, summer and late fall exposed sectors, respectively. Yield and density data indicated a rapid revegetation of the spring and summer exposed sectors during 1970 as a result of an influx of invader species such as Salsola kali tenuifolia, Chenopodium leptophyllum and Lepidium densiflorum and the

  1. [Endolacunar laser radiation of the tonsils in conservative treatment of chronic tonsillitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroverova, T K; Shul'diakov, V A; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tatarenko, D A

    2007-01-01

    Vegetative and immune system indices, clinical symptoms of chronic tonsillitis exacerbation were compared in laser radiation of the tonsils with two methods - surface pharyngeal and endolacunar. The results show that under endolacunar method the symptoms regress 1.46 times faster, the number of late exacerbations decrease 1.5-2-fold.

  2. Radiation effects on four polysulfone films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, B.; Sykes, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    The response of polysulfones to proton and electron radiation is evaluated by assessing the radiation durability of four selected sulfones, establishing radiation interaction mechanisms with the polymer chain, and determining the dependence of radiation durability on chemical structure. Chain scission appears to predominate at lower doses up to about 10 to the 9th rad, and past this threshold the second mechanism, crosslinking, seems to predominate. This is evidenced by the increase in modulus, glass transition temperature, and increased quantity of thermally stable residue at high temperatures. The variations of chemical structure of the polysulfones appear to have little effect on the response to radiation.

  3. Radiation effects on biochemical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seddon, G.M

    2000-04-01

    Xanthine oxidase catalyses the oxidative hydroxylation of hypoxanthine, xanthine and a wide range of carbonyl compounds. The enzyme exists as an oxidase and a dehydrogenase; both catalyze the oxidation of the same substrates. Steady state radiolysis and pulse radiolysis were used to generate oxidative and reductive free radicals. Their effects on the enzymatic activity of xanthine oxidase were determined. Initially inactivation studies were carried out to evaluate the extent to which radiolysis in aqueous solution affects the enzyme activity. Values of D{sub 37} and G{sub inactivation} were calculated following irradiation in the presence of free radical scavengers and in the presence of catalase and superoxide dismutase. The kinetic constants Vmax and Km were also determined following radiolysis. The effect of ionising radiation on the iron content of xanthine oxidase was measured using atomic absorption spectrometry. Native gel electrophoresis and iso-electric focussing were performed in an attempt to demonstrate changes in the overall structure of the enzyme. The binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin was carried out by measuring, (1) the displacement of methylene blue (MB{sup +}) from a heparin-MB{sup +} complex, (2) affinity chromatography and, (3) pulse radiolysis. The effect of irradiation on the binding process was investigated using techniques (1) and (2). Finally the radiation-induced conversion of xanthine oxidase to dehydrogenase was established. The results indicate that xanthine oxidase is inactivated greatest in the presence of air and irradiation causes Vmax to he reduced and Km to increase. The iron content of irradiated xanthine oxidase is unaffected. Electrophoresis shows the enzyme becomes fragmented and the isoelectric points of the fragments vary over a wide range of pH. Binding of xanthine oxidase to heparin as measured by displacement of MB{sup +} from a heparin-MB{sup +} complex suggests that irradiation increases the affinity of the enzyme

  4. Protective effects in radiation modification of elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głuszewski, Wojciech; Zagórski, Zbigniew P.; Rajkiewicz, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Saturated character of ethylene/octene thermoplastic elastomers demands an application of nonconventional methods of crosslinking connections between chains of molecules. These are organic peroxides, usually in the presence of coagents or an application of ionizing radiation. Several approaches (radiation, peroxide, peroxide/plus radiation and radiation/plus peroxide) were applied in crosslinking of elastomere Engage 8200. Attention was directed to the protection effects by aromatic peroxides and by photo- and thermostabilizers on radiolysis of elastomers. Role of dose of radiation, dose rate of radiation as well as the role of composition of elastomere on the radiation yield of hydrogen and absorbtion of oxygen was investigated. DRS method was used to follow postirradiation degradation. Influence of crosslinking methods on properties of elastomers is described. Results were interpreted from the point of view of protective actions of aromatic compounds.

  5. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William j. Weber; Lumin Wang; Jonathan Icenhower

    2004-07-09

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials.

  6. High-Intensity Synchrotron Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Various effects of intense synchrotron radiation on the performance of particle accelerators, especially for storage rings, are discussed. Following a brief introduction to synchrotron radiation, the basic concepts of heat load, gas load, electron emission, and the countermeasures against these effects are discussed.

  7. Reaction of fresh water zooplankton community to chronic radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, D.; Pryakhin, E. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine - URCRM (Russian Federation); Ivanov, I. [FSUE Mayak PA (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    The characteristic features of ecological community as a whole and cenosis of zooplankton organisms as part of it determine the intensity of the processes of self-purification of water and the formation of a particular body of water. Identifying features of the structure and composition of the zooplankton community of aquatic ecosystems exposed to different levels of radiation exposure, it is necessary to identify patterns of changes in zooplankton and hydro-biocenosis as a whole. Industrial reservoirs, the storage of liquid low-level radioactive waste 'Mayak' for decades, have high radiation load. A large range of levels of radioactive contamination (total volume beta-activity in water varies from 2.2x10{sup 3} to 2.3x10{sup 7} Bq/l, total volume alpha-activity - from 2.6x10{sup -1} to 3.1x10{sup 3} Bq/l) provides a unique opportunity to study ecosystems in a number of reservoirs with increasing impact of radiation factor. We studied five reservoirs that were used as the storage of low-and intermediate-level liquid radioactive waste pond and one comparison water body. In parallel with zooplankton sampling water samples were collected for hydro-chemical analysis. 41 indicators were analysed in order to assess the water chemistry. To determine the content of radionuclides in the various components of the ecosystem samples were collected from water, bottom sediments and plankton. Sampling of zooplankton for the quantitative analysis was performed using the method of weighted average auto bathometer. Apshteyn's plankton net of the surface horizon was used for qualitative analysis of the species composition of zooplankton. Software package ERICA Assessment Tool 2012 was used for the calculation of the absorbed dose rate. Species diversity and biomass of zooplankton, the share of rotifers in the number of species, abundance and biomass decrease with the increase of the absorbed dose rate and salinity. The number of species in a sample decreases with the

  8. Radiation Effects on Polymers - XI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanem, N. A.; El-Awady, N. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius;

    1979-01-01

    With the aim of improving properties of cellulose acetate membranes for reverse osmosis desalination, grafting was performed using high energy electrons. In this paper, the grafting parameters (radiation dose and method, monomer concentration, solvents, chain transfer agent and redox system...

  9. Physics of intense, high energy radiation effects.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Hartman, E. Frederick; Magyar, Rudolph J.; Crozier, Paul Stewart

    2011-02-01

    This document summarizes the work done in our three-year LDRD project titled 'Physics of Intense, High Energy Radiation Effects.' This LDRD is focused on electrical effects of ionizing radiation at high dose-rates. One major thrust throughout the project has been the radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) produced by the ionizing radiation. Another important consideration has been the electrical effect of dose-enhanced radiation. This transient effect can produce an electromagnetic pulse (EMP). The unifying theme of the project has been the dielectric function. This quantity contains much of the physics covered in this project. For example, the work on transient electrical effects in radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) has been a key focus for the work on the EMP effects. This physics in contained in the dielectric function, which can also be expressed as a conductivity. The transient defects created during a radiation event are also contained, in principle. The energy loss lead the hot electrons and holes is given by the stopping power of ionizing radiation. This information is given by the inverse dielectric function. Finally, the short time atomistic phenomena caused by ionizing radiation can also be considered to be contained within the dielectric function. During the LDRD, meetings about the work were held every week. These discussions involved theorists, experimentalists and engineers. These discussions branched out into the work done in other projects. For example, the work on EMP effects had influence on another project focused on such phenomena in gases. Furthermore, the physics of radiation detectors and radiation dosimeters was often discussed, and these discussions had impact on related projects. Some LDRD-related documents are now stored on a sharepoint site (https://sharepoint.sandia.gov/sites/LDRD-REMS/default.aspx). In the remainder of this document the work is described in catergories but there is much overlap between the atomistic

  10. Health effects of prenatal radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela M; Fletcher, Stacy

    2010-09-01

    Pregnant women are at risk of exposure to nonionizing and ionizing radiation resulting from necessary medical procedures, workplace exposure, and diagnostic or therapeutic interventions before the pregnancy is known. Nonionizing radiation includes microwave, ultrasound, radio frequency, and electromagnetic waves. In utero exposure to nonionizing radiation is not associated with significant risks; therefore, ultrasonography is safe to perform during pregnancy. Ionizing radiation includes particles and electromagnetic radiation (e.g., gamma rays, x-rays). In utero exposure to ionizing radiation can be teratogenic, carcinogenic, or mutagenic. The effects are directly related to the level of exposure and stage of fetal development. The fetus is most susceptible to radiation during organogenesis (two to seven weeks after conception) and in the early fetal period (eight to 15 weeks after conception). Noncancer health effects have not been detected at any stage of gestation after exposure to ionizing radiation of less than 0.05 Gy (5 rad). Spontaneous abortion, growth restriction, and mental retardation may occur at higher exposure levels. The risk of cancer is increased regardless of the dose. When an exposure to ionizing radiation occurs, the total fetal radiation dose should be estimated and the mother counseled about the potential risks so that she can make informed decisions about her pregnancy management.

  11. Radiation effects in optoelectronic devices. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, C.E.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1984-05-01

    Purpose of this report is to provide not only a summary of radiation damage studies at Sandia National Laboratories, but also of those in the literature on the components of optoelectronic systems: light emitting diodes (LEDs), laser diodes, photodetectors, optical fibers, and optical isolators. This review of radiation damage in optoelectronic components is structured according to device type. In each section, a brief discussion of those device properties relevant to radiation effects is given.

  12. Biochemical Changes in Saliva of Patients with Chronic Generalized Parodontitis under Combined Action of Alternating Running Magnetic Field and Laser Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Yu. Guseva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical changes in oral fluid of patients with chronic generalized parodontitis were investigated; the most informative indices were found out, they were used for estimating complex therapy effectiveness by means of low intensive helium — neon laser radiation and alternating running magnetic field

  13. Biological effects of high LET radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Masami [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    Biological effect of radiation is different by a kind of it greatly. Heavy ions were generally more effective in cell inactivation, chromosome aberration induction, mutation induction and neoplastic cell transformation induction than {gamma}-rays in SHE cells. (author)

  14. Flare loop radiative hydrodynamics. III - Nonlocal radiative transfer effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, R. C.; Fisher, G. H.; Mcclymont, A. N.

    1983-01-01

    The study has three goals. The first is to demonstrate that processes exist whose intrinsic nonlocal nature cannot be represented by local approximations. The second is to elucidate the physical nature and origins of these nonlocal processes. The third is to suggest that the methods and results described here may prove useful in constructing semiempirical models of the chromosphere by means more efficient than trial and error. Matrices are computed that describe the effect of a temperature perturbation at an arbitrary point in the loop on density, hydrogen ionized fraction, total radiative loss rate, and radiative loss rate of selected hydrogen lines and continua at all other points. It is found that the dominant nonlocal radiative transfer effects can be separated into flux divergence coefficient effects and upper level population effects. The former are most important when the perturbation takes place in a region of significant opacity. Upper level population effects arise in both optically thick and thin regions in response to nonlocal density, ionization, and interlocking effects.

  15. A case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy treated with long-time corticosteroid administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Higashino, Takanori; Obayashi, Kayoko; Takada, Yoshiki [Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan); Hishikawa, Yoshio

    1998-05-01

    This is a report of one patient who developed chronic progressive radiation myelopathy at a gap of two portals 31 months after 40 Gy irradiation. He presented an unusual clinical course with over 5 years and 6 months administration of oral corticosteroid, very slow progression and long-lasting presentation of Gd-DTPA enhanced area in the suffered cord by MRI. It is suggested that corticosteroid administration from initial onset for a long period may change the natural course of radiation myelopathy, that is, may delay progress of it. (author)

  16. Cytogenetic damage at low doses and the problem of bioindication of chronic low level radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, S.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Nesterov, E.B.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S. [Russian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2000-05-01

    The analysis undertaken by us of the experimentally observed cellular responses to low dose irradiation has shown that the relationship between the yield of induced cytogenetic damage and radiation dose within low dose range is non-linear and universal in character. Because of the relationship between the yield of cytogenetic damage and dose within low dose range is non-linear, the aberration frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry in the most important in terms of practical application case. The cytogenetic damage frequency cannot be used in biological dosimetry also because of the probability of synergistic and antagonistic interaction effects of the different nature factors simultaneously acting on test-object in real conditions is high within low dose (concentration) range. In our experimental study of the regularities in the yield of structural mutations in conditions of combined influence of ionizing radiation, heavy metals and pesticides it was found that synergistic and antagonistic effects are mainly induced in conditions of combined action of low exposure injuring agents. Experiments on agricultural plants were carried out in 1986-1989 at the 30-km zone around Chernobyl NPP. It was shown that chronic low dose exposure could cause an inheritable destabilization of genetic structures expressing in increase of cytogenetic damage and yield karyotypic variability in offspring's of irradiated organisms. Obviously exactly this circumstance is the reason of the phenomenon found in our researches of significant time delay of cytogenetic damage reduction rate from radioactive pollution reduction rate from time past from the accident moment. Research of cytogenetic damage of reproductive (seeds) and vegetative (needles) plant organs of the Pinus sylvestris tree micropopulations growing in contrast by radioactive pollution level sites of the 30-km ChNPP zone and also in the vicinity of the industrial plant <> for processing and temporary storage

  17. Bystander Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, John B. [Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases

    2017-01-17

    The objectives of this grant renewal are to provide administrative support and travel funds to allow the continued participation of the principal investigator (Dr. John B. Little) as an advisor to research initiated by several research fellows from his laboratory. The actual research will be carried out under the direction of Dr. Hatsumi Nagasawa with the collaboration of Dr. Joel Bedford at the Colorado State University, and by Drs. Edouard Azzam and Sonia de Toledo at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. Dr. Little will advise on the planning of experiments and development of experimental protocols, the analysis of data, and the preparation of manuscripts for publication. The Specific Aims for several of the planned experiments include: 1) to extend studies of the role of recombinational repair in the bystander effect by examining other genes in this pathway and cell lines deficient in excision repair; 2) to continue studies to determine the nature of the damage signal transmitted to bystander cells including the expression of several connexins in the bystander response, and the extent to which the enhanced oxidative metabolism observed in bystander cells may relate to the nature of the transmitted bystander signal; 3) to utilize a genome-wide approach to examine the genetic basis for the hypersensitivity to ionization we have observed in unaffected parents of patients with hereditary retinoblastoma, as well as from a group of a apparently normal individuals that show similar radiosensitivity; 4) to complete studies concerning the induction of high frequencies of cells with massive chromosome damage in clonal derivatives of p53 and p21 knockout mouse cell lines; in particular to examine the role of telomere changes in this phenomenon. Overall, the results of these studies should enhance our understanding of the risk of low dose exposures to ionizing radiation, including human populations to residential radon as well as occupational exposures.

  18. Dose-effect relationship in radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1983-01-01

    As criterion for the evaluation of risk in connection with nuclear accidents the diminishing of life expectance is assumed. This would allow a better weighting of the different detriments. The possible dose-effect relations for the different detriments caused by radiation are discussed. Some models for a realistic evaluation of the different radiation detriments are proposed.

  19. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage from Chronic Laser Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    W.K.: The effects of the pineal gland on light-induced retinal photoreceptor damage. Exp. Eye Res. 28:37-44, 1979. 17. Hollyfield, Joe G., Rayborn...co-iI workers in 196612. Noell reported that irreversible retinal damage occurs in normal laboratory rats exposed continuously to an illuminated...light than with either red or blue light. In fact, the action spectrum of the damage paralleled the action spectrum of the ERG. The iris of pigmented rats

  20. Physics of radiation effects in crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, RA

    1986-01-01

    ``Physics of Radiation Effects in Crystals'' is presented in two parts. The first part covers the general background and theory of radiation effects in crystals, including the theory describing the generation of crystal lattice defects by radiation, the kinetic approach to the study of the disposition of these defects and the effects of the diffusion of these defects on alloy compositions and phases. Specific problems of current interest are treated in the second part and include anisotropic dimensional changes in x-uranium, zirconium and graphite, acceleration of thermal creep in reactor ma

  1. Effects of gamma radiation in tomato seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiendl, Toni A.; Wiendl, Fritz W.; Franco, Suely S.H.; Franco, Jose G.; Althur, Valter, E-mail: tawiendl@hotmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Tomato dry seeds of the hybrid 'Gladiador' F1 were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from Co-60 source at 0,509 kGy tax rate in order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination and plant growth. Eight treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 2,5; 5,0; 7,5; 10,0; 12,5; 15,0; 20,0 Gy. Seed germination as well as green fruits number, harvested fruit number, fruit weight and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Tomato seeds and plants were handled as for usual tomato production in Brazil. Low doses of gamma radiation treatment in the seeds stimulate germination and substantially increase fruit number and total production up to 86% at 10 Gy dose. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production thus, showing hormetic effects. (author)

  2. Sterilizing radiation effects on selected polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiens, W. E.

    1979-03-01

    The mechanism of radiation effects and their industrial applications are discussed for the following classes of polymers: thermoplastics, thermosets, elastomers, films and fibers, and adhesives/coatings/potting compounds. 35 references, 3 tables. (DLC)

  3. Inverse Faraday Effect driven by Radiation Friction

    CERN Document Server

    Liseykina, T V; Macchi, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of extremely intense ($>10^{23}~\\mbox{W cm}^{-2}$), circularly polarized laser pulses with thick targets, theory and simulations show that a major fraction of the laser energy is converted into incoherent radiation because of collective electron motion during the "hole boring" dynamics. The effective dissipation due to radiative losses allows the absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum, which in turn leads to the generation of an axial magnetic field of tens of gigagauss value. This peculiar "inverse Faraday effect" is demonstrated in three-dimensional simulations including radiation friction.

  4. Visible Effects of Invisible Hidden Valley Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Carloni, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Assuming there is a new gauge group in a Hidden Valley, and a new type of radiation, can we observe it through its effect on the kinematic distributions of recoiling visible particles? Specifically, what are the collider signatures of radiation in a hidden sector? We address these questions using a generic SU(N)-like Hidden Valley model that we implement in Pythia. We find that in both the e+e- and the LHC cases the kinematic distributions of the visible particles can be significantly affected by the valley radiation. Without a proper understanding of such effects, inferred masses of "communicators" and of invisible particles can be substantially off.

  5. Cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, J.; Chai, A.-T.; Mo, T.; Green, A. E. O.

    1977-01-01

    An Eppley radiometer and a Robertson-Berger sunburn meter are employed along with an all-sky camera setup to study cloud effects on middle ultraviolet global radiation at the ground level. Semiempirical equations to allow for cloud effects presented in previous work are compared with the experimental data. The study suggests a means of defining eigenvectors of cloud patterns and correlating them with the radiation at the ground level.

  6. The biological effects of ionising radiation on Crustaceans: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuller, Neil; Lerebours, Adélaïde [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom); Smith, Jim T. [School of Earth & Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Ford, Alex T., E-mail: alex.ford@port.ac.uk [Institute of Marine Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Ferry Road, Portsmouth, Hampshire PO4 9LY (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We comprehensively review the effects of ionising radiation in crustaceans. • Current environmental radioprotection levels found to be inadequate in some cases. • Mutation is shown to be a sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure. • Lowest observed effect dose rate varies by orders of magnitude. - Abstract: Historic approaches to radiation protection are founded on the conjecture that measures to safeguard humans are adequate to protect non-human organisms. This view is disparate with other toxicants wherein well-developed frameworks exist to minimise exposure of biota. Significant data gaps for many organisms, coupled with high profile nuclear incidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, have prompted the re-evaluation of our approach toward environmental radioprotection. Elucidating the impacts of radiation on biota has been identified as priority area for future research within both scientific and regulatory communities. The crustaceans are ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems, comprising greater than 66,000 species of ecological and commercial importance. This paper aims to assess the available literature of radiation-induced effects within this subphylum and identify knowledge gaps. A literature search was conducted pertaining to radiation effects on four endpoints as stipulated by a number of regulatory bodies: mortality, morbidity, reproduction and mutation. A major finding of this review was the paucity of data regarding the effects of environmentally relevant radiation doses on crustacean biology. Extremely few studies utilising chronic exposure durations or wild populations were found across all four endpoints. The dose levels at which effects occur was found to vary by orders of magnitude thus presenting difficulties in developing phyla-specific benchmark values and reference levels for radioprotection. Based on the limited data, mutation was found to be the most sensitive endpoint of radiation exposure, with mortality the least sensitive

  7. Correlated Uncertainties in Radiation Shielding Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Charles M.; Maung, Khin Maung; Blattnig, Steve R.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    2013-01-01

    The space radiation environment is composed of energetic particles which can deliver harmful doses of radiation that may lead to acute radiation sickness, cancer, and even death for insufficiently shielded crew members. Spacecraft shielding must provide structural integrity and minimize the risk associated with radiation exposure. The risk of radiation exposure induced death (REID) is a measure of the risk of dying from cancer induced by radiation exposure. Uncertainties in the risk projection model, quality factor, and spectral fluence are folded into the calculation of the REID by sampling from probability distribution functions. Consequently, determining optimal shielding materials that reduce the REID in a statistically significant manner has been found to be difficult. In this work, the difference of the REID distributions for different materials is used to study the effect of composition on shielding effectiveness. It is shown that the use of correlated uncertainties allows for the determination of statistically significant differences between materials despite the large uncertainties in the quality factor. This is in contrast to previous methods where uncertainties have been generally treated as uncorrelated. It is concluded that the use of correlated quality factor uncertainties greatly reduces the uncertainty in the assessment of shielding effectiveness for the mitigation of radiation exposure.

  8. Acute effects of solar particle event radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.; Weissman, Drew; Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Wan, X. Steven; Romero-Weaver, Ana L.; Diffenderfer, Eric S.; Lin, L.; Cengel, K.

    2014-01-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animals exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations: gamma rays or electrons). All animal studies described have been approved by the University of PA IACUC. Some conclusions from recent CARR investigations are as follows: (i) the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for SPE-like protons compared with standard reference radiations (gammas or electrons) for white blood cells (WBCs) vary greatly between mice, ferrets and pigs, with the RBE values being greater in ferrets than those in mice, and considerably greater in pigs compared with those in ferrets or mice [1, 2]. This trend for the data suggests that the RBE values for WBCs in humans could be considerably greater than those observed in small mammals, and SPE proton radiation may be far more hazardous to humans than previously estimated from small animal studies. (ii) Very low doses of SPE proton radiation (25 cGy) increase blood clotting times in ferrets, and the low SPE-like dose rate has more severe effects than high dose rate radiation [3]. (iii) Results from pig and ferret studies suggest that disseminated intravascular coagulation is a major cause of death at doses near the LD50 level for SPE-like proton and gamma radiation. (iv) Exposure to SPE-like proton or gamma radiation, in combination with

  9. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  10. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.; Corrales, L. Rene; Ness, Nancy J.; Williford, Ralph E.; Heinisch, Howard L.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Song, Jakyoung; Park, Byeongwon; Jiang, Weilin; Begg, Bruce D.; Birtcher, R. B.; Chen, X.; Conradson, Steven D.

    2000-10-02

    Radiation effects from the decay of radionuclides may impact the long-term performance and stability of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. In an effort to address these concerns, the objective of this project was the development of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, particularly on solid-state radiation effects and their influence on aqueous dissolution kinetics. This study has employed experimental, theoretical and computer simulation methods to obtain new results and insights into radiation damage processes and to initiate the development of predictive models. Consequently, the research that has been performed under this project has significant implications for the High-Level Waste and Nuclear Materials focus areas within the current DOE/EM mission. In the High-Level Waste (HLW) focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials focus area, the results of this research could lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. Ultimately, this research could result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  11. Radiation effects on branched polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K.; Seki, S.; Tagawa, S. [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research; Shibata, H.; Iwai, T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Science and Technology

    2000-03-01

    We observed crosslinking and scission caused by gamma radiation in linear and branched polysilanes which have from 5% to 33% of the branching points. The crosslinking reactions become predominant for the irradiation with branching density increasing. The cleavage did not take place exclusively at the branching points and branching polysilanes are sensitive to radiation extraordinary as compared with linear polysilane from a careful study of the radiolysis products of a series of polysilanes. This is due to the increasing Si {center_dot} contributing to the crosslinking reaction and that they are not resonance-stabilized by double bonds as the reaction mechanism in the irradiated polysilanes. However, the gelation curve in linear PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} is almost consistent with that in branching PMPS, indicating that the size of chemical track is responsible for the gel fraction. The crosslinking G value for high molecular weight PMPS irradiated by 2 MeV He{sup +} was drastically decreased as compared with that for low molecular weight. It suggests that there are a large number of intramolecular crosslinking points for high molecular weight PMPS. (author)

  12. Fallout radiation effects analysis methodology. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-31

    Fallout radiation is viewed by the weapons effects community as a potentially serious impediment to maintaining or restoring critical National Security Emergency Preparedness (NSEP) telecommunication capabilities in a nuclear environment. The OMNCS' Electromagnetic Pulse Mitigation Program is designed, in part, to identify the survival probability (survivability) of the nation's NSEP telecommunications infrastructure against fallout radiation effects. The OMNCS (Office of the Manager National Communications System) is developing a balanced approach consisting of fallout radiation stress tests on the electronic piece-parts and the use of estimated performance measures of telecommunication network elements in network simulation models to predict user connectivity levels. It is concluded that, given limited available data, the proposed method can predict fallout radiation effects on network telecommunication equipment. The effects of fallout radiation are small at low dosage levels (bin 1 and bin 2). More pronounced variations in equipment performance were exhibited for radiation dosage in the 1k-5k Rads(Si) bin. Finally, the results indicate that by increasing the sample size to approximately 200 samples, the statistical quality of survivability predictions can be significantly improved.

  13. Radiation effects on ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwer, T.E.; Goldstein, M.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1977-11-01

    An extensive literature review and data compilation has been completed on the radiation-damage of ion exchange resins. The primary goal of the study has been to review the available literature on ion exchange materials used in, as well as those with potential for use in, the nuclear fuel and waste reprocessing areas. The physical and chemical properties of ion exchangers are reviewed. Experimental parameters useful in characterizing the effects of radiation on synthetic ion exchange resins are identified or defined. In compiling the diverse types of data, an effort was made to present the experimental data or experimentally based parameters in a format that would be useful for inter-comparing radiation effects on resins. When subject to radiation there are various general trends or qualitative effects displayed by the different types of resins. These radiation-trends and effects have been formulated into qualitative statements. The present day level of understanding of the behavior of resins under ionizing radiation is too limited to justify quantitative predictive modeling. The limitations and deficiencies of the literature are discussed and the experimentation needed to achieve quantitative modeling are outlined. 14 figs., 108 references.

  14. Effect of gamma radiation on Campylobacter jejuni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J.D.; Maxcy, R.B.

    Radiation resistance of Campylobacter jejuni in broth, ground beef, and ground turkey meat was determined using dose levels from 0-200 Krad at -30 +/- 10/sup 0/C, at 0-5/sup 0/C, and at 30 +/- 10/sup 0/C. Irradiation at -30/sup 0/C increased radiation resistance of cultures in ground meats; broth cultures were not greatly influenced by temperature. The effect of culture age on radiation resistance was also evaluated using cells in various physiological phases. Age did not have a pronounced effect on radiation resistance. The largest D/sub 10/ value for C. jejuni was 32 Krad, which was less than D/sub 10/ values commonly reported for salmonellae. 20 references, 4 figures.

  15. Biological effect of radiation on human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yun Sil; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Su Jae [and others

    2000-04-01

    1. Adaptive response when 0.01 Gy was preirradiated before high challenging dose is induced in normal cell types such normal lymphocytes, primary keratinocytes, and L929 fibroblast cells but not in neoplastic cells such as L5178Y lymphoma cells, EL-4 lymphoma cells and 308 papilloma cells. 2. Heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and inducible HSP70 is responsible for the induction of adaptive response and radioresistance - cell cycle regulation, antiapoptotic molecule and PKC activation were involved. 3. Apoptosis was induced at most 5. hrs after irradiation in primary keratinocytes, in v-rasHa transformed keratinocytes, the maximum interval was 16 hrs, and in 308 papilloma cells, the maximum was 48 hrs. 4. PKC response by radiation is correlated with induction of apoptosis. 5. Rapid induction PKCdelta in primary keratinocytes and no response of PKC epsilon may involved in radiation induced apoptosis. 6. The rate of resorption was increased when radiation was given at 2.5 days after gestation. Early death including foetal death were highly expressed when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. There are no difference in incidence of late death including embryonic death. 7. 2 Gy is the most effective dose in radiation induced teratogenesis in mouse model. 8. Growth retardation and small head was present when radiation was given at 5.5, 7.5, 11.5 and 15.5 days after gestation and small head showed high incidence at 11.5 days after gestation. 9. External malformation, internal malformation and skeletal malformation was induced when radiation was given at 7.5 days after gestation. 10. OGG1-mutated cells induced radiosensitive by G2/M cell cycle arrest. 11. Radiation induced G2/M phase cell cycle and correlated with radiosensitivity. 12. PKCalpha induced differentiation. 13. Radiation exposed cells showed carcinogenic effect. 14. Organ specific radiosensitivity was shown and protein expression was involved.

  16. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Neitz, N

    2013-01-01

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here, we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect, i.e., the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the full quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicated that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  17. Stochasticity effects in quantum radiation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitz, N; Di Piazza, A

    2013-08-02

    When an ultrarelativistic electron beam collides with a sufficiently intense laser pulse, radiation-reaction effects can strongly alter the beam dynamics. In the realm of classical electrodynamics, radiation reaction has a beneficial effect on the electron beam as it tends to reduce its energy spread. Here we show that when quantum effects become important, radiation reaction induces the opposite effect; i.e., the energy distribution of the electron beam spreads out after interacting with the laser pulse. We identify the physical origin of this opposite tendency in the intrinsic stochasticity of photon emission, which becomes substantial in the quantum regime. Our numerical simulations indicate that the predicted effects of the stochasticity can be measured already with presently available lasers and electron accelerators.

  18. Moving towards effective chronic illness management: asthma as an exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Tracy S

    2011-01-01

    The United States health care system is at a pivotal point in its ability to manage chronic illness. The demands and philosophical differences between the management of acute and chronic illnesses suggest the need for different strategies for effective and efficient management of chronic illness. The purpose of this article is to discuss the Chronic Care Model and the collaborative approach to managing chronic illnesses. Asthma, as an exemplar, will be used to illustrate the need for the development of new models of collaborative care for the treatment of chronic illnesses.

  19. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham S. Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day. EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  20. Non-thermal continuous and modulated electromagnetic radiation fields effects on sleep EEG of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Haitham S; Fahmy, Heba M; Radwan, Nasr M; Elsayed, Anwar A

    2013-03-01

    In the present study, the alteration in the sleep EEG in rats due to chronic exposure to low-level non-thermal electromagnetic radiation was investigated. Two types of radiation fields were used; 900 MHz unmodulated wave and 900 MHz modulated at 8 and 16 Hz waves. Animals has exposed to radiation fields for 1 month (1 h/day). EEG power spectral analyses of exposed and control animals during slow wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM sleep) revealed that the REM sleep is more susceptible to modulated radiofrequency radiation fields (RFR) than the SWS. The latency of REM sleep increased due to radiation exposure indicating a change in the ultradian rhythm of normal sleep cycles. The cumulative and irreversible effect of radiation exposure was proposed and the interaction of the extremely low frequency radiation with the similar EEG frequencies was suggested.

  1. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang [Dept. of Ultrasound, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation.

  2. Anti-damping effect of radiation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G.; Li, H.; Shen, Y. F.; Yuan, X. Z.; Zi, J.

    2010-01-01

    The anti-damping effect of radiation reaction, which means the radiation reaction does non-negative work on a radiating charge, is investigated at length by using the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) for the motion of a point charge respectively acted on by (a) a pure electric field, (b) a pure magnetic field and (c) the fields of an electromagnetic wave. We found that the curvature of the charge's trajectory plays an important role in the radiation reaction force, and the anti-damping effect cannot take place for the real macroscopic motions of a point charge. The condition for this anti-damping effect to take place is that the gradient of the external force field must exceed a certain value over the region of magnitude of the classical radius of massive charges (~10-15 m). Our results are potentially helpful to lessen the controversy on LDE and justify it as the correct classical equation describing the radiating charge's motion. If this anti-damping effect of LDE were a real existing physical process, it could serve as a mechanism within the context of classical electrodynamics for the stability of hydrogen atoms. Using the picture of an electron in quantum electrodynamics, namely the negative bare charge surrounded by the polarized positive charges of vacuum, we can obtain a reasonable explanation for the energy transferred to the electron during the occurrence of the anti-damping effect, on which the venerable work of Wheeler and Feynman has thrown some light.

  3. Plutonium, Mineralogy and Radiation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    During the past fifty years, more than 1,800 metric tonnes of Pu and substantial quantities of other "minor" actinides, such as Np, Am and Cm, have been generated in nuclear reactors. Some of these transuranic elements can be a source of energy in fission reactions (e.g., 239Pu), a source of fissile material for nuclear weapons (e.g., 239Pu and 237Np), or are of environmental concern because of their long half- lives and radiotoxicity (e.g., 239Pu, t1/2 = 24,100 years, and 237Np, t1/2 = 2.1 million years). There are two basic strategies for the disposition of these elements: 1.) to "burn" or transmute the actinides using nuclear reactors or accelerators; 2.) to "sequester" the actinides in chemically durable, radiation-resistant materials that are suitable for geologic disposal. There has been substantial interest in the use of actinide-bearing minerals, such as zircon or isometric pyrochlore, A2B2O7 (A = rare earths; B = Ti, Zr, Sn, Hf; Fd3m; Z=8), for the immobilization of actinides, particularly plutonium. One of the principal concerns has been the accumulation of structural damage caused by alpha-decay events, particularly from the recoil nucleus. Systematic ion beam irradiation studies of rare-earth pyrochlores have led to the discovery that certain compositions (B = Zr, Hf) are stable to very high fluences of alpha-decay event damage. Some compositions, Gd2Ti2O7, are amorphized at relatively low doses (0.2 displacements per atom, dpa, at room temperature), while other compositions, Gd2Zr2O7, do not amorphize (even at doses of > 40 dpa at 25K), but instead disorder to a defect fluorite structure. By changing the composition of the A-site (e.g., substitution of different rare earth elements), the temperature above which the pyrochlore composition can no longer be amorphized, Tc, varies by >600 K (e.g., Lu2Ti2O7: Tc = 480 K; Gd2Ti2O7: Tc = 1120 K). The variation in response to irradiation as a function of composition can be used to model the long

  4. Possible cause for altered spatial cognition of prepubescent rats exposed to chronic radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sareesh Naduvil; Kumar, Raju Suresh; Karun, Kalesh M; Nayak, Satheesha B; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2015-10-01

    The effects of chronic and repeated radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RFEMR) exposure on spatial cognition and hippocampal architecture were investigated in prepubescent rats. Four weeks old male Wistar rats were exposed to RF-EMR (900 MHz; SAR-1.15 W/kg with peak power density of 146.60 μW/cm(2)) for 1 h/day, for 28 days. Followed by this, spatial cognition was evaluated by Morris water maze test. To evaluate the hippocampal morphology; H&E staining, cresyl violet staining, and Golgi-Cox staining were performed on hippocampal sections. CA3 pyramidal neuron morphology and surviving neuron count (in CA3 region) were studied using H&E and cresyl violet stained sections. Dendritic arborization pattern of CA3 pyramidal neuron was investigated by concentric circle method. Progressive learning abilities were found to be decreased in RF-EMR exposed rats. Memory retention test performed 24 h after the last training revealed minor spatial memory deficit in RF-EMR exposed group. However, RF-EMR exposed rats exhibited poor spatial memory retention when tested 48 h after the final trial. Hirano bodies and Granulovacuolar bodies were absent in the CA3 pyramidal neurons of different groups studied. Nevertheless, RF-EMR exposure affected the viable cell count in dorsal hippocampal CA3 region. RF-EMR exposure influenced dendritic arborization pattern of both apical and basal dendritic trees in RF-EMR exposed rats. Structural changes found in the hippocampus of RF-EMR exposed rats could be one of the possible reasons for altered cognition.

  5. Radiation effects on LDPE/EVA blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharif, Jamaliah; Aziz, S.H.S.A.Sharifah Hanisah Syed Abdul; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2000-04-01

    The effect of radiation on the properties of low density polyethylene (LDPE) and ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) blends were investigated. The improvement of the measured gel content, thermal elongation, tensile strength, elongation at break and heat deformation of the blends have confirmed the positive effect of electron beam irradiation on the blends.

  6. Effects of radiation and debris to SSPS

    OpenAIRE

    Utashima, Masayoshi; 歌島 昌由

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies effects of the radiation and space debris to the Space Solar Power Systems (SSPS). In the first half of the paper, the in-space transportation from low-Earth orbit to geostationary Earth orbit is studied in consideration of these effects. In the second half, the debris impacts to SSPS on geostationary Earth orbit are analyzed.

  7. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  8. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-alpha line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, the impact of some previously ignored radiative transfer effects is calculated. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-alpha line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-alpha line blueward of the hydrogen ...

  9. Oide Effect and Radiation in Bending Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Oscar; Bambade, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Including radiation effects during lattice design optimization is crucial in high energy accelerators. Oide effect and radiation in bending magnets are reviewed aiming to include them in the optical design process to minimize the IP beam size. The Oide double integral is expressed in simpler terms in order to speed up calculations, concluding in how longer quadrupoles with lower gradients may help reducing the Oide effect. Radiation in bending magnets is reviewed for linear lattices, generalizing to the case when the final dispersion is different from zero and making comparisons with theoretical results and particle tracking. An agreement between the theory, the implemented approximation included in MAPCLASS2 and the six-dimensional tracking in PLACET has been found.

  10. Genetic effects in somatic and germ cells, induced by ionizing radiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, B.; Benova, D.; Bajrakova, A.; Bulanova, M.; Vyglenov, A.; Rupova, I.; Georgieva, I. (Meditsinska Akademiya, Sofia (Bulgaria). Nauchen Inst. po Rentgenologiya i Radiobiologiya)

    1983-01-01

    Quantitative data are reported on injuries to hereditary structures in somatic and sex cells, induced by different types of ionizing radiation. The model systems used were human peripheral blood lymphocytes, in vitro irradiated with different doses: bone-marrow cells of mice and rats irradiated in vivo: mouse, rat, rabbit and hamster sex cells. To evaluate the dose-effect dependency after acute and chronic irradiation, the authors used mathematical models, describing the amount of chromosomal injuries. Attempt was made to estimate the somatic and genetic risk, following acute and chronic irradiation with different doses of ionizing radiations.

  11. Strain-dependent Effects of Acute, Chronic, and Withdrawal from Chronic Nicotine on Fear Conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    Portugal, George S.; Wilkinson, Derek S.; Kenney, Justin W.; Sullivan, Colleen; Gould, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of nicotine on cognitive processes such as learning and memory may play an important role in the addictive liability of tobacco. However, it remains unknown whether genetic variability modulates the effects of nicotine on learning and memory. The present study characterized the effects of acute, chronic, and withdrawal from chronic nicotine administration on fear conditioning, somatic signs, and the elevated plus maze in 8 strains of inbred mice. Strain-dependent effects of acute ...

  12. Treatment and long-term outcome of chronic radiation esophagitis after radiation therapy for head and neck tumors: A report of 13 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvain, C.; Barrioz, T.; Besson, I.; Babin, P.; Fontanel, J.P.; Daban, A.; Matuchansky, C.; Beauchant, M. (CHU J Bernard, Poitiers (France))

    1993-05-01

    The natural history of chronic radiation esophagitis occurring in previously normal esophagus is still unknown. The authors describe here the long-term outcome of chronic esophagitis arising after neck irradiation for oropharynx and larynx carcinomas in 13 consecutive adult patients. The first clinical signs of radiation esophagitis were dysphagia or impossibility of oral intake, which appeared within 26 months (range 2--120 months) after the end of radiation for pyriform fossae carcinoma (N = 5), tonsil carcinoma (N = 2), larynx carcinoma (N = 2), pharynx carcinoma (N = 2), base of the tongue (N = 1), and thyroid carcinomas (N = 1). During upper endoscopy, an esophageal stenosis was found in 11 cases and was associated with ulceration in three cases. An isolated esophageal ulceration was present in only two cases. Chronic radiation esophagitis diagnosis was confirmed by histology and surgery in seven cases. In the last six cases, diagnosis was supported by the absence of first cancer relapses within a median follow-up of two years (16 months to nine years) and by endoscopic findings. Seven patients received parenteral or enteral nutrition. Ten patients were treated by peroral dilatations. These treatments allowed nearly normal oral diet in 11/13 patients. Only one patient was lost of follow-up after 20 months. Four patients died from chronic radiation esophagitis. One of these patients died from massive hemorrhage after peroral dilatation. Four patients died of a second carcinoma with no first cancer recurrence. Four patients were alive after six months to nine years of follow-up. Moderate dysphagia was still present, allowing nearly normal oral feeding. In conclusion, chronic radiation esophagitis is a severe disease with an underestimated frequency. In this study, peroral dilatations appeared to be necessary and were not associated with an increased morbidity. 21 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation in annatto seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Camilo F. de Oliveira, E-mail: camilo.urucum@hotmail.com [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA/EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula B., E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Harder, Marcia N.C., E-mail: marcia.harder@fatec.sp.gov.br [Centro Paula Souza, Curso Superior de Tecnologia em Bicombustiveis (FATEC), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Filho, Jose C.; Neto, Miguel B., E-mail: jorgecazefilho@yahoo.com.br [Empresa Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria da Paraiba (EMEPA), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The annatto bixin has emerged as a major source of natural dyes used in the world notably by the substitution of synthetics harmful to human health and ecologic tendency in obtaining industrial products free of additives with applications in industries textiles; cosmetics; pharmaceutical and food mainly. The aim of this research was to obtain increased of germination rate and dormancy breaking on annatto seeds by gamma radiation. Annatto dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.456 kGy/hour dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination rate and dormancy breaking in the seeds. Five treatments with gamma radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 100; 125; 150 and 175 Gy. After irradiation the annatto seeds were planted as for usual seed production. According to the results obtained in this experiment we can conclude that the low doses of gamma radiation utilized on the annatto seeds did not presented significantly effect on the germination of plants. But the best dose to increase the germination of seeds was 150 Gy. (author)

  14. Effects of gamma radiation in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Jose Gilmar; Franco, Suely Salumita Haddad; Arthur, Valter; Arthur, Paula Bergamin, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Franco, Caio Haddad [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (LNBio/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Nacional de Biociencias; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia, E-mail: zegilmar60@gmail.com, E-mail: gilmita@uol.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The degree of radiosensitivity depends mostly on the species, the stage of the embryo at irradiation, the doses employed and the criteria used to measure the effect. One of the most common criteria to evaluate radiosensitivity in seeds is to measure the average plant production. Soya dry seeds were exposed to low doses of gamma radiation from source of Cobalt-60, type Gammecell-220, at 0.245 kGy dose rate. In order to study stimulation effects of radiation on germination, plant growth and production. Five treatments radiation doses were applied as follows: 0 (control); 25; 50; 75 and 100 Gy. Seed germination and harvest of number of seeds and total production were assessed to identify occurrence of stimulation. Soya seeds and plants were handled as for usual seed production in Brazil. The low doses of gamma radiation in the seeds that stimulate the production were doses of 25, 50 and 75 Gy. There are evidences that the use of low doses of gamma radiation can stimulate germination and plant production. (author)

  15. Biotropic Effect of Radiation Conditions on Orbital Cosmic Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsetlin, Vladimir; Ushakov, Igor; Gurieva, Tamar; Moisa, Svetlana; Zotin, Alexei; Lobanov, Alexei

    On the orbit of pilot orbital stations the crews undergo to low doses of chronic irradiation of cosmic radiation. The studying of radiobiological effects in different living systems were carried out in the ship’s side (OC “MIR” and ICS) and model surface experiments (power dose 200 mGy/day, density of neutron flow 30 particles/sm2 sec). It was shown that ionized radiation effects on embryonal development of Japanese quail embryo, inducing morphological disturbances in 12% of embryos. Many years ontogenesis (more 15 years of life in OC “MIR”) of microbial association evoked replacement of dominant types of micromycetes and bacterium and increasing of colony-formed units (CFU) in four orders. In laboratory low doses of γ-radiation induced the increasing of flight strain biomass of Aspergillus niger that corresponds to a radiation hormezis and also the increasing of radio-sensitivity. Moreover, under γ-neutron radiation were marked some deviations in morphology of supporting cell and numerous head falls of Aspergillus niger. The irradiation of Protozoa by low doses led to that spontaneous motion activity of spirostoms (Spirostomum ambiguum Ehbg.) accommodated in water processing by mixed γ-neutron radiation decreased twice that testified the fact that the definite factor of γ-neutron radiation effect is the changing of water medium state. In dry seeds of the highest plants wetting in water of preliminary low doses α-and γ-irradiation field in 100-300 times lower than geomagnetic one) the germination of seeds was higher approximately twice under γ-radiation. Low doses of γ-radiation decreased and α-radiation increased a negative influence of hypo-magnetic field on these processes. It was shown that hypomagnetic field occurred, in general, beneficial effect on the development of Planorbarius corneus: the portion of teratogenic effect is decreased, embryos initially occurred in hypomagnetic conditions were characterized by lowering mortality. Mobility

  16. Effects of the neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcober, V. (Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain)); Martinez Ruis, F.; Manuzi, M.A. (Dpto. de Traumatologia Centro Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain))

    1984-01-01

    An introduction to the cortical bone neutron irradiation subject and to the effect of the irradiation on the mechanical properties of bone considered as a composite material is presented. Only the special case of the simple flexion has been treated. The evolution of the load-deflection curve as a function of the epithermal neutron dose has been studied. Some hypotheses on the role performed by the organic and mineral phases are introduced.

  17. Antiproton radiation found effective in cancer research

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "An international collaboration of scientists has completed the first ever antiproton beam experiments designed to reveal the biological effectiveness of antiproton radiation in terminating cells used for cancer research...PBar Labs assembled the collaboration at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research in Geneva) to perform the measurements" (1 page).

  18. Dose-rate dependent effects of ionizing radiation on vascular reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorava, T; Luksha, L; Bulanova, K Ya; Lobanok, L M

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the dose-rate dependent effects of ionising radiation on endothelium- and NO-mediated reactivity of aorta and coronary vessels. Rats were exposed to acute ((137)Cs, 9 x 10(-4) Gy s(-1), 18 min) and chronic ((137)Cs, 2.8 x 10(-7) Gy s(-1), 41 days) radiation in 1 Gy dose. Acute irradiation transiently increased coronary flow in eNOS-activity-dependent manner on day 3 after exposure. In striking contrast, chronic irradiation caused a significant depression of coronary flow even on day 90 after irradiation and abolished the effects of NO-synthase inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (10 micromol l(-1)). Furthermore, low intensity radiation strongly diminished the vasodilator properties of NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (5 micromol l(-1)). A similar pattern was observed in aortic rings. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was increased on days 3 and 10 after acute irradiation, but strongly inhibited following chronic exposure for the entire post-radiation period. This was accompanied by a diminished vasodilator response to NO-donor on days 3, 10 and 30 of post-radiation but not on day 90. The data suggest that ionising radiation in 1 Gy induces changes of aortic and coronary vessels reactivity depending on the dose-rate and the interval after exposure.

  19. Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bagrov, V G; Levin, A; Tlyachev, V B

    2001-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation of a charged particle in a constant uniform magnetic field and in the presence of the Aharonov-Bohm solenoid field is studied in the frame of the relativistic quantum theory. First, to this end exact solutions of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations are found. Using such solutions, all characteristics of one photon spontaneous irradiation, such as its intensity and angular distribution and polarization were calculated and analyzed. It is shown that usual spectrum of the synchrotron radiation is essentially affected by the presence of the solenoid (the Aharonov-Bohm effect). We believe that this deformation may be observed by spectroscopic methods of measurement. It is shown that

  20. Memory effects in radiative jet energy loss

    CERN Document Server

    Michler, Frank; Greiner, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    In heavy-ion collisions the created quark-gluon plasma forms a quickly evolving background, leading to a time dependent radiative behavior of high momentum partons traversing the medium. We use the Schwinger Keldysh formalism to describe the jet evolution as a non-equilibrium process including the Landau-Pomeranschuk-Migdal effect. Concentrating on photon emission, a comparison of our results to a quasistatic calculation shows good agreement, leading to the conclusion that the radiative behavior follows the changes in the medium almost instantaneously.

  1. Alpha Radiation Effects on Silicon Oxynitride Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morichetti, Francesco; Grillanda, Stefano; Manandhar, Sandeep; Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Kimerling, Lionel; Melloni, Andrea; Agarwal, Anuradha M.

    2016-09-21

    Photonic technologies are today of great interest for use in harsh environments, such as outer space, where they can potentially replace current communication systems based on radiofrequency components. However, very much alike to electronic devices, the behavior of optical materials and circuits can be strongly altered by high-energy and high-dose ionizing radiations. Here, we investigate the effects of alpha () radiation with MeV-range energy on silicon oxynitride (SiON) optical waveguides. Irradiation with a dose of 5×1015 cm-2 increases the refractive index of the SiON core by nearly 10-2, twice as much that of the surrounding silica cladding, leading to a significant increase of the refractive index contrast of the waveguide. The higher mode confinement induced by -radiation reduces the loss of tightly bent waveguides. We show that this increases the quality factor of microring resonators by 20%, with values larger than 105 after irradiation.

  2. Anti-damping effect of radiation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G; Yuan, X Z [School of Physics and Electric Information, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Li, H [Department of Physics, Yantai University, Yantai 264005 (China); Shen, Y F [Department of Physics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China); Zi, J [National Laboratory of Surface Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)], E-mail: gz_wang131@yahoo.cn

    2010-01-15

    The anti-damping effect of radiation reaction, which means the radiation reaction does non-negative work on a radiating charge, is investigated at length by using the Lorentz-Dirac equation (LDE) for the motion of a point charge respectively acted on by (a) a pure electric field, (b) a pure magnetic field and (c) the fields of an electromagnetic wave. We found that the curvature of the charge's trajectory plays an important role in the radiation reaction force, and the anti-damping effect cannot take place for the real macroscopic motions of a point charge. The condition for this anti-damping effect to take place is that the gradient of the external force field must exceed a certain value over the region of magnitude of the classical radius of massive charges ({approx}10{sup -15} m). Our results are potentially helpful to lessen the controversy on LDE and justify it as the correct classical equation describing the radiating charge's motion. If this anti-damping effect of LDE were a real existing physical process, it could serve as a mechanism within the context of classical electrodynamics for the stability of hydrogen atoms. Using the picture of an electron in quantum electrodynamics, namely the negative bare charge surrounded by the polarized positive charges of vacuum, we can obtain a reasonable explanation for the energy transferred to the electron during the occurrence of the anti-damping effect, on which the venerable work of Wheeler and Feynman has thrown some light.

  3. Effects of XUV radiation on circumbinary planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sanz-Forcada, J; Micela, G

    2014-01-01

    Several circumbinary planets have recently been discovered. The orbit of a planet around a binary stellar system poses several dynamic constraints. The effects that radiation from the host stars may have on the planet atmospheres must be considered. Because of the configuration of a close binary system, these stars have a high rotation rate, which causes a permanent state of high stellar activity and copious XUV radiation. The accumulated effects are stronger than for exoplanets around single stars, and cause a faster evaporation of their atmospheres. We evaluate the effects that stellar radiation has on the evaporation of exoplanets around binary systems and on the survival of these planets. We considered the XUV spectral range to account for the photons that are easily absorbed by a planet atmosphere that is mainly composed of hydrogen. A more complex atmospheric composition is expected to absorb this radiation more efficiently. We used direct X-ray observations to evaluate the energy in the X-rays range an...

  4. Effect of low and chronic radiation exposure: a case-control study of mental retardation and cleft lip/palate in the monazite-bearing coastal areas of southern Kerala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koya, P K M; Chougaonkar, M P; Predeep, P; Jojo, P J; Cheriyan, V D; Mayya, Y S; Seshadri, M

    2012-01-01

    A population-based 1:3 age-matched case-control study was conducted during 2006-2009 to assess the role of high-level natural radiation (>1 mSv/year) on congenital mental retardation and cleft lip/palate in the southwest coastal area of Kerala. Dosimetry was carried out in the house where parents resided during conception and the subsequent two trimesters of pregnancy of the study subject. Conditional logistic regression did not suggest any statistically significant association of either mental retardation (n = 445) or cleft lip/palate (n = 116) with high-level natural radiation. The odds of mental retardation and cleft lip/palate among those exposed to high-level natural radiation relative to normal levels of natural background radiation (≤1 mSv/year) were 1.26 (95% CI: 0.91-1.73) and 0.56 (95% CI: 0.31-1.02), respectively, after controlling for gender and maternal age at birth of the study subject. The data did not suggest any dose-related trend in the risk of either mental retardation (P = 0.113) or cleft lip/palate (P = 0.908). Notwithstanding the use of a single dose estimate to reconstruct past radiation exposure and the complex etiology of congenital malformations, it may reasonably be concluded that the prevailing high-level natural radiation in the study area does not appear to increase the risk of either mental retardation or cleft lip/palate among offspring of parents staying in the area.

  5. Exploring gamma radiation effect on exoelectron emission properties of bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, M.; Dekhtyar, Y.; Bogucharska, T.; Noskov, V. [Riga Technical Univ., Biomedical Engineering and Nanotechnology Institute (Latvia)

    2006-07-01

    Gamma radiation is used for radiation therapy to treat carcinogenic diseases including bone cancer. Ionising radiation kills carcinogenic calls. However, there are side effects of the gamma radiation on the bone surface electron structure. One of the effects is in the form of altering electron density of states of bone that, with time, influences biomedical reactions on bone life condition. (authors)

  6. Effects of {gamma}-radiation on white tea volatiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fanaro, Gustavo B.; Silveira, Ana Paula M.; Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: gbfanaro@ipen.br; Purgatto, Eduardo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Alimentos e Nutricao Experimental

    2009-07-01

    Tea is the second most widely consumed beverages in the world and is processed from two and a bud of Camellia sinensis (L.). Depending on the processing may give rise to four mainly teas (green, black, oolong and white tea). The white tea is the one that has recently awakened interest in scientific community due the fact that this tea has more antioxidant property and activity than green tea. A further industrialization and commercialization of these plants become a problem of public health. The presence of potentially toxigenic fungi can be found in these products, indicating a great potential for the presence of mycotoxins that can cause acute and chronic effects in different organs and systems of the human body. Ionizing radiation is one of the most effective means disinfecting dry food ingredients. This treatment can inhibit cellular life division, like microorganisms, promoting a molecular structural modification. The aim of this study was evaluate the effects of radiation on volatile formation in white tea. Samples were irradiated in room temperature at {sup 60}Co source Gammacell 220 (A.E.C. Ltda) at doses of 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20-kGy. The volatiles organic compound was extracted by hydrodistillation and the extract was separated and identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. The results show that the quantities of volatiles formations are directly proportional to the increase of radiation dose. About 37.86% of the compounds were stable at all radiation doses and 47.53% of new compounds were identified after irradiation. (author)

  7. Whey peptides prevent chronic ultraviolet B radiation-induced skin aging in melanin-possessing male hairless mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kobayashi, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    Whey proteins or peptides exhibit various actions, including an antioxidant action, an anticancer action, and a protective action against childhood asthma and atopic syndrome. The effects of orally administered whey peptides (WPs) on chronic ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation-induced cutaneous changes, including changes in cutaneous thickness, elasticity, wrinkle formation, etc., have not been examined. In this study, we studied the preventive effects of WPs on cutaneous aging induced by chronic UVB irradiation in melanin-possessing male hairless mice (HRM). UVB (36-180 mJ/cm(2)) was irradiated to the dorsal area for 17 wk in HRM, and the measurements of cutaneous thickness and elasticity in UVB irradiated mice were performed every week. WPs (200 and 400 mg/kg, twice daily) were administered orally for 17 wk. WPs inhibited the increase in cutaneous thickness, wrinkle formation, and melanin granules and the reduction in cutaneous elasticity associated with photoaging. Furthermore, it has been reported that UVB irradiation-induced skin aging is closely associated with the increase in expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), Ki-67-, and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells. WPs also prevented increases in the expression of MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9, VEGF, and Ki-67- and 8-OHdG-positive cells induced by chronic UVB irradiation. It was found that WPs prevent type IV collagen degradation, angiogenesis, proliferation, and DNA damage caused by UVB irradiation. Overall, these results demonstrate the considerable benefit of WPs for protection against solar UV-irradiated skin aging as a supplemental nutrient.

  8. Adaptive response in frogs chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Audette-Stuart, M., E-mail: stuartm@aecl.ca [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada); Kim, S.B.; McMullin, D.; Festarini, A.; Yankovich, T.L.; Carr, J.; Mulpuru, S. [Environmental Technologies Branch, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1P0 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Using the micronucleus assay, decreased levels of DNA damage were found after high dose ionizing radiation exposure of liver cells taken from frogs inhabiting a natural environment with above-background levels of ionizing radiation, compared to cells taken from frogs inhabiting background areas. The data obtained from a small number of animals suggest that stress present in the above-background environment could induce an adaptive response to ionizing radiation. This study did not reveal harmful effects of exposure to low levels of radioactivity. On the contrary, stress present in the above-background area may serve to enhance cellular defense mechanisms. - Highlights: > Frogs were collected from background and higher tritium level habitats. > The micronucleus assay was conducted on liver cells obtained from the frogs. > No detrimental effects were noted in frogs exposed to elevated tritium. > Adaptive responses were observed in frogs exposed to elevated tritium.

  9. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  10. Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, William J.

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics, as well as the influence of solid-state radiation effects on aqueous dissolution kinetics, which may impact the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. This work provides the underpinning science to develop improved glass and ceramic waste forms for the immobilization and disposition of high-level tank waste, excess plutonium, plutonium residues and scrap, other actinides, and other nuclear waste streams. Furthermore, this work is developing develop predictive models for the performance of nuclear waste forms and stabilized nuclear materials. Thus, the research performed under this project has significant implications for the immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW) and Nuclear Materials, two mission areas within the Office of Environmental Management (EM). With regard to the HLW mission, this research will lead to improved understanding of radiation-induced degradation mechanisms and their effects on dissolution kinetics, as well as development of predictive models for waste form performance. In the Nuclear Materials mission, this research will lead to improvements in the understanding of radiation effects on the chemical and structural properties of materials for the stabilization and long-term storage of plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, and other actinides. The research uses plutonium incorporation, ion-beam irradiation, and electron-beam irradiation to simulate the effects of alpha decay and beta decay on relevant glasses and ceramics. The research under this project has the potential to result in improved glass and ceramic materials for the stabilization and immobilization of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues and scraps, surplus weapons plutonium, highly-enriched uranium, other actinides, and other radioactive materials.

  11. Effect of PGE2 on radiation response of chinese hamster V79 cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holahan, E.V.; Blakely, W.F.; Walden, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Several recent investigations have reported that 16,16-dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (DiPGE2) can protect murine intestinal epithelial cells and hematopoietic stem cells (CFU-S) in vivo from ionizing radiation. It has been postulated that PGE2 may also increase radiation resistance in vitro by stimulating free-radical scavenging or repair systems for oxidative damage. This study reports on the effect of PGE2 in modifying radiation sensitivity in an in vitro mammalian cell line. Chinese hamster V79A03 cells were cultured. Exponentially growing cells were incubated before exposure to graded doses of 250-kVp X rays. Cells were assayed for variations in intracellular levels of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), total protein, and glutathione (GSH), and radiation sensitivity was measured by cell survival before and after PGE2 treatment. An acute (2-hr) exposure induced a 25% increase in cAMP content with no significant change in intracellular GSH or protein and no effect on cell survival after exposure to radiation. Chronic exposure to PGE2 increased intracellular GSH, protein, and cAMP levels by 82%, 3%, and 74%, respectively. However, no increase in radiation resistance was apparent following chronic exposure to PGE2. The increased radiation resistance observed in vitro may be due to modifications such as localized tissue or organ-system hypoxia.

  12. Effects of chronic parasitosis on women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiso, R

    1997-07-01

    Parasitic diseases are closely related to the lack of sanitation (unavailability of potable water, inadequate disposal of human waste, lack of latrines) or the absence of personal hygiene. They are also closely linked to warm and humid climates, and are therefore considered tropical diseases. This chapter addresses chronic hookworm parasitosis and malaria, and their effect on women's health. Of all Helminthes, hookworms cause the most severe anemia because of iron deficiency due to chronic blood loss. Worldwide, an estimated 51% of pregnant women suffer from anemia-almost twice as many as non-pregnant women. In severe cases (Hb deficiency affects the fetus, causes retarded intrauterine growth, and reduces fetal ability to absorb iron provided by the mother. Hookworms are nematodes that infect roughly 1 billion people. Their preferred habitat is the jejunum, where they attach to the mucous tissue to feed, and secrete an anticoagulant causing bleeding. Hookworm infections often begin in childhood. The worm enters the body through the skin and reaches the highest number at the end of adolescence and young adulthood. Little attention has been given to the treatment of pregnant women because of unavailability of safe antiparasitic drugs and fear of teratogenesis. However, there are new treatments, and the anthelminthic drugs may be administered in schools and organized women's groups in communities. During pregnancy anthelminthic treatment can improve maternal, fetal and infant health. Treatment given every 4 months has been shown to interrupt the transmission cycle of the parasite and help to improve the iron status of all women. Therapeutic strategies should be linked to other measures, such as promoting the use of shoes, introduction of potable water, education and treatment of the population at large, especially the school-age population. An estimated 267 million people are annually infected by malaria, a parasitic disease caused by Protozoa of the genus Plasmodium

  13. Radiative effects in radiative shocks in shock tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. P.; Doss, F. W.; McClarren, R. G.; Adams, M. L.; Amato, N.; Bingham, D.; Chou, C. C.; DiStefano, C.; Fidkowski, K.; Fryxell, B.; Gombosi, T. I.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Holloway, J. P.; van der Holst, B.; Huntington, C. M.; Karni, S.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.; Larsen, E.; van Leer, B.; Mallick, B.; Marion, D.; Martin, W.; Morel, J. E.; Myra, E. S.; Nair, V.; Powell, K. G.; Rauchwerger, L.; Roe, P.; Rutter, E.; Sokolov, I. V.; Stout, Q.; Torralva, B. R.; Toth, G.; Thornton, K.; Visco, A. J.

    2011-09-01

    Using modern high-energy-density facilities it is straightforward to produce radiative shock waves in which the transfer of energy by radiation controls the hydrodynamic structure of the system. Some of these experiments use shock tubes. This paper discusses such experiments, with an emphasis on the simple physical relations that determine the primary features of such shocks and on the details and impact of radiative energy transfer in such systems. Notable aspects include the creation of high-density shocked layers, the flow of radiative energy toward regions of higher energy density, and the creation of secondary shocks by ablation of the tube walls ahead of the primary shock front. Simulations of one such experimental system are also shown.

  14. Effect of laser radiation on rat radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laprun, I.B.

    1979-03-01

    Quite a few experimental data have been obtained to date indicating that radioresistance of the organism is enhanced under the influence of electromagnetic emissions in the radiofrequency and optical ranges. But no studies were made of the possible radioprotective properties of coherent laser radiation. At the same time, it was demonstrated that the low-energy emission of optical quantum generators (lasers) in the red band stimulates the protective forces of the organism and accelerates regenerative processes; i.e., it induces effects that are the opposite of that of ionizing radiation. Moreover, it was recently demonstrated that there is activation of catalase, a radiosensitive enzyme that plays an important role in the metabolism of peroxide compounds, under the influence of lasers. For this reason, the effect of pre-exposure to laser beams on radiosensitivity of rats was tested.

  15. Radiation Effects in the Space Telecommunications Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Winokur, Peter S.

    1999-05-17

    Trapped protons and electrons in the Earth's radiation belts and cosmic rays present significant challenges for electronics that must operate reliably in the natural space environment. Single event effects (SEE) can lead to sudden device or system failure, and total dose effects can reduce the lifetime of a telecommmiications system with significant space assets. One of the greatest sources of uncertainty in developing radiation requirements for a space system is accounting for the small but finite probability that the system will be exposed to a massive solar particle event. Once specifications are decided, standard laboratory tests are available to predict the total dose response of MOS and bipolar components in space, but SEE testing of components can be more challenging. Prospects are discussed for device modeling and for the use of standard commercial electronics in space.

  16. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  17. Casimir Effect, Hawking Radiation and Trace Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Setare, M R

    2001-01-01

    The Casimir energy for massless scalar field of two parallel conductor, in two dimensional Schwarzchild black hole background, with Dirichlet boundary conditions is calculated by making use of general properties of renormalized stress tensor. We show that vacuum expectation value of stress tensor can be obtain by Casimir effect, trace anomaly and Hawking radiation. Four-dimensional of this problem, by this method, is under progress by this author.

  18. Cellular and molecular aspects of the anti-inflammatory effects of low-dose radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Large, Martin

    2015-01-01

    For decades an anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of low-dose X-irradiation (LD-RT) has clinically been well established in the treatment of a plethora of benign diseases and chronic degenerative disorders with empirically identified single doses < 1 Gy to be most effective. Although considerable progress has been achieved in the understanding of immune modulatory effects of ionising radiation, especially in the low-dose range, the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently not fully r...

  19. 47 CFR 22.867 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Effective radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of ground and airborne stations... peak ERP of airborne mobile station transmitters must not exceed 12 Watts. (b) The peak ERP of...

  20. 47 CFR 95.855 - Transmitter effective radiated power limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Transmitter effective radiated power limitation. The effective radiated power (ERP) of each CTS and RTU shall... with an ERP exceeding 20 watts. No mobile RTU may transmit with an ERP exceeding 4 watts....

  1. Biologically based multistage modeling of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Hazelton; Suresh Moolgavkar; E. Georg Luebeck

    2005-08-30

    This past year we have made substantial progress in modeling the contribution of homeostatic regulation to low-dose radiation effects and carcinogenesis. We have worked to refine and apply our multistage carcinogenesis models to explicitly incorporate cell cycle states, simple and complex damage, checkpoint delay, slow and fast repair, differentiation, and apoptosis to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation in mouse intestinal crypts, as well as in other tissues. We have one paper accepted for publication in ''Advances in Space Research'', and another manuscript in preparation describing this work. I also wrote a chapter describing our combined cell-cycle and multistage carcinogenesis model that will be published in a book on stochastic carcinogenesis models edited by Wei-Yuan Tan. In addition, we organized and held a workshop on ''Biologically Based Modeling of Human Health Effects of Low dose Ionizing Radiation'', July 28-29, 2005 at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. We had over 20 participants, including Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff as keynote speaker, talks by most of the low-dose modelers in the DOE low-dose program, experimentalists including Les Redpath (and Mary Helen), Noelle Metting from DOE, and Tony Brooks. It appears that homeostatic regulation may be central to understanding low-dose radiation phenomena. The primary effects of ionizing radiation (IR) are cell killing, delayed cell cycling, and induction of mutations. However, homeostatic regulation causes cells that are killed or damaged by IR to eventually be replaced. Cells with an initiating mutation may have a replacement advantage, leading to clonal expansion of these initiated cells. Thus we have focused particularly on modeling effects that disturb homeostatic regulation as early steps in the carcinogenic process. There are two primary considerations that support our focus on homeostatic regulation. First, a number of

  2. Analytic approximate radiation effects due to Bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi I.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this note is to provide analytic approximate expressions that can provide quick estimates of the various effects of the Bremsstrahlung radiation produced relatively low energy electrons, such as the dumping of the beam into the beam stop at the ERL or field emission in superconducting cavities. The purpose of this work is not to replace a dependable calculation or, better yet, a measurement under real conditions, but to provide a quick but approximate estimate for guidance purposes only. These effects include dose to personnel, ozone generation in the air volume exposed to the radiation, hydrogen generation in the beam dump water cooling system and radiation damage to near-by magnets. These expressions can be used for other purposes, but one should note that the electron beam energy range is limited. In these calculations the good range is from about 0.5 MeV to 10 MeV. To help in the application of this note, calculations are presented as a worked out example for the beam dump of the R&D Energy Recovery Linac.

  3. Reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Allan

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses reliability and radiation effects in compound semiconductors, which have evolved rapidly during the last 15 years. Johnston's perspective in the book focuses on high-reliability applications in space, but his discussion of reliability is applicable to high reliability terrestrial applications as well. The book is important because there are new reliability mechanisms present in compound semiconductors that have produced a great deal of confusion. They are complex, and appear to be major stumbling blocks in the application of these types of devices. Many of the reliability problems that were prominent research topics five to ten years ago have been solved, and the reliability of many of these devices has been improved to the level where they can be used for ten years or more with low failure rates. There is also considerable confusion about the way that space radiation affects compound semiconductors. Some optoelectronic devices are so sensitive to damage in space that they are very difficu...

  4. Radiation piezoelectric effect in germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.

    1977-06-01

    Irradiation with ionizing particles of a germanium single crystal and uniaxial deformation at right-angles to the particle beam produced an electric field and a corresponding emf due to the radiation piezoelectric effect. Measurements were carried out when such a single crystal was irradiated with ..cap alpha.. particles and protons. The piezoelectric emf increased linearly with the compressive stress and the ..cap alpha..-particle flux intensity. The emf depended weakly on the particle energy. The observed effect was due to the anisotropy resulting from uniaxial deformation.

  5. The effects of solar radiation and black body re-radiation on thermal comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, Simon; Parsons, Ken

    2008-04-01

    When the sun shines on people in enclosed spaces, such as in buildings or vehicles, it directly affects thermal comfort. There is also an indirect effect as surrounding surfaces are heated exposing a person to re-radiation. This laboratory study investigated the effects of long wave re-radiation on thermal comfort, individually and when combined with direct solar radiation. Nine male participants (26.0 +/- 4.7 years) took part in three experimental sessions where they were exposed to radiation from a hot black panel heated to 100 degrees C; direct simulated solar radiation of 600 Wm(-2) and the combined simulated solar radiation and black panel radiation. Exposures were for 30 min, during which subjective responses and mean skin temperatures were recorded. The results showed that, at a surface temperature of 100 degrees C (close to maximum in practice), radiation from the flat black panel provided thermal discomfort but that this was relatively small when compared with the effects of direct solar radiation. It was concluded that re-radiation, from a dashboard in a vehicle, for example, will not have a major direct influence on thermal comfort and that existing models of thermal comfort do not require a specific modification. These results showed that, for the conditions investigated, the addition of re-radiation from internal components has an effect on thermal sensation when combined with direct solar radiation. However, it is not considered that it will be a major factor in a real world situation. This is because, in practice, dashboards are unlikely to maintain very high surface temperatures in vehicles without an unacceptably high air temperature. This study quantifies the contribution of short- and long-wave radiation to thermal comfort. The results will aid vehicle designers to have a better understanding of the complex radiation environment. These include direct radiation from the sun as well as re-radiation from the dashboard and other internal surfaces.

  6. Radiation Effects on DC-DC Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Xin; AbdulMazid, M. D.; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this work, several DC-DC converters were designed and built. The converters are Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, Flyback, and full-bridge zero-voltage switched. The total ionizing dose radiation and single event effects on the converters were investigated. The experimental results for the TID effects tests show that the voltages of the Buck Buck-Boost, Cuk, and Flyback converters increase as total dose increased when using power MOSFET IRF250 as a switching transistor. The change in output voltage with total dose is highest for the Buck converter and the lowest for Flyback converter. The trend of increase in output voltages with total dose in the present work agrees with those of the literature. The trends of the experimental results also agree with those obtained from PSPICE simulation. For the full-bridge zero-voltage switch converter, it was observed that the dc-dc converter with IRF250 power MOSFET did not show a significant change of output voltage with total dose. In addition, for the dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation-hardened power MOSFET, the output voltage did not change significantly with total dose. The experimental results were confirmed by PSPICE simulation that showed that FB-ZVS converter with IRF250 power MOSFET's was not affected with the increase in total ionizing dose. Single Event Effects (SEE) radiation tests were performed on FB-ZVS converters. It was observed that the FB-ZVS converter with the IRF250 power MOSFET, when the device was irradiated with Krypton ion with ion-energy of 150 MeV and LET of 41.3 MeV-square cm/mg, the output voltage increased with the increase in fluence. However, for Krypton with ion-energy of 600 MeV and LET of 33.65 MeV-square cm/mg, and two out of four transistors of the converter were permanently damaged. The dc-dc converter with FSF254R4 radiation hardened power MOSFET's did not show significant change at the output voltage with fluence while being irradiated by Krypton with ion energy of 1.20 GeV and LET of 25

  7. Transplantation of Endothelial Cells to Mitigate Acute and Chronic Radiation Injury to Vital Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, Shahin; Ginsberg, Michael; Scandura, Joseph; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-08-01

    Current therapeutic approaches for treatment of exposure to radiation involve the use of antioxidants, chelating agents, recombinant growth factors and transplantation of stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cell transplantation). However, exposure to high-dose radiation is associated with severe damage to the vasculature of vital organs, often leading to impaired healing, tissue necrosis, thrombosis and defective regeneration caused by aberrant fibrosis. It is very unlikely that infusion of protective chemicals will reverse severe damage to the vascular endothelial cells (ECs). The role of irradiated vasculature in mediating acute and chronic radiation syndromes has not been fully appreciated or well studied. New approaches are necessary to replace and reconstitute ECs in organs that are irreversibly damaged by radiation. We have set forth the novel concept that ECs provide paracrine signals, also known as angiocrine signals, which not only promote healing of irradiated tissue but also direct organ regeneration without provoking fibrosis. We have developed innovative technologies that enable manufacturing and banking of human GMP-grade ECs. These ECs can be transplanted intravenously to home to and engraft to injured tissues where they augment organ repair, while preventing maladaptive fibrosis. In the past, therapeutic transplantation of ECs was not possible due to a shortage of availability of suitable donor cell sources and preclinical models, a lack of understanding of the immune privilege of ECs, and inadequate methodologies for expansion and banking of engraftable ECs. Recent advances made by our group as well as other laboratories have breached the most significant of these obstacles with the development of technologies to manufacture clinical-scale quantities of GMP-grade and human ECs in culture, including genetically diverse reprogrammed human amniotic cells into vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) or human pluripotent stem cells into vascular ECs (iVECs). This

  8. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Costa de Camargo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ. Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h, measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  9. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  10. Late effects of ionizing radiation on testis; Effets tardifs des radiations ionisantes sur le testicules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardet, E. [Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer Rene-Gauducheau, 44 - Nantes (France)

    1997-12-01

    Most of the basic data regarding the effect of radiation on the testis are issued from animal studies. They demonstrate the extreme radiosensitivity on the germ cell lineage but little is known about the reversible or definitive aspects of these radiation induced effects. In man, the late non stochastic effects of radiation to the testicle are mainly related to persisting spermatogenesis disturbances or/and hormone related problems. Morphological, physiological, radiobiological specificities of the human testis along with numerous parameters depending on radiation conditions make it difficult to evaluate the late effects and radiation tolerance doses. Evaluation of such effects based on a common scale for therapeutic radiation schedules would improve the present understanding and possibility prevent the occurrence of these delayed effects, for the benefit of patients. (author)

  11. Effects of UV radiation on phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Cullen, John J.

    1995-07-01

    It is now widely documented that reduced ozone will result in increased levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation, especially UV-B (280-320nm), incident at the surface of the earth [Watson, 1988; Anderson et al., 1991; Schoeberl and Hartmann, 1991; Frederick and Alberts, 1991; WMO, 1991; Madronich, 1993; Kerr and McElroy, 1993], and there is considerable and increasing evidence that these higher levels of UV-B radiation may be detrimental to various forms of marine life in the upper layers of the ocean. With respect to aquatic ecosystems, we also know that this biologically- damaging mid-ultraviolet radiation can penetrate to ecologically- significant depths in marine and freshwater systems [Jerlov, 1950; Lenoble, 1956; Smith and Baker, 1979; Smith and Baker, 1980; Smith and Baker, 1981; Kirk et al., 1994]. This knowledge, plus the dramatic decline in stratospheric ozone over the Antarctic continent each spring, now known to be caused by anthropogenically released chemicals [Solomon, 1990; Booth et al., 1994], has resulted in increased UV-environmental research and a number of summary reports. The United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) has provided recent updates with respect to the effects of ozone depletion on aquatic ecosystems (Hader, Worrest, Kumar in UNEP 1989, 1991, Hader, Worrest, Kumar and Smith UNEP 1994) and the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) has provided [SCOPE, 1992] a summary of the effects of increased UV radiation on biological systems. SCOPE has also reported [SCOPE, 1993] on the effects of increased UV on the biosphere. In addition, several books have recently been published reviewing various aspects of environmental UV photobiology [Young et al., 1993], UV effects on humans, animals and plants [Tevini, 1993], the biological effects of UV radiation in Antarctica [Weiler and Penhale, 1994], and UV research in freshwater ecosystems [Williamson and Zagarese, 1994]. Several other reviews are relevant [NAS, 1984; Caldwell

  12. Chronic Inhalation Toxicity of Hydrazine: Oncogenic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    the results from hamsters. Tumor incidence tables were compiled and statistical analyses, using the Fisher Exact Test, were performed by the UCI staff... malnutrition during chronic exposure. Based upon these studies, the current OSHA Threshold Limit Value of 1.0 ppm for hydrazine is unsatisfactory while the

  13. Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation KidsHealth > For Parents > Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Radiation Print A A A What's in ... and can no longer do their jobs efficiently. Chemotherapy (or "chemo") and radiation , the two most common ...

  14. Effective physical treatment for chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, C G

    2004-01-01

    It is now feasible to adopt an evidence-based approach when providing physical treatment for patients with chronic LBP. A summary of the efficacy of a range of physical treatments is provided in Table 1. The evidence-based primary care options are exercise, laser, massage, and spinal manipulation; however, the latter three have small or transient effects that limit their value as therapies for chronic LBP. In contrast, exercise produces large reductions in pain and disability, a feature that suggests that exercise should play a major role in the management of chronic LBP. Physical treatments, such as acupuncture, backschool, hydrotherapy, lumbar supports, magnets, TENS, traction, ultrasound, Pilates therapy, Feldenkrais therapy, Alexander technique, and craniosacral therapy are either of unknown value or ineffective and so should not be considered. Outside of primary care, multidisciplinary treatment or functional restoration is effective; however, the high cost probably means that these programs should be reserved for patients who do not respond to cheaper treatment options for chronic LBP. Although there are now effective treatment options for chronic LBP, it needs to be acknowledged that the problem of chronic LBP is far from solved. Though treatments can provide marked improvements in the patient's condition, the available evidence suggests that the typical chronic LBP patient is left with some residual pain and disability. Developing new, more powerful treatments and refining the current group of known effective treatments is the challenge for the future.

  15. Oxygen effects in radiation biology and radiation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, E.L.; Held, K.D.

    1979-01-01

    The question of the influence of O/sub 2/ on the radiation sensitivity of organisms, cells and biomolecules is reviewed. Evidence is presented to show that there are two mechanisms that govern the manner in which O/sub 2/ acts in cells. It is also suggested that these may in addition be other mechanisms but no evidence is presented to support this. (ACR)

  16. Space storms and radiation causes and effects

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2010-01-01

    Heliophysics is a fast-developing scientific discipline that integrates studies of the Sun's variability, the surrounding heliosphere, and the environment and climate of planets. The Sun is a magnetically variable star and for planets with intrinsic magnetic fields, planets with atmospheres, or planets like Earth with both, there are profound consequences. This 2010 volume, the second in this series of three heliophysics texts, integrates the many aspects of space storms and the energetic radiation associated with them - from causes on the Sun to effects in planetary environments. It reviews t

  17. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    Adriano Costa de Camargo; Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza Vieira; Marisa Aparecida Bismara Regitano-D’Arce; Maria Antonia Calori-Domingues; Solange Guidolin Canniatti-Brazaca

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to...

  18. Healing of Chronic Wounds through Systemic Effects of Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo, L.; Trigos, I.; García-Cantú, R.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Serrano, G.

    2002-08-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) were configured to interact with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). These ELF were applied in the arm to five patients with chronic wounds resistant to medical and surgical treatment. Wound healing began in all patients during the first two weeks after ELF exposure permiting their previously unresponsive chronic wounds to function as internal controls. All lesions were cured or healed >70% in less than four months. Systemic effects were explained by ELF activation of PBMC and their transportation through the blood to the affected site. This therapy is effective in selected patients with chronic wounds.

  19. Medical response to effects of ionising radiation. [Nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosbie, W.A.; Gittus, J.H. (UKAEA Headquarters, London (UK))

    1989-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on 'Medical Response to Effects of Ionising Radiation' in 1989 in the form of nineteen papers published as a book. Topics discussed include radiation accidents at nuclear facilities, the medical management of radiation casualties, the responsibilities, plans and resources for coping with a nuclear accident and finally the long term effects of radiation, including leukaemia epidemiology studies. All papers were selected and indexed separately. (UK).

  20. Radiative Effects in the Standard Model Extension

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovskii, V C; Murchikova, E M

    2006-01-01

    The possibility of radiative effects induced by the Lorentz and CPT non-invariant interaction term for fermions in the Standard Model Extension is investigated. In particular, electron-positron photo-production and photon emission by electrons and positrons were studied. The rates of these processes were calculated in the Furry picture. It was demonstrated that the rates obtained in the framework of the model adopted strongly depend on the polarization states of the particles involved. Indeed, ultra-relativistic particles should occupy states with a preferred spin orientation, i.e., photons have the sign of polarization opposite to the sign of the effective potential, while charged particle are preferably in the state with the helicity coinciding with the sign of the effective potential. This leads to evident spatial asymmetries which may have certain consequences observable in astrophysical and cosmological studies.

  1. Conditions for effects of radiation pulsing

    CERN Document Server

    Trinkaus, H

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of pulsing effects on radiation damage is due to differences in the delay times of relevant defect reactions and/or to the non-linear dependence of such reactions on defect production rates. Thus, significant pulsing effects require (1) proper relationships of the internal time scales of defect production and reaction to the time scales of pulsing and (2) sufficiently large pulsing induced fluctuations in relevant microstructural variables. We show that the first condition, which we quantify by a 'relative dynamic bias', is indeed fulfilled in wide ranges of the main irradiation parameters. The second condition, quantified by an 'absolute dynamic bias', is, however, found to restrict the parameter ranges of possible pulsing effects substantially. For planned spallation neutron sources and similar accelerator driven systems facilities we find, for instance, that, in the temperature range of interest, the defect yield of one pulse (controlling the absolute dynamic bias) is much too small to allo...

  2. MEDICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF UV RADIATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND, B.M.

    2001-07-26

    Organisms living on the earth are exposed to solar radiation, including its ultraviolet (UV) components (for general reviews, the reader is referred to Smith [1] and Young et al. [2]). UV wavelength regions present in sunlight are frequently designated as UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm). In today's solar spectrum, UVA is the principal UV component, with UVB present at much lower levels. Ozone depletion will increase the levels of UVB reaching the biosphere, but the levels of UVA will not be changed significantly [3]. Because of the high efficiency of UVB in producing damage in biological organisms in the laboratory experiments, it has sometimes been assumed that UVA has little or no adverse biological effects. However, accumulating data [4, 5], including action spectra (efficiency of biological damage as a function of wavelength of radiation; see Section 5) for DNA damage in alfalfa seedlings [6], in human skin [7], and for a variety of plant damages (Caldwell, this volume) indicate that UVA can induce damage in DNA in higher organisms. Thus, understanding the differential effects of UVA and UVB wavebands is essential for estimating the biological consequences of stratospheric ozone depletion.

  3. Predicted levels of human radiation tolerance extrapolated from clinical studies of radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushbaugh, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Results of clinical studies of radiation effects on man are used to evaluate space radiation hazards encountered during manned space travel. Considered are effects of photons as well as of mixed fission neutrons and gamma irradiations in establishing body radiosensitivity and tolerance levels. Upper and lower dose-response-time relations for acute radiation syndromes in patients indicate that man is more than sufficiently radioresistant to make the risks of an early radiation effect during one short space mission intangibly small in relation to the other nonradiation risks involved.

  4. Efeitos da radiação solar crônica prolongada sobre o sistema imunológico de pescadores profissionais em Recife (PE, Brasil Effects of long-term chronic exposure to sun radiation in immunological system of commercial fishermen in Recife, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Maria de Fátima Martins de Carvalho Bezerra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTOS: Existe um consenso de que a exposição à radiação ultravioleta determina alterações n o sistema imunológico da pele, o que permite que se avente a hipótese de que a exposição prolongada e crônica ao Sol pode representar uma das maiores agressões ambientais à saúde humana. Entre as várias ocupações que requerem, necessariamente, exposição prolongada e crônica ao Sol está a de pescador. No entanto, a experiência clínica dermatológica, amealhada ao longo de vários anos de exercício da Medicina, não parece confirmar essa hipótese. OBJETIVO: Avaliar efeitos clínicos, histológicos e imunológicos da exposição crônica e prolongada à radiação ultravioleta em pescadores. MÉTODOS: Em estudo prospectivo, transversal, observacional, foram caracterizadas lesões dermatológicas, marcadores imunológicos e alterações histológicas de pescadores e subpopulações de linfócitos comparadas a grupo-controle. Empregaram-se testes de Mann-Whitney, exato de Fisher, Wilcoxon em nível de 0,05. RESULTADOS: Houve diferenças entre os grupos exposto e protegido em elastose (p = 0,03, ectasia de vasos dérmicos (p = 0,012 e número de células nas camadas epidérmicas entre os cones (p = 0,029. Foram mais comuns em pescadores CD45RO, CD68+ e mastócitos na pele (p = 0,040, p BACKGROUND: Among the various occupations which necessarily require long-term and chronic sun exposure is that of a fisherman. However, clinical experience in dermatology earned over several years of medical practice does not seem to confirm this hypothesis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate clinical, histological and immunological effects of long-term and chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation in fishermen. METHODS: A prospective, cross-sectional and observational study characterized skin lesions, immunological markers and histological alterations in fishermen, as well as lymphocyte subpopulations compared to a control group. Mann-Whitney, Fisher's and

  5. Radiation effects in power converters: Design of a radiation hardened integrated switching DC/DC converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adell, Philippe

    When electronic devices are used in space and military systems, they may be exposed to various types of radiation, including photons, electrons, protons, neutrons, and heavy ions. The effects of radiation on the semiconductor devices within the systems range from gradual degradation to catastrophic failure. In order to design and produce reliable systems for space or military applications, it is necessary to understand the device-level effects of radiation and develop appropriate strategies for reducing system susceptibility. This research focuses on understanding radiation effects in power converters for space and military applications. We show that power converters are very sensitive to radiation (total-dose, single event effects and displacement damage) and that their radiation response is dependent on input bias conditions and load conditions. We compared the radiation hardness of various power converter topologies using experiments and simulations. Evaluation of these designs under different modes of operation is demonstrated to be critical for determining radiation hardness. We emphasize the correlation between radiation effects and the role of the dynamic response of these topologies. For instance, total dose exposure has been found to degrade loop gain and affect regulation in some converters. We propose several radiation-hardening solutions to improve the radiation response of these designs. For instance, we demonstrate the design of a digitally controlled boost converter suitable for space applications based on an SRAM FPGA. A design hardening solution has been developed and successfully applied through VHDL simulations and experiments to assure the continuous operation of the converter in the presence of SEES (more precisely SEFIs). This research led to the design of a digitally controlled radiation hardened integrated switching buck converter. The proposed design is suitable for micro-satellite applications and is based on a high-voltage/CMOS process

  6. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camargo, Adriano Costa de [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin; Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira de Souza; Regitano-d' Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia, E-mail: sgcbraza@usp.b, E-mail: tvieira@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: mabra@esalq.usp.b, E-mail: macdomin@esalq.usp.b [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao

    2011-07-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The viability of using natural sources of antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants was assessed. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays at a dose rate of 7.5 kGy/h using a {sup 60}Co source. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached deodorized (RBD) soybean oil that was free from synthetic antioxidants. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Rancimat method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. Ethanolic extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Rancimat method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT but lower than THBQ. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative level when added to soybean oil. The induction period of the control soybean oil was 5.7 h, while soybean oil with added ethanolic peanut skin extract had an induction period of 7.2 h, on average. (author)

  7. Effects of Chronic Central Arginine Vasopressin (AVP on Maternal Behavior in Chronically Stressed Rat Dams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C. Nephew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of mothers to chronic stressors during pregnancy or the postpartum period often leads to the development of depression, anxiety, or other related mood disorders. The adverse effects of mood disorders are often mediated through maternal behavior and recent work has identified arginine vasopressin (AVP as a key neuropeptide hormone in the expression of maternal behavior in both rats and humans. Using an established rodent model that elicits behavioral and physiological responses similar to human mood disorders, this study tested the effectiveness of chronic AVP infusion as a novel treatment for the adverse effects of exposure to chronic social stress during lactation in rats. During early (day 3 and mid (day 10 lactation, AVP treatment significantly decreased the latency to initiate nursing and time spent retrieving pups, and increased pup grooming and total maternal care (sum of pup grooming and nursing. AVP treatment was also effective in decreasing maternal aggression and the average duration of aggressive bouts on day 3 of lactation. Central AVP may be an effective target for the development of treatments for enhancing maternal behavior in individuals exposed to chronic social stress.

  8. Biological effects of space radiation and development of effective countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-04-01

    As part of a program to assess the adverse biological effects expected from astronauts' exposure to space radiation, numerous different biological effects relating to astronauts' health have been evaluated. There has been major focus recently on the assessment of risks related to exposure to solar particle event (SPE) radiation. The effects related to various types of space radiation exposure that have been evaluated are: gene expression changes (primarily associated with programmed cell death and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling), oxidative stress, gastrointestinal tract bacterial translocation and immune system activation, peripheral hematopoietic cell counts, emesis, blood coagulation, skin, behavior/fatigue (including social exploration, submaximal exercise treadmill and spontaneous locomotor activity), heart functions, alterations in biological endpoints related to astronauts' vision problems (lumbar puncture/intracranial pressure, ocular ultrasound and histopathology studies), and survival, as well as long-term effects such as cancer and cataract development. A number of different countermeasures have been identified that can potentially mitigate or prevent the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to space radiation.

  9. Light-Cone Effect of Radiation Fields in Cosmological Radiative Transfer Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Ahn, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel method to implement time-delayed propagation of radiation fields in cosmological radiative transfer simulations. Time-delayed propagation of radiation fields requires construction of retarded-time fields by tracking the location and lifetime of radiation sources along the corresponding light-cones. Cosmological radiative transfer simulations have, until now, ignored this "light-cone effect" or implemented ray-tracing methods that are computationally demanding. We show that radiative transfer calculation of the time-delayed fields can be easily achieved in numerical simulations when periodic boundary conditions are used, by calculating the time-discretized retarded-time Green's function using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method and convolving it with the source distribution. We also present a direct application of this method to the long-range radiation field of Lyman-Werner band photons, which is important in the high-redshift astrophysics with first stars.

  10. Radiation physical chemistry effects on organic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, C.H.; Duarte, C.L.; Hamada, M.M. E-mail: mmhamada@net.ipen.br

    2003-06-01

    The radiation damage effect on a liquid scintillating system was evaluated in the PPO and POPOP solutes. Samples containing PPO (1%w/v) and POPOP (0.2%w/v) diluted in toluene were irradiated at different doses, using a {sup 60}Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy/s. The transmittance and the chemical degradation of those solutes were evaluated as a function of dose. The PPO transmittance at 360 nm decayed exponentially with the dose, while the POPOP transmittance at 420 nm decayed linearly. The chemical degradation on the PPO and POPOP was fitted to a bi-exponential mathematical model as a function of dose. The first exponential (fast slope) was interpreted as damage produced by toluene radiolytics whereas the second exponential (slow slope) was interpreted as the damage caused by primary interaction of the {gamma}-radiation with targets, i.e., {gamma} photons that hit PPO and POPOP directly. The w (eV/damage molecule) and G (damaged molecules/100 eV) parameters were estimated in this paper.

  11. Radiation effects on DC-DC Converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dexin; Attia, John O.; Kankam, Mark D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    DC-DC switching converters are circuits that can be used to convert a DC voltage of one value to another by switching action. They are increasing being used in space systems. Most of the popular DC-DC switching converters utilize power MOSFETs. However power MOSFETs, when subjected to radiation, are susceptible to degradation of device characteristics or catastrophic failure. This work focuses on the effects of total ionizing dose on converter performance. Four fundamental switching converters (buck converter, buck-boost converter, cuk converter, and flyback converter) were built using Harris IRF250 power MOSFETs. These converters were designed for converting an input of 60 volts to an output of about 12 volts with a switching frequency of 100 kHz. The four converters were irradiated with a Co-60 gamma source at dose rate of 217 rad/min. The performances of the four converters were examined during the exposure to the radiation. The experimental results show that the output voltage of the converters increases as total dose increases. However, the increases of the output voltage were different for the four different converters, with the buck converter and cuk converter the highest and the flyback converter the lowest. We observed significant increases in output voltage for cuk converter at a total dose of 24 krad (si).

  12. Stimulatory effects of low ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, S.; Kurisu, Y.; Murata, I.; Takahashi, A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Masui, H.; Iida, T. [Department of Electronic, Information Systems and Energy Engineering, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Radioisotope Research Center, Osaka Univ., Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis was strongly carried out for animals and plants; subharmful dose of radiation may stimulate any organism. The concept of radiation hormesis effect consists of 1) biopositive effects of low dose radiation; influence caused by low dose radiation is totally different from one caused by high dose radiation, low dose radiation produces physiological useful effects against high dose radiation, and 2) radio-adaptive response; radiation also acts the organism as stress. Irradiated with small dose radiation previously, it raises its own defense response against the stress (radiation), resulting in the phenomenon that radiation influence decreases in appearance. In this paper we have investigated the phenomenon of radiation hormesis effects for plants through irradiation experiments with neutrons and gamma-rays to find out the mechanism. In the present experiment, dry seeds of Raphanus sativus were irradiated with D-T neutrons (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 100 kGy), D-D neutrons (1 mGy {approx} 100 mGy), thermal and fast neutrons (irradiation in a nuclear reactor: 100 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy), 60Co gamma-rays (10 {mu}Gy {approx} 10 Gy). To confirm existence of the radiation hormesis effects, germination percentage, length of hypocotyl, length of root and total weight of seed leaf were measured at 7th day after starting cultivation. We estimated relative effectiveness as the hormesis effect, that is the ratio of mean values of measured subjects for the irradiated and control groups. For Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effect on seed leaf growth has been observed in the seed group irradiated by D-T neutrons and D-D neutrons. The observed hormesis effect is from 5 to 25 percents. (author)

  13. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence findings in chronic phototoxic maculopathy secondary to snow-reflected solar radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A professional mountain trekker presented with gradual, moderate visual decline in one eye. The subnormal vision could not be explained by the examination of anterior and posterior segment of either eye, which was unremarkable. Optical coherence tomography and autofluorescence imaging revealed subtle defects in the outer retina, which correlated with the extent of visual disturbance. A novel presentation of retinal phototoxicity due to indirect solar radiation reflected from snow in inadequately protected eyes of a chronically exposed subject is reported.

  14. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; Wishart, James F.; Hao, Yufeng; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. Here, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. We believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.

  15. Chronic Mammalian Toxicological Effects of LAP Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Adenocarcinoma 1 3 2 2 5 4 Subcutaneous Fibroma 2 2 2 3 3 4 Hemangiopericytoma 1 0 0 2 0 0 Hemangiosarcoma 0 1 0 0 2 0 Myxoma 1 0 0 2 0 0 125 Table 38...Hyperplasia, mild 0 2 0 0 3 0 U Inflammation, chronic 0 1 0 0 2 0 Adenoma 3 0 0 5 0 0 Adenocarcinoma 1 0 2 2 0 3 Fibroma 1 0 0 2 0 0 Fibroadenoma 20 6t 2t 31...Neurilemoma 0 1 0 0 2 0 Foot Hemangiosarcoma 1 0 0 2 0 0 Jaw Squamous cell carcinoma 1 1 0 2 2 0 Subcutaneous Adenocarcinoma 0 0 1 0 0 2 Fibroma 1 1

  16. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeneva, Inna B., E-mail: inna.korzeneva@molgen.vniief.ru [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Kostuyk, Svetlana V.; Ershova, Liza S. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Osipov, Andrian N. [Federal Medial and Biological Center named after Burnazyan of the Federal Medical and Biological Agency (FMBTz named after Burnazyan of FMBA), Moscow (Russian Federation); State Research Center - Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of Federal Medical Biological Agency, Zhivopisnaya, 46, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Porokhovnik, Lev N.; Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The chronic exposure to low-dose IR induces DSBs in human lymphocytes (TM index). • Exposure to IR decreases the level of human circulating DNA (cfDNA index). • IR induces an increase of DNase1 activity (DNase1 index) in plasma. • IR induces an increase of the level of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA index) in plasma. • The ratio cfDNA/(DNase 1 × Ab DNA × TM) is a potential marker of human exposure to IR. - Abstract: The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism’s cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1 × Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab

  17. Relationship Between Radiation-Induced Apoptosis of T Lymphocytes and Chronic Toxicity in Patients With Prostate Cancer Treated by Radiation Therapy: A Prospective Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foro, Palmira, E-mail: pforo@parcdesalutmar.cat [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Algara, Manuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lozano, Joan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Rodriguez, Nuria; Sanz, Xavier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Torres, Erica [Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Carles, Joan [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Oncology, Hospital Vall d' Hebron, Barcelona (Spain); Reig, Anna; Membrive, Ismael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Quera, Jaume [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Fernandez-Velilla, Enric; Pera, Oscar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Lacruz, Marti [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Radiation Protection Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain); Bellosillo, Beatriz [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Pathology Department, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of radiation-induced apoptosis in vitro of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes with late toxicity of prostate cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: 214 patients were prospectively included in the study. Peripheral blood was drawn from patients before treatment and irradiated with 8 Gy. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes that underwent radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by flow cytometry. Toxicity and mortality were correlated in 198 cases with pretreatment apoptosis and clinical and biological variables by use of a Cox proportional hazards model. Results: The mean percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte radiation-induced apoptosis was 28.58% (±14.23) and 50.76% (±18.9), respectively. Genitourinary (GU) toxicity was experienced by 39.9% of patients, while gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity was experienced by 19.7%. The probability of development of GU toxicity was nearly doubled (hazard ratio [HR] 1.99, P=.014) in those patients in whom the percentage of in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T-lymphocytes was ≤28.58%. It was also almost double in patients who received doses ≥50 Gy in 65% of the bladder volume (V65 ≥50) (HR 1.92, P=.048). No correlation was found between GI toxicity and any of the variables studied. The probability of death during follow-up, after adjustment for different variables, was 2.7 times higher in patients with a percentage of CD8+ T lymphocyte apoptosis ≤50.76% (P=.022). Conclusions: In conclusion, our study shows, in the largest prospective cohort of prostate cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, that in vitro radiation-induced apoptosis of CD4+ T lymphocytes assessed before radiation therapy was associated with the probability of developing chronic GU toxicity. In addition, the radiation dose received in the urinary bladder (V65 ≥50) affected the occurrence of GU toxicity. Finally, we also demonstrate that radiation-induced apoptosis of

  18. II. Biological studies of radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.H.

    1948-05-24

    With the completion of the 184 inch cyclotron in Berkeley and the successful construction of a deflector system, it was possible to bring the 190 Mev deuteron and the 380 Mev alpha beams out into the air and to begin a study of the effects of high-energy deuteron beams by direct irradiation of biological specimens. The direct biological use of deuteron beams was attempted earlier in Berkeley by Marshak, MacLeish, and Walker in 1940. These and other investigators have been aware for some time of the potential usefulness of high energy particle beams for radio-biological studies and their suitability for biological investigations. R.R. Wilson advanced the idea of using fast proton beams to deliver radiation and intervening tissues. R.E. Zirkle pointed out that such particle beams may be focused or screened until a cross-section of the beam is small enough to study effects of irradiation under the microscope on single cells or on parts of single cells. This article gives an overview of the radiological use of high energy deuteron beams, including the following topics: potential uses of high energy particle beams; experiments on the physical properties of the beam; lethal effect of the deuteron beam on mice.

  19. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    CERN Document Server

    Mercer, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly-formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous, and (ii) episodic. We find that: (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilises the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, th...

  20. Plenary panel 1: The scientific bases of radiation protection. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salomaa, S. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (L.N.T.) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (authors)

  1. Effects of bromocriptine and radiation on the size and activity of estrogen-induced rat prolactinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Tomokatsu; Numata, Hideharu; Hokama, Yasuo; Muraoka, Kiyoaki; Saito, Yoshikazu (Tottori Univ., Yonago (Japan). School of Medicine); Kawamoto, Kaoru

    1985-01-01

    Estrogen-induced rat prolactinomas were produced after seven weekly injections of 2.5 mg of estradiol valerate. The rats were treated with various combinations of therapeutic agents. They were divided into four groups including the bromocriptine (CB) treated group, irradiated group, combined CB and radiation treated group, and finally the control group. Serum concentrations of prolactin and weights of tumors containing pituitary tissues were measured and statistically compared. The suppressing effect of CB against prolactinomas was well demonstrated in their hormonal activities. But it alone was not effective in reducing the size of prolactinomas. Concerning irradiation, on the 17th day it alone was not effective in reducing hormonal activities of rat prolactinomas. In the chronic stage, on the 30th day radiation alone was effective in reducing hormonal activity. Throughout the experiment CB was more potent than radiation in reducing hormonal activity. Concerning the size reducing effect, combined use of CB with radiation was significantly effective. If CB is not sufficient in reducing the size and hormonal activity of human prolactinoma, its combined use with radiation may be suggested.

  2. Radiation effects on organic materials in nuclear plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, M B; Davis, M V

    1981-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to identify information useful in determining the lowest level at which radiation causes damage to nuclear plant equipment. Information was sought concerning synergistic effects of radiation and other environmental stresses. Organic polymers are often identified as the weak elements in equipment. Data on radiation effects are summarized for 50 generic name plastics and 16 elastomers. Coatings, lubricants, and adhesives are treated as separate groups. Inorganics and metallics are considered briefly. With a few noted exceptions, these are more radiation resistant than organic materials. Some semiconductor devices and electronic assemblies are extremely sensitive to radiation. Any damage threshold including these would be too low to be of practical value. With that exception, equipment exposed to less than 10/sup 4/ rads should not be significantly affected. Equipment containing no Teflon should not be significantly affected by 10/sup 5/ rads. Data concerning synergistic effects and radiation sensitization are discussed. The authors suggest correlations between the two effects.

  3. Terrestrial radiation effects in ULSI devices and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ibe, Eishi H

    2014-01-01

    A practical guide on how mathematical approaches can be used to analyze and control radiation effects in semiconductor devices within various environments Covers faults in ULSI devices to failures in electronic systems caused by a wide variety of radiation fields, including electrons, alpha -rays, muons, gamma rays, neutrons and heavy ions. Readers will learn the environmental radiation features at the ground or avionics altitude. Readers will also learn how to make numerical models from physical insight and what kind of mathematical approaches should be implemented to analyze the radiation effects. A wide variety of mitigation techniques against soft-errors are reviewed and discussed. The author shows how to model sophisticated radiation effects in condensed matter in order to quantify and control them. The book provides the reader with the knowledge on a wide variety of radiation fields and their effects on the electronic devices and systems. It explains how electronic systems including servers and rout...

  4. LONG-TERM EFFECT OF HOMOHARRINGTONINE ON CHRONIC GRANULOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yu-feng; ZHU Jia-bin; WANG Chun-ling; DING Bang-he; LI Yuan-yuan; XUAN Heng-bao; QIAN Mo-sheng

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To observe the long-term effect of homoharringtonine (HHT) on chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL) and its pharmacological mechanism. Methods: 76 patients with newly diagnosed early chronic phase CGL received treatment of merely 1.5 mg/m2 daily HHT for induction remission and long-term maintenance treatment. The apoptosis rate of bone marrow CD34+ cells induced by HHT was assayed with flow cytometer. Results: 86.8% patients achieved CHR, 13.2% patients PHR and 31.8% patients got cytogenetic response in HHT treatment group, which was longer than 31 (8-54) months in hydroxyurea (HU) group (P<0.05). The effect of apoptosis induction HHT was stronger on CGL-CP patients bone marrow CD34+ cells than on normal person bone marrow CD34+ cells. Conclusion: HHT is a very effective drug for remission induction and long-term maintenance treatment in early chronic phase CGL patients.

  5. Effects of ionizing radiations on in utero development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lallemand, J. (EdF, 75 - Paris (France))

    1984-01-01

    Following a reminder of embryology and methodology, a review is made of the main teratogenic effects related to radiation exposure, i.e. lethal effects, radioinduced malformations, maldevelopment and cancers. The sensitivity of the embryo and foetus to radiation seems to last during the whole gestation. Howewer, the latest investigations indicate that the main damage is mental retardation. This review concludes on practical considerations of radiation protection in the field of radiographic examinations of pregnant women.

  6. Glucocorticoid therapy-induced memory deficits: acute versus chronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, Daniel; Wolf, Oliver T; Kollias, Spyros; Roozendaal, Benno; Forster, Adrian; de Quervain, Dominique J-F

    2008-03-26

    Conditions with chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels are usually associated with declarative memory deficits. Considerable evidence suggests that long-term glucocorticoid exposure may cause cognitive impairment via cumulative and long-lasting influences on hippocampal function and morphology. However, because elevated glucocorticoid levels at the time of retention testing are also known to have direct impairing effects on memory retrieval, it is possible that such acute hormonal influences on retrieval processes contribute to the memory deficits found with chronic glucocorticoid exposure. To investigate this issue, we examined memory functions and hippocampal volume in 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis who were treated either chronically (5.3 +/- 1.0 years, mean +/- SE) with low to moderate doses of prednisone (7.5 +/- 0.8 mg, mean +/- SE) or without glucocorticoids. In both groups, delayed recall of words learned 24 h earlier was assessed under conditions of either elevated or basal glucocorticoid levels in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. Although the findings in this patient population did not provide evidence for harmful effects of a history of chronic prednisone treatment on memory performance or hippocampal volume per se, acute prednisone administration 1 h before retention testing to either the steroid or nonsteroid group impaired word recall. Thus, these findings indicate that memory deficits observed under chronically elevated glucocorticoid levels result, at least in part, from acute and reversible glucocorticoid effects on memory retrieval.

  7. The effects of chronic marijuana use on circadian entrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Lauren N; Fogler, Kethera; Hall, Kate; Hartmann, Matthew; Dyche, Jeff

    2015-05-01

    Animal literature suggests a connection between marijuana use and altered circadian rhythms. However, the effect has not yet been demonstrated in humans. The present study examined the effect of chronic marijuana use on human circadian function. Participants consisted of current users who reported smoking marijuana daily for at least a year and non-marijuana user controls. Participants took a neurocognitive assessment, wore actigraphs and maintained sleep diaries for three weeks. While no significant cognitive changes were found between groups, data revealed that chronic marijuana use may act as an additional zeitgeber and lead to increased entrainment in human users.

  8. Atrophy of sacrospinal muscle groups in patients with chronic, diffusely radiating lumbar back pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laasonen, E.M.

    1984-01-01

    After surgery necessitated by lumbar back pain syndromes, radiolucency verified by CT may appear in the sacrospinal muscle group on the operate side. This radiolucency represents muscular atrophy and is in its most severe form a result of the replacement of muscle tissue with adipose tissue. Such muscular atrophy appeared in the present series in 31 out of all 156 patients (19.9%) and in 29 out of 94 patients operated on because of radiating lumbar back pain (30.9%). The radiological appearance, extent, and HU values of this muscular atrophy are presented in detail. Only weak correlations with the multitude of clinical symptoms and signs were found in this retrospective study. The effects of irreversible muscular atrophy on the indications for surgery and physiotherapy are discussed.

  9. Studies on EB radiation effect on PA610

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Kebin; Zhang Huaming; Li Xiurong; Xiong Ruilin [Sichuan Forever Group Co. Ltd., China Academy of Engineering Physics, Miangany (China)

    2000-03-01

    Radiation effect of PA610 with polyfunctional monomer trially isocyanurate (TAIC) was studied, the results show that crosslinking effect of EB radiation on PA610 is obvious. After the PA610 samples were radiated by EB with dosage 75KGY, the physical characters of PA610 materials were greatly improved, especially their tensile strength being increased about 18% and their impact strength about 50%, but their water and oil absorption were decreased. So, EB radiation can enhance PA610 materials physical strength, resistance to solvents and water and increase their thermal-deformation temperature. (author)

  10. Basic mechanisms of radiation effects in the natural space radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwank, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    Four general topics are covered in respect to the natural space radiation environment: (1) particles trapped by the earth`s magnetic field, (2) cosmic rays, (3) radiation environment inside a spacecraft, (4) laboratory radiation sources. The interaction of radiation with materials is described by ionization effects and displacement effects. Total-dose effects on MOS devices is discussed with respect to: measurement techniques, electron-hole yield, hole transport, oxide traps, interface traps, border traps, device properties, case studies and special concerns for commercial devices. Other device types considered for total-dose effects are SOI devices and nitrided oxide devices. Lastly, single event phenomena are discussed with respect to charge collection mechanisms and hard errors. (GHH)

  11. Acute Radiation Effects Resulting from Exposure to Solar Particle Event-Like Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann; Cengel, Keith

    2012-07-01

    A major solar particle event (SPE) may place astronauts at significant risk for the acute radiation syndrome (ARS), which may be exacerbated when combined with other space flight stressors, such that the mission or crew health may be compromised. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) Center of Acute Radiation Research (CARR) is focused on the assessment of risks of adverse biological effects related to the ARS in animal models exposed to space flight stressors combined with the types of radiation expected during an SPE. As part of this program, FDA-approved drugs that may prevent and/or mitigate ARS symptoms are being evaluated. The CARR studies are focused on the adverse biological effects resulting from exposure to the types of radiation, at the appropriate energies, doses and dose-rates, present during an SPE (and standard reference radiations, gamma rays or electrons). The ARS is a phased syndrome which often includes vomiting and fatigue. Other acute adverse biologic effects of concern are the loss of hematopoietic cells, which can result in compromised bone marrow and immune cell functions. There is also concern for skin damage from high SPE radiation doses, including burns, and resulting immune system dysfunction. Using 3 separate animal model systems (ferrets, mice and pigs), the major ARS biologic endpoints being evaluated are: 1) vomiting/retching and fatigue, 2) hematologic changes (with focus on white blood cells) and immune system changes resulting from exposure to SPE radiation with and without reduced weightbearing conditions, and 3) skin injury and related immune system functions. In all of these areas of research, statistically significant adverse health effects have been observed in animals exposed to SPE-like radiation. Countermeasures for the management of ARS symptoms are being evaluated. New research findings from the past grant year will be discussed. Acknowledgements: This research is supported by the NSBRI Center of Acute

  12. Space radiation effects on plant and mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C.; De Micco, V.; Macaeva, E.; Quintens, R.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the effects of ionizing radiation on organisms is related to different research aims. The current review emphasizes the studies on the effects of different doses of sparsely and densely ionizing radiation on living organisms, with the final purpose of highlighting specific and common effects of space radiation in mammals and plants. This topic is extremely relevant in the context of radiation protection from space environment. The response of different organisms to ionizing radiation depends on the radiation quality/dose and/or the intrinsic characteristics of the living system. Macromolecules, in particular DNA, are the critical targets of radiation, even if there is a strong difference between damages encountered by plant and mammalian cells. The differences in structure and metabolism between the two cell types are responsible for the higher resistance of the plant cell compared with its animal counterpart. In this review, we report some recent findings from studies performed in Space or on Earth, simulating space-like levels of radiation with ground-based facilities, to understand the effect of ionizing radiation on mammalian and plant cells. In particular, our attention is focused on genetic alterations and repair mechanisms in mammalian cells and on structures and mechanisms conferring radioresistance to plant cells.

  13. Adverse Effects of Radiation and Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    The long-term consequences of radiation and chemotherapy on intellectual and endocrine function in children with brain tumors is reviewed from the Departments of Neurology and Pediatrics, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY.

  14. Solenoid and Synchrotron radiation effects in CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Tomás, R; Angal-Kalinin, D

    2010-01-01

    The emission of Synchrotron Radiation in the CLIC BDS is one of the major limitations of the machine performance. An extensive revision of this phenomenon is presented with special emphasis on the Interaction point (IP) solenoid.

  15. Studies of the hemolytic effect of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, S.; Katz, E.; Porter, L.M.; Jacobson, L.O.; Watson, C.J.

    1945-07-10

    These studies were aimed at elucidating affects of radiation in inducing hemolysis independent of inhibition of erythropoiesis. Research studies were conducted both on human patients and dogs. Phosphorus-32 in mc amounts were administered either intravenously or orally to patients suffering Polycythemia rubra vera. Dogs were treated with either P-32 or x-radiation. Hemoglobin metabolism was monitored in all test subjects by hematology, blood chemistry, and fecal excretion of hemoglobin catabolites.

  16. Differential effect of opioids in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staahl, Camilla; Dimcevski, Georg; Andersen, Søren Due

    2007-01-01

    and morphine on experimental pain in patients with pain caused by chronic pancreatitis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Ten patients took part in this blinded, cross-over study. The analgesic effects of morphine (30 mg, oral), oxycodone (15 mg, oral) and placebo were tested against multimodal (mechanical, thermal...

  17. Chronic Juvenile Delinquency and the "Suppression Effect": An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Mark; Norman, Michael

    1988-01-01

    Notes that fear of apprehension and punishment have been reported to suppress juvenile crime. Discusses suppression effect in regard to the correlates of chronic juvenile delinquency and exploratory evidence that youth who commit large volume of crime do not fear sanctions imposed by juvenile court any more than youth who commit only one offense…

  18. Effect of Radiation Drag on Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Nio, T; Fukue, J; Nio, Tomomi; Matsuda, Takuya; Fukue, Jun

    1998-01-01

    Hoyle-Lyttleton type accretion is investigated, by taking account of not only the effect of radiation pressure but the effect of radiation drag. We calculate the trajectories of particles for three cases: only the effect of gravity is considered (case A); the effect of radiation pressure is taken into account (case B); the effect of radiation drag as well as radiation pressure is taken into account (case C). The accretion radii for former two cases are $2GM/v_{\\infty}^2$ for case A and $2GM(1-\\Gamma)/v_{\\infty}^2$ for case B, where M is the mass of the accreted object, $v_{\\infty}$ the relative velocity, and Gamma the normalized luminosity of the accreted object. We found that the accretion radius for case C is in between those of cases A and B under the present approximation; i.e., the accretion radius decreases due to radiation pressure while it increases due to radiation drag. In addition, the accretion radius for case C becomes larger as the incident velocity becomes fast. The effect of radiation drag bec...

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation; Effecten van ioniserende straling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M.; Hardeman, F.; Holmstock, L.; Hurtgen, C.; Mahieu, L.; Sohier, A.; Vandecasteele, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmaercke, H.; Zeevaert, T

    1998-12-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to radiation protection, the report gives an overview of exposure to ionising radiation in Belgium due to activities in relation to the nuclear fuel cycle, processing and disposal of radioactive waste and other artificial or natural sources. Where appropriate, the Belgian situation discussed from an international perspective. The radiological impact of reprocessing and non-reprocessing are compared. The biological effects of ionizing radiation, epidemiological studies as well as surveillance programmes on the Belgian territory are reported on.

  20. Radiation effects on microelectronics and future space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Jeffrey D.

    2003-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews the three basic radiation effect mechanisms, and how they interrupt the functionality of currently available non-volatile memory technologies. This paper also presents a very general overview of the radiation environments expected in future space exploration missions. Unfortunately, these environments will be very harsh, from a radiation standpoint, and thus a significant effort is required to develop non-volatile technologies that will meet future mission requirements.

  1. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  2. Argon plasma coagulation and hyperbaric oxygen therapy in chronic radiation proctopathy, effectiveness and impact on tissue toxicity Argón plasma y oxígeno hiperbárico para el control de la rectorragia crónica secundaria a la proctopatía por radiación

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio César Álvaro-Villegas

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: chronic radiation proctopathy (CRP is associated with recurrent rectal bleeding and transfusional requirements. Argon plasma coagulation (APC and hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HOT have been shown to be effective in the control of CRP. No prospective comparisons have been reported between these treatments. Aim: the aim was to evaluate the effectiveness, safety and impact on tissue toxicity of APC compared to HOT in patients with CRP. Material and methods: a prospective study for evaluating treatment response was conducted. Patients with cervical cancer and CRP with rectal bleeding were recruited. They had not received previous treatment. Collected data included: demographics, previous radiation dosage, duration and severity of rectal bleeding. Hemoglobin, transfusional requirements, and tissue toxicity (SOMA LENT questionnaire at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months follow up were recorded. Results: thirty-one patients were included, 14 in the APC group and 17 in the HOT group. No response was noted in 13 and 18% of patients in the APC and HOT group respectively (p = NS. At the 1 and 2 months follow-up, the APC group showed a significantly better response in terms of transfusional requirements (0.6 vs. 3.4 and 0.7 vs. 2.5 and tissue toxicity score (5.3 vs. 8.6 and 3.8 vs. 7.248. After 3 months, both groups showed further improvement in all parameters without significant differences between them. Conclusions: APC and HOT were effective, safe and decreased the tissue toxicity scores in patients with CRP. However, response rate was higher and faster in the APC group.Introducción: la proctopatía por radiación (PPR se asocia con rectorragía recurrente y requerimientos de trasfusiones. La coagulación con argón plasma (APC y la terapia con oxígeno hiperbárico (HOT han sido efectivas en el control de la PPR. No hay estudios prospectivos comparativos entre ambas técnicas. Objetivo: el objetivo del estudio es evaluar la efectividad

  3. Radiation hydrodynamics of triggered star formation: the effect of the diffuse radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Haworth, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of including diffuse field radiation when modelling the radiatively driven implosion of a Bonnor-Ebert sphere (BES). Radiation-hydrodynamical calculations are performed by using operator splitting to combine Monte Carlo photoionization with grid-based Eulerian hydrodynamics that includes self-gravity. It is found that the diffuse field has a significant effect on the nature of radiatively driven collapse which is strongly coupled to the strength of the driving shock that is established before impacting the BES. This can result in either slower or more rapid star formation than expected using the on-the-spot approximation depending on the distance of the BES from the source object. As well as directly compressing the BES, stronger shocks increase the thickness and density in the shell of accumulated material, which leads to short, strong, photo-evaporative ejections that reinforce the compression whenever it slows. This happens particularly effectively when the diffuse field is includ...

  4. The Effects of Aroma Acupuncture applied on Chronic Headache Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Tae JUNG; Su Yong KIM; Doo Ik LEE; Keon Sik KIM; Jae Dong LEE; Yun Ho LEE; Do Young CHOI

    2005-01-01

    @@ Background: Because the cause and etiology of chronic headache is not yet fully explained, the treatment of this symptom is not simple. This study compares the effects of aroma acupuncture and normal acupuncture applied on chronic headache patients, in order to establish a primary data for further studies of new treatments and developments of new practical acupuncture. Methods: 38 clinical experiment participants were gathered and through a questionnaire patients who experienced headache for more than 4 hours a day and more than 15 days per month were qualified as chronic headache patients. The qualified patients were classified into two groups, aroma acupuncture group (Aroma AT group, n=23) and normal acupuncture group (AT group, n=15).

  5. Non-targeted effects of ionising radiation - Implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sisko Salomaa [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The universality of the target theory of radiation-induced effects is challenged by observations on non-targeted effects such as bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive response. Essential features of non-targeted effects are that they do not require direct nuclear exposure by radiation and they are particularly significant at low doses. This new evidence suggests a need for a new paradigm in radiation biology. The new paradigm should cover both the classical (targeted) and the non-targeted effects. New aspects include the role of cellular communication and tissue-level responses. A better understanding of non-targeted effects may have important consequences for health risk assessment and, consequently, on radiation protection. Non-targeted effects may contribute to the estimation of cancer risk from occupational, medical and environmental exposures. In particular, they may have implications for the applicability of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) model in extrapolating radiation risk data into the low-dose region. This also means that the adequacy of the concept of dose to estimate risk is challenged by these findings. Moreover, these effects may provide new mechanistic explanations for the development of non-cancer diseases. Further research is required to determine if these effects, typically measured in cell cultures, are applicable in tissue level, whole animals, and ultimately in humans. (author)

  6. The study of the radiation protection of propolis to the radiation effects in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y.H.; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Muto, H. [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan); Yanagisawa, Takaharu; Iwasa, Toshihiro; Bamen, K.

    2000-05-01

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. Therefore, even an effects to this fetus is grasped precisely, and protection criterion and resource are decided from the viewpoint of the protection of radiation as well. If it does so, a child and maturitas aren't so difficult as in the protection of radiation and the managerial side. It was examined about control group, propolis administration chisels for medical use group, 1.5 Gy independent exposure group and propolis pluse 1.5 Gy group in this study. It was examined about the protection of radiation of propolis which to malformation, fetal death, arrested development, and so on in the organogenesis (8 days post conception) being done when sensibility is the highest against the teratogenesis. Preimplantation death rate was compared with the control group and the sham control group, and statistical significant difference wasn't recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group, propolis administration 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5 Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It has a 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5 Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5 Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5 Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so

  7. Acoustic radiation force impulse imaging for non-invasive assessment of renal histopathology in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Hu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the stiffness values obtained by acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI quantification in assessing renal histological fibrosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: 163 patients with CKD and 32 healthy volunteers were enrolled between June 2013 and April 2014. ARFI quantification, given as shear wave velocity (SWV, was performed to measure renal parenchyma stiffness. Diagnostic performance of ARFI imaging and conventional ultrasound (US were compared with histologic scores at renal biopsy. Intra- and inter-observer reliability of SWV measurement was analyzed. RESULTS: In CKD patients, SWV measurements correlated significantly with pathological parameters (r = -0.422--0.511, P<0.001, serum creatinine (r = -0.503, P<0.001, and glomerular filtration rate (r = 0.587, P<0.001. The mean SWV in kidneys with severely impaired (histologic score: ≥19 points was significant lower than that mildly impaired (histologic score: ≤9 points, moderately impaired (histologic score: 10-18 points, and control groups (all P<0.001. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves analyses indicated that the area under the ROC curve for the diagnosis of renal histological fibrosis using ARFI imaging was superior to these conventional US parameters. Using the optimal cut-off value of 2.65 m/s for the diagnosis of mildly impaired kidneys, 2.50 m/s for moderately impaired kidneys, and 2.33 m/s for severely impaired kidneys, the corresponding area under the ROC curves were 0.735, 0.744, and 0.895, respectively. Intra- and intre-observer agreement of SWV measurements were 0.709 (95% CI: 0.390-0.859, P<0.001 and 0.627 (95% CI: 0.233-0.818, P = 0.004, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: ARFI may be an effective tool for evaluating renal histological fibrosis in CKD patients.

  8. The Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect of Primordial Recombination Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kholupenko, E E; Ivanchik, A V; Varshalovich, D A

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that recombination radiation of primordial hydrogen-helium plasma leads to the distortions of the planckian spectrum shape of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB). We discuss the thermal Sunayev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect with taking into account primordial recombination radiation (PRR). Since in the thermal SZ effect the redistribution of the photons depends on the derivatives of the spectrum, the value of relative correction to SZ effect due to PRR significantly higher than relative corrections due to PRR in the initial spectrum. Calculations of corrections to the thermal SZ effect due to PRR show that depending on the cluster parameters: 1) in the range of frequencies $\

  9. Quantum radiation reaction effects in multiphoton Compton scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Piazza, A; Hatsagortsyan, K Z; Keitel, C H

    2010-11-26

    Radiation reaction effects in the interaction of an electron and a strong laser field are investigated in the realm of quantum electrodynamics. We identify the quantum radiation reaction with the multiple photon recoils experienced by the laser-driven electron due to consecutive incoherent photon emissions. After determining a quantum radiation dominated regime, we demonstrate how in this regime quantum signatures of the radiation reaction strongly affect multiphoton Compton scattering spectra and that they could be measurable in principle with presently available laser technology.

  10. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants – Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, K.G., E-mail: fieldkg@ornl.gov; Remec, I.; Pape, Y. Le

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Neutron and gamma rays fields in concrete biological shield are calculated. • An extensive database on irradiated concrete properties has been collected. • Concrete mechanical properties decrease beyond 1.0 × 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} fluence. • Loss of properties appears correlated with radiation induced-aggregate swelling. • Commercial reactor bio-shield may experience long-term irradiation damage. - Abstract: A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.

  11. Collective effects in the radiation pressure force

    CERN Document Server

    Bachelard, R; Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the role of diffuse, Mie and cooperative scattering on the radiation pressure force acting on the center of mass of a cloud of cold atoms. Even though a mean-field Ansatz (the `timed Dicke state'), previously derived from a cooperative scattering approach, has been shown to agree satisfactorily with experiments, diffuse scattering also describes very well most features of the radiation pressure force on large atomic clouds. We compare in detail an incoherent, random walk model for photons and a diffraction approach to the more complete description based on coherently coupled dipoles. We show that a cooperative scattering approach, although it provides a quite complete description of the scattering process, is not necessary to explain the previous experiments on the radiation pressure force.

  12. On the instability effects in radiation-sensitive chalcogenide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V. [Lviv State University for Vital Activity Safety, 35 Kleparivska str., Lviv, UA-79007 (Ukraine); Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); Kovalskiy, A. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States); Shpotyuk, O. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine); International Materials Institute for New Functionality in Glass, Lehigh University, 5 East Packer Avenue, Bethlehem, PA 18015-3195 (United States)], E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua; Vakiv, M. [Lviv Institute of Materials of SRC ' Carat' , 202 Stryjska str., Lviv, UA-79031 (Ukraine)

    2007-04-15

    The features of application of radiation-sensitive media based on chalcogenide glasses of As-Ge-S system for registration of high-energy {gamma}-radiation are analysed. It is shown that compositional features of the observed time-instability effect should be taken into account in order to ensure a higher accuracy of the developed dosimeters.

  13. Biological effects of ionizing radiations; Effets biologiques des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, J.C. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire]|[Commission Internationale de protection radiologique (France)]|[Association Internationale de Radiopathologie (France)

    1999-01-01

    Since ten years the ionizing radiations are more and more often used in various domains as medical, industrial or research sector. In the same way, these radiation impacts on the environment and the living organisms, have been studied intensively. The effects mechanism knowledge improved considerably and allowed to better protect the workers and the public. (A.L.B.)

  14. 47 CFR 22.913 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power (ERP) of transmitters in the Cellular Radiotelephone Service must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. In general, the effective radiated power (ERP) of base transmitters and... areas, as those areas are defined in § 22.949, the ERP of base transmitters and cellular repeaters...

  15. 47 CFR 22.627 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.621 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (watts)...

  16. 47 CFR 22.659 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... radiated power limits. The purpose of the rules in this section, which limit effective radiated power (ERP... subsequently relocated. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP of base transmitters must not exceed 100 Watts under any circumstances. The ERP of mobile transmitters must not exceed 60 Watts under any circumstances. (b)...

  17. Effects of space-relevant radiation on pre-osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yueyuan

    2014-02-12

    Until now limited research has been conducted to address the mechanisms leading ionizing radiation exposure induced bone loss. This is relevant for cancer radiotherapy and human spaceflight. Exposure to radiation can result in elevated bone fracture risk in patients receiving cancer radiotherapy. In human spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to space radiation which is a very complex mixture consisting primarily of high-energy charged particles. Osteoblasts are of mesenchymal origin and responsible for creating and maintaining skeletal architecture; these cells produce extracellular matrix proteins and regulators of matrix mineralization during initial bone formation and later bone remodeling. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on pre-osteoblasts including cellular survival, cell cycle regulation and differentiation modification. Experiments with the pre-osteoblast cell line OCT-1 and the mesenchymal stem cell line C3H10T1/2 showed that radiation cell killing depends on dose and linear energy transfer (LET) and is most effective at an LET of ∝150 keV/μm. High-LET radiation has a much more pronounced ability to induce cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. After both X-rays and heavy ions exposure, expression of the cell cycle regulator CDKN1A was significantly up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner. The findings suggest that cell cycle regulation is more sensitive to high-LET radiation than cell survival, which is not solely regulated through elevated CDKN1A expression. Radiation exposure enhances osteoblastic differentiation and maturation, and mediates Runx2 and TGF-β1 expression during early differentiation of pre-osteoblasts. Osteogenic differentiation did not alter cellular radiosensitivity, DNA repair of radiation-induced damages and the effects of radiation on proliferation. Further experiments are needed to elucidate possible synergistic effects of microgravity and radiation on osteoblast differentiation. This may

  18. Retrospective results of radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media; Retrospektive Ergebnisse der perkutanen Strahlentherapie der Tuba Eustachii bei chronischer Otitis media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultze, J.; Reinke, C.; Kimmig, B. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie (Radioonkologie), Universitaetsklinikum Kiel (Germany); Frese, K.A. [Klinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Kopf- und Halschirurgie, Universitaetsklinikum Kiel (Germany)

    2003-01-01

    Background: The treatment results of symptomatic radiation therapy of the Eustachian tube in chronic otitis media had to be evaluated retrospectively. Patients and Methods: Between 1980 and 1997, 66 patients were referred for therapy. The median age was 58 years. In the clinical presentation, all the patients had a hearing impairment, 35 patients complained of pain, 21 had otorrhea. In their history, 20 patients indicated chronic recurrent infections. The complaints lasted for 4.7 years in the median, primary conservative (adstringentia, antibiotics) and surgical treatment (paracentesis, tympanic tubule, tympanoplastic) did not lead to lasting cure. In 40 of 66 patients, finally radiation therapy was done of both Eustachian tubes. With opposed fields and cobalt-60 photons a total dose of 6 Gy at single doses of 1 Gy, three times a week, was applied. Under the causes for exclusion of radiation therapy were non-acceptance of the patients (nine), prior radiation therapies (six) or spontaneous improvement after initial presentation in our department. The treatment results were evaluated by interviews of the patients and regular otorhinolaryngological examinations. Results: There were no side effects noticed. 28 of 40 (70%) patients reported a significant improvement that could be verified by objective otorhinolaryngological examinations. In the group of 26 nonirradiated patients, 22 could be interviewed indicating in 16 cases (72%) that the complaints were unchanged and chronic otitis media was lasting. In a subgroup analysis concerning the duration of otitis media radiation therapy proved more effective in an acute and subacute stadium of disease of up to 5 years duration, while the patients resistant to radiation therapy were entirely in a chronic stage of disease exceeding 5 years duration. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Die Behandlungsergebnisse der symptomatischen Radiotherapie bei chronischer Otitis media sollten retrospektiv evaluiert werden. Patienten und

  19. Radiation effects on materials in high-radiation environments: A workshop summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, W. J.; Mansur, L. K.; Clinard, F. W.; Parkin, D. M.

    1991-08-01

    A workshop on Radiation Effects on Materials in High-Radiation Environments was held in Salt Lake City, Utah (USA) from August 13 to 15, 1990 under the auspices of the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. The workshop focused on ceramics, alloys, and intermetallics and covered research needs and capabilities, recent experimental data, theory, and computer simulations. It was concluded that there is clearly a continuing scientific and technological need for fundamental knowledge on the underlying causes of radiation-induced property changes in materials. Furthermore, the success of many current and emerging nuclear-related technologies critically depend on renewed support for basic radiation-effects research, irradiation facilities, and training of scientists. The highlights of the workshop are reviewed and specific recommendations are made regarding research needs.

  20. Kinetic treatment of radiation reaction effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Adam; Gratus, Jonathan; Burton, David; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Islam, M. Ranaul; Kravets, Yevgen; Raj, Gaurav; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2011-05-01

    Modern accelerators and light sources subject bunches of charged particles to quasiperiodic motion in extremely high electric fields, under which they may emit a substantial fraction of their energy. To properly describe the motion of these particle bunches, we require a kinetic theory of radiation reaction. We develop such a theory based on the notorious Lorentz-Dirac equation, and explore how it reduces to the usual Vlasov theory in the appropriate limit. As a simple illustration of the theory, we explore the radiative damping of Langmuir waves.

  1. 慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的治疗%Management of chronic radiation enteritis with intestinal obstruction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周创业; 周振理; 马军宏; 吕鹏

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的治疗方法及疗效.方法:回顾分析21例慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的临床资料,对其进行总结.结果:7例保守治疗的病例中有5例复发,治愈率仅(28.6%,2/7),保守治疗效果不佳.14例手术患者总体疗效满意.10例行肠切除吻合术的患者,治愈率达(90.0%,9/10),可见手术治疗为慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的最佳方法.1例出现吻合口瘘的患者,再次手术证实为第1次手术切除肠管过少,残留病变肠管所致.结论:慢性放射性肠炎并发肠梗阻的最佳治疗方法为手术治疗,手术方式应尽量行肠切除一期吻合术,手术时应尽量切除全部病变肠管,避免出现吻合口瘘.同时肠造口术或旁路手术也是必要术式,应根据具体情况选择.%AIM: To evaluate the effect of various treatment methods for chronic radiation enteritis with concurrent intestinal obstruction.METHODS: The clinical data for 21 patients with chronic radiation enteritis and intestinal obstruction was retrospectively analyzed.RESULTS: Five of seven patients who received conservative treatment experienced relapse, and the cure rate was only 28.6%. Fourteen patients who underwent surgical treatment (of them ten patients underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis) had satisfactory outcome, and the cure rate was as high as 90.0%. One patient developed intestinal fistula, and re-operation confirmed that it was caused by residual radiation enteritis.CONCLUSION: Surgical treatment is the bestway for treatment of chronic radiation enteritis with intestinal obstruction. All intestinal lesions should be surgically removed to avoid intestinal fistula.

  2. Quantum radiation by electrons in lasers and the Unruh effect

    CERN Document Server

    Schützhold, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the Larmor radiation known from classical electrodynamics, electrons in a laser field may emit pairs of entangled photons -- which is a pure quantum effect. We investigate this quantum effect and discuss why it is suppressed in comparison with the classical Larmor radiation (which is just Thomson backscattering of the laser photons). Further, we provide an intuitive explanation of this process (in a simplified setting) in terms of the Unruh effect.

  3. Space and terrestrial radiation effects in flash memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatin, Marta; Gerardin, Simone; Paccagnella, Alessandro

    2017-03-01

    We present a comprehensive review of the effects of ionizing radiation on advanced flash memories. The effects of ionizing radiation as well as the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are thoroughly discussed on both floating gate cells and the complex control circuitry. The covered effects are relevant for all floating-gate based flash memories that require very high levels of reliability, from critical applications at the terrestrial level to radiation-harsh environments, such as space, nuclear power plants, and high-energy physics experiments.

  4. Radiation effects on science instruments in Grand Tour type missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    The extent of the radiation effects problem is delineated, along with the status of protective designs for 15 representative science instruments. Designs for protecting science instruments from radiation damage is discussed for the various instruments to be employed in the Grand Tour type missions. A literature search effort was undertaken to collect science instrument components damage/interference effects data on the various sensitive components such as Si detectors, vidicon tubes, etc. A small experimental effort is underway to provide verification of the radiation effects predictions.

  5. Rays Sting: The Acute Cellular Effects of Ionizing Radiation Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A; Ciccarelli, M; Sorriento, D; Napolitano, L; Fiordelisi, A; Trimarco, B; Durante, M; Iaccarino, G

    2016-05-01

    High-precision radiation therapy is a clinical approach that uses the targeted delivery of ionizing radiation, and the subsequent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in high proliferative, radiation sensitive cancers. In particular, in thoracic cancer ratdiation treatments, can not avoid a certain amount of cardiac toxicity. Given the low proliferative rate of cardiac myocytes, research has looked at the effect of radiation on endothelial cells and consequent coronary heart disease as the mechanism of ratdiation induced cardiotoxicity. In fact, little is known concerning the direct effect of radiation on mitochondria dynamis in cardiomyocyte. The main effect of ionizing radiation is the production of ROS and recent works have uncovered that they directly participates to pivotal cell function like mitochondrial quality control. In particular ROS seems to act as check point within the cell to promote either mitochondrial biogenesis and survival or mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Thus, it appears evident that the functional state of the cell, as well as the expression patterns of molecules involved in mitochondrial metabolism may differently modulate mitochondrial fate in response to radiation induced ROS responses. Different molecules have been described to localize to mitochondria and regulate ROS production in response to stress, in particular GRK2. In this review we will discuss the evidences on the cardiac toxicity induced by X ray radiation on cardiomyocytes with emphasis on the role played by mitochondria dynamism.

  6. Radiation Effects Simulation of Fuel Assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI; Yao

    2015-01-01

    Due to a large number of photons irradiated by the fuel assemblies after radiation in the reactor,the data acquisition and image reconstruction will be interfered seriously for the nuclear fuel assembly non-destructive testing system.Therefore,in process of the fuel assembly NDT system

  7. Radiation Effects on Polymers-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aly, M. I.; Singer, Klaus Albert Julius; Ghanem, N. A.

    1978-01-01

    obtained at radiation doses between 2 and 3 Mrad, at acrylic acid concentrations of 40–60% and at FeSO4 · 7H2O concentrations of 0.25-0.5% by weight. The grafted films were tested for reverse osmosis properties. A membrane with 60% polyacrylic acid content gave 87% salt rejection and a water flux of 0...

  8. The development and purpose of the FREDERICA radiation effects database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copplestone, D; Hingston, J; Real, A

    2008-09-01

    Any system for assessing the impact of a contaminant on the environment requires an analysis of the possible effects on the organisms and ecosystems concerned. To facilitate this, the FREDERICA radiation effects database has been developed to provide an online search of the known effects of ionising radiation on non-human species, taken from papers in the scientific peer reviewed literature. The FREDERICA radiation effects database has been produced by merging the work done on radiation effects under two European funded projects (FASSET and EPIC) and making the database available online. This paper highlights applications for the database, gaps in the available data and explains the use of quality scores to help users of the database determine which papers may benefit their research in terms of techniques and reproducibility.

  9. Effects of solar radiation on collagen-based biomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Sionkowska

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solar radiation on collagen and collagen/synthetic polymer blends in the form of thin films and solutions has been studied by UV-VIS and FTIR spectroscopies. Films and solutions of collagen blended with poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP were irradiated by solar light. It was found that UV-VIS spectra, which characterize collagen, collagen/PVA, and collagen/PVP blended films, were significantly altered by solar radiation. FTIR spectra of collagen, collagen/PVA, and collagen/PVP films showed that after solar irradiation, the positions of Amide A bands were shifted to lower wavenumbers. There was not any significant alteration in the position of Amide I and Amide II bands of collagen and its blends after solar radiation. The effect of solar UV radiation in comparison with artificial UV radiation has been discussed.

  10. A new solvent suppression method via radiation damping effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Xiao-Hong; Peng Ling; Zhang Zhen-Min; Cai Shu-Hui; Chen Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Radiation damping effects induced by the dominated solvent in a solution sample can be applied to suppress the solvent signal.The precession pathway and rate back to equilibrium state between solute and solvent spins are different under radiation damping.In this paper,a series of pulse sequences using radiation damping were designed for the solvent suppression in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy.Compared to the WATERGATE method,the solute signals adjacent to the solvent would not be influenced by using the radiation damping method.The one-dimensional (1D) 1H NMR,two-dimensional (2D) gCOSY,and J-resolved experimental results show the practicability of solvent suppression via radiation damping effects in 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Combined effect of space radiation and adjuvants on mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Peleshko, Vladimir

    2012-07-01

    Recently we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation on SHK mice in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator with 70 GeV proton energy, that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights. It was found that low doses of high-LET irradiation led to an increase in the cytogenetic damage in mice which can be compared with level of spontaneous lesions. At the same time no decrease of cytogenetic damage was detected after irradiation with the challenging dose of 1.5 Gy, i. e., no adaptive response (AR) takes place in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) as opposed to low doses of chronic X-radiation. The goal of the present work was to determine if there is any influence of combined action of low doses of high-LET radiation and adjuvants on the cytogenetic damages and solid tumor growth in mice. Two-month-old SHK male mice were used. A search for potential adaptogens was performed among the adjuvants such as dibazol and calcium chloride. In each experiment, a group of animals was exposed to low doses of high-LET radiation and treated with dibazol or CaCl2 solutions after that mice were additionally irradiated with X-radiation according to the scheme of AR: 0.1 Gy + 1.5 Gy. After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in PCE were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of combined treatment of high-LET radiation and adjuvants on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells into the femur. Our earlier study has shown that dibazol when used alone not only induced AR but also increased the magnitude of radiation AR when used in combination with low doses of X-radiation. In present work the obtained results

  12. Radiation effect on non-cancer diseases among a-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, G.; Akahoshi, M.; Fujiwara, S.; Neriishi, K.; Yamada, M.; Hakoda, M. [Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    It has been well documented in the literature that radiation induces DNA damages and increases cancer risk. Besides cancer risk, the Life Span Study (LSS) on A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki that has been conducted since 1950 by RERF demonstrated an increase in non-cancer death by cardiovascular diseases and chronic liver diseases (1). Since LSS analysis depends on death certificate, a physiological mechanism has not been elucidated how radiation increases the incidence of non-cancer diseases. In order to elucidate radiation effect on non-fatal disorders, RERF has conducted the Adult Health Study (AHS) since 1958 where 23,000 A-bomb survivors have been examined every other year. This study suggested that radiation exposure about 55 years before reduced the immune response to pathogens such as HB virus and Chlamydia pneumoniae, increased the levels of serum inflammatory markers, the prevalence of chronic hepatitis/liver cirrhosis and senile cataract, and the incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Our colleagues reported a dose-dependent decrease in the CD4 T cell number among A-bomb survivors (2,3). Since chronic inflammation and oxidative stress are causative of atherogenic cardiovascular diseases or cataract, we speculate a decrease in the immune response to pathogens, at least in part, is one of the mechanisms that A-bomb exposure increased non-cancer diseases. When the levels of inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), were analyzed among subjects with evidence of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection, significantly higher levels of CRP were associated with antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae in those subjects receiving >1Gy than those receiving <5mGy. It is well known that high CRP is one of the risk factors of arteriosclerosis (4,5). Thus, A-bomb exposure seems to augment inflammatory response to pathogens, though of which mechanisms are not clear now.

  13. The effect of radiative feedback on disc fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Anthony; Stamatellos, Dimitris

    2017-02-01

    Protostellar discs may become massive enough to fragment producing secondary low-mass objects: planets, brown dwarfs and low-mass stars. We study the effect of radiative feedback from such newly formed secondary objects using radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We compare the results of simulations without any radiative feedback from secondary objects with those where two types of radiative feedback are considered: (i) continuous and (ii) episodic. We find that (i) continuous radiative feedback stabilizes the disc and suppresses further fragmentation, reducing the number of secondary objects formed; (ii) episodic feedback from secondary objects heats and stabilizes the disc when the outburst occurs, but shortly after the outburst stops, the disc becomes unstable and fragments again. However, fewer secondary objects are formed compared to the case without radiative feedback. We also find that the mass growth of secondary objects is mildly suppressed due to the effect of their radiative feedback. However, their mass growth also depends on where they form in the disc and on their subsequent interactions, such that their final masses are not drastically different from the case without radiative feedback. We find that the masses of secondary objects formed by disc fragmentation are from a few MJ to a few 0.1 M⊙. Planets formed by fragmentation tend to be ejected from the disc. We conclude that planetary-mass objects on wide orbits (wide-orbit planets) are unlikely to form by disc fragmentation. Nevertheless, disc fragmentation may be a significant source of free-floating planets and brown dwarfs.

  14. X-ray diffraction radiation in conditions of Cherenkov effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tishchenko, A. A.; Potylitsyn, A. P.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction radiation from ultra-relativistic electrons moving near an absorbing target is considered. The emission yield is found to increase significantly in conditions of Cherenkov effect. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of particle clustering on radiative transfer in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Liberman, M; Rogachevskii, I; Haugen, N E L

    2016-01-01

    The effect of particle clustering on the radiation penetration length in particle laden turbulent flows is studied using a mean-field approach. Particle clustering in temperature stratified turbulence implies the formation of small-scale clusters with a high concentration of particles, exceeding the mean concentration by a few orders of magnitude. We show that the radiative penetration length increases by several orders of magnitude due to the particle clustering in a turbulent flow. Such strong radiative clearing effect plays a key role in a number of atmospheric and astrophysical phenomena, and can be of fundamental importance for understanding the origin of dust explosions.

  16. Conference on Radiation and its Effects on Components and Systems

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The aim of RADECS conferences is to provide an annual European forum for the presentation and discussion of the latest advances in the field of radiation effects on electronic and photonic materials, devices, circuits, sensors, and systems. The scope of the conference encompasses technological processes and design techniques for producing radiation tolerant systems for space, aeronautical or terrestrial applications, as well as relevant methodologies for their characterization and qualification. The conference features a technical program, an Industrial Exhibit, and one day tutorial or ‘short course’ on radiation effects. The technical program includes oral and poster sessions and round tables.

  17. FALLOUT RADIATION: EFFECTS ON THE SKIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A.; Cronkite, E. P.; Bond, V. P.

    1963-02-06

    Until recently it has been generally assumed that injury to the skin from ionizing radiation was not a serious hazard associated with the detonation of nuclear dcvices. However, in 1954 the importance of this hazard became apparent when widespread lesions of the skin developed in a large group of people accidentally exposed to fallout radiation in the Marshall Islands following the experimental detonation of a large nuclear device. The accident in the Marshall Islands affords an example of large numbers of lesions of the skin in human beings from the fallout. Studies have been documented and will be referred to frequently in this chapter. The possibility of such accidents must be considered seriously in view of the increasingly widespread use of radioisotopes.

  18. Radiative Feedback Effects during Cosmic Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, David; Iliev, Ilian T.

    2016-10-01

    We present coupled radiation hydrodynamical simulations of the epoch of reionization, aimed at probing self-feedback on galactic scales. Unlike previous works, which assume a (quasi) homogeneous UV background, we self-consistently evolve both the radiation field and the gas to model the impact of previously unresolved processes such as spectral hardening and self-shielding. We find that the characteristic halo mass with a gas fraction half the cosmic mean, Mc (z), a quantity frequently used in semi-analytical models of galaxy formation, is significantly larger than previously assumed. While this results in an increased suppression of star formation in the early Universe, our results are consistent with the extrapolated stellar abundance matching models from Moster et al. 2013.

  19. Coherent Radiation Effects in the LCLS Undulator

    CERN Document Server

    Reiche, Sven

    2004-01-01

    For X-ray Free-Electron Lasers, a change in the electron energy while amplifying the FEL radiation can shift the resonance condition out of the bandwidth of the FEL. The largest sources of energy loss is incoherent undulator radiation. Because the loss per electron depends only on the undulator parameters and the beam energy, which are fixed for a given resonant wavelength, the average energy loss can be compensated for by a fixed taper of the undulator. Coherent radiation has a strong enhancement proportional to the number of electrons in the bunch for wavelengths comparable to or longer than the bunch dimension or bunch sub-structures. If the coherent loss is comparable to that of the incoherent the required taper depends on the bunch charge and the applied compression scheme and a change of these parameters would require a change of the taper. This imposes a limitation on the operation of FELs, where the taper can only be adjusted manually. In this presentation we analyze the coherent emission of undulator...

  20. Expected radiation effects in plutonium immobilization ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A., LLNL

    1997-09-01

    The current formulation of the candidate ceramic for plutonium immobilization consists primarily of pyrochlore, with smaller amounts of hafnium-zirconolite, rutile, and brannerite or perovskite. At a plutonium loading of 10.5 weight %, this ceramic would be made metamict (amorphous) by radiation damage resulting from alpha decay in a time much less than 10,000 years, the actual time depending on the repository temperature as a function of time. Based on previous experimental radiation damage work by others, it seems clear that this process would also result in a bulk volume increase (swelling) of about 6% for ceramic that was mechanically unconfined. For the candidate ceramic, which is made by cold pressing and sintering and has porosity amounting to somewhat more than this amount, it seems likely that this swelling would be accommodated by filling in the porosity, if the material were tightly confined mechanically by the waste package. Some ceramics have been observed to undergo microcracking as a result of radiation-induced anisotropic or differential swelling. It is unlikely that the candidate ceramic will microcrack extensively, for three reasons: (1) its phase composition is dominated by a single matrix mineral phase, pyrochlore, which has a cubic crystal structure and is thus not subject to anisotropic swelling; (2) the proportion of minor phases is small, minimizing potential cracking due to differential swelling; and (3) there is some flexibility in sintering process parameters that will allow limitation of the grain size, which can further limit stresses resulting from either cause.

  1. Radiation Effects on Polypropylene Carbon Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, John; Mion, Thomas; Chipara, Alin C.; Ibrahim, Elamin I.; Lozano, Karen; Chipara, Magdalena; Tidrow, Steven C.; Chipara, Mircea

    2010-03-01

    Dispersion of carbon nanostructures within polymeric matrices affects most physical and chemical properties of the polymeric matrix (increased Young modulus, improved thermal stability, faster crystallization rates, higher equilibrium degree of crystallinity, modified glass, melting, and crystallization temperatures, enhanced thermal and electrical conductivity). Such changes have been reported and explained by thorough spectroscopic investigations. Nevertheless, little is known about the radiation stability of such nanocomposites. The research is focused on spectroscopic investigations of radiation-induced modifications in isotactic polypropylene (iPP)-vapor grown nanofiber (VGCNF)composites. VGCNF were dispersed within iPP by extrusion at 180^oC. Composites containing various amounts of VGCNFs ranging from 0 to 20 % wt. were prepared and subjected to gamma irradiation, at room temperature, at various integral doses (10 MGy, 20 MGy, and 30 MGy). Raman spectroscopy, ATR, and WAXS were used to assess the radiation-induced modifications in these nanocomposites. Acknowledgements: This research was supported by the Welch Foundation (Department of Chemistry at UTPA) and by US Army Research Office (AMSRD-ARL-RO-SI: 54498-MS-ISP).

  2. Effective temperature and exergy of monochromic blackbody radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A new parameter named monochromic effective temperature Tλ is proposed, which represents the thermodynamic quality of monochromic blackbody radiation. The exergy of the monochromic blackbody radiation is expressed by Tλ. The monochromic effective temperature equation is developed, which shows that the produci of Tλ and the wavelength is constant, which equals 5.33016×10-3 tion in photosynthesis can be explained by the results of this work.

  3. Radiation-induced edge effects in deep submicron CMOS transistors

    CERN Document Server

    Faccio, F

    2005-01-01

    The study of the TID response of transistors and isolation test structures in a 130 nm commercial CMOS technology has demonstrated its increased radiation tolerance with respect to older technology nodes. While the thin gate oxide of the transistors is extremely tolerant to dose, charge trapping at the edge of the transistor still leads to leakage currents and, for the narrow channel transistors, to significant threshold voltage shift-an effect that we call Radiation Induced Narrow Channel Effect (RINCE).

  4. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila M. de Sousa; Martins, Estefania Mara Nascimento; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maressend@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log{sub 10} cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  5. In vivo effects of chronic contamination with 137 cesium on testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignard, Elise; Gueguen, Yann; Grison, Stephane; Gourmelon, Patrick; Souidi, Maamar [Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Radiological Protection and Human Health Division, Radiobiology and Epidemiology Department, Laboratory of Experimental Toxicology, BP no 17, Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A. [UMR Universite Blaise Pascal-CNRS 6547, Physiologie Comparee et Endocrinologie Moleculaire, Centre de Recherche en Nutrition Humaine d' Auvergne, Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2008-09-15

    More than 20 years after Chernobyl nuclear power plant explosion, radionuclids are still mainly bound to the organic soil layers. The radiation exposure is dominated by the external exposure to gamma-radiation following the decay of {sup 137}Cs and by soil-to-plant-to-human transfer of {sup 137}Cs into the food chain. Because of this persistence of contamination with {sup 137}Cs, questions regarding public health for people living in contaminated areas were raised. We investigated the biological effects of chronic exposure to {sup 137}Cs on testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis metabolisms in rat. Animals were exposed to radionuclide in their drinking water for 9 months at a dose of 6,500 Bq/l (610 Bq/kg/day). Cesium contamination decreases the level of circulating 17{beta}-estradiol, and increases corticosterone level. In testis, several nuclear receptors messenger expression is disrupted; levels of mRNA encoding Liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}) and LXR{beta} are increased, whereas farnesoid X receptor mRNA presents a lower level. Adrenal metabolism presents a paradoxical decrease in cyp11a1 gene expression. In conclusion, our results show for the first time molecular and hormonal modifications in testicular and adrenal steroidogenic metabolism, induced by chronic contamination with low doses of {sup 137}Cs. (orig.)

  6. Effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Tian, Tian; Xiao, Bo; Li, Wen

    2017-01-01

    The current work examines the effects of electromagnetic radiation on the hemorheology to provide an experimental basis for radiation protection. Electromagnetic radiation was generated by a Helmholtz coil constructed from copper wire. There were six rats altogether: three rats in the experimental group, and three rats in the control group. The rats in the experimental group were continuously exposed to radiation for 10 hours every day, and rats in the control group remained in a normal environment. After 30 days, the characteristics of hemorheology of the two groups were compared. The average plasma viscosity, whole blood high shear velocity, and whole blood low shear viscosity were lower in rats in the experimental group than in rats in the control group, while the whole blood shear viscosity was higher in the experimental group than in the control group. Results suggest that long term exposure to electromagnetic radiation does have certain impacts on the cardiovascular system, deeming it necessary to take preventative measures.

  7. Effects of high vs low-level radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, V.P.

    1983-01-01

    In order to appreciate adequately the various possible effects of radiation, particularly from high-level vs low-level radiation exposure (HLRE, vs LLRE), it is necessary to understand the substantial differences between (a) exposure as used in exposure-incidence curves, which are always initially linear and without threshold, and (b) dose as used in dose-response curves, which always have a threshold, above which the function is curvilinear with increasing slope. The differences are discussed first in terms of generally familiar nonradiation situations involving dose vs exposure, and then specifically in terms of exposure to radiation, vs a dose of radiation. Examples are given of relevant biomedical findings illustrating that, while dose can be used with HLRE, it is inappropriate and misleading the LLRE where exposure is the conceptually correct measure of the amount of radiation involved.

  8. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    effectiveness of radiation mitigator's. The NSRM- 2014 approaches to model radiation quality dependent lethality and NTE's will be described. CNS effects include both early changes that may occur during long space missions and late effects such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD effects 50% of the population above age 80-yr, is a degenerative disease that worsens with time after initial onset leading to death, and has no known cure. AD is difficult to detect at early stages and the small number of low LET epidemiology studies undertaken have not identified an association with low dose radiation. However experimental studies in mice suggest GCR may lead to early onset AD. We discuss modeling approaches to consider mechanisms whereby radiation would lead to earlier onset of occurrence of AD. Biomarkers of AD include amyloid beta (A(Beta)) plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made up of aggregates of the hyperphosphorylated form of the micro-tubule associated, tau protein. Related markers include synaptic degeneration, dentritic spine loss, and neuronal cell loss through apoptosis. Radiation may affect these processes by causing oxidative stress, aberrant signaling following DNA damage, and chronic neuroinflammation. Cell types to be considered in multi-scale models are neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We developed biochemical and cell kinetics models of DNA damage signaling related to glycogen synthase kinase-3(Beta) (GSK3(Beta)) and neuroinflammation, and considered multi-scale modeling approaches to develop computer simulations of cell interactions and their relationships to A(Beta) plaques and NFTs. Comparison of model results to experimental data for the age specific development of A(Beta) plaques in transgenic mice will be discussed.

  9. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  10. The effect of ionizing radiation on metoprolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrodowczyk, Magdalena; Marciniec, Barbara; Czwajda, Aleksandra

    2013-07-01

    The influence of ionising radiation on physico-chemical properties of metoprolol tartrate (MT) in solid phase was studied. The compound was irradiated by radiation produced by a beam of high-energy electrons in an accelerator, in doses from 25 to 400 kGy, and the possible changes in the samples were detected by organoleptic analysis (colour, forms, clarity), chromatographic and spectrometric methods. Already at the standard sterilisation dose of 25 kGy, the presence of free radicals (0.3764 × 10(16) spin/g) and a decrease in the melting point by 1°C were noted. At higher doses of irradiation products of radiolysis appeared (100 kGy) and the colour was changed from white to pale cream (200 kGy). Our observation was that with increasing mass loss of MT after irradiation with 100, 200 and 400 kGy, the concentration of free radicals increased from 1.0330 to 1.6869 × 10(16) spin/g. The radiolytic yield of total radiolysis was 4.54 × 10(7) mol/J for 100 kGy, 7.42 × 10(7) mol/J for 200 kGy and 4.74 × 10(7) mol/J for 400 kGy. No significant changes were observed in the character of FT-IR spectra, but in UV an increase in intensity of the band at the analytical wavelength was noted. As follows from the results MT shows high radiochemical stability for the typical sterilisation doses 25-50 kGy, and will probably be able to be sterilised by radiation in the dose of 25 kGy.

  11. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  12. Chlorpyrifos chronic toxicity in broilers and effect of vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kammon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to study chlorpyrifos chronic toxicity in broilers and the protective effect of vitamin C. Oral administration of 0.8 mg/kg body weight (bw (1/50 LD50 chlorpyrifos (Radar®, produced mild diarrhea and gross lesions comprised of paleness, flaccid consistency and slightly enlargement of liver. Histopathologically, chlorpyrifos produced degenerative changes in various organs. Oral administration of 100 mg/kg bw vitamin C partially ameliorated the degenerative changes in kidney and heart. There was insignificant alteration in biochemical and haematological profiles. It is concluded that supplementation of vitamin C reduced the severity of lesions induced by chronic chlorpyrifos toxicity in broilers.

  13. Effect of ultraviolet radiation, smoking and nutrition on hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2015-01-01

    Similar to the rest of the skin, the hair is exposed to noxious environmental factors. While ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and smoking are well appreciated as major factors contributing to the extrinsic aging of the skin, their effects on the condition of hair have only lately attracted the attention of the medical community. Terrestrial solar UVR ranges from approximately 290 to 400 nm; UV-B (290-315 nm) reaches only the upper dermis, while the penetration of UV-A (315-400 nm) into the dermis increases with wavelength. The two most important chronic effects of UVR on the skin and bald scalp are photocarcinogenesis and solar elastosis; however, the effects of UVR on hair have largely been ignored. As a consequence of increased leisure time and a growing popularity of outdoor activities and holidays in the sun, the awareness of sun protection of the skin has become important and should also apply to the hair. Besides being the single-most preventable cause of significant cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and an important cause of death, the association of tobacco smoking with various adverse effects on the skin and hair has also been recognized. Increasing public awareness of the association between smoking and hair loss seems to offer a good opportunity for the prevention or cessation of smoking, since the appearance of hair plays an important role in the overall physical appearance and self-perception of people. Finally, the quantity and quality of hair are closely related to the nutritional state of an individual. Normal supply, uptake, and transport of proteins, calories, trace elements, and vitamins are of fundamental importance in tissues with high biosynthetic activity, such as the hair follicle. In instances of protein and calorie malnutrition as well as essential amino acid, trace element, and vitamin deficiencies, hair growth and pigmentation may be impaired. Ultimately, important commercial interest lies in the question of whether increasing the

  14. The radiation reaction effect in ultra intense laser foil interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimo, O.; Jirka, M.; Masek, M.; Limpouch, J.; Bussmann, M.; Korn, G.

    2013-05-01

    Since the radiation reaction effect on electron propagation is very small in most cases, it can be usually neglected and the Lorentz force equation can be applied. However, ultra-intense lasers with normalized vector potential of the order of 100 can accelerate electrons to relativistic velocities with very high gamma factor. When the electron is accelerated to such high velocities the amount of emitted radiation may become large and radiation damping and emission of energetic photons should be considered. This work studies the influence of the radiation reaction force on laser interaction with solid foil targets. It compares different approaches adopted in PIC simulations to take into account the radiation reaction. The simulations of a counter-propagating relativistic electron and an ultra-intense laser beam demonstrate a strong energy loss of electrons due to non-linear Compton scattering. The interaction of ultra-intense laser pulse with solid foil is studied using PIC simulations. It is shown that the effect of radiation reaction strongly depends on the recirculation of high-energy electrons. When the recirculation is efficient, the radiation coming from the target is much more intense and it shows different spectral and angular characteristics.

  15. [Comparative evaluation of influence of low-intensity laser radiation of different spectrum components and regimen of laser work upon microcirculation in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechina, E K; Shidova, A V; Maslova, V V

    2008-01-01

    Comparative study of the influence details of low-intensity pulse and continuous oscillation of laser radiation of red and infrared parts of spectrum upon microcirculation indices in comprehensive treatment of chronic parodontitis of light and middle severity was performed. For the first time the predominantly activating influence upon microcirculation in gingival tissues of the pulsed laser radiation in the red part of spectrum was established.

  16. Radiation hormesis. Stimulatory effects of low level ionizing radiation on plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Shigenobu; Masui, Hisashi; Yoshida, Shigeo; Murata, Isao [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1999-04-01

    Recently, the study for radiation hormesis has been executed against animals and plants; subharmful doses of radiation may evoke a stimulatory response in any organism. We executed irradiating experiments of dry seeds with fusion (D-T) neutron, fission neutron, cobalt-60 gamma-ray and investigated existence of the radiation hormesis effects by measuring germination, the length of a stalk and the total weight of a seed leaf on the 7th day after starting cultivation. And we estimated radiation hormesis effects by relative effectiveness, the ratio of the mean value of measurement subjects for the irradiated group to that of non-irradiated group. In relation to Raphanus sativus, the hormesis effects on seed leaf growth from irradiated seeds have only turned up in seed groups irradiated by the fusion (D-T) neutron. We have confirmed that absorbed dose range which revealed the effects is from 1 cGy to 10 Gy and the increasing rate is from 5 percent to 25 percent against a control group. (author)

  17. Radiation effects on reactor pressure vessel supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Lipinski, R.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rockville, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the findings from the work done in accordance with the Task Action Plan developed to resolve the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Safety Issue No. 15, (GSI-15). GSI-15 was established to evaluate the potential for low-temperature, low-flux-level neutron irradiation to embrittle reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports to the point of compromising plant safety. An evaluation of surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) had suggested that some materials used for RPV supports in pressurized-water reactors could exhibit higher than expected embrittlement rates. However, further tests designed to evaluate the applicability of the HFIR data to reactor RPV supports under operating conditions led to the conclusion that RPV supports could be evaluated using traditional method. It was found that the unique HFIR radiation environment allowed the gamma radiation to contribute significantly to the embrittlement. The shielding provided by the thick steel RPV shell ensures that degradation of RPV supports from gamma irradiation is improbable or minimal. The findings reported herein were used, in part, as the basis for technical resolution of the issue.

  18. Effect of chronic psychosocial stress on nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Barbara; Neumann, Inga D; Müller, Martina; Reber, Stefan O; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by hepatic lipid accumulation which may progress towards inflammation (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)). NAFLD is regarded as a consequence of a sedentary, food-abundant lifestyle which, in the modern world, often coincides with chronically high levels of perceived psychosocial stress. Here, we aimed to characterize the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on the development of NAFLD/NASH in male mice either fed with standard chow or NASH-inducing high fat diet. Chronic psychosocial stress was induced by chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC), a pre-clinically validated paradigm relevant for human affective and somatic disorders. Single housed (SHC) mice served as controls. Under standard chow conditions CSC mice revealed lower hepatic triglyceride levels but higher hepatic TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX mRNA expression, while serum transaminase levels did not significantly differ from SHC mice. Under the NASH-inducing high-fat diet CSC and SHC mice showed similar body weight-gain and serum levels of glucose and adiponectin. Moreover, liver histology as well as TNFα, MCP-1 and HMOX expression were similar in CSC and SHC mice fed with HFD. Surprisingly, CSC showed even significantly lower transaminase levels than SHC mice fed with the same NASH-inducing diet. Together, these data indicate that under normal dietary conditions the CSC model induces noticeable hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation without causing manifest hepatocellular injury. In contrast, CSC exhibited a protective effect on hepatocellular injury in a dietary NASH-model. Identification of the underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to prevent progression of NAFLD.

  19. Short-term effects of radiation in glioblastoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg Petterson, Stine; Pind Jakobsen, Ida; Jensen, Stine Skov;

    2016-01-01

    and five days. We found a small reduction in primary spheroid size after radiation and an associated small increase in uptake of the cell death marker propidium iodide. Using immunohistochemistry, P53 expression was found to be significantly increased, whereas the Ki-67 proliferation index...... capacity. Gene expression analysis of nine stem cell- and two hypoxia-related genes did not reveal any upregulation after radiation. In conclusion, this study suggests that a major short-term effect of radiation is pronounced reduction of tumor cell proliferation. We found no upregulation of stem cell...

  20. Adaptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudritsky, Yu.K.; Georgievsky, A.B.; Karpov, V.I.

    1993-12-31

    The adoptation hypothesis of biological effectiveness of ionizing radiations is based on the recognition of the invariability of general biological laws for radiobiology and on the comprehension of life evolution regularities and axiomatic principles of environment and biota unity. The ionizing radiation factor is essential for life which could not exist beyond the radiation field. The possibility of future development of the adaptation hypothesis serves as a basis for it`s transformation into the theoretical foundation of radiobiology. This report discusses the aspects of the adaptation theory.

  1. Temperature effects on radiation damage to silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Leslie, J.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W. (SCIPP, Univ. California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)); Boissevain, J.G.; Ferguson, P.; Holzscheiter, K.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Sommer, W.F.; Sondheim, W.E.; Ziock, H.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Ellison, J.A.; Fleming, J.K.; Jerger, S.; Joyce, D.; Lietzke, C.; Wimpenny, S.J. (Univ. California, Riverside, CA (United States)); Matthews, J.A.J.; Skinner, D. (Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Motivated by the large particle fluences anticipated for the SSC and LHC, we are performing a systematic study of radiation damage to silicon microstrip detectors. Here we report radiation effects on detectors cooled to 0deg C (the proposed operating point for a large SSC silicon tracker) including leakage currents and change in depletion voltage. We also present results on the annealing behavior of the radiation damage. Finally, we report results of charge collection measurements of the damaged detectors made with an [sup 241]Am [alpha] source. (orig.).

  2. Effect of radiative cooling on collapsing charged grains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B P Pandey; Vinod Krishan; M Roy

    2001-01-01

    The effect of the radiative cooling of electrons on the gravitational collapse of cold dust grains with fluctuating electric charge is investigated. We find that the radiative cooling as well as the charge fluctuations, both, enhance the growth rate of the Jeans instability. However, the Jeans length, which is zero for cold grains and nonradiative plasma, becomes finite in the presence of radiative cooling of electrons and is further enhanced due to charge fluctuations of grains resulting in an increased threshold of the spatial scale for the Jeans instability.

  3. Effects of gamma-Radiation on Select Lipids and Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolph, Jacob; Mauer, Lisa; Perchonok, Michele

    2006-01-01

    Radiation encountered on an extended duration space mission (estimates of 3 Sieverts for a mission to Mars) poses a threat not only to human health, but also to the quality, nutritional value, and palatability of the food system. Free radicals generated by radiation interaction with foods may initiate many unwanted reactions including: 1) autoxidation in lipids that alters flavor, odor, and concentrations of essential fatty acids, and 2) depletion of antioxidants food products and dietary supplements. Studies have shown that antioxidants may provide long term health protection from oxidative stress caused by radiation exposure; therefore, consumption of antioxidants will be important. Stability of essential fatty acids is also important for astronauts long-term health status. The objectives of this study were to characterize the effects of low dose gamma-radiation on lipids and antioxidants by monitoring oxidation and reducing power, respectively, in model systems. Select oils and antioxidants were exposed to levels of gamma-radiation ranging from 0 to 1000 Gy (1 Gy = 1 Sv) using a Gammacell 220 and stored at ambient or elevated temperatures (65 C) for up to 3 months prior to analysis. A Fricke dosimeter was used to verify differences between the radiation doses administered. Primary and secondary products of lipid oxidation in soybean and peanut oils were monitored using conjugated diene and 2-thiobarbituric acid (TBARs) assays. Changes in fatty acid composition and formation and vitamin E levels were also measured. The reducing power of antioxidant compounds, including vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, was determined using the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay. Significant differences (alpha =0.05) were present between all radiation doses tested using the Fricke dosimeter. Increasing radiation doses above 3 Sv resulted in significantly (alpha =0.05) elevated levels of oxidation and free fatty acids in soybean and peanut oils. Decreases in

  4. Targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Desouky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available For a long time it was generally accepted that effects of ionizing radiation such as cell death, chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, mutagenesis, and carcinogenesis result from direct ionization of cell structures, particularly DNA, or from indirect damage through reactive oxygen species produced by radiolysis of water, and these biological effects were attributed to irreparable or misrepaired DNA damage in cells directly hit by radiation. Using linear non-threshold model (LNT, possible risks from exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (below 100 mSv are estimated by extrapolating from data obtained after exposure to higher doses of radiation. This model has been challenged by numerous observations, in which cells that were not directly traversed by the ionizing radiation exhibited responses similar to those of the directly irradiated cells. Therefore, it is nowadays accepted that the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation are not restricted only in the irradiated cells, but also to non-irradiated bystander or even distant cells manifesting various biological effects.

  5. Age-specific radiation dose commitment factors for a one-year chronic intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenes, G.R.; Soldat, J.K.

    1977-11-01

    During the licensing process for nuclear facilities, radiation doses and dose commitments must be calculated for people in the environs of a nuclear facility. These radiation doses are determined by examining characteristics of population groups, pathways to people, and radionuclides found in those pathways. The pertinent characteristics, which are important in the sense of contributing a significant portion of the total dose, must then be analyzed in depth. Dose factors are generally available for adults, see Reference 1 for example, however numerous improvements in data on decay schemes and half-lives have been made in recent years. In addition, it is advisable to define parameters for calculation of the radiation dose for ages other than adults since the population surrounding nuclear facilities will be composed of various age groups. Further, since infants, children, and teens may have higher rates of intake per unit body mass, it is conceivable that the maximally exposed individual may not be an adult. Thus, it was necessary to develop new radiation-dose commitment factors for various age groups. Dose commitment factors presented in this report have been calculated for a 50-year time period for four age groups.

  6. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Hao, Yan-Hui; Peng, Rui-Yun

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  7. Advances in the biological effects of terahertz wave radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhao; Yan-Hui Hao; Rui-Yun Peng

    2014-01-01

    The terahertz (THz) band lies between microwave and infrared rays in wavelength and consists of non-ionizing radiation. Both domestic and foreign research institutions, including the army, have attached considerable importance to the research and development of THz technology because this radiation exhibits both photon-like and electron-like properties, which grant it considerable application value and potential. With the rapid development of THz technology and related applications, studies of the biological effects of THz radiation have become a major focus in the field of life sciences. Research in this field has only just begun, both at home and abroad. In this paper, research progress with respect to THz radiation, including its biological effects, mechanisms and methods of protection, will be reviewed.

  8. More Abstracts on Effects of Radiation on Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.

    1987-01-01

    Second volume of bibliography summarizes literature on radiation effects on new electronic devices. Includes those of protons, electrons, neutrons, gamma rays, and cosmic rays at energies up to about 20 GeV. Volume contains 219 abstracts from unclassified sources. Organized into four sections: dose-rate effects, new technology, post-irradiaton effects, and test environments.

  9. Effects of ionizing radiation in ginkgo and guarana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo Soriani, Renata [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Satomi, Lucilia Cristina [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pinto, Terezinha de Jesus A. [Departamento de Farmacia, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida professor Lineu Prestes, 580-Bloco13, Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)]. E-mail: tjapinto@usp.br

    2005-07-01

    Raw plant materials normally carry high bioburden due to their origin, offering potential hazards to consumers. The use of decontamination processes is therefore an important step towards the consumer safety and therapeutical efficiency. Several authors have reported the treatment of medicinal herbs with ionizing radiation. This work evaluated the effects of different radiation doses on the microbial burden and chemical constituents of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) and guarana (Paullinia cupana H.B.K.)

  10. Evidence Report: Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana; Huff, Janice; Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Blattnig, Steve; Wu, Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Occupational radiation exposure from the space environment may result in non-cancer or non-CNS degenerative tissue diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cataracts, and respiratory or digestive diseases. However, the magnitude of influence and mechanisms of action of radiation leading to these diseases are not well characterized. Radiation and synergistic effects of radiation cause DNA damage, persistent oxidative stress, chronic inflammation, and accelerated tissue aging and degeneration, which may lead to acute or chronic disease of susceptible organ tissues. In particular, cardiovascular pathologies such as atherosclerosis are of major concern following gamma-ray exposure. This provides evidence for possible degenerative tissue effects following exposures to ionizing radiation in the form of the GCR or SPEs expected during long-duration spaceflight. However, the existence of low dose thresholds and dose-rate and radiation quality effects, as well as mechanisms and major risk pathways, are not well-characterized. Degenerative disease risks are difficult to assess because multiple factors, including radiation, are believed to play a role in the etiology of the diseases. As additional evidence is pointing to lower, space-relevant thresholds for these degenerative effects, particularly for cardiovascular disease, additional research with cell and animal studies is required to quantify the magnitude of this risk, understand mechanisms, and determine if additional protection strategies are required.The NASA PEL (Permissive Exposure Limit)s for cataract and cardiovascular risks are based on existing human epidemiology data. Although animal and clinical astronaut data show a significant increase in cataracts following exposure and a reassessment of atomic bomb (A-bomb) data suggests an increase in cardiovascular disease from radiation exposure, additional research is required to fully understand and quantify these adverse outcomes at lower doses (less than 0.5 gray

  11. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C. T.

    1981-02-01

    A survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma is given. For pedagogical reasons plasma processes are examined by relating them to a particular reference plasma which consists of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT = 1 KeV (ten million degrees Kelvin) and an electron density N = 3 x 10 to the 23rd power/cu cm, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cu cm) and an ion density N sub i = 5 x 10 to the 22nd power/cu cm. The transport of photons, ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy, in such plasmas is considered. Such photons are to be used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  12. Radiation induced dynamic mutations and transgenerational effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Ohtsura

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have confirmed that radiation can induce genomic instability in whole body systems. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying induced genomic instability are not known at present, this interesting phenomenon could be the manifestation of a cellular fail-safe system in which fidelity of repair and replication is down-regulated to tolerate DNA damage. Two features of genomic instability namely, delayed mutation and untargeted mutation, require two mechanisms of ;damage memory' and ;damage sensing, signal transduction and execution' to induce mutations at a non damaged-site. In this report, the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability and possible mechanisms are discussed using mouse data collected in our laboratory as the main bases.

  13. RADIATION EFFECTS ON EPOXY CARBON FIBER COMPOSITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E

    2008-05-30

    Carbon fiber-reinforced bisphenol-A epoxy matrix composite was evaluated for gamma radiation resistance. The composite was exposed to total gamma doses of 50, 100, and 200 Mrad. Irradiated and baseline samples were tested for tensile strength, hardness and evaluated using FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) for structural changes. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate microstructural behavior. Mechanical testing of the composite bars revealed no apparent change in modulus, strain to failure, or fracture strength after exposures. However, testing of only the epoxy matrix revealed changes in hardness, thermal properties, and FTIR results with increasing gamma irradiation. The results suggest the epoxy within the composite can be affected by exposure to gamma irradiation.

  14. Effects of gamma radiation on snake venoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, N.; Spencer, P.J.; Andrade, H.F.; Guarnieri, M.C.; Rogero, J.R

    1998-06-01

    Ionizing radiation is able to detoxify several venoms, including snake venoms, without affecting significantly their immunogenic properties. In order to elucidate this phenomena, we conceived a comparative pharmacological study between native and irradiated (2,000 Gy) crotoxin, the main toxin of the South American rattlesnake Crotalus durissus terrificus. Crotoxin was isolated and purified by molecular exclusion chromatography, pI precipitation and, subsequently submitted to irradiation. Gel filtration of the irradiated toxin resulted in some high molecular weight aggregates formation. Crotoxin toxicity decreased two folds after irradiation, as determined by LD{sub 50} in mice. Native and irradiated crotoxin biodistribution ocurred in the same general manner, with renal elimination. However, in contrast to irradiated crotoxin, the native form was initially retained in kidneys. A later concentration (2-3 hr) appeared in phagocytic mononuclear cells rich organs (liver and spleen) and neural junction rich organs (muscle and brain)

  15. Fundamental radiation effects parameters in metals and ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Useful information on defect production and migration can be obtained from examination of the fluence-dependent defect densities in irradiated materials, particularly when a transition from linear to sublinear accumulation is observed. Further work is needed on several intriguing reported radiation effects in metals. The supralinear defect cluster accumulation regime in thin foil irradiated metals needs further experimental confirmation, and the physical mechanisms responsible for its presence need to be established. Radiation hardening and the associated reduction in strain hardening capacity in FCC metals is a serious concern for structural materials. In general, the loss of strain hardening capacity is associated with dislocation channeling, which occurs when a high density of small defect clusters are produced (stainless steel irradiated near room temperature is a notable exception). Detailed investigations of the effect of defect cluster density and other physical parameters such as stacking fault energy on dislocation channeling are needed. Although it is clearly established that radiation hardening depends on the grain size (radiation-modified Hall-Petch effect), further work is needed to identify the physical mechanisms. In addition, there is a need for improved hardening superposition models when a range of different obstacle strengths are present. Due to a lack of information on point defect diffusivities and the increased complexity of radiation effects in ceramics compared to metals, many fundamental radiation effects parameters in ceramics have yet to be determined. Optical spectroscopy data suggest that the oxygen monovacancy and freely migrating interstitial fraction in fission neutron irradiated MgO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are {approximately}10% of the NRT displacement value. Ionization induced diffusion can strongly influence microstructural evolution in ceramics. Therefore, fundamental data on ceramics obtained from highly ionizing radiation sources

  16. Effect of Wheel Load on Wheel Vibration and Sound Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Jian; WANG Ruiqian; WANG Di; GUAN Qinghua; ZHANG Yumei; XIAO Xinbiao; JIN Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    The current researches of wheel vibration and sound radiation mainly focus on the low noise damped wheel. Compared with the traditional research, the relationship between the sound and wheel/rail contact is difficulty and worth studying. However, there are few studies on the effect of wheel load on wheel vibration and sound radiation. In this paper, laboratory test carried out in a semi-anechoic room investigates the effect of wheel load on wheel natural frequencies, damping ratios, wheel vibration and its sound radiation. The laboratory test results show that the vibration of the wheel and total sound radiation decrease significantly with the increase of the wheel load from 0 t to 1 t. The sound energy level of the wheel decreases by 3.7 dB. When the wheel load exceeds 1 t, the attenuation trend of the vibration and sound radiation of the wheel becomes slow. And the increase of the wheel load causes the growth of the wheel natural frequencies and the mode damping ratios. Based on the finite element method (FEM) and boundary element method (BEM), a rolling noise prediction model is developed to calculate the influence of wheel load on the wheel vibration and sound radiation. In the calculation, the used wheel/rail excitation is the measured wheel/rail roughness. The calculated results show that the sound power level of the wheel decreases by about 0.4 dB when the wheel load increases by 0.5 t. The sound radiation of the wheel decreases slowly with wheel load increase, and this conclusion is verified by the field test. This research systematically studies the effect of wheel load on wheel vibration and sound radiation, gives the relationship between the sound and wheel/rail contact and analyzes the reasons, therefore, it provides a reference for further research.

  17. Radiation sterilization of fluoroquinolones in solid state: Investigation of effect of gamma radiation and electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Babita K., E-mail: singhbab2001@rediffmail.co [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India); Parwate, Dilip V. [Department of Chemistry, RTM Nagpur University Campus, Amravati Road, Nagpur 440033 (India); Dassarma, Indrani B. [Jhulelal Institute of Technology, Nagpur (India); Shukla, Sudhir K. [Central Forensic Science Laboratory, Ramanthapur, Hyderabad 500013 (India)

    2010-09-15

    The effect of gamma radiation from {sup 60}Co source and 2 MeV electron beam was studied on two fluoroquinolone antibiotics viz norfloxacin and gatifloxacin in the solid state. The changes in reflectance spectrum, yellowness index, vibrational characteristics, thermal behavior, UV spectrum, chemical potency (HPLC) and microbiological potency were investigated. ESR measurement gave the number of free radical species formed and their population. The nature of final radiolytic impurities was assessed by studying the HPLC impurity profile. Both norfloxacin and gatifloxacin were observed to be radiation resistant, and did not show significant changes in their physico-chemical properties. They could be radiation sterilized at a dose of 25 kGy.

  18. Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Elastography for fibrosis evaluation in patients with chronic hepatitis C: An international multicenter study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sporea, Ioan, E-mail: isporea@umft.ro [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara (Romania); Bota, Simona, E-mail: bota_simona1982@yahoo.com [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara (Romania); Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus, E-mail: markus.peck@meduniwien.ac.at [Internal Medicine III, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical University of Vienna (Austria); Sirli, Roxana, E-mail: roxanasirli@gmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy Timisoara (Romania); Tanaka, Hironori, E-mail: hironori@hyo-med.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Iijima, Hiroko, E-mail: hiroko.iijima@nifty.com [Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya (Japan); Badea, Radu, E-mail: rbadea2003@yahoo.com [3rd Medical Clinic, University of Medicine, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Lupsor, Monica, E-mail: monica.lupsor@umfcluj.ro [3rd Medical Clinic, University of Medicine, Cluj Napoca (Romania); Fierbinteanu-Braticevici, Carmen, E-mail: cfierbinteanu@yahoo.com [2nd Medical Clinic and Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Bucharest (Romania); Petrisor, Ana, E-mail: ana1petrisor@yahoo.com [2nd Medical Clinic and Gastroenterology, University Hospital, Bucharest (Romania); Saito, Hidetsugu, E-mail: hidetsugusaito@gmail.com [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Ebinuma, Hirotoshi, E-mail: ebinuma@a5.keio.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Friedrich-Rust, Mireen, E-mail: Mireen.Friedrich-Rust@kgu.de [Department of Internal Medicine, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Sarrazin, Christoph, E-mail: sarrazin@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Department of Internal Medicine, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); and others

    2012-12-15

    Aim: The aim of this international multicenter study was to evaluate the reliability of Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) elastography for predicting fibrosis severity, in patients with chronic hepatitis C. Patients and methods: We compared ARFI to liver biopsy (LB) in 914 patients (10 centers, 5 countries) with chronic hepatitis C. In each patient LB (evaluated according to the METAVIR score) and ARFI measurements were performed (median of 5–10 valid measurements, expressed in meters/second – m/s). In 400 from the 914 patients, transient elastography (TE) was also performed (median of 6–10 valid measurements, expressed in kiloPascals – kPa). Results: Valid ARFI measurements were obtained in 911 (99.6%) of 914 cases. On LB 61 cases (6.7%) had F0, 241 (26.4%) had F1, 202 (22.1%) had F2, 187 (20.4%) had F3, and 223 (24.4%) had F4 fibrosis. A highly significant correlation (r = 0.654) was found between ARFI measurements and fibrosis (p < 0.0001). The predictive values of ARFI for various stages of fibrosis were: F ≥ 1 – cut-off > 1.19 m/s (AUROC = 0.779), F ≥ 2 – cut-off > 1.33 m/s (AUROC = 0.792), F ≥ 3 – cut-off > 1.43 m/s (AUROC = 0.829), F = 4 – cut-off > 1.55 m/s (AUROC = 0.842). The correlation with histological fibrosis was not significantly different for TE in comparison with ARFI elastography: r = 0.728 vs. 0.689, p = 0.28. TE was better than ARFI for predicting the presence of liver cirrhosis (p = 0.01) and fibrosis (F ≥ 1, METAVIR) (p = 0.01). Conclusion: ARFI elastography is a reliable method for predicting fibrosis severity in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  19. Cardioprotective Effects of ω-3 PUFAs in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Mi Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, and cardiovascular disease (CVD is a main cause of death in patients with CKD. The high incidence of CVD in CKD patients is related to chronic inflammation, dyslipidemia, malnutrition, atherosclerosis, and vascular calcification. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs have been shown to reduce the risk of CVD. In this paper, we review the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs on CVD and the possible cardioprotective mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs in CKD patients by determining the effect of ω-3 PUFAs in the general population. ω-3 PUFAs have several cardioprotective benefits, such as reducing inflammation, decreasing oxidative stress, inhibiting platelet activity, exerting antiarrhythmic effects, and improving triglyceride levels, in the general population and patients with CKD. Modifications of erythrocyte membrane fatty acid content, including an increased ω-3 index and decreased oleic acid, after ω-3 PUFAs supplementation are important changes related to CVD risk reduction in the general population and patients with CKD. Further basic and clinical studies are essential to confirm the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on vitamin D activation, vascular calcification prevention, cardiovascular events, and mortality in CKD patients.

  20. The Effect of Radiation "Memory" in Alkali-Halide Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korovkin, M. V.; Sal'nikov, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The exposure of the alkali-halide crystals to ionizing radiation leads to the destruction of their structure, the emergence of radiation defects, and the formation of the electron and hole color centers. Destruction of the color centers upon heating is accompanied by the crystal bleaching, luminescence, and radio-frequency electromagnetic emission (REME). After complete thermal bleaching of the crystal, radiation defects are not completely annealed, as the electrons and holes released from the color centers by heating leave charged and locally uncompensated defects. Clusters of these "pre centers" lead to electric microheterogeneity of the crystal, the formation of a quasi-electret state, and the emergence of micro-discharges accompanied by radio emission. The generation of REME associated with residual defectiveness, is a manifestation of the effect of radiation "memory" in dielectrics.

  1. Radiative instabilities in plasmas: impurity motion and recombination effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, D.K.; Herrera, J.J.E. [Instituto de Ciencias y Artes, Chiapas (Mexico). Escuela de Biologia

    1995-03-01

    Radiative instabilities in an impurity-seeded plasma are investigated when the plasma is supposed to be highly but partially ionized. Since in such plasmas radiative losses strongly depend on neutral and impurity densities, their dynamics are taken into account. As a result, a new radiative-recombination instability is found and described. We show that the influence of the ionization-recombination balance on plasma stability is sufficient for plasma densities above 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The effects of a finite impurity Larmor radius are not small and play a stabilizing role as well as the thermal forces. On the other hand, compressibility of the magnetic field leads to plasma destabilization. We note that this radiative-recombination instability accumulates impurities in a cold zone while cleaning other regions. (Author).

  2. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  3. New Scientific Pearl about Biologic Effect of Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Alamdaran

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Soon after the discovery of X-ray by Rontgen in 1895, it became evident that radiation can cause some somatic damage to tissues. The hazards of X-ray exposure were clearly known when many large hospitals had radiology departments. The greatest increased in knowledge about X-ray risks had accrued from the dropping of the two atomic bombs in Japan in 1945 and some other atomic accident. For example, among the Japanese bomb survivors from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there have been about 400 extra cancer deaths. These were the origin of radiology personnel and people fear from radiation exposure and resistant in against simple X-ray exam (radiophobia. However, new scientific data on the effects radiation on survivors, especially about biologic effect of ionizing rays, background radiation exposure, amount of endogenous radiation, hormosis phenomenon and comparison radiation risk with other risk over lifetime are still being continuously revised and risk estimates updated. Fundamentally, this risk is much"nlower than whatever already estimated and it is insignificant in diagnostic domain. Better perception of physician from these instances help to prevent of false radiophobia and to make proper use of diagnostic and therapeutic advantages of ionizing beam.

  4. Addressing ecological effects of radiation on populations and ecosystems to improve protection of the environment against radiation: Agreed statements from a Consensus Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bréchignac, François; Oughton, Deborah; Mays, Claire; Barnthouse, Lawrence; Beasley, James C; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Bradshaw, Clare; Brown, Justin; Dray, Stéphane; Geras'kin, Stanislav; Glenn, Travis; Higley, Kathy; Ishida, Ken; Kapustka, Lawrence; Kautsky, Ulrik; Kuhne, Wendy; Lynch, Michael; Mappes, Tapio; Mihok, Steve; Møller, Anders P; Mothersill, Carmel; Mousseau, Timothy A; Otaki, Joji M; Pryakhin, Evgeny; Rhodes, Olin E; Salbu, Brit; Strand, Per; Tsukada, Hirofumi

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports the output of a consensus symposium organized by the International Union of Radioecology in November 2015. The symposium gathered an academically diverse group of 30 scientists to consider the still debated ecological impact of radiation on populations and ecosystems. Stimulated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters' accidental contamination of the environment, there is increasing interest in developing environmental radiation protection frameworks. Scientific research conducted in a variety of laboratory and field settings has improved our knowledge of the effects of ionizing radiation on the environment. However, the results from such studies sometimes appear contradictory and there is disagreement about the implications for risk assessment. The Symposium discussions therefore focused on issues that might lead to different interpretations of the results, such as laboratory versus field approaches, organism versus population and ecosystemic inference strategies, dose estimation approaches and their significance under chronic exposure conditions. The participating scientists, from across the spectrum of disciplines and research areas, extending also beyond the traditional radioecology community, successfully developed a constructive spirit directed at understanding discrepancies. From the discussions, the group has derived seven consensus statements related to environmental protection against radiation, which are supplemented with some recommendations. Each of these statements is contextualized and discussed in view of contributing to the orientation and integration of future research, the results of which should yield better consensus on the ecological impact of radiation and consolidate suitable approaches for efficient radiological protection of the environment.

  5. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is implicated in the premature senescence of primary human endothelial cells exposed to chronic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yentrapalli, Ramesh; Azimzadeh, Omid; Sriharshan, Arundhathi; Malinowsky, Katharina; Merl, Juliane; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Atkinson, Michael J; Becker, Karl-Friedrich; Haghdoost, Siamak; Tapio, Soile

    2013-01-01

    The etiology of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (CVD) after chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is only marginally understood. We have previously shown that a chronic low-dose rate exposure (4.1 mGy/h) causes human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to prematurely senesce. We now show that a dose rate of 2.4 mGy/h is also able to trigger premature senescence in HUVECs, primarily indicated by a loss of growth potential and the appearance of the senescence-associated markers ß-galactosidase (SA-ß-gal) and p21. In contrast, a lower dose rate of 1.4 mGy/h was not sufficient to inhibit cellular growth or increase SA-ß-gal-staining despite an increased expression of p21. We used reverse phase protein arrays and triplex Isotope Coded Protein Labeling with LC-ESI-MS/MS to study the proteomic changes associated with chronic radiation-induced senescence. Both technologies identified inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway accompanying premature senescence. In addition, expression of proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure and EIF2 signaling was reduced. Age-related diseases such as CVD have been previously associated with increased endothelial cell senescence. We postulate that a similar endothelial aging may contribute to the increased rate of CVD seen in populations chronically exposed to low-dose-rate radiation.

  6. The PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is implicated in the premature senescence of primary human endothelial cells exposed to chronic radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Yentrapalli

    Full Text Available The etiology of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (CVD after chronic exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation is only marginally understood. We have previously shown that a chronic low-dose rate exposure (4.1 mGy/h causes human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs to prematurely senesce. We now show that a dose rate of 2.4 mGy/h is also able to trigger premature senescence in HUVECs, primarily indicated by a loss of growth potential and the appearance of the senescence-associated markers ß-galactosidase (SA-ß-gal and p21. In contrast, a lower dose rate of 1.4 mGy/h was not sufficient to inhibit cellular growth or increase SA-ß-gal-staining despite an increased expression of p21. We used reverse phase protein arrays and triplex Isotope Coded Protein Labeling with LC-ESI-MS/MS to study the proteomic changes associated with chronic radiation-induced senescence. Both technologies identified inactivation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway accompanying premature senescence. In addition, expression of proteins involved in cytoskeletal structure and EIF2 signaling was reduced. Age-related diseases such as CVD have been previously associated with increased endothelial cell senescence. We postulate that a similar endothelial aging may contribute to the increased rate of CVD seen in populations chronically exposed to low-dose-rate radiation.

  7. Chronic Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation Exposure Induces Premature Senescence in Human Fibroblasts that Correlates with Up Regulation of Proteins Involved in Protection against Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Loseva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The risks of non-cancerous diseases associated with exposure to low doses of radiation are at present not validated by epidemiological data, and pose a great challenge to the scientific community of radiation protection research. Here, we show that premature senescence is induced in human fibroblasts when exposed to chronic low dose rate (LDR exposure (5 or 15 mGy/h of gamma rays from a 137Cs source. Using a proteomic approach we determined differentially expressed proteins in cells after chronic LDR radiation compared to control cells. We identified numerous proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress, suggesting that these pathways protect against premature senescence. In order to further study the role of oxidative stress for radiation induced premature senescence, we also used human fibroblasts, isolated from a patient with a congenital deficiency in glutathione synthetase (GS. We found that these GS deficient cells entered premature senescence after a significantly shorter time of chronic LDR exposure as compared to the GS proficient cells. In conclusion, we show that chronic LDR exposure induces premature senescence in human fibroblasts, and propose that a stress induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS is mechanistically involved.

  8. A review of ground-based heavy-ion radiobiology relevant to space radiation risk assessment: Part II. Cardiovascular and immunological effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2007-02-26

    The future of manned space flight depends on an analysis of the numerous potential risks of travel into deep space. Currently no radiation dose limits have been established for these exploratory missions. To set these standards more information is needed about potential acute and late effects on human physiology from appropriate radiation exposure scenarios, including pertinent radiation types and dose rates. Cancer risks have long been considered the most serious late effect from chronic daily relatively low-dose exposures to the complex space radiation environment. However, other late effects from space radiation exposure scenarios are under study in ground-based accelerator facilities and have revealed some unique particle radiation effects not observed with conventional radiations. A comprehensive review of pertinent literature that considers tissue effects of radiation leading to functional detriments in specific organ systems has recently been published (NCRP National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements, Information Needed to Make Radiation Protection Recommendations for Space Missions Beyond Low-Earth Orbit, Report 153, Bethesda, MD, 2006). This paper highlights the review of two non-cancer concerns from this report: cardiovascular and immunological effects.

  9. Thermal effects of radiation from cellular telephones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainwright, Peter

    2000-08-01

    A finite element thermal model of the head has been developed to calculate temperature rises generated in the brain by radiation from cellular telephones and similar electromagnetic devices. A 1 mm resolution MRI dataset was segmented semiautomatically, assigning each volume element to one of ten tissue types. A finite element mesh was then generated using a fully automatic tetrahedral mesh generator developed at NRPB. There are two sources of heat in the model: firstly the natural metabolic heat production; and secondly the power absorbed from the electromagnetic field. The SAR was derived from a finite difference time domain model of the head, coupled to a model `mobile phone', namely a quarter-wavelength antenna mounted on a metal box. The steady-state temperature distribution was calculated using the standard Pennes `bioheat equation'. In the normal cerebral cortex the high blood perfusion rate serves to provide an efficient cooling mechanism. In the case of equipment generally available to the public, the maximum temperature rise found in the brain was about 0.1 °C. These results will help in the further development of criteria for exposure guidelines, and the technique developed may be used to assess temperature rises associated with SARs for different types of RF exposure.

  10. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation in chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Hernandez, E.; Lavenhar, M.; Vidaver, R.; Dowling, P.C.

    1986-06-21

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI; 1980 cGy) or sham irradiation was given to 40 patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) in a prospective, randomised, double-blind study. During mean follow-up of 21 months, MS patients treated with TLI has less functional decline than sham-irradiated MS patients (p<0.01). A significant relation was noted between absolute blood lymphocyte counts in the first year after TLI and subsequent course, patients with higher lymphocyte counts generally having a worse prognosis (p<0.01). TLI was well tolerated and associated with only mild short-term, and to date, long-term side-effects.

  11. Radiation effects in nuclear waste materials. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, W.J.; Corrales, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US); Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Nastasi, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US)

    1998-06-01

    'The objective of this multidisciplinary, multi-institutional research effort is to develop a fundamental understanding of radiation effects in glasses and ceramics at the atomic, microscopic, and macroscopic levels. The goal is to provide the underpinning science and models necessary to assess the performance of glasses and ceramics designed for the immobilization and disposal of high-level tank waste, plutonium residues, excess weapons plutonium, and other highly radioactive waste streams. A variety of experimental and computer simulation methods are employed in this effort. In general, research on glasses focuses on the electronic excitations due to ionizing radiation emitted from beta decay, since this is currently thought to be the principal mechanism for deleterious radiation effects in nuclear waste glasses. Research on ceramics focuses on defects and structural changes induced by the elastic interactions between alpha-decay particles and the atoms in the structure. Radiation effects can lead to changes in physical and chemical properties that may significantly impact long-term performance of nuclear waste materials. The current lack of fundamental understanding of radiation effects in nuclear waste materials makes it impossible to extrapolate the limited existing data bases to larger doses, lower dose rates, different temperature regimes, and different glass compositions or ceramic structures. This report summarizes work after almost 2 years of a 3-year project. Work to date has resulted in 9 publications. Highlights of the research over the past year are presented.'

  12. The Effect of Radiation on the Immune Response to Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonggoo Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy, the beneficial effects of radiation can extend beyond direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells. Delivery of localized radiation to tumors often leads to systemic responses at distant sites, a phenomenon known as the abscopal effect which has been attributed to the induction and enhancement of the endogenous anti-tumor innate and adaptive immune response. The mechanisms surrounding the abscopal effect are diverse and include trafficking of lymphocytes into the tumor microenvironment, enhanced tumor recognition and killing via up-regulation of tumor antigens and antigen presenting machinery and, induction of positive immunomodulatory pathways. Here, we discuss potential mechanisms of radiation-induced enhancement of the anti-tumor response through its effect on the host immune system and explore potential combinational immune-based strategies such as adoptive cellular therapy using ex vivo expanded NK and T cells as a means of delivering a potent effector population in the context of radiation-enhanced anti-tumor immune environment.

  13. JCCRER Project 2.3 -- Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M. [Inst. of Biophysics, Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1998-12-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness.

  14. The effect of acute and chronic stress on growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sävendahl, Lars

    2012-10-23

    Impaired bone growth is observed in many children exposed to stress, but whether the underlying cause is psychological or secondary to a variety of chronic disorders is unclear. The growth plate is specifically targeted by stress through many different mechanisms, including increased serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and cortisol, as well as impaired actions of the growth hormone (GH)-insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) axis. Both glucocorticoids, such as cortisol, and proinflammatory cytokines adversely affect several aspects of chondrogenesis in the growth plate, and these effects can be ameliorated by raising local IGF-1 concentrations. However, this intervention does not completely normalize growth. In children with stress related to chronic inflammation, the cornerstone of improving stress-impaired growth remains the judicious use of glucocorticoids while ensuring effective control of the disease process. Specific immunomodulatory therapy that targets the actions of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) is at least partially effective at rescuing linear growth in many children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Patients who do not respond to anti-TNF treatment may be candidates for therapeutic agents that target other proinflammatory cytokines and for GH intervention. Although GH treatment rescues linear growth in some patients with JIA, it is unknown whether GH can rescue growth in those patients who do not respond to anticytokine therapy. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to explore these and other new potential treatment strategies that could improve bone growth in patients who do not respond to conventional therapy.

  15. Background radiation effects and hazards in planetary instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, Gillian [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: gib@star.le.ac.uk; Sims, Mark R. [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom); Fraser, George [Space Research Centre, Michael Atiyah Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH, (United Kingdom); Klingelhoefer, Goestar [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Bernhardt, Bodo [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Staudinger Weg 9, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Davidson, Andrew [EADS Astrium, Gunnels Wood Road, Stevenage SG1 2AS, (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-01

    Recent and proposed future planetary missions are becoming increasingly concerned with detailed geochemical assessment, often in a bid to ascertain the presence of water and life supporting geochemical systems. The instruments involved may use some kind of radioactive source, e.g. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Moessbauer spectrometry, neutron scattering. Having radioactive sources on a lander/rover poses various potential problems, in regard to both safety to personnel involved in the building of the instrument and to radiation effects on spacecraft structure and on other instruments. Indeed background radiation effects from one instrument may dominate measurements in another resulting in loss of scientific performance. Drawing on experience with the Beagle 2 probe which contained two instruments with radioactive sources, we present a discussion on the management of radiation hazards and background effects posed by radioactive sources for such planetary missions.

  16. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, W H; Artoli, A M [Al Neelain University Department of Medical and Biophysics 11121 Khartoum (Sudan)], E-mail: wasilhashim@yahoo.com

    2008-08-15

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  17. Case of chronic progressive radiation myelopathy with a CT myelogram simulating intramedullary tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanemaru, Kazutomi; Kamo, Hisaki; Yamao, Satoshi; Akiguchi, Ichiro; Kameyama, Masakuni

    1985-05-01

    A 58-year-old man underwent a right middle lobectomy in June, 1975, for poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the lung. Postoperative irradiation was given to the hilus (6100 rads), and to the right supraclavicular area (6000 rads). In 1980, 60 months after completion of irradiation, the patient noticed weakness of his legs particularly on the left side. In 1982, he noticed the girdle sensation in the upper thoracic region, and paresthesia in the lateral side of the right thigh. In Dec 1983, micturition disturbance appeared, and gait disturbance progressed, he was admitted to the Kyoto University Hospital. Neurological examination revealed an incomplete left Brown-Sequard syndrome with diminution of pain and thermal sensation on the right lower limb, and weakness and spasticity particularly on the left lower limb. Conventional myelogram with CT myelogram showed spinal cord swelling from T-2 through T-5. No extramedullary lesion was found. Laminectomy was performed through T-1 to T-6. When the dura was opened, the cord was swollen and necrotic with a cyst formation. Microscopic examination of the thickened part of the cord showed necrosis and gliosis. The lesion was correspond to the cord segments exposed to the radiation, and a diagnosis of radiation myelopathy was made. Several cases of radiation myelopathy with definite swelling of the cord at myelography were reported, but myelography in these cases was performed at most within 11 months after the onset. In this case, myelography was performed three years after the onset, and revealed difinite swelling of the cord due to a cyst formation. (author).

  18. Functional proteomic analysis revealed ground-base ion radiations cannot reflect biological effects of space radiations of rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yeqing; Zhao, Qian; Han, Lu

    2016-07-01

    Highly ionizing radiation (HZE) in space is considered as main factor causing biological effects. Radiobiological studies during space flights are unrepeatable due to the variable space radiation environment, ground-base ion radiations are usually performed to simulate of the space biological effect. Spaceflights present a low-dose rate (0.1˜~0.3mGy/day) radiation environment inside aerocrafts while ground-base ion radiations present a much higher dose rate (100˜~500mGy/min). Whether ground-base ion radiation can reflect effects of space radiation is worth of evaluation. In this research, we compared the functional proteomic profiles of rice plants between on-ground simulated HZE particle radiation and spaceflight treatments. Three independent ground-base seed ionizing radiation experiments with different cumulative doses (dose range: 2˜~20000mGy) and different liner energy transfer (LET) values (13.3˜~500keV/μμm) and two independent seed spaceflight experiments onboard Chinese 20th satellite and SZ-6 spacecraft were carried out. Alterations in the proteome were analyzed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry identifications. 45 and 59 proteins showed significant (pmetabolic process, protein folding and phosphorylation. The results implied that ground-base radiations cannot truly reflect effects of spaceflight radiations, ground-base radiation was a kind of indirect effect to rice causing oxidation and metabolism stresses, but space radiation was a kind of direct effect leading to macromolecule (DNA and protein) damage and signal pathway disorders. This functional proteomic analysis work might provide a new evaluation method for further on-ground simulated HZE radiation experiments.

  19. Chronic effects of lead on the renin-angiotensin system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vander, A.J.

    1988-06-01

    This paper reviews the chronic effects of lead exposure on the renin-angiotensin system in experimental animals and human beings. In rats, when lead exposure is begun several weeks after birth in doses that cause blood lead concentration (PbB) of 30 to 40 ..mu..g/L, the result is an increase in basal plasma renin activity (PRA) and renal renin concentration, with no change in the metabolic clearance of renin; this is presumptive evidence for increased renin secretion. PRA is also increased in 1-month-old animals whose exposure to lead (in doses that raise PbB to 9 ..mu..g/dL) was begun in utero. In contrast, older animals whose exposure was begun in utero manifest no change or a decrease in their PRA and renal renin concentration. Regardless of when the exposure is begun, lead can decrease the plasma concentration of angiotensin II at any given PRA, but the dose required for this effect is highly variable. The hypertension induced by lead exposure is associated with low PRA and a normal anigotensin II/PRA ratio. Chronic human exposure to lead also is associated with highly variable changes in PRA from study to study; it has been reported to be decreased under both basal and stimulated conditions, unchanged, or increased in a manner exponentially related to PbB. The human data are consistent with the tentative hypothesis that lead-exposed persons may have higher PRA than normal during the early periods of modest exposure but normal or depressed PRA following more chronic severe exposures. In a small preliminary study, blood lead concentration was found to be higher in high-renin hypertensive persons than in normotensive persons.

  20. The effectiveness of thoracic manipulation on patients with chronic mechanical neck pain - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Herman Mun Cheung; Wing Chiu, Thomas Tai; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2011-04-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of thoracic manipulation (TM) on patients with chronic neck pain. 120 patients aged between 18 and 55 were randomly allocated into two groups: an experimental group which received TM and a control group without the manipulative procedure. Both groups received infrared radiation therapy (IRR) and a standard set of educational material. TM and IRR were given twice weekly for 8 sessions. Outcome measures included craniovertebral angle (CV angle), neck pain (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS), neck disability (Northwick Park Neck Disability Questionnaire; NPQ), health-related quality of life status (SF36 Questionnaire) and neck mobility. These outcome measures were assessed immediately after 8 sessions of treatment, 3-months and at a 6-month follow-up. Patients that received TM showed significantly greater improvement in pain intensity (p = 0.043), CV angle (p = 0.049), NPQ (p = 0.018), neck flexion (p = 0.005), and the Physical Component Score (PCS) of the SF36 Questionnaire (p = 0.002) than the control group immediately post-intervention. All these improvements were maintained at the 6-month follow-ups. This study shows that TM was effective in reducing neck pain, improving dysfunction and neck posture and neck range of motion (ROM) for patients with chronic mechanical neck pain up to a half-year post-treatment.

  1. Geometric doppler effect: spin-split dispersion of thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Nir; Gorodetski, Yuri; Frischwasser, Kobi; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2010-09-24

    A geometric Doppler effect manifested by a spin-split dispersion relation of thermal radiation is observed. A spin-dependent dispersion splitting was obtained in a structure consisting of a coupled thermal antenna array. The effect is due to a spin-orbit interaction resulting from the dynamics of the surface waves propagating along the structure whose local anisotropy axis is rotated in space. The observation of the spin-symmetry breaking in thermal radiation may be utilized for manipulation of spontaneous or stimulated emission.

  2. Radiative Transfer Effects during Photoheating of the Intergalactic Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, T; Abel, Tom; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    1999-01-01

    The thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) after reionization is to a large extent determined by photoheating. Here we demonstrate that calculations of the photoheating rate which neglect radiative transfer effects substantially underestimate the energy input during and after reionization. The neglect of radiative transfer effects results in temperatures of the IGM which are too low by a factor of two after HeII reionization. We briefly discuss implications for the absorption properties of the IGM and the distribution of baryons in shallow potential wells.

  3. Analysis of the mortality experience amongst U.S. nuclear power industry workers after chronic low-dose exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Geoffrey R; Zablotska, Lydia B; Fix, Jack J; Egel, John; Buchanan, Jeff

    2004-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 [95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4] and 0.506 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). While associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15 countries will have greater power for testing the main hypotheses

  4. Analysis of the Mortality Experience amongst U.S. Nuclear Power Industry Workers after Chronic Low-Dose Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, Geoffrey R.; Zablotska, Lydia B.; Fix, Jack J.; Egel, John N.; Buchanan, Jeffrey A.

    2004-11-01

    Workers employed in 15 utilities that generate nuclear power in the United States have been followed for up to 18 years between 1979 and 1997. Their cumulative dose from whole-body ionizing radiation has been determined from the dose records maintained by the facilities themselves and the REIRS and REMS systems maintained by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Energy, respectively. Mortality in the cohort from a number of causes has been analyzed with respect to individual radiation doses. The cohort displays a very substantial healthy worker effect, i.e. considerably lower cancer and noncancer mortality than the general population. Based on 26 and 368 deaths, respectively, positive though statistically nonsignificant associations were seen for mortality from leukemia (excluding chronic lymphocytic leukemia) and all solid cancers combined, with excess relative risks per sievert of 5.67 (95% confidence interval (CI) -2.56, 30.4) and 0.596 (95% CI -2.01, 4.64), respectively. These estimates are very similar to those from the atomic bomb survivors study, though the wide confidence intervals are also consistent with lower or higher risk estimates. A strong positive and statistically significant association between radiation dose and deaths from arteriosclerotic heart disease including coronary heart disease was also observed in the cohort, with an ERR of 8.78 (95% CI 2.10, 20.0). While associations with heart disease have been reported in some other occupational studies, the magnitude of the present association is not consistent with them and therefore needs cautious interpretation and merits further attention. At present, the relatively small number of deaths and the young age of the cohort (mean age at end of follow-up is 45 years) limit the power of the study, but further follow-up and the inclusion of the present data in an ongoing IARC combined analysis of nuclear workers from 15 countries will have greater power for testing the main hypotheses

  5. Effect of ionizing radiation on rat parotid gland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boraks, George; Tampelini, Flavio Silva; Pereira, Kleber Fernando; Chopard, Renato Paulo [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. of Biomedical Sciences. Dept. of Anatomy]. E-mail: rchopard@usp.br

    2008-01-15

    A common side effect of radiotherapy used in the treatment of oral cancer is the occurrence of structural and physiological alterations of the salivary glands due to exposure to ionizing radiation, as demonstrated by conditions such as decreased salivary flow. The present study evaluated ultrastructural alterations in the parotid glands of rats receiving a fractionated dose (1,500-cGy) of radiation emitted by a Cesium-137 source and rats that were not subjected to ionizing radiation. After sacrifice, the parotid glands were removed and examined by transmission electron microscopy. Damage such as cytoplasmic vacuolisation, dilatation of the endoplasmic reticulum and destruction of mitochondria, as well as damage to the cellular membrane of acinar cells, were observed. These findings lead to the conclusion that ionizing radiation promotes alterations in the glandular parenchyma, and that these alterations are directly related to the dose level of absorbed radiation. Certain phenomena that appear in the cytoplasm and nuclear material indicate that ionizing radiation causes acinar cell death (apoptosis). (author)

  6. Biophysics and medical effects of enhanced radiation weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Glen I

    2012-08-01

    Enhanced radiation weapons (ERW) are fission-fusion devices where the massive numbers of neutrons generated during the fusion process are intentionally allowed to escape rather than be confined to increase yield (and fallout products). As a result, the energy partition of the weapon output shifts from blast and thermal energies toward prompt radiation. The neutron/gamma output ratio is also increased. Neutrons emitted from ERW are of higher energy than the Eave of neutrons from fission weapons. These factors affect the patterns of injury distribution; delay wound healing in combined injuries; reduce the therapeutic efficacy of medical countermeasures; and increase the dose to radiation-only casualties, thus potentiating the likelihood of encountering radiation-induced incapacitation. The risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis is also increased. Radiation exposure to first responders from activation products is increased over that expected from a fission weapon of similar yield. However, the zone of dangerous fallout is significantly reduced in area. At least four nations have developed the potential to produce such weapons. Although the probability of detonation of an ERW in the near future is very small, it is nonzero, and clinicians and medical planners should be aware of the medical effects of ERW.

  7. Occultation Modeling for Radiation Obstruction Effects on Spacecraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carufel, Guy; Li, Zu Qun; Harvey, Jason; Crues, Edwin Z.; Bielski, Paul

    2016-01-01

    A geometric occultation model has been developed to determine line-of-sight obstruction of radiation sources expected for different NASA space exploration mission designs. Example applications includes fidelity improvements for surface lighting conditions, radiation pressure, thermal and power subsystem modeling. The model makes use of geometric two dimensional shape primitives to most effectively model space vehicles. A set of these primitives is used to represent three dimensional obstructing objects as a two dimensional outline from the perspective of an observing point of interest. Radiation sources, such as the Sun or a Moon's albedo is represented as a collection of points, each of which is assigned a flux value to represent a section of the radiation source. Planetary bodies, such as a Martian moon, is represented as a collection of triangular facets which are distributed in spherical height fields for optimization. These design aspects and the overall model architecture will be presented. Specific uses to be presented includes a study of the lighting condition on Phobos for a possible future surface mission, and computing the incident flux on a spacecraft's solar panels and radiators from direct and reflected solar radiation subject to self-shadowing or shadowing by third bodies.

  8. Countermeasures for Space Radiation Induced Malignancies and Acute Biological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann

    The hypothesis being evaluated in this research program is that control of radiation induced oxidative stress will reduce the risk of radiation induced adverse biological effects occurring as a result of exposure to the types of radiation encountered during space travel. As part of this grant work, we have evaluated the protective effects of several antioxidants and dietary supplements and observed that a mixture of antioxidants (AOX), containing L-selenomethionine, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid, vitamin E succinate, and alpha-lipoic acid, is highly effective at reducing space radiation induced oxidative stress in both in vivo and in vitro systems, space radiation induced cytotoxicity and malignant transformation in vitro [1-7]. In studies designed to determine whether the AOX formulation could affect radiation induced mortality [8], it was observed that the AOX dietary supplement increased the 30-day survival of ICR male mice following exposure to a potentially lethal dose (8 Gy) of X-rays when given prior to or after animal irradiation. Pretreatment of animals with antioxidants resulted in significantly higher total white blood cell and neutrophil counts in peripheral blood at 4 and 24 hours following exposure to doses of 1 Gy and 8 Gy. Antioxidant treatment also resulted in increased bone marrow cell counts following irradiation, and prevented peripheral lymphopenia following 1 Gy irradiation. Supplementation with antioxidants in irradiated animals resulted in several gene expression changes: the antioxidant treatment was associated with increased Bcl-2, and decreased Bax, caspase-9 and TGF-β1 mRNA expression in the bone marrow following irradiation. These results suggest that modulation of apoptosis may be mechanistically involved in hematopoietic system radioprotection by antioxidants. Maintenance of the antioxidant diet was associated with improved recovery of the bone marrow following sub-lethal or potentially lethal irradiation. Taken together

  9. Impact of chronic, low-level ionising radiation exposure on terrestrial invertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hingston, J.; Wood, M.D.; Copplestone, D.; Zinger, I. [Liverpool Univ., School of Biological Sciences, Merseyside (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    There is a need to confirm that the environment is being adequately protected from the mixture of contaminants released into it. In the field of environmental radioactivity, tools have been developed to assess the impacts of ionising radiation on wildlife. The scientific data upon which these assessments are based is, however, lacking. New documentation has been produced by the UK Environment Agency to provide guidelines on structuring experiments (using environmentally relevant doses) and select suitable non-human species and endpoints for study. It is anticipated that this documentation will be used to direct future experiments in this field. This paper presents the results of the first of these experiments. Numbers of the earthworm Eisenia fetida and the wood louse Porcellio scaber were segregated and constantly exposed to one of six radiation doses (background, 0.1, 0.4, 1.5, 4.0 and 8.0 mGyh{sup -1}) for a total of 16 and 14 weeks respectively. The endpoints of mortality, number of viable offspring and average weight of an individual were recorded and the results of this study will be discussed here. (author)

  10. The U.S.-Russian radiation health effects research program in the Southern Urals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, P.J.

    2000-07-01

    The Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) was established through a bilateral US-Russian agreement to support research and exchange information on radiation health effects. The U.S. member agencies include the Department of Energy (DOE), Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Department of Defense (DoD), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Russians are represented by the Ministries of Emergencies (EMERCOM), the Atomic Energy (MINATOM) and Health (MINZDRAV), and the Russian Academy of Sciences (IBRAE). The focus of this research is on the workers from the Mayak Production Association (MAYAK) in the Southern Urals and on the neighboring populations along the Techa River exposed to contamination from the plant. The goal of the program is to better define the relationship between the health effects and the chronic low dose and dose-rate exposure, these data being essential to validate current radiation protection standards and practices. The current primary areas of JCCRER research include dose reconstruction, epidemiologic health studies, molecular epidemiology/biodosimetry, and the creation of tissue banks. The organization of the ongoing research conducted under the aegis of the JCCRER and the rationale for this work are described.

  11. Effect of radiofrequency radiation in cultured mammalian cells: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Debashri; Ghosh, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile phone related technologies will continue to increase in the foreseeable future worldwide. This has drawn attention to the probable interaction of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation with different biological targets. Studies have been conducted on various organisms to evaluate the alleged ill-effect on health. We have therefore attempted to review those work limited to in vitro cultured cells where irradiation conditions were well controlled. Different investigators have studied varied endpoints like DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, cellular morphology and viability to weigh the genotoxic effect of such radiation by utilizing different frequencies and dose rates under various irradiation conditions that include continuous or pulsed exposures and also amplitude- or frequency-modulated waves. Cells adapt to change in their intra and extracellular environment from different chemical and physical stimuli through organized alterations in gene or protein expression that result in the induction of stress responses. Many studies have focused on such effects for risk estimations. Though the effects of microwave radiation on cells are often not pronounced, some investigators have therefore combined radiofrequency radiation with other physical or chemical agents to observe whether the effects of such agents were augmented or not. Such reports in cultured cellular systems have also included in this review. The findings from different workers have revealed that, effects were dependent on cell type and the endpoint selection. However, contradictory findings were also observed in same cell types with same assay, in such cases the specific absorption rate (SAR) values were significant.

  12. Protective Effect of Chitin Urocanate Nanofibers against Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikuko Ito

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urocanic acid is a major ultraviolet (UV-absorbing chromophore. Chitins are highly crystalline structures that are found predominantly in crustacean shells. Alpha-chitin consists of microfibers that contain nanofibrils embedded in a protein matrix. Acid hydrolysis is a common method used to prepare chitin nanofibrils (NFs. We typically obtain NFs by hydrolyzing chitin with acetic acid. However, in the present study, we used urocanic acid to prepare urocanic acid chitin NFs (UNFs and examined its protective effect against UVB radiation. Hos: HR-1 mice coated with UNFs were UVB irradiated (302 nm, 150 mJ/cm2, and these mice showed markedly lower UVB radiation-induced cutaneous erythema than the control. Additionally, sunburn cells were rarely detected in the epidermis of UNFs-coated mice after UVB irradiation. Although the difference was not as significant as UNFs, the number of sunburn cells in mice treated with acetic acid chitin nanofibrils (ANFs tended to be lower than in control mice. These results demonstrate that ANFs have a protective effect against UVB and suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of NFs influence the protective effect of ANFs against UVB radiation. The combination of NFs with other substances that possess UV-protective effects, such as urocanic acid, may provide an enhanced protective effect against UVB radiation.

  13. Effective control of hypertension in adults with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Adhikary

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adequate control of hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease patients is difficult to achieve. This study was designed to analyze the adequacy of Hypertension control in adults with CKD using different classes of antihypertensive drugs. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was done that included 85 patients with CKD admitted to our Medicine Department over a period of two years (2006-2008 A.D.. Presence of CKD was defined as glomerular filtration rate 30ug/mg. Adequate blood pressure control was defined as systolic blood pressure less than or equals to 130 and diastolic blood pressure less than or equals to 80 mm Hg. Data and Statistical analysis was done using SPSS Version 12 for Windows. RESULTS: Of all the CKD patients, 51.4% required three Anti-Hypertensive drugs combination for the effective control of Hypertension, while only 21% of CKD patients with hypertension was controlled on two drugs. CONCLUSION: Adequate control of blood pressure in CKD patient was shown to be most effective on combination of three antihypertensive drugs. A poor control was seen on patients taking less than three antihypertensive drugs. Keywords: antihypertensive drug; chronic kidney disease; glomerular filtration rate; hypertension.

  14. Mustard gas toxicity: the acute and chronic pathological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S; Ghanei, Mostafa; Ansarin, Khalil; Shoja, Mohammadali M

    2010-10-01

    Ever since it was first used in armed conflict, mustard gas (sulfur mustard, MG) has been known to cause a wide range of acute and chronic injuries to exposure victims. The earliest descriptions of these injuries were published during and in the immediate aftermath of the First World War, and a further series of accounts followed the Second World War. More recently, MG has been deployed in warfare in the Middle East and this resulted in large numbers of victims, whose conditions have been studied in detail at hospitals in the region. In this review, we bring together the older and more recent clinical studies on MG toxicity and summarize what is now known about the acute and chronic effects of the agent on the eyes, skin, respiratory tract and other physiological systems. In the majority of patients, the most clinically serious long-term consequences of MG poisoning are on the respiratory system, but the effects on the skin and other systems also have a significant impact on quality of life. Aspects of the management of these patients are discussed.

  15. Novel pathways for glucocorticoid effects on neutrophils in chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, N J; Euzger, H S; Butt, S K; Perretti, M

    1998-10-01

    Neutrophils have been implicated in mediating much of the tissue damage associated with chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, where they are involved in destruction of both cartilage and bone. Glucocorticoids are powerful anti-inflammatory agents, often used in the treatment of this autoimmune disease. They exert significant inhibitory effects on neutrophil activation and functions, such as chemotaxis, adhesion, transmigration, apoptosis, oxidative burst, and phagocytosis. The mechanisms by which glucocorticoids exert these effects on neutrophils are unclear. Evidence from studies of inflammation in human subjects and animal models suggests that annexin-I an endogenous, glucocorticoid-induced protein also known as lipocortin-1, has a pivotal role in modulating neutrophil activation, transmigratory, and phagocytic functions. Furthermore, we present evidence for altered neutrophil functions in rheumatoid arthritis that correspond to a significantly reduced capacity of these cells to bind annexin-I. A proposed novel pathway for glucocorticoid actions on neutrophils involving annexin-I could explain the development of chronic neutrophil activation in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Erkang; WU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    A bstract In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy a-particle irradiated and non-irradiated by- stander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensi- tive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline- 1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose a-particle radiation-induced damage in ir- radiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  17. Intermittent Jolts of Galactic UV Radiation Mutagenetic Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Scalo, J M; Williams, P; Scalo, John M.; Williams, Peter

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the frequency of intermittent hypermutation events and disruptions of planetary/satellite photochemistry due to ultraviolet radiation from core collapse supernova explosions. Calculations are presented for planetary systems in the local Milky Way, including the important moderating effects of vertical Galactic structure and UV absorption by interstellar dust. The events are particularly frequent for satellites of giant gas planets at \\gtrsim 5-10 AU distance from solar-type parent stars, or in the conventional habitable zones for planets orbiting spectral type K and M parent stars, with rates of significant jolts about 10^3 - 10^4 per Gyr. The steep source spectra and existing data on UVA and longer-wavelength radiation damage in terrestrial organisms suggest that the mutational effects may operate even on planets with ozone shields. We argue that the mutation doubling dose for UV radiation should be much smaller than the mean lethal dose, using terrestrial prokaryotic organisms as our model, and ...

  18. Space Radiation and the Challenges Towards Effective Shielding Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulnasser

    2014-01-01

    The hazards of space radiation and their effective mitigation strategies continue to pose special science and technology challenges to NASA. It is widely accepted now that shielding space vehicles and structures will have to rely on new and innovative materials since aluminum, like all high Z materials, are poor shields against the particulate and highly ionizing nature of space radiation. Shielding solutions, motivated and constrained by power and mass limitations, couple this realization with "multifunctionality," both in design concept as well as in material function and composition. Materials endowed with effective shielding properties as well as with some degree of multi-functionality may be the kernel of the so-called "radiation-smart" structures and designs. This talk will present some of the challenges and potential mitigation ideas towards the realization of such structures and designs.

  19. Effects of solar radiation on hair and photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dario, Michelli F; Baby, André R; Velasco, Maria Valéria R

    2015-12-01

    In this paper the negative effects of solar radiation (ultraviolet, visible and infrared wavelengths) on hair properties like color, mechanical properties, luster, protein content, surface roughness, among others, will be discussed. Despite knowing that radiation damages hair, there are no consensus about the particular effect of each segment of solar radiation on the hair shaft. The hair photoprotection products are primarily targeted to dyed hair, specially auburn pigments, and gray shades. They are usually based on silicones, antioxidants and quaternary chemical UV filters that have more affinity for negatively charged hair surface and present higher efficacy. Unfortunately, there are no regulated parameters, like for skin photoprotection, for efficacy evaluation of hair care products, which makes impossible to compare the results published in the literature. Thus, it is important that researchers make an effort to apply experimental conditions similar to a real level of sun exposure, like dose, irradiance, time, temperature and relative humidity.

  20. Diffraction and polarization effects in Earth radiation budget measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, J R; Barki, A R; Priestley, K J

    2016-12-01

    Thermal radiation emitted and reflected from the Earth and viewed from near-Earth orbit may be characterized by its spectral distribution, its degree of coherence, and its state of polarization. The current generation of broadband Earth radiation budget instruments has been designed to minimize the effect of diffraction and polarization on science products. We used Monte Carlo ray-trace (MCRT) models that treat individual rays as quasi-monochromatic, polarized entities to explore the possibility of improving the performance of such instruments by including measures of diffraction and polarization during calibration and operation. We have demonstrated that diffraction and polarization sensitivity associated with typical Earth radiation budget instrument design features has a negligible effect on measurements.

  1. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  2. Effects of radiation on direct-drive laser target interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombant, D. G.

    1999-11-01

    Radiation may be useful for reducing laser imprint and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth in direct-drive target pellets. We will discuss the important role of radiation in a proposed direct-drive X-ray preheated target concept(S.Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 5,1901(1998)). In this design, a high-Z coating surrounds a thin plastic coat, over a DT-wicked foam and on top of the DT fuel. Radiation effects will be examined and discussed in the context of this design. The soft X-ray radiation emitted during the foot of the laser pulse - at a few 10^12W/cm^2- preheats the foam ablator which contributes to the reduction of the RT instability. The ablator also stops the radiation, allowing the fuel to stay on a low adiabat. Radiation in the blow-off corona of the target establishes a long scalelength plasma. This separates the ablation region from the laser absorption region where the remaining defects in laser uniformity/pellet surface finish constitute the seed for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, when the pulse intensity rises, the pressure generated by the laser in combination with the changing opacity of the plasma causes the plasma to be pushed back toward the ablator. This is called a Radiative Plasma Structure (RPS)(J.Dahlburg et al., J.Q.S.R.T. 54,113(1995)). These RPS's are a potential problem because they may carry with them the imprint which was present in the low-density corona. We will show and discuss these various effects, as well as some of the experimental work(C.Pawley et al., this conference) under way in connection with this program. These experiments are essential in order to validate both the design concepts and the numerical models, which include on-line state-of-the-art atomic physics modeling(M.Klapisch et al.,Phys. Plasmas 5,1919(1998)).

  3. Solid cancer mortality associated with chronic external radiation exposure at the French atomic energy commission and nuclear fuel company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz-Flamant, C; Samson, E; Caër-Lorho, S; Acker, A; Laurier, D

    2011-07-01

    nuclear workers, which should improve knowledge about the risks associated with chronic low doses and provide useful risk estimates for radiation protection.

  4. Radiation shielding effectiveness of newly developed superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vishwanath P.; Medhat, M. E.; Badiger, N. M.; Saliqur Rahman, Abu Zayed Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Gamma ray shielding effectiveness of superconductors with a high mass density has been investigated. We calculated the mass attenuation coefficients, the mean free path (mfp) and the exposure buildup factor (EBF). The gamma ray EBF was computed using the Geometric Progression (G-P) fitting method at energies 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp. The fast-neutron shielding effectiveness has been characterized by the effective neutron removal cross-section of the superconductors. It is shown that CaPtSi3, CaIrSi3, and Bi2Sr2Ca1Cu2O8.2 are superior shielding materials for gamma rays and Tl0.6Rb0.4Fe1.67Se2 for fast neutrons. The present work should be useful in various applications of superconductors in fusion engineering and design.

  5. Skyglow effects in UV and visible spectra: Radiative fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Hector Antonio

    2013-09-01

    Several studies have tried to understand the mechanisms and effects of radiative transfer under different night-sky conditions. However, most of these studies are limited to the various effects of visible spectra. Nevertheless, the invisible parts of the electromagnetic spectrum can pose a more profound threat to nature. One visible threat is from what is popularly termed skyglow. Such skyglow is caused by injudiciously situated or designed artificial night lighting systems which degrade desired sky viewing. Therefore, since lamp emissions are not limited to visible electromagnetic spectra, it is necessary to consider the complete spectrum of such lamps in order to understand the physical behaviour of diffuse radiation at terrain level. In this paper, the downward diffuse radiative flux is computed in a two-stream approximation and obtained ultraviolet spectral radiative fluxes are inter-related with luminous fluxes. Such a method then permits an estimate of ultraviolet radiation if the traditionally measured illuminance on a horizontal plane is available. The utility of such a comparison of two spectral bands is shown, using the different lamp types employed in street lighting. The data demonstrate that it is insufficient to specify lamp type and its visible flux production independently of each other. Also the UV emissions have to be treated by modellers and environmental scientists because some light sources can be fairly important pollutants in the near ultraviolet. Such light sources can affect both the living organisms and ambient environment.

  6. Improved treatment of radiation effects on the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wandl, E.O.; Kaercher, K.H.; Wandl-Hainberger, I.

    1985-04-29

    The treatment concept developed by K.H. Kaercher was extended by a therapy using Elasten S cream. In the course of a highvoltage therapy using fast electrons or cobalt-60, interesting aspects in the treatment and progression of the radiation reactions of the skin were established. The dermato-therapeutic principles layed down by K.H. Kaercher with the treatment palette used hitherto, have without doubt invariably proven their value. The exclusive powder treatment, however, may be made more practical by application of the new treatment cream in accordance with the intervals in radiation treatment or as a basic treatment towards the end of therapy. Furthermore it is ideally suited for the care and after-treatment of skin, strained by radiation. It reduces considerably the remaining visible radiation reactions. The treatment with powder and emulsion has for more than 10 years proven effective. After the excellent results of the new cream during radiation treatment, additional positive effects are expected in a long-term trial which will be reported on separately.

  7. Synergistic effect of ozonation and ionizing radiation for PVA decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Weihua; Chen, Lujun; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-08-01

    Ozonation and ionizing radiation are both advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) without chemical addition and secondary pollution. Also, the two processes' efficiency is determined by different pH conditions, which creates more possibilities for their combination. Importantly, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation could be suitable for treating wastewaters with extreme pH values, i.e., textile wastewater. To find synergistic effects, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation mineralization was investigated for degradation of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) at different pH levels. A synergistic effect was found at initial pH in the range 3.0-9.4. When the initial pH was 3.0, the combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation gave a PVA mineralization degree of 17%. This was 2.7 times the sum achieved by the two individual processes, and factors of 2.1 and 1.7 were achieved at initial pH of 7.0 and 9.4, respectively. The combined process of ozonation and ionizing radiation was demonstrated to be a feasible strategy for treatment of PVA-containing wastewater.

  8. Evaluating Shielding Effectiveness for Reducing Space Radiation Cancer Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Ren, Lei

    2007-01-01

    We discuss calculations of probability distribution functions (PDF) representing uncertainties in projecting fatal cancer risk from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). The PDF s are used in significance tests of the effectiveness of potential radiation shielding approaches. Uncertainties in risk coefficients determined from epidemiology data, dose and dose-rate reduction factors, quality factors, and physics models of radiation environments are considered in models of cancer risk PDF s. Competing mortality risks and functional correlations in radiation quality factor uncertainties are treated in the calculations. We show that the cancer risk uncertainty, defined as the ratio of the 95% confidence level (CL) to the point estimate is about 4-fold for lunar and Mars mission risk projections. For short-stay lunar missions (shielding, especially for carbon composites structures with high hydrogen content. In contrast, for long duration lunar (>180 d) or Mars missions, GCR risks may exceed radiation risk limits, with 95% CL s exceeding 10% fatal risk for males and females on a Mars mission. For reducing GCR cancer risks, shielding materials are marginally effective because of the penetrating nature of GCR and secondary radiation produced in tissue by relativistic particles. At the present time, polyethylene or carbon composite shielding can not be shown to significantly reduce risk compared to aluminum shielding based on a significance test that accounts for radiobiology uncertainties in GCR risk projection.

  9. Effects of very high radiation on SiPMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heering, A., E-mail: Adriaan.Heering@cern.ch [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Musienko, Yu, E-mail: Iouri.Musienko@cern.ch [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Instutute for Nuclear Research RAS, pr. 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ruchti, R.; Wayne, M. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Karneyeu, A.; Postoev, V. [Instutute for Nuclear Research RAS, pr. 60-letiya Oktyabrya 7a, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-11

    During the last 5 years we have successfully completed R&D for the instrumentation of silicon photo multipliers (SiPMs) for the CMS HCAL Phase 1 upgrade in 2018. Much focus was put on radiation damage during these years. For the HCAL we expect a maximum total dose of 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} for a total lifetime integrated luminosity of 3000 fb{sup −1}. Good correlation between cell size and performance with high radiation was found during this R&D. To evaluate the possibility of using the SiPMs in the wider CMS environment we have exposed the current state of the art smallest cell SiPMs to radiation of 6×10{sup 12} p/cm{sup 2} in 62 MeV LIF beam line in 2014 at UCL Belgium and up to 1.3×10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2} in the CERN PS 23 GeV proton beam in late 2014. The SiPM's main parameters were measured before and after irradiation. Here we report on the effects of noise increase and breakdown voltage shift due to the extremely high dose. - Highlights: • Modeling of noise increase in SiPMs vs. 1 MeV equivalent neutron radiation. • Other effects in SiPMs exposed to very high radiation.

  10. Rheology of Indian Honey: Effect of Temperature and Gamma Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhanshu Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Honey brands commonly available in Indian market were characterized for their rheological and thermal properties. Viscosity of all the honey samples belonging to different commercial brands was found to decrease with increase in temperature (5–40°C and their sensitivity towards temperature varied significantly as explained by calculating activation energy based on Arrhenius model and ranged from 54.0 to 89.0 kJ/mol. However, shear rate was not found to alter the viscosity of honey indicating their Newtonian character and the shear stress varied linearly with shear rate for all honey samples. Honey is known to contain pathogenic microbial spores and in our earlier study gamma radiation was found to be effective in achieving microbial decontamination of honey. The effect of gamma radiation (5–15 kGy on rheological properties of honey was assessed, and it was found to remain unchanged upon radiation treatment. The glass transition temperatures (Tg of these honey analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry varied from −44.1 to −54.1°C and remained unchanged upon gamma radiation treatment. The results provide information about some key physical properties of commercial Indian honey. Radiation treatment which is useful for ensuring microbial safety of honey does not alter these properties.

  11. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  12. Effects of Hand Vibration on Motor Output in Chronic Hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibele de Andrade Melo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Muscle vibration has been shown to increase the corticospinal excitability assessed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and to change voluntary force production in healthy subjects. Objectives. To evaluate the effect of vibration on corticospinal excitability using TMS and on maximal motor output using maximal voluntary contraction (MVC in individuals with chronic hemiparesis. Methodology. Nineteen hemiparetic and 17 healthy control subjects participated in this study. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs and MVC during lateral pinch grip were recorded at first dorsal interosseous muscle in a single session before, during, and after one-minute trials of 80 Hz vibration of the thenar eminence. Results. In hemiparetic subjects, vibration increased MEP amplitudes to a level comparable to that of control subjects and triggered a MEP response in 4 of 7 patients who did not have a MEP at rest. Also, vibration increased the maximal rate of force production (dF/dtmax⁡ in both control and hemiparetic subjects but it did not increase MVC. Conclusion. Motor response generated with a descending cortical drive in chronic hemiparetic subjects can be increased during vibration. Vibration could be used when additional input is needed to reveal motor responses and to increase rate of force generation.

  13. Effects of chronic stress on sleep in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, G J; Pastel, R H; Bauman, R A; Meininger, G R; Maughan, K R; Robinson, T N; Wright, W L; Covington, P S

    1995-02-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the effects of chronic stress on sleep using a rodent paradigm of around-the-clock signalled intermittent foot shock in which some rats can pull a chain to avoid/escape shock while another group of rats is yoked to the first group. We measured sleep using telemetry; four-channel EEG was collected 24 h/day in rats during 2 prestress days; days 1, 2, 3, 7, and 14 during chronic stress; and 3 poststress days. States of REM sleep, non-REM (NREM) sleep, and waking were scored for each 15-s period of the EEG recordings. During the prestress period, rats slept (REM plus NREM) 55% of available time during the light hours and 34% of the dark hours with the remainder represented by waking. On the first day of stress, total sleep and, especially REM sleep, decreased markedly. By the second day of stress, only REM sleep in the controllable stress group (but not the uncontrollable stress group) was still significantly decreased compared to prestress levels, and REM sleep returned to baseline levels by day 7 of stress. The recovery of sleep quantity was accomplished by increased sleep during the dark hours, resulting in a long-lasting disruption of normal circadian sleep patterning.

  14. Radiation Preservation of Foods and Its Effect on Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Edward S.; Thomas, Miriam H.

    1970-01-01

    Presents a discussion of (1) some possible applications of ionizing radiation to the treatment and preservation of food and (2) the effects of irradiation on nutrients such as proteins, fats, oils, carbohydrates and vitamins. The authors suggest that the irradiation process has great potential in food technology. Bibliography. (LC)

  15. Study of radiation effects on mammalian cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, W. K.

    1968-01-01

    Radiation effect on single cells and cell populations of Chinese hamster lung tissue is studied in vitro. The rate and position as the cell progresses through the generation cycle shows division delay, changes in some biochemical processes in the cell, chromosomal changes, colony size changes, and loss of reproductive capacity.

  16. Effect of arc on radiation thermometry in welding process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮玉; 王燕; 武宝林

    2002-01-01

    The effect of arc on radiation thermometry is analyzed in a field close to the arc during the welding process, and the ratio of signal to noise and other factors are obtained for a small current arc .The method of the temperature measurement is feasible when the arc current is decreased to a smaller value in the welding process.

  17. A theory of cooperative effects in stimulated Cerenkov radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the possibility of cooperative effects in Cerenkov radiation will be discussed theoretically. A crude sketch is given of a possible capture of photons from a part of the rather broadband Cerenkov spectrum in a high quality resonator. We then introduce a classical Markoffian master equa

  18. Research of Fast Neutron Radiation Effect on Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In order to research the fast neutron radiation effect on rats,the 8 weeks Wistar male rats were wholly irradiated by 14 MeV fast neutron with 5 Gy. In the experiment,the rats were divided into normal and irradiation group, and killed

  19. Reminder of the edge effect in Synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H

    1998-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation in the LHC will be rather soft and weak, compared to high energy electron machines. Still it is expected to generate non negligible heating and photon-induced gas desorption. A summary of standard formulas and numbers for the LHC have been collected in this note, including a very rough discussion of the spectrum shift expected by the edge effect.

  20. Radiation therapy of prostate cancer applied with cooling effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhata, Akihiko; Ogawa, Katsuaki; Miyazaki, Machiko; Iwai, Hiroshi [Yokosuka National Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Takeda, Takashi

    1995-05-01

    The radio-sensitivity of prostate carcinoma is a resistant one. Also a prostate locates close to rectum, urethra and bladder of which mucus membranes are intermediate sensitive for irradiation, and causes side effects frequently. In this study, we applied with hyperfraction and local membrane cooling to the radiation therapy of the prostate cancer. This brought favorable clinical results with decreased morbidities. (author).

  1. 47 CFR 22.535 - Effective radiated power limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... limits. The effective radiated power (ERP) of transmitters operating on the channels listed in § 22.531 must not exceed the limits in this section. (a) Maximum ERP. The ERP must not exceed the applicable limits in this paragraph under any circumstances. Frequency range (MHz) Maximum ERP (Watts) 35-36 600...

  2. Radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikoin, I.K.; Kikoin, L.I.; Lazarev, S.D.

    1980-10-01

    An experimental study was made of the radiation-electromagnetic effect in germanium single crystals when excess carriers were generated by bombardment with ..cap alpha.. particles, protons, or x rays in magnetic fields up to 8 kOe. The source of ..cap alpha.. particles and protons was a cyclotron and x rays were provided by a tube with a copper anode. The radiation-electromagnetic emf increased linearly on increase in the magnetic field and was directly proportional to the flux of charged particles at low values of the flux, reaching saturation at high values of the flux (approx.5 x 10/sup 11/ particles .cm/sup -2/ .sec/sup -1/). In the energy range 4--40 MeV the emf was practically independent of the ..cap alpha..-particle energy. The sign of the emf was reversed when samples with a ground front surface were irradiated. Measurements of the photoelectromagnetic and Hall effects in the ..cap alpha..-particle-irradiated samples showed that a p-n junction was produced by these particles and its presence should be allowed for in investigations of the radiation-electromagnetic effect. The measured even radiation-electromagnetic emf increased quadratically on increase in the magnetic field. An investigation was made of the barrier radiation-voltaic effect (when the emf was measured between the irradiated and unirradiated surfaces). Special masks were used to produce a set of consecutive p-n junctions in germanium crystals irradiated with ..cap alpha.. particles. A study of the photovoltaic and photoelectromagnetic effects in such samples showed that the method could be used to increase the efficiency of devices utilizing the photoelectromagnetic effect.

  3. Effect of bremsstrahlung radiation emission on fast electrons in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embréus, O.; Stahl, A.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-09-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation emission is an important energy loss mechanism for energetic electrons in plasmas. In this paper we investigate the effect of spontaneous bremsstrahlung emission on the momentum-space structure of the electron distribution, fully accounting for the emission of finite-energy photons by modeling the bremsstrahlung interactions with a Boltzmann collision operator. We find that electrons accelerated by electric fields can reach significantly higher energies than predicted by the commonly used radiative stopping-power model. Furthermore, we show that the emission of soft photons can contribute significantly to the dynamics of electrons with an anisotropic distribution by causing pitch-angle scattering at a rate that increases with energy.

  4. Radiation damage to DNA: the effect of LET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, J.F.; Milligan, J.R. [California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1997-03-01

    Mechanisms whereby ionizing radiation induced damage are introduced into cellular DNA are discussed. The types of lesions induced are summarized and the rationale is presented which supports the statement that radiation induced singly damaged sites are biologically unimportant. The conclusion that multiply damaged sites are critical is discussed and the mechanisms whereby such lesions are formed are presented. Structures of multiply damaged sites are summarized and problems which they present to cellular repair systems are discussed. Lastly the effects of linear energy transfer on the complexity of multiply damaged sites are surveyed and the consequences of this increased complexity are considered in terms of cell survival and mutation. (author)

  5. Tunnelling Effect and Hawking Radiation from a Vaidya Black Hole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-Yi; ZHAO Zheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ We extend Parikh's study to the non-stationary black hole. As an example of the non-stationary black hole, we investigate the tunnelling effect and Hawking radiation from a Vaidya black hole whose Bondi mass is identical to its mass parameter. The Hawking radiation is considered as a tunnelling process across the event horizon and we calculate the tunnelling probability. It is found that the result is different from Parikh's study because drH/dv is the function of Bondi mass m(v).

  6. Direct Radiative Effect of Intense Dust Outbreaks in the Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkikas, A.; Obiso, V.; Basart, S.; Jorba, O.; Pérez García-Pando, C.; Hatzianastassiou, N.; Gassó, S.; Baldasano, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The broader Mediterranean basin is affected by intense desert dust outbreaks in spring. In the present study, we make use of satellite observations and modelling to investigate dust radiative impacts during three consecutive dust outbreaks occurred over the Mediterranean in the period 9/4-15/4/2008. The direct radiative effect (DRE) is estimated by using two simulations run with the NMMB/BSC-Dust model, where the interaction between dust aerosols and radiation is activated and deactivated, respectively. The simulation domain covers the North Africa, the Middle East and Europe at 0.25ºx0.25° and 40σ-layers. The first outbreak took place over the central and eastern Mediterranean on the 9th reaching aerosol optical depths (AODs) close to 1. The second one, with AODs up to 2, lasted from 10th to 14th affecting mainly the central Mediterranean. The third one, with AODs up to 5, affected the Iberian Peninsula on the 15th. DREs are computed for the outgoing radiation at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), the absorbed radiation into the atmosphere (ATMAB), for the downwelling (SURF) and the absorbed (NETSURF) radiation at surface, for the shortwave (SW), longwave (LW) and NET (SW+LW) radiation. According to our results, it is evident that DREs' spatial patterns are driven by those of AOD. Negative (cooling) instantaneous DRETOA, DRESURF and DRENETSURF values up to -500W/m2, -700W/m2 and -600W/m2, respectively, and positive (warming) instantaneous DREATMAB up to 340W/m2 are found for the SW spectrum, during daytime. Opposite but less pronounced effects are encountered for the LW radiation and during nightime. Due to these perturbations on the radiation field, the surface temperature is reduced locally by up to 8°C during daytime and increased by up to 4°C during nightime. It is found that the regional average NET DREs can be as large as -12W/m2, -45W/m2, -30W/m2 and 27W/m2 for TOA, SURF, NETSURF and ATMAB, respectively. Impacts on atmospheric stability and dust

  7. Chronic TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, Lindsay K. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Diamond, Stephen A. [Nanosafe Inc., Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (United States); Ma, Hongbo [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 53211 (United States); Hoff, Dale J. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Li, Shibin, E-mail: lishibinepa@gmail.com [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH){sub 3} coated nano-TiO{sub 2} used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH){sub 3} coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings. - Highlights: • Chronic toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} to a benthic organism (Hyalella azteca) was examined. • Phototoxicity was investigated through exposure of solar simulated radiation (SSR). • The degradation of a surface coating resulted in an increase in photoactivity. • In this testing scenario, UV had a larger impact than chemical exposure in toxicity.

  8. ACOUSTIC RADIATION FORCE IMPULSE IS EQUIVALENT TO LIVER BIOPSY TO EVALUATE LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C AND NONALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Ayres de Alencar Arrais GUERRA

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLiver biopsy is recommended as the gold standard method for assessing the stage of liver fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease. However, it is invasive, with potential risks and complications. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that provides information of changes in the liver tissue, evaluating tissue elasticity and acoustic radiation force impulse is one of the available techniques.ObjectiveThe main objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of acoustic radiation force impulse comparing to liver biopsy to evaluate fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.MethodsTwenty four patients were included, everyone underwent liver biopsy and acoustic radiation force impulse, and the results were compared with values described in the literature by several authors.ResultsIn the population of patients with chronic hepatitis C, our data were better correlated with data published by Carmen Fierbinteanu-Braticevici et al., with an accuracy of 82.4%, sensitivity of 71.4% and specificity of 90%. For nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, our data were better correlated with data published by Masato Yoneda et al., with an accuracy of 85.7%, sensitivity 80% and specificity of 100%.ConclusionAcoustic radiation force impulse is a method with good accuracy to distinguish initial fibrosis from advanced fibrosis in hepatitis C virus and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and can replace biopsy in most cases.

  9. Ion beam radiation effects in monazite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picot, V. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Deschanels, X. [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)], E-mail: xavier.deschanels@cea.fr; Peuget, S. [CEA Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Glorieux, B. [Laboratoire des Procedes, Materiaux et Energie Solaire, UPR 8521, Rambla de la Thermodynamique, 66100 Perpignan (France); Seydoux-Guillaume, A.M. [Laboratoire des Mecanismes et Transferts en Geologie, CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier, IRD, OMP, 14 Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Wirth, R. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, PB 4.1, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    Monazite is a potential matrix for conditioning minor actinides arising from spent fuel reprocessing. The matrix behavior under irradiation must be investigated to ensure long-term containment performance. Monazite compounds were irradiated by gold and helium ions to simulate the consequences of alpha decay. This article describes the effects of such irradiation on the structural and macroscopic properties (density and hardness) of monazites LaPO{sub 4} and La{sub 0.73}Ce{sub 0.27}PO{sub 4}. Irradiation by gold ions results in major changes in the material properties. At a damage level of 6.7 dpa, monazite exhibits volume expansion of about 8.1%, a 59% drop in hardness, and structure amorphization, although Raman spectroscopy analysis shows that the phosphate-oxygen bond is unaffected. Conversely, no change in the properties of these compounds was observed after He ion implantation. These results indicate that ballistic effects predominate in the studied dose range.

  10. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, A.; Almeida-Muradian, L. B.; Sabato, S. F.

    2009-07-01

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  11. Two Effective Heuristics for Beam Angle Optimization in Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmand, Hamed

    2013-01-01

    In radiation therapy, mathematical methods have been used for optimizing treatment planning for delivery of sufficient dose to the cancerous cells while keeping the dose to critical surrounding structures minimal. This optimization problem can be modeled using mixed integer programming (MIP) whose solution gives the optimal beam orientation as well as optimal beam intensity. The challenge, however, is the computation time for this large scale MIP. We propose and investigate two novel heuristic approaches to reduce the computation time considerably while attaining high-quality solutions. We introduce a family of heuristic cuts based on the concept of 'adjacent beams' and a beam elimination scheme based on the contribution of each beam to deliver the dose to the tumor in the ideal plan in which all potential beams can be used simultaneously. We show the effectiveness of these heuristics for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) on a clinical liver case.

  12. Long-Term Lunar Radiation Degradation Effects on Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdev, Kristina; ORourke, Mary Jane; Koontz, Steve; Alred, John; Hill, Charles; Devivar, Rodrigo; Morera-Felix, Shakira; Atwell, William; Nutt, Steve; Sabbann, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is focused on developing technologies for extending human presence beyond low Earth orbit. These technologies are to advance the state-of-the-art and provide for longer duration missions outside the protection of Earth's magnetosphere. One technology of great interest for large structures is advanced composite materials, due to their weight and cost savings, enhanced radiation protection for the crew, and potential for performance improvements when compared with existing metals. However, these materials have not been characterized for the interplanetary space environment, and particularly the effects of high energy radiation, which is known to cause damage to polymeric materials. Therefore, a study focusing on a lunar habitation element was undertaken to investigate the integrity of potential structural composite materials after exposure to a long-term lunar radiation environment. An overview of the study results are presented, along with a discussion of recommended future work.

  13. Effects of gamma radiation in cauliflower (Brassica spp) minimally processed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Thaise C.F.; Rogovschi, Vladimir D.; Thomaz, Fernanda S.; Trindade, Reginaldo A.; Villavicencio, Anna L.C.H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: villavic@ipen.br; thaisecfnunes@hotmail.com; Alencar, Severino M. [Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Consumers demand for health interests and the latest diet trends. The consumption of vegetables worldwide has increased every year over the past decade, consequently, less extreme treatments or additives are being required. Minimally processed foods have fresh-like characteristics and satisfy the new consumer demand. Food irradiation is an exposure process of the product to controlled sources of gamma radiation with the intention to destroy pathogens and to extend the shelf life. Minimally processed cauliflower (Brassica oleraceae) exposed to low dose of gamma radiation does not show any change in sensory attributes. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of the low doses of gamma radiation on sensorial aspects like appearance, texture and flavor of minimally processed cauliflower. (author)

  14. CLIC 3TeV Beamsize Optimization with Radiation Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, OR; Tomas, R

    2013-01-01

    Oide effect and radiation in bending magnets are reviewed aiming to include this in the optical design process to minimize the beam size. The Oide double integral is expressed in simpler terms in order to speed up calculations. Part of the Oide function is used to evaluate how prone is a quadrupole magnet to contribute to the beam size increase, concluding in larger magnets with lower gradients. Radiation in bending magnets is reviewed for linear lattices, solving the case when the dispersion is different from zero and using the result to compare with theoretical results and a tracking code. An agreement between the theory, the implemented approximation included in MAPCLASS2 and the six-dimensional radiation in PLACET has been found.

  15. Effect of gamma radiation on honey quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bera, A. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: berale@usp.br; Almeida-Muradian, L.B. [Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 580-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sabato, S.F. [Radiation Technology Center, IPEN-CNEN/SP, A. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: sfsabato@ipen.br

    2009-07-15

    Honey is one of the most complex substances produced by bees, mainly from the nectar of flowers. Gamma radiation is a technique that can be used to decrease the number of microbiological problems associated with food and increase the shelf life of certain products. The objective of this study was to verify the effect of gamma radiation with source of cobalto-60 (10 kGy) on some parameters used in honey quality control. Seven samples of pure honey were obtained from local markets in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in 2007. The methods used are in accordance with Brazilian Regulations. The physicochemical parameters analyzed were: moisture, HMF, free acidity, pH, sugars and ash. The results showed that gamma radiation, in the dose mentioned above, did not cause significant physicochemical alterations.

  16. Effect of UV Radiation by Projectors on 3D Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko Iaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymers that solidify under light radiation are commonly used in digital light processing (DLP 3D printing. A wide range of photopolymers use photoinitiators that react to radiation in range of ultraviolet (UV wavelength. In the present study we provided measurement of radiant fluence in the UV wavelength range from 280 nm to 400 nm for two data projectors and compared effect of radiation on quality of 3D printing. One projector is commonly used DLP projector with high energy lamp. Second one is an industrial projector, in which RGB light emitting diodes (LEDs are replaced by UV LEDs with wattage at the level of 3.6 % of the first one. Achieved data confirmed uneven distribution of radiant energy on illuminated area. These results validate, that undesired heating light causes internal stress inside built models that causes defects in final products.

  17. Endocrine effects of Fukushima: Radiation-induced endocrinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Asfandyar Khan; Niazi, Shaharyar Khan

    2011-01-01

    The unfortunate accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima have led to an enormous amount of radioactive material being released into the atmosphere. Radiation exposure to the human body may be as a result of accidents, such as those in Chernobyl and Fukushima, or due to occupational hazards, such as in the employees of nuclear plants, or due to therapeutic or diagnostic procedures. These different sources of radiations may affect the human body as a whole or may cause localized damage to a certain area of the body, depending upon the extent and dosage of the irradiation. More or less every organ is affected by radiation exposure. Some require a higher dose to be affected while others may be affected at a lower dose. All the endocrine glands are susceptible to damage by radiation exposure; however, pituitary, thyroid and gonads are most likely to be affected. In addition to the endocrine effects, the rates of birth defects and carcinomas may also be increased in the population exposed to excessive radiation. PMID:21731864

  18. Greenhouse effect from the point of view of radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Barcza, Szabolcs

    2016-01-01

    Radiative power balance of a planet in the solar system is delineated. The terrestrial powers are transformed to average global flux in an effective atmospheric column (EAC) approximation, its components are delineated. The estimated and measured secular changes of the average global flux are compared to the fluxes derived from the Stefan-Boltzmann law using the observed global annual temperatures in the decades between 1880 and 2010. The conclusion of this procedure is that the radiative contribution of the greenhouse gas ${\\rm CO}_2$ is some $21\\pm 7$~\\% to the observed global warming from the end of the XIXth century excluding the feedback mechanisms playing determining role in the climate system. Stationary radiative flux transfer is treated in an air column as a function of the column density of the absorbent. Upper and lower limit of radiative forcing is given by assuming true absorption and coherent scatter of the monochromatic radiation. An integral formula is given for the outgoing long wave radiatio...

  19. Radiation damage effects in CMR manganite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Pal, Sudipta [Department of Solid State Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Sarkar, A. [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 Acharya Prafulla Chandra Road, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Department of Physics, Bangabasi Morning College, 19 Rajkumar Chakraborty Sarani, Kolkata 700 009 (India); Ravi Kumar [Nuclear Science Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post Box 10502, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Chaudhuri, B.K. [Department of Solid State Physics, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700 032 (India)]. E-mail: sspbkc@mahendra.iacs.res.in

    2005-04-01

    Polycrystalline La{sub 0.5}Pb{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1-x}Cr {sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0.075 and 0.15) samples have been irradiated with 50 MeV Li{sup 3+} ions with different fluences and the effects on the transport properties have been studied by means of the temperature and magnetic field dependent resistivity measurements. Due to Li{sup 3+} ion irradiation, the resistivity increases and the metal-insulator transition temperature (T {sub mi}) decreases. At low temperatures (below T {sub mi}), a dominant contribution of the electron-magnon scattering process is observed for all the irradiated and unirradiated samples. The low temperature resistivity behavior as well as the magnetoresistance is modified due to irradiation. The changes in the magnetotransport properties due to irradiation have been compared with the changes caused due to Mn site substitution.

  20. Effect of Deep Space Radiation on Human Hematopoietic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalota, Anna; Bennett, Paula; Swider, Cezary R.; Sutherland, Betsy M.; Gewirtz, Alan M.

    Astronaut flight crews on long-term missions in deep space will be exposed to a unique radiation environment as a result of exposure to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE). This environment consists predominantly of high energy protons, helium and high charge, high energy (HZE) atomic nuclei from iron predominantly, but all other elements as well. The effect of such particles, alone, or in combination, on human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) has not been well studied but is clearly of interest since blood forming cells are known to be sensitive to radiation, and irreversible damage to these cells could quickly compromise a mission due to loss of marrow function. To better understand the effects of GCR and SPE on human stem/progenitor cell function, we have exposed partially purified CD34+ normal human marrow cells to protons, radioactive Fe, and Ti, alone, and in combination at varying doses up to 70cGy, and down to 1, 2, and 4 particle hits per nucleus. We then examined the effects of these radiations on HSPC function, as assessed by the ability to form CFU-GEMM, and LTCIC colonies in semi-solid culture medium. At the highest doses (50 and 70cGy), all radiation types tested significantly diminished the ability of CD34+ cells to form such colonies. The number of CFU-GEMM in irradiated samples was 70-90

  1. Radiation effects on rare-earth doped optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, S.; Marcandella, C. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, DIF 91 (France); Ouerdane, Y.; Tortech, B.; Boukenter, A.; Meunier, J.P.; Vivona, M. [Lab. Hubert Curien, CNRS, 42 - Saint-Etienne (France); Vivona, M.; Robin, Th.; Cadier, B. [iXFiber SAS, 22 - lannion (France)

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we reviewed our previous work concerning the responses of rare-earth (RE) doped fibers (Yb, Er and Er/Yb) to various types of radiations like gamma-rays, X-rays and protons. For all these harsh environments, the main measured macroscopic radiation-induced effect is an increase of the linear attenuation of these waveguides due to the generation of point defects in the RE-doped core and silica-based cladding. To evaluate the vulnerability of this class of optical fibers for space missions, we characterize the growth and decay kinetics of their radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) during and after irradiation for various compositions. Laboratory testing reveals that this class of optical fibers is very sensitive to radiations compared to passive (RE-free) samples. As a consequence, despite the small length used for space applications, the understanding of the radiation-induced effects in this class of optical fibers becomes necessary before their integration as part of fiber-based systems like gyroscopes or communication systems. In this paper, we more particularly discussed about the relative influence of the rare-earth ions (Er{sup 3+} and/or Yb{sup 3+}) and of the glass matrix dopants (Al, P, ... ) on the optical degradation due to radiations. This has been done by using a set of five prototype optical fibers designed by the fiber manufacturer iXFiber SAS to enlighten the role of these parameters. Additional spectroscopic tools like con-focal microscopy of luminescence are also used to detect possible changes in the spectroscopy of the rare-earth ions and their consequences on the functionality of the active optical fibers. (authors)

  2. Direct radiative effect by multicomponent aerosol over China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xin; Song, Yu; Zhao, Chun; Cai, Xuhui; Zhang, Hongsheng; Zhu, Tong

    2015-05-01

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of multiple aerosol species (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and mineral aerosol) and their spatiotemporal variations over China were investigated using a fully coupled meteorology–chemistry model (WRF-Chem) for the entire year of 2006. We made modifications to improve model performance, including updating land surface parameters, improving the calculation of transition metal-catalyzed oxidation of SO2, and adding in heterogeneous reactions between mineral aerosol and acid gases. The modified model well reproduced the magnitude, seasonal pattern, and spatial distribution of the measured meteorological conditions, concentrations of PM10 and its components, and aerosol optical depth (AOD). A diagnostic iteration method was used to estimate the overall DRE of aerosols and contributions from different components. At the land surface, all kinds of aerosol species reduced the incident net radiation flux with a total DRE of 10.2 W m-2 over China. Aerosols significantly warm the atmosphere with the national mean DRE of +10.8 W m-2. BC was the leading radiative-heating component (+8.7 W m-2), followed by mineral aerosol (+1.1 W m-2). At the top of the atmosphere (TOA), BC introduced the largest radiative perturbation (+4.5 W m-2), followed by sulfate (-1.4 W m-2). The overall perturbation of aerosols on radiation transfer is quite small over China, demonstrating the counterbalancing effect between scattering and adsorbing aerosols. Aerosol DRE at the TOA had distinct seasonality, generally with a summer maximum and winter minimum, mainly determined by mass loadings, hygroscopic growth, and incident radiation flux.

  3. AGGLOMERATION AND RADIATION EFFECT OF THE PULL OF URBANIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Jin-li

    2003-01-01

    In order to explore the train of thought for China's urbanizing development and coordinated rural eco-nomic development, and to find good ways of solving rural problems through urbanization, this paper absorbs the push-and-pull forces theory and the systematic dynamic theory in the traditional population migration theories, views urbanization as a dynamic system, makes research on the push-and-pull mechanism of urbanization. The pull ingpower of urbanization is analyzed according to two aspects, the agglomeration effect and the radiation effect of cities. The agglomeration effect provides continuous propelling force for urbanization, and the radiation effect furtheraccelerates the urbanization process by pushing forward the development of rural economy. Of course, the slow de-velopment of urbanization can result in the hindrance to rural economic development.

  4. Low-dose-rate high-let radiation cytogenetic effects on mice in vivo as model of space radiation action on mammalian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokina, Svetlana; Zaichkina, Svetlana; Rozanova, Olga; Aptikaeva, Gella; Romanchenko, Sergei; Smirnova, Helene; Dyukina, Alsu; Peleshko, Vladimir

    At present time little is known concerning the biological effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation exposure in space. The currently available experimental data on the biological effect of low doses of chronic radiation with high-LET values, which occur under the conditions of aircraft and space flights, have been primarily obtained in the examinations of pilots and astronauts after flights. Another way of obtaining this kind of evidence is the simulation of irradiation conditions during aircraft and space flights on high-energy accelerators and the conduction of large-scale experiments on animals under these conditions on Earth. In the present work, we investigated the cytogenetic effects of low-dose-rate high-LET radiation in the dose ranges of 0.2-30 cGy (1 cGy/day) and 0.5-16 cGy (0.43 cGy/day) in the radiation field behind the concrete shield of the Serpukhov accelerator of 70 GeV protons that simulates the spectral and component composition of radiation fields formed in the conditions of high-altitude flights on SHK mice in vivo. The dose dependence, adaptive response (AR) and the growth of solid tumor were examined. For induction of AR, two groups of mice were exposed to adapting doses of 0.2-30 cGy and the doses of 0.5-16 cGy of high-LET radiation. For comparison, third group of mice from unirradiated males was chronically irradiated with X-rays at adapting doses of 10 cGy (1 cGy/day). After a day, the mice of all groups were exposed to a challenging dose of 1.5 Gy of X-rays (1 Gy/min). After 28 h, the animals of all groups were killed by the method of cervical dislocation. Bone marrow specimens for calculating micronuclei (MN) in polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) were prepared by a conventional method with minor modifications. The influence of adapting dose of 16 cGy on the growth of solid tumor of Ehrlich ascite carcinoma was estimated by measuring the size of the tumor at different times after the inoculation of ascitic cells s.c. into the femur. It was

  5. Control of synchrotron radiation effects during recirculation with bunch compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, David [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Benson, Stephen [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Krafft, Geoffrey [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Terzic, Balsa [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States); Tsai, Cheng [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Studies of beam quality during recirculation have been extended to an arc providing bunch compression with positive momentum compaction. It controls both incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation (ISR and CSR) using methods including optics balance and generates little microbunching gain. We detail the dynamical basis for the design, discuss the design process, give an example, and provide simulations of ISR and CSR effects. Reference will be made to a complete analysis of microbunching effects.

  6. Effects of pneumococcal vaccine in patients with chronic respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Watanuki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In developed countries, it is very difficult to demonstrate the effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccines because the incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia is very low. Vaccination against pneumococci infection was advised for 1378 outpatients, over 60 years of age, with chronic respiratory disease for more than one year. Of these patients, those who responded affirmatively to the advice were vaccinated against pneumococci between August and November 2002. The effectiveness of vaccination was evaluated by means of a 2-year cohort-study, comparing the vaccinated group (647 with the non-vaccinated group (731. The variables analyzed were the frequency of onset of bacterial respiratory infection, hospitalization due to bacterial respiratory infection and onset of pneumococcal respiratory infection. The incidence of bacterial respiratory infection and the incidence of pneumococcal respiratory infection to have decreased in the following 2 years (17.4%, 0.9%, as compared to the previous year (25.9%, 3.1%, in the vaccinated group. Conversely, the frequency was higher in the following 2 years (14.4%, 0.9% as compared to the previous year (14.2%, 0.4% in the non-vaccinated group. This inter-group difference was statistically significant. Simultaneous vaccination against pneumococci and influenza virus also resulted in a significant reduction in the incidence of bacterial respiratory infection. No decrease was observed in the frequency of hospitalization. These results indicate that pneumococcal vaccine is useful for elderly patients with chronic respiratory disease and that its efficacy may be enhanced by simultaneous vaccination against influenza.

  7. Chronic graft-versus-host disease in the rat radiation chimera: I. clinical features, hematology, histology, and immunopathology in long-term chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beschorner, W.E.; Tutschka, P.J.; Santos, G.W.

    1982-04-01

    The clinical features, pathology, and immunopathology of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developing in the long-term rat radiation chimera are described. At 6 to 12 months post-transplant, the previously stable ACI/LEW chimeras developed patchy to diffuse severe hair loss and thickened skin folds, and had microscopic features resembling scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis. Skin histology showed dermal inflammation and acanthosis with atrophy of the appendages, with progression to dermal sclerosis. The liver revealed chronic hepatitis with bile duct injury and proliferation and periportal piecemeal necrosis. The tongue had considerable submucosal inflammation, muscular necrosis, and atrophy and arteritis. The serous salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and bronchi had lymphocytic inflammation and injury to duct, acinar, and mucosal columnar epithelium. The thymus had lymphocyte depletion of the medulla with prominent epithelium. The spleen and lymph nodes had poorly developed germinal centers but increased numbers of plasma cells. IgM was observed along the basement membrane and around the basal cells of the skin and tongue and along the basement membrane of the bile ducts. IgM was present also in the arteries of the tongue. Immunoglobulins eluted from the skin, cross-reacted with the bile duct epithelium and usually with both ACI and Lewis skin. Increased titers of speckled antinuclear antibodies were present in the serum of rats with chronic (GVHD). Chronic GVHD in the long-term rat radiation chimera is very similar to human chronic GVHD and is a potentially excellent model for autoimmune disorders including scleroderma, Sjorgren's syndrome, and chronic hepatitis.

  8. Effects of Chronic Exercise on Feelings of Energy and Fatigue: A Quantitative Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetz, Timothy W.; O'Connor, Patrick; Dishman, Rod K.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of chronic exercise on feelings of energy and fatigue using meta-analytic techniques. Chronic exercise increased feelings of energy and lessened feelings of fatigue compared with control conditions by a mean effect delta of 0.37. The effect varied according to the presence or absence of a placebo control or…

  9. Tunable acoustic radiation pattern assisted by effective impedance boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Wang, Li-Wei; Liu, Xiao-Zhou; Gong, Xiu-Fen

    2016-02-01

    The acoustic wave propagation from a two-dimensional subwavelength slit surrounded by metal plates decorated with Helmholtz resonators (HRs) is investigated both numerically and experimentally in this work. Owing to the presence of HRs, the effective impedance of metal surface boundary can be manipulated. By optimizing the distribution of HRs, the asymmetric effective impedance boundary will be obtained, which contributes to generating tunable acoustic radiation pattern such as directional acoustic beaming. These dipole-like radiation patterns have high radiation efficiency, no fingerprint of sidelobes, and a wide tunable range of the radiation pattern directivity angle which can be steered by the spatial displacements of HRs. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2012CB921504 and 2011CB707902), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11474160), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 020414380001), the State Key Laboratory of Acoustics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. SKLOA201401), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, and the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry.

  10. Evanescent radiation, quantum mechanics and the Casimir effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt to bridge the gap between classical and quantum mechanics and to explain the Casimir effect is presented. The general nature of chaotic motion is discussed from two points of view: the first uses catastrophe theory and strange attractors to describe the deterministic view of this motion; the underlying framework for chaos in these classical dynamic systems is their extreme sensitivity to initial conditions. The second interpretation refers to randomness associated with probabilistic dynamics, as for Brownian motion. The present approach to understanding evanescent radiation and its relation to the Casimir effect corresponds to the first interpretation, whereas stochastic electrodynamics corresponds to the second viewpoint. The nonlinear behavior of the electromagnetic field is also studied. This well-understood behavior is utilized to examine the motions of two orbiting charges and shows a closeness between the classical behavior and the quantum uncertainty principle. The evanescent radiation is used to help explain the Casimir effect.

  11. Chronic TiO2 nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: Impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study examined the chronic toxicity of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca, using an industry standard, P25, and a coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products. There is limited information on the chronic effects of nano...

  12. The Effects of Crosswind Flight on Rotor Harmonic Noise Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Eric; Sim, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop recommendations for procedures for helicopter source noise characterization, the effects of crosswinds on main rotor harmonic noise radiation are assessed using a model of the Bell 430 helicopter. Crosswinds are found to have a significant effect on Blade-Vortex Interaction (BVI) noise radiation when the helicopter is trimmed with the fuselage oriented along the inertial flight path. However, the magnitude of BVI noise remains unchanged when the pilot orients the fuselage along the aerodynamic velocity vector, crabbing for zero aerodynamic sideslip. The effects of wind gradients on BVI noise are also investigated and found to be smaller in the crosswind direction than in the headwind direction. The effects of crosswinds on lower harmonic noise sources at higher flight speeds are also assessed. In all cases, the directivity of radiated noise is somewhat changed by the crosswind. The model predictions agree well with flight test data for the Bell 430 helicopter captured under various wind conditions. The results of this investigation would suggest that flight paths for future acoustic flight testing are best aligned across the prevailing wind direction to minimize the effects of winds on noise measurements when wind cannot otherwise be avoided.

  13. Genetic susceptibility: radiation effects relevant to space travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Warner, Christy; Bedford, Joel S

    2012-11-01

    Genetic variation in the capacity to repair radiation damage is an important factor influencing both cellular and tissue radiosensitivity variation among individuals as well as dose rate effects associated with such damage. This paper consists of two parts. The first part reviews some of the available data relating to genetic components governing such variability among individuals in susceptibility to radiation damage relevant for radiation protection and discusses the possibility and extent to which these may also apply for space radiations. The second part focuses on the importance of dose rate effects and genetic-based variations that influence them. Very few dose rate effect studies have been carried out for the kinds of radiations encountered in space. The authors present here new data on the production of chromosomal aberrations in noncycling low passage human ATM+/+ or ATM+/- cells following irradiations with protons (50 MeV or 1 GeV), 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions and gamma rays, where doses were delivered at a high dose rate of 700 mGy(-1) min, or a lower dose rate of 5 mGy min(-1). Dose responses were essentially linear over the dose ranges tested and not significantly different for the two cell strains. Values of the dose rate effectiveness factor (DREF) were expressed as the ratio of the slopes of the dose-response curves for the high versus the lower (5 mGy min(-1)) dose rate exposures. The authors refer to this as the DREF5. For the gamma ray standard, DREF5 values of approximately two were observed. Similar dose rate effects were seen for both energies of protons (DREF5 ≈ 2.2 in both cases). For 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions [linear energy transfer (LET) ≈ 150 keV μ(-1)], the DREF5 was not 1 as might have been expected on the basis of LET alone but was approximately 1.3. From these results and conditions, the authors estimate that the relative biological effectiveness for 1 GeV(-1) n iron ions for high and low dose rates, respectively, were about 10 and 15

  14. Effects of chronic smoking on color vision in young subjects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hatice; Arda; G; Ertugrul; Mirza; Osman; A; Polat; Sarper; Karakucuk; Ayse; Oner; Koray; Gumus

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of chronic smoking on color vision in young subjects.METHODS: This study included 91 smokers and 88non-smokers(a total of 179 volunteers) without any ophthalmologic and systemical disorders. The subjects were between 18-40 years of age with a best corrected visual acuity(BCVA) of 20/20, normal anterior and posterior segment examinations and normal intraocular pressure. The color vision of the subjects were evaluated with Farnsworth-Munsell 100 Hue test(FMHT). The total error scores and axis calculation were performed for each subject and the results correlated.RESULTS: Mean age and the standard deviation was28±5y in the smokers group, and 26.7±5.5y in the control group(P =0.101). Sex distribution was similar in the two groups(P =0.365). There was no significant correlation between age and FMHT total error scores(P =0.069).Median of FMHT total error scores of smokers and non-smokers were 65 and 50.50, respectively. FMHT total error scores was found significantly higher in smokers than non-smokers(P =0.004). There was no statisticaly significant difference between smoker and non-smoker groups with respect to axis ratio calculation(P =0.611).There was no significant correlation with FMHT total error scores with neither smoking duration nor number of cigarettes smoked per day(P =0.405, P =0.454,respectively).· CONCLUSION: This study suggested that chronic smoking affects the color vision of young smokers but this may not be sector selective.

  15. DNA damage caused by chronic transgenerational exposure to low dose gamma radiation in Medaka fish ( Oryzias latipes ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygoryev, D; Moskalenko, O; Hinton, T G; Zimbrick, J D

    2013-09-01

    The effect of transgenerational exposure to low dose rate (2.4 and 21 mGy/day) gamma irradiation on the yield of DNA double-strand breaks and oxidized guanine (8-hydroxyguanine) has been studied in the muscle and liver tissue of a model organism, the Japanese medaka fish. We found the level of unrepaired 8-hydroxyguanine in muscle tissue increased nonlinearly over four generations and the pattern of this change depended on the radiation dose rate, suggesting that our treatment protocols initiated genomic instability and an adaptive response as the generations progressed. The yield of unrepaired double-strand breaks did not vary significantly among successive generations in muscle tissue in contrast to liver tissue in which it varied in a nonlinear manner. The 8-hydroxyguanine and DSB radiation yields were significantly higher at 2.4 mGy/day than at 21 mGy/day in both muscle and liver tissue in all generations. These data are consistent with the hypothesis of a threshold for radiation-induced activation of DNA repair systems below which tissue levels of DNA repair enzymes remain unchanged, leading to the accumulation of unrepaired damage at very low doses and dose rates.

  16. [The effect of prostatilen on the hemostatic indices in chronic prostatitis (a clinical and experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Shukri, S Kh; Petrishchev, N N; Gorbachev, A G; Mikhaĭlova, I A; Bobkov, Iu A; Kuz'min, I V; Borovets, S Iu; Savel'eva, I B; Korokhodkina, M V

    1997-01-01

    Prostatilen effects on hemostasis were studied in 120 intact and 240 chronic prostatitis rats, 34 patients with chronic prostatitis. Intact rats responded to prostatilen by inhibition of platelet-vascular and coagulation hemostatic mechanisms and activation of fibrinolysis. Experimental chronic prostatitis in rats induced hemostatic shifts to hypercoagulation. These parameters returned to normal after 5- and 10-day course of prostatilen administration. A single prostatilen dose was unable to produce the above action. As to patients with chronic prostatitis, there were also prostatilen-induced platelet-vascular hemostatic normalization and fibrinolysis activation. Hemocoagulation was affected in a less degree. Prostatilen effects were unrelated to the disease stage. Normalization of hemostasis seems to be one of the factors of prostatilen therapeutic efficacy in chronic prostatitis. This peptide is found effective as a pathogenetic treatment of chronic prostatitis.

  17. The Effect of Whole-Body Radiation on Blood Levels of Gastrointestinal Peptides in the Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Katanyutanon, Sakdhisapol; WU, RONGQIAN; Wang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Radiation-induced injury may occur in various incidents as well as the terrorist radiation exposure scenario. The digestive tract is among the most radiosensitive organs in the body and its function, which is partly regulated by gastrointestinal (GI) peptides, can be affected by radiation exposure. However, very little is known about the effect of whole-body radiation on blood GI peptides. The aim of this study therefore was to determine the effect of whole-body radiation on circulating level...

  18. The effects of gamma radiation on soybean isoflavones contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcos R.R. de; Mastro, Nelida L. del [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: nlmastro@ipen.br, e-mail: mrramos@ipen.br; Mandarino, Jose M.G. [EMBRAPA Soybean, Londrina, PR (Brazil)], e-mail: jmarcos@cnpso.embrapa.br

    2009-07-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is the most common source of isoflavones in human feeding. It was suggested that there is a correlation among antioxidant activity of flavonoids and total phenolics content. Plants use isoflavones and their derivatives as part of the plant's defensive arsenal, to ward off disease-causing pathogenic fungi and other microbes. Highly processed foods made from legumes, such as tofu, retain most of their isoflavone content, with the exception of fermented miso, which has increased levels. Little is known about the influence of oxidative stress induced by radiation on the isoflavones contents. In the present paper, the effects of gamma irradiation on soybean isoflavones contents are presented. Samples from several Brazilian soybean cultivars were gamma irradiated with doses of 0, 1, 2, 5 e 10 kGy, dose rate about 3 kGy/h in a {sup 60}Co (Gammacell 220 - AECL). Isoflavones contents were determined after extraction with 70% ethanol containing 0.1% acetic acid by an HPLC method. The total isoflavone content remained almost unchanged with the increase of radiation dose up to 10 kGy. Although a general correlation among total isoflavone content and radiation dose was not found, some data suggest that for a few of the isoflavones from specific cultivars, the increase in the radiation dose induced a decrease in their content as for glucosyl glucosides and malonyl isoflavones, as well as an increase in their aglycone content. (author)

  19. Stochastic Effects in Computational Biology of Space Radiation Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Pluth, Janis; Harper, Jane; O'Neill, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Estimating risk from space radiation poses important questions on the radiobiology of protons and heavy ions. We are considering systems biology models to study radiation induced repair foci (RIRF) at low doses, in which less than one-track on average transverses the cell, and the subsequent DNA damage processing and signal transduction events. Computational approaches for describing protein regulatory networks coupled to DNA and oxidative damage sites include systems of differential equations, stochastic equations, and Monte-Carlo simulations. We review recent developments in the mathematical description of protein regulatory networks and possible approaches to radiation effects simulation. These include robustness, which states that regulatory networks maintain their functions against external and internal perturbations due to compensating properties of redundancy and molecular feedback controls, and modularity, which leads to general theorems for considering molecules that interact through a regulatory mechanism without exchange of matter leading to a block diagonal reduction of the connecting pathways. Identifying rate-limiting steps, robustness, and modularity in pathways perturbed by radiation damage are shown to be valid techniques for reducing large molecular systems to realistic computer simulations. Other techniques studied are the use of steady-state analysis, and the introduction of composite molecules or rate-constants to represent small collections of reactants. Applications of these techniques to describe spatial and temporal distributions of RIRF and cell populations following low dose irradiation are described.

  20. Effects of stratospheric radiations on human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerù, Maria Paola; Amicarelli, Fernanda; Cristiano, Loredana; Colafarina, Sabrina; Aimola, Pierpaolo; Falone, Stefano; Cinque, Benedetta; Ursini, Ornella; Moscardelli, Roberto; Ragni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of stratospheric radiations on neural tumour cells. ADF human glioblastoma cells were hosted on a stratospheric balloon within the 2002 biological experiment campaign of the Italian Space Agency. The flight at an average height of 37 km lasted about 24 hrs. Cell morphology, number and viability, cell cycle and apoptosis, some antioxidant enzymes and proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and gene expression were studied. Stratospheric radiations caused a significant decrease in cell number, as well as a block of proliferation, but not apoptosis or necrosis. Radiations also induced activation and induction of some antioxidant enzymes, increase in DNA repair-related proteins (p53 and Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen) and variations of the transcription factors Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors. Morphologically, test cells exhibited more electron dense cytoplasm and less condensed chromatin than controls and modification of their surfaces. Our results indicate that glioblastoma cells, exposed to continuous stratospheric radiations for 24 hrs, show activation of cell cycle check point, decrease of cell number, variations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors and increase of Reactive Oxygen Species-scavenging enzymes.

  1. Radiation effect in normal tissue. Principles of damage and protection; Strahlenwirkung am Normalgewebe. Prinzipien der Schaedigung und Protektion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerr, W. [Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Onkologie

    2010-07-01

    The curative effectivity of external or internal radiotherapy necessitates exposure of normal tissues with significant radiation doses, and hence must be associated with an accepted rate of side effects. These complications can not a priori be considered as an indication of a too aggressive therapy. Based on the time of first diagnosis, early (acute) and late (chronic) radiation sequelae in normal tissues can be distinguished. Early reactions per definition occur within 90 days after onset of the radiation exposure. They are based on impairment of cell production in turnover tissues, which in face of ongoing cell loss results in hypoplasia and eventually a complete loss of functional cells. The latent time is largely independent of dose and is defined by tissue biology (turnover time). Usually, complete healing of early reactions is observed. Late radiation effects can occur after symptom-free latent times of months to many years, with an inverse dependence of latency on dose. Late normal tissue changes are progressive and usually irreversible. They are based on a complex interaction of damage to various cell populations (organ parenchyma, connective tissue, capillaries), with a contribution from macrophages. Late effects are sensitive for a reduction in dose rate (recovery effects). A number of biologically based strategies for protection of normal tissues or for amelioration of radiation effects was and still is tested in experimental systems, yet, only a small fraction of these approaches has so far been introduced into clinical studies. One advantage of most of the methods is that they may be effective even if the treatment starts way after the end of radiation exposure. For a clinical exploitation, hence, the availability of early indicators for the progression of subclinical damage in the individual patient would be desirable. Moreover, there is need to further investigate the molecular pathogenesis of normal tissue effects in more detail, in order to

  2. Neurological Adverse Effects after Radiation Therapy for Stage II Seminoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbeskov Lauritsen, Liv; Meidahl Petersen, Peter; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT). They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost....../or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate...... their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic....

  3. Gamma radiation effects on pequi fruits (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcio Ramatiz L.; Arthur, Valter [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Irradiacao de Alimentos e Radioentomologia], e-mail: mramatiz@eafce.gov.br, e-mail: vaarthur@cena.usp.br; Salgado, Jocelem M.; Spoto, Marta H. Fillet; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz (ESALQ). Dept. de Agroindustria, Alimentos e Nutricao], e-mail: jmsalgad@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: mhfspoto@esalq.usp.br, e-mail: sgcbraza@esalq.usp.br

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation on characteristics of pequi fruits (Caryocar brasiliense Camb.). Just now, they are gained attention of researchers due their nutritional properties, between then is the pequi fruits. Fruits come from Goias State was classified, washed and processed to separate the endocarp (edible part) from pericarp. The endocarps were packing in polyethylene bags with 150 g, labeled and submitted to radiation process (0.0, 0.4, 0.6 and 1.0 kGy doses) on multipurpose irradiator located in IPEN/USP. The samples were analyzed to chemical (pH, trititable acidity, deg Brix, ratio TSS/TTA, lipids, ash, humidity, protein, soluble and insoluble fiber, total carotenoids and antioxidant activity) and physical properties (loss weight, texture and color). The irradiation process using gamma rays from Co{sup 60} was effective to protect pequi fruits in postharvest period. (author)

  4. Radiation damage effects in standard float zone silicon diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascoalino, Kelly C.; Camargo, Fabio; Barbosa, Renata F.; Goncalves, Josemary A.C.; Tobias, Carmen C.B., E-mail: ccbueno@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to study the radiation damage effects on the electrical properties of standard float zone diodes (STFZ). Such effects were evaluated by measuring the current and capacitance of these devices as a function of the reverse voltage. For comparison, current and capacitance measurements were carried out with a non-irradiated STFZ device. The irradiation was performed in the Radiation Technology Center (CTR) at IPEN/CNEN-SP using a {sup 60}Co irradiator (Gammacell 220 - Nordion) with a dose rate of about 2.2 kGy/h. Samples were irradiated at room temperature in steps variable from 50 kGy up 140 kGy which lead to an accumulated dose of 460 kGy. The results obtained have shown that the upper dose limit for a 'damageless' STFZ diode is about 50 kGy. (author)

  5. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    OpenAIRE

    Jolyon H Hendry; Simon, Steven L.; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2009-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations li...

  6. Double humps and radiation effects of SOI NMOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Jiangwei; Yu Xuefeng; Ren Diyuan; He Chengfa; Gao Bo; Li Ming; Lu Jian

    2011-01-01

    Radiation experiments have been carried out with a SOI NMOSFET. The behavior of double humps was studied under irradiation. The characterization of the hump was demonstrated. The results have shown that the shape of the hump changed along with the total dose and the reason for this was analyzed. In addition, the coupling effect of the back-gate transistor was more important for the main transistor than the parasitic transistor.

  7. Double humps and radiation effects of SOI NMOSFET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Jiangwei; Yu Xuefeng; Ren Diyuan; He Chengfa; Gao Bo; Li Ming; Lu Jian, E-mail: cuijiangwei@sina.cn [Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Radiation experiments have been carried out with a SOI NMOSFET. The behavior of double humps was studied under irradiation. The characterization of the hump was demonstrated. The results have shown that the shape of the hump changed along with the total dose and the reason for this was analyzed. In addition, the coupling effect of the back-gate transistor was more important for the main transistor than the parasitic transistor. (semiconductor devices)

  8. CARES: Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study Science Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaveri, RA; Shaw, WJ; Cziczo, DJ

    2010-05-27

    Carbonaceous aerosol components, which include black carbon (BC), urban primary organic aerosols (POA), biomass burning aerosols, and secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from both urban and biogenic precursors, have been previously shown to play a major role in the direct and indirect radiative forcing of climate. The primary objective of the CARES 2010 intensive field study is to investigate the evolution of carbonaceous aerosols of different types and their effects on optical and cloud formation properties.

  9. Studying laser radiation effect on steel structure and properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. М. Gazaliyev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the effect of laser radiation on the structure and properties of annealed and tempered steel with different content of carbon. For surface hardening there was used a laser complex equipped with Nd: YAG pulse laser with power density up to 30 kW/сm2. As a result of the carried-out studies there were calculated characteristics of laser, steel microstructure and properties.

  10. Radiating fluid spheres in the effective variables approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Barreto, W; Martínez, H

    2002-01-01

    We study the evolution of spherically symmetric radiating fluid distributions using the effective variables method, implemented {\\it ab initio} in Schwarzschild coordinates. To illustrate the procedure and to establish some comparison with the original method, we integrate numerically the set of equations at the surface for two different models. The first model is derived from the Schwarzschild interior solution. The second model is inspired in the Tolman VI solution.

  11. Adverse effects of oral antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaaslan, Bircan; Guner, Rahmet

    2017-01-01

    Oral nucleoside/nucleotide analogues (NAs) are currently the backbone of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection treatment. They are generally well-tolerated by patients and safe to use. To date, a significant number of patients have been treated with NAs. Safety data has accumulated over the years. The aim of this article is to review and update the adverse effects of oral NAs. NAs can cause class adverse effects (i.e., myopathy, neuropathy, lactic acidosis) and dissimilar adverse effects. All NAs carry a “Black Box” warning because of the potential risk for mitochondrial dysfunction. However, these adverse effects are rarely reported. The majority of cases are associated with lamivudine and telbivudine. Adefovir can lead to dose- and time-dependent nephrotoxicity, even at low doses. Tenofovir has significant renal and bone toxicity in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, bone and renal toxicity in patients with CHB are not as prominent as in HIV infection. Entecavir and lamivudine are not generally associated with renal adverse events. Entecavir has been claimed to increase the risk of lactic acidosis in decompensated liver disease and high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores. However, current studies reported that entecavir could be safely used in decompensated cirrhosis. An increase in fetal adverse events has not been reported with lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir use in pregnant women, while there is no adequate data regarding entecavir and adefovir. Further long-term experience is required to highlight the adverse effects of NAs, especially in special patient populations, including pregnant women, elderly and patients with renal impairment. PMID:28261380

  12. The regulatory effects of radiation and histone deacetylase inhibitor on liver cancer cell cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Choi, Hyung Seok; Jang, Dong Gun; Lee, Hong Je; Yang, Seoung Oh [Dept. Nuclear Medicine, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medicine Sciences Cancer Center, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Radiation has been an effective tool for treating cancer for a long time. Radiation therapy induces DNA damage within cancer cells and destroys their ability to reproduce. Radiation therapy is often combined with other treatments, like surgery and chemotherapy. Here, we describe the effects of radiation and histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostain A, on cell cycle regulation in hepatoma cells. Results demonstrate that the treatment of radiation TSA induces cell cycle arrest, thereby stimulating cell death in hepatoma cells. In addition, since different cells or tissues have different reactivity to radiation and TSA, these results might be an indicator for the combination therapy with radiation and drugs in diverse cancers.

  13. Low dose radiation damage effects in silicon strip detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiącek, P.; Dąbrowski, W.

    2016-11-01

    The radiation damage effects in silicon segmented detectors caused by X-rays have become recently an important research topic driven mainly by development of new detectors for applications at the European X-ray Free Electron Laser (E-XFEL). However, radiation damage in silicon strip is observed not only after extreme doses up to 1 GGy expected at E-XFEL, but also at doses in the range of tens of Gy, to which the detectors in laboratory instruments like X-ray diffractometers or X-ray spectrometers can be exposed. In this paper we report on investigation of radiation damage effects in a custom developed silicon strip detector used in laboratory diffractometers equipped with X-ray tubes. Our results show that significant degradation of detector performance occurs at low doses, well below 200 Gy, which can be reached during normal operation of laboratory instruments. Degradation of the detector energy resolution can be explained by increasing leakage current and increasing interstrip capacitance of the sensor. Another observed effect caused by accumulation of charge trapped in the surface oxide layer is change of charge division between adjacent strips. In addition, we have observed unexpected anomalies in the annealing process.

  14. Managing Radiation Therapy Side Effects: What to Do When You Have Loose Stools (Diarrhea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rice • White toast Fruits and other foods • Applesauce • Bananas • Canned fruit, such as peaches and pears • Gelatin ( ... series of 9 Radiation Therapy Side Effects Fact Sheets at: www. cancer. gov/ radiation- side- effects

  15. The effect of radiation therapy on hemophilic arthropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jin Oh; Hong, Seong Eon; Kim, Sang Gi; Shin, Dong Oh [School of Medicine, KyungHee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Repetitive bleeding into the joint space is the cause of debilitative hemophilic arthropathy. To interrupt this process, we treated the hemophilic patients suffering from repetitive joint bleeding with radiation therapy. From 1997 to 2001, a total of 41 joints from 37 hemophilic arthropathy patients were treated with radiation therapy at KyungHee University Hospital. The treated joints were 35 ankles, 3 knees and 3 elbows, respectively. The age of the patients ranged from 4 to 27 years (median age: 11 years). The radiation dose ranged from 900 cGy to 2360 cGy (median dose: 900 cGy). The fraction size was 150 cGy, 180 cGy or 200 cGy. The number of bleeding in one year before and after radiotherapy was compared. There was a tendency of frequent bleeding for the patients younger than 11 ({rho} 0.051) but there was also a tendency for more improvement in this group ({rho} 0.057). The number of joint bleedings was related with joint pain ({rho} 0.012) and joint swelling ({rho} = 0.033) but not with the Arbold-Hilgartner stage ({rho} 0.739),cartilage destruction ({rho} = 0.718) and synovial hypertrophy ({rho} = 0.079). The number of bleeding was reduced in thirty-three cases, and eight cases showed no improvement after radiation therapy. The average number of bleeding in a month was 2.52 before radiotherapy, but this was reduced to 1.4 after radiotherapy ({rho} = 0.017). Radiation therapy was effective for the hemophilia patients with repetitive joint bleeding to decrease the bleeding frequency and to prevent hemophilic arthropathy.

  16. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guiting; Reed-Maldonado, Amanda B; Lin, Maofan; Xin, Zhongcheng; Lue, Tom F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS) is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS.

  17. Effects and Mechanisms of Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound for Chronic Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guiting Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Prostatitis/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome (CP/CPPS is one of the most common urologic diseases, and no curative treatments have been identified. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS has been successfully used in promoting tissue healing, inhibiting inflammation and pain, differentiating stem cells, and stimulating nerve regeneration/muscle regeneration, as well as enhancing angiogenesis. Very recently, LIPUS has been proven an effective approach for CP/CPPS. This review summarizes the possible mechanisms responsible for the therapeutic effect of LIPUS for CP/CPPS. To search publications relevant to the topics of this review, the search engine for life sciences of Entrez was used. We reviewed the available evidence from 1954 through 2015 concerning LIPUS for CP/CPPS. According to the literature, both transrectal and transperineal approaches of LIPUS are effective for CP/CPPS.

  18. Effects of microwave radiation on peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-ling YIN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects and mechanisms of microwave radiation on peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations in Wistar rats.Methods A total of 100 Wistar rats(180-220g were exposed to microwave with different average power densities of 5,10,30 and 60 mW/cm2,and sham exposure of 0mW/cm2 was performed in a control group at the same time.At day 1,7,14 and 28 after microwave irradiation,the changes in peripheral CD3+,CD4+,CD8+ T cells,ratio of CD4+/CD8+ and CD45RA+ B lymphocyte in rats were analyzed by flow cytometry(FCM.Results The CD3+ T cells decreased significantly in 10-30mW/cm2 groups at day 7 and in 5-30 mW/cm2 groups at day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.05,and CD4+ T cells decreased significantly in 10mW/cm2 group at day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.01.From day 1 to day 14 after radiation,CD8+ T cells showed a reduction in number in all irradiated groups when compared with the control,but statistical significance was only found in the 30mW/cm2 group(P < 0.05.The CD4+/CD8+ ratio increased in 5mW/cm2 group on day 1,while decreased significantly in 5-30mW/cm2 groups on day 14 after radiation as compared with control group(P < 0.05.After microwave exposure,however,CD45RA+ B cells in 30mW/cm2 group at day 1 and in 30-60mW/cm2 groups at day 14 after radiation increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner.Conclusion A definite dosage of microwave radiation,ranging from 5-60mW/cm2,may induce changes in subpopulations of peripheral lymphocytes and cause acute immune function impairment in rats.

  19. Effect of Chronic Lead Intoxication on Risky Behavior in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Mohammadyar

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: With industrialization of human societies, pollutants like lead have entered in the life cycle, causing harmful effects on body organs. No sufficient studies have been done on the effects of pollutants on behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate possible effects of lead on some measurable behaviors of an animal model. Methods: Forty eight male adult mice were divided into 4 groups of 12 each. Lead acetate was added at concentrations of 0, 5, 50, or 500 ppm to the drinking water of the animals for 4 weeks (28 days. On day 29, animals were placed on an Elevated Plus maze (EPM for 5 min and the time in sec spent was measured on closed arms, open arms and the end 1/3rd of the open arms. Increased time on open arms, particularly the end 1/3rd was considered to reflect an enhanced risk-accepting behavior. Results: In this study, it was shown that lead exposure caused an increased number of entrance (P=0.006 and time spent (P=0.034 by mice on open arms of the EPM. There was a positive correlation between the concentration of lead acetate and those two effects. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that lead poisoning may decrease normal anxiety in mice and increase risky behavior in this species. Clinical studies on human subjects with risky behavior are strongly suggested in order to find a possible relation between chronic exposures to lead as well as plasma concentration of lead with the extent of this kind of behavior.

  20. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-07-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  1. Cognitive impairment and neurogenotoxic effects in rats exposed to low-intensity microwave radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Pravin Suryakantrao; Nasare, Namita; Megha, Kanu; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Ahmed, Rafat Sultana; Singh, Digvijay; Abegaonkar, Mahesh Pandurang; Tripathi, Ashok Kumar; Mediratta, Pramod Kumari

    2015-01-01

    The health hazard of microwave radiation (MWR) has become a recent subject of interest as a result of the enormous increase in mobile phone usage. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic low-intensity microwave exposure on cognitive function, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), and DNA damage in rat brain. Experiments were performed on male Fischer rats exposed to MWR for 180 days at 3 different frequencies, namely, 900, 1800 MHz, and 2450 MHz. Animals were divided into 4 groups: group I: sham exposed; group II: exposed to MWR at 900 MHz, specific absorption rate (SAR) 5.953 × 10(-4) W/kg; group III: exposed to 1800 MHz, SAR 5.835 × 10(-4) W/kg; and group IV: exposed to 2450 MHz, SAR 6.672 × 10(-4) W/kg. All the rats were tested for cognitive function at the end of the exposure period and were subsequently sacrificed to collect brain. Level of HSP70 was estimated by enzyme-linked immunotarget assay and DNA damage was assessed using alkaline comet assay in all the groups. The results showed declined cognitive function, elevated HSP70 level, and DNA damage in the brain of microwave-exposed animals. The results indicated that, chronic low-intensity microwave exposure in the frequency range of 900 to 2450 MHz may cause hazardous effects on the brain.

  2. A Development of Domestic Food Chain Model Data for Chronic Effect Estimation of Off-site Consequence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seok-Jung; KEUM, Dong-Kwon; Jang, Seung-Cheol [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The FCM includes complex transport phenomena of radiation materials on a biokinetic system of contaminated environments. An estimation of chronic health effects is a key part of the level 3 PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment), which depends on the FCM estimation from contaminated foods ingestion. A cultural ingestion habit of a local region and agricultural productions are different to the general features over worldwide scale or case by case. This is a reason to develop a domestic FCM data for the level 3 PSA. However, a generation of the specific FCM data is a complex process and under a large degree of uncertainty due to inherent biokinetic models. As a preliminary study, the present study focuses on an infrastructure development to generation of a specific FCM data. During this process, the features of FCM data to generate a domestic FCM data were investigated. Based on the insights obtained from this process, a specific domestic FCM data was developed. The present study was developed a domestic FCM data to estimate the chronic health effects of off-site consequence analysis. From this study, an insight was obtained, that a domestic FCM data is roughly 20 times higher than the MACCS2 defaults data. Based on this observation, it is clear that the specific chronic health effects of a domestic plant site should be considered in the off-site consequence analysis.

  3. The effectiveness of calcitonin on chronic back pain and daily activities in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis

    OpenAIRE

    Papadokostakis, G.; Damilakis, J; Mantzouranis, E.; Katonis, P.; Hadjipavlou, A.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nasal calcitonin on chronic back pain and disability attributed to osteoporosis. The study design involved three groups of osteoporotic postmenopausal women suffering from chronic back pain. Group I consisted of 40 women with vertebral fractures, group II of 30 women with degenerative disorders and group III of 40 patients with non specific chronic back pain and without abnormality on plain X-rays. Pain intensity was measured using a nume...

  4. [Effects of laser radiation on the periodontium. An animal model approach. Effects of usual radiation dosage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerol Rodriguez, B; Alandez Chamorro, J; Cañizares Garcia, J; Campos Muñoz, A; Sicilia Felechosa, A

    1989-05-01

    Twenty four albino mice of forty days old were selected. Twelve forty days old albino mice were irradiated with a Helium-Neon laser source, dose of 10.50566 Jul/cm2. They were divided in two groups according to time of animal sacrifice (immediately after irradiation and ten days after). As control were used twelve mice using the same time as the experimental groups, but without radiation. T.E.M. ultrathin sections showed alteration only in the conjunctiva and in the bone tissues, but not in the epithelial tissue. The bone showed two osteocyte population according to their response to irradiation. The first population showed characteristic comparable with the controls, and the second showed alterations suggestive of a degenerative process. The connective tissue also showed two fibroblasts populations, the first showed signs of a big synthesizing activity, and the second, degenerative signs. The first fibroblast population appeared in the animals sacrificed immediately after irradiation.

  5. Radiation protection effect by the combination of propolis and agaricus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Yeunhwa; Yamada, Katsunori; Ukawa, Yuuichi [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Suzuka (Japan)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    The aims of the radioprotection are a human and the safety keeping of the environment. The leukocyte that much research is to do in the animals, and relations between the lymphocyte and the radiation are being made distinct until now. It paid attention to it in this determination stage, and lymphocyte toward the radiation was observed by using the ICR mice used for the lymphocyte simulation abundantly in this research. And, it was examined about the fetal effect toward the radiation. So, an excuse as a radioprotective agent of the effect on the fetus toward the radiation was examined experimentally by using the propolis and agaricus by this research. Therefore, it is a purpose to obtain information as a medicament of the radioprotection. ICR mice were used for the experiment. The pregnant mice were placed in plastic cages for radiation exposure, and were treated with a single whole-body X -radiation at 1 Gy and 2Gy with a dose rate of 35 cGy/min on 8 days after the conception. 100 mg/kg of propolis and agaricus. The total number of irradiated dams observed in this study was 40, a total of 38 non-irradiated control and sham control dams was also prepared, and 659 non-irradiated live fetuses served as controls. Statistical significant difference was recognized between the lymphocyte of the 1.0Gy and 2.0Gy group and the 1.0Gy and 2.0Gy + propolis and agaricus extracts of water solution administrated group toward the lymphocyte and embryonic death of control group and sham control group (p<0.01). But, when it was compared with the lymphocyte and embryonic death rate of the 1.0Gy and 2.0Gy group and the 1.0Gy and 2.0Gy + Propolis and agaricus group, the lymphocyte rate of the 1.0Gy and 2.0Gy + Propolis and agaricus group was decrease. And, if propolis and agaricus was administered, the embryo beyond the haploid number that did implantation was found out in the exposure beyond 1.0Gy or 2.0Gy.

  6. Gamma radiation effects on siloxane-based additive manufactured structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalzer, Andrew M.; Cady, Carl M.; Geller, Drew; Ortiz-Acosta, Denisse; Zocco, Adam T.; Stull, Jamie; Labouriau, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Siloxane-basedadditive manufactured structures prepared by the direct ink write (DIW) technology were exposed to ionizing irradiation in order to gauge radiolysis effects on structure-property relationships. These well-defined 3-D structures were subjected to moderate doses of gamma irradiation in an inert atmosphere and characterized by a suite of experimental methods. Changes in thermal, chemical, microstructure, and mechanical properties were evaluated by DSC, TGA, FT-IR, mass spectroscopy, EPR, solvent swelling, SEM, and uniaxial compressive load techniques. Our results demonstrated that 3-D structures made from aromatic-free siloxane resins exhibited hardening after being exposed to gamma radiation. This effect was accompanied by gas evolution, decreasing in crystallization levels, decreasing in solvent swelling and damage to the microstructure. Furthermore, long-lived radiation-induced radicals were not detected by EPR methods. Our results are consistent with cross-link formation being the dominant degradation mechanism over chain scission reactions. On the other hand, 3-D structures made from high phenyl content siloxane resins showed little radiation damage as evidenced by low off gassing.

  7. Mitochondrial mutagenesis induced by tumor-specific radiation bystander effects.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The radiation bystander effect is a cellular process whereby cells not directly exposed to radiation display cellular alterations similar to directly irradiated cells. Cellular targets including mitochondria have been postulated to play a significant role in this process. In this study, we utilized the Random Mutation Capture assay to quantify the levels of random mutations and deletions in the mitochondrial genome of bystander cells. A significant increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial mutations was found at 24 h in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from irradiated tumor explants (p = 0.018). CG:TA mutations were the most abundant lesion induced. A transient increase in the frequency of random mitochondrial deletions was also detected in bystander cells exposed to conditioned media from tumor but not normal tissue at 24 h (p = 0.028). The increase in both point mutations and deletions was transient and not detected at 72 h. To further investigate mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial membrane potential and reactive oxygen species were assessed in these bystander cells. There was a significant reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and this was positively associated with the frequency of random point mutation and deletions in bystander cells treated with conditioned media from tumor tissue (r = 0.71, p = 0.02). This study has shown that mitochondrial genome alterations are an acute consequence of the radiation bystander effect secondary to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggests that this cannot be solely attributable to changes in ROS levels alone.

  8. Effect of radiation-induced modification in fluoroelastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo, E-mail: helozen@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Polymers exposed to ionizing irradiation, even at low doses, often undergo structural changes accompanied by molecular crosslinking and chain scission (degradation) reactions. The general effect of the radiation on polymers is determined by the ratio of crosslinking to chain scission events. This ratio depends on parameters such as chemical structure, physical state, radicals stability and mobility, irradiation rate and irradiation atmosphere. The radiation process is a large used technique to promote modification in their structures to apply them in different areas and is well known for its merits and potential in modifying the chemical and the physical properties of polymeric materials without cause drastic changes in their inherent properties, depend on the dose irradiated. In this study was used fluoroelastomer with 70% - fluor that having excellent thermal, chemical and mechanical properties. Vulcanized and non-vulcanized samples of this material were submitted to gamma radiation under air atmosphere in order to observe the effect of atmosphere in the polymer matrix. The irradiated doses were 5, 10 and 20kGy, at room temperature. The characterization was made by scanning electron microscope (SEM), infrared spectroscopy using attenuate reflectance (ATR-IR) and X-ray diffraction. The results demonstrated which was expected, the degradation reactions were observed. (author)

  9. Effects of {sup 60}Co radiation on bothropstoxin-1 structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, P.J.; Nascimento, N.; Rogero, J.R. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Radiobiologia; Byrne, M.; Smith, L.A. [United States Army Medical Research, Frederick, MD (United States). Inst. of Infectious Diseases. Toxinology Div.

    2000-07-01

    Gamma radiation is able to detoxify snake venoms and toxins without significantly affecting their immunogenic properties. This method has been successfully employed to attenuate toxins for antisera production without inducing toxic effects in animals undergoing immunization. However, the mechanism of attenuation is not fully understood and much work remains at the molecular level in order to further characterize the effects of radiation on these proteins. The present study was undertaken to evaluate structural modifications following irradiation of bothropstoxin-1 (bthTx-1), a myotoxin from Bothrops jararacussu. It is believed that the functional form of the toxin is a homodimer with the binding affinity provided by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Purified BthTx-1 was irradiated with 500, 1000 and 2000 Gy of {sup 60}Co gamma radiation. The irradiated and native toxins were compared by mass spectrometry, circular dichroism (CD) and tryptophan fluorescence quenching, results suggest that the monomer-monomer interactions are hydrophobic in nature. No significant differences were observed between the two forms of the toxin by CD spectral interpretation. However, significant losses of secondary structure could be observed when the native and irradiated BthTX-1 were compared after disulfide bond reduction. Fluorescence data indicates that the solvent accessibility of Trp 77 has been modified, which may explain the differences in quaternary structure. (author)

  10. Teratogen effects of ionizing radiations. Effets teratogenes des rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, P. (Hopital Beaujon, 92 - Clichy (France)); Gambini, D.J.; Collignon-le-Bouedec, M.A.; Barritault, L. (Hopital Laennec, 75 - Paris (France))

    1994-03-01

    This article treats the problem of teratogenesis of ionizing radiations. If no malformations has been seen before 20*10 [sup -2] Grays and no carcinogen effect before 30*10 [sup -2] Grays, it is reasonable to limit the irradiation of pregnant women. If there is an emergency for mother's life as it is the case in thrombo-embolic pathology, all ways of protection must be used: high voltage, diaphragms, reduction of time exposure, abdomen protection with screens, fast screen-film couples, radioscopy television, limiting number of negatives, make the mother drink after the examination to eliminate the radioactive products. Note that beta radiations are contraindicated and preferentially use, when it is possible, echography, echo doppler or nuclear magnetic resonance.

  11. Effects of radiation damping on Z-spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, David C; Närväinen, Johanna; Hubbard, Penny L; Kauppinen, Risto A; Morris, Gareth A

    2006-12-01

    Radiation damping induced by the strong water magnetization in Z-spectroscopy experiments can be sufficient to perturb significantly the resultant Z-spectrum. With a probe tuned to exact electrical resonance the effects are relatively straightforward, narrowing the central feature of the Z-spectrum. Where, as is commonly the case, the probe is tuned sufficiently well to give optimum signal-to-noise ratio and radiofrequency field strength but is not at exact resonance, radiation damping introduces an unexpected asymmetry into the Z-spectrum. This has the potential to complicate the use of Z-spectrum asymmetry to study chemical exchange, for example in the estimation of pH in vivo.

  12. Radiation Effects on Breakdown Characteristics of Multi Guarded Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Da Rold, M; Bisello, D; Candelori, A; Da Re, A; Dalla Betta, Gian Franco; Paccagnella, A; Soncini, G; Verzellesi, G; Wheadon, R

    1997-01-01

    Multiguard structures are used in order to enhance the breakdown voltage of microstrip detectors. In this work we studied the electrical properties of devices designed in four different layouts on n-Si substrates, based on a central diode surrounded by various p+ and/or n+ floating rings. In particular we measured the main DC characteristics and we compared the experimental results with those simulated by a two-dimensional drift-diffusion computer model. Device noise was also measured for the central diode as a function of the applied voltage. We repeated all measurements after neutron and gamma irradiation, in view of the application of these devices to silicon microstrip detectors for future high energy physics experiments. For example at the LHC the level of radiation damage expected during the detector lifetime implies very high bias voltages for the detector operation. Multiguards can offer a solution, provided the optimisation of the design takes into account the radiation effects.

  13. Ion irradiation and biomolecular radiation damage II. Indirect effect

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Wei; Su, Wenhui

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that damage of genome in a living cell by ionizing radiation is about one-third direct and two-thirds indirect. The former which has been introduced in our last paper, concerns direct energy deposition and ionizing reactions in the biomolecules; the latter results from radiation induced reactive species (mainly radicals) in the medium (mainly water) surrounding the biomolecules. In this review, a short description of ion implantation induced radical formation in water is presented. Then we summarize the aqueous radical reaction chemistry of DNA, protein and their components, followed by a brief introduction of biomolecular damage induced by secondary particles (ions and electron). Some downstream biological effects are also discussed.

  14. Radiation-induced bystander effects in vivo are sex specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koturbash, Igor; Kutanzi, Kristy; Hendrickson, Karl; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kogosov, Dmitry [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4 (Canada)], E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2008-07-03

    Ionizing radiation (IR) effects span beyond the area of direct exposure and can be observed in neighboring and distant naive cells and organs. This phenomenon is termed a 'bystander effect'. IR effects in directly exposed tissue in vivo are epigenetically mediated and distinct in males and females. Yet, IR-induced bystander effects have never been explored in a sex-specificity domain. We used an in vivo mouse model, whereby the bystander effects are studied in spleen of male and female animals subjected to head exposure when the rest of the body is protected by a medical-grade lead shield. We analyzed the induction of DNA damage and alterations in global DNA methylation. Molecular parameters were correlated with cellular proliferation and apoptosis levels. The changes observed in bystander organs are compared to the changes in unexposed animals and animals exposed to predicted and measured scatter doses. We have found the selective induction of DNA damage levels, global DNA methylation, cell proliferation and apoptosis in exposed and bystander spleen tissue of male and female mice. Sex differences were significantly diminished in animals subjected to a surgical removal of gonads. These data constitute the first evidence of sex differences in radiation-induced bystander effects in mouse spleen in vivo. We show the role of sex hormones in spleen bystander responses and discuss implications of the observed changes.

  15. Differential Effects of Chronic and Chronic-Intermittent Ethanol Treatment and Its Withdrawal on the Expression of miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne M. Lewohl

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic and excessive alcohol misuse results in changes in the expression of selected miRNAs and their mRNA targets in specific regions of the human brain. These expression changes likely underlie the cellular adaptations to long term alcohol misuse. In order to delineate the mechanism by which these expression changes occur, we have measured the expression of six miRNAs including miR-7, miR-153, miR-152, miR-15B, miR-203 and miR-144 in HEK293T, SH SY5Y and 1321 N1 cells following exposure to ethanol. These miRNAs are predicted to target key genes involved in the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Chronic and chronic-intermittent exposure to ethanol, and its removal, resulted in specific changes in miRNA expression in each cell line suggesting that different expression patterns can be elicited with different exposure paradigms and that the mechanism of ethanol’s effects is dependent on cell type. Specifically, chronic exposure to ethanol for five days followed by a five day withdrawal period resulted in up-regulation of several miRNAs in each of these cell lines similar to expression changes identified in post mortem human brain. Thus, this model can be used to elucidate the role of miRNAs in regulating gene expression changes that occur in response to ethanol exposure.

  16. Effects of chronic kidney disease on blood cells membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderjakova, Z; Lajdova, I; Horvathova, M; Morvova, M; Sikurova, L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is progressive loss of renal function associated among others with increased intracellular calcium concentration. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of CKD on cell membrane properties such as human red blood cell Ca(2+) ATPase activity, lymphocyte plasma membrane P2X(7) receptor expression and function. This could help us in elucidating the origin of increased calcium concentration in blood cells. We found out Ca(2+) ATPase activity is decreased in early stage CKD patients resulting in altered calcium removal from cytoplasm. By means of flow cytometry we assessed that P2X(7) receptor expression on lymphocyte membrane is 1.5 fold increased for CKD patients. Moreover, we detected an increased uptake of ethidium bromide through this receptor in CKD at basal conditions. It means CKD lymphocyte membranes contain more receptors which are more permeable thus allowing increased calcium influx from extracellular milieu. Finally, we can state alterations in blood cell membranes are closely linked to CKD and may be responsible for intracellular calcium accumulation.

  17. Effects of UV-B radiation on wax biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom); Paul, N. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Percy, K. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Broadbent, P. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); McLaughlin, C. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[Canadian Forest Service, Natural Resources Canada, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Mullineaux, P. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[John Innes Inst., Norwich (United Kingdom); Creissen, G. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[John Innes Inst., Norwich (United Kingdom); Wellburn, A. [Dept. of Agricultural and Environmental Science, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)]|[Inst. of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    Two genotypes of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) were exposed in controlled environment chambers to three levels of biologically effective ultraviolet-B radiation (UV-B{sub BE}; 280-320nm): 0, 4.54 (ambient) and 5.66 ({approx} 25% enhancement) kJ m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. After 28 days, the quantity of wax deposited on leaf surfaces was determined gravimetrically; epicuticular wax chemical composition was determined by capillary gas chromatography with homologue assignments confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Leaf wettability was assessed by measuring the contact angle of water droplets placed on leaf surfaces. Tobacco wax consisted of three major hydrocarbon classes: Straight-chain alkanes (C{sub 27}-C{sub 33}) which comprised {approx} 59% of the hydrocarbon fraction, containing a predominance of odd-chain alkanes with C{sub 31} as the most abundant homologue; branched-chain alkanes (C{sub 25}-C{sub 32}) which comprised {approx}38% of the hydrocarbon fraction with anteiso 3-methyltriacontane (C{sub 30}) as the predominant homologue; and fatty acids (C{sub 14}-C{sub 18}) which comprised {approx} 3% of the wax. Exposure to enhanced UV-B radiation reduced the quantity of wax on the adaxial surface of the transgenic mutant, and resulted in marked changes in the chemical composition of the wax on the exposed leaf surface. Enhanced UV-B decreased the quantity of straight-chain alkanes, increased the quantity of branched-chain alkanes and fatty acids, and resulted in shifts toward shorter straight-chain lengths. Furthermore, UV-B-induced changes in wax composition were associated with increased wettability of tobacco leaf surfaces. Overall, the data are consistent with the view that UV-B radiation has a direct and fundamental effect on wax biosynthesis. Relationships between the physico-chemical nature of the leaf surface and sensitivity to UV-B radiation are discussed. (orig.)

  18. The Effect of Sun Radiation on the Course of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in BALB/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Abas Azarian

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sStudies have described immunomedulatory effects of sun exposure and ultraviolet radiation on infectious and neoplastic diseases. Here the effect of exposure to low potency radiation of sun on the course of leishmaniasis in mice was studied. Materials and MethodsFifteen BALB/c mice were exposed to suberythemogenic doses of sun (mean 180 mJ/cm2/day of UVB 2 months before and 4 months after Leishmania major inoculation to food pad. Control group was kept in the sun protected environment. From 2nd to 17th week after inoculation, size of the lesion was recorded in each group weekly and at last week the parasite burden in spleen was detected. Results were compared between two groups. ResultsSeven mice from case group and 9 mice from control group survived up to last week. The mean lesion size was 0.90±0.59 cm in exposed and 4.01±3.59 cm in unexposed mice (P= 0.037. Parasite burden in spleen of case and control groups were 5.5±4.61 and 106.94±279.76 respectively (P= 0.006.ConclusionChronic exposure of BALB/c mice to suberythemogenic doses of sun suppressed skin lesion and decreased the extension of L. major to spleen.

  19. THE PARADOXICAL EFFECT ON PNEUMONIA OF CHRONIC INHALED CORTICOSTEROIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Sibila, Oriol; Anzueto, Antonio; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading infectious cause of death in developed countries. Several studies have shown that the risk of pneumonia is increased in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) who are receiving chronic inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). The impact of ICS On pneumonia prognosis is controversial. Recent studies have shown that COPD patients with prior ICS use have less mortality after developing CAP as compared with patients with COPD without pri...

  20. Impacts of emission reductions on aerosol radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Pietikäinen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The global aerosol–climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ was used to investigate changes in the aerosol burden and aerosol radiative effects in the coming decades. Four different emissions scenarios were applied for 2030 (two of them applied also for 2020 and the results were compared against the reference year 2005. Two of the scenarios are based on current legislation reductions: one shows the maximum potential of reductions that can be achieved by technical measures, and the other is targeted to short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs. We have analyzed the results in terms of global means and additionally focused on eight subregions. Based on our results, aerosol burdens show an overall decreasing trend as they basically follow the changes in primary and precursor emissions. However, in some locations, such as India, the burdens could increase significantly. The declining emissions have an impact on the clear-sky direct aerosol effect (DRE, i.e. the cooling effect. The DRE could decrease globally 0.06–0.4 W m−2 by 2030 with some regional increases, for example, over India (up to 0.84 W m−2. The global changes in the DRE depend on the scenario and are smallest in the targeted SLCF simulation. The aerosol indirect radiative effect could decline 0.25–0.82 W m−2 by 2030. This decrease takes place mostly over the oceans, whereas the DRE changes are greatest over the continents. Our results show that targeted emission reduction measures can be a much better choice for the climate than overall high reductions globally. Our simulations also suggest that more than half of the near-future forcing change is due to the radiative effects associated with aerosol–cloud interactions.

  1. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  2. Effects of chronic corticosterone and imipramine administration on panic and anxiety-related responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, L; Dos Reis, B B; de Castro, G M; Medalha, C C; Viana, M B

    2011-10-01

    It is known that chronic high levels of corticosterone (CORT) enhance aversive responses such as avoidance and contextual freezing. In contrast, chronic CORT does not alter defensive behavior induced by the exposure to a predator odor. Since different defense-related responses have been associated with specific anxiety disorders found in clinical settings, the observation that chronic CORT alters some defensive behaviors but not others might be relevant to the understanding of the neurobiology of anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic CORT administration (through surgical implantation of a 21-day release 200 mg pellet) on avoidance acquisition and escape expression by male Wistar rats (200 g in weight at the beginning of the experiments, N = 6-10/group) tested in the elevated T-maze (ETM). These defensive behaviors have been associated with generalized anxiety and panic disorder, respectively. Since the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine is successfully used to treat both conditions, the effects of combined treatment with chronic imipramine (15 mg, ip) and CORT were also investigated. Results showed that chronic CORT facilitated avoidance performance, an anxiogenic-like effect (P Imipramine significantly reversed the anxiogenic effect of CORT (P imipramine inhibited escape responses, a panicolytic-like effect. Unlike chronic CORT, imipramine also decreased locomotor activity in an open field. These data suggest that chronic CORT specifically altered ETM avoidance, a fact that should be relevant to a better understanding of the physiopathology of generalized anxiety and panic disorder.

  3. Distinctions of effects of pulsed laser radiation and /sup 60/Co gamma radiation on some microorganisms. [Escherichia coli; Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petin, V.G.; Rusina, L.K.; Sebrant, Yu.V.; Baranov, V.Yu.; Malyuta, D.D.; Niz' ev, V.G.

    1979-03-01

    Studies were made of the sensitivity of yeast cells varying in ploidy and bacterial cells varying in genotype to the effects of pulsed laser radiation and the combined effect of laser and ionizing radiation. It was demonstrated that there is no additivity of irradiation with a train of pulses, as compared to a single pulse. The impairment of cellular reproductive capacity under the influence of lasers was irreversible.

  4. Effects of lactic bacteria on immunological activation and radiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzen, Hajime; Yuki, Rumio [Otsu Red Cross Hospital, Shiga (Japan); Gu, Yeunhwa; Hasegawa, Takeo [Suzuka Univ. of Medical Science, Mie (Japan). Graduate School

    2003-03-01

    Although some studies have suggested that certain substances, such as vitamins and glucan, found in natural food products may have protective effect against radiation injuries, no substance is used practically as radioprotectors. Safe radioprotectors without side effects are, however, yet to see. Enterococcus faecalis (Ef) in intestines is known to enhance immunity of the host as a biological response modifier. In this report, we have examined the radiation protection effect of Ef using C3H mice and assessed the effect of Ef on the natural killer (NK) cells activity of the splenic cells in the mice. Less body weight losses after irradiation were observed among Ef injection groups, in comparison with control groups. Our data showed a strong tendency to prolong the surviving fraction among the groups with the Ef injection. Hence, the Ef treatment appeared to have protected mucosal damage caused by the X-ray irradiation. The NK cells activities were markedly enhanced after the Ef injection as well. With the evidence mentioned above, we conclude that the Ef may have positive effect on patients who undergo a radiotherapy. (author)

  5. Radiation effects on communication performance of radio frequency identification tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kazuyuki; Meng, Zhaowu; Kikuchi, Hirosumi; Kataoka, Yasuhide; Nakazato, Kazuhisa; Deji, Shizuhiko; Ito, Shigeki; Saze, Takuya; Hirota, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Kunihide

    2010-11-01

    Radioactive materials (sources) are managed by bookkeeping and stocktaking. The radiation protection section staffs should check the sources manually. Annual effective dose concerning stocktaking of them are estimated at some mSv concerning fingers. A radio frequency identification (RFID) tag's absorbed dose is estimated at some dozen Gy. RFID for stocktaking automatically was devised. Radiation effects on the communication performance of RFID tags were investigated by using response times and read ranges as indices. The RFID system was composed of a computer, a detector, and transponders (tag) consisting of an integrated circuit chip and an antenna. The tag is joined to the source for identification. The tags were irradiated at doses between 5 and 5,000 Gy by an x-ray irradiator. The response times and the read ranges were tracked from 40 to 23,200 min after irradiation. Relative read ranges fluctuated between 0.9 and 1.1 in the dose region less than 2,000 Gy, but fluctuated greatly in the dose region beyond 2,000 Gy. Malfunctioning tags appeared from 3,000 Gy, and all tags malfunctioned in the dose region over 4,500 Gy. The threshold dose leading to malfunction was determined to be 2,100 Gy. Time variation of relative read ranges was classified into four patterns. The pattern shifted from pattern 1 to 4 when the dose was increased. The relative read ranges lengthened in pattern 1. The relative read rages were approximately 1.0 in pattern 2. The read ranges tentatively shortened, then recovered in pattern 3. The tags malfunctioned in pattern 4. Once the tags malfunctioned, they never recovered their performance. Radiation enhances or deteriorates communication performance depending on dosage. Tags can spontaneously recover from radiation deterioration. The time variation of the read ranges can be illustrated by enhancement, deterioration, and recovery. The mechanism of four patterns is explained based on the variation of the frequency harmonization strength and

  6. Effect of Hedera helix on lung histopathology in chronic asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Babayigit Hocaoglu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hedera helix  is widely used to treat bronchial asthma for many years. However, effects of this herb on lung histopathology is still far from clear. We aimed to determine the effect of oral administration of Hedera helix on lung histopathology in a murine model of chronic asthma.BALB/c  mice  were  divided  into  four  groups;   I  (Placebo,  II  (Hedera  helix, III (Dexamethasone and IV (Control. All mice except controls were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. Then, mice in group I received saline, group II 100 mg/kg Hedera helix and group III 1 mg/kg  dexamethasone via orogastic gavage once daily for one week. Airway histopathology was evaluated by using light and electron microscopy in all groups.Goblet  cell numbers and thicknesses of basement membrane were found  significantly lower in group II, but there was no statistically significant difference in terms of number of mast cells, thicknesses of epithelium and subepithelial smooth muscle layers between group I and II. When Hedera helix and dexamethasone groups were compared with each other, thickness of epithelium, subepithelial muscle layers, number of mast cells and goblet cells of group III were significantly ameliorated when compared with the group II.Although Hedera helix administration reduced only goblet cell counts and the thicknesses of basement membrane  in the  asthmatic airways, dexamethasone ameliorated all histopathologic parameters except thickness of  basement  membrane  better  than  Hedera helix.

  7. Effects of obesity and chronic low back pain on gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galli Manuela

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is often associated with low back pain (LBP. Despite empirical evidence that LBP induces gait abnormalities, there is a lack of quantitative analysis of the combined effect of obesity and LBP on gait. The aim of our study was to quantify the gait pattern of obese subjects with and without LBP and normal-mass controls by using Gait Analysis (GA, in order to investigate the cumulative effects of obesity and LBP on gait. Methods Eight obese females with chronic LBP (OLG; age: 40.5 ± 10.1 years; BMI: 42.39 ± 5.47 Kg/m2, 10 obese females (OG; age: 33.6 ± 5.2 years; BMI: 39.26 ± 2.39 Kg/m2 and 10 healthy female subjects (CG; age: 33.4 ± 9.6 years; BMI: 22.8 ± 3.2 Kg/m2, were enrolled in this study and assessed with video recording and GA. Results and Discussion OLG showed longer stance duration and shorter step length when compared to OG and CG. They also had a low pelvis and hip ROM on the frontal plane, a low knee flexion in the swing phase and knee range of motion, a low dorsiflexion in stance and swing as compared to OG. No statistically significant differences were found in ankle power generation at push-off between OLG and OG, which appeared lower if compared to CG. At hip level, both OLG and OG exhibited high power generation levels during stance, with OLG showing the highest values. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the association of obesity and LBP affects more the gait pattern than obesity alone. OLG were in fact characterised by an altered knee and ankle strategy during gait as compared to OG and CG. These elements may help optimizing rehabilitation planning and treatment in these patients.

  8. Effects and mechanism of Tripterygium wilfordii on chronic glomerulo nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, W Y; Yang, C H; Zhang, X L

    2016-02-05

    The objective of this study was to investigate the clinical effects of Tripterygium wilfordii on chronic glomerulo nephritis (CGN) and its mechanisms. Eighty-two cases of CGN treated in our hospital were randomly divided into observation and control groups. The control group was treated with conventional western medicine, and the observation group was treated with conventional western medicine and orally-administered T. wilfordii pills for three courses of treatment, each consisting of 4 weeks. Changes in serum reatinine, blood urea nitrogen, blood total cholesterol, blood albumin, and 24-h urine protein were observed. The levels of peripheral tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The curative effects of both groups were evaluated respectively. Both groups had significantly improved serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, blood total cholesterol, blood albumin, and 24-h urine protein (P < 0.05), and the observation group exhibited a more significant improvement (P < 0.05). TNF-α and IL-6 levels in both groups obviously decreased (P < 0.05), and the observation group exhibited remarkable changes (P < 0.05). After treatment, the total efficiency of the observation group was 90.24%, which was significantly higher than the 73.17% of the control group (P < 0.05). In conclusion, T. wilfordii can significantly improve kidney function and clinical symptoms in CGN patients, and the mechanism is possibly related to its inhibition of the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6.

  9. The differential effects of gratitude and sleep on psychological distress in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Mei-Yee; Wong, Wing-Sze

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the possible cross-sectional mediating role of sleep in the relationship of gratitude with depression and anxiety in patients with chronic pain. A total of 224 patients with chronic pain completed structured questionnaires assessing chronic pain, depression and anxiety symptoms, gratitude, and sleep disturbances. Results of multiple regression analyses yielded a modest mediating effect for sleep on the gratitude-depression link whereas a stronger mediating effect was found for sleep on the gratitude-anxiety link. These data show much of the effect of gratitude on depression was direct whereas sleep exerted a stronger mediating effect on the gratitude-anxiety link.

  10. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  11. Heavy irradiation effects in radiation-resistant optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Tatsuo [Tohoku Univ., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Branch, Inst. for Materials Research

    1998-07-01

    Development of a system for optical measurements in a nuclear reactor has been progressing to investigate dynamic changes in a material caused by heavy irradiation. In such system, transfer of optical signals to out-pile measuring systems is being attempted by the use of optical fibers. In this report, the characteristics of optical fibers in the heavy irradiation field were summarized. It has been known that amorphous silica might produce radiolysis and structural defects by the exposure to ionizing radiation. The effects of heavy irradiation on molten silica were extremely complicated. A large intensity of visible light absorption occurred from an early time during start-up of the reactor. The absorption range was limited below 700 nm for the radiation associating fast neutron and the absorption was mostly attributed to non-bridging oxygen hole center. The depletion of optical transferring capacity under the radiation might be related to the internal stress. Therefore, it seems desirable to use optical fibers in the conditions without leading too much stress. (M.N.)

  12. Effects of heavy ion radiation on digital micromirror device performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travinsky, Anton; Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran; Raisanen, Alan D.; Pellish, Jonny; Robberto, Massimo; Heap, Sara

    2016-09-01

    There is a pressing need in the astronomical community for space-suitable multiobject spectrometers (MOSs). Several digital micromirror device (DMD)-based prototype MOSs have been developed for ground-based observatories; however, their main use will come with deployment on a space-based mission. Therefore, the performance of DMDs under exoatmospheric radiation needs to be evaluated. DMDs were rewindowed with 2-μm thick pellicle and tested under accelerated heavy-ion radiation (control electronics shielded from radiation), with a focus on the detection of single-event effects (SEEs) including latch-up events. Testing showed that while DMDs are sensitive to nondestructive ion-induced state changes, all SEEs are cleared with a soft reset (i.e., sending a pattern to the device). The DMDs did not experience single-event induced permanent damage or functional changes that required a hard reset (power cycle), even at high ion fluences. This suggests that the SSE rate burden will be manageable for a DMD-based instrument when exposed to solar particle fluxes and cosmic rays in orbit.

  13. Effects of microgravity and cosmic radiations on human T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pippia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In space living organisms, including cells, are affected by two new environmental conditions: microgravity and cosmic radiations. Several experiments in dedicated space missions and in simulated microgravity have shown that low gravity causes a dramatic depression of the mitogenic in vitro activation of T lymphocytes. The goal of this reserch was to determine in space (on board the International Space Station the ability of adherent monocytes to migrate, as well as to interact with T-cells. A reduced motility of the J-111 cells and changes in the structures of actin, tubulin and vinculin were observed. Moreover, we demonstrated that LFA-I/ICAM-I interactions occur in space and are dependent on activation time but show differences in number, arrangement and fluorescence intensity, depending on time and experimental conditions. In order to evaluate the effects of cosmic radiations on the gene expression in human T lymphocytes we exposed these cells to high quote cosmic radiation during two stratospheric balloon trans-mediterranean flights (BIRBA missions. The gene expression was analized by cDNA microarray hybridization technology. Activated T cells react to the ionizing stress by activating genes involved in cell cycle check-point, oxidative stress response, heat shock proteins production or by repressing denes involved in antigen recognition.

  14. Radiation effects on life span in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T.E.; Hartman, P.S.

    1988-09-01

    Wild-type and radiation-sensitive (Rad) mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans were irradiated using a /sup 137/Cs source (2.7 krads/min.) at several developmental stages and subsequently monitored for life span. Acute doses of radiation ranged from 1 krad to 300 krads. All stages required doses above 100 krads to reduce mean life span. Dauers and third stage larvae were more sensitive, and 8-day-old adults were the most resistant. Occasional statistically significant but nonrepeatable increases in survival were observed after intermediate levels of irradiation (10-30 krads). Unirradiated rad-4 and rad-7 had life spans similar to wild-type; all others had a significant reduction in survival. The mutants were about as sensitive as wild-type to the effects of ionizing radiation including occasional moderate life span extensions at intermediate doses. We conclude that the moderate life span extensions sometimes observed after irradiation are likely to be mediated by a means other than the induction of DNA repair enzymes.

  15. Effect of Melatonin on Sleep, Behavior, and Cognition in ADHD and Chronic Sleep-Onset Insomnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Heijden, Kristiaan B.; Smits, Marcel G.; Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; Gunning, W. Boudewijn

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of melatonin treatment on sleep, behavior, cognition, and quality of life in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and chronic sleep onset insomnia. Method: A total of 105 medication-free children, ages 6 to 12 years, with rigorously diagnosed ADHD and chronic sleep onset insomnia…

  16. The combined effect of cancer and chronic diseases on general practitioner consultation rates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Korevaar, J.C.; Donker, G.A.; Rijken, P.M.; Schellevis, F.G.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: More than two-thirds of cancer patients have one or more chronic diseases besides cancer. The purpose of this study was to get detailed insight into the combined effect of cancer and chronic diseases on general practitioner (GP) consultation rates. Methods: From the NIVEL Primary Care Database

  17. A critical review of chronic stress effects on spatial learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Cheryl D

    2010-06-30

    The purpose of this review is to evaluate the effects of chronic stress on hippocampal-dependent function, based primarily upon studies using young, adult male rodents and spatial navigation tasks. Despite this restriction, variability amongst the findings was evident and how or even whether chronic stress influenced spatial ability depended upon the type of task, the dependent variable measured and how the task was implemented, the type and duration of the stressors, housing conditions of the animals that include accessibility to food and cage mates, and duration from the end of the stress to the start of behavioral assessment. Nonetheless, patterns emerged as follows: For spatial memory, chronic stress impairs spatial reference memory and has transient effects on spatial working memory. For spatial learning, however, chronic stress effects appear to be task-specific: chronic stress impairs spatial learning on appetitively motivated tasks, such as the radial arm maze or holeboard, tasks that evoke relatively mild to low arousal components from fear. But under testing conditions that evoke moderate to strong arousal components from fear, such as during radial arm water maze testing, chronic stress appears to have minimal impairing effects or may even facilitate spatial learning. Chronic stress clearly impacts nearly every brain region and thus, how chronic stress alters hippocampal spatial ability likely depends upon the engagement of other brain structures during behavioral training and testing.

  18. Chronic beta-blocker treatment in patients with advanced heart failure - Effects on neurohormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teisman, ACH; van Veldhuisen, DJ; Boomsma, F; de Kam, PJ; Pinto, YM; de Zeeuw, D; van Gilst, WH

    2000-01-01

    Background: To date, the use of beta-blockers in treating patients with chronic heart failure gains support, this since several large clinical trials reported reduced mortality after chronic beta-blockade. Part of these beneficial effects may result from inhibition of deleterious neurohormone activa

  19. Chronic Absenteeism and Its Effects on Students' Academic and Socioemotional Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent policy dialogue suggests that chronic absenteeism is not only underdocumented, but is also detrimental to the success of students as early as kindergarten. That said, almost no empirical research has examined the effects of chronic absenteeism on student outcomes. This study addresses this underresearched issue in more depth. Using a…

  20. Health effects of chronic noise exposure in pregnancy and childhood: A systematic review initiated by ENRIECO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hohmann, C.; Grabenhenrich, L.; Kluizenaar, Y. de; Tischer, C.; Heinrich, J.; Chen, C.-M.; Thijs, C.; Nieuwenhuijsen, M.; Keil, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic noise is an environmental pollutant and well-known to cause annoyance and sleep disturbance. Its association with clinical and subclinical adverse health effects has been discussed. Objectives: This systematic review aimed to examine associations between chronic noise exposure du

  1. Effectiveness of radiation processing in elimination of Aeromonas from food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagar, Vandan [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bandekar, Jayant R., E-mail: jrb@barc.gov.i [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Genus Aeromonas has emerged as an important human pathogen because it causes a variety of diseases including gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal infections. Contaminated water, sprouts, vegetables, seafood and food of animal origin have been considered to be the important sources of Aeromonas infection. In the present study, radiation sensitivity of indigenous strains of Aeromonas spp. from different food samples was evaluated. The decimal reduction dose (D{sub 10}) values of different Aeromonas isolates in saline at 0-4 {sup o}C were in the range of 0.031-0.046 kGy. The mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were inoculated with a cocktail of five most resistant isolates (A. salmonicida Y567, A. caviae A85, A. jandaei A514A, A. hydrophila CECT 839{sup T} and A. veronii Y47) and exposed to {gamma} radiation to study the effectiveness of radiation treatment in elimination of Aeromonas. D{sub 10} values of Aeromonas cocktail in mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were found to be 0.081{+-}0.001, 0.089{+-}0.003 and 0.091{+-}0.003 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in complete elimination of 10{sup 5} CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples. No recovery of Aeromonas was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 {sup o}C up to 12 (mixed sprouts) and 7 days (chicken and fish samples), even after enrichment and selective plating. This study demonstrates that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could result in complete elimination of 10{sup 5} CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples.

  2. Effectiveness of radiation processing in elimination of Aeromonas from food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Vandan; Bandekar, Jayant R.

    2011-08-01

    Genus Aeromonas has emerged as an important human pathogen because it causes a variety of diseases including gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal infections. Contaminated water, sprouts, vegetables, seafood and food of animal origin have been considered to be the important sources of Aeromonas infection. In the present study, radiation sensitivity of indigenous strains of Aeromonas spp. from different food samples was evaluated. The decimal reduction dose (D10) values of different Aeromonas isolates in saline at 0-4 °C were in the range of 0.031-0.046 kGy. The mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were inoculated with a cocktail of five most resistant isolates (A. salmonicida Y567, A. caviae A85, A. jandaei A514A, A. hydrophila CECT 839T and A. veronii Y47) and exposed to γ radiation to study the effectiveness of radiation treatment in elimination of Aeromonas. D10 values of Aeromonas cocktail in mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples were found to be 0.081±0.001, 0.089±0.003 and 0.091±0.003 kGy, respectively. Radiation treatment with a 1.5 kGy dose resulted in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples. No recovery of Aeromonas was observed in the 1.5 kGy treated samples stored at 4 °C up to 12 (mixed sprouts) and 7 days (chicken and fish samples), even after enrichment and selective plating. This study demonstrates that a 1.5 kGy dose of irradiation treatment could result in complete elimination of 105 CFU/g of Aeromonas spp. from mixed sprouts, chicken and fish samples.

  3. Radiation dosimetry.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, J

    1991-01-01

    This article summarizes the basic facts about the measurement of ionizing radiation, usually referred to as radiation dosimetry. The article defines the common radiation quantities and units; gives typical levels of natural radiation and medical exposures; and describes the most important biological effects of radiation and the methods used to measure radiation. Finally, a proposal is made for a new radiation risk unit to make radiation risks more understandable to nonspecialists.

  4. Effect of solar radiation on severity of soybean rust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather M; George, Sheeja; Narváez, Dario F; Srivastava, Pratibha; Schuerger, Andrew C; Wright, David L; Marois, James J

    2012-08-01

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, is a damaging fungal disease of soybean (Glycine max). Although solar radiation can reduce SBR urediniospore survival, limited information is available on how solar radiation affects SBR progress within soybean canopies. Such information can aid in developing accurate SBR prediction models. To manipulate light penetration into soybean canopies, structures of shade cloth attenuating 30, 40, and 60% sunlight were constructed over soybean plots. In each plot, weekly evaluations of severity in lower, middle, and upper canopies, and daily temperature and relative humidity were recorded. Final plant height and leaf area index were also recorded for each plot. The correlation between amount of epicuticular wax and susceptibility of leaves in the lower, middle, and upper canopies was assessed with a detached leaf assay. Final disease severity was 46 to 150% greater in the lower canopy of all plots and in the middle canopy of 40 and 60% shaded plots. While daytime temperature within the canopy of nonshaded soybean was greater than shaded soybean by 2 to 3°C, temperatures recorded throughout typical evenings and mornings of the growing season in all treatments were within the range (10 to 28.5°C) for SBR development as was relative humidity. This indicates temperature and relative humidity were not limiting factors in this experiment. Epicuticular wax and disease severity in detached leaf assays from the upper canopy had significant negative correlation (P = 0.009, R = -0.84) regardless of shade treatment. In laboratory experiments, increasing simulated total solar radiation (UVA, UVB, and PAR) from 0.15 to 11.66 MJ m(-2) increased mortality of urediniospores from 2 to 91%. Variability in disease development across canopy heights in early planted soybean may be attributed to the effects of solar radiation not only on urediniospore viability, but also on plant height, leaf area index, and epicuticular wax, which influence

  5. Effects of low-level radiation upon the hematopoietic steam cell: implications for leukemogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bond, V.P.; Carsten, A.L.; Miller, M.E.; Bullis, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    These studies have addressed firstly the effect of single small doses of x-ray upon murine hematopoietic stem cells to obtain a better estimate of the D/sub q/. It is small, of the order of 20 rads. Secondly, a dose fractionation schedule tht does not kill or perturb the kinetics of hemopoietic cell proliferation was sought in order to investigate the leukemogenic potential of low level radiation upon an unperturbed hemopoietic system. The studies reported herein show tht 1.25 rads every other day decrease the CFU-S content of bone marrow by the time 40 rads are accumulated. Studies on the effect of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 rads 3 times per week are under way. Two rads 3 times per week produced a modest decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow after an accumulation of 68 rads. With 3.0 rads 3 times per week an accumulation of 102 rads produces a significant decrease in CFU-S content of bone marrow. Dose fractionation at 0.5 and 1.0 rad 3 times per week has not produced a CFU-S depression after accumulation of 17 and 34 rads. Radiation leukemogenesis studies published to date have utilized single doses and chronic exposure schedules that probably have significantly perturbed the kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells. Whether radiation will produce leukemia in animal models with dose schedules that do not perturb kinetics of hematopoietic stem cells remains to be seen.

  6. Radioprotection, biological effects of the radiations and security in the handling of radioactive material

    CERN Document Server

    Teran, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of the philosophy of the radioprotection is dependent on the understanding of the effects of the radiation in the man. Behind the fact that the radiation is able to produce biological damages there are certain factors with regard to the biological effects of the radiations that determine the boarding of the radioprotection topics.

  7. Non-Riemannian effective spacetime effects on Hawking radiation in superfluids

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia de Andrade, L C

    2005-01-01

    Riemannian effective spacetime description of Hawking radiation in $^{3}He-A$ superfluids is extended to non-Riemannian effective spacetime. An example is given of non-Riemannian effective geometry of the rotational motion of the superfluid vacuum around the vortex where the effective spacetime Cartan torsion can be associated to the Hawking giving rise to a physical interpretation of effective torsion recently introduced in the literature in the form of an acoustic torsion in superfluid $^{4}He$ (PRD-70(2004),064004). Curvature and torsion singularities of this $^{3}He-A$ fermionic superfluid are investigated. This Lense-Thirring effective metric, representing the superfluid vacuum in rotational motion, is shown not support Hawking radiation when the isotropic $^{4}He$ is restored at far distances from the vortex axis. Hawking radiation can be expressed also in topological solitons (moving domain walls) in fermionic superfluids in non-Riemannian (teleparallel) $(1+1)$ dimensional effective spacetime. A telep...

  8. The protective effects of trace elements against side effects induced by ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jaial [Dept. of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Center, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Trace elements play crucial role in the maintenance of genome stability in the cells. Many endogenous defense enzymes are containing trace elements such as superoxide dismutase and metalloproteins. These enzymes are contributing in the detoxification of reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by ionizing radiation in the cells. Zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium are main trace elements that have protective roles against radiation-induced DNA damages. Trace elements in the free salt forms have protective effect against cell toxicity induced by oxidative stress, metal-complex are more active in the attenuation of ROS particularly through superoxide dismutase mimetic activity. Manganese-complexes in protection of normal cell against radiation without any protective effect on cancer cells are more interesting compounds in this topic. The aim of this paper to review the role of trace elements in protection cells against genotoxicity and side effects induced by ionizing radiation.

  9. Universality of nonperturbative QCD effects in radiative B-decays

    CERN Document Server

    Descotes-Genon, S

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate, by an explicit one-loop calculation, that at leading twist the nonperturbative effects in B -> gamma l nu, B -> gamma gamma and B -> gamma l+ l- radiative decays are contained in a common multiplicative factor (\\Lambda_B(E_\\gamma), where E_\\gamma is the energy of the photon). We argue that this result holds also at higher orders. Ratios of the amplitudes for these processes do not depend on scales below the mass of the B-meson (M_B), and can be calculated as perturbative series in \\alpha_s(M_B)

  10. Effect of bremsstrahlung radiation emission on fast electrons in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Embréus, Ola; Fülöp, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    Bremsstrahlung radiation emission is an important energy loss mechanism for energetic electrons in plasmas. In this paper we investigate the effect of spontaneous bremsstrahlung emission on the momentum-space structure of the electron distribution, fully accounting for the emission of finite-energy photons. We find that electrons accelerated by electric fields can reach significantly higher energies than what is expected from energy-loss considerations. Furthermore, we show that the emission of soft photons can contribute significantly to the dynamics of electrons with an anisotropic distribution.

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalovidouris, A.E.; Papayannis, A.G. (Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece))

    1981-01-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on platelet function was investigated in vitro. Platelet-rich plasma (300x10/sup 9//l) was irradiated with doses of 1, 4, 10, 20 and 50 Gy. Platelet function tests were performed on both irradiated and control (non-irradiated) platelet samples. The platelet function tests were (1) platelet aggregation by ADP (1, 2, 4 ..mu..mol final concentration), adrenaline and collagen, (2) ADP-release from platelets, (3) clot retraction and (4) platelet factor-3 availability. It was found that roentgen irradiation of platelets in vitro did not affect these platelet function tests.

  12. Biological effect of non-ionizing radiations on microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Takayoshi [Osaka Univ., Radioisotope Research Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Nakaoka, Yasuo [Osaka Univ., Graduate School of Engineering Science, Department of Biophysical Engineering, Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    We studied the effect of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) of 60-Hz and 500 mT on the growth and the mutation frequency of the budding yeast S.cerevisiae and on the behavior of the ciliate Paramecium multimicronucleatum. The growth rate and mutation frequencies of several strains of S.cerevisiae (wild type and radiation sensitive mutants, rad or rev) were examined but no significant difference was observed. Moreover, the behavior of P.multimicronucleatum under the ELF-MF was examined. When exposed to a vertical field of 0.6 T, the cells accumulated at the upper end of the cuvette. (author)

  13. Computer program for pulsed thermocouples with corrections for radiation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    A pulsed thermocouple was used for measuring gas temperatures above the melting point of common thermocouples. This was done by allowing the thermocouple to heat until it approaches its melting point and then turning on the protective cooling gas. This method required a computer to extrapolate the thermocouple data to the higher gas temperatures. A method that includes the effect of radiation in the extrapolation is described. Computations of gas temperature are provided, along with the estimate of the final thermocouple wire temperature. Results from tests on high temperature combustor research rigs are presented.

  14. Radiation effects in x-irradiated hydroxy compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budzinski, Edwin E.; Potter, William R.; Box, Harold C.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation effects are compared in single crystals of xylitol, sorbitol, and dulcitol x-irradiated at 4.2 °K. In xylitol and dulcitol, but not in sorbitol, a primary oxidation product is identified as an alkoxy radical. ENDOR measurements detected three proton hyperfine couplings associated with the alkoxy ESR absorption, one of which is attributed to a proton three bond lengths removed from the seat of unpaired spin density. Intermolecular trapping of electrons is observed in all three crystals. ENDOR measurements were made of the hyperfine couplings between the trapped electron and the hydroxy protons forming the trap.

  15. Ozone precursors have regionally variable effect on radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-02-01

    When released near the surface, carbon monoxide, assorted nitrogen oxides (NOx ), and nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) contribute to the production of ozone, a key component of photochemical smog, which is known to have serious deleterious effects on human health. However, when ozone gets lifted into the troposphere, it is a greenhouse gas. That these ozone precursors have such a dual-pronged effect—affecting both human health and the global radiation budget—suggests that mitigating their emissions could be a potential method to both improve air quality and dampen the rate of anthropogenic climate change.

  16. Yanshu spraying agent, a traditional Chinese medicine, relieves chronic pharyngitis in animals by anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects

    OpenAIRE

    LU, CHENGWEN; SONG, YANQIN; Zhang, Jianqiao; Du, Yuan; Wang, Tian; XUE, YUNLI; Fu, Fenghua; ZHANG, LEIMING

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pharyngitis is chronic inflammation that is often caused by repeated occurrences of acute pharyngitis or upper respiratory tract infections, including Streptococcus and Staphylococcus. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of Yanshu spraying agent (Yanshu) in relieving chronic pharyngitis, as well as the possible underlying mechanisms. The results revealed that Yanshu inhibited chronic inflammation in ammonia-induced chronic pharyngitis in rabbits and cotton pellet-induce...

  17. The radiation protection effect of propolis to embryonic effects in ICR mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Sachiyo; Gu, Yeunhwa; Suzuki, Ikukatsu; Hasegawa, Takeo; Yamamoto, Youichi; Muto, Hroe; Yanagisawa, Takaharu; Iwasa, Toshihiro [Suzuka University, Mie (Japan)

    1999-07-01

    The profit which radiation brought to the Homo sapiens is very big. But, radiation has even harmful parameter for the human besides one case. After effect on man to the radiation is thought about, the individiual of which sensibility is the highest is a fetus. As for the embryonic death rate, propolis was administered, and obviously embryonic death rate was poorer than the 1.5Gy independent exposure group, and significant difference was recognized by a 1.5Gy radiation exposure group (p<0.001). It had a 1.5Gy radiation exposure group made clear by this research fetal death rate propolis administer more only 1.5Gy exposure fetal death rate development low (p<0.001). Fetal death rate wasn't recognized by propolis administration group (Sham control). As for the teratogenesis rate, propolis was administered, and the teratogenesis rate of the 1.5Gy radiation exposure group was higher than the 1.5Gy radiation independent exposure group. But, this is thought anamorphosis appear by propolis administration so long as there was much number of the survival fetuses. The modality of the external malformation which appeared was exencephaly, anaomalise of tail, anophthalmia, cleft palate, hydrcephaly, and so on. As for the fetal body weight were recognized, a 1.5Gy group and propolis administered 1.5Gy radiation exposure group decreased in comparison with the control as for significant difference (p<0.001)

  18. Dermatopathology effects of simulated solar particle event radiation exposure in the porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzari, Jenine K; Diffenderfer, Eric S; Hagan, Sarah; Billings, Paul C; Gridley, Daila S; Seykora, John T; Kennedy, Ann R; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-07-01

    The space environment exposes astronauts to risks of acute and chronic exposure to ionizing radiation. Of particular concern is possible exposure to ionizing radiation from a solar particle event (SPE). During an SPE, magnetic disturbances in specific regions of the Sun result in the release of intense bursts of ionizing radiation, primarily consisting of protons that have a highly variable energy spectrum. Thus, SPE events can lead to significant total body radiation exposures to astronauts in space vehicles and especially while performing extravehicular activities. Simulated energy profiles suggest that SPE radiation exposures are likely to be highest in the skin. In the current report, we have used our established miniature pig model system to evaluate the skin toxicity of simulated SPE radiation exposures that closely resemble the energy and fluence profile of the September, 1989 SPE using either conventional radiation (electrons) or proton simulated SPE radiation. Exposure of animals to electron or proton radiation led to dose-dependent increases in epidermal pigmentation, the presence of necrotic keratinocytes at the dermal-epidermal boundary and pigment incontinence, manifested by the presence of melanophages in the derm is upon histological examination. We also observed epidermal hyperplasia and a reduction in vascular density at 30 days following exposure to electron or proton simulated SPE radiation. These results suggest that the doses of electron or proton simulated SPE radiation results in significant skin toxicity that is quantitatively and qualitatively similar. Radiation-induced skin damage is often one of the first clinical signs of both acute and non-acute radiation injury where infection may occur, if not treated. In this report, histopathology analyses of acute radiation-induced skin injury are discussed.

  19. Geant4 electromagnetic physics updates for space radiation effects simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivantchenko, Anton; Nieminen, Petteri; Incerti, Sebastien; Santin, Giovanni; Ivantchenko, Vladimir; Grichine, Vladimir; Allison, John; Karamitos, Mathiew

    The Geant4 toolkit is used in many applications including space science studies. The new Geant4 version 10.0 released in December 2013 includes a major revision of the toolkit and offers multi-threaded mode for event level parallelism. At the same time, Geant4 electromagnetic and hadronic physics sub-libraries have been significantly updated. In order to validate the new and updated models Geant4 verification tests and benchmarks were extended. Part of these developments was sponsored by the European Space Agency in the context of research aimed at modelling radiation biological end effects. In this work, we present an overview of results of several benchmarks for electromagnetic physics models relevant to space science. For electromagnetic physics, recently Compton scattering, photoelectric effect, and Rayleigh scattering models have been improved and extended down to lower energies. Models of ionization and fluctuations have also been improved; special micro-dosimetry models for Silicon and liquid water were introduced; the main multiple scattering model was consolidated; and the atomic de-excitation module has been made available to all models. As a result, Geant4 predictions for space radiation effects obtained with different Physics Lists are in better agreement with the benchmark data than previous Geant4 versions. Here we present results of electromagnetic tests and models comparison in the energy interval 10 eV - 10 MeV.

  20. Characterizations of and Radiation Effects in Several Emerging CMOS Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufeng Ren

    the total ionizing dose (TID) effect, to understand the associated physical mechanisms, and to help to inspire ideas to improve radiation immunity of these novel devices. The experimental methods used in this thesis research include the measurements of C-V, I-V characteristics, where novel gate stack and interface characterization techniques are employed, such as AC Gm method, 1/f low frequency noise method, inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) for chemical bonding and defects detection, and carrier transport modeling. Sentaurus TCAD simulations are also carried out to obtain more physical insight in the complex, extremely scaled, device structures.

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease—Effect of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Palaneeswari Meenakshi Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing health problem with increasing incidence. The annual mortality of end-stage renal disease patients is about 9%, which is 10–20 fold higher than the general population, approximately 50% of these deaths are due to cardiovascular (CV disease. CV risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are strongly associated with poor outcome. Many other nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, anemia, and malnutrition are also present. In this review we will focus on the role of oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease.

  2. Early effects of preoperative radiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaka, Shigeo; Igarashi, Tatsuo; Ito, Haruo

    1983-10-01

    22 patients with high grade invasive bladder cancer were treated with preoperative radiation therapy (910 rad by fast neutron or 3000 rad by X ray during 2 weeks) followed by radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. 62.5 % of patients showed reduction in tumor size more than 50% evaluated by cystogram. Stage down was observed in 38% of patients compared between clinical and pathological stage. Histopathological effect of GII or GIII, according to the criteria described by Ohboshi, was noticed in 79 % of the patients. Better effect seemed to be obtained in fast neutron treated group than in X ray group. 19 patients received curative surgery, and 18 patients were alive without recurrence after 10 months (mean observed term). One died from lung metastasis 4.5 months after surgery. 50% of the patients complained of side effects of irradiation although they were tolerable, and 32% of the patients had major complications of surgery.

  3. Topological magnetoelectric effects in microwave far-field radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Berezin, M; Shavit, R

    2015-01-01

    Similar to electromagnetism, described by the Maxwell equations, the physics of magnetoelectric (ME) phenomena deals with the fundamental problem of the relationship between electric and magnetic fields. Despite a formal resemblance between the two notions, they concern effects of different natures. In general, ME coupling effects manifest in numerous macroscopic phenomena in solids with space and time symmetry breakings. Recently it was shown that the near fields in the proximity of a small ferrite particle with magnetic dipolar mode (MDM) oscillations have the space and time symmetry breakings and topological properties of these fields are different from topological properties of the free space electromagnetic (EM) fields. Such MDM originated fields, called magnetoelectric (ME) fields, carry both spin and orbital angular momentums. They are characterized by power flow vortices and non zero helicity. In this paper, we report on observation of the topological ME effects in far field microwave radiation based ...

  4. Effectiveness of biofeedback therapy in patients with chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Univaldo Etsuo Sagae

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of physical therapy in women diagnosed with chronic constipation using functional training of the pelvic floor (biofeedback. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From March 2009 to March 2010, 67 women with chronic constipation were prospectively evaluated. The patients were evaluated and the constipation score proposed by Agachan et al. was applied. Then, they were sent to biofeedback. These patients were divided into 2 groups: with anismus (group I: mean age of 46.90 years old and without anismus (group II: mean age of 44.89 years old and diagnosed by anorectal electromanometry. The treatment was performed with different exercises for each group, associated with some hygieno-dietetic directions. At the end of treatment, the constipation score was reapplied. RESULTS: Pre-biofeedback constipation score in group I was 15.04 (standard deviation - SD=2.48 and post-biofeedback constipation score was 3.39 (SD=1.62 (pOBJETIVO: Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o efeito do tratamento fisioterapêutico, em mulheres diagnosticadas com constipação crônica, utilizando treinamento funcional do assoalho pélvico (biofeedback. CASUÍSTICA E MÉTODO: No período de março de 2009 a março de 2010, foram avaliadas, prospectivamente, 67 mulheres com constipação intestinal. As pacientes foram avaliadas e o escore de constipação, proposto por Agachan et al., foi aplicado; então, foram encaminhadas ao biofeedback. Essas pacientes foram divididas em 2 grupos: com anismus (56 pacientes do grupo I: média de idade 46,90 anos e sem anismus (11 pacientes do grupo II: média de idade 44,89 anos, diagnosticadas pela eletromanometria anorretal. Para o tratamento, foram estipulados exercícios diferentes para cada grupo, associados com orientações higienodietéticas. Ao fim do tratamento, foi reaplicado o escore de constipação. RESULTADOS: O escore de constipação do grupo I, na avaliação pré-biofeedback, foi 15

  5. Convection and radiation effects in hollow, compound optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.I. [Room I-320-D, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad de Malaga, Plaza El Ejido, s/n, 29013 Malaga (Spain)

    2005-09-01

    A coupled model for the study of hollow, compound optical fiber drawing processes that accounts for the heat transfer in the preform and fiber and for the motion of the gases surrounding the preform and fiber by means of two-dimensional equations, employs a net radiative model for the radiative heat exchanges amongst the preform, fiber, irises and furnace walls, and uses asymptotic one-dimensional equations for the geometry, axial velocity component and temperature along the fiber for small Biot numbers is presented. It is shown that the coupled model predicts that radiative heat exchanges are about three times larger than forced convection effects, and free convection is not important. It is also shown that the fiber's geometry, axial velocity and temperature predicted by the coupled model are in remarkable good agreement with those obtained with only the one-dimensional model for hollow, compound fibers using a properly chosen constant Biot number. The results of the one-dimensional model for hollow, compound fibers show that, as the heat transfer losses from the fiber increase, the fiber's dynamic viscosity increases, the fiber exhibits a strong necking phenomenon and the fiber's axial velocity increases rapidly from its value at the die's exit to a constant value downstream and then remains constant. For the boundary conditions considered in this paper, it is shown that the activation energies of the viscosity laws for the inner and outer materials of the hollow, compound fiber do not have very strong effects on the fiber's geometry, axial velocity component and temperature, whereas the fiber's solidification point moves towards the die as the thermal Peclet number is decreased. It is also shown that the pre-exponential factor and activation energy of the dynamic viscosity law do not play a key role in determining the fiber's geometry and temperature for the conditions analyzed in this paper. (authors)

  6. Comparative effectiveness of drugs for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, M; Segreti, A; Rogliani, P

    2012-12-01

    Current guidelines for the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) recommend the use of inhaled long-acting bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs) and their combinations for maintenance treatment of moderate to severe COPD. However, doctors still wonder if in patients with mild/moderate stable COPD it is best to start with a β-adrenoceptor agonist or an antimuscarinic agent. They also wonder if once- or twice-daily dosing is preferable, and if it is enough to develop a novel therapy that is dosed once daily rather than twice daily if the agents are both equally safe and effective. It also remains unclear whether and when a second bronchodilator with a different mechanism of action should be used in patients with stable COPD and when, in its place, an ICS must be added, and also whether long-acting antimuscarinic agent (LAMA)/long-acting β-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is preferred over LAMA plus LABA/ICS. Moreover, there is no solid evidence of the best way to administer a triple combination product: should drugs be delivered concomitantly or sequentially? In any case, the growing evidence that COPD is a heterogeneous disease with characteristics that occur with different phenotypes suggests that a specific therapy may not be ultimately identified for every phenotype. Therefore, there is a clear need to move toward personalized treatment in COPD because phenotypic heterogeneity may affect treatment response and the clinical course of the disease. Unfortunately, however, there is not enough money or time to examine the impact of each treatment step or combination of treatments in each specific phenotype using randomized controlled trials. Consequently, doctors wonder if there is a role for comparative effectiveness research (CER), which can be considered a subset of patient-oriented research that examines available therapeutic options in particular patients to determine relevant health outcomes. There is a strong

  7. Acute stress does not affect the impairing effect of chronic stress on memory retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Ozbaki

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Due to the prevalence and pervasiveness of stress in modern life and exposure to both chronic and acute stresses, it is not clear whether prior exposure to chronic stress can influence the impairing effects of acute stress on memory retrieval. This issue was tested in this study. Materials and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: control, acute, chronic, and chronic + acute stress groups. The rats were trained with six trials per day for 6 consecutive days in the water maze. Following training, the rats were either kept in control conditions or exposed to chronic stress in a restrainer 6 hr/day for 21 days. On day 22, a probe test was done to measure memory retention. Time spent in target and opposite areas, platform location latency, and proximity were used as indices of memory retention. To induce acute stress, 30 min before the probe test, animals received a mild footshock. Results: Stressed animals spent significantly less time in the target quadrant and more time in the opposite quadrant than control animals. Moreover, the stressed animals showed significantly increased platform location latency and proximity as compared with control animals. No significant differences were found in these measures among stress exposure groups. Finally, both chronic and acute stress significantly increased corticosterone levels. Conclusion: Our results indicate that both chronic and acute stress impair memory retrieval similarly. Additionally, the impairing effects of chronic stress on memory retrieval were not influenced by acute stress.

  8. Biological effects of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabrese, E.J. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    In May 1990 a group of scientists representing several federal agencies, the International Society of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, the private sector, and academia met to develop a strategy to encourage the study of the biological effects of low level exposures (BELLE) to chemical agents and radioactivity. A workshop was held in 1991 with seven invited speakers focusing on the toxicological implications of biological adaptations. The selection of topics and speakers was designed to consider critically the concept of hormesis, not only in a broad, conceptual manner, but also at the molecular and biochemical levels. These presentations offered a complementary perspective on the diverse range of molecular mechanisms that can become activated at low levels of toxicant exposure. In addition to chemical toxicology research, an overview of current research on Effects of low-dose radiation on the immune response' was presented as well as Cellular adaptation as an important response during chemical carcinogenesis'. The final presentation was devoted to biostatistical considerations when designing studies that address issues associated with the biological responses to low doses of chemicals and radiation, as well as issues in interpretation of the findings from such studies.

  9. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Radiologicaland Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  10. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  11. Neurological AdverseEffects after Radiation Therapyfor Stage II Seminoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Ebbeskov Lauritsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We report 3 cases of patients with testicular cancer and stage II seminoma who developed neurological symptoms with bilateral leg weakness about 4 to 9 months after radiation therapy (RT. They all received RT to the para-aortic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40 Gy (36 Gy + 4 Gy as a boost against the tumour bed with a conventional fractionation of2 Gy/day, 5 days per week. RT was applied as hockey-stick portals, also called L-fields. In 2 cases, the symptoms fully resolved. Therapeutic irradiation can cause significant injury to the peripheral nerves of the lumbosacral plexus and/or to the spinal cord. RT is believed to produce plexus injury by both direct toxic effects and secondary microinfarction of the nerves, but the exact pathophysiology of RT-induced injury is unclear. Since reported studies of radiation-induced neurological adverse effects are limited, it is difficult to estimate their frequency and outcome. The treatment of neurological symptoms due to RT is symptomatic.

  12. Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, Robert; Davis, Catherine; Weed, Michael; Guida, Peter; Gooden, Virginia; Brady, Joseph; Roma, Peter

    Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests INTRODUCTION Risk assessment of the biological consequences of living in the space radiation environment represents one of the highest priority areas of NASA radiation research. Of critical importance is the need for a risk assessment of damage to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to functional cognitive/behavioral changes during long-term space missions, and the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures to such risks. The present research focuses on the use of an animal model that employs neurobehavioral tests identical or homologous to those currently in use in human models of risk assessment by U.S. agencies such as the Depart-ment of Defense and Federal Aviation and Federal Railroad Administrations for monitoring performance and estimating accident risks associated with such variables as fatigue and/or alcohol or drug abuse. As a first approximation for establishing human risk assessments due to exposure to space radiation, the present work provides animal performance data obtained with the rPVT (rat Psychomotor Vigilance Test), an animal analog of the human PVT that is currently employed for human risk assessments via quantification of sustained attention (e.g., 'vigilance' or 'readiness to perform' tasks). Ground-based studies indicate that radiation can induce neurobehavioral changes in rodents, including impaired performance on motor tasks and deficits in spatial learning and memory. The present study is testing the hypothesis that radiation exposure impairs motor function, performance accuracy, vigilance, motivation, and memory in adult male rats. METHODS The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was originally developed as a human cognitive neurobe-havioral assay for tracking the temporally dynamic changes in sustained attention, and has also been used to track changes in circadian rhythm. In humans the test requires responding to a small, bright

  13. Genotoxicity Induced by Foetal and Infant Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Modulation of Ionising Radiation Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Udroiu

    Full Text Available Few studies have investigated the toxicity and genotoxicity of extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF during prenatal and neonatal development. These phases of life are characterized by cell proliferation and differentiation, which might make them sensitive to environmental stressors. Although in vitro evidences suggest that ELF-MF may modify the effects of ionizing radiation, no research has been conducted so far in vivo on the genotoxic effects of ELF-MF combined with X-rays.Aim of this study was to investigate in somatic and germ cells the effects of chronic ELF-MF exposure from mid gestation until weaning, and any possible modulation produced by ELF-MF exposure on ionizing radiation-induced damage. Mice were exposed to 50 Hz, 65 μT magnetic field, 24 hours/day, for a total of 30 days, starting from 12 days post-conception. Another group was irradiated with 1 Gy X-rays immediately before ELF-MF exposure, other groups were only X-irradiated or sham-exposed. Micronucleus test on blood erythrocytes was performed at multiple times from 1 to 140 days after birth. Additionally, 42 days after birth, genotoxic and cytotoxic effects on male germ cells were assessed by comet assay and flow cytometric analysis.ELF-MF exposure had no teratogenic effect and did not affect survival, growth and development. The micronucleus test indicated that ELF-MF induced a slight genotoxic damage only after the maximum exposure time and that this effect faded away in the months following the end of exposure. ELF-MF had no effects on ionizing radiation (IR-induced genotoxicity in erythrocytes. Differently, ELF-MF appeared to modulate the response of male germ cells to X-rays with an impact on proliferation/differentiation processes. These results point to the importance of tissue specificity and development on the impact of ELF-MF on the early stages of life and indicate the need of further research on the molecular mechanisms underlying ELF-MF biological

  14. Effects of radiation exposure on plant populations and radiation protection of the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geras' kin, St.A.; Dikarev, V.G.; Oudalova, A.A.; Vasiliev, D.V.; Dikareva, N.S.; Baykova, T.A. [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Evseeva, T.I. [Institute of Biology, Komi Scientific Center, Ural Div. RAS, Syktyvkar (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The results of long-term field experiments in the 30-km Chernobyl NPP zone, In the vicinity of the radioactive wastes storage facility (Leningrad Region), at radium production industry storage cell (the Komi Republic), and in Bryansk Region affected by the ChNPP accident that have been carried out