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Sample records for chronic progressive disease

  1. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  2. Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural History of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in Stages 4 and 5. ... Conclusion: Low serum bicarbonate level and high urinary protein excretion at baseline are independent predictors of progression in stage 4 and 5 CKD. Keywords: Chronic kidney disease; End stage renal disease; Glomerular filtration rate; ...

  3. Allopurinol Against Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Sima; Almasi, Afshin; Manouchehri, M; Omrani, Hamid Reza; Zandkarimi, Mohammad Reza

    2017-07-01

    Hyperuricemia is common in approximately 50% of patients with kidney failure due to decreased uric acid excretion, and it has been recently known as an independent factor in the progression of renal insufficiency. Allopurinol inhibits the production of uric acid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of allopurinol on chronic kidney disease progression. In a clinical trial, patients with stages 3 and 4 of chronic kidney disease were divided into two groups to receive allopurinol, 100 mg, daily and placebo for 12 months. Patients' kidney function and serum uric acid levels were assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months after initial administration. Subgroups of patients with severe and mild glomerular filtration rate (GFR) impairment (GFR, 15 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and 30 mL/min/1.73 m2 to 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, respectively), were compared between the groups. Serum uric acid levels decreased significantly during after 12 months of allopurinol administration (P = .004). In patients with severe GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels did not decrease significantly and there was no significant increase in GFR, but in those with mild GFR impairment, serum creatinine levels decreased and GFR increase significantly (P kidney disease progression and could be administered with other effective medications for controlling the kidney disease.

  4. Urinary endotrophin predicts disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring; Fenton, Anthony; Jesky, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is the central pathogenic process in progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Collagen type VI (COL VI) is upregulated in renal fibrosis. Endotrophin is released from COL VI and promotes pleiotropic pro-fibrotic effects. Kidney disease severity varies considerably and accurate...... information regarding CKD progression may improve clinical decisions. We tested the hypothesis that urinary endotrophin derived during COL VI deposition in fibrotic human kidneys is a marker for progression of CKD in the Renal Impairment in Secondary Care (RIISC) cohort, a prospective observational study...... of 499 CKD patients. Endotrophin localised to areas of increased COL VI deposition in fibrotic kidneys but was not present in histologically normal kidneys. The third and fourth quartiles of urinary endotrophin:creatinine ratio (ECR) were independently associated with one-year disease progression after...

  5. [Various pathways leading to the progression of chronic liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egresi, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Somogyi, Anikó; Blázovics, Anna; Hagymási, Krisztina

    2016-02-21

    As the result of various effects (viruses, metabolic diseases, nutritional factors, toxic agents, autoimmune processes) abnormal liver function, liver steatosis and connective tissue remodeling may develop. Progression of this process is complex including various pathways and a number of factors. The authors summarize the factors involved in the progression of chronic liver disease. They describe the role of cells and the produced inflammatory mediators and cytokines, as well as the relationship between the disease and the intestinal flora. They emphasize the role of oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in disease progression. Insulin resistance and micro-elements (iron, copper) in relation to liver damage are also discussed, and genetic and epigenetic aspects underlying disease progression are summarized. Discovery of novel treatment options, assessment of the effectiveness of treatment, as well as the success and proper timing of liver transplantation may depend on a better understanding of the process of disease progression.

  6. Occupational therapy for patients with chronic diseases: CVA, rheumatoid arthritis and progressive diseases of the central nervous system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, M.J.; Dekker, J.; Lankhorst, G.; Zee, J. van der

    1997-01-01

    A substantial proportion of the patients treated by occupational therapists have a chronic disease. The aim of this study was to describe the outlines of occupational therapy treatment for three specific groups of chronic diseases: progressive neurological diseases, cerebrovascular accident and

  7. Periodontal Pocket Depth, Hyperglycemia, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Feng; Yeh, Jih-Chen; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Liou, Jian-Chiun; Hsiung, Jing-Ru; Tung, Tao-Hsin

    2017-01-01

    No large epidemiological study has been conducted to investigate the interaction and joint effects of periodontal pocket depth and hyperglycemia on progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. Periodontal pocket depth was utilized for the grading severity of periodontal disease in 2831 patients from January 2002 to June 2013. Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as progression of color intensity in glomerular filtration rate and albuminuria grid of updated Kidney Disease-Improving Global Outcomes guidelines. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) in various models were presented across different levels of periodontal pocket depth and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in forest plots and 3-dimensional histograms. During 7621 person-years of follow-up, periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C levels were robustly associated with incremental risks for progression of chronic kidney disease (aHR 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.0-4.6 for periodontal pocket depth >4.5 mm, and 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.4 for HbA1C >6.5%, respectively). The interaction between periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C on progression of chronic kidney disease was strong (P periodontal pocket depth (>4.5 mm) and higher HbA1C (>6.5%) had the greatest risk (aHR 4.2; 95% CI, 1.7-6.8) compared with the lowest aHR group (periodontal pocket depth ≤3.8 mm and HbA1C ≤6%). Our study identified combined periodontal pocket depth and HbA1C as a valuable predictor of progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with periodontal diseases. While considering the interaction between periodontal diseases and hyperglycemia, periodontal survey and optimizing glycemic control are warranted to minimize the risk of worsening renal function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lipidomic Signature of Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farsad Afshinnia

    2016-11-01

    Discussion: We conclude that a distinct panel of lipids may improve prediction of progression of chronic kidney disease beyond estimated glomerular filtration rate and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio when added to the base model.

  9. JAK2V617F mutation in chronic myeloid leukemia predicts early disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahore, Z.A.A.; Shamsi, T.S.; Taj, M.; Farzana, T.; Ansari, S.H.; Nadeem, M.; Ahmad, M.; Naz, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the association of JAK2V617F mutation along with BCR-ABL translocation or Philadelphia chromosome in chronic myeloid leukemia with early disease progression to advanced stages (accelerated phase or blast crisis) and poor outcome. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: National Institute of Blood Diseases and Bone Marrow Transplantation, Karachi, from February 2008 to August 2009. Methodology: All the newly diagnosed cases of BCR-ABL or Philadelphia positive CML were tested for JAK2V617F mutation by Nested PCR. Demographic data, spleen size, hemoglobin levels, white blood cell and platelet counts were recorded. Independent sample t-test was used for age, haemoglobin level and spleen size. Fisher's exact test was applied to compare disease progression in JAK2V617F mutation positive and negative cases. Results: Out of 45 newly diagnosed cases of CML, 40 were in chronic phase, 01 in accelerated phase and 04 in blast crisis. JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 12 (26.7%) patients; 09 (22.5%) in chronic phase, none in accelerated phase and 03 (75%) in blast crisis. During a mean follow-up of 8 months, 03 patients in chronic phase transformed in blast crisis and 02 into accelerated phase. Overall 08 out of 11 (73%) JAK2V617F positive patients either had advanced disease or showed disease progression. Only 2 of 20 (10%) available patients, negative for the mutation, showed disease progression by transforming into blast crisis (p < 0.001). No statistically significant difference was seen in the age, spleen size, haemoglobin levels, white blood cells and platelets counts in JAK2V617F positive patients. Conclusion: JAK2V617F mutation was detected in 26.7% cases of chronic myeloid leukemia. A significant proportion of them showed early disease progression. (author)

  10. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Gemma; Taylor, Alison H M; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. Hyperkalaemi...... pressure and urinary protein/albumin excretion with a quantifiable risk of hyperkalaemia above predefined study upper limit....

  11. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure: two muscle diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troosters, Thierry; Gosselink, Rik; Decramer, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure are two increasingly prevalent chronic diseases. Although care for these patients often is provided by different clinical teams, both disease conditions have much in common. In recent decades, more knowledge about the systemic impact of both diseases has become available, highlighting remarkable similarities in terms of prognostic factors and disease management. Rehabilitation programs deal with the systemic consequences of both diseases. Although clinical research also is conducted by various researchers investigating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure, it is worthwhile to compare the progress in relation to these two diseases over recent decades. Such comparison, the purpose of the current review, may help clinicians and scientists to learn about progress made in different, yet related, fields. The current review focuses on the similarities observed in the clinical impact of muscle weakness, the mechanisms of muscle dysfunction, the strategies to improve muscle function, and the effects of exercise training on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

  12. Occult hepatitis B virus infection is not associated with disease progression of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhyeon; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Yun Suk; Jeon, Yejoo; Chung, Jung Wha; Baeg, Joo Yeong; Si, Won Keun; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2016-11-14

    To clarify the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and the association between OBI and liver disease progression, defined as development of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), worsening of Child-Pugh class, or mortality in cases of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. This prospective cohort study enrolled 174 patients with chronic HCV infection (chronic hepatitis, n = 83; cirrhosis, n = 47; HCC, n = 44), and evaluated disease progression during a mean follow-up of 38.7 mo. OBI was defined as HBV DNA positivity in 2 or more different viral genomic regions by nested polymerase chain reaction using 4 sets of primers in the S, C, P and X open reading frame of the HBV genome. The overall OBI prevalence in chronic HCV patients at enrollment was 18.4%, with 16.9%, 25.5% and 13.6% in the chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and HCC groups, respectively ( P = 0.845). During follow-up, 52 patients showed disease progression, which was independently associated with aspartate aminotransferase > 40 IU/L, Child-Pugh score and sustained virologic response (SVR), but not with OBI positivity. In 136 patients who were not in the SVR state during the study period, OBI positivity was associated with neither disease progression, nor HCC development. The prevalence of OBI in chronic HCV patients was 18.4%, and OBI was not associated with disease progression in South Koreans.

  13. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in patients with progressive chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krenning, Guido; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.; Drouven, Johannes W.; Waanders, Femke; Franssen, Casper F. M.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.; Popa, Eliane R.

    Krenning G, Dankers PY, Drouven JW, Waanders F, Franssen CF, van Luyn MJ, Harmsen MC, Popa ER. Endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in patients with progressive chronic kidney disease. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 296: F1314-F1322, 2009. First published April 1, 2009; doi:

  14. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Rouhani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED, renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake of patients was assessed by a validated food frequency questionnaire. DED (in kcal/g was calculated with the use of energy content and weight of solid foods and energy yielding beverages. Renal function was measured by blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Cr, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results. Patients in the first tertile of DED consumed more amounts of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, potassium, phosphorus, zinc, magnesium, calcium, folate, vitamin C, and vitamin B2. After adjusting for confounders, we could not find any significant trend for BUN and Cr across tertiles of DED. In multivariate model, an increased risk of being in the higher stage of CKD was found among those in the last tertile of DED (OR: 3.15; 95% CI: 1.30, 7.63; P=0.01. Conclusion. We observed that lower DED was associated with better nutrient intake and lower risk of CKD progression.

  15. Uraemia progression in chronic kidney disease stages 3-5 is not constant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya; Mortensen, Leif Spange

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive disease leading to loss of glomerular filtration rate (ΔGFR, measured in ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year). ΔGFR is usually assumed to be constant, but the hyperfiltration theory suggests that it accelerates in severe uraemia. A retrospective analysis of estimated...... GFR (eGFR) calculated from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation was performed to evaluate whether ΔGFR is constant or accelerating....

  16. Disease impact in chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia: more than meets the eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.W.; Fermont, J.; Delnooz, C.C.S.; Kalkman, J.S.; Bleijenberg, G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2011-01-01

    We determined the extent of disease impact in 28 patients with genetically confirmed chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO) and compared the outcomes to those of matched myotonic dystrophy type I patients. CPEO patients reported a high frequency of severe fatigue (67.9%), pain (96.2%),

  17. Potential mechanisms of disease progression and management of advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Elias J.; Hughes, Timothy P.; Cortés, Jorge E.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Hochhaus, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Despite vast improvements in treatment of Philadelphia chromosome–positive chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in chronic phase (CP), advanced stages of CML, accelerated phase or blast crisis, remain notoriously difficult to treat. Treatments that are highly effective against CML-CP produce disappointing results against advanced disease. Therefore, a primary goal of therapy should be to maintain patients in CP for as long as possible, by (1) striving for deep, early molecular response to treatment; (2) using tyrosine kinase inhibitors that lower risk of disease progression; and (3) more closely observing patients who demonstrate cytogenetic risk factors at diagnosis or during treatment. PMID:24050507

  18. Brain viscoelasticity alteration in chronic-progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar-Josche Streitberger

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Viscoelastic properties indicate structural alterations in biological tissues at multiple scales with high sensitivity. Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE is a novel technique that directly visualizes and quantitatively measures biomechanical tissue properties in vivo. MRE recently revealed that early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS is associated with a global decrease of the cerebral mechanical integrity. This study addresses MRE and MR volumetry in chronic-progressive disease courses of MS. METHODS: We determined viscoelastic parameters of the brain parenchyma in 23 MS patients with primary or secondary chronic progressive disease course in comparison to 38 age- and gender-matched healthy individuals by multifrequency MRE, and correlated the results with clinical data, T2 lesion load and brain volume. Two viscoelastic parameters, the shear elasticity μ and the powerlaw exponent α, were deduced according to the springpot model and compared to literature values of relapsing-remitting MS. RESULTS: In chronic-progressive MS patients, μ and α were reduced by 20.5% and 6.1%, respectively, compared to healthy controls. MR volumetry yielded a weaker correlation: Total brain volume loss in MS patients was in the range of 7.5% and 1.7% considering the brain parenchymal fraction. All findings were significant (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic-progressive MS disease courses show a pronounced reduction of the cerebral shear elasticity compared to early relapsing-remitting disease. The powerlaw exponent α decreased only in the chronic-progressive stage of MS, suggesting an alteration in the geometry of the cerebral mechanical network due to chronic neuroinflammation.

  19. Progression of autosomal dominant kidney disease: measurement of the stage transitions of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Blanchette

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is a progressive genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous kidney cysts that result in kidney failure. Little is known regarding the key patient characteristics and utilization of healthcare resources for ADPKD patients along the continuum of disease progression. This observational study was designed to describe the characteristics of ADPKD patients and compare them with those of patients with other chronic kidney diseases. Methods: This retrospective cohort study involved patients with a claim for ADPKD or PKD unspecified from 1/1/2000–2/28/2013 and ≥6 months of previous continuous enrollment (baseline within a large database of administrative claims in the USA. A random sample of chronic kidney disease (CKD patients served as comparators. For a subset of ADPKD patients who had only a diagnosis code of unspecified PKD, abstraction of medical records was undertaken to estimate the proportion of patients who had medical chart-confirmed ADPKD. In patients with linked electronic laboratory data, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was calculated via serum creatinine values to determine CKD stage at baseline and during follow-up. Proportions of patients transitioning to another stage and the mean age at transition were calculated. Results: ADPKD patients were, in general, younger and had fewer physician visits, but had more specific comorbidities at observation start compared with CKD patients. ADPKD patients had a longer time in the milder stages and longer duration before recorded transition to a more severe stage compared with CKD patients. Patients with ADPKD at risk of rapid progression had a shorter time-to-end-stage renal disease than patients with CKD and ADPKD patients not at risk, but stage duration was similar between ADPKD patients at risk and those not at risk. Conclusions: These results suggest that distribution of patients by age at transition

  20. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Currie, G. (Gemma); Taylor, A.H.M. (Alison H. M.); Fujita, T. (Toshiro); Ohtsu, H. (Hiroshi); Lindhardt, M. (Morten); K. Rossing; Boesby, L. (Lene); Edwards, N.C. (Nicola C.); Ferro, C.J. (Charles J.); J. Townend (Jonathan); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton); Saklayen, M.G. (Mohammad G.); Oveisi, S. (Sonia); Jardine, A.G. (Alan G.); C. Delles (Christian); Preiss, D.J. (David J.); Mark, P.B. (Patrick B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease.

  1. Current and future disease progression of the chronic HCV population in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesak, Martin; Francis, Kevin; Gedeon, Alex; Gillis, John; Hvidsten, Kyle; Kidder, Phyllis; Li, Hong; Martyn, Derek; Orne, Leslie; Smith, Amanda; Kwong, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can lead to advanced liver disease (AdvLD), including cirrhosis, decompensated cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The aim of this study was to determine recent historical rates of HCV patient progression to AdvLD and to project AdvLD prevalence through 2015. We first determined total 2008 US chronic HCV prevalence from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Surveys. Next, we examined disease progression and associated non-pharmacological costs of diagnosed chronic HCV-infected patients between 2007-2009 in the IMS LifeLink and CMS Medicare claims databases. A projection model was developed to estimate AdvLD population growth through 2015 in patients diagnosed and undiagnosed as of 2008, using the 2007-2009 progression rates to generate a "worst case" projection of the HCV-related AdvLD population (i.e., scenario where HCV treatment is the same in the forecasted period as it was before 2009). We found that the total diagnosed chronic HCV population grew from 983,000 to 1.19 million in 2007-2009, with patients born from 1945-1964 accounting for 75.0% of all patients, 83.7% of AdvLD patients, and 79.2% of costs in 2009, indicating that HCV is primarily a disease of the "baby boomer" population. Non-pharmacological costs grew from $7.22 billion to $8.63 billion, with the majority of growth derived from the 60,000 new patients that developed AdvLD in 2007-2009, 91.5% of whom were born between 1945 and 1964. The projection model estimated the total AdvLD population would grow from 195,000 in 2008 to 601,000 in 2015, with 73.5% of new AdvLD cases from patients undiagnosed as of 2008. AdvLD prevalence in patients diagnosed as of 2008 was projected to grow 6.5% annually to 303,000 patients in 2015. These findings suggest that strategies to diagnose and treat HCV-infected patients are urgently needed to increase the likelihood that progression is interrupted, particularly for patients born from 1945-1964.

  2. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  3. Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buffoli, A.; Micheletti, E.; Capra, R.; Mattioli, F.; Marciano', N.

    1991-01-01

    A long-lasting immunological suppression action seems to be produced by total lymphoid irradiation; some authors emphasize the favorable effect of this treatment on chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. In order to evaluate the actual role of TLI, 6 patients affected with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis were submitted to TLI with shaped and personalized fields at the Istituto del Radio, University of Brescia, Italy. The total dose delivered was 19.8 Gy in 4 weeks, 1.8 Gy/day, 5d/w; a week elapsed between the first and the second irradiation course. Disability according to Kurtzke scale was evaluated, together with blood lymphocyte count and irradiation side-effects, over a mean follow-up period of 20.8 months (range: 13-24). Our findings indicate that: a) disease progression was not markedly reduced by TLI; b) steroid hormones responsivity was restored after irradiation, and c) side-effects were mild and tolerable

  4. Development of a Conceptual Model of Disease Progression for Use in Economic Modeling of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabberer, Maggie; Gonzalez-McQuire, Sebastian; Muellerova, Hana; Briggs, Andrew H; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Chambers, Mike; Lomas, David A

    2017-05-01

    To develop and validate a new conceptual model (CM) of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) for use in disease progression and economic modeling. The CM identifies and describes qualitative associations between disease attributes, progression and outcomes. A literature review was performed to identify any published CMs or literature reporting the impact and association of COPD disease attributes with outcomes. After critical analysis of the literature, a Steering Group of experts from the disciplines of health economics, epidemiology and clinical medicine was convened to develop a draft CM, which was refined using a Delphi process. The refined CM was validated by testing for associations between attributes using data from the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE). Disease progression attributes included in the final CM were history and occurrence of exacerbations, lung function, exercise capacity, signs and symptoms (cough, sputum, dyspnea), cardiovascular disease comorbidities, 'other' comorbidities (including depression), body composition (body mass index), fibrinogen as a biomarker, smoking and demographic characteristics (age, gender). Mortality and health-related quality of life were determined to be the most relevant final outcome measures for this model, intended to be the foundation of an economic model of COPD. The CM is being used as the foundation for developing a new COPD model of disease progression and to provide a framework for the analysis of patient-level data. The CM is available as a reference for the implementation of further disease progression and economic models.

  5. Retrospective analysis of factors affecting the progression of Chronic Renal Failure in Adult Polycystic Kidney Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.R.; Tashkandi, Muhammed A.; Nahrir, S.; Maulana, A.

    2006-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the commonest congenital cystic renal disease. Factors such as hypertension, urinary tract infection, hematuria and proteinuria may effect the progression to chronic renal failure in ADPKD patients. Therapeutic interventions, such as the use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or diet modification, may impact the natural progression of the disease. We aim in this study to review a registry of ADPKD patients in order to compare the slow and fast progressors and identify possible predictors of progression and interventions that slow the progression of this disease. Sheffield Kidney Institute (SKI), one of the largest kidney institutes in Northern Europe, has registered a large number of ADPKD patients since 1981. SKI's computer network contains a wide range of information on these patients. We selected 94 adult polycystic patients from the SKI for retrospective analysis of factors affecting progression to chronic renal failure. Patients who doubled their s. creatinine in 3 6 months were considered fast progressors (FP), while those who doubled their s. creatinine in > 36 months were regarded as slow progressors (SP). There 70 patients in the FP group and 24 patients in the SP group. A third group of 137 patients consisted of non-progressors (NP) who ha d stable s. creatinine levels during the same period. We found that the incidence of hypertension, UTI, macroscopic and microscopic hematuria, and overt proteinuria in the FP group was higher than in SP and NP groups. Modification of some factors, such as hypertension and UTI, may decrease the rate of the deterioration of renal function. (author)

  6. Fear of progression in chronic diseases: psychometric properties of the Fear of Progression Questionnaire.

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    Herschbach, Peter; Berg, Petra; Dankert, Andrea; Duran, Gabriele; Engst-Hastreiter, Ursula; Waadt, Sabine; Keller, Monika; Ukat, Robert; Henrich, Gerhard

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development and psychometric testing of a new psychological questionnaire to measure the fear of progression (FoP) in chronically ill patients (cancer, diabetes mellitus and rheumatic diseases). The Fear of Progression Questionnaire (FoP-Q) was developed in four phases: (1) generation of items (65 interviews); (2) reduction of items--the initial version of the questionnaire (87 items) was presented to 411 patients, to construct subscales and test the reliability; (3) testing the convergent and discriminative validity of the reduced test version (43 items) within a new sample (n=439); (4) translation--German to English. The scale comprised five factors (Cronbach's alpha >.70): affective reactions (13 items), partnership/family (7), occupation (7), loss of autonomy (7) and coping with anxiety (9). The test-retest reliability coefficients varied between .77 and .94. There was only a medium relationship to traditional anxiety scales. This is an indication of the independence of the FoP. Significant relationships between the FoP-Q and the patient's illness behaviour indicate discriminative validity. The FoP-Q is a new and unique questionnaire developed for the chronically ill. A major problem and source of stress for this patient group has been measuring both specifically and economically the FoP of an illness. The FoP-Q was designed to resolve this problem, fulfill this need and reduce this stress.

  7. Does significant renal ablation truly and invariably lead to hyperfiltration and progressive chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrew; Sam, Ramin

    2017-06-01

    It is generally believed that significant renal ablation leads to hyperfiltration and eventually progressively worsening chronic kidney disease. The data behind this belief have not been scrutinized intensively. More importantly, the above belief leads many physicians to manage patients differently than they otherwise would manage. Here, we examine the data behind whether hyperfiltration occurs when patients lose kidney mass (by excision or by disease) and whether the hyperfiltration is uniformly injurious.

  8. Urine liver fatty acid binding protein and chronic kidney disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khatir, Dinah S; Bendtsen, Mette D; Birn, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , regarding progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a prospective study design a cohort of 74 stage 3-4 CKD patients (age 61 ± 13 years) were included. Glomerular filtration ratio (GFR, 51Cr-EDTA-clearance), 24-hour ambulatory BP, 24-hour urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UAC) and urinary L......Excretion of the tubular protein liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is a potential novel biomarker of renal dysfunction. We examined whether urine L-FABP excretion adds prognostic information to the well-established risk markers, blood pressure (BP), albumin excretion and baseline GFR...

  9. PROGRESSIVE MUSCLE RELAXATION INCREASE PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW RATE ON CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Tintin Sukartini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limited progressive air flow in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD can caused by small airway disease (bronchiolitis obstructive and loss of elasticity of the lung (emphysema. Further it can be decreasing the quality of life in COPD patients because dyspnea and uncomfortable in activity. Progressive muscle relaxation (PMR is one of the relaxation technique that can repair pulmonary ventilation by decreasing chronic constriction of the respiratory muscles. The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of progressive muscle relaxation on raised peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR. Method: A pre-experimental one group pre-post test design was used in this study. Population was all of the COPD patients at Pulmonary Specialist Polyclinic Dr Mohamad Soewandhie Surabaya. There were 8 respondents taken by using purposive sampling. PEFR was counted by using peak flow meter every six day. Data were analyzed by using Paired t-Test with significance level  p≤0.05. Result: The result showed that PMR had significance level on increasing of PEFR (p=0.012. Discussion: It can be concluded that PMR has an effect on raise PEFR. Further studies are recommended to measure the effect of PMR on respiratory rate (RR, heart rate (HR subjective dyspnoe symptoms, forced expiration volume on the first minute (FEV1 and mid maximum flow rate (MMFR in COPD patients.

  10. [Retrospective analysis of influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wendi; Yin, Daoxin; Cui, Wenying; Liu, Wenhu

    2014-01-28

    To explore retrospectively the influence of differential protein intake on renal prognosis for progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD). A total of 159 chronic kidney disease patients at stages 2, 3 and 4 were enrolled and a questionnaire survey was conducted from January 2009 to July 2012. They were followed monthly and their clinical data collected, including primary disease, blood pressure, body mass index and adverse events. Laboratory tests were performed every 3 months, including biochemical parameters, protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), diet reviews and daily protein intake (DPI). A simplified MDRD formula was employed to evaluate the level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). According to the level of DPI, they were divided into 3 groups of very low protein diet (VLPD): DPI ≤ 0.6 g · kg(-1) · d(-1), low-protein diet (LPD): DPI >0.6-protein diet (NPD): DPI ≥ 0.8 · g · kg(-1) · d(-1). Among them, 4 cases (2.50%) progressed to uremia stage and received renal replacement therapy, 2(1.25%) experienced rapid decline in renal function, 9(5.66%) were hospitalized from cardio-cerebral diseases and the 2-year kidney survival rate was 97.5%. At the end of study, among 9 patients of PEM, 2 subjects had a serum level of albumin under 32 g/L and another 7 with a BMI 0.05). Within a certain range, differential protein intake may not significantly affect the prognosis of kidney for progressive CKD patients.

  11. Personalized Medicine for Chronic Respiratory Infectious Diseases: Tuberculosis, Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Diseases, and Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Wassilew, Nasstasja; Köhler, Niklas; Olaru, Ioana D; Günther, Gunar; Herzmann, Christian; Kalsdorf, Barbara; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Terhalle, Elena; Rolling, Thierry; Lange, Christoph; Heyckendorf, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infectious diseases are causing high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Tuberculosis, a major cause of chronic pulmonary infection, is currently responsible for approximately 1.5 million deaths per year. Although important advances in the fight against tuberculosis have been made, the progress towards eradication of this disease is being challenged by the dramatic increase in multidrug-resistant bacilli. Nontuberculous mycobacteria causing pulmonary disease and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis are emerging infectious diseases. In contrast to other infectious diseases, chronic respiratory infections share the trait of having highly variable treatment outcomes despite longstanding antimicrobial therapy. Recent scientific progress indicates that medicine is presently at a transition stage from programmatic to personalized management. We explain current state-of-the-art management concepts of chronic pulmonary infectious diseases as well as the underlying methods for therapeutic decisions and their implications for personalized medicine. Furthermore, we describe promising biomarkers and techniques with the potential to serve future individual treatment concepts in this field of difficult-to-treat patients. These include candidate markers to improve individual risk assessment for disease development, the design of tailor-made drug therapy regimens, and individualized biomarker-guided therapy duration to achieve relapse-free cure. In addition, the use of therapeutic drug monitoring to reach optimal drug dosing with the smallest rate of adverse events as well as candidate agents for future host-directed therapies are described. Taken together, personalized medicine will provide opportunities to substantially improve the management and treatment outcome of difficult-to-treat patients with chronic respiratory infections. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: getting it right. Does optimal management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease alter disease progression and improve survival?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard E

    2014-03-01

    We live in a world where people live longer lives. The standardized mortality rate for many diseases is decreasing. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is not following this trend. Over the last 10 years, interventions for COPD have been developed, but have any changed the prognosis or trajectory of this modern epidemic? We review the most recent and classical literature in order to answer this question. Recent analyses of data have clarified which interventions are effective in COPD and which are not. New studies have defined what is achievable with the current therapies. Only two interventions have been demonstrated to improve survival: smoking cessation and long-term oxygen therapy. Other treatments do reduce exacerbations, improve lung function and improve the patient's quality of life, but do not affect physiological disease progression or mortality. There is much work to do, not only to improve the treatments we have for this disease, but also to diagnose it early, intervene at the right time, reduce the treatment side-effects and most importantly understand the pathophysiology better. Moreover, we are duty bound to look at each patient and review what we are trying to achieve for each one through appropriate phenotyping as well as sometimes taking a more palliative approach.

  13. Smart garments in chronic disease management: progress and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Ajit

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents the progress made developments in the area of Smart Garments for chronic disease management over last 10 years. A large number of health monitoring smart garments and wearable sensors have been manufactured to monitor patient's physiological parameters such as electrocardiogram, blood pressure, body temperature, heart rate, oxygen saturation, while patient is not in hospital. In last few years with the advancement in smartphones and cloud computing it is now possible to send the measure physiological data to any desired location. However there are many challenges in the development of smart garment systems. The two major challenges are development of new lightweight power sources and there is a need for global standardization and a road map for development of smart garments. In this paper we will discuss current state-of-theart smart garments and wearable sensor systems. Also discussed will be the new emerging trends in smart garment research and development.

  14. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-09-01

    To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87-97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4-5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96-98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Clinical Periodontology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparing clinical attachment level and pocket depth for predicting periodontal disease progression in healthy sites of patients with chronic periodontitis using multi-state Markov models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdala, Ibrahimu; Olsen, Ingar; Haffajee, Anne D; Socransky, Sigmund S; Thoresen, Magne; de Blasio, Birgitte Freiesleben

    2014-01-01

    Aim To understand degeneration of healthy sites and identify factors associated with disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis. Material and Methods Data on healthy sites from 163 American and Swedish subjects were analysed using two-three-state (health, gingivitis, chronic periodontitis) Markov models based on bleeding on probing (BOP), and either clinical attachment level (CAL) + BOP or pocket depth (PD) + BOP. Results In 2 years, 10% (CAL + BOP) and 3% (PD + BOP) of healthy sites developed chronic periodontitis. On average, healthy sites remained healthy for 32 months before transiting in both models. Most transitions (87–97%) from health were to the gingivitis state. The expected duration of the gingivitis lesion was 4–5 months and sites recovered with a high probability (96–98%). Disease severity as measured by number of sites with CAL/PD > 4 mm at baseline and smoking, were associated with fast progression from health to chronic periodontitis within 6 months as were gingival redness in the PD + BOP model only. With age, the rate of disease progression to gingivitis decreased. Conclusion Transition probabilities for gingivitis and chronic periodontitis were higher with CAL + BOP than with PD + BOP. Smoking and disease severity were significant predictors for fast progression. PMID:24888705

  16. The Chronic Kidney Disease Model: A General Purpose Model of Disease Progression and Treatment

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    Patel Uptal D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is the focus of recent national policy efforts; however, decision makers must account for multiple therapeutic options, comorbidities and complications. The objective of the Chronic Kidney Disease model is to provide guidance to decision makers. We describe this model and give an example of how it can inform clinical and policy decisions. Methods Monte Carlo simulation of CKD natural history and treatment. Health states include myocardial infarction, stroke with and without disability, congestive heart failure, CKD stages 1-5, bone disease, dialysis, transplant and death. Each cycle is 1 month. Projections account for race, age, gender, diabetes, proteinuria, hypertension, cardiac disease, and CKD stage. Treatment strategies include hypertension control, diabetes control, use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nephrology specialty care, CKD screening, and a combination of these. The model architecture is flexible permitting updates as new data become available. The primary outcome is quality adjusted life years (QALYs. Secondary outcomes include health state events and CKD progression rate. Results The model was validated for GFR change/year -3.0 ± 1.9 vs. -1.7 ± 3.4 (in the AASK trial, and annual myocardial infarction and mortality rates 3.6 ± 0.9% and 1.6 ± 0.5% vs. 4.4% and 1.6% in the Go study. To illustrate the model's utility we estimated lifetime impact of a hypothetical treatment for primary prevention of vascular disease. As vascular risk declined, QALY improved but risk of dialysis increased. At baseline, 20% and 60% reduction: QALYs = 17.6, 18.2, and 19.0 and dialysis = 7.7%, 8.1%, and 10.4%, respectively. Conclusions The CKD Model is a valid, general purpose model intended as a resource to inform clinical and policy decisions improving CKD care. Its value as a tool is illustrated in our example which projects a relationship between

  17. The role of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system genes in the progression of chronic kidney disease: findings from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tanika N; Raj, Dominic; Rahman, Mahboob; Kretzler, Matthias; Kallem, Radhakrishna R; Ricardo, Ana C; Rosas, Sylvia E; Tao, Kaixiang; Xie, Dawei; Hamm, Lotuce Lee; He, Jiang

    2015-10-01

    We conducted single-marker, gene- and pathway-based analyses to examine the association between renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) variants and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression among Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort study participants. A total of 1523 white and 1490 black subjects were genotyped for 490 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 12 RAAS genes as part of the ITMAT-Broad-CARe array. CKD progression phenotypes included decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) over time and the occurrence of a renal disease event, defined as incident end-stage renal disease or halving of eGFR from baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to examine SNP associations with eGFR decline, while Cox proportional hazards models tested SNP associations with renal events. Gene- and pathway-based analyses were conducted using the truncated product method. All analyses were stratified by race, and a Bonferroni correction was applied to adjust for multiple testing. Among white and black participants, eGFR declined an average of 1.2 and 2.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2)/year, respectively, while renal events occurred in a respective 11.5 and 24.9% of participants. We identified strong gene- and pathway-based associations with CKD progression. The AGT and RENBP genes were consistently associated with risk of renal events in separate analyses of white and black participants (both P renal events in both groups (both P < 1.00 × 10(-6)). No single-marker associations with CKD progression were observed. The current study provides strong evidence for a role of the RAAS in CKD progression. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Stage effect of chronic kidney disease in erectile function

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    Márcio Rodrigues Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose The study aims to assess the influence of the stage of chronic kidney disease and glomerular filtration rate on prevalence and degree of erectile dysfunction. Materials and Methods This transversal study, conducted from May 2013 to December 2015, included patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment, stages III/IV/V. Erectile dysfunction was evaluated by the International Index of Erectile Function. Data classically associated with erectile dysfunction were obtained by medical record review. Erectile dysfunction, degree of erectile dysfunction, and other main variables associated with erectile dysfunction were compared between patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment stages III versus IV/V using the Chi-square test. The relationship between score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction and glomerular filtration rate was established by Pearson correlation coefficient. Results Two hundred and forty five patients with chronic kidney disease in conservative treatment participated of the study. The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease in stages IV/V was greater than in stage III. Glomerular filtration rate positively correlated with score of the International Index of Erectile Dysfunction. Conclusions The study suggests that chronic kidney disease progression (glomerular filtration rate decrease and advance in chronic kidney disease stages worsen erectile function. Hypothetically, diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction may be anticipated with the analysis of chronic kidney disease progression.

  19. Progression of motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiping Xia; Zhi-Hong Mao

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic progressive neurodegenerative disease that is clinically manifested by a triad of cardinal motor symptoms - rigidity,bradykinesia and tremor - due to loss of dopaminergic neurons.The motor symptoms of PD become progressively worse as the disease advances.PD is also a heterogeneous disease since rigidity and bradykinesia are the major complaints in some patients whereas tremor is predominant in others.In recent years,many studies have investigated the progression of the hallmark symptoms over time,and the cardinal motor symptoms have different rates of progression,with the disease usually progressing faster in patients with rigidity and bradykinesia than in those with predominant tremor.The current treatment regime of dopamine-replacement therapy improves motor symptoms and alleviates disability.Increasing the dosage of dopaminergic medication is commonly used to combat the worsenirtg symptoms.However,the drug-induced involuntary body movements and motor comphcations can significantly contribute to overall disability.Further,none of the currently-available therapies can slow or halt the disease progression.Significant research efforts have been directed towards developing neuroprotective or disease-modifying agents that are intended to slow the progression.In this article,the most recent clinical studies investigating disease progression and current progress on the development of disease-modifying drug trials are reviewed.

  20. Curcumin, Inflammation, and Chronic Diseases: How Are They Linked?

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    Yan He

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available It is extensively verified that continued oxidative stress and oxidative damage may lead to chronic inflammation, which in turn can mediate most chronic diseases including cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular, neurological, inflammatory bowel disease and pulmonary diseases. Curcumin, a yellow coloring agent extracted from turmeric, shows strong anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities when used as a remedy for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the progression of chronic diseases is the focus of this review. Thus, research to date suggests that chronic inflammation, oxidative stress, and most chronic diseases are closely linked, and the antioxidant properties of curcumin can play a key role in the prevention and treatment of chronic inflammation diseases.

  1. Embryonic Stem Cells-loaded Gelatin Microcryogels Slow Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiao-Dong; Zheng, Wei; Wu, Cong-Mei; Wang, Shu-Qiang; Hong, Quan; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei; Wu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a public health problem. New interventions to slow or prevent disease progression are urgently needed. In this setting, cell therapies associated with regenerative effects are attracting increasing interest. We evaluated the effect of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) on the progression of CKD. Methods: Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy. We used pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded gelatin microcryogels (GMs) on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney. The viability of ESCs within the GMs was detected using in vitro two-photon fluorescence confocal imaging. Rats were sacrificed after 12 weeks. Renal injury was evaluated using serum creatinine, urea nitrogen, 24 h protein, renal pathology, and tubular injury score results. Structural damage was evaluated by periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome staining. Results: In vitro, ESCs could be automatically loaded into the GMs. Uniform cell distribution, good cell attachment, and viability were achieved from day 1 to 7 in vitro. After 12 weeks, in the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on 5/6 nephrectomized rats group, the plasma urea nitrogen levels were 26% lower than in the right nephrectomy group, glomerulosclerosis index was 62% lower and tubular injury index was 40% lower than in the 5/6 nephrectomized rats group without GMs. Conclusions: In a rat model of established CKD, we demonstrated that the pedicled greater omentum flaps packing ESC-loaded GMs on the 5/6 nephrectomized kidney have a long-lasting therapeutic rescue function, as shown by the decreased progression of CKD and reduced glomerular injury. PMID:26879011

  2. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanoto, Masafumi; Hosoya, Takaaki; Toyoguchi, Yuuki; Oda, Atsuko

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis

  3. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization in chronic pulmonary disease

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    Gutiérrez S.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis jirovecii causes pneumonia in immunosuppressed individuals. However, it has been reported the detection of low levels of Pneumocystis DNA in patients without signs and symptoms of pneumonia, which likely represents colonization. Several studies performed in animals models and in humans have demonstrated that Pneumocystis induces a local and a systemic response in the host. Since P. jirovecii colonization has been found in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases it has been suggested that P. jirovecii may play a role in the physiopathology and progression of those diseases. In this report we revise P. jirovecii colonization in different chronic pulmonary diseases such us, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung diseases, cystic fibrosis and lung cancer.

  4. High serum bicarbonate level within the normal range prevents the progression of chronic kidney disease in elderly chronic kidney disease patients

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    Kanda Eiichiro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic acidosis leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. The guidelines recommend a lower limit of serum bicarbonate level, but no upper limit. For serum bicarbonate level to be clinically useful as a therapeutic target marker, it is necessary to investigate the target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range to prevent CKD progression. Methods One hundred and thirteen elderly CKD patients, whose serum bicarbonate level was controlled within the normal range, were enrolled in this retrospective cohort study in Ibaraki, Japan. Outcome was defined as a decrease of 25% or more in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR or starting dialysis. We used Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for patients’ characteristics to examine the association between serum bicarbonate level and the outcome. Results Female patients were 36.3%: average age (SD, 70.4 (6.6 years; eGFR, 25.7 (13.6 ml/min/1.73 m2; serum bicarbonate level, 27.4 (3.2 mEq/l. Patients with the lowest quartile of serum bicarbonate levels [23.4 (1.8 mEq/l] showed a high risk of CKD progression compared with patients with high serum bicarbonate levels [28.8 (2.3 mEq/l]: adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 3.511 (95% CI, 1.342-9.186. A 1 mEq/l increase in serum bicarbonate level was associated with a low risk of CKD progression: adjusted HR, 0.791 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.684-0.914]. Conclusions In elderly CKD patients, our findings suggest that serum bicarbonate level is independently associated with CKD progression, and that a high serum bicarbonate level is associated with a low risk of CKD progression. A high target serum bicarbonate level within the normal range may be effective for preventing CKD progression.

  5. CHRONIC THROMBOEMBOLIC PULMONARY HYPERTENSION AND PROBLEMS OF RARE AND INTERDISCIPLINARY DISEASE

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    N. A. Shostak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a rare life-threatening disease with a prevalence of 2 cases per 100000 population. CTEPH is a chronic, progressive disease characterized by high disability and mortality rates in young and middle-aged people, often with underlying genetic and autoimmune thrombophilic disorders. The need for pathogenetic therapy with orphan drugs that can slow the progression of the disease is supported.

  6. Risk factors associated with disease progression and mortality in chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology: a cohort study in Medawachchiya, Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senevirathna, Lalantha; Abeysekera, Tilak; Nanayakkara, Shanika; Chandrajith, Rohana; Ratnatunga, Neelakanthi; Harada, Kouji H; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Komiya, Toshiyuki; Muso, Eri; Koizumi, Akio

    2012-05-01

    The alarming rise in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) among the low socioeconomic farming community in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka has been recognized as an emerging public health issue in the country. This study sought to determine the possible factors associated with the progression and mortality of CKDu. The study utilized a single-center cohort registered in 2003 and followed up until 2009 in a regional clinic in the endemic region, and used a Cox proportional hazards model. We repeatedly found an association between disease progression and hypertension. Men were at higher risk of CKDu than women. A significant proportion of the patients in this cohort were underweight, which emphasized the need for future studies on the nutritional status of these patients. Compared with findings in western countries and other regions of Asia, we identified hypertension as a major risk factor for progression of CKDu in this cohort.

  7. SECRETED KLOTHO AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming Chang; Kuro-o, Makoto; Moe, Orson W.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble Klotho (sKl) in the circulation can be generated directly by alterative splicing of the Klotho transcript or the extracellular domain of membrane Klotho can be released from membrane-anchored Klotho on the cell surface. Unlike membrane Klotho which functions as a coreceptor for fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), sKl, acts as hormonal factor and plays important roles in anti-aging, anti-oxidation, modulation of ion transport, and Wnt signaling. Emerging evidence reveals that Klotho deficiency is an early biomarker for chronic kidney diseases as well as a pathogenic factor. Klotho deficiency is associated with progression and chronic complications in chronic kidney disease including vascular calcification, cardiac hypertrophy, and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In multiple experimental models, replacement of sKl, or manipulated up-regulation of endogenous Klotho protect the kidney from renal insults, preserve kidney function, and suppress renal fibrosis, in chronic kidney disease. Klotho is a highly promising candidate on the horizon as an early biomarker, and as a novel therapeutic agent for chronic kidney disease. PMID:22396167

  8. Sex and gender differences in chronic kidney disease: progression to end-stage renal disease and haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Gabriela; Hecking, Manfred; Port, Friedrich K; Exner, Isabella; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter; Carrero, Juan Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Sex and gender differences are of fundamental importance in most diseases, including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Men and women with CKD differ with regard to the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and its complications, present different symptoms and signs, respond differently to therapy and tolerate/cope with the disease differently. Yet an approach using gender in the prevention and treatment of CKD, implementation of clinical practice guidelines and in research has been largely neglected. The present review highlights some sex- and gender-specific evidence in the field of CKD, starting with a critical appraisal of the lack of inclusion of women in randomized clinical trials in nephrology, and thereafter revisits sex/gender differences in kidney pathophysiology, kidney disease progression, outcomes and management of haemodialysis care. In each case we critically consider whether apparent discrepancies are likely to be explained by biological or psycho-socioeconomic factors. In some cases (a few), these findings have resulted in the discovery of disease pathways and/or therapeutic opportunities for improvement. In most cases, they have been reported as merely anecdotal findings. The aim of the present review is to expose some of the stimulating hypotheses arising from these observations as a preamble for stricter approaches using gender for the prevention and treatment of CKD and its complications. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. ANESTHETIC CONSIDERATION S IN CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMON ARY DISEASE

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    Awati

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a spectrum of diseases that includes emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway disease. It i s characterized by progressive increased resistance to breathing. Patients with marked obstructive pulmonary disease are at increased risk for both intraoperative and Postoperative pulmonary complications. These patients require thorough preoperative prepa ration, meticulous intraoperative management & postoperative care. This article describes anesthetic considerations in a patient with COPD.

  10. Synopsis on the linkage of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease with chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabir, Nasimudeen R; Firoz, Chelapram K; Baeesa, Saleh S; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Akhtar, Suhail; Kamal, Warda; Kamal, Mohammad A; Tabrez, Shams

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is the progressive loss of neuronal structure and function, which ultimately leads to neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple sclerosis, and Huntington's disease. Even after the recent significant advances in neurobiology, the above-mentioned disorders continue to haunt the global population. Several studies have suggested the role of specific environmental and genetic risk factors associated with these disorders. However, the exact mechanism associated with the progression of these disorders still needs to be elucidated. In the recent years, sophisticated research has revealed interesting association of prominent neurodegenerative disorders such as AD and PD with chronic diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Several common molecular mechanisms such as generation of free radicals, oxidative DNA damage, aberrations in mitochondrial DNA, and dysregulation of apoptosis have been highlighted as possible points of connection. The present review summarizes the possible mechanism of coexistence of AD and PD with other chronic diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Metabolomics insights into activated redox signaling and lipid metabolism dysfunction in chronic kidney disease progression

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    Hua Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD rats and CKD patients. Compared with control rats, AAN rats showed anemia, increased serum urea and creatinine, progressive renal interstitial fibrosis, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic proteins at weeks 8 and 12. However, no significant difference was found at week 4. Metabolomics identified 12-ketodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodesoxycholic acid, LPC(15:0 and docosahexaenoic acid as biomarkers for early detection of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. With prolonging aristolochic acid I exposure, LPE(20:2, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and LPC(17:0 were identified as biomarkers for progression from early to advanced AAN and lysoPE(22:5, indoxyl sulfate, uric acid and creatinine as biomarkers of advanced AAN. These biomarkers were reversed by treatment of irbesartan and ergone in AAN rats at week 24 and adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, these biomarkers were also reversed by irbesartan treatment in CKD patients.

  12. Emerging bronchoscopic treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Wouter H.; Kerstjens, Huib A. M.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease characterized by pathophysiological factors including airflow limitation, hyperinflation and reduced gas exchange. Treatment consists of lifestyle changes, lung rehabilitation and pharmacological therapies such as long acting

  13. Novel combined management approaches to patients with diabetes, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaak, J

    2017-03-01

    Most patients we care for today suffer from more than one chronic disease, and multimorbidity is a rapidly growing challenge. Concomitant cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes represent a large proportion of all patients in cardiology, nephrology and diabetology. These entities commonly overlap due to their negative effects on vascular function and an accelerated atherosclerosis progression. At the same time, a progressive subspecialisation has caused the cardiologist to treat 'only' the heart, nephrologists 'only' the kidneys and endocrinologists' 'only' diabetes. Studies and guidelines follow the same pattern. This often requires patients to visit specialists for each field, with a risk of both under-diagnosis and under-treatment. From the patient's perspective, there is a great need for coordination and facilitation of the care, not only to reduce disease progression but also to improve quality of life. Person-centred integrated clinics for patients with cardiovascular disease, renal dysfunction and diabetes are a promising approach for complex chronic disease management.

  14. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy: The unknown disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, R; Paredes, I; Munarriz, P M; Paredes, B; Alén, J F

    2017-04-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a neurodegenerative disease produced by accumulated minor traumatic brain injuries; no definitive premortem diagnosis and no treatments are available for chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Risk factors associated with chronic traumatic encephalopathy include playing contact sports, presence of the apolipoprotein E4, and old age. Although it shares certain histopathological findings with Alzheimer disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy has a more specific presentation (hyperphosphorylated tau protein deposited as neurofibrillary tangles, associated with neuropil threads and sometimes with beta-amyloid plaques). Its clinical presentation is insidious; patients show mild cognitive and emotional symptoms before progressing to parkinsonian motor signs and finally dementia. Results from new experimental diagnostic tools are promising, but these tools are not yet available. The mainstay of managing this disease is prevention and early detection of its first symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  16. Disease progression of acute pancreatitis in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Fabao; Guo, Hongjie; Luo, Qianfu; Guo, Chunbao

    2016-05-15

    Approximately 10% of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) progress to chronic pancreatitis. Little is known about the factors that affect recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode. We retrospectively investigated patients with AP, focusing on their outcomes and the predictors for disease progression. Between July 2003 and June 2015, we retrospectively enrolled first-time AP patients with medical records on disease etiology, severity (according to the Atlanta classifications), and recurrence of AP. Independent predictors of recurrent AP (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis were identified using the logistic regression model. Of the total 159 patients, 45 (28.3%) developed RAP, including two episodes of RAP in 19 patients, and 9 (5.7%) developed chronic pancreatitis. The median duration from the time of AP to the onset of RAP was 5.6 ± 2.3 months. RAP patients were identified as more common among patients with idiopathic first-time AP. The presence of severe ascites, pancreatic necrosis, and systemic complications was independent predictors of RAP in pediatric patients. Experiencing over two RAP episodes was the predictor for developing chronic pancreatitis. No influence of age or number of AP episodes was found on the occurrence of abdominal pain, pain severity, and the prevalence of any pain. Severity of first-time AP and idiopathic first-time AP are related to RAP. Recurrence increases risk for progression to chronic pancreatitis. The risk of recurrence increased with increasing numbers of AP episodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Malnutrition in pre-dialysis chronic kidney disease patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malnutrition is a complication in chronic kidney disease (CKD) known to affect quality of life and prognosis although not often diagnosed. It is associated with rapid progression to end stage renal disease (ESRD) and mortality. Early identification and treatment will slow down progression to ESRD and mortality.

  18. Serum bilirubin: a simple routine surrogate marker of the progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moolchandani, K; Priyadarssini, M; Rajappa, M; Parameswaran, S; Revathy, G

    2016-10-01

    Studies suggest that Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a global burden health associated with significant comorbid conditions. Few biochemical parameters have gained significance in predicting the disease progression. The present work aimed to study the association of the simple biochemical parameter of serum bilirubin level with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), and to assess their association with the co-morbid conditions in CKD. We recruited 188 patients with CKD who attended a Nephrology out-patient department. eGFR values were calculated based on the serum creatinine levels using CKD-EPI formula. Various biochemical parameters including glucose, creatinine, uric acid, total and direct bilirubin were assayed in all study subjects. Study subjects were categorized into subgroups based on their eGFR values and their diabetic status and the parameters were compared among the different subgroups. We observed a significantly decreased serum bilirubin levels (p bilirubin levels (r = 0.92). We also observed a significant positive correlation between the eGFR levels and the direct bilirubin levels (r = 0.76). On multivariate linear regression analysis, we found that total and direct bilirubin independently predict eGFR, after adjusting for potential confounders (p bilirubin may help in predicting the early progression of CKD and more so in diabetic CKD.

  19. Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) disease is a rare disorder in which persons are unable to control infection with the virus. The disease is progressive with markedly elevated levels of EBV DNA in the blood and infiltration of organs by EBV-positive lymphocytes. Patients often present with fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, EBV hepatitis, or pancytopenia. Over time, these patients develop progressive immunodeficiency and if not treated, succumb to opportunistic infections, hemophagocytosis, multiorgan failure, or EBV-positive lymphomas. Patients with CAEBV in the United States most often present with disease involving B or T cells, while in Asia, the disease usually involves T or NK cells. The only proven effective treatment for the disease is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current studies to find a cause of this disease focus on immune defects and genetic abnormalities associated with the disease.

  20. Chronic Active Epstein–Barr Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kimura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus (CAEBV disease is a rare disorder in which persons are unable to control infection with the virus. The disease is progressive with markedly elevated levels of EBV DNA in the blood and infiltration of organs by EBV-positive lymphocytes. Patients often present with fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, EBV hepatitis, or pancytopenia. Over time, these patients develop progressive immunodeficiency and if not treated, succumb to opportunistic infections, hemophagocytosis, multiorgan failure, or EBV-positive lymphomas. Patients with CAEBV in the United States most often present with disease involving B or T cells, while in Asia, the disease usually involves T or NK cells. The only proven effective treatment for the disease is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current studies to find a cause of this disease focus on immune defects and genetic abnormalities associated with the disease.

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) denote progressive lung diseases characterized by airway obstruction. COPD exhibits specific morphologic changes in the lung parenchyma, central and peripheral airways and pulmonary vasculature. A person with COPD may have either emphysema or chronic bronchitis, but most have both. Some people with COPD may also have an asthma-like or reactive component. Imaging modalities play important role in the detection or exclusion of COPD, distribution and extent of disease processes. Combined inspiratory and expiratory high resolution CT allows phenotyping of COPD (emphysema predominant, airway predominant, or mixed) and quantification of severity. Magnetic resonance imaging enables functional evaluation and demonstrates ventilation defects correlating closely with pulmonary function tests. Imaging techniques are also helpful in guiding the treatment, such as bullectomy in patients with bullous emphysema, lung volume reduction surgery or endoscopic interventions in those with severe emphysema, and smoking cessation and medical treatment designed to stop lung destruction in patients with mild or moderate emphysema or bronchiectasis.

  2. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  3. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  4. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  5. Exercise training and the progression of chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eidemak, I; Haaber, A B; Feldt-Rasmussen, B

    1997-01-01

    The possible beneficial effect of regular exercise training on the progression of chronic renal failure was studied in a prospective randomized controlled study. Thirty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 25 ml/(min.1.73 m2) (range 10-43) were randomized to physical training...... the rate of progression judged by the slope of GFR versus time plot was equal in the two groups. Hence, the beneficial effect of exercise training, earlier observed in rat studies, could not be reproduced in our patients. Physical exercise had no untoward effect on progression of renal disease....

  6. HBV genome analysis in the progression of HBV related chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruksana Raihan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although HBV is a non-cytopathic virus, alteration of viral genome may also alter host immunity and may play a part in the pathogenesis LC and HCC. During the last decade, various studies have shown that mutations in the HBV genome may play a role in HCC pathogenesis. Here, we have analyzed HBV genome from patients with asymptomatic HBV carrier [ASC], chronic hepatitis B (CHB, cirrhosis of liver (LC, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC of Bangladeshi origin. A total of 225 patients tested positive for HBV with different stages of chronic HBV infection were enrolled in this study. The extent of liver damages were assayed by estimating serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT, serum bilirubin and finally by abdominal ultrasonography and/or fine needle aspiration cytology. Wherever required, cancer marker like alpha fetoprotein (AFP was assessed. HBV genotype was evaluated by immunoassays and sequenced. A total of 25 patients were ASC, 135 were CHB and 65 were LC and HCC. Among ASC patients, 5, 7 and 13 belonged to HBV genotype A, C, and D, respectively. On the other hand, HBV genotype C was most prevalent in CHB patients (about 42%, followed by HBV genotype D (36%. About 69% patients with LC and HCC also had genotype C. Full genomic analysis of sera of patients with progressive liver damages (LC and HCC revealed mutations at HBeAg promoter regions in more than 80% patients. However, mutations in this region were mostly unseen in ASC and patients with less progressive liver diseases. HBV genotype was found quite different in Bangladeshi HBV patients which seem a mixture of Indian and Asia-Pacific region. This study also reveals that HBeAg promoter region mutation may have role in development of HBV related LC and HCC.

  7. Factors That Affect Disease Progression After First Attack of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode, and little is known about how the disease progresses or what factors affect progression. We performed a population-based study of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) to determine their outcomes and associated factors. We performed a retrospective study of patients with first-time AP from 2003 through 2012 in a well-defined area of Sweden. Data were collected from medical records on disease etiology, severity (according to the Atlanta classification), recurrence of AP, subsequent chronic pancreatitis, and mortality. Patients were followed up for a median time of 4.6 years, until death or the end of 2013. We identified 1457 patients with first-time AP (48% biliary disease, 17% alcohol-associated, 9.9% severe); 23% of patients had 1 or more recurrences. Risk for recurrence was significantly higher among smokers (hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.95; P = .03), patients with alcohol-associated AP (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.25-2.23; P chronic pancreatitis, although alcohol-associated AP progressed most frequently (2.8/100 patient-years). Patients with recurrent AP were at the highest risk for chronic pancreatitis (HR, 6.74; 95% CI, 4.02-11.3; P associated AP (HR, 3.10; 95% CI, 2.05-5.87; P associated only with organ failure (odds ratio, 71.17; 95% CI, 21.14-239.60; P chronic pancreatitis. Recurrence increases the risk for progression to chronic pancreatitis. Most patients who die upon disease recurrence have biliary AP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. A microsimulation model for the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.; Boessen, R.; Fishwick, D.; Klein Entink, R.H.; Meijster, T.; Pronk, A.; Van Duuren-Stuurman, B.; Warren, N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is thought to affect over one million people in Great Britain. The main factor contributing to the development of COPD is tobacco smoke. This paper presents a microsimulation model for the development of COPD, incorporating

  9. A microsimulation model for the development and progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, E.; Boessen, R.; Fishwick, D.; Klein Entink, R.; Meijster, T.; Pronk, A.; Duuren-Stuurman, B. van; Warren, N.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic lung disease that is thought to affect over one million people in Great Britain. The main factor contributing to the development of COPD is tobacco smoke. This paper presents a microsimulation model for the development of COPD, incorporating

  10. Bicarbonate therapy for prevention of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoniewski, Igor; Wesson, Donald E

    2014-03-01

    Kidney injury in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is likely multifactorial, but recent data support that a component is mediated by mechanisms used by the kidney to increase acidification in response to an acid challenge to systemic acid-base status. If so, systemic alkalization might attenuate this acid-induced component of kidney injury. An acid challenge to systemic acid-base status increases nephron acidification through increased production of endothelin, aldosterone, and angiotensin II, each of which can contribute to kidney inflammation and fibrosis that characterizes CKD. Systemic alkalization that ameliorates an acid challenge might attenuate the contributions of angiotensin II, endothelin, and aldosterone to kidney injury. Some small clinical studies support the efficacy of alkalization in attenuating kidney injury and slowing glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. This review focuses on the potential that orally administered NaHCO₃ prevents CKD progression and additionally addresses its mechanism of action, side effects, possible complications, dosage, interaction, galenic form description, and contraindications. Current National Kidney Foundation guidelines recommend oral alkali, including NaHCO₃(-), in CKD patients with serum HCO₃(-) <22 mmol/l. Although oral alkali can be provided by other medications and by base-inducing dietary constituents, oral NaHCO₃ will be the focus of this review because of its relative safety and apparent efficacy, and its comparatively low cost.

  11. Brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanoto, Masafumi, E-mail: mkanoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Hosoya, Takaaki, E-mail: thosoya@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Toyoguchi, Yuuki, E-mail: c-elegans_0201g@mail.goo.ne.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan); Oda, Atsuko, E-mail: a.oda@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata University, Iida-Nishi 2-2-2, 990-9585 Yamagata (Japan)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease (CPNBD) resembles multiple sclerosis (MS) on patient background and image findings, and therefore is difficult to diagnose. The purpose is to identify the characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of CPNBD and to clarify the differences between the MRI findings of CPNBD and those of MS. Materials and methods: The subjects consist of a CPNBD group (n = 4; 1 male and 3 females; mean age, 51 y.o.), a MS group (n = 19; 3 males and 16 females; mean age, 45 y.o.) and a normal control group (n = 23; 10 males and 13 females; mean age, 45 y.o.). Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were retrospectively evaluated in each subjects. In middle sagittal brain MR images, the prepontine distance was measured as an indirect index of brain stem and cerebellar atrophy and the pontine and mesencephalic distance was measured as a direct index of brain stem atrophy. These indexes were statistically analyzed. Results: Brain stem atrophy, cerebellar atrophy, and leukoencephalopathy were seen in all CPNBD cases. Prepontine distance was significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.05), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Pontine and mesencephalic distance were significantly different between the CPNBD group and the MS group (p < 0.001, p < 0.01 respectively), and between the CPNBD group and the normal control group (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Chronic progressive neuro-Behçet's disease should be considered in patients with brain stem and cerebellar atrophy in addition to leukoencephalopathy similar to that seen in multiple sclerosis.

  12. Increased frequency of CD8+ and CD4+ regulatory T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: association with disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi; Memarian, Ali; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Razavi, Seyed Mohsen; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2013-02-01

    Little is known regarding the immunobiology of regulatory T (Treg) cells in hematopoietic malignancies, particularly in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the present study, we showed that the frequencies of CD8(+) and CD4(+) Treg cells were significantly increased in progressive as compared with indolent CLL patients and normal subjects. Enriched CD4(+) Treg cells induced a similar level of inhibition in polyclonally activated B cells and effector T cells from CLL patients and normal subjects. Our results suggest that the increase in circulating Treg cells may result in downregulation of tumor-specific immune response, leading to tumor expansion and disease progression.

  13. Independent and combined effect of bilirubin and smoking on the progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Jiancheng Wang,1,* Binyan Wang,1,2,* Min Liang,1 Guobao Wang,1 Jianping Li,3 Yan Zhang,3 Yong Huo,3 Yimin Cui,4 Xiping Xu,1,5 Xianhui Qin1 1National Clinical Research Center for Kidney Disease, State Key Laboratory for Organ Failure Research, Renal Division, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 2Institute for Biomedicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 3Department of Cardiology, 4Department of Pharmacy, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, 5Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, Key Laboratory of Functional Dairy, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: Whether serum bilirubin and cigarette smoking affect the risk of renal function decline remains inconclusive. We aimed to test the independent and combined effects of bilirubin and cigarette smoking on the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD in hypertensive adults. Methods: The study population consisted of 12,633 patients in the renal sub-study of the China Stroke Primary Prevention Trial. The primary outcome was progression of CKD, defined as a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of ≥30% and to a level of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 if baseline eGFR was ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2, or a decrease in eGFR of ≥50% if baseline eGFR was <60 mL/min/1.73 m2, or end-stage renal disease. The secondary outcomes included 1 rapid decline in renal function and 2 annual rate of eGFR decline. Results: The median follow-up duration was 4.4 years. Cigarette smoking had no significant effect on the progression of CKD (odds ratio [OR]: 1.11, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.78–1.57. However, a significantly lower risk of the primary event (OR: 0.72, 95% CI: 0.55–0.95 was found in participants in tertile 3 compared to those in tertiles 1–2 for total bilirubin (TBiL levels. More importantly, there was an interaction

  14. Chronic kidney disease: sonographic/clinical findings at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Kidney disease arises from various causes which can lead to death, especially if it progresses to chronic renal disease. Some of these patients can be managed by the use of conservative management, drugs, dialysis or renal transplantation depending on several factors. Amongst several investigative methods ...

  15. Inflammation and nutrition in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Juan; Cheung, Wai W; Mak, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and nutritional imbalance are important comorbid conditions that correlate with poor clinical outcomes in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Nutritional disorders such as cachexia/protein energy wasting, obesity and growth retardation negatively impact the quality of life and disease progression in children with CKD. Inadequate nutrition has been associated with growth disturbances in children with CKD. On the other hand, over-nutrition and obesity are associated...

  16. S100-A9 protein in exosomes from chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells promotes NF-κB activity during disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Daniel; Sotelo, Natalia; Seija, Noé; Sernbo, Sandra; Abreu, Cecilia; Durán, Rosario; Gil, Magdalena; Sicco, Estefanía; Irigoin, Victoria; Oliver, Carolina; Landoni, Ana Inés; Gabus, Raúl; Dighiero, Guillermo; Oppezzo, Pablo

    2017-08-10

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an incurable disease characterized by accumulation of clonal B lymphocytes, resulting from a complex balance between cell proliferation and apoptotic death. Continuous crosstalk between cancer cells and local/distant host environment is required for effective tumor growth. Among the main actors of this dynamic interplay between tumoral cells and their microenvironment are the nano-sized vesicles called exosomes. Emerging evidence indicates that secretion, composition, and functional capacity of exosomes are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. In CLL, no data exist exploring the specific changes in the proteomic profile of plasma-derived exosomes from patients during disease evolution. We hereby report for the first time different proteomic profiles of plasma exosomes, both between indolent and progressive CLLs as well as within the individual patients at the onset of disease and during its progression. Next, we focus on the changes of the exosome protein cargoes, which are found exclusively in patients with progressive CLL after disease progression. The alterations in the proteomic cargoes underline different networks specific for leukemia progression related to inflammation, oxidative stress, and NF-κB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathway activation. Finally, our results suggest a preponderant role for the protein S100-A9 as an activator of the NFκB pathway during CLL progression and suggest that the leukemic clone can generate an autoactivation loop through S100-A9 expression, NF-κB activation, and exosome secretion. Collectively, our data propose a new pathway for NF-κB activation in CLL and highlight the importance of exosomes as extracellular mediators promoting tumor progression in CLL. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  17. Lipid disorders in patients with renal failure: Role in cardiovascular events and progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Visconti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The spectrum of lipid disorders in chronic kidney disease (CKD is usually characterized by high triglycerides and reduced high dense lipoprotein (HDL, associated with normal or slightly reduced low dense lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol. This dyslipidemia is associated with an increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Keys for the cardiovascular risk reduction in these patients are lowering the number and modifying the composition of the cholesterol-carrying atherogenic lipoprotein particles. Statins have an important role in primary prevention of cardiovascular events and mortality in non-hemodialyzed CKD patients. The benefits in terms of progression of renal failure are contradictory. Patient education regarding dietary regimen should be part of the CKD clinical management.

  18. Association of periodontitis and chronic kidney disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Nabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of our study is to study the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis in chronic kidney disease and to identify a correlation between periodontitis and chronic kidney disease, with the help of periodontal exaamination, ultrasonographic and hematobiochemical analysis. Materials and Methods: 46 dogs with renal failure were studied and classified as presenting a slight (56.52%, moderate (36.95% and severe (47.8% degree of periodontal disease. Results: Marked gingival recession involving whole maxillary dental arcade, Oral mucosa ulcers and tissue necrosis and mobility of mandibular incisors was observed in dogs with chronic kidney disease. Dogs with normal renal function were observed to have minimal gingival recession of the mandibular teeth only. Conclusion: In view of the causative association between periodontal infection, generalized inflammation and important systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease, we hypothesize that targeted prophylaxis and careful treatment of oral diseases can prevent the progression of renal failure

  19. Sodium intake, RAAS-blockade and progressive renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Borst, Martin H; Navis, Gerjan

    Pharmacological blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers is the current standard treatment to prevent progressive renal function loss in patients with chronic kidney disease. Yet in many patients the

  20. Value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Teng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the clinical value of HBsAg level in dynamic monitoring of disease progression in patients with chronic HBV infection. MethodsA retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 1107 patients with different clinical stages of chronic HBV infection who had not received antiviral therapy at the time of hospitalization in The Second Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University from May 2011 to December 2015, and according to the disease status, they were divided into HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, compensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-C group, decompensated liver cirrhosis group (LC-D group, and primary liver cancer (PLC group. These groups were compared in terms of HBsAg expression and the association between HBsAg and clinical features. An analysis of variance was used for comparison of continuous data between multiple groups, and the least significant difference t-test was used for further comparison between any two groups; the t-test was used for comparison of continuous data between two groups. The chi-square test was used for comparison of categorical data between these groups. Pearson correlation analysis was also performed. ResultsThere was a significant difference in serum HBsAg level between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=100.45, P<0.001. The HBeAg-positive CHB group had significantly higher levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA than the HBeAg-negative CHB group (t= 16.67 an 16.22, both P<0.001. There were significant differences in HBsAg and HBV DNA levels between the HBeAg-positive CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F= 42.92 and 27.38, both P<0.001, as well as between the HBeAg-negative CHB group, LC-C group, LC-D group, and PLC group (F=6.04 and 4.10, both P<0.05. HBV DNA level was significantly different across patients with different HBsAg levels (<1000 IU/ml, 1000-20 000 IU

  1. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a transgenic mouse model of Prion disease

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    Nina Fainstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic protein without accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders the efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice, mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age matched wild type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process indicated by progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses, starting at age of 4-6 months, in accordance with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with progressive neurological disease, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Chronic Progressive Neurodegeneration in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Prion Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainstein, Nina; Dori, Dvir; Frid, Kati; Fritz, Alexa T; Shapiro, Ilona; Gabizon, Ruth; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases present pathologically with progressive structural destruction of neurons and accumulation of mis-folded proteins specific for each condition leading to brain atrophy and functional disability. Many animal models exert deposition of pathogenic proteins without an accompanying neurodegeneration pattern. The lack of a comprehensive model hinders efforts to develop treatment. We performed longitudinal quantification of cellular, neuronal and synaptic density, as well as of neurogenesis in brains of mice mimicking for genetic Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease as compared to age-matched wild-type mice. Mice exhibited a neurodegenerative process of progressive reduction in cortical neurons and synapses starting at age of 4-6 months, in accord with neurologic disability. This was accompanied by significant decrease in subventricular/subependymal zone neurogenesis. Although increased hippocampal neurogenesis was detected in mice, a neurodegenerative process of CA1 and CA3 regions associated with impaired hippocampal-dependent memory function was observed. In conclusion, mice exhibit pathological neurodegeneration concomitant with neurological disease progression, indicating these mice can serve as a model for neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Mobile technologies and the holistic management of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Farhaan; Norris, Tony; Stockdale, Rosemary

    2008-12-01

    Ageing populations and unhealthy lifestyles have led to some chronic conditions such as diabetes and heart disease reaching epidemic proportions in many developed nations. This paper explores the potential of mobile technologies to improve this situation. The pervasive nature of these technologies can contribute holistically across the whole spectrum of chronic care ranging from public information access and awareness, through monitoring and treatment of chronic disease, to support for patient carers. A related study to determine the perceptions of healthcare providers to m-health confirmed the view that attitudes were likely to be more important barriers to progress than technology. A key finding concerned the importance of seamless and integrated m-health processes across the spectrum of chronic disease management.

  4. Chronic Kidney Disease and Lipid Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubovic, Sandra Vegar; Kristic, Spomenka; Prevljak, Sabina; Pasic, Irmina Sefic

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a serious public health problem due to the increase in incidence and prevalence of this disease worldwide. Given the significant morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the population of patients with CKD, and the fact that dyslipidemia itself is a risk factor for CVD, increases the importance of lipid metabolism study in patients with CKD. Evaluate the lipid status of patients with chronic kidney disease. A one-year prospective study included 150 adult patients who were in various stages of chronic renal failure (stage I to IV). Estimate of creatinine clearance was performed using Cockroft-Goult formula. The classification of patients according to stages of chronic renal insufficiency was performed in accordance with the criteria of Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI). Of the total number of patients (N=150) there was 71 males and 79 females. The mean age of patients was 55.43 years. Average values of serum cholesterol were highest in patients with stage II renal disease and the lowest in patients classified as stage IV (5.76±1.60 mmol/L vs. 5.07±1.88 mmol/L). Analysis of the average value of triglycerides in blood show a slight increase through the stages of CKD in a manner that patients classified into stage I have low serum triglyceride levels (1.73±1.17 mmol/L (range 0.61 to 5.5 mmol/L), and patients classified in stage III the highest value 2.13±1.11 mmol/L (range 0.62 to 4.66 mmol/L). Average cholesterol levels does not statistically significantly change with progression of chronic renal disease. There is an almost linear increase in average triglyceride levels in chronic renal disease. Triglyceride levels in serum begins to increase in the early stage of chronic renal disease and reach the peak in stage IV.

  5. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1996-01-01

    renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension......This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation....... In addition, marked associations with disturbance of systemic haemodynamics and with abnormal distribution of blood volume have been reported. Although the pathophysiological importance of the ET system in chronic liver disease is not completely understood, similarities to other vasopressive...

  6. [The French Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort study: To better understand chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Bénédicte; Combe, Christian; Jacquelinet, Christian; Briançon, Serge; Fouque, Denis; Laville, Maurice; Frimat, Luc; Pascal, Christophe; Herpe, Yves-Édouard; Morel, Pascal; Deleuze, Jean-François; Schanstra, Joost P; Pisoni, Ron L; Robinson, Bruce M; Massy, Ziad A

    2016-04-01

    Preserving kidney function and improving the transition from chronic kidney disease to end stage is a research and healthcare challenge. The national Chronic Kidney Disease-Renal Epidemiology and Information Network (CKD-REIN) cohort was established to identify the determinants, biomarkers and practice patterns associated with chronic kidney disease outcomes. The study will include more than 3000 adult patients with moderate to advanced chronic kidney disease from a representative sample of 40 nephrology clinics with respect to regions and legal status, public or private. Patients are recruited during a routine visit and followed for 5 years, before and after starting renal replacement therapy. Patient-level clinical, biological, and lifestyle data are collected annually, as well as provider-level data on clinical practices, coordinated with the International Chronic Kidney Disease Outcomes and Practice Pattern Study. Blood and urine samples are stored in a biobank. Major studied outcomes include survival, patient-reported outcomes, disease progression and hospitalizations. More than 13,000 eligible patients with chronic kidney disease were identified, 60% with stage 3 and 40% with stage 4. Their median age is 72 years [interquartile range, 62-80 years], 60% are men and 38% have diabetes. By the end of December 2015, 2885 patients were included. The CKD-REIN cohort will serve to improve our understanding of chronic kidney disease and provide evidence to improve patient survival and quality of life as well as health care system performances. Copyright © 2016 Association Société de néphrologie. All rights reserved.

  7. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  8. Retarding chronic kidney disease (CKD progression: a practical nutritional approach for non-dialysis CKD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bellizzi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a case report on a patient with non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD in whom several nutritional issues are briefly discussed from a practical point of view. The article is accompanied by an editorial published in this Journal in relation to the 2nd International Conference of the European Renal Nutrition working group at ERA-EDTA—“Retarding CKD progression: readily available through comprehensive nutritional management?”—and focuses on several practical topics associated with the nutritional approach for the conservative treatment of non-dialysis CKD. The article is divided into 3 sections—basic nutritional assessment, nutritional targets, and nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD—linked to 3 consecutive steps of the clinical follow-up of the patient and the related nutritional concerns and intervention. First visit: Baseline nutritional assessment and basic nutritional considerations in non-dialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD • What nutritional assessment/monitoring for protein-energy wasting (PEW should be employed? • Is a body mass index (BMI of 21 kg/m2 adequate? • What phosphate target should be pursued? • What are the nutritional habits in patients with incident CKD? • What protein needs and amount of dietary protein should be pursued? • Does the quality of protein matter? • What amount of dietary salt should be employed? How should this be obtained? • How should normal serum phosphate be achieved? • What diet should be recommended? Is a vegetarian diet an option? Second visit: Major nutritional targets in non-dialysis CKD • Consequences of unintentional weight loss • What is the role of the renal dietitian in helping the patient adhere to a renal diet? Intermediate visits: Nutritional follow-up in non-dialysis CKD • What treatment for calcium/parathyroid hormone (PTH will affect CKD progression? Final visits: • Would a dietary recall/intensive dietary education improve adherence with

  9. Advanced Therapeutic Strategies for Chronic Lung Disease Using Nanoparticle-Based Drug Delivery

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    Ji Young Yhee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lung diseases include a variety of obstinate and fatal diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, cystic fibrosis (CF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF, and lung cancers. Pharmacotherapy is important for the treatment of chronic lung diseases, and current progress in nanoparticles offers great potential as an advanced strategy for drug delivery. Based on their biophysical properties, nanoparticles have shown improved pharmacokinetics of therapeutics and controlled drug delivery, gaining great attention. Herein, we will review the nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for the treatment of chronic lung diseases. Various types of nanoparticles will be introduced, and recent innovative efforts to utilize the nanoparticles as novel drug carriers for the effective treatment of chronic lung diseases will also be discussed.

  10. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease-A Friend or Foe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Franczyk, Beata; Rysz, Jacek

    2017-04-10

    Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension). It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  11. Chronic kidney disease among children in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón, Alejandro; Fort, Meredith P; Morine, Chris M; Lou-Meda, Randall

    2014-12-01

    To describe the distribution of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Guatemala, estimate incidence and prevalence of pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD), and estimate time to progress to ESRD. This study analyzed the registry of the only pediatric nephrology center in Guatemala, from 2004-2013. Incidence and prevalence were calculated for annual periods. Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation was used to determine significance of geographic distribution of incidence. Time to progress to ESRD and associated risk factors were calculated with multivariate Cox regression. Of 1 545 patients from birth to less than 20 years of age, 432 had chronic renal failure (CRF). Prevalence and incidence of ESRD were 4.9 and 4.6 per million age-related population, respectively. Incidence was higher for the Pacific coast and Guatemala City. The cause of CRF was undetermined in 43% of patients. Average time to progress to ESRD was 21.9 months; factors associated with progression were: older age, diagnosis of glomerulopathies, and advanced-stage CKD at consultation. Prevalence and incidence of ESRD in Guatemala are lower than in other countries. This may reflect poor access to diagnosis. Areas with higher incidence and large proportion of CKD of undetermined cause are compatible with other studies from the geographic subregion. Findings on progression to ESRD may reflect delayed referral.

  12. Chronic kidney disease among children in Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Cerón

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the distribution of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD in Guatemala, estimate incidence and prevalence of pediatric end-stage renal disease (ESRD, and estimate time to progress to ESRD. METHODS: This study analyzed the registry of the only pediatric nephrology center in Guatemala, from 2004-2013. Incidence and prevalence were calculated for annual periods. Moran's index for spatial autocorrelation was used to determine significance of geographic distribution of incidence. Time to progress to ESRD and associated risk factors were calculated with multivariate Cox regression. RESULTS: Of 1 545 patients from birth to less than 20 years of age, 432 had chronic renal failure (CRF. Prevalence and incidence of ESRD were 4.9 and 4.6 per million age-related population, respectively. Incidence was higher for the Pacific coast and Guatemala City. The cause of CRF was undetermined in 43% of patients. Average time to progress to ESRD was 21.9 months; factors associated with progression were: older age, diagnosis of glomerulopathies, and advanced-stage CKD at consultation. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence and incidence of ESRD in Guatemala are lower than in other countries. This may reflect poor access to diagnosis. Areas with higher incidence and large proportion of CKD of undetermined cause are compatible with other studies from the geographic subregion. Findings on progression to ESRD may reflect delayed referral.

  13. Do frequent moderate exacerbations contribute to progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients who are ex-smokers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreyse J

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Dreyse,1 Orlando Díaz,1 Paula Repetto,2 Arturo Morales,1 Fernando Saldías,1 Carmen Lisboa11Department of Pulmonary Diseases, School of Medicine, 2School of Psychology, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, ChileBackground: In addition to smoking, acute exacerbations are considered to be a contributing factor to progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. However, these findings come from studies including active smokers, while results in ex-smokers are scarce and contradictory. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if frequent acute moderate exacerbations are associated with an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and impairment of functional and clinical outcomes in ex-smoking COPD patients.Methods: A cohort of 100 ex-smoking patients recruited for a 2-year follow-up study was evaluated at inclusion and at 6-monthly scheduled visits while in a stable condition. Evaluation included anthropometry, spirometry, inspiratory capacity, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation, severity of dyspnea, a 6-minute walking test, BODE (Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea, Exercise performance index, and quality of life (St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire and Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire. Severity of exacerbation was graded as moderate or severe according to health care utilization. Patients were classified as infrequent exacerbators if they had no or one acute exacerbation/year and frequent exacerbators if they had two or more acute exacerbations/year. Random effects modeling, within hierarchical linear modeling, was used for analysis.Results: During follow-up, 419 (96% moderate acute exacerbations were registered. At baseline, frequent exacerbators had more severe disease than infrequent exacerbators according to their FEV1 and BODE index, and also showed greater impairment in inspiratory capacity, forced vital capacity, peripheral capillary oxygen saturation

  14. No independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to end-stage renal disease in a large screen for chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Peralta, Carmen A.; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Sachs, Michael; Shah, Anuja; Norris, Keith; Saab, Georges; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Kestenbaum, Bryan; McCullough, Peter A.

    2014-01-01

    Whether higher serum phosphorus levels are associated with a higher risk for death and/or progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not well established, and whether the association is confounded by access and barriers to care is unknown. To answer these questions, data of 10,672 individuals identified to have CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate disease (ESRD) (unadjusted hazards ratio, 6.72 (4.16–10.85)); however, the risk became nonsignificant on adjustment for potential confounders. There was no appreciable change in hazards ratio with inclusion of variables related to access and barriers to care. Additional analyses in subgroups based on 12 different variables yielded similar negative associations. Thus, in the largest cohort of individuals with early-stage CKD to date, we could not validate an independent association of serum phosphorus with risk for death or progression to ESRD. PMID:23615501

  15. Aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of chronic kidney disease in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnanasambandan Ramanathan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD is the most common heritable kidney disease and is characterized by bilateral renal cysts. Hypertension is a frequent cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD and mortality in patients with ADPKD. The aldosterone synthase gene polymorphisms of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system have been extensively studied as hypertension candidate genes. The present study is aimed to investigate the potential modifier effect of CYP11B2 gene on the progression of CKD in ADPKD. One hundred and two ADPKD patients and 106 healthy controls were recruited based on Ravine inclusion and exclusion criteria. The three tag-SNPs within CYP11B2 gene (rs3802230, rs4543, and rs4544 were genotyped using FRET-based KASPar method. Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to assess the potential associations between these polymorphisms and CKD stages. Mantel- Haenszel stratified analysis was used to explore confounding and interaction effects of these polymorphisms. Of the three tag-SNPs genotyped, rs4544 polymorphism was monomorphic and rs3802230 deviated Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The CYP11B2 tag-SNPs did not show significant association with ADPKD or CKD. Further, these polymorphisms did not exhibit confounding effect on the relationship between CKD progression and hypertension. Our results suggest that aldosterone synthase gene is not a major susceptibility gene for progression of CKD in South Indian ADPKD patients.

  16. Cholesterol Crystal Embolism and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhu; Bayliss, George; Zhuang, Shougang

    2017-05-24

    Renal disease caused by cholesterol crystal embolism (CCE) occurs when cholesterol crystals become lodged in small renal arteries after small pieces of atheromatous plaques break off from the aorta or renal arteries and shower the downstream vascular bed. CCE is a multisystemic disease but kidneys are particularly vulnerable to atheroembolic disease, which can cause an acute, subacute, or chronic decline in renal function. This life-threatening disease may be underdiagnosed and overlooked as a cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) among patients with advanced atherosclerosis. CCE can result from vascular surgery, angiography, or administration of anticoagulants. Atheroembolic renal disease has various clinical features that resemble those found in other kidney disorders and systemic diseases. It is commonly misdiagnosed in clinic, but confirmed by characteristic renal biopsy findings. Therapeutic options are limited, and prognosis is considered to be poor. Expanding knowledge of atheroembolic renal disease due to CCE opens perspectives for recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of this cause of progressive renal insufficiency.

  17. Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Models in Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southerland, Janet H; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Bednarsh, Helene; Mouton, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional collaboration in health has become essential to providing high-quality care, decreased costs, and improved outcomes. Patient-centered care requires synthesis of all the components of primary and specialty medicine to address patient needs. For individuals living with chronic diseases, this model is even more critical to obtain better health outcomes. Studies have shown shown that oral health and systemic disease are correlated as it relates to disease development and progression. Thus, inclusion of oral health in many of the existing and new collaborative models could result in better management of chronic illnesses and improve overall health outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-based therapies for chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, A.N.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may lead to end-stage renal failure, requiring renal replacement strategies. Development of new therapies to reduce progression of CKD is therefore a major global public health target. The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether cell-based therapies have the

  19. Analysis of electrocardiogram in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazović, Biljana; Svenda, Mirjana Zlatković; Mazić, Sanja; Stajić, Zoran; Delić, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is the fourth leading cause of mortality worldwide. It is defined as a persistent airflow limitation usually progressive and not fully reversible to treatment. The diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severity of disease is confirmed by spirometry. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produces electrical changes in the heart which shows characteristic electrocardiogram pattern. The aim of this study was to observe and evaluate diagnostic values of electrocardiogram changes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with no other comorbidity. We analyzed 110 electrocardiogram findings in clinically stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and evaluated the forced expiratory volume in the first second, ratio of forces expiratory volume in the first second to the fixed vital capacity, chest radiographs and electrocardiogram changes such as p wave height, QRS axis and voltage, right bundle branch block, left bundle branch block, right ventricular hypertrophy, T wave inversion in leads V1-V3, S1S2S3 syndrome, transition zone in praecordial lead and QT interval. We found electrocardiogram changes in 64% patients, while 36% had normal electrocardiogram. The most frequent electrocardiogram changes observed were transition zone (76.36%) low QRS (50%) and p pulmonale (14.54%). Left axis deviation was observed in 27.27% patients. Diagnostic values of electrocardiogram in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients should be screened electrocardiographically in addition to other clinical investigations.

  20. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skehan, S. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Norris, S. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Hegarty, J. [Liver Unit, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Owens, A. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); MacErlaine, D. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Vincent`s Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    1997-08-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Brain MRI changes in chronic liver disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skehan, S.; Norris, S.; Hegarty, J.; Owens, A.; MacErlaine, D.

    1997-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients are known to have abnormally high signal principally in the globus pallidus on non-contrast T1-weighted MRI. The purpose of this study was to relate MR changes to clinical and pathological features of chronic liver disease. We confirmed abnormally high signal in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted images in 25 of 28 patients with chronic liver disease, showing that it also occurs in patients who have not yet progressed to cirrhosis. Changes were seen in patients both with and without clinical portosystemic shunting. This abnormality is not responsible for hepatic encephalopathy. Cholestatic disease was more likely to produce marked changes than non-cholestatic disease. No statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between the severity of liver disease and the degree of MR abnormality. However, marked improvement in MR appearances was seen after successful liver transplantation. (orig.). With 3 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  3. Skin autofluorescence is associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Nakayama, Masaaki; Kanno, Makoto; Kimura, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kimio; Tani, Yoshihiro; Kusano, Yuki; Suzuki, Hodaka; Hayashi, Yoshimitsu; Asahi, Koichi; Sato, Keiji; Miyata, Toshio; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE) accumulation is thought to be a measure of cumulative metabolic stress that has been reported to independently predict cardiovascular disease in diabetes and renal failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between AGE accumulation, measured as skin autofluorescence, and the progression of renal disease in pre-dialysis patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Skin autofluorescence was measured noninvasively with an autofluorescence reader at baseline in 449 pre-dialysis patients with CKD. The primary end point was defined as a doubling of serum creatinine and/or need for dialysis. Thirty-three patients were lost to follow-up. Forty six patients reached the primary end point during the follow-up period (Median 39 months). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significantly higher risk of development of the primary end points in patients with skin autofluorescence levels above the optimal cut-off level of 2.31 arbitrary units, derived by receiver operator curve analysis. Cox regression analysis revealed that skin autofluorescence was an independent predictor of the primary end point, even after adjustment for age, gender, smoking history, diabetes, estimated glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria (adjusted hazard ratio 2.58, P = 0.004). Tissue accumulation of AGEs, measured as skin autofluorescence, is a strong and independent predictor of progression of CKD. Skin autofluorescence may be useful for risk stratification in this group of patients; further studies should clarify whether AGE accumulation could be one of the therapeutic targets to improve the prognosis of CKD.

  4. Diminished disease progression rate in a chronic kidney disease population following the replacement of dietary water source with quality drinking water: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardhana, Edirisinghe Arachchige Ranga Iroshanie Edirisinghe; Perera, Ponnamperuma Aratchige Jayasumana; Sivakanesan, Ramiah; Abeysekara, Tilak; Nugegoda, Danaseela Bandara; Weerakoon, Kosala; Siriwardhana, Dunusingha Asitha Surandika

    2018-05-01

    Environmental toxin/s is alleged to be the contributory factor for the chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology (CKDu) in Sri Lanka. The potential of drinking water as a medium for the nephrotoxic agents in the affected subjects has been comprehensively discoursed in the recent past. The present study was aimed to assess the effect of replacing the habitual drinking water on the kidney function of CKDu patients residing in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka: METHODS: An interventional study was carried out to assess the disease progression rate of a CKDu population whose habitual drinking water was replaced by bottled spring water certified by Sri Lanka Standard (SLS) for a period of 18 month along with a population of CKDu patients who continued with their usual drinking water. Kidney function of subjects in both groups were monitored in terms of blood pressure, serum creatinine, serum calcium, serum phosphorus, hemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein at 6 months intervals during the intervention and follow up periods. Diminished disease progression rate was observed in CKDu patients in the intervention group when compared with the non- intervention group based on serum creatinine, Hb, estimated glomerular filtration rate and urinary protein levels. Extensive interventional studies are required to generalize effect of drinking water on CKDu population. The habitual drinking water is likely to be a contributory factor towards the progression of the disease. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  5. Preclinical murine models of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Ross; Bozinovski, Steven

    2015-07-15

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a major incurable global health burden and is the 4th leading cause of death worldwide. It is believed that an exaggerated inflammatory response to cigarette smoke causes progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation, where macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes are prominent, leads to oxidative stress, emphysema, small airway fibrosis and mucus hypersecretion. Much of the disease burden and health care utilisation in COPD is associated with the management of its comorbidities and infectious (viral and bacterial) exacerbations (AECOPD). Comorbidities, defined as other chronic medical conditions, in particular skeletal muscle wasting and cardiovascular disease markedly impact on disease morbidity, progression and mortality. The mechanisms and mediators underlying COPD and its comorbidities are poorly understood and current COPD therapy is relatively ineffective. Thus, there is an obvious need for new therapies that can prevent the induction and progression of COPD and effectively treat AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD. Given that access to COPD patients can be difficult and that clinical samples often represent a "snapshot" at a particular time in the disease process, many researchers have used animal modelling systems to explore the mechanisms underlying COPD, AECOPD and comorbidities of COPD with the goal of identifying novel therapeutic targets. This review highlights the mouse models used to define the cellular, molecular and pathological consequences of cigarette smoke exposure and the recent advances in modelling infectious exacerbations and comorbidities of COPD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Toll like receptor7 polymorphisms in relation to disease susceptibility and progression in Chinese patients with chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junping; Zhang, Tong; Cao, Lina; Li, Aixin; Zheng, Kai; Zhang, Nan; Su, Bin; Chen, Zhiyun; Chen, Ning; Wu, Hao; He, Qiushui

    2017-09-29

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate and adaptive immunity, protecting the host from viral pathogens. We studied the effect of TLR7 polymorphisms on disease susceptibility and progression of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection in Chinese adults. Blood samples were taken from 612 patients with confirmed CHB, hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cirrhosis (LC) or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 293 controls. TLR7 polymorphisms (rs179010-C > T, rs2074109-T > C, and rs179009-A > G) were analyzed by PCR-based sequencing. A significantly higher frequency of TLR7 rs179010 C allele was found in male CHB patients than in controls (74.8% vs 59.5%, P = 0.002). The frequency of rs179009 G allele was markedly increased with disease progression when male patients with CHB, LC and HCC were compared (P = 0.012). The haplotype CTA was significantly associated with an increased susceptibility to CHB among male patients (P = 0.000). Frequency of the haplotype CTG was higher in male patients with HCC than CHB (P = 0.005). No such differences in these allele frequencies were found between female patients and controls. Our results indicated that TLR7 polymorphisms play an important role in disease susceptibility and the progression of CHB infections in Chinese adults, and may partly explain the high incidence of HBV related diseases in Chinese men.

  7. Contribution of inflammation to vascular disease in chronic kidney disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, Mohamed E.; Stenvinkel, P.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by an exceptionally high mortality rate, much of which results from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Chronic low-grade inflammation, as evidenced by increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), is a common feature of CKD and may cause atherosclerotic CVD through various pathogenetic mechanisms. Evidence suggests that persistent inflammation may also be a risk factor for progression of CKD, which may result in a vicious inflammation-driven circle. The causes of inflammation in CKD are multifactorial. The influence of various comorbidities may contribute to inflammation in the setting of progressive loss of renal function. Available data suggest that pro-inflammatory cytokines also play a central role in the genesis of the metabolic syndrome. There is a lack of epidemiological data on the prevalence and consequences of inflammation in relation to protein-energy wasting (PEW) and CVD in CKD patients from developing countries. The westernization of nutritional intakes and changes of life style besides the high prevalence of chronic infections in developing countries are possible additive contributors to a high prevalence of inflammation, PEW and CVD among CKD patients. Also, genetic differences may affect inflammatory responses and nutritional status and thus the susceptibility to CVD in different regions. (author)

  8. Chronic progressive lymphoedema in draught horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keyser, K; Janssens, S; Buys, N

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this review was to summarise and evaluate the current state of knowledge about chronic progressive lymphoedema in draught horses. Clinical signs of this multifactorial disorder are mainly restricted to the lower limbs, comprising progressively deteriorating skin, swelling and deformation. Although typical lesions were first reported at the beginning of the 20th century, chronic progressive lymphoedema was recognised as a specific syndrome only in 2003, and since then research has driven forward. Despite the high prevalence in some breeds and the serious economic impact, the pathogenesis is not fully understood, and the available treatment options remain symptomatic and noncurative. There is a need to improve diagnostic techniques and to develop selection tools. © 2014 EVJ Ltd.

  9. The Complex Interplay between Chronic Inflammation, the Microbiome, and Cancer: Understanding Disease Progression and What We Can Do to Prevent It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Armstrong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a multifaceted condition, in which a senescent cell begins dividing in an irregular manner due to various factors such as DNA damage, growth factors and inflammation. Inflammation is not typically discussed as carcinogenic; however, a significant percentage of cancers arise from chronic microbial infections and damage brought on by chronic inflammation. A hallmark cancer-inducing microbe is Helicobacter pylori and its causation of peptic ulcers and potentially gastric cancer. This review discusses the recent developments in understanding microbes in health and disease and their potential role in the progression of cancer. To date, microbes can be linked to almost every cancer, including colon, pancreatic, gastric, and even prostate. We discuss the known mechanisms by which these microbes can induce cancer growth and development and how inflammatory cells may contribute to cancer progression. We also discuss new treatments that target the chronic inflammatory conditions and their associated cancers, and the impact microbes have on treatment success. Finally, we examine common dietary misconceptions in relation to microbes and cancer and how to avoid getting caught up in the misinterpretation and over inflation of the results.

  10. Metabonomics Research Progress on Liver Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengqian; Zhu, Ying; Cong, Qingwei; Wu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomics as the new omics technique develops after genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics and has rapid development at present. Liver diseases are worldwide public health problems. In China, chronic hepatitis B and its secondary diseases are the common liver diseases. They can be diagnosed by the combination of history, virology, liver function, and medical imaging. However, some patients seldom have relevant physical examination, so the diagnosis may be delayed. Many other liver diseases, such as drug-induced liver injury (DILI), alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and autoimmune liver diseases, still do not have definite diagnostic markers; the diagnosis consists of history, medical imaging, and the relevant score. As a result, the clinical work becomes very complex. So it has broad prospects to explore the specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver diseases with metabolomics. In this paper, there are several summaries which are related to the current research progress and application of metabolomics on biomarkers of liver diseases.

  11. The effect of the World Kidney Day campaign on the awareness of chronic kidney disease and the status of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and renal progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Ho Jun; Ahn, Jeong Myeong; Na, Ki Young; Chae, Dong-Wan; Lee, Tae Woo; Heo, Nam Joo; Kim, Suhnggwon

    2010-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide problem. We describe the trends in CKD awareness before and after the World Kidney Day (WKD) campaign and the impact of the WKD campaign in increasing awareness and appropriate management of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease and renal progression. We selected 57 718 people who had undergone a routine health check-up. The average CKD awareness was 3.1% (95% CI: 2.6-3.7%) and was increased with progressing CKD stage. The awareness was increased from 1.1% before the WKD campaign to 5.8% after the campaign (P campaign had a positive impact on the awareness and control of risk factors in CKD subjects but the absolute frequency of CKD awareness still remains undesirable in Korea. We need new campaign strategies to publicize the importance of early diagnosis and appropriate management of CKD.

  12. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease phenotypes: the future of COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, MeiLan K; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M

    2010-01-01

    Significant heterogeneity of clinical presentation and disease progression exists within chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although FEV(1) inadequately describes this heterogeneity, a clear alternative has not emerged. The goal of phenotyping is to identify patient groups with unique...... prognostic or therapeutic characteristics, but significant variation and confusion surrounds use of the term "phenotype" in COPD. Phenotype classically refers to any observable characteristic of an organism, and up until now, multiple disease characteristics have been termed COPD phenotypes. We, however......, propose the following variation on this definition: "a single or combination of disease attributes that describe differences between individuals with COPD as they relate to clinically meaningful outcomes (symptoms, exacerbations, response to therapy, rate of disease progression, or death)." This more...

  13. Changes in body composition in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rutten, Erica P A; Calverley, Peter M A; Casaburi, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The follow-up of the ECLIPSE study, a prospective longitudinal study to identify and define parameters that predict disease progression over 3 years in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), allows the examination of the effect of body composition changes on COPD-related outcomes....

  14. Hepcidin-25 in diabetic chronic kidney disease is predictive for mortality and progression to end stage renal disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wagner

    Full Text Available Anemia is common and is associated with impaired clinical outcomes in diabetic chronic kidney disease (CKD. It may be explained by reduced erythropoietin (EPO synthesis, but recent data suggest that EPO-resistance and diminished iron availability due to inflammation contribute significantly. In this cohort study, we evaluated the impact of hepcidin-25--the key hormone of iron-metabolism--on clinical outcomes in diabetic patients with CKD along with endogenous EPO levels.249 diabetic patients with CKD of any stage, excluding end-stage renal disease (ESRD, were enrolled (2003-2005, if they were not on EPO-stimulating agent and iron therapy. Hepcidin-25 levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. The association of hepcidin-25 at baseline with clinical variables was investigated using linear regression models. All-cause mortality and a composite endpoint of CKD progression (ESRD or doubling of serum creatinine were analyzed by Cox proportional hazards models.Patients (age 67 yrs, 53% male, GFR 51 ml/min, hemoglobin 131 g/L, EPO 13.5 U/L, hepcidin-25 62.0 ng/ml were followed for a median time of 4.2 yrs. Forty-nine patients died (19.7% and forty (16.1% patients reached the composite endpoint. Elevated hepcidin levels were independently associated with higher ferritin-levels, lower EPO-levels and impaired kidney function (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was related to mortality, along with its interaction with EPO, older age, greater proteinuria and elevated CRP (all p<0.05. Hepcidin was also predictive for progression of CKD, aside from baseline GFR, proteinuria, low albumin- and hemoglobin-levels and a history of CVD (all p<0.05.We found hepcidin-25 to be associated with EPO and impaired kidney function in diabetic CKD. Elevated hepcidin-25 and EPO-levels were independent predictors of mortality, while hepcidin-25 was also predictive for progression of CKD. Both hepcidin-25 and EPO may represent important prognostic factors of clinical outcome and have the

  15. ‘WNT-er is coming’: WNT signalling in chronic lung diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baarsma, H A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases represent a major public health problem with only limited therapeutic options. An important unmet need is to identify compounds and drugs that target key molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases. Over the last decade, there has been extensive interest in investigating Wingless/integrase-1 (WNT) signalling pathways; and WNT signal alterations have been linked to pulmonary disease pathogenesis and progression. Here, we comprehensively review the cumulative evidence for WNT pathway alterations in chronic lung pathologies, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, asthma and COPD. While many studies have focused on the canonical WNT/β-catenin signalling pathway, recent reports highlight that non-canonical WNT signalling may also significantly contribute to chronic lung pathologies; these studies will be particularly featured in this review. We further discuss recent advances uncovering the role of WNT signalling early in life, the potential of pharmaceutically modulating WNT signalling pathways and highlight (pre)clinical studies describing promising new therapies for chronic lung diseases. PMID:28416592

  16. Lymphoscintigraphy of draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cock, H E V; Affolter, V K; Wisner, E R; Larson, R F; Ferraro, G L

    2006-03-01

    Early diagnosis of chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) may result in more effective interventions and provide a basis for further investigation of whether early diagnosis could be used as a means of eliminating potential genetic influences by cessation of breeding from affected individuals. Lymphoscintigraphy may be useful in draught horses to differentiate early lesions of CPL from other conditions in the pastern region. Forelimbs of 2 normal and 5 CPL-affected draught horses were evaluated with lymphoscintigraphy. Lymphoscintigraphy showed clearly the presence of interstitial fluid stasis and delayed lymphatic drainage in the affected extremities of diseased animals in contrast to normal animals of these breeds. The rate of decreased clearance of a particulate radiopharmaceutical from the tissues was related positively to the severity of clinical signs. Our findings support the hypothesis that lymph stasis is probably responsible for the progressive swelling and concurrent skin lesions observed in association with CPL in draught horses. Lymphoscintigraphy should also prove useful in diagnosis of CPL in draught horses, even in the mild stages of the disease; such early diagnosis may result in more effective intervention.

  17. Paediatric chronic kidney disease | van Biljon | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctors use various guidelines on paediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) for managing their patients according to the availability of resources. As with adolescent and adult patients, CKD in children can also progress to end-stage renal failure – the time course being influenced by several modifiable factors. Decline in ...

  18. Evolution of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibody production in patients with chronic Chagas disease: Correlation between antibody titers and development of cardiac disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingebourg Georg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is one of the most important endemic infections in Latin America affecting around 6-7 million people. About 30-50% of patients develop the cardiac form of the disease, which can lead to severe cardiac dysfunction and death. In this scenario, the identification of immunological markers of disease progression would be a valuable tool for early treatment and reduction of death rates. In this observational study, the production of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies through a retrospective longitudinal follow-up in chronic Chagas disease patients´ cohort and its correlation with disease progression and heart commitment was evaluated. Strong inverse correlation (ρ = -0.6375, p = 0.0005 between anti-T. cruzi IgG1 titers and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF in chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC patients were observed after disease progression. Elevated levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG3 titers were detected in all T. cruzi-infected patients, indicating a lack of correlation of this IgG isotype with disease progression. Furthermore, low levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG2, IgG4, and IgA were detected in all patients through the follow-up. Although without statistical significance anti-T. cruzi IgE tends to be more reactive in patients with the indeterminate form (IND of the disease (p = 0.0637. As this study was conducted in patients with many years of chronic disease no anti-T. cruzi IgM was detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the levels of anti-T. cruzi IgG1 could be considered to seek for promising biomarkers to predict the severity of chronic Chagas disease cardiomyopathy.

  19. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsiana Beiko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant decreases in morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases (CVD and cancers, morbidity and cost associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD continue to be increasing. Failure to improve disease outcomes has been related to the paucity of interventions improving survival. Insidious onset and slow progression halter research successes in developing disease-modifying therapies. In part, the difficulty in finding new therapies is because of the extreme heterogeneity within recognized COPD phenotypes. Novel biomarkers are necessary to help understand the natural history and pathogenesis of the different COPD subtypes. A more accurate phenotyping and the ability to assess the therapeutic response to new interventions and pharmaceutical agents may improve the statistical power of longitudinal clinical studies. In this study, we will review known candidate biomarkers for COPD, proposed pathways of pathogenesis, and future directions in the field.

  20. Phosphorus and Nutrition in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio González-Parra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with renal impairment progressively lose the ability to excrete phosphorus. Decreased glomerular filtration of phosphorus is initially compensated by decreased tubular reabsorption, regulated by PTH and FGF23, maintaining normal serum phosphorus concentrations. There is a close relationship between protein and phosphorus intake. In chronic renal disease, a low dietary protein content slows the progression of kidney disease, especially in patients with proteinuria and decreases the supply of phosphorus, which has been directly related with progression of kidney disease and with patient survival. However, not all animal proteins and vegetables have the same proportion of phosphorus in their composition. Adequate labeling of food requires showing the phosphorus-to-protein ratio. The diet in patients with advanced-stage CKD has been controversial, because a diet with too low protein content can favor malnutrition and increase morbidity and mortality. Phosphorus binders lower serum phosphorus and also FGF23 levels, without decreasing diet protein content. But the interaction between intestinal dysbacteriosis in dialysis patients, phosphate binder efficacy, and patient tolerance to the binder could reduce their efficiency.

  1. ROLE OF THE RENAL MICROCIRCULATION IN PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY INJURY IN OBESITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chade, Alejandro R.; Hall, John E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Obesity is largely responsible for the growing incidence and prevalence of diabetes, cardiovascular, and renal disease. Current strategies to prevent and treat obesity and its consequences have been insufficient to reverse the ongoing trends. Lifestyle modification or pharmacological therapies often produce modest weight loss which is not sustained and recurrence of obesity is frequently observed, leading to progression of target organ damage in many obese subjects. Therefore, research efforts have focused not only on the factors that regulate energy balance, but also on understanding mechanisms of target organ injury in obesity. Summary and Key message Microvascular disease plays a pivotal role in progressive kidney injury from different etiologies such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, which are all important consequences of chronic obesity. The microvascular networks are anatomical units that are closely adapted to specific functions of nutrition and removal of waste in every organ. Damage of the small vessels in several tissues and organs has been reported in obesity and may increase cardio-renal risk. However, the mechanisms by which obesity and its attendant cardiovascular and metabolic consequences interact to cause renal microvascular injury and chronic kidney disease are still unclear, although substantial progress has been made in recent years. This review addresses potential mechanisms and consequences of obesity-induced renal microvascular injury as well as current treatments that may provide protection of the renal microcirculation and slow progressive kidney injury in obesity. PMID:27771702

  2. Regulatory T-cells in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: their role in disease progression and autoimmune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Deepesh P; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) have been shown to be important for the balance of autoimmunity and oncogenesis. Tregs have a protective role in autoimmune diseases and conversely promote oncogenesis. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is unique in being at the cross-roads of oncogenesis and autoimmunity. We studied Tregs, defined as CD4+CD25(high)CD127(low)FOXP3+, in 32 treatment-naive patients with CLL. Our study shows that patients with CLL had a higher absolute Treg count than the control group (p < 0.001). A progressive increase of Tregs was noted in advanced stages of the disease (p < 0.001). The increase in absolute Treg count is more significant than the increase in percentage Tregs. The absolute Treg count appears to be more important in disease pathogenesis. The absolute Treg count was significantly higher in those patients having autoimmune cytopenias. There was an inverse correlation between lymphocyte doubling time and absolute Treg count (p = 0.03). The absolute Treg count may be used as a prognostic marker in CLL.

  3. Antioxidant effect of Morus nigra on Chagas disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenote, Michelly Cristina; Wajsman, Vithor Zuccaro; Konno, Yoichi Takaki; Ferreira, Paulo César; Silva, Regildo Márcio Gonçalves; Therezo, Altino Luiz Silva; Silva, Luciana Pereira; Martins, Luciamáre Perinetti Alves

    2017-11-06

    Considering the widespread popular use of Morus nigra and the amount of scientific information on its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, the effectiveness of this phytotherapeutic compound in the parasitemia progression during the acute phase of Chagas disease and its role in the development of the inflammatory process as well as its effects on the oxidative damage in the chronic phase of infection were evaluated. Thus, 96 male Swiss mice were randomly divided into eight groups, four groups were uninfected controls, and four groups were intraperitoneally infected with 5.0 x 104 blood trypomastigotes forms of T. cruzi QM2 strain. Four batches composed of one uninfected and one infected group were respectively treated with 70% alcohol solution and 25 μL, 50 μL and 75 μL of the phytotherapeutic compound. Levels of antioxidant elements (TBARS, FRAP, GSH and Sulfhydryl groups) were measured in plasma samples. The phytotherapeutic compound's antioxidant activity was measured by polyphenol and total flavonoid quantification, DPPH, NO, and FRAP method. Our results showed that the vehicle influenced some of the results that may have physiological relevance in Chagas disease. However, an important action of M. nigra tincture was observed in the progression of Chagas disease, since our results demonstrated a reduction in parasitemia of treated groups when compared to controls, especially in the group receiving 25 µL. However, in the chronic phase, the 50-µL dosage presented a better activity on some antioxidant defenses and minimized the tissue inflammatory process. Results indicated an important action of M. nigra tincture on the Chagas disease progression.

  4. Features of Mineral Metabolism and Parathyroid Glands Functioning in Chronic Renal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Martynyuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The calcium phosphoric metabolism was analyzed depending on the severity of renal functioning disorders. Chronic renal disease is known to be associated with impaired mineral metabolism in terms of hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia and enhanced level of Ca × P product that aggravates in chronic renal failure progression. The majority of patients with nephropathy have parathyroid hormone concentration to be different from target one recommended by NKF-K/DOQI (2003, at that secondary hyperparathyroidism prevails on pre-dialysis stage of chronic renal disease, the relative hypoparathyroidism is common among the patients received dialysis.

  5. Screening Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeniçerioğlu, Yavuz; Akdam, Hakan; Dursun, Belda; Alp, Alper; Sağlam Eyiler, Funda; Akın, Davut; Gün, Yelda; Hüddam, Bülent; Batmazoğlu, Mehmet; Gibyeli Genek, Dilek; Pirinççi, Serhat; Ersoy, İsmail Rıfkı; Üzüm, Atilla; Soypaçacı, Zeki; Tanrısev, Mehmet; Çolak, Hülya; Demiral Sezer, Sibel; Bozkurt, Gökay; Akyıldız, Utku Oğan; Akyüz Ünsal, Ayşe İpek; Ünübol, Mustafa; Uslu, Meltem; Eryılmaz, Ufuk; Günel, Ceren; Meteoğlu, İbrahim; Yavaşoğlu, İrfan; Ünsal, Alparslan; Akar, Harun; Okyay, Pınar

    2017-11-01

    Fabry's disease is an X-linked inherited, rare, progressive, lysosomal storage disorder, affecting multiple organs due to the deficient activity of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A) enzyme. The prevalence has been reported to be 0.15-1% in hemodialysis patients; however, the information on the prevalence in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis is lacking. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease. The patients older than 18 years, enclosing KDIGO 2012 chronic kidney disease definitions, not on dialysis, were enrolled. Dried blood spots on Guthrie papers were used to analyze α-Gal A enzyme and genetic analysis was performed in individuals with enzyme activity ≤1.2 μmol/L/h. A total of 1453 chronic kidney disease patients not on dialysis from seven clinics in Turkey were screened. The mean age of the study population was 59.3 ± 15.9 years. 45.6% of patients were female. The creatinine clearance of 77.3% of patients was below 60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 , 8.4% had proteinuria, and 2.5% had isolated microscopic hematuria. The mean value of patients' α-Gal A enzyme was detected as 2.93 ± 1.92 μmol/L/h. 152 patients had low levels of α-Gal A enzyme activity (≤1.2 μmol/L/h). In mutation analysis, A143T and D313Y variants were disclosed in three male patients. The prevalence of Fabry's disease in chronic kidney disease not on dialysis was found to be 0.2% (0.4% in male, 0.0% in female). Fabry's disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chronic kidney disease with unknown etiology even in the absence of symptoms and signs suggestive of Fabry's disease.

  6. [Hepatobiliary System Diseases as the Predictors of Psoriasis Progression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, S V; Barilo, A A; Smolnikova, M V

    2016-01-01

    To assess the state of the hepatobiliary system in psoriasis andpsoriatic arthritis in order to establish a causal relationship and to identify clinical and functional predictors of psoriatic disease progression. The study includedpatients with extensive psoriasis vulgaris (n = 175) aged 18 to 66 years old and healthy donors (n = 30), matched by sex and age: Group 1--patients with psoriasis (PS, n = 77), group 2--patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA, n = 98), group 3--control. The evaluation of functional state of the hepatobiliary system was performed by the analysis of the clinical and anamnestic data and by the laboratory-instrumental methods. We identified predictors of psoriasis: triggers (stress and nutritionalfactor), increased total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, eosinophilia, giardiasis, carriers of hepatitis C virus, ductal changes andfocal leisons in the liver, thickening of the walls of the gallbladder detected by ultrasound. Predictors ofpsoriatic arthritis: age over 50 years, dyspeptic complaints, the presence of hepatobiliary system diseases, the positive right hypochondrium syndrome, the clinical symptoms of chronic cholecystitis, excess body weight, high levels of bilirubin, cholesterol and low density lipoprotein, hepatomegaly, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. High activity of hepatocytes cytolysis, cholestasis, inflammation, metabolic disorders let us considerpsoriatic arthritis as a severe clinical stage psoriatic disease when the hepatobiliary system, in turn, is one of the main target organs in systemic psoriatic process. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and chronic cholecystitis are predictors of psoriatic disease progression.

  7. Chronic periodontitis, inflammatory cytokines, and interrelationship with other chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Elsa Maria; Reis, Cátia; Manzanares-Céspedes, Maria Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, such as chronic periodontitis, share common inflammatory risk factors with other systemic and chronic inflammatory disorders. Mucosal tissues, such as oral epithelia, are exposed to environmental stressors, such as tobacco and oral bacteria, that might be involved in promoting a systemic inflammatory state. Conversely, chronic disorders can also affect oral health. This review will summarize recent evidence for the interrelationship between chronic periodontitis and other prevalent chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases. The association with pregnancy is also included due to possible obstetric complications. We will focus on inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-alpha, IL-1, and IL-6, because they have been shown to be increased in patients with chronic periodontitis, in patients with chronic systemic diseases, and in patients with both chronic periodontitis and other chronic diseases. Therefore, an imbalance towards a proinflammatory immune response could underline a bidirectional link between chronic periodontitis and other chronic diseases. Finally, we highlight that a close coordination between dental and other health professionals could promote oral health and prevent or ameliorate other chronic diseases.

  8. Vitamin D, Phosphate and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23: A role in the pathogenesis and management of Chronic Kidney Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease Mineral and Bone Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Damasiewicz, Matthew John

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined by the presence of proteinuria or decreased kidney function, with a prevalence of 10-15% in the adult population. CKD can progress to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) and is associated with progressive abnormalities of bone and mineral metabolism, defined as CKD mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). The use of vitamin D in CKD, the optimal level for initiating treatment and the use of current and novel biomarkers in the management of ...

  9. Murine nephrotoxic nephritis as a model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ougaard, M. K.E.; Kvist, P. H.; Jensen, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Using the nonaccelerated murine nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) as a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could provide an easily inducible model that enables a rapid test of treatments. Originally, the NTN model was developed as an acute model of glomerulonephritis, but in this study we evaluate...... progressive mesangial expansion and significant renal fibrosis within three weeks suggesting CKD development. CD1 and C57BL/6 females showed a similar disease progression, but female mice seemed more susceptible to NTS compared to male mice. The presence of albuminuria, GFR decline, mesangial expansion...

  10. Homecare-based motor rehabilitation in musculoskeletal chronic graft versus host disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Tendas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD is a frequent complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Extensive musculoskeletal and skin involvement may induce severe functional impairment, disability and quality of life deterioration. Physical rehabilitation is recommended as ancillary therapy in these forms, but experiences are sparse. A 39-year-old man affected by musculoskeletal and skin chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD was treated with a homecare-based motor rehabilitation program during palliation for disease progression. Significant functional improvement was obtained. Motor rehabilitation should be strongly considered for patients with musculoskeletal cGVHD, both in the palliative and in the curative phase of disease.

  11. Unresolved Subclinical Hypothyroidism is Independently Associated with Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Oh; Lee, Ihn Suk; Choi, Yoo A; Lee, Sang Ju; Chang, Yoon Kyung; Yoon, Hye Eun; Jang, Yi Sun; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Hye Soo; Yang, Chul Woo; Kim, Suk Young; Hwang, Hyeon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often have subclinical hypothyroidism. However, few reports have investigated changes in the status of subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients and its clinical significance in CKD progression. Methods: We included 168 patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD stages 2-4. The normalization of subclinical hypothyroidism during follow-up was assessed, and the association between transitions in subclinical hypothyroid status and the rate of decline of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was investigated. Results: At baseline, 127 patients were euthyroid and 41 (24.4%) patients were diagnosed with subclinical hypothyroidism. Of these 41 patients, 21 (51.2%) spontaneously resolved to euthyroid during follow-up. The rate of eGFR decline of patients with resolved subclinical hypothyroidism was similar to that of euthyroid patients. The patients with unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism showed a steeper renal function decline than patients with euthyroidism or resolved subclinical hypothyroidism (all p hypothyroidism than in those who were euthyroid (p = 0.006). In multivariate linear regression for rate of eGFR decrease, unresolved subclinical hypothyroidism (β = -5.77, p = 0.001), baseline renal function (β = -0.12, p hypothyroidism did not resolve to euthyroidism, and this lack of resolution was independently associated with rapid renal function decline. PMID:24396286

  12. Endothelins in chronic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1996-01-01

    This review describes recent progress in the accumulation of knowledge about the endothelins (ETs), a family of vasoactive 21-amino acid polypeptides, in chronic liver disease. Particular prominence is given to the dynamics of ET-1 and ET-3 and their possible relation to the disturbed circulation...... renal failure. Studies on liver biopsies have revealed synthesis of ET-1 in hepatic endothelial and other cells, and recent investigations have identified the hepatosplanchnic system as a major source of ET-1 and ET-3 spillover into the circulation, with a direct relation to portal venous hypertension...

  13. Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Angela C; Nagler, Evi V; Morton, Rachael L; Masson, Philip

    2017-03-25

    The definition and classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) have evolved over time, but current international guidelines define this condition as decreased kidney function shown by glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of less than 60 mL/min per 1·73 m 2 , or markers of kidney damage, or both, of at least 3 months duration, regardless of the underlying cause. Diabetes and hypertension are the main causes of CKD in all high-income and middle-income countries, and also in many low-income countries. Incidence, prevalence, and progression of CKD also vary within countries by ethnicity and social determinants of health, possibly through epigenetic influence. Many people are asymptomatic or have non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, itch, or loss of appetite. Diagnosis is commonly made after chance findings from screening tests (urinary dipstick or blood tests), or when symptoms become severe. The best available indicator of overall kidney function is GFR, which is measured either via exogenous markers (eg, DTPA, iohexol), or estimated using equations. Presence of proteinuria is associated with increased risk of progression of CKD and death. Kidney biopsy samples can show definitive evidence of CKD, through common changes such as glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy, and interstitial fibrosis. Complications include anaemia due to reduced production of erythropoietin by the kidney; reduced red blood cell survival and iron deficiency; and mineral bone disease caused by disturbed vitamin D, calcium, and phosphate metabolism. People with CKD are five to ten times more likely to die prematurely than they are to progress to end stage kidney disease. This increased risk of death rises exponentially as kidney function worsens and is largely attributable to death from cardiovascular disease, although cancer incidence and mortality are also increased. Health-related quality of life is substantially lower for people with CKD than for the general population, and falls as GFR

  14. Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth / For Kids / Chronic Kidney Diseases What's ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  15. [Management of high blood pressure in patients with chronic kidney disease : Summary of recent guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hougardy, J M; Leeman, M

    Chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure are two common diseases that mutually maintain during their evolution. In the advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, most pat ients are hypertensive and show signs of vascular disease (coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular or peripheral). Almost one third of the patients with advanced chronic kidney disease exhibit resistant hypertension that requires complex therapeutic management. In chronic kidney disease, antihypertensive treatment is conditioned by comorbidities, but also by proteinuria, which is an independent cardiovascular risk factor in addition to the rate of glomerular filtration rate. The treatment of high blood pressure is a cornerstone of the management of the chronic kidney disease. It limits the risk of cardiovascular events (eg. myocardial infarction, stroke), but also slows the progression of chronic kidney disease. Various recommendations have been recently published on the subject in order to offer assistance to the therapeutic management of hypertension in the patient suffering from chronic kidney disease. The purpose of this article is to highlight these main key elements.

  16. Antioxidant Phytochemicals for the Prevention and Treatment of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jie Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Overproduction of oxidants (reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in the human body is responsible for the pathogenesis of some diseases. The scavenging of these oxidants is thought to be an effective measure to depress the level of oxidative stress of organisms. It has been reported that intake of vegetables and fruits is inversely associated with the risk of many chronic diseases, and antioxidant phytochemicals in vegetables and fruits are considered to be responsible for these health benefits. Antioxidant phytochemicals can be found in many foods and medicinal plants, and play an important role in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases caused by oxidative stress. They often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities, as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits, such as anticancer, anti-aging, and protective action for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, obesity and neurodegenerative diseases. This review summarizes recent progress on the health benefits of antioxidant phytochemicals, and discusses their potential mechanisms in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases.

  17. Hospital specific factors affect quality of blood pressure treatment in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuilen, A.D. van; Blankestijn, P.J.; Buren, M. van; Dam, M.A. ten; Kaasjager, K.A.; Ligtenberg, G.; Sijpkens, Y.W.; Sluiter, H.E.; Ven, P.J. van der; Vervoort, G.M.M.; Vleming, L.; Bots, M.L.; Wetzels, J.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Blood pressure (BP) is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) disease and progression of kidney dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease. Despite extensive antihypertensive treatment possibilities, adequate control is notoriously hard to achieve.

  18. Lipids, inflammation, and chronic kidney disease: a SHARP perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, David D; Vogt, Liffert

    2018-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that inflammation plays a role in the initiation and progression of chronic kidney disease. In the Study of Heart and Renal Protection (SHARP) trial, higher baseline C-reactive protein and higher baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were both associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular events, but higher baseline C-reactive protein levels were also associated with a higher risk of nonvascular events. Simvastatin/ezetimibe reduced cardiovascular events independent of baseline C-reactive protein levels. However, this observation does not exclude inflammation as a causal factor for cardiovascular disease development in chronic kidney disease patients. Copyright © 2018 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of interstitial changes in the progression of chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Sulikowska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interstitium – the renal tubulointerstitial compartment – is located between the renal tubule basement membrane and microcirculation vessels. Interstitial fibroblasts produce the extracellular matrix and constitute the structure’s cellular skeleton, regulating spatial relationships between its components (microenvironment.The tubular epithelium and endothelium cooperate within an integrated microenvironment. Structural or functional impairment of the extracellular matrix, microcirculation vessels or tubular epithelium results in disturbances of tubulointerstitial compartment components.In the course of glomerular kidney diseases, the intrarenal RAA system becomes activated and inflammatory mediators are released. Interstitial inflammation and microcirculatory disorders develop, inducing adverse consequences, manifested mainly through the process of hypoxia and inflammation.Inflammation-induced increase in interleukin-1 (TNF-α expression leads to increased concentrations of VEGF, ICAM-1, angiotensin II, IL-6 and IL-8. Cytokines activate fibroblasts, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibrosis is also triggered by HIF-1alpha pathway activation, resulting in vascular growth and fibroblast proliferation. This reaction likewise occurs through activation of NF-ĸβ, EPO, GLUT-1, IGF-1 and INOS.Interstitial fibrosis is one of the factors determining the clinical course of kidney diseases. Apart from inducing fibrosis, microcirculatory disorders lead to the progression of hypoxia.Angiogenesis is a part of the repair process accompanying fibrosis. Its determinant is the normal function and structure of endothelial cells manifested by their ability to migrate and proliferate in response to, inter alia, angiopoietins, VEGF and nitric oxide synthase.Administering a three-drug RAAS-inhibiting therapy to patients with chronic glomerulopathies improves tubular function, measured by the decrease in excretion of NAG and propeptide of type III

  20. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siener, Roswitha

    2018-04-20

    Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid⁻base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8⁻1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  1. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roswitha Siener

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid–base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8–1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  2. Longitudinal study of spatially heterogeneous emphysema progression in current smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Tanabe

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for emphysema, which is a key pathology in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Low attenuation areas (LAA in computed tomography (CT images reflect emphysema, and the cumulative size distribution of LAA clusters follows a power law characterized by the exponent D. This property of LAA clusters can be explained by model simulation, where mechanical force breaks alveolar walls causing local heterogeneous lung tissue destruction. However, a longitudinal CT study has not investigated whether continuous smoking causes the spatially heterogeneous progression of emphysema. METHODS: We measured annual changes in ratios of LAA (LAA%, D and numbers of LAA clusters (LAN in CT images acquired at intervals of ≥ 3 years from 22 current and 31 former smokers with COPD to assess emphysema progression. We constructed model simulations using CT images to morphologically interpret changes in current smokers. RESULTS: D was decreased in current and former smokers, whereas LAA% and LAN were increased only in current smokers. The annual changes in LAA%, D, and LAN were greater in current, than in former smokers (1.03 vs. 0.37%, p=0.008; -0.045 vs. -0.01, p=0.004; 13.9 vs. 1.1, p=0.007, respectively. When LAA% increased in model simulations, the coalescence of neighboring LAA clusters decreased D, but the combination of changes in D and LAN in current smokers could not be explained by the homogeneous emphysema progression model despite cluster coalescence. Conversely, a model in which LAAs heterogeneously increased and LAA clusters merged somewhat in relatively advanced emphysematous regions could reflect actual changes. CONCLUSIONS: Susceptibility to parenchymal destruction induced by continuous smoking is not uniform over the lung, but might be higher in local regions of relatively advanced emphysema. These could result in the spatially heterogeneous progression of emphysema in current smokers.

  3. Interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 gene polymorphisms and the risk of further periodontal disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzopoulos, Georgios; Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet; Wolff, Larry; Kouvatsi, Anastasia

    2018-03-08

    Susceptible genotypes to periodontal disease are associated with disease onset and progression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of gene polymorphisms on the risk of further disease progression and the need for further treatment among adults with chronic periodontal disease. Sixty-seven patients diagnosed with chronic periodontitis were grouped according to genotype status and risk of further progression of disease and tooth loss. All individuals were clinically evaluated for probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and bleeding on probing at baseline and 45 days after treatment. Blood samples were collected at baseline and genotyping of the polymorphisms in IL-6 (rs1800796) and IL-10 (rs1800872) genes were performed by PCR. Following DNA separation and genotyping, 65.7% of the patients were homozygous carriers of the IL-6 -572G and 49.3% were carriers of the IL-10 -592A allele. Individuals at risk of disease progression ranged from 7.5% to 62.7% based on the criteria used. Carriers of the IL-10 -592A allele were significantly associated with BOP ≥ 30% and therefore exhibited a higher risk of further periodontal breakdown (p = 0.018) with an odds ratio of 1.18. None of the other definitions of disease progression were significantly associated with the examined IL-6 and IL-10 genotypes (p > 0.05). IL-10 polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of further disease progression and the potential need for further treatment following non-surgical periodontal treatment. Susceptible IL-6 genotypes were not associated with the risk of persisting or recurrent disease activity.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging in chronic liver disease evaluated in relation to hepatic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Akihiko; Ohta, Yasuhiko; Ohtomo, Kuni

    1990-01-01

    In 21 patients with chronic liver disease, the ratio of liver to muscle signal intensity on T 1 -weighted images was negatively correlated with the progression of hepatic fibrosis defined according to findings by laparoscopy and liver biopsy, and differentiated six patients with early chronic hepatitis from eight with liver cirrhosis. On T 2 -weighted images, the number of low intensity nodules comparable in size to regenerating nodules surrounded by connective tissues showed a positive correlation with stage. When hepatic fibrosis with no necrosis or fat infiltration was induced in rats, T 2 values were positively correlated with hepatic hydroxyproline content, though there was no such correlation for T 1 values. These results suggest that MR imaging may be useful for determining the progression of hepatic fibrosis in chronic liver disease. T 2 values may directly reflect hepatic fibrosis. (author)

  5. Diabetes mellitus and renal involvement in chronic viral liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovanescu, V F; Streba, C T; Ionescu, M; Constantinescu, A F; Vere, C C; Rogoveanu, I; Moța, E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral liver disease is often associated with other conditions. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is frequently reported in this context and may play a role in the progression of the liver disease to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Renal disease is also an important extrahepatic manifestation of hepatitis viral infection and its presence is associated with poor prognosis and management issues. Our study had multiple purposes: to determine the frequency of the association between chronic viral liver disease and diabetes mellitus, evaluate the potential of diabetes mellitus as a risk factor for HCC and assess an eventual renal involvement. We included in our study a number of 246 patients with chronic liver disease, from whom 136 were diagnosed with chronic viral hepatitis and 110 with viral liver cirrhosis. These patients were assessed by using a clinical examination and a series of tests, including serum transaminase levels, serum bilirubin, serum albumin, markers of cholestasis, fasting plasma glucose levels, serum creatinine, urea, albuminuria, Addis-Hamburger test, electrophoresis of urinary proteins, abdominal ultrasound and, in some cases, CT examination. We obtained the following results: diabetes mellitus is often associated with chronic liver disease of viral etiology, having been identified in 18.29% of the patients in our study. Age above 60 in patients with chronic hepatitis (p=0.013diabetes mellitus. Renal disease was present in 13.4% of the patients with chronic liver disease and it was especially associated with liver cirrhosis and hepatitis C virus. The most common form of renal injury was glomerulonephritis. Acute kidney injury was diagnosed only in cirrhotic patients as hepatorenal syndrome, occurring in 7.27% of the subjects, while chronic kidney disease was identified only in two cases of chronic viral hepatitis. Four patients in our study were diagnosed with HCC and none of them presented diabetes mellitus. Our study revealed that there is a

  6. Particulate matter air pollution exposure: role in the development and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean H Ling

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sean H Ling, Stephan F van EedenJames Hogg iCAPTURE Centre for Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Research and Heart and Lung Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, CanadaAbstract: Due to the rapid urbanization of the world population, a better understanding of the detrimental effects of exposure to urban air pollution on chronic lung disease is necessary. Strong epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulate matter (PM air pollution causes exacerbations of pre-existing lung conditions, such as, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. However, little is known whether a chronic, low-grade exposure to ambient PM can cause the development and progression of COPD. The deposition of PM in the respiratory tract depends predominantly on the size of the particles, with larger particles deposited in the upper and larger airways and smaller particles penetrating deep into the alveolar spaces. Ineffective clearance of this PM from the airways could cause particle retention in lung tissues, resulting in a chronic, low-grade inflammatory response that may be pathogenetically important in both the exacerbation, as well as, the progression of lung disease. This review focuses on the adverse effects of exposure to ambient PM air pollution on the exacerbation, progression, and development of COPD.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, particulate matter, air pollution, alveolar macrophage

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease and Exposure to Nephrotoxic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Sarah E.; Bridges, Christy C.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common progressive disease that is typically characterized by the permanent loss of functional nephrons. As injured nephrons become sclerotic and die, the remaining healthy nephrons undergo numerous structural, molecular, and functional changes in an attempt to compensate for the loss of diseased nephrons. These compensatory changes enable the kidney to maintain fluid and solute homeostasis until approximately 75% of nephrons are lost. As CKD continues to progress, glomerular filtration rate decreases, and remaining nephrons are unable to effectively eliminate metabolic wastes and environmental toxicants from the body. This inability may enhance mortality and/or morbidity of an individual. Environmental toxicants of particular concern are arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury. Since these metals are present throughout the environment and exposure to one or more of these metals is unavoidable, it is important that the way in which these metals are handled by target organs in normal and disease states is understood completely. PMID:28498320

  8. Repeat interventions as a long-term treatment strategy in the management of progressive coronary artery disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.G. Lehmann (Kenneth); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.J.B.M. van den Brand (Marcel); P.J. de Feyter (Pim); A.C.P. Maas (Arthur); R.T. van Domburg (Ron)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractObjectives. This study investigates whether repeat coronary interventions, applied over an extended time period, can successfully curtail the progression of ischemic symptoms and angiographic lumen narrowing. Background. Coronary artery disease is a chronic and generally progressive

  9. Histone 3.3 Participates in a Self-Sustaining Cascade of Apoptosis That Contributes to the Progression of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrero, Carlos A.; Perez-Leal, Oscar; Aksoy, Mark; Moncada, Camilo; Ji, Rong; Lopez, Yolanda; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Madesh, Muniswamy; Criner, Gerard J.; Kelsen, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Shifts in the gene expression of nuclear protein in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a progressive disease that is characterized by extensive lung inflammation and apoptosis, are common; however, the extent of the elevation of the core histones, which are the major components of nuclear proteins and their consequences in COPD, has not been characterized, which is important because extracellular histones are cytotoxic to endothelial and airway epithelial cells. Objectives: To investigate the role of extracellular histones in COPD disease progression. Methods: We analyzed the nuclear lung proteomes of ex-smokers with and without the disease. Further studies on the consequences of H3.3 were also performed. Measurements and Main Results: A striking finding was a COPD-specific eightfold increase of hyperacetylated histone H3.3. The hyperacetylation renders H3.3 resistant to proteasomal degradation despite ubiquitination; when combined with the reduction in proteasome activity that is known for COPD, this resistance helps account for the increased levels of H3.3. Using anti-H3 antibodies, we found H3.3 in the airway lumen, alveolar fluid, and plasma of COPD samples. H3.3 was cytotoxic to lung structural cells via a mechanism that involves the perturbation of Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial toxicity. We used the primary human airway epithelial cells and found that the antibodies to either the C or N terminus of H3 could partially reverse H3.3 toxicity. Conclusions: Our data indicate that there is an uncontrolled positive feedback loop in which the damaged cells release acetylated H3.3, which causes more damage, adds H3.3 release, and contributes toward the disease progression. PMID:23924319

  10. Prion protein polymorphisms affect chronic wasting disease progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J Johnson

    Full Text Available Analysis of the PRNP gene in cervids naturally infected with chronic wasting disease (CWD suggested that PRNP polymorphisms affect the susceptibility of deer to infection. To test this effect, we orally inoculated 12 white-tailed deer with CWD agent. Three different PRNP alleles, wild-type (wt; glutamine at amino acid 95 and glycine at 96, Q95H (glutamine to histidine at amino acid position 95 and G96S (glycine to serine at position 96 were represented in the study cohort with 5 wt/wt, 3 wt/G96S, and 1 each wt/Q95H and Q95H/G96S. Two animals were lost to follow-up due to intercurrent disease. The inoculum was prepared from Wisconsin hunter-harvested homozygous wt/wt animals. All infected deer presented with clinical signs of CWD; the orally infected wt/wt had an average survival period of 693 days post inoculation (dpi and G96S/wt deer had an average survival period of 956 dpi. The Q95H/wt and Q95H/G96S deer succumbed to CWD at 1,508 and 1,596 dpi respectively. These data show that polymorphisms in the PRNP gene affect CWD incubation period. Deer heterozygous for the PRNP alleles had extended incubation periods with the Q95H allele having the greatest effect.

  11. Diet in chronic kidney disease in a Mediterranean African country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, Khawla; Chaker, Hanen; Mahfoudh, Hichem; Makhlouf, Nouha; Jarraya, Faical; Hachicha, Jamil

    2017-01-23

    Mediterranean diet is characterized by low to moderate consumption of animal protein and high consumption of fruits, vegetables, bread, beans, nuts, seeds and other cereals. It has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not suitable for chronic kidney disease because of high potassium intake. Tunisia is an emerging Mediterranean country with limited resources, a high prevalence of chronic hemodialysis treatment and high dialysis expenditures. In order to limit dialysis cost, primary and secondary prevention of chronic renal disease are of paramount importance. In addition to drugs, secondary prevention includes diet measures (e.g. salt diet, protein diet). The aims of diet practice in chronic kidney disease are to slow chronic renal failure progression and to prevent its complications like hyperphosphatemia and hyperkaliemiae. A few decades ago, a Tunisian diet was exclusively Mediterranean, and protein consumption was not excessive. However, today, protein consumption is more comparable to western countries. Salt consumption is also excessive. Some Tunisian diets still include food with high potassium intake, which are not suitable for patients with chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the role of the dietician is extremely important to help calculate and create a dietary regimen tailored to each of our patients. Advice about diets should be adapted to both the patient and population habits to improve adherence rate. As such, the purpose of this article is to provide our own experience regarding medical nutrition therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease in Tunisia, with some changes in food habits. Prevention is far better than treatment. In this perspective, dietary measures must be at the core of our intervention.

  12. Chronic kidney disease screening: Results of the 2013 World ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is on the rise globally due to the increase in prevalence of common risk factors. Screening for CKD risk factors is important for early detection and institution of measures to retard its progression. This study aimed to determine the markers of CKD and its risk factors in a selected ...

  13. HIV-1 subtype C envelope characteristics associated with divergent rates of chronic disease progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goulder Philip JR

    2010-11-01

    is an important correlate of disease progression in chronic HIV-1 subtype C infection.

  14. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artérielle Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in ... as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs in people with chronic kidney ...

  15. Chronic unremitting headache associated with Lyme disease-like illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Andre Kowacs

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian Lyme-disease-like illness (BLDLI or Baggio-Yoshinari syndrome is a unique zoonosis found in Brazil. It reproduces all the clinical symptoms of Lyme disease except for the high frequencies of relapse and the presence of autoimmune manifestations. Two cases of borreliosis manifesting with unremitting headache, which is a symptom associated with late-stage BLDLI, were presented. Clinical, therapeutic, and prognostic aspects of the BLDLI and its associated headaches were showed and discussed in this article. BLDLI diagnosis requires additional attention by physicians, since the disease has a tendency to progress to the late, recurrent stage or the chronic form, and the associated headache can be confused with chronic primary headache or with analgesic-overuse one. Special attention should be paid to patients with headaches who have traveled to endemic areas.

  16. Laboratory database population surveillance to improve detection of progressive chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David M; Chatha, Kamaljit; Rayner, Hugh C

    2013-09-01

    Some patients with chronic kidney disease are still referred late for specialist care despite the evidence that earlier detection and intervention can halt or delay progression to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). To develop a population surveillance system using existing laboratory data to enable early detection of patients at high risk of ESKD by reviewing cumulative graphs of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). A database was developed, updated daily with data from the laboratory computer. Cumulative eGFR graphs containing up to five years of data are reviewed by clinical scientists for all primary care patients or out-patients with a low eGFR for their age. For those with a declining trend, a report containing the eGFR graph is sent to the requesting doctor. A retrospective audit was performed using historical data to assess the predictive value of the graphs. In nine months, we reported 370,000 eGFR results, reviewing 12,000 eGFR graphs. On average 60 graphs per week were flagged as 'high' or 'intermediate' risk. Patients with graphs flagged as high risk had a significantly higher mortality after 3.5 years and a significantly greater chance of requiring renal replacement therapy after 4.5 years of follow-up. Five patients (7%) with graphs flagged as high risk had a sustained >25% fall in eGFR without evidence of secondary care referral. Feedback about the service from requesting clinicians was 73% positive. We have developed a system for laboratory staff to review cumulative eGFR graphs for a large population and identify patients at highest risk of developing ESKD. Further research is needed to measure the impact of this service on patient outcomes. © 2013 European Dialysis and Transplant Nurses Association/European Renal Care Association.

  17. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  18. Progressive atlanto-axial subluxation in Behcet's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-hyuk [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Jeonju City, Jeonbuk (Korea); Eoh, Whan [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2010-03-15

    Behcet's disease is a chronic inflammatory condition involving several organs, such as the skin, mucous membranes, eyes, joints, intestines, lungs and central nervous system. It rarely affects the spinal column. We describe a case of progressive atlanto-axial subluxation in a 44-year-old woman with Behcet's disease. The patient started complaining of posterior neck pain 10 years after the diagnosis of her Behcet's disease. Initial radiographs showed no abnormal finding, but follow-up radiographs 6 month later demonstrated atlanto-axial subluxation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second reported case in the worldwide literature of an atlanto-axial instability in a patient with Behcet's disease. (orig.)

  19. CYTOKINE PROFILE FEATURES IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Р. Kalinina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. We studied cytokine profile in blood and exhaled breath condensate (EBC in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD being in remission state. It is shown that pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine contents depended on the disease severity, both in whole blood and EBC of the COPD patients. We have revealed an increase in TNFα, s-TNFα RI, TGF-β1 and bFGF in EBC of patients with COPD manifestations, thus being indicative for progression of metabolic changes in lung tissue, and advanced stage of respiratory functional disturbances. Cytokine profile abnormalities in COPD patients resulting, in part, from systemic and local disorders of cellular immunity, represent a major pathogenetic mechanism determining the disease progression.

  20. The Effect of Chinese rhubarb, Rheum officinale, with and without benazepril on the progression of naturally occurring chronic kidney disease in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlicek, A S; Roof, C J; Sanderson, M W; Grauer, G F

    2014-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is common in progressive kidney disease. Transforming growth factors β (TGF-β) are important mediators of all types of fibrosis, including renal fibrosis. Chinese rhubarb has been shown to have antifibrotic properties in part because of inhibition of TGF-β and has slowed the progression of kidney disease in rodent models. That administration of a Chinese rhubarb supplement will slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats and the concurrent administration of Chinese rhubarb and benazepril will be more effective than either alone. Twenty-nine client-owned cats with naturally occurring IRIS Stage 2 or early Stage 3 CKD and without comorbidity such as cancer, urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infection, poorly controlled hyperthyroidism, or systemic hypertension were enrolled in the study. A randomized, positive-controlled, prospective study was performed. Cats received Chinese rhubarb, benazepril, or both in addition to standard treatment for CKD. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to assess changes in serum creatinine concentration, body weight, hematocrit, urine protein: urine creatinine ratio (UPC), and systemic arterial blood pressure over time between and within treatment groups over an average of 22 months. No significant differences were detected in serum creatinine concentration, body weight, hematocrit, UPC, and systemic arterial pressure over time between or within treatment groups. This study failed to detect a significant difference in the progression of CKD in cats treated with Chinese rhubarb, benazepril, or both. Further study in specific subsets of cats with CKD is warranted. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  1. Psychometric evaluation of a new instrument to measure disease self-management of the early stage chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Chu; Wu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Li-Min; Chen, Hsing-Mei; Chang, Shu-Chen

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to develop a valid and reliable chronic kidney disease self-management instrument (CKD-SM) for assessing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours. Enhancing early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management plays a key role in delaying the progression of chronic kidney disease. Healthcare provider understanding of early stage chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours can help develop effective interventions. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring chronic kidney disease patients' self-management behaviours is needed. A cross-sectional descriptive study collected data for principal components analysis with oblique rotation. Mandarin- or Taiwanese-speaking adults with chronic kidney disease (n=252) from two medical centres and one regional hospital in Southern Taiwan completed the CKD-SM. Construct validity was evaluated by exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were estimated by Cronbach's alpha and Pearson correlation coefficients. Four factors were extracted and labelled self-integration, problem-solving, seeking social support and adherence to recommended regimen. The four factors accounted for 60.51% of the total variance. Each factor showed acceptable internal reliability with Cronbach's alpha from 0.77-0.92. The test-retest correlations for the CKD-SM was 0.72. The psychometric quality of the CKD-SM instrument was satisfactory. Research to conduct a confirmatory factor analysis to further validate this new instrument's construct validity is recommended. The CKD-SM instrument is useful for clinicians who wish to identify the problems with self-management among chronic kidney disease patients early. Self-management assessment will be helpful to develop intervention tailored to the needs of the chronic kidney disease population. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Sodium-Glucose Linked Cotransporter-2 Inhibition Does Not Attenuate Disease Progression in the Rat Remnant Kidney Model of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Zhang

    Full Text Available Pharmacological inhibition of the proximal tubular sodium-glucose linked cotransporter-2 (SGLT2 leads to glycosuria in both diabetic and non-diabetic settings. As a consequence of their ability to modulate tubuloglomerular feedback, SGLT2 inhibitors, like agents that block the renin-angiotensin system, reduce intraglomerular pressure and single nephron GFR, potentially affording renoprotection. To examine this further we administered the SGLT2 inhibitor, dapagliflozin, to 5/6 (subtotally nephrectomised rats, a model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD that like CKD in humans is characterised by single nephron hyperfiltration and intraglomerular hypertension and where angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are demonstrably beneficial. When compared with untreated rats, both sham surgery and 5/6 nephrectomised rats that had received dapagliflozin experienced substantial glycosuria. Nephrectomised rats developed hypertension, heavy proteinuria and declining GFR that was unaffected by the administration of dapagliflozin. Similarly, SGLT2 inhibition did not attenuate the extent of glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial fibrosis or overexpression of the profibrotic cytokine, transforming growth factor-ß1 mRNA in the kidneys of 5/6 nephrectomised rats. While not precluding beneficial effects in the diabetic setting, these findings indicate that SGLT2 inhibition does not have renoprotective effects in this classical model of progressive non-diabetic CKD.

  3. Clinical and fiberoptic endoscopic assessment of swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macri, Marina Rodrigues Bueno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is characterized by progressive and partially reversible obstruction of pulmonary airflow. Aim: To characterize swallowing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and correlate the findings with the degree chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, and smoking. Method: We conducted a prospective cohort study of 19 patients (12 men and 7 women; age range, 50–85 years with confirmed medical diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This study was performed in 2 stages (clinical evaluation and functional assessment using nasolaryngofibroscopy on the same day. During both stages, vital signs were checked by medical personnel. Results: Clinical evaluation of swallowing in all patients showed the clinical signs of cough. The findings of nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted subsequent intraoral escape in 5 patients (26.5%. No patient had tracheal aspiration. There was no association of subsequent intraoral escape with degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking. Conclusion: In patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, there was a prevalence of oral dysphagia upon swallowing and nasolaryngofibroscopy highlighted the finding of subsequent intraoral escape. There was no correlation between intraoral escape and the degree of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart and respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, or smoking.

  4. [DIET CHARACTERISTICS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bašić-Marković, N; Šutić, I; Popović, B; Marković, R; Vučak, J

    2016-12-01

    Because of the increasing number of patients, chronic kidney disease (CKD) has become a significant public health problem. As kidney function decreases, it is necessary to introduce certain dietary modifications. The aim was to investigate what is the appropriate approach to diet of CKD patients, which could contribute to slowing down progression of the disease. Dietary recommendations are individual for each patient, but also vary in the same patient depending on the stage of disease progression because special attention must be paid to appropriate intake of macronutrients (protein, carbohydrates and fats), micronutrients (sodium, potassium, calcium, phosphorus, zinc, selenium, various vitamins), and water. In newly diagnosed patients, it is necessary to assess their nutritional status and energy requirements. It has been shown that protein-energy malnutrition, muscle loss and cachexia are strong predictors of mortality in CKD. Comparing different dietary approaches in everyday life of patients suffering from CKD, it was found that the most effective diet is Mediterranean food style. Studies confirm that Mediterranean diet has a preventive effect on renal function and reduces progression of the disease. Preventive measures, correct identification and early intervention can increase survival of patients and improve their quality of life. Mediterranean diet tailored to individual stages of CKD has been confirmed as the best choice in CKD patients.

  5. Chronic Diseases Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Templates All Chronic Surveillance Systems Communications Center Social Media Press Room Press Release Archives Multimedia Communication Campaigns Publications Chronic Disease Overview 2016–2017 At A ...

  6. Risk factors for CKD progression in Japanese patients: findings from the Chronic Kidney Disease Japan Cohort (CKD-JAC) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaguma, Daijo; Imai, Enyu; Takeuchi, Ayano; Ohashi, Yasuo; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Nitta, Kosaku; Akizawa, Tadao; Matsuo, Seiichi; Makino, Hirofumi; Hishida, Akira

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) eventually progresses to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, risk factors associated with CKD progression have not been well characterized in Japanese patients with CKD who are less affected with coronary disease than Westerners. A large-scale, multicenter, prospective, cohort study was conducted in patients with CKD and under nephrology care, who met the eligibility criteria [Japanese; age 20-75 years; and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): 10-59 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ]. The primary endpoint was a composite of time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline or time to the initiation of renal replacement therapy (RRT). The secondary endpoints were the rate of decline in eGFR from baseline, time to a 50 % decline in eGFR from baseline, time to the initiation of RRT, and time to doubling of serum creatinine (Cre) concentration. 2966 patients (female, 38.9 %; age, 60. 3 ± 11.6 years) were enrolled. The incidence of the primary endpoint increased significantly (P < 0.0001) in concert with CKD stage at baseline. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards models revealed that elevated systolic blood pressure (SBP) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.203, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.099-1.318)] and increased albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR ≥ 1000 mg/g Cre; HR: 4.523; 95 % CI 3.098-6.604) at baseline were significantly associated (P < 0.0001, respectively) with the primary endpoint. Elevated SBP and increased UACR were risk factors that were significantly associated with CKD progression to ESRD in Japanese patients under nephrology care. UMIN clinical trial registry number: UMIN000020038.

  7. Effects of uric acid-lowering therapy on the progression of chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuemei; Zhai, Tingting; Ma, Ruixia; Luo, Congjuan; Wang, Huifang; Liu, Liqiu

    2018-11-01

    Whether uric acid levels were associated with the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) remained controversial. This meta-analysis was aimed to assess the effect of lowering serum uric acid therapy on the progression of CKD to clarify the role of uric acid in the progression of CKD indirectly. Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane library, CBM were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the efficiency of lowering serum uric acid therapy on the progression of CKD without language restriction. Summary estimates of weighted mean differences (WMDs) and relative risk (RR) were obtained by using random-effect or fixed-effect models. Sensitivity analyses were performed to identify the source of heterogeneity. A total of 12 randomized controlled trials with 832 CKD participants were included in the analysis. Pooled estimate for eGFR was in favor of lowering serum uric acid therapy with a mean difference (MD) of 3.88 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , 95% CI 1.26-6.49 ml/min/1.73 m 2 , p = .004 and this was consistent with results for serum creatinine. The risk of worsening of kidney function or ESRD or death was significantly decreased in the treatment group compared to the control group (RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.28-0.52, pUric acid-lowering therapy may be effective in retarding the progression of CKD. Further randomized controlled trials should be performed to confirm the effect of lowering serum uric acid therapy on the progression of CKD.

  8. The study of platelet function in chronic renal diseases by radioimmunoassay-(RIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fugang; Wu Guoxin; Li Peixia; Ruan Changgeng

    1992-07-01

    The platelet function in patients with chronic renal diseases was studied by radioimmunoassay methods. In the patients with nephritic syndrome, the number of molecules of GMP-140 on the platelet surface and in plasma was greatly increased, and the concentrations of TXB 2 and β-TG in plasma was increased as well. In the patients with uremia, increased β-TG and decreased TXB 2 in plasma were found in comparison with those of control. In the patients with chronic glomerulonephritis, the platelet changed only slightly. These results suggest that the platelet function in patients with nephritic syndrome and uremia changes greatly and plays an important role in the progress of chronic renal diseases

  9. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  10. New-onset vitiligo and progression of pre-existing vitiligo during treatment with biological agents in chronic inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méry-Bossard, L; Bagny, K; Chaby, G; Khemis, A; Maccari, F; Marotte, H; Perrot, J L; Reguiai, Z; Sigal, M L; Avenel-Audran, M; Boyé, T; Grasland, A; Gillard, J; Jullien, D; Toussirot, E

    2017-01-01

    The development of vitiligo during treatment with biological agents is an unusual event and only a few isolated cases have been reported. To describe the clinical characteristics and evolution of patients developing new-onset vitiligo following initiation of a biological agent for chronic inflammatory disease; and also to report the clinical course of pre-existing vitiligo under biological therapy. This nationwide multicentre, retrospective study, carried out between July 2013 and January 2015, describes the characteristics of a large series of 18 patients (psoriasis N = 8, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 8, ulcerative colitis N = 1, uveitis N = 1) who developed new-onset vitiligo while receiving a biological agent. TNFα inhibitors were the most common biological agent involved (13/18) while anti-IL-12/23 and anti-IL-17 agents or abatacept were less common (4/18 and 1/18 respectively). Mean duration of biological agent exposure before vitiligo onset was 13.9 ± 16.5 months. Outcome was favourable for most patients (15/17) while maintaining the biological agent. Data were also collected for 18 patients (psoriasis N = 5, inflammatory rheumatic diseases N = 10, inflammatory bowel diseases N = 2, SAPHO N = 1) who had pre-existing vitiligo when treatment with a biological agent started (TNFα inhibitors N = 15, ustekinumab N = 1, rituximab N = 1, tocilizumab N = 1). Vitiligo progressed in seven patients and was stable or improved in eight cases. Vitiligo may thus emerge and/or progress during treatment with various biological agents, mainly TNFα inhibitors and could be a new paradoxical skin reaction. De novo vitiligo displays a favourable outcome when maintaining the biological agent, whereas the prognosis seems worse in cases of pre-existing vitiligo. © 2016 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  11. [The state of the art research findings on the relationship between chronic periodontitis and Alzheimer's disease: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X S; Ge, S

    2018-04-09

    Along with the development of periodontal medicine, there is a growing number of evidence showing that periodontitis could influence systemic health. Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by microbial infection mediated by dental plaque. Periodontal pathogenic microorganisms and its toxic products can disseminate through the blood stream or may cause the host immune response, which may lead to pathological changes of cerebral vessels and brain tissues to establish connection with Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive memory loss, language and cognitive dysfunction. This article reviewed the association between chronic periodontitis and AD.

  12. Addition of vitamin D reverses the decline in GFR following treatment with ACE inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Abel Esteves; Maes, Michael; Godeny, Paula; Matsumoto, Andressa Keiko; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; da Silva, Taysa Antonia F; Souza, Flávio Henrique M O; Delfino, Vinicius Daher Alvares

    2017-12-15

    Vitamin D has anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic effect, and may block the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system. Adequate vitamin D levels in conjunction with the use of Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors/Angiotensin Receptor Blockers may help to slow down chronic kidney disease progression. To study a possible beneficial effect of vitamin D supplementation in chronic kidney disease patients using angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers on chronic kidney disease progression we performed a clinical study involving vitamin D supplementation in patients with deficiency of this vitamin. This study was conducted in two chronic kidney disease clinics in the city of Londrina, Brazil, from October 2010 to December 2012. It was involved stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate between 60 and 15mL/min/1.73m 2 ) patients with and without vitamin D deficiency. The patients ingested six-month cholecalciferol 50,000IU oral supplementation to chronic kidney disease patients with vitamin D deficiency. We hypothesize changes in estimated glomerular filtration rate over study period. Our data demonstrate reservation of estimated glomerular filtration with cholecalciferol supplementation to chronic kidney disease patients taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers. The combination treatment of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers with cholecalciferol prevents the decline in estimated glomerular filtration in patients with chronic kidney disease following treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers and may represent a valid approach to reduce renal disease progression in chronic kidney disease patients with vitamin D deficiency. This result needs confirmation in prospective controlled clinical trials. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Effect of blood pressure lowering on markers of kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains a common comorbidity and cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD). As the number of patients with CKD grows, so does the need to identify modifiable risk factors for CKD progression. Data on slowing progression of CKD or preventing end-stage renal disease with aggressive blood pressure control have not yielded definitive conclusions regarding ideal blood pressure targets. Shifting the focus of antihypertensive therapy to alternative markers of end-organ damage, specifically proteinuria, has yielded some promise in preventing the progression of CKD. Nevertheless, proteinuria and decline in estimated GFR may represent an irreversible degree of injury to the kidney that limits the impact of any therapy. The identification and use of novel markers of kidney injury to assess the impact of antihyper-tensive therapy may yield clearer direction with regard to optimal management of hypertension in the setting of CKD.

  14. Evidence for chronic inflammation as a component of the interstitial lung disease associated with progressive systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, G.A.; Bitterman, P.B.; Rennard, S.I.; Ferrans, V.J.; Crystal, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) is a generalized disorder characterized by fibrosis of many organs including the lung parenchyma. Unlike most other interstitial disorders, traditional concepts of the interstitial lung disease associated with PSS have held it to be a ''pure'' fibrotic disorder without a significant inflammatory component. To directly evaluate whether an active alveolitis is associated with this disorder, patients with chronic interstitial lung disease and PSS were studied by open lung biopsy, gallium-67 scanning, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Histologic evaluation of the biopsies demonstrated that the interstitial fibrosis of PSS is clearly associated with the presence of macrophages, lymphocytes, and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, both in the interstitium and on the alveolar epithelial surface. Gallium-67 scans were positive in 77% of the patients, showing diffuse, primarily lower zone uptake, suggestive of active inflammation. Consistent with the histologic findings, bronchoalveolar lavage studies demonstrated a mild increase in the proportions of neutrophils and eosinophils with occasional increased numbers of lymphocytes. Importantly, alveolar macrophages from patients with PSS showed increased release of fibronectin and alveolar-macrophage-derived growth factor, mediators that together stimulate lung fibroblasts to proliferate, thus suggesting at least one mechanism modulating the lung fibrosis of these patients

  15. PTH levels and not serum phosphorus levels are a predictor of the progression of kidney disease in elderly patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toapanta Gaibor, Néstor Gabriel; Nava Pérez, Nathasha Carolina; Martínez Echevers, Yeleine; Montes Delgado, Rafael; Guerrero Riscos, María Ángeles

    At present, there is a high incidence of elderly patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and it is important to know the long term progression and the factors that influence it. To analyse the progression of advanced CKD in elderly patients and the influence of bone-mineral metabolism. Retrospective study of 125 patients ≥70years of age with CKD stages 4-5 who started follow-up from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008, showing the progression of CKD (measured by the slope of the regression line of the estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] by MDRD-4) over 5years. Progression in the entire group (median and 25th and 75th percentiles): -1.15 (-2.8/0.17) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year, CKD-4: -1.3 (-2.8/0.03) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year, CKD-5: -1.03 (-3.0/0.8) ml/min/1.73m 2 /year; the slope of the regression line was positive in 35 patients (28%: CKD does not progress) and negative in 90 patients (72%: CKD progresses). Negative correlation (Spearman) (slower progression): PTH, albumin/Cr ratio and daily Na excretion (all baseline measurements). No correlation with eGFR, serum P, urinary P excretion, protein intake and intake of P (all baseline measurements). In the linear regression analysis (dependent variable: slope of progression): albuminuria and PTH (both at baseline measurements) influenced this variable independently. Logistic regression (progresses vs. does not progress): PTH, albuminuria and eGFR (all at baseline measurements) influenced significantly. In our group of elderly patients, impairment of renal function is slow, particularly in CKD-5 patients. Albuminuria and PTH at baseline levels are prognostic factors in the evolution of renal function. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Chronic kidney disease : Defining clinical cut-offs for albumin:creatinine ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Stephan J L

    2013-01-01

    Albuminuria is rapidly gaining recognition as a marker of the presence and of the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In a new study, Naresh et al. attempt to define cut-off values for percentage change in urinary albumin:creatinine ratio that reflect changes in CKD status rather than

  17. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  18. Quality of chronic kidney disease management in primary care: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gelder, Vincent A; Scherpbier-De Haan, Nynke D; De Grauw, Wim J C; Vervoort, Gerald M M; Van Weel, Chris; Biermans, Marion C J; Braspenning, Jozé C C; Wetzels, Jack F M

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate management of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in primary care are essential to reduce morbidity and mortality. To assess the quality of care (QoC) of CKD in primary healthcare in relation to patient and practice characteristics in order to tailor improvement strategies. Retrospective study using data between 2008 and 2011 from 47 general practices (207 469 patients of whom 162 562 were adults). CKD management of patients under the care of their general practitioner (GP) was qualified using indicators derived from the Dutch interdisciplinary CKD guideline for primary care and nephrology and included (1) monitoring of renal function, albuminuria, blood pressure, and glucose, (2) monitoring of metabolic parameters, and alongside the guideline: (3) recognition of CKD. The outcome indicator was (4) achieving blood pressure targets. Multilevel logistic regression analysis was applied to identify associated patient and practice characteristics. Kidney function or albuminuria data were available for 59 728 adult patients; 9288 patients had CKD, of whom 8794 were under GP care. Monitoring of disease progression was complete in 42% of CKD patients, monitoring of metabolic parameters in 2%, and blood pressure target was reached in 43.1%. GPs documented CKD in 31.4% of CKD patients. High QoC was strongly associated with diabetes, and to a lesser extent with hypertension and male sex. Room for improvement was found in all aspects of CKD management. As QoC was higher in patients who received structured diabetes care, future CKD care may profit from more structured primary care management, e.g. according to the chronic care model. Quality of care for chronic kidney disease patients in primary care can be improved. In comparison with guideline advice, adequate monitoring of disease progression was observed in 42%, of metabolic parameters in 2%, correct recognition of impaired renal function in 31%, and reaching blood pressure targets in 43% of chronic

  19. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kusumi, Shizuyo; Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  20. Hepatitis virus infection and chronic liver disease among atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Cologne, John; Akahoshi, Masazumi [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan); Kusumi, Shizuyo [Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association, Tokyo (Japan); Kodama, Kazunori; Yoshizawa, Hiroshi [Hiroshima University School of Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    Hepatitis C and B virus (HCV, HBV) infection plays a crucial role in the etiology of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma, which have been reported to increase with radiation dose among the atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether radiation exposure altered the prevalence of hepatitis virus infection or accelerated the progress toward chronic hepatitis after hepatitis virus infection. Levels of serum antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV), HBs antigen (HBsAg), and anti-HBs antibody (anti-HBs) were measured for 6,121 participants in the Adult Health Study of atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. No relationship was found between anti-HCV prevalence and radiation dose, after adjusting for age, sex, city, history of blood transfusion, acupuncture, and family history, but prevalence of anti-HCV was significantly lower overall among the radiation-exposed people (relative prevalence 0.84, p=0.022) compared to people with estimated radiation dose 0 Gy. No significant interaction was found between any of the above mentioned risk factors and radiation dose. People with anti-HCV positive had 13 times higher prevalence of chronic liver disease than those without anti-HCV. However, the radiation dose response for chronic liver disease among anti-HCV positive survivors may be greater than that among anti-HCV negative survivors (slope ratio 20), but the difference was marginally significant (p=0.097). Prevalence of HBsAg increased with whole-body kerma. However, no trend with radiation dose was found in the anti-HBs prevalence. In the background, prevalence of chronic liver disease in people with HBsAg-positive was approximately three times higher that in those without HBsAg. No difference in slope of the dose was found among HBsAg positive and negative individuals (slope: HBsAg positive 0.91/Gy, HBsAg negative 0.11/Gy, difference p=0.66). In conclusion, no dose-response relationship was found between

  1. Effect of enalapril on the progression of chronic renal failure. A randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A L; Strandgaard, S; Leyssac, P P

    1992-01-01

    In order to study the influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the progression of chronic nephropathy, 70 patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 15 (range, 6 to 54) mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomized in an open study to basic treatment with enalapril or conve......In order to study the influence of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition on the progression of chronic nephropathy, 70 patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 15 (range, 6 to 54) mL/min/1.73 m2 were randomized in an open study to basic treatment with enalapril...... or conventional antihypertensive treatment. The patients were followed for at least 2 years or until they needed dialysis. The groups were comparable with respect to age and sex distribution, etiology of renal diseases, initial levels of renal function and arterial blood pressure (BP), and protein intake.......18 to -7.11) mL/min/1.73 m2/month and in the control group it was -0.31 (+0.01 to -1.97) mL/min/1.73 m2/month (P less than .05). There was no significant difference in blood pressure or plasma lipid levels between the groups. Thus, the progression of moderate to severe chronic nephropathy was slower...

  2. Dietary Metabolites and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Hasegawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dietary contents and their metabolites are closely related to chronic kidney disease (CKD progression. Advanced glycated end products (AGEs are a type of uremic toxin produced by glycation. AGE accumulation is not only the result of elevated glucose levels or reduced renal clearance capacity, but it also promotes CKD progression. Indoxyl sulfate, another uremic toxin derived from amino acid metabolism, accumulates as CKD progresses and induces tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerular sclerosis. Specific types of amino acids (d-serine or fatty acids (palmitate are reported to be closely associated with CKD progression. Promising therapeutic targets associated with nutrition include uremic toxin absorbents and inhibitors of AGEs or the receptor for AGEs (RAGE. Probiotics and prebiotics maintain gut flora balance and also prevent CKD progression by enhancing gut barriers and reducing uremic toxin formation. Nrf2 signaling not only ameliorates oxidative stress but also reduces elevated AGE levels. Bardoxolone methyl, an Nrf2 activator and NF-κB suppressor, has been tested as a therapeutic agent, but the phase 3 clinical trial was terminated owing to the high rate of cardiovascular events. However, a phase 2 trial has been initiated in Japan, and the preliminary analysis reveals promising results without an increase in cardiovascular events.

  3. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  4. Emphysema and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in coal miners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, L.H.S. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Coal mining remains a major industry that has workers at risk for developing chronic lung disease. Aside from simple coal workers' pneumoconiosis and progressive massive fibrosis, the development of emphysema and obstructive lung disease independent of smoking may be underappreciated. This article reviews more recent studies that may help rectify this faulty view. Cumulative exposure to coal dust is a significant risk factor for the development of emphysema and has an additive effect to smoking. Increased coal dust exposure is associated with increased risk of death from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In newly employed coal miners, bronchitic symptoms are associated with a rapid decline in lung function within 2 years after starting work. In evaluating impairment, the chest radiograph may be helpful as a marker of exposure but the diffusing capacity is most correlated with dyspnea, whereas the emphysema computed tomography score has good association with expiratory flow limitation. Latest studies further support the association of emphysema and COPD with coal dust exposure. Increased cumulative exposure may also increase risk of death from these diseases.

  5. New Directions in Chronic Disease Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hun-Sung Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A worldwide epidemic of chronic disease, and complications thereof, is underway, with no sign of abatement. Healthcare costs have increased tremendously, principally because of the need to treat chronic complications of non-communicable diseases including cardiovascular disease, blindness, end-stage renal disease, and amputation of extremities. Current healthcare systems fail to provide an appropriate quality of care to prevent the development of chronic complications without additional healthcare costs. A new paradigm for prevention and treatment of chronic disease and the complications thereof is urgently required. Several clinical studies have clearly shown that frequent communication between physicians and patients, based on electronic data transmission from medical devices, greatly assists in the management of chronic disease. However, for various reasons, these advantages have not translated effectively into real clinical practice. In the present review, we describe current relevant studies, and trends in the use of information technology for chronic disease management. We also discuss limitations and future directions.

  6. Frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullah, R.; Ghaffar, T.; Khan, I.; Muhammad, R.; Salman, S.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) is considered as risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD) along with other risk factors. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients with coronary artery disease. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the Pulmonology and Cardiology wards/OPD's of Khyber Teaching Hospital Peshawar. Patients more than 35 years of age, diagnosed with CAD of either gender were included. Patients already diagnosed with COPD, recent myocardial infarction (within 7 days), left ventricular impairment, pneumothorax, bronchiectasis, comatose patient, asthmatic and those with chest trauma were excluded. All the patients underwent spirometry examination before and after administration of salbutamol (5 mg for 5 minutes) via nebulizer. FEV1/FVC less than 70% confirmed the presence of COPD. Results: Out of 151 patients, 57 (37.7%) were found to have COPD. Among them, 39 (68.42%) were male and 18 (31.57%) were female. Among male patients with COPD, 82.05% (n=32) were smokers and 17.94% (n=7) were nonsmokers while in females with COPD no one was smoker. Conclusion: COPD is an under-diagnosed progressive disease in patients with high risk patients with coronary artery disease. (author)

  7. Chronic kidney disease screening methods and its implication for Malaysia: an in depth review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almualm, Yasmin; Zaman Huri, Hasniza

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred.  Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia.  Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR 60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been otherwise missed if only albuminuria and serum creatinine are measured.

  8. Second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors prevent disease progression in high-risk (high CIP2A) chronic myeloid leukaemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C M; Harris, R J; Holcroft, A K; Scott, L J; Carmell, N; McDonald, E; Polydoros, F; Clark, R E

    2015-07-01

    High cancerous inhibitor of PP2A (CIP2A) protein levels at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) are predictive of disease progression in imatinib-treated patients. It is not known whether this is true in patients treated with second generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (2G TKI) from diagnosis, and whether 2G TKIs modulate the CIP2A pathway. Here, we show that patients with high diagnostic CIP2A levels who receive a 2G TKI do not progress, unlike those treated with imatinib (P=<0.0001). 2G TKIs induce more potent suppression of CIP2A and c-Myc than imatinib. The transcription factor E2F1 is elevated in high CIP2A patients and following 1 month of in vivo treatment 2G TKIs suppress E2F1 and reduce CIP2A; these effects are not seen with imatinib. Silencing of CIP2A, c-Myc or E2F1 in K562 cells or CML CD34+ cells reactivates PP2A leading to BCR-ABL suppression. CIP2A increases proliferation and this is only reduced by 2G TKIs. Patients with high CIP2A levels should be offered 2G TKI treatment in preference to imatinib. 2G TKIs disrupt the CIP2A/c-Myc/E2F1 positive feedback loop, leading to lower disease progression risk. The data supports the view that CIP2A inhibits PP2Ac, stabilising E2F1, creating a CIP2A/c-Myc/E2F1 positive feedback loop, which imatinib cannot overcome.

  9. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  10. [50 years of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, M M; Mayerle, J

    2013-04-01

    The German Journal of Gastroenterology celebrates its fifties anniversary in 2013. Over half a century original studies, reviews and guidelines covering the topics of acute and chronic pancreatitis as well as pancreatic cancer have assumed a prominent role on its pages. Already in the first edition of the Journal Haemmerli and Hefti have summarized the Zurich experience with chronic pancreatitis and provided a detailed state-of-the-art review for the year 1963. 50 years later the current guidelines of the German Society of Digestive and Metabolic Diseases (DGVS) have been published in the same Journal and allow to summarize the scientific progress over this period. Back then chronic pancreatitis was regarded as a rare disorder (tenfold less common than e. g. acute pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer). This misconception had little to do with actual prevalence but with highly insensitive diagnostic tests, particularly in the area of diagnostic imaging. While pathogenetic factors for chronic pancreatitis, including a possible genetic disposition, were largely known in 1963, our understanding of their cellular mechanisms has very much improved. The greatest progress in diagnostic options was achieved by the introduction of novel imaging techniques such as ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound, ERCP, CT and MRCP. In terms of therapy the notion that a blockage of pancreatitic secretion is an effective pharmacological option has been abandoned and endoscopic intervention and surgical treatment have been newly developed as alternatives. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Dermatological diseases in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon1, Amy L; Desai, Tejas

    2013-04-01

    There are a variety of dermatological diseases that are more commonly seen in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and renal transplants than the general population. Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Google Scholar, Pubmed (NLM), LISTA (EBSCO) and Web of Science has been searched. Some cutaneous diseases are clearly unique to this population. Of them, Lindsay's Nails, xerosis cutis, dryness of the skin, nephrogenic systemic fibrosis and acquired perforating dermatosis have been described in chronic kidney disease patients. The most common malignancy found in all transplant recipients is non-melanoma skin cancer. It is important for patients and physicians to recognize the manifestations of skin disease in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease to mitigate the morbidity associated with these conditions.

  12. Magnesium modifies the association between serum phosphate and the risk of progression to end-stage kidney disease in patients with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yusuke; Iwatani, Hirotsugu; Hamano, Takayuki; Tomida, Kodo; Kawabata, Hiroaki; Kusunoki, Yasuo; Shimomura, Akihiro; Matsui, Isao; Hayashi, Terumasa; Tsubakihara, Yoshiharu; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2015-10-01

    It is known that magnesium antagonizes phosphate-induced apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells and prevents vascular calcification. Here we tested whether magnesium can also counteract other pathological conditions where phosphate toxicity is involved, such as progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We explored how the link between the risk of CKD progression and hyperphosphatemia is modified by magnesium status. A post hoc analysis was run in 311 non-diabetic CKD patients who were divided into four groups according to the median values of serum magnesium and phosphate. During a median follow-up of 44 months, 135 patients developed end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). After adjustment for relevant clinical factors, patients in the lower magnesium-higher phosphate group were at a 2.07-fold (95% CI: 1.23-3.48) risk for incident ESKD and had a significantly faster decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate compared with those in the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group. There were no significant differences in the risk of these renal outcomes among the higher magnesium-higher phosphate group and both lower phosphate groups. Incubation of tubular epithelial cells in high phosphate and low magnesium medium in vitro increased apoptosis and the expression levels of profibrotic and proinflammatory cytokine; these changes were significantly suppressed by increasing magnesium concentration. Thus, magnesium may act protectively against phosphate-induced kidney injury.

  13. Chronic progressive polyarthritis and other symptoms of collagen vascular disease induced by graft-vs-host reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, S. T.; Radaszkiewicz, T.; Roozendaal, L.; Gleichmann, E.

    1985-01-01

    The induction of a GVHR in (BALB/c X A)F1 mice by i.v. injection of 80 to 120 X 10(6) BALB/c spleen cells leads to the development of chronic progressive polyarthritis, which shares several of the articular and extra-articular manifestations of human rheumatoid arthritis. The development of these

  14. Sympathetic Overactivity in Chronic Kidney Disease: Consequences and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, with more than 26 million people suffering from CKD in the United States alone. More patients with CKD die of cardiovascular complications than progress to dialysis. Over 80% of CKD patients have hypertension, which is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Another common, perhaps underappreciated, feature of CKD is an overactive sympathetic nervous system. This elevation in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA not only contributes to hypertension but also plays a detrimental role in the progression of CKD independent of any increase in blood pressure. Indeed, high SNA is associated with poor prognosis and increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality independent of its effect on blood pressure. This brief review will discuss some of the consequences of sympathetic overactivity and highlight some of the potential pathways contributing to chronically elevated SNA in CKD. Mechanisms leading to chronic sympathoexcitation in CKD are complex, multifactorial and to date, not completely understood. Identification of the mechanisms and/or signals leading to sympathetic overactivity in CKD are crucial for development of effective therapeutic targets to reduce the increased cardiovascular risk in this patient group.

  15. Progression of Tubulointerstitial Fibrosis and the Chronic Kidney Disease Phenotype – Role of Risk Factors and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Hewitson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the kidney has capacity to repair after mild injury, ongoing or severe damage results in scarring (fibrosis and an associated progressive loss of kidney function. However, despite its universal significance, evidence highlights a population based heterogeneity in the trajectory of chronic kidney disease (CKD in these patients. To explain the heterogeneity of the CKD phenotype requires an understanding of the relevant risk factors for fibrosis. These factors include both the extrinsic nature of injury, and intrinsic factors such as age, gender, genetics, and perpetual activation of fibroblasts through priming. In many cases an additional level of regulation is provided by epigenetic mechanisms which integrate the various pro-fibrotic and anti-fibrotic triggers in fibrogenesis. In this review we therefore examine the various molecular and structural changes of fibrosis, and how they are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. Our aim is to provide a unifying hypothesis to help explain the transition from acute to CKD.

  16. Mycophenolate mofetil combined with systemic corticosteroids prevents progression to chronic recurrent inflammation and development of 'sunset glow fundus' in initial-onset acute uveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M; Dosari, Mona; Hemachandran, Suhail; Gikandi, Priscilla W; Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as first-line therapy combined with systemic corticosteroids in initial-onset acute uveitis associated with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease. This prospective study included 38 patients (76 eyes). The main outcome measures were final visual acuity, corticosteroid-sparing effect, progression to chronic recurrent granulomatous uveitis and development of complications, particularly 'sunset glow fundus'. The mean follow-up period was 37.0 ± 29.3 (range 9-120 months). Visual acuity of 20/20 was achieved by 93.4% of the eyes. Corticosteroid-sparing effect was achieved in all patients. The mean interval between starting treatment and tapering to 10 mg or less daily was 3.8 ± 1.3 months (range 3-7 months). Twenty-two patients (57.9%) discontinued treatment without relapse of inflammation. The mean time observed off of treatment was 28.1 ± 19.6 months (range 1-60 months). None of the eyes progressed to chronic recurrent granulomatous uveitis. The ocular complications encountered were glaucoma in two eyes (2.6%) and cataract in five eyes (6.6%). None of the eyes developed 'sunset glow fundus', and none of the patients developed any systemic adverse events associated with the treatment. Use of MMF as first-line therapy combined with systemic corticosteroids in patients with initial-onset acute VKH disease prevents progression to chronic recurrent granulomatous inflammation and development of 'sunset glow fundus'. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Effect of low-protein diet supplemented with keto acids on progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneata, Liliana; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2013-05-01

    Hypoproteic diets are most often discussed for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) who do not receive dialysis. A very low-protein diet supplemented with ketoanalogues of essential amino acids (keto-diet) proved effective in ameliorating metabolic disturbances of advanced CKD and delaying the initiation of dialysis without deleterious effects on nutritional status. Several recent studies report that the keto-diet could also slow down the rate of decline in renal function, with better outcomes after the initiation of dialysis. Results of a single-center randomized controlled trial addressing the rate of CKD progression revealed a 57% slower decline in renal function with the keto-diet compared with a conventional low-protein diet (LPD). The keto-diet allowed the safe management of selected patients with stage 4-5 CKD, delaying dialysis for almost 1 year, with a major impact on patient quality of life and health expenditures. Therefore, the keto-diet could be a link in the integrated care model. Careful selection of patients, nutritional monitoring, and dietary counseling are required. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of maternal chronic diseases during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølving, Line Riis; Nielsen, Jan; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is substantial evidence of a negative impact of maternal chronic disease during pregnancy on reproductive outcomes. Knowledge of the prevalence of chronic diseases during pregnancy is limited, but essential for a focused preventive effort regarding optimal disease control during...... chronic diseases were chronic lung diseases/asthma (1.73%), thyroid disorders (1.50%) and anxiety and personality disorders (1.33%). Taking increasing maternal age at birth into account, the relative risk for women to have a chronic disease from 2009 to 2013 was 4.14 (95% CI 4.05-4.22), compared...

  19. Progression of recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: A short-term follow up study from a southern Indian centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, M Ganesh; Pai, C Ganesh; Kamath, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Little data exist on the progression of recurrent acute (RAP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) from regions from where the entity of tropical chronic pancreatitis was originally described. The study aimed to follow up patients with RAP and CP seen at a southern Indian centre for progression of disease over time. Prospectively enrolled patients with RAP and CP were followed up, and the alcoholic and idiopathic subgroups were assessed for progression of structural and functional changes in the organ. One hundred and forty patients (RAP = 44; 31.4 %, CP = 96; 68.5 %) were followed up over a median 12.2 (interquartile range 12.0-16.8) months. The cause was alcohol in 31 (22.1 %) and not evident in 109 (77.8 %). The disease progressed from RAP to CP in 7 (15.9 %), 6 (16.2 %) out of 37 in the idiopathic and 1 (14.2 %; p = 1.00) out of 7 in the alcoholic subgroups. Three (42.8 %) and 1 (14.2 %) developed steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus (DM), respectively, and 2 (4.5 %) developed calcification. Established CP progressed in 19 (19.7 %), 1 (1.0 %), 5 (5.2 %), 2 (2.0 %) and 11 (11.4 %) newly developed DM, steatorrhea, calcification and duct dilation during follow up. Among the idiopathic and alcoholic CP, disease progression was seen in 15 (20.8 %) out of 72 and 4 (16.6 %) out of 24 respectively. Idiopathic RAP and CP progressed during the short-term follow up. This is similar to other etiological forms of pancreatitis, as described from elsewhere in the world.

  20. Do We Need a Diet Therapy to Manage Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease in the Predialysis Period?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Kushnirenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the criteria for diagnosis of chronic kidney disease and the feasibility of diet therapy in combination with keto-analogues of essential amino acids at predialysis stage. It is proved that additional administration to the patients with predialysis chronic kidney disease of keto-analogues of essential amino acids enhances the metabolic beneficial effects of low-protein diet, promotes normalization of the amino acid composition of the blood and correction of metabolic acidosis, supports the parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism at an optimum level under reduced protein intake, slowing further progression of chronic kidney disease.

  1. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  2. Correlations of Hepatic Hemodynamics, Liver Function, and Fibrosis Markers in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Comparison with Chronic Hepatitis Related to Hepatitis C Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Shigefuku, Ryuta; Takahashi, Hideaki; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Matsunaga, Kotaro; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki; Kato, Masaki; Morita, Ryo; Michikawa, Yousuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Hiraishi, Tetsuya; Hattori, Nobuhiro; Noguchi, Yohei; Nakahara, Kazunari; Ikeda, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    The progression of chronic liver disease differs by etiology. The aim of this study was to elucidate the difference in disease progression between chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by means of fibrosis markers, liver function, and hepatic tissue blood flow (TBF). Xenon computed tomography (Xe-CT) was performed in 139 patients with NAFLD and 152 patients with CHC (including liver cirrhosis (LC)). The cutoff values for fibrosis markers were compared between ...

  3. Chronic diseases in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Wraae, Kristian; Gudex, Claire

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: prevalence estimates for chronic diseases and associated risk factors are needed for priority setting and disease prevention strategies. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the self-reported and clinical prevalence of common chronic disorders in elderly men. STUDY......-reported data on risk factors and disease prevalence were compared with data from hospital medical records. RESULTS: physical inactivity, smoking and excessive alcohol intake were reported by 27, 22 and 17% of the study population, respectively. Except for diabetes, all the chronic diseases investigated......, including hypertension, musculoskeletal and respiratory diseases were underreported by study participants. Erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism were substantially underreported in the study population even though these diseases were found to affect 48 and 21% of the participants, respectively. CONCLUSIONS...

  4. Assessing risk of fibrosis progression and liver-related clinical outcomes among patients with both early stage and advanced chronic hepatitis C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica A Konerman

    Full Text Available Assessing risk of adverse outcomes among patients with chronic liver disease has been challenging due to non-linear disease progression. We previously developed accurate prediction models for fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes among patients with advanced chronic hepatitis C (CHC. The primary aim of this study was to validate fibrosis progression and clinical outcomes models among a heterogeneous patient cohort.Adults with CHC with ≥3 years follow-up and without hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, liver transplant (LT, HBV or HIV co-infection at presentation were analyzed (N = 1007. Outcomes included: 1 fibrosis progression 2 hepatic decompensation 3 HCC and 4 LT-free survival. Predictors included longitudinal clinical and laboratory data. Machine learning methods were used to predict outcomes in 1 and 3 years.The external cohort had a median age of 49.4 years (IQR 44.3-54.3; 61% were male, 80% white, and 79% had genotype 1. At presentation, 73% were treatment naïve and 31% had cirrhosis. Fibrosis progression occurred in 34% over a median of 4.9 years (IQR 3.2-7.6. Clinical outcomes occurred in 22% over a median of 4.4 years (IQR 3.2-7.6. Model performance for fibrosis progression was limited due to small sample size. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC for 1 and 3-year risk of clinical outcomes was 0.78 (95% CI 0.73-0.83 and 0.76 (95% CI 0.69-0.81.Accurate assessments for risk of clinical outcomes can be obtained using routinely collected data across a heterogeneous cohort of patients with CHC. These methods can be applied to predict risk of progression in other chronic liver diseases.

  5. Haematuria as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease progression in glomerular diseases: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Juan Antonio; Yuste, Claudia; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Sevillano, Ángel M; Rubio-Navarro, Alfonso; Amaro-Villalobos, Juan Manuel; Praga, Manuel; Egido, Jesús

    2016-04-01

    Haematuria has long been considered to be a benign condition associated with glomerular diseases. However, new evidences suggest that haematuria has a pathogenic role in promoting kidney disease progression. An increased risk for end-stage renal disease has been reported in adolescents and young adults with persistent microscopic haematuria. A persistent impairment of renal function has been also reported following macroscopic haematuria-associated acute kidney injury in immunoglobulin A nephropathy. Haematuria-induced renal damage has been related to oxidant, cytotoxic and inflammatory effects induced by haemoglobin or haem released from red blood cells. The pathophysiological origin of haematuria may be due to a more fragile and easily ruptured glomerular filtration barrier, as reported in several glomerular diseases. In this review we describe a number of the key issues associated with the epidemiology and pathogenesis of haematuria-associated diseases, provide an update of recent knowledge on the role of haematuria on renal function outcome and discuss specific therapeutic approaches in this setting. KEY SUMMARY POINTS: 1. Glomerular haematuria is a common observation in a number of renal diseases that may lead to persistent renal injury. 2. Haematuria in children differs from that in adults in specific aspects, particularly in the frequency of glomerular diseases and renal disease outcome. 3. Regular follow-up of renal function in children with isolated microhaematuria may be recommended.

  6. Progression of Renal Impairment and Chronic Kidney Disease in Chronic Heart Failure: An Analysis From GISSI-HF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Masson, Serge; Lucci, Donata; Gorini, Marco; Urso, Renato; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Tarantini, Luigi; Tognoni, Gianni; Voors, Adriaan; Latini, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Data on the natural change in renal function in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was assessed over 36 months in 6934 patients included in the GISSI-HF study. Associations from baseline, changes in renal function, and occurrence of cardiovascular death or HF hospitalization were assessed. Mean age was 67 years, mainly men (78%), and mean eGFR was 68 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Change in eGFR in the 1st year was -1.5 ± 16 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 , and over 36 months it was -3.7 ± 18 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 . Over the latter period, only 25% deteriorated ≥1 Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiatives (KDOQI) class of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Fifteen percent of patients had >15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 decrease in eGFR in the 1st 12 months. Lower eGFR was associated with outcome: hazard ratio (HR) 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.10 (P 15 mL • min -1  • 1.73 m -2 in the 1st year showed the highest risk of events (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.36; P renal function over time in patients with chronic HF was modest. Only 25% deteriorated ≥1 KDOQI class of CKD after 3 years. Any decrease in eGFR over time was associated with strongly increased event rates. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Empowering Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bestek, Mate; Meglič, Matic; Kurent, Blaž

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic diseases require most of the resources in todays healthcare systems. Healthcare systems, as such, are thus not sustainable in the long term. Solutions to this problem are needed and a lot of research is focused on finding new approaches to more sustainable healthcare systems...... himself to become empowered. The patient needs to see data about his health in order to start thinking about new decisions in life that can lead to change in his behaviour. Objective: We have approached the problem of empowering patients with chronic diseases from a biological, psychological, sociological....... We want to develop extensible technology to support even more new interventions for different chronic diseases. We want the technology to enable semantic interoperability with other systems. Methods: We have collaborated with doctors in order to model the care plans for different chronic diseases...

  8. Predictors of high healthcare resource utilization and liver disease progression among patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMori, Joyce; Tandon, Neeta; Laliberté, François; Germain, Guillaume; Pilon, Dominic; Lefebvre, Patrick; Prabhakar, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Since hepatitis C virus therapy is typically prioritized for patients with more advanced disease, predicting which patients will progress could help direct scarce resources to those likely to benefit most. This study aims to identify demographics and clinical characteristics associated with high healthcare resource utilization (HRU) and liver disease progression among CHC patients. Using health insurance claims (January 2001-March 2013), adult patients with ≥2 CHC claims (ICD-9-CM: 070.44 or 070.54), and ≥6 months of continuous insurance coverage before and ≥36 months after the first CHC diagnosis were included. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus were excluded. Generalized estimating equations were used to identify the demographic and clinical characteristics of being in the 20% of patients with the highest HRU. Factors predicting liver disease progression were also identified. In the study population (n = 4898), liver disease severity and both CHC- and non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions were strong predictors of high healthcare costs, with odds ratios (ORs; 95% confidence interval [CI]) for ≥2 CHC-related and ≥2 non-CHC-related comorbidities/conditions of 2.78 (2.48-3.12) and 2.19 (1.76-2.72), respectively. CHC- and non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions were also strong predictors of liver disease progression with ORs (95% CI) for ≥2 CHC-related and ≥2 non-CHC-related comorbidities and conditions of 2.18 (1.83-2.60) and 1.50 (1.14-1.97), respectively. Potential inaccuracies in claims data, information or classification bias, and findings based on a privately insured population. This study suggests that CHC patients with high healthcare resource utilization have a high level of comorbidity at baseline and also that non-CHC comorbidities and conditions are strong predictors of high HRU. Non-cirrhotic CHC patients with one or more comorbidities are at high risk of progressing to cirrhosis or end-stage liver disease.

  9. Gallstones in Patients with Chronic Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With prevalence of 10–20% in adults in developed countries, gallstone disease (GSD is one of the most prevalent and costly gastrointestinal tract disorders in the world. In addition to gallstone disease, chronic liver disease (CLD is also an important global public health problem. The reported frequency of gallstone in chronic liver disease tends to be higher. The prevalence of gallstone disease might be related to age, gender, etiology, and severity of liver disease in patients with chronic liver disease. In this review, the aim was to identify the epidemiology, mechanisms, and treatment strategies of gallstone disease in chronic liver disease patients.

  10. Interferon-γ production by tubulointerstitial human CD56bright natural killer cells contributes to renal fibrosis and chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Becker M P; Wilkinson, Ray; Wang, Xiangju; Kildey, Katrina; Lindner, Mae; Rist, Melissa J; Beagley, Kenneth; Healy, Helen; Kassianos, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a population of lymphoid cells that play a significant role in mediating innate immune responses. Studies in mice suggest a pathological role for NK cells in models of kidney disease. In this study, we characterized the NK cell subsets present in native kidneys of patients with tubulointerstitial fibrosis, the pathological hallmark of chronic kidney disease. Significantly higher numbers of total NK cells (CD3 - CD56 + ) were detected in renal biopsies with tubulointerstitial fibrosis compared with diseased biopsies without fibrosis and healthy kidney tissue using multi-color flow cytometry. At a subset level, both the CD56 dim NK cell subset and particularly the CD56 bright NK cell subset were elevated in fibrotic kidney tissue. However, only CD56 bright NK cells significantly correlated with the loss of kidney function. Expression of the tissue-retention and -activation molecule CD69 on CD56 bright NK cells was significantly increased in fibrotic biopsy specimens compared with non-fibrotic kidney tissue, indicative of a pathogenic phenotype. Further flow cytometric phenotyping revealed selective co-expression of activating receptor CD335 (NKp46) and differentiation marker CD117 (c-kit) on CD56 bright NK cells. Multi-color immunofluorescent staining of fibrotic kidney tissue localized the accumulation of NK cells within the tubulointerstitium, with CD56 bright NK cells (NKp46 + CD117 + ) identified as the source of pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ within the NK cell compartment. Thus, activated interferon-γ-producing CD56 bright NK cells are positioned to play a key role in the fibrotic process and progression to chronic kidney disease. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk prediction for chronic kidney disease progression using heterogeneous electronic health record data and time series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotte, Adler; Ranganath, Rajesh; Hirsch, Jamie S; Blei, David; Elhadad, Noémie

    2015-07-01

    As adoption of electronic health records continues to increase, there is an opportunity to incorporate clinical documentation as well as laboratory values and demographics into risk prediction modeling. The authors develop a risk prediction model for chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression from stage III to stage IV that includes longitudinal data and features drawn from clinical documentation. The study cohort consisted of 2908 primary-care clinic patients who had at least three visits prior to January 1, 2013 and developed CKD stage III during their documented history. Development and validation cohorts were randomly selected from this cohort and the study datasets included longitudinal inpatient and outpatient data from these populations. Time series analysis (Kalman filter) and survival analysis (Cox proportional hazards) were combined to produce a range of risk models. These models were evaluated using concordance, a discriminatory statistic. A risk model incorporating longitudinal data on clinical documentation and laboratory test results (concordance 0.849) predicts progression from state III CKD to stage IV CKD more accurately when compared to a similar model without laboratory test results (concordance 0.733, P<.001), a model that only considers the most recent laboratory test results (concordance 0.819, P < .031) and a model based on estimated glomerular filtration rate (concordance 0.779, P < .001). A risk prediction model that takes longitudinal laboratory test results and clinical documentation into consideration can predict CKD progression from stage III to stage IV more accurately than three models that do not take all of these variables into consideration. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  12. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cysts Solitary Kidney Your Kidneys & How They Work Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  13. A Customizable Model for Chronic Disease Coordination: Lessons Learned From the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voetsch, Karen; Sequeira, Sonia; Chavez, Amy Holmes

    2016-03-31

    In 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided funding and technical assistance to all states and territories to implement the Coordinated Chronic Disease Program, marking the first time that all state health departments had federal resources to coordinate chronic disease prevention and control programs. This article describes lessons learned from this initiative and identifies key elements of a coordinated approach. We analyzed 80 programmatic documents from 21 states and conducted semistructured interviews with 7 chronic disease directors. Six overarching themes emerged: 1) focused agenda, 2) identification of functions, 3) comprehensive planning, 4) collaborative leadership and expertise, 5) managed resources, and 6) relationship building. These elements supported 4 essential activities: 1) evidence-based interventions, 2) strategic use of staff, 3) consistent communication, and 4) strong program infrastructure. On the basis of these elements and activities, we propose a conceptual model that frames overarching concepts, skills, and strategies needed to coordinate state chronic disease prevention and control programs.

  14. Leveraging human-centered design in chronic disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Gordon O; Pacione, Chris; Shultz, Rebecca K; Klügl, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Bridging the knowing-doing gap in the prevention of chronic disease requires deep appreciation and understanding of the complexities inherent in behavioral change. Strategies that have relied exclusively on the implementation of evidence-based data have not yielded the desired progress. The tools of human-centered design, used in conjunction with evidence-based data, hold much promise in providing an optimal approach for advancing disease prevention efforts. Directing the focus toward wide-scale education and application of human-centered design techniques among healthcare professionals will rapidly multiply their effective ability to bring the kind of substantial results in disease prevention that have eluded the healthcare industry for decades. This, in turn, would increase the likelihood of prevention by design. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Urine Trefoil Factors as Prognostic Biomarkers in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanari, Toshio; Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Morinaga, Hiroshi; Kitagawa, Masashi; Onishi, Akifumi; Ogawa-Akiyama, Ayu; Kano, Yuzuki; Mise, Koki; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Shikata, Kenichi; Wada, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides are increased in serum and urine in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, whether the levels of TFF predict the progression of CKD remains to be elucidated. We determined the TFF levels using peptide-specific ELISA in spot urine samples and performed a prospective cohort study. The association between the levels of urine TFFs and other urine biomarkers as well as the renal prognosis was analyzed in 216 CKD patients (mean age: 53.7 years, 47.7% female, 56.9% with chronic glomerulonephritis, and mean eGFR: 58.5 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ). The urine TFF1 and TFF3 levels significantly increased with the progression of CKD stages, but not the urine TFF2 levels. The TFF1 and TFF3 peptide levels predicted the progression of CKD ≥ stage 3b by ROC analysis (AUC 0.750 and 0.879, resp.); however, TFF3 alone predicted CKD progression in a multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio 3.854, 95% confidence interval 1.316-11.55). The Kaplan-Meier survival curves demonstrated that patients with a higher TFF1 and TFF3 alone, or in combination with macroalbuminuria, had a significantly worse renal prognosis. The data suggested that urine TFF peptides are associated with renal progression and the outcomes in patients with CKD.

  16. Association of Intensive Blood Pressure Control and Kidney Disease Progression in Nondiabetic Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Chuan; Peng, Yu-Sen; Yang, Ju-Yeh; Chen, Hung-Yuan; Chiu, Yen-Ling; Hsu, Shih-Ping; Ko, Mei-Ju; Pai, Mei-Fen; Tu, Yu-Kang; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chien, Kuo-Liong

    2017-01-01

    Importance The optimal blood pressure (BP) target remains debated in nondiabetic patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective To compare intensive BP control (intensive vs a standard BP target in nondiabetic adults with CKD, reporting changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), doubling of serum creatinine level, 50% reduction in GFR, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), or all-cause mortality. Data Extraction and Synthesis Random-effects meta-analyses for pooling effect measures. Meta-regression and subgroup analyses for exploring heterogeneity. Main Outcomes and Measures Differences in annual rate of change in GFR were expressed as mean differences with 95% CIs. Differences in doubling of serum creatinine or 50% reduction in GFR, ESRD, composite renal outcome, and all-cause mortality were expressed as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% CIs. Results We identified 9 trials with 8127 patients and a median follow-up of 3.3 years. Compared with standard BP control, intensive BP control did not show a significant difference on the annual rate of change in GFR (mean difference, 0.07; 95% CI, −0.16 to 0.29 mL/min/1.73 m2/y), doubling of serum creatinine level or 50% reduction in GFR (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.76-1.29), ESRD (RR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.78-1.18), composite renal outcome (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.81-1.21), or all-cause mortality (RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.64-1.02). Intensive BP control reduced mortality (RR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.61-0.99) in sensitivity analysis when the study populations were strictly restricted to those without diabetes. Nonblacks and patients with higher levels of proteinuria showed a trend of lower risk of kidney disease progression with intensive BP control. Conclusions and Relevance Targeting BP below the current standard did not provide additional benefit for renal outcomes compared with standard treatment during a follow-up of 3.3 years in patients with CKD without diabetes. However, nonblack patients or those with higher levels of proteinuria might benefit from

  17. Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings

    OpenAIRE

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Psicólogo, magíster en Salud Pública.; Ipince, Alessandra; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. antropóloga.; Toyama, Mauricio; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Letras y Ciencias Humanas, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, Lima, Perú. estudiante de Psicología.; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú. médico geriatra.; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico cirujano.; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Gerencia de Prestaciones Primarias de Salud, Gerencia Central de Prestaciones de Salud, Seguro Social del Perú, EsSalud. Lima, Perú. médico pediatra.; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Centro de Salud “El Progreso”, Microrred de Salud Carabayllo, Red de Salud Túpac Amaru, DISA V Lima Ciudad, Ministerio de Salud, Lima, Perú. psicólogo.; Araya, Ricardo; Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Londres, Reino Unido. médico psiquiatra, doctor en Epidemiología Psiquiátrica.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Addition...

  18. Hypoxemia in patients with COPD: cause, effects, and disease progression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of death and disability internationally. Alveolar hypoxia and consequent hypoxemia increase in prevalence as disease severity increases. Ventilation\\/perfusion mismatch resulting from progressive airflow limitation and emphysema is the key driver of this hypoxia, which may be exacerbated by sleep and exercise. Uncorrected chronic hypoxemia is associated with the development of adverse sequelae of COPD, including pulmonary hypertension, secondary polycythemia, systemic inflammation, and skeletal muscle dysfunction. A combination of these factors leads to diminished quality of life, reduced exercise tolerance, increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity, and greater risk of death. Concomitant sleep-disordered breathing may place a small but significant subset of COPD patients at increased risk of these complications. Long-term oxygen therapy has been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, reduce erythrocytosis, and improve survival in selected patients with severe hypoxemic respiratory failure. However, the optimal treatment for patients with exertional oxyhemoglobin desaturation, isolated nocturnal hypoxemia, or mild-to-moderate resting daytime hypoxemia remains uncertain.

  19. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia disease progression is accelerated by APRIL-TACI interaction in the TCL1 transgenic mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lascano, Valeria; Guadagnoli, Marco; Schot, Jan G.; Luijks, Dieuwertje M.; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; Cameron, Katherine; Hahne, Michael; Pals, Steven; Slinger, Erik; Kipps, Thomas J.; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Eldering, Eric; Medema, Jan Paul; Kater, Arnon P.

    2013-01-01

    Although in vitro studies pointed to the tumor necrosis factor family member APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand) in mediating survival of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells, clear evidence for a role in leukemogenesis and progression in CLL is lacking. APRIL significantly prolonged in

  20. HIV/AIDS, chronic diseases and globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    HIV/AIDS has always been one of the most thoroughly global of diseases. In the era of widely available anti-retroviral therapy (ART), it is also commonly recognised as a chronic disease that can be successfully managed on a long-term basis. This article examines the chronic character of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and highlights some of the changes we might expect to see at the global level as HIV is increasingly normalised as "just another chronic disease". The article also addresses the use of this language of chronicity to interpret the HIV/AIDS pandemic and calls into question some of the consequences of an uncritical acceptance of concepts of chronicity.

  1. The Role of Dendritic Cells in Fibrosis Progression in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Almeda-Valdes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most frequent cause of chronic liver disease. NAFLD encompasses a wide range of pathologies, from simple steatosis to steatosis with inflammation to fibrosis. The pathogenesis of NAFLD progression has not been completely elucidated, and different liver cells could be implicated. This review focuses on the current evidence of the role of liver dendritic cells (DCs in the progression from NAFLD to fibrosis. Liver DCs are a heterogeneous population of hepatic antigen-presenting cells; their main function is to induce T-cell mediated immunity by antigen processing and presentation to T cells. During the steady state liver DCs are immature and tolerogenic. However, in an environment of chronic inflammation, DCs are transformed to potent inducers of immune responses. There is evidence about the role of DC in liver fibrosis, but it is not clearly understood. Interestingly, there might be a link between lipid metabolism and DC function, suggesting that immunogenic DCs are associated with liver lipid storage, representing a possible pathophysiological mechanism in NAFLD development. A better understanding of the interaction between inflammatory pathways and the different cell types and the effect on the progression of NAFLD is of great relevance.

  2. Fisetin and Its Role in Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Harish C; Pearlman, Ross L; Afaq, Farrukh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a prolonged and dysregulated immune response leading to a wide variety of physiological and pathological conditions such as neurological abnormalities, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, obesity, pulmonary diseases, immunological diseases, cancers, and other life-threatening conditions. Therefore, inhibition of persistent inflammation will reduce the risk of inflammation-associated chronic diseases. Inflammation-related chronic diseases require chronic treatment without side effects. Use of traditional medicines and restricted diet has been utilized by mankind for ages to prevent or treat several chronic diseases. Bioactive dietary agents or "Nutraceuticals" present in several fruits, vegetables, legumes, cereals, fibers, and certain spices have shown potential to inhibit or reverse the inflammatory responses and several chronic diseases related to chronic inflammation. Due to safe, nontoxic, and preventive benefits, the use of nutraceuticals as dietary supplements or functional foods has increased in the Western world. Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone) is a dietary flavonoid found in various fruits (strawberries, apples, mangoes, persimmons, kiwis, and grapes), vegetables (tomatoes, onions, and cucumbers), nuts, and wine that has shown strong anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-tumorigenic, anti-invasive, anti-angiogenic, anti-diabetic, neuroprotective, and cardioprotective effects in cell culture and in animal models relevant to human diseases. In this chapter, we discuss the beneficial pharmacological effects of fisetin against different pathological conditions with special emphasis on diseases related to chronic inflammatory conditions.

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  4. Mechanisms by Which Dehydration May Lead to Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncal-Jimenez, C; Lanaspa, M A; Jensen, T; Sanchez-Lozada, L G; Johnson, R J

    2015-01-01

    Dehydration, a condition that characterizes excessive loss of body water, is well known to be associated with acute renal dysfunction; however, it has largely been considered reversible and to be associated with no long-term effects on the kidney. Recently, an epidemic of chronic kidney disease has emerged in Central America in which the major risk factor seems to be recurrent heat-associated dehydration. This has led to studies investigating whether recurrent dehydration may lead to permanent kidney damage. Three major potential mechanisms have been identified, including the effects of vasopressin on the kidney, the activation of the aldose reductase-fructokinase pathway, and the effects of chronic hyperuricemia. The discovery of these pathways has also led to the recognition that mild dehydration may be a risk factor in progression of all types of chronic kidney diseases. Furthermore, there is some evidence that increasing hydration, particularly with water, may actually prevent CKD. Thus, a whole new area of investigation is developing that focuses on the role of water and osmolarity and their influence on kidney function and health. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  6. Th2 Regulation of Viral Myocarditis in Mice: Different Roles for TLR3 versus TRIF in Progression to Chronic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric D. Abston

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are able to induce autoimmune inflammation in the heart. Here, we investigated the role of virus-activated Toll-like receptor (TLR3 and its adaptor TRIF on the development of autoimmune coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis in mice. Although TLR3- or TRIF-deficient mice developed similarly worse acute CVB3 myocarditis and viral replication compared to control mice, disease was significantly worse in TRIF compared to TLR3-deficient mice. Interestingly, TLR3-deficient mice developed an interleukin (IL-4-dominant T helper (Th2 response during acute CVB3 myocarditis with elevated markers of alternative activation, while TRIF-deficient mice elevated the Th2-associated cytokine IL-33. Treatment of TLR3-deficient mice with recombinant IL-33 improved heart function indicating that elevated IL-33 in the context of a classic Th2-driven response protects against autoimmune heart disease. We show for the first time that TLR3 versus TRIF deficiency results in different Th2 responses that uniquely influence the progression to chronic myocarditis.

  7. [The role of balanced low-protein diet in inhibition of predialysis chronic kidney disease progression in patients with systemic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanov, Iu S; Lysenko, L V; Milovanova, L Iu; Dobrosmyslov, I A

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of low-protein diet (LPD) balanced by addition of highly energetic mix and essential keto/amino acids on inhibition of renal failure in patients with systemic diseases with predialysis stages of chronic disease of the kidney (CDK). Forty six patients with stage III--IV of CDK in systemic diseases (33 SLE patients and 13 with systemic vasculitis) were randomized into three groups. Group 1 consisted of 18 patients with CDK (10 with stage III and 8 with stage IV). They received LPD (0.6 g/kg/day) with addition of essential keto/amino acids for 24-48 months. Group 2 of 18 CDK patients with the same stages received the same diet but greater amount of vegetable protein (highly purified soya protein) to 0.3 g/kg/day in highly energetic nutrient mixture. Group 3--10 CDK patients (7 with stage III and 3 with stage IV) received free diet. Group 1 and 2 patients received LPD irrespective of the nutrient status assessed basing on anthropometric and other data. Protein consumption and caloric value were estimated by 3-day food diary. Before diet therapy, out of 46 examinees nutrient status was abnormal in 45.7% patients. Both variants of LPD were well tolerated and nutrient status was corrected while the rate of nutritive disorders in group 3 increased 1.5-fold (from 40 to 60%) with progression of renal failure. Intake of LPD diet for at least a year reduced glomerular filtration rate inhibition, especially in addition of highly energetic mixture. Early (predialysis) restriction of diet protein (0.6 g/kg/day) with addition of highly energetic mixture and essential keto/amino acids improves a nutritive status of CDK patients and inhibits GFR decline.

  8. Etiologies of chronic liver disease in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahmand F

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Liver diseases in children is the result of many different diseases including: metabolic, genetic, infectious, toxic and idiopathic causes. This was a case series study on 133 infants and children with age range 6 month to 12 years old, who presented clinically with manifestation of chronic liver disease and were admitted to Children Hospital Medical Center from year 1999 to 2000. In this study, 32 (24.5 percent patients had autoimmune chronic hepatitis, 15 (11.3 percent Glycogen storage diseases, 12 (9 percent extrahepatic biliary atresia, 11 (8.2 percent willson disease, 10 (7.5 percent cryptogenic cirrhosis, 6 (4.5 percent chronic hepatitis C, 5 (3.8 percen chronic hepatitic B, 5 (3.8 percent galactosemia 3 (2.25 percent congenital hepatic fibrosis, 3 (3.8 percent histiocytosis X, 3 (2.25 percent sclerosing cholangitis, 2 (1.5 percent byler’s disease 2 (1.5 percent primary tuberculosis, 1 (0.75 percent choledocalcyst, 1 (0.75 percent Alagyle syndrome. According to our data, chronic liver disease should be considered in infants and children. In our study, the most common causes are found to be: metabolic and genetic diseases (37.5 percent, chronic autoimmune hepatitis (24 percent and biliary disorders (14 percent, that encompass 86 percent of the patients.

  9. Prediction of fibrosis progression in chronic viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Lai-Hung Wong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of liver fibrosis progression has a key role in the management of chronic viral hepatitis, as it will be translated into the future risk of cirrhosis and its various complications including hepatocellular carcinoma. Both hepatitis B and C viruses mainly lead to fibrogenesis induced by chronic inflammation and a continuous wound healing response. At the same time direct and indirect profibrogenic responses are also elicited by the viral infection. There are a handful of well-established risk factors for fibrosis progression including older age, male gender, alcohol use, high viral load and co-infection with other viruses. Metabolic syndrome is an evolving risk factor of fibrosis progression. The new notion of regression of advanced fibrosis or even cirrhosis is now strongly supported various clinical studies. Even liver biopsy retains its important role in the assessment of fibrosis progression, various non-invasive assessments have been adopted widely because of their non-invasiveness, which facilitates serial applications in large cohorts of subjects. Transient elastography is one of the most validated tools which has both diagnostic and prognostic role. As there is no single perfect test for liver fibrosis assessment, algorithms combining the most validated noninvasive methods should be considered as initial screening tools.

  10. A novel del(8)(q23.2q24.11) contributing to disease progression in a case of JAK2/TET2 double mutated chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Petersen, Marie; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Nederby, Line

    2014-01-01

    We have identified a novel 7.7 Mb del(8)(q23.2q24.11) in a patient progressing to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) following a 12-year stable phase of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). A surprisingly high JAK2+ allelic burden of 92% at the time of AML led us to delineate the molecular aberrations...... relevant for leukemogenesis. While a frameshift mutation in the TET2 gene was stably present throughout the course of disease the JAK2 mutation was acquired after initial diagnosis of CMML. At progression aCGH revealed del(8q)(q23.2q24.11) encompassing various cancer relevant genes of which RAD21 and CSMD3...

  11. MMP3 and TIMP1 variants contribute to chronic periodontitis and may be implicated in disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letra, Ariadne; Silva, Renato M; Rylands, Ryan J; Silveira, Elcia M; de Souza, Ana P; Wendell, Steven K; Garlet, Gustavo P; Vieira, Alexandre R

    2012-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play a key role in the tissue destruction characteristic of chronic periodontitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of MMP and TIMP polymorphisms with chronic periodontitis in two populations. A total of 34 polymorphisms spanning 12 MMP and 2 TIMP genes were genotyped in 401 individuals from Brazil (99 cases with chronic periodontitis and 302 controls), and 274 individuals from the US (70 cases and 204 controls). Individuals were considered cases if presenting at least three teeth exhibiting sites of clinical attachment loss ≥ 5 mm in two different quadrants. Controls were characterized by absence of clinical attachment loss and no sites with probing depth >3 mm. MMP3 and TIMP1 mRNA expression was evaluated in healthy and diseased periodontal tissues. TIMP1 showed association with chronic periodontitis in the Brazilian population (for rs5906435, p = 0.0004), whereas MMP3 showed association in the US population (for rs679620, p = 0.0003; and rs650108, p = 0.002) and in the Brazilian population (for rs639752, p = 0.005). MMP3 and TIMP1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in diseased tissues when compared to control tissues. Our results further support a role for variations in MMP3 in chronic periodontitis and report a novel association with TIMP1. These genes may be considered additional candidate genes for chronic periodontitis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. The natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannino, DM; Watt, G; Hole, D

    2006-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the USA, and it remains one of the few diseases that continues to increase its numbers. The development and progression of COPD can vary dramatically between individuals. A low level of lung function...... remains the cornerstone of COPD diagnosis and is a key predictor of prognosis. Lung function, however, is not the only factor in determining morbidity and mortality related to COPD, with factors such as body mass index, exercise capability and comorbid disease being important predictors of poor outcomes....... Exacerbations of COPD are additional important indicators of both quality of life and outcomes in COPD patients. Definitions of exacerbations can vary, ranging from an increase in symptoms to COPD-related hospitalisations and death. COPD exacerbations are more common in patients with lower levels of lung...

  13. Continuation of lithium after a diagnosis of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L V; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Andersen, P K

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether continued lithium or anticonvulsant treatment after a first diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was associated with progression to irreversible end-stage kidney disease. METHODS: Nationwide cohort study including all individuals in Denmark in a period from...... 1995 to 2012 with a diagnosis of CKD and (i) a history of lithium treatment (N = 754, among whom 238 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder) or (ii) a history of anticonvulsant treatment (N = 5.004, among whom 199 patients had a diagnosis of bipolar disorder). End-stage CKD was defined as chronic...... dialysis or renal transplantation. RESULTS: Continuing lithium (HR = 0.58 (95% CI: 0.37-0.90) and continuing anticonvulsants (HR = 0.53 (95% CI: 0.44-0.64) were associated with decreased rates of end-stage CKD. In the subcohorts of patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, continuing lithium...

  14. α2-adrenergic blockade mimics the enhancing effect of chronic stress on breast cancer progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkin, Donald M.; Sung, Ha Yeon; Yang, Gyu Sik; David, John M.; Ma, Jeffrey C.Y.; Cole, Steve W.; Sloan, Erica K.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental studies in preclinical mouse models of breast cancer have shown that chronic restraint stress can enhance disease progression by increasing catecholamine levels and subsequent signaling of β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamines also signal α-adrenergic receptors, and greater α-adrenergic signaling has been shown to promote breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. However, antagonism of α-adrenergic receptors can result in elevated catecholamine levels, which may increase β-adrenergic signaling, because pre-synaptic α2-adrenergic receptors mediate an autoinhibition of sympathetic transmission. Given these findings, we examined the effect of α-adrenergic blockade on breast cancer progression under non-stress and stress conditions (chronic restraint) in an orthotopic mouse model with MDA-MB-231HM cells. Chronic restraint increased primary tumor growth and metastasis to distant tissues as expected, and non-selective α-adrenergic blockade by phentolamine significantly inhibited those effects. However, under non-stress conditions, phentolamine increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis. Sympatho-neural gene expression for catecholamine biosynthesis enzymes was elevated by phentolamine under non-stress conditions, and the non-selective β-blocker propranolol inhibited the effect of phentolamine on breast cancer progression. Selective α2-adrenergic blockade by efaroxan also increased primary tumor size and distant metastasis under non-stress conditions, but selective α1-adrenergic blockade by prazosin did not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that α2-adrenergic signaling can act through an autoreceptor mechanism to inhibit sympathetic catecholamine release and, thus, modulate established effects of β-adrenergic signaling on tumor progression-relevant biology. PMID:25462899

  15. Salivary pathogen and serum antibody to assess the progression of chronic periodontitis: a 24-mo prospective multicenter cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, T; Nakagawa, T; Nomura, Y; Sugaya, T; Kawanami, M; Suzuki, F; Takahashi, K; Abe, Y; Sato, S; Makino-Oi, A; Saito, A; Takano, S; Minabe, M; Nakayama, Y; Ogata, Y; Kobayashi, H; Izumi, Y; Sugano, N; Ito, K; Sekino, S; Numabe, Y; Fukaya, C; Yoshinari, N; Fukuda, M; Noguchi, T; Kono, T; Umeda, M; Fujise, O; Nishimura, F; Yoshimura, A; Hara, Y; Nakamura, T; Noguchi, K; Kakuta, E; Hanada, N; Takashiba, S; Yoshie, H

    2016-12-01

    A diagnosis of periodontitis progression is presently limited to clinical parameters such as attachment loss and radiographic imaging. The aim of this multicenter study was to monitor disease progression in patients with chronic periodontitis during a 24-mo follow-up program and to evaluate the amount of bacteria in saliva and corresponding IgG titers in serum for determining the diagnostic usefulness of each in indicating disease progression and stability. A total of 163 patients with chronic periodontitis who received trimonthly follow-up care were observed for 24 mo. The clinical parameters and salivary content of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were assessed using the modified Invader PLUS assay, and the corresponding serum IgG titers were measured using ELISA. The changes through 24 mo were analyzed using cut-off values calculated for each factor. One-way ANOVA or Fisher's exact test was used to perform between-group comparison for the data collected. Diagnostic values were calculated using Fisher's exact test. Of the 124 individuals who completed the 24-mo monitoring phase, 62 exhibited periodontitis progression, whereas 62 demonstrated stable disease. Seven patients withdrew because of acute periodontal abscess. The ratio of P. gingivalis to total bacteria and the combination of P. gingivalis counts and IgG titers against P. gingivalis were significantly related to the progression of periodontitis. The combination of P. gingivalis ratio and P. gingivalis IgG titers was significantly associated with the progression of periodontitis (p = 0.001, sensitivity = 0.339, specificity = 0.790). It is suggested that the combination of P. gingivalis ratio in saliva and serum IgG titers against P. gingivalis may be associated with the progression of periodontitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - adults - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... coughing up dark mucus Your fingertips or the skin around your fingernails are blue Alternative Names COPD - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive airways disease - adults - discharge; Chronic obstructive lung disease - adults - discharge; ...

  17. Progranulin Is a Novel Independent Predictor of Disease Progression and Overall Survival in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    G?bel, Maria; Eisele, Lewin; M?llmann, Michael; H?ttmann, Andreas; Johansson, Patricia; Scholtysik, Ren?; Bergmann, Manuela; Busch, Raymonde; D?hner, Hartmut; Hallek, Michael; Seiler, Till; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; D?hrsen, Ulrich; D?rig, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Progranulin (Pgrn) is a 88 kDa secreted protein with pleiotropic functions including regulation of cell cycle progression, cell motility, wound repair and tumorigenesis. Using microarray based gene expression profiling we have recently demonstrated that the gene for Pgrn, granulin (GRN), is significantly higher expressed in aggressive CD38(+)ZAP-70(+) as compared to indolent CD38(-)ZAP-70(-) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases. Here, we measured Pgrn plasma concentrations by enzyme-linke...

  18. Plasma YKL-40 and all-cause mortality in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, Dennis Back; Mygind, Lone; Titlestad, Ingrid Louise

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is hallmarked by inflammatory processes and a progressive decline of lung function. YKL-40 is a potential biomarker of inflammation and mortality in patients suffering from inflammatory lung disease, but its prognostic value in patients with COPD remains...... unknown. We investigated whether high plasma YKL-40 was associated with increased mortality in patients with moderate to very severe COPD....

  19. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mekov Evgeni V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a preventable, treatable disease with significant extrapulmonary manifestations that could affect negatively its course in some patients. Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV, on the other hand, is associated with a number of extrahepatic manifestations. COPD patients have increased prevalence of HCV and patients with HCV, especially older ones, have increased prevalence and faster progression of COPD. HCV infection exerts long-term effects on lung tissue and is an additional risk factor for the development of COPD. The presence of HCV is associated with an accelerated loss of lung function in COPD patients, especially in current smokers. COPD could represent extrahepatic manifestation associated with HCV infection. The aim of this article was to review the literature on prevalence of HCV in COPD and vice versa, pathogenetic link and the consequences of their mutual existence.

  20. Urinary uromodulin excretion predicts progression of chronic kidney disease resulting from IgA nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Uromodulin, or Tamm-Horsfall protein, is the most abundant urinary protein in healthy individuals. Recent studies have suggested that uromodulin may play a role in chronic kidney diseases. We examined an IgA nephropathy cohort to determine whether uromodulin plays a role in the progression of IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 344 IgA nephropathy patients were involved in this study. Morphological changes were evaluated with the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA measured the urinary uromodulin level on the renal biopsy day. Follow up was done regularly on 185 patients. Time-average blood pressure, time-average proteinuria, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and eGFR decline rate were caculated. Association between the urinary uromodulin level and the eGFR decline rate was analyzed with SPSS 13.0. RESULTS: We found that lower baseline urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.03 and higher time-average proteinuria (P = 0.04 were risk factors for rapid eGFR decline in a follow-up subgroup of the IgA nephropathy cohort. Urinary uromodulin level was correlated with tubulointerstitial lesions (P = 0.016. Patients that had more tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis on the surface had lower urinary uromodulin levels (P = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary uromodulin level is associated with interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy and contributes to eGFR decline in IgA nephropathy.

  1.  Association between hepatitis B virus and chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Donato, Francesca M; Messa, Piergiorgio

     Background. Hepatitis B virus infection and chronic kidney disease are prevalent and remain a major public health problem worldwide. It remains unclear how infection with hepatitis B virus impacts on the development and progression of chronic kidney disease. To evaluate the effect of infection with HBV on the risk of chronic kidney disease in the general population. We conducted a systematic review of the published medical literature to determine if hepatitis B infection is associated with increased likelihood of chronic kidney disease. We used the random effects model of DerSimonian and Laird to generate a summary estimate of the relative risk for chronic kidney disease (defined by reduced glomerular filtration rate and/or detectable proteinuria) with hepatitis B virus across the published studies. Meta-regression and stratified analysis were also conducted. We identified 16 studies (n = 394,664 patients) and separate meta-analyses were performed according to the outcome. The subset of longitudinal studies addressing ESRD (n = 2; n = 91,656) gave a pooled aHR 3.87 (95% CI, 1.48; 6.25, P chronic kidney disease (including end-stage renal disease). No relationship occurred between HBV positive status and prevalent chronic disease (n = 7, n = 109,889 unique patients); adjusted odds ratio, were 1.07 (95% CI, 0.89; 1.25) and 0.93 (95% CI, 0.76; 1.10), respectively. HBV infection is possibly associated with a risk of developing reduced glomerular filtration rate in the general population; no link between HBV sero-positive status and frequency of chronic kidney disease or proteinuria was noted in cross-sectional surveys.

  2. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP).

  3. Analysis of the Airway Microbiota of Healthy Individuals and Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by T-RFLP and Clone Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakharkina, Tetyana; Heinzel, Elke; Koczulla, Rembert A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory lung disease that affects a large number of patients and has significant impact. One hallmark of the disease is the presence of bacteria in the lower airways....

  4. Difference of polymorphism VEGF-gene rs699947 in Indonesian chronic liver disease population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neneng Ratnasari

    Full Text Available The VEGF gene polymorphism rs699947 related to clinical pathology, mortality, and recurrence of HCC. Few studies mentioned an association between VEGF gene polymorphisms with illness progression in chronic liver disease. We aimed to explore differences of VEGF gene polymorphism rs699947 in chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma patients in Indonesian population.A cross-sectional study with consecutive sampling and without matching was performed during a 3 years period (2011-2014 at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Blood DNA was sequenced from 123 subjects with chronic liver diseases [39 chronic hepatitis (CH, 39 liver cirrhosis (LC, and 45 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC]. 59 healthy subjects also participated. Using isolated VEGF genes for specific primers for rs699947, blood samples were examined by targeting DNA sequences with Applied Bio systems. All data were analyzed using STATA version 11.0 with significance level at P0.05. HBV was the dominant etiology in HCC, LC, and CH besides HCV and non HBV-HCV (PC vs. C>C, and genotypes distribution. Proportion of SNP -2578 A>C vs. C>C CH 1.8:1; HCC 1.4:1; healthy 1.7:1; but its proportion in LC was inversed (1:1.2. Genotype A was low in all subjects (5%-11%. Significant difference of allele distribution was found in healthy vs. LC, and HCC; CH vs. LC. Based on HWE analyses, distribution of allele C was dominant. There were not significant differences in deletion, insertion-deletion at -2547 until -2526, and haplotype (Ht CCGACCCC (P>0.05. The OR analyses of allele and SNP showed that allele A can be a predictor of disease progression in LC to HCC (OR 2.26 and healthy to LC (OR 1.65; and SNP A>C also can be a predictor in healthy to HCC (OR 1.41 and CH (OR 1.14.The occurrence of allele A and SNP A>C VEGF gene (-2578 might predict illness progression from healthy to CH, LC or HCC and LC to HCC.

  5. Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Riis

    2018-01-01

    Inflammation plays a significant role in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Patients with chronic inflammatory diseases are at increased risk of CVD, but it is debated whether this association is causal or dependent on shared risk factors, other exposures, genes, and/or inflammatory...... pathways. The current review summarizes epidemiological, clinical, and experimental data supporting the role of shared inflammatory mechanisms between atherosclerotic CVD and rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, and periodontitis, respectively, and provides insights to future...... prospects in this area of research. Awareness of the role of inflammation in CVD in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases and the potential for anti-inflammatory therapy, e.g., with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors, to also reduce atherosclerotic CVD has evolved into guideline- based recommendations...

  6. Multidimensional Analyses of Long-Term Clinical Courses of Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Oga

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are chronic respiratory disorders involving obstructive airway defects. There have been many discussions on their similarities and differences. Although airflow limitation expressed as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 has been considered to be the main diagnostic assessment in both diseases, it does not reflect the functional impairment imparted to the patients by these diseases. Therefore, multidimensional approaches using multiple measurements in assessing disease control or severity have been recommended, and multiple endpoints in addition to FEV1 have been set recently in clinical trials so as not to miss the overall effects. In particular, as improving symptoms and health status as well as pulmonary function are important goals in the management of asthma and COPD, some patient-reported measurements such as health-related quality of life or dyspnea should be included. Nonetheless, there have been few reviews on the long-term clinical course comparing asthma and COPD as predicted by measurements other than airflow limitation. Here, we therefore analyzed and compared longitudinal changes in both physiological measurements and patient-reported measurements in asthma and COPD. Although both diseases showed similar long-term progressive airflow limitation similarly despite guideline-based therapies, disease progression was different in asthma and COPD. In asthma, patient-reported assessments of health status, disability and psychological status remained clinically stable over time, in contrast to the significant deterioration of these parameters in COPD. Thus, because a single measurement of airflow limitation is insufficient to monitor these diseases, multidimensional analyses are important not only for disease control but also for understanding disease progression in asthma and COPD. KEY WORDS: asthma, COPD, longitudinal survey, multidimensional analysis, patient

  7. Perceived Benefits and Challenges of Coordinated Approaches to Chronic Disease Prevention in State Health Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sequeira, Sonia; Best, Leslie; Jones, Ellen; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Brownson, Ross C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic disease prevention efforts have historically been funded categorically according to disease or risk factor. Federal agencies are now progressively starting to fund combined programs to address common risk. The purpose of this study was to inform transitions to coordinated chronic disease prevention by learning views on perceived benefits and challenges of a coordinated approach to funding. Methods A national survey on evidence-based public health was conducted from March through May 2013 among state health department employees working in chronic disease prevention (N = 865). Participants were asked to rank the top 3 benefits and top 3 challenges in coordinating chronic disease approaches from provided lists and could provide additional responses. Descriptive analyses, χ2 tests, and analysis of variance were conducted. Results The most common perceived benefits of coordinated approaches to chronic disease prevention were improved health outcomes, common risk factors better addressed, and reduced duplication of program efforts. The most common perceived challenges were funding restrictions, such as disease-specific performance measures; competing priorities; lack of communication across programs; funding might be reduced; agency not structured for program coordination; and loss of disease-specific partner support. Rankings of benefits and challenges were similar across states and participant roles; the perceived challenges “lack of communication across programs” (P = .02) and “funding might be reduced” differed by program area (P organizational support for coordinated approaches, and create benefits for organizational partners. PMID:24809362

  8. Disease Progression in a Patient with Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tseng

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is a severe form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. The prevalence and clinical significance of NAFLD/NASH have been increasingly recognized in Western countries but much less known in Asian countries, including Taiwan. Here, we report the case of a 43-year-old man who had abnormal liver tests for 18 years. Retrospective evaluation of his initial clinical, laboratory and histologic findings indicated that the hepatic disorder was compatible with the diagnosis of NASH. Although his liver biochemical tests improved after taking lipid-lowering agents, a liver biopsy 17 years later demonstrated histologic progression of intralobular necroinflammation and perivenular fibrosis. These facts suggest that NASH, albeit mild and slowly progressive, indeed exists in Taiwan. After the control of chronic hepatitis B and C and westernization of the lifestyle in Taiwan, an increasing burden of NAFLD/NASH is anticipated and active prophylactic measures should be implemented.

  9. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  10. Role of the inflammasome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarusso, Chiara; Terlizzi, Michela; Molino, Antonio; Pinto, Aldo; Sorrentino, Rosalinda

    2017-10-10

    Inflammation is central to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a pulmonary disorder characterized by chronic bronchitis, chronic airway obstruction, emphysema, associated to progressive and irreversible decline of lung function. Emerging genetic and pharmacological evidence suggests that IL-1-like cytokines are highly detected in the sputum and broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) of COPD patients, implying the involvement of the multiprotein complex inflammasome. So far, scientific evidence has focused on nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a specialized inflammatory signaling platform that governs the maturation and secretion of IL-1-like cytokines through the regulation of caspase-1-dependent proteolytic processing. Some studies revealed that it is involved during airway inflammation typical of COPD. Based on the influence of cigarette smoke in various respiratory diseases, including COPD, in this view we report its effects in inflammatory and immune responses in COPD mouse models and in human subjects affected by COPD. In sharp contrast to what reported on experimental and clinical studies, randomized clinical trials show that indirect inflammasome inhibitors did not have any beneficial effect in moderate to severe COPD patients.

  11. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter

    2012-01-01

    by glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  12. The role of sympathetic nervous system in the progression of chronic kidney disease in the era of catheter based sympathetic renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petras, Dimitrios; Koutroutsos, Konstantinos; Kordalis, Athanasios; Tsioufis, Costas; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2013-08-01

    The kidney has been shown to be critically involved as both trigger and target of sympathetic nervous system overactivity in both experimental and clinical studies. Renal injury and ischemia, activation of renin angiotensin system and dysfunction of nitric oxide system have been implicated in adrenergic activation from kidney. Conversely, several lines of evidence suggest that sympathetic overactivity, through functional and morphological alterations in renal physiology and structure, may contribute to kidney injury and chronic kidney disease progression. Pharmacologic modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity has been found to have a blood pressure independent renoprotective effect. The inadequate normalization of sympathoexcitation by pharmacologic treatment asks for novel treatment options. Catheter based renal denervation targets selectively both efferent and afferent renal nerves and functionally denervates the kidney providing blood pressure reduction in clinical trials and renoprotection in experimental models by ameliorating the effects of excessive renal sympathetic drive. This review will focus on the role of sympathetic overactivity in the pathogenesis of kidney injury and CKD progression and will speculate on the effect of renal denervation to these conditions.

  13. Enteral nutrition in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBellis, Heather F; Fetterman, James W

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, chronic disease, in which malnutrition can have an undesirable effect. Therefore, the patient's nutritional status is critical for optimizing outcomes in COPD. The initial nutrition assessment is focused on identifying calorically compromised COPD patients in order to provide them with appropriate nutrition. Nutritional intervention consists of oral supplementation and enteral nutrition to prevent weight loss and muscle mass depletion. Evaluation of nutritional status should include past medical history (medications, lung function, and exercise tolerance) and dietary history (patient's dietary habits, food choices, meal patterns, food allergy information, and malabsorption issues), in addition to physiological stress, visceral proteins, weight, fat-free mass, and body mass index. The current medical literature conflicts regarding the appropriate type of formulation to select for nutritional intervention, especially regarding the amount of calories from fat to provide COPD patients. This review article focuses on the enteral product formulations currently available, and how they are most appropriately utilized in patients with COPD.

  14. Chronic disease as risk multiplier for disadvantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzin Donoso, Francisca

    2018-03-06

    This paper starts by establishing a prima facie case that disadvantaged groups or individuals are more likely to get a chronic disease and are in a disadvantaged position to adhere to chronic treatment despite access through Universal Health Coverage. However, the main aim of this paper is to explore the normative implications of this claim by examining two different but intertwined argumentative lines that might contribute to a better understanding of the ethical challenges faced by chronic disease health policy. The paper develops the argument that certain disadvantages which may predispose to illness might overlap with disadvantages that may hinder self-management, potentially becoming disadvantageous in handling chronic disease. If so, chronic diseases may be seen as disadvantages in themselves, describing a reproduction of disadvantage among the chronically ill and a vicious circle of disadvantage that could both predict and shed light on the catastrophic health outcomes among disadvantaged groups-or individuals-dealing with chronic disease. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Pathway reconstruction of airway remodeling in chronic lung diseases: a systems biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Najafi

    Full Text Available Airway remodeling is a pathophysiologic process at the clinical, cellular, and molecular level relating to chronic obstructive airway diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma and mustard lung. These diseases are associated with the dysregulation of multiple molecular pathways in the airway cells. Little progress has so far been made in discovering the molecular causes of complex disease in a holistic systems manner. Therefore, pathway and network reconstruction is an essential part of a systems biology approach to solve this challenging problem. In this paper, multiple data sources were used to construct the molecular process of airway remodeling pathway in mustard lung as a model of airway disease. We first compiled a master list of genes that change with airway remodeling in the mustard lung disease and then reconstructed the pathway by generating and merging the protein-protein interaction and the gene regulatory networks. Experimental observations and literature mining were used to identify and validate the master list. The outcome of this paper can provide valuable information about closely related chronic obstructive airway diseases which are of great importance for biologists and their future research. Reconstructing the airway remodeling interactome provides a starting point and reference for the future experimental study of mustard lung, and further analysis and development of these maps will be critical to understanding airway diseases in patients.

  16. Clinical significance of determination of plasma leptin, NPY and serum Hcy levels in patients with chronic renal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Zhifeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between progress of disease and blood levels of leptin, NPY, Hcy in patients with chronic renal diseases. Methods: Plasma leptin, NPY (with RIA) and serum Hcy (with CLIA) were determined in (1) 32 patients with chronic pyelonephritis (2) 28 patients with dibetic nephropathy (3) 30 patients with chronic renal failure and (4) 30 controls. Results: Blood levels of leptin, NPY and Hcy were slightly higher in patients with chronic pyelonephritis than those in controls but without significance (P>0.05). In patients with diabetic nephropathy, the plasma leptin and serum Hcy levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). In patients with chronic renal failure,the blood levels of NPY (P<0.05) and leptin, Hcy (P<0.01) were all significantly higher than those in controls. Conclusion: Blood levels of these three parameters especially leptin and Hcy, were increased in patients with chronic renal diseases and the increase was most significant in advanced cases. (authors)

  17. Cell cycle arrest and the evolution of chronic kidney disease from acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Guillaume; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2015-04-01

    For several decades, acute kidney injury (AKI) was generally considered a reversible process leading to complete kidney recovery if the individual survived the acute illness. Recent evidence from epidemiologic studies and animal models, however, have highlighted that AKI can lead to the development of fibrosis and facilitate the progression of chronic renal failure. When kidney injury is mild and baseline function is normal, the repair process can be adaptive with few long-term consequences. When the injury is more severe, repeated, or to a kidney with underlying disease, the repair can be maladaptive and epithelial cell cycle arrest may play an important role in the development of fibrosis. Indeed, during the maladaptive repair after a renal insult, many tubular cells that are undergoing cell division spend a prolonged period in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. These tubular cells recruit intracellular pathways leading to the synthesis and the secretion of profibrotic factors, which then act in a paracrine fashion on interstitial pericytes/fibroblasts to accelerate proliferation of these cells and production of interstitial matrix. Thus, the tubule cells assume a senescent secretory phenotype. Characteristic features of these cells may represent new biomarkers of fibrosis progression and the G2/M-arrested cells may represent a new therapeutic target to prevent, delay or arrest progression of chronic kidney disease. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biology of the cell cycle and how cell cycle arrest links AKI to chronic kidney disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  18. Inflammatory chronic disease of the colon: How to image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, Roberta; Barchiesi, Annalisa; Di Mizio, Veronica; Di Terlizzi, Marco; Leo, Luca; Filippone, Antonella; Canalis, Luigi; Fossaceca, Rita; Carriero, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and UC, is a chronic disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The inflammatory process in UC is confined to the mucosa and submucosa and it involves only the colon. In contrast, in Crohn's disease the inflammation process extends through the bowel wall layers and it can involve any part of gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, inflammatory bowel disease of the colon may be associated with complications, such as toxic megacolon, fulminant colitis, acute bleeding, fistulas and abscesses. Radiographic imaging studies are useful for the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease, and may be used to assess the extent and severity of disease, rule out complications, and monitor the response to therapy. The double-contrast barium study is a valuable technique for diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease colonic alterations, even in patients with early mucosal abnormalities. The earliest finding of UC is characterized by a fine granular appeareance of the colonic mucosa, usually involving the rectosigmoid junction. In chronic UC double-contrast enema may reveal marked colonic shortening with tubular narrowing of the bowel and loss of haustration. The earliest radiographics findings of Crohn's disease are represented by aphthous ulcers. As disease progresses, aphthous ulcers may enlarge and coalesce to form stellate or linear areas of ulceration. In advanced Crohn's disease, transmural ulceration may lead to the development of fissures, sinus tracts, fistulas, and abscesses. Cross sectional studies such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and sometimes ultrasound, are useful alternative tools not only in the assessment of bowel wall abnormalities, but also for the assessment of extraluminal alterations in patients with advanced disease

  19. Role of bronchodilation and pattern of breathing in increasing tidal expiratory flow with progressive induced hypercapnia in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Kevin E; Singh, Bhajan

    2018-01-01

    Hypercapnia (HC) in vitro relaxes airway smooth muscle; in vivo, it increases respiratory effort, tidal expiratory flows (V̇ exp ), and, by decreasing inspiratory duration (Ti), increases elastic recoil pressure (Pel) via lung viscoelasticity; however, its effect on airway resistance is uncertain. We examined the contributions of bronchodilation, Ti, and expiratory effort to increasing V̇ exp with progressive HC in 10 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV 1 ) 53% predicted. Lung volumes (Vl), V̇ exp , esophageal pressure (Pes), Ti, and end-tidal Pco 2 ([Formula: see text]) were measured during six tidal breaths followed by an inspiratory capacity (IC), breathing air, and at three levels of HC. V̇ exp and V̇ with submaximal forced vital capacities breathing air (V̇ sFVC ) were compared. Pulmonary resistance ( Rl) was measured from the Pes-V̇ relationship. V̇ exp and Pes at end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) + 0.3 tidal volume [V̇ (0.3Vt) and Pes (0.3Vt) , respectively], Ti, and Rl correlated with [Formula: see text] ( P pulmonary disease (COPD), progressive HC increases tidal expiratory flows by inducing bronchodilation and via an increased rate of inspiration and lung viscoelasticity, a probable increase in lung elastic recoil pressure, both changes increasing expiratory flows, promoting lung emptying and a stable end-expiratory volume. Bronchodilation with HC occurred despite optimal standard bronchodilator therapy, suggesting that in COPD further bronchodilation is possible.

  20. Blood Dendritic Cells: Canary in the Coal Mine to Predict Chronic Inflammatory Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodie eMiles

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of risk factors for chronic inflammatory diseases are unknown. This makes personalized medicine for assessment, prognosis, and choice of therapy very difficult. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that low-grade subclinical infections may be an underlying cause of many chronic inflammatory diseases and thus may contribute to secondary outcomes (e.g. cancer. Many diseases are now categorized as inflammatory-mediated diseases that stem from a dysregulation in host immunity. There is a growing need to study the links between low-grade infections, the immune responses they elicit, and how this impacts overall health. One such link explored in detail here is the extreme sensitivity of myeloid dendritic cells (mDC in peripheral blood to chronic low-grade infections and the role that these mDCs play in arbitrating the resulting immune responses. We find that emerging evidence supports a role for pathogen-induced mDCs in chronic inflammation leading to increased risk of secondary clinical disease. The mDCs that are elevated in the blood as a result of low-grade bacteremia often do not trigger a productive immune response, but can disseminate the pathogen throughout the host. This aberrant trafficking of mDCs can accelerate systemic inflammatory disease progression. Conversely, restoration of DC homeostasis may aid in pathogen elimination and minimize dissemination. Thus it would seem prudent when assessing chronic inflammatory disease risk to consider blood mDC numbers, and the microbial content (microbiome and activation state of these mDCs. These may provide important clues (the canary in the coal mine of high inflammatory disease risk. This will facilitate development of novel immunotherapies to eliminate such smoldering infections in atherosclerosis, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, and pre-eclampsia.

  1. Progression of Liver Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  2. An unusual renal manifestation of chronic HBV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindan, Ananthakrishnapuram; Yong, Jim; Killingsworth, Murray; Strasser, Simone; Suranyi, Michael

    2010-08-01

    Hepatitis B viral infection is usually a self-limiting disease in immunocompetent individuals. Chronic infection can be seen in up to 5% of infected patients. Renal manifestations of chronic HBV infection are usually glomerular. We describe here an uncommon presentation of a patient with chronic HBV infection with very high viral load and rapidly progressive renal failure. Renal biopsy showed features of tubulointerstitial nephritis and tubular epithelial inclusion bodies suggestive of HBV infection. Entecavir treatment slowed down the progression of his renal disease. Tubulointerstitial nephritis should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis in patients with HBV infection. Early antiviral treatment may halt the progression of renal disease.

  3. Patient with rapidly evolving neurological disease with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Lewy body dementia, chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Maria Gabriella; Tiple, Dorina; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Ladogana, Anna; Colaizzo, Elisa; Capellari, Sabina; Rossi, Marcello; Parchi, Piero; Masullo, Carlo; Pocchiari, Maurizio

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of rapidly evolving neurological disease in a patient with neuropathological lesions of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), chronic subcortical vascular encephalopathy and meningothelial meningioma. The coexistence of severe multiple pathologies in a single patient strengthens the need to perform accurate clinical differential diagnoses in rapidly progressive dementias. © 2016 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  4. Should We View Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Differently after ECLIPSE? A Clinical Perspective from the Study Team

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.; Agusti, A.; Wouters, E. F. M.

    2014-01-01

    . Risk factors for 3-year change in both FEV1 and lung density were assessed. For FEV1 decline, continued smoking and presence of emphysema were the strongest predictors of progression; dub cell protein was found to be a potential biomarker for disease activity. For progression of emphysema......, the strongest predictors were continued smoking and female sex. Conclusions: By following a large, well characterized cohort of patients with COPD over 3 years, we have a clearer picture of a heterogeneous disease with clinically important subtypes ("phenotypes") and a variable and not inherently progressive......Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) seems to be a heterogeneous disease with a variable course. Objectives: We wished to characterize the heterogeneity and variability of COPD longitudinally. Methods: In the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate...

  5. Chronic Disease Management in Family Practice: Clinical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    disease management in the family practice selling. This paper discusses chronic disease management in the family practice selling....Chronic disease management is the process of evaluating and treating a medical condition or disease state which can not be readily cured so as to...minimize it’s negative impact on the individual. Examples of chronic disease management include the treatment of hypertension, diabetes, osteoporosis

  6. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang [Dept. of Ultrasound, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation.

  7. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation

  8. Models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung K Fan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major global health problem and is predicted to become the third most common cause of death by 2020. Apart from the important preventive steps of smoking cessation, there are no other specific treatments for COPD that are as effective in reversing the condition, and therefore there is a need to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to new therapeutic strategies. The development of experimental models will help to dissect these mechanisms at the cellular and molecular level. COPD is a disease characterized by progressive airflow obstruction of the peripheral airways, associated with lung inflammation, emphysema and mucus hypersecretion. Different approaches to mimic COPD have been developed but are limited in comparison to models of allergic asthma. COPD models usually do not mimic the major features of human COPD and are commonly based on the induction of COPD-like lesions in the lungs and airways using noxious inhalants such as tobacco smoke, nitrogen dioxide, or sulfur dioxide. Depending on the duration and intensity of exposure, these noxious stimuli induce signs of chronic inflammation and airway remodelling. Emphysema can be achieved by combining such exposure with instillation of tissue-degrading enzymes. Other approaches are based on genetically-targeted mice which develop COPD-like lesions with emphysema, and such mice provide deep insights into pathophysiological mechanisms. Future approaches should aim to mimic irreversible airflow obstruction, associated with cough and sputum production, with the possibility of inducing exacerbations.

  9. Health Technologies for the Improvement of Chronic Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitovic, M; Brener, S

    2013-01-01

    Background As part of ongoing efforts to improve the Ontario health care system, a mega-analysis examining the optimization of chronic disease management in the community was conducted by Evidence Development and Standards, Health Quality Ontario (previously known as the Medical Advisory Secretariat [MAS]). Objective The purpose of this report was to identify health technologies previously evaluated by MAS that may be leveraged in efforts to optimize chronic disease management in the community. Data Sources The Ontario Health Technology Assessment Series and field evaluations conducted by MAS and its partners between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2011. Review Methods Technologies related to at least 1 of 7 disease areas of interest (type 2 diabetes, coronary artery disease, atrial fibrillation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, stroke, and chronic wounds) or that may greatly impact health services utilization were reviewed. Only technologies with a moderate to high quality of evidence and associated with a clinically or statistically significant improvement in disease management were included. Technologies related to other topics in the mega-analysis on chronic disease management were excluded. Evidence-based analyses were reviewed, and outcomes of interest were extracted. Outcomes of interest included hospital utilization, mortality, health-related quality of life, disease-specific measures, and economic analysis measures. Results Eleven analyses were included and summarized. Technologies fell into 3 categories: those with evidence for the cure of chronic disease, those with evidence for the prevention of chronic disease, and those with evidence for the management of chronic disease. Conclusions The impact on patient outcomes and hospitalization rates of new health technologies in chronic disease management is often overlooked. This analysis demonstrates that health technologies can reduce the burden of illness; improve patient

  10. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Integration of mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases in Peru: challenges and opportunities for primary care settings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Ipince, Alessandra; Toyama, Mauricio; Benate-Galvez, Ysabel; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Medina-Verástegui, Julio César; Sánchez-Moreno, David; Araya, Ricardo; Miranda, J Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the relationship between mental health and chronic non-communicable diseases is discussed as well as the possibility to address them in a comprehensive manner in the Peruvian health system. First, the prevalence estimates and the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases and mental disorders worldwide and in Peru are reviewed. Then, the detrimental impact of depression in the early stages as well as the progress of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases is described. Additionally, the gap between access to mental health care in Peru is analyzed. Lastly, the alternatives to reduce the gap are explored. Of these alternatives, the integration of mental health into primary care services is emphasized; as a feasible way to meet the care needs of the general population, and people with chronic diseases in particular, in the Peruvian context.

  12. Health-Related Quality of Life Impacts Mortality but Not Progression to End-Stage Renal Disease in Pre-Dialysis Chronic Kidney Disease: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesky, Mark D; Dutton, Mary; Dasgupta, Indranil; Yadav, Punit; Ng, Khai Ping; Fenton, Anthony; Kyte, Derek; Ferro, Charles J; Calvert, Melanie; Cockwell, Paul; Stringer, Stephanie J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with reduced health-related quality of life (HRQL). However, the relationship between pre-dialysis CKD, HRQL and clinical outcomes, including mortality and progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is unclear. All 745 participants recruited into the Renal Impairment In Secondary Care study to end March 2014 were included. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were collected at baseline including an assessment of HRQL using the Euroqol EQ-5D-3L. Health states were converted into an EQ-5Dindex score using a set of weighted preferences specific to the UK population. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression and competing risk analyses were undertaken to evaluate the association of HRQL with progression to ESRD or all-cause mortality. Regression analyses were then performed to identify variables associated with the significant HRQL components. Median eGFR was 25.8 ml/min/1.73 m2 (IQR 19.6-33.7ml/min) and median ACR was 33 mg/mmol (IQR 6.6-130.3 mg/mmol). Five hundred and fifty five participants (75.7%) reported problems with one or more EQ-5D domains. When adjusted for age, gender, comorbidity, eGFR and ACR, both reported problems with self-care [hazard ratio 2.542, 95% confidence interval 1.222-5.286, p = 0.013] and reduced EQ-5Dindex score [hazard ratio 0.283, 95% confidence interval 0.099-0.810, p = 0.019] were significantly associated with an increase in all-cause mortality. Similar findings were observed for competing risk analyses. Reduced HRQL was not a risk factor for progression to ESRD in multivariable analyses. Impaired HRQL is common in the pre-dialysis CKD population. Reduced HRQL, as demonstrated by problems with self-care or a lower EQ-5Dindex score, is associated with a higher risk for death but not ESRD. Multiple factors influence these aspects of HRQL but renal function, as measured by eGFR and ACR, are not among them.

  13. Epigenetics of kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanner, Nicola; Bechtel-Walz, Wibke

    2017-07-01

    DNA methylation and histone modifications determine renal programming and the development and progression of renal disease. The identification of the way in which the renal cell epigenome is altered by environmental modifiers driving the onset and progression of renal diseases has extended our understanding of the pathophysiology of kidney disease progression. In this review, we focus on current knowledge concerning the implications of epigenetic modifications during renal disease from early development to chronic kidney disease progression including renal fibrosis, diabetic nephropathy and the translational potential of identifying new biomarkers and treatments for the prevention and therapy of chronic kidney disease and end-stage kidney disease.

  14. Prostaglandin E and the local immune response in chronic periodontal disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loening, T.; Albers, H.-K.; Lisboa, B.P.; Burkhardt, A.; Caselitz, J.

    1980-01-01

    The local immune reaction of progressive chronic periodontal disease may be particularly influenced by macrophages and macrophage-derived factors. Among these substances the prostaglandins and lysosomal enzymes may play an important pathogenetic role. Parallel immunohistochemical and radioimmunological studies were done to investigate the relatiships of the immune-competent cells and the inflammatory mediators in gingival tissues. The radioimmunological analysis revealed that prostaglandin E increases markedly in the established gingival lesions. Immunohistochemically prostaglandin E was mainly localized within macrophage-like cells. Cytoplasmic lysozyme could be detected in these cells, too. On the other hand, the B-cell response is the prominent feature in established chronic periodontal disease. However, there is apparently a disturbed B-cell reaction as indicated by the irregular IgG-subclass pattern and by the production of mainly monomeric IgA. The possible interactions of macrophages and especially B-cells via prostaglandin E-mediated mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  15. Timely Referral to Outpatient Nephrology Care Slows Progression and Reduces Treatment Costs of Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Lonnemann

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Timely referral to outpatient nephrology care is associated with slowed disease progression, less hospital admissions, reduced total treatment costs, and improved survival in patients with CKD.

  16. Clinical aspects and characteristics of the course of Parkinson’s disease with chronic cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskresenskaya O.N.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The article is devoted characteristics current of Parkinson’s disease with chronic cerebral ischemia. Objective: to study the clinical presentation and features of PD against cerebral ischemia. Methods. A total of 44 patients with a diagnosis of “Parkinson’s disease”, 20 of which were determined by accurate clinical and instrumental signs of chronic cerebral ischemia. Comparative characteristics of the neurological status, cognitive functions, some laboratory and instrumental data in the two groups of patients: Parkinson’s disease with a background of chronic ischemia of the brain and without it. Results. Statistically signifcant differences between groups are observed on the following variables: duration of illness, severity of depression, the concentration of glucose in the blood. Formed groups of signifcant difference in the severity of atherosclerosis of cerebral vessels. Conclusion. The data of the acceleration of the progression of Parkinson’s disease with chronic cerebral ischemia, as well as the more frequent occurrence of depression in this patient group.

  17. Curative effect of sesame oil in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuan-Teng; Chien, Se-Ping; Hsu, Dur-Zong; Periasamy, Srinivasan; Liu, Ming-Yie

    2015-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease causes a progressive and irreversible loss of renal function. We investigated the curative effect of sesame oil, a natural, nutrient-rich, potent antioxidant, in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease was induced by subcutaneously injecting uni-nephrectomized rats with deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) and 1% NaCl [DOCA/salt] in drinking water. Four weeks later, the rats were gavaged with sesame oil (0.5 or 1 mL/kg per day) for 7 days. Renal injury, histopathological changes, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, lipid peroxidation, Nrf2, osteopontin expression, and collagen were assessed 24 h after the last dose of sesame oil. Blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, urine volume, and albuminuria were significantly higher in the DOCA/salt treated rats than in control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased these four tested parameters in DOCA/salt treated rats. In addition, creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression were significantly decreased in the DOCA/salt treated rats compared to control rats. Sesame oil significantly decreased hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite level, lipid peroxidation, osteopontin, and renal collagen deposition, but increased creatinine clearance rate and nuclear Nrf2 expression in DOCA/salt treated rats. We conclude that supplementation of sesame oil mitigates DOCA/salt induced chronic kidney disease in rats by activating Nrf2 and attenuating osteopontin expression and inhibiting renal fibrosis in rats. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  18. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: 2. Short-term prognostic scores for acute exacerbations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod, Alain F

    2014-01-22

    The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or COPD is a slowly progressive disease whose course is frequently the subject of acute episodes, of variable severity, although, in general, reversible, called acute exacerbations. In the past five years (between 2008 and 2013), seven prognostic scores have been published to try to assess the short-term risk of these acute exacerbations. Their components and characteristics are analysed and commented upon. An Internet program with a detailed compilation of the main features of these scores (www.medhyg.ch/scoredoc) supplements this review.

  19. Early chronic kidney disease: diagnosis, management and models of care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Olivier J.; O'Donoghue, Donal J.; Ritchie, James; Kanavos, Panos G.; Narva, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a prevalent condition in many countries, and it is estimated that over $1 trillion is spent globally on end-stage renal disease (ESRD) care. There is a clear clinical and economic rationale for designing timely and appropriate health system responses to limit progression from CKD to ESRD. This article reviews the gaps in our knowledge about which early CKD interventions are appropriate, the optimal time to intervene, and what model of care to adopt. The available diagnostic tests exhibit key limitations. Clinical care may improve if early-stage (1–3) CKD with risk for progression towards ESRD is differentiated from early CKD that is unlikely to advance. It is possible that CKD should be re-conceptualized as a part of primary care. Additional research is needed to better understand the risk factors for CKD progression. Systems modelling can be used to evaluate the impact of different care models on CKD outcomes and costs. The US Indian Health Service experience has demonstrated that an integrated, system-wide approach, even in an underfunded system, can produce significant benefits. PMID:26055354

  20. Impact of acute kidney injury on long-term mortality and progression to chronic kidney disease among critically ill children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najlaa G. Al-Otaibi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the 2-year outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI following admission to pediatric critical care units (PICU. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted between January 2012 and December 2013. We followed 131 children admitted to PICU, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia with a diagnosis of AKI, based on pRIFLE (pediatric risk, injury, failure, loss, and end-stage renal disease, for 2 years. During the study period, 46 children died and 38 of survivors completed the follow-up. Factors affecting long-term progression to chronic kidney disease were also evaluated. Results: The 2-year mortality was more than 40%. The main determinant of the 2-year mortality was the pediatric risk of mortality (PRISM score, which increased the risk of mortality by 6% per each one score (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06: 95% confidence interval: 1.00-1.11. By the end of the 2 years, 33% of survivors had reduction in the glomerular filtration rate and proteinuria, and 73% were hypertensive. Patients with more severe renal impairment at admission, based on the pRIFLE criteria, had higher mortality rate. This association, however, was not independent since it was influenced by baseline disease severity (PRISM score. Conclusion: Large proportion of patients admitted to PICU with AKI either died during the first 2 months of follow-up or developed long-term complications. The severity of AKI, however, was not an independent risk factor for mortality.

  1. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor use and progression of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease: a single-center retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaewput W

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Wisit Kaewput,1,2 Preedee Disorn,2 Bancha Satirapoj2 1Department of Military and Community Medicine, Phramongkutklao College of Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, Phramongkutklao Hospital and College of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand Background: The use of selective COX-2 (sCOX-2 inhibitors with acute kidney injury, salt water retention, and cardiovascular events have been correlated in subjects with normal kidney function, but sCOX-2 inhibitor use concerning the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD remains uncertain. Objectives: To determine the progression of renal function and electrolyte abnormalities among CKD patients after using sCOX-2 inhibitors during short- and long-term periods. Methods: The study employed a retrospective cohort design comprising all types of CKD patients with and without sCOX-2 inhibitors (celecoxib and etoricoxib. Data collected included medical data, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, and serum electrolytes at 3 and 6 months between January 2009 and January 2014. Subjects attended the outpatient clinic and were then followed up until discontinuation of the drugs at years 1 and 2 until May 2016. Results: Ninety-two CKD patients on sCOX-2 inhibitors and 92 CKD patients without sCOX-2 inhibitors were included. The sCOX-2 inhibitor group showed more decline in eGFR than the control group at 3 and 6 months of follow-up (–8.27±9.75 vs –1.64±6.05 mL/min/1.73 m2, P<0.001 and –12.36±6.48 vs –4.31±5.11 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.001, respectively and at 1 and 2 years of follow-up after subjects discontinued sCOX-2 (–6.84±10.34 vs –1.61±8.93 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.004 and –10.26±10.19 vs –5.12±8.61 mL/min/1.73 m2, P=0.005, respectively. In addition, the sCOX-2 inhibitor group had significantly more increased serum potassium during the study follow-up than the control group. Conclusion: The sCOX-2 inhibitors are associated with an increased risk for rapid eGFR decline and hyperkalemia in both the

  2. Netherlands : employment opportunities for people with chronic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    There is no clear national definition of a chronic disease in a work situation in the Netherlands. Questionnaire data shows that between 25% and 30% of all workers are affected by a chronic disease. Worker with a chronic disease have slightly different working conditions as compared to workers

  3. Moderate alcohol consumption and chronic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukamal, Kenneth J; Clowry, Catherine M; Murray, Margaret M

    2016-01-01

    Drinking within recommended limits is highly prevalent in much of the world, and strong epidemiological associations exist between moderate alcohol consumption and risk of several major chronic diseases, including coronary heart disease, diabetes, and breast cancer. In many cases, plausible...... biological mediators for these associations have been identified in randomized trials, but gold standard evidence that moderate drinking causes or prevents any chronic disease remains elusive and important concerns about available evidence have been raised. Although long-term randomized trials to test...... suggests that objections to the execution of a full-scale, long-term clinical trial of moderate drinking on chronic disease are increasingly untenable. We present potential lessons learned for such a trial and discuss key features to maximize its feasibility and value....

  4. [A case of mixed connective tissue disease positive for proteinase 3 antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody in a patient with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus and chronic thyroiditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michitsuji, Tohru; Horai, Yoshiro; Sako, Ayaka; Asano, Taro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Izumi, Yasumori; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2017-01-01

      A female in her sixties with slowly progressive type 1 diabetes mellitus (SPT1DM) and chronic thyroiditis was referred to our rheumatology department with swelling in her fingers. A prominent atherosclerotic lesion was revealed upon brain magnetic resonance imaging, and she was found to have mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) positive for proteinase 3 (PR3)-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). This rare case of MCTD accompanying SPT1DM and PR3-ANCA suggested that a synergy between MCTD and PR3-ANCA triggers atherosclerosis.

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Heart Dysfunction in Chronic Lung Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirmasoud Zangiabadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Group 3 pulmonary hypertension (PH is a common complication of chronic lung disease (CLD, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, interstitial lung disease, and sleep-disordered breathing. Development of PH is associated with poor prognosis and may progress to right heart failure, however, in the majority of the patients with CLD, PH is mild to moderate and only a small number of patients develop severe PH. The pathophysiology of PH in CLD is multifactorial and includes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary vascular remodeling, small vessel destruction, and fibrosis. The effects of PH on the right ventricle (RV range between early RV remodeling, hypertrophy, dilatation, and eventual failure with associated increased mortality. The golden standard for diagnosis of PH is right heart catheterization, however, evidence of PH can be appreciated on clinical examination, serology, radiological imaging, and Doppler echocardiography. Treatment of PH in CLD focuses on management of the underlying lung disorder and hypoxia. There is, however, limited evidence to suggest that PH-specific vasodilators such as phosphodiesterase-type 5 inhibitors, endothelin receptor antagonists, and prostanoids may have a role in the treatment of patients with CLD and moderate-to-severe PH.

  6. The effects of different physical activities on atrial fibrillation in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kiuchi, M?rcio Galindo; Chen, Shaojie; Hoye, Neil Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is highly common, and is most frequently observed in individuals with hypertension and structural cardiac disease. Sympathetic hyperactivity plays a fundamental role in the progression, maintenance and aggravation of arrhythmia. Endurance exercise training clearly lowers sympathetic activity in sympathoexcitatory disease states, and is well-tolerated by patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods: We assessed 50 CKD patients with hypertension. Each...

  7. Prevalence and correlates of gout in a large cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease: the German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jiaojiao; Kielstein, Jan T; Schultheiss, Ulla T; Sitter, Thomas; Titze, Stephanie I; Schaeffner, Elke S; McAdams-DeMarco, Mara; Kronenberg, Florian; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Köttgen, Anna

    2015-04-01

    Reduced kidney function is a risk factor for hyperuricaemia and gout, but limited information on the burden of gout is available from studies of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We therefore examined the prevalence and correlates of gout in the large prospective observational German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD) study. Data from 5085 CKD patients aged 18-74 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 30-patients on urate lowering therapy, 47.2% still showed hyperuricaemia. Factors associated with gout were serum urate, lower eGFR, advanced age, male sex, higher body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio, higher triglyceride and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations, alcohol intake and diuretics use. While lower eGFR categories showed significant associations with gout in multivariable-adjusted models (prevalence ratio 1.46 for eGFR patients with CKD and lower GFR is strongly associated with gout. Pharmacological management of gout in patients with CKD is suboptimal. Prospective follow-up will show whether gout and hyperuricaemia increase the risk of CKD progression and cardiovascular events in the GCKD study. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  8. Renal function trajectory is more important than chronic kidney disease stage for managing patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosansky, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Management of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) emphasizes a current level of function as calculated from the modification of diet in renal disease glomerulofiltration rate equations (eGFR) and proteinuria for staging of CKD. Change in a patient's eGFR over time (renal function trajectory) is an additional and potentially more important consideration in deciding which patients will progress to the point where they will require renal replacement therapy (RRT). Many patients with CKD 3-5 have stable renal function for years. Proteinuria/albuminuria is a primary determinant of renal trajectory which may be slowed by medications that decrease proteinuria and/or aggressively lower blood pressure. A renal trajectory of >3 ml/min/1.73 m(2)/year may relate to a need for closer renal follow-up and increased morbidity and mortality. Additional CKD population-based studies need to examine the relationship of renal trajectory to: baseline renal function; acute kidney injury episodes; age, race, sex and primary etiologies of renal disease; blood pressure control and therapies; dietary protein intake; blood glucose control in diabetics and the competitive risk of death versus the requirement for renal replacement therapy. In the elderly CKD 4 population with significant comorbidities and slow decline in renal function, the likelihood of death prior to the need for RRT should be considered before placing AV access for dialysis. Prediction models of renal progression must account for the competitive risk of death as well as stable or improved renal function to be clinically useful. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Framing international trade and chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labonté, Ronald; Mohindra, Katia S; Lencucha, Raphael

    2011-07-04

    There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011). Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks.

  10. Framing international trade and chronic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs). This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011). Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks. PMID:21726434

  11. Framing international trade and chronic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohindra Katia S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an emerging evidence base that global trade is linked with the rise of chronic disease in many low and middle-income countries (LMICs. This linkage is associated, in part, with the global diffusion of unhealthy lifestyles and health damaging products posing a particular challenge to countries still facing high burdens of communicable disease. We developed a generic framework which depicts the determinants and pathways connecting global trade with chronic disease. We then applied this framework to three key risk factors for chronic disease: unhealthy diets, alcohol, and tobacco. This led to specific 'product pathways', which can be further refined and used by health policy-makers to engage with their country's trade policy-makers around health impacts of ongoing trade treaty negotiations, and by researchers to continue refining an evidence base on how global trade is affecting patterns of chronic disease. The prevention and treatment of chronic diseases is now rising on global policy agendas, highlighted by the UN Summit on Noncommunicable Diseases (September 2011. Briefs and declarations leading up to this Summit reference the role of globalization and trade in the spread of risk factors for these diseases, but emphasis is placed on interventions to change health behaviours and on voluntary corporate responsibility. The findings summarized in this article imply the need for a more concerted approach to regulate trade-related risk factors and thus more engagement between health and trade policy sectors within and between nations. An explicit recognition of the role of trade policies in the spread of noncommunicable disease risk factors should be a minimum outcome of the September 2011 Summit, with a commitment to ensure that future trade treaties do not increase such risks.

  12. Sperm Morphological Features Associated with Chronic Chagas Disease in the Semen of Experimentally Infected Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Morales, Olivia; Pedro-Martínez, Elvia; Hernández-Pichardo, José Ernesto; Alejandre-Aguilar, Ricardo; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Graullera-Rivera, Verónica; Arce-Fonseca, Minerva

    2014-01-01

    The presence of trypanosomatids in the reproductive systems of different mammals (causing genital lesions in the acute stage of the disease) may predispose the animals to low semen quality. However, there are no studies examining the alterations in the sperm morphological features in the chronic stage of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. Knowledge of these aspects is important to understand the other ways of transmission of the Chagas disease. Progressive motility, mass motility, concentration, and sperm morphology of 84 ejaculates of dogs that were chronically infected with T. cruzi were evaluated. Most of the findings were consistent with the reference values and with those obtained from healthy control dogs. The scrotal circumference was not correlated with spermatozoa concentration in the infected animals. In conclusion, the T. cruzi Ninoa (MHOM/MX/1994/Ninoa) strain does not cause significant alterations in the semen quality of dogs experiencing chronic Chagas disease (at concentrations of 5 × 104 to 1 × 106 parasites per animal). PMID:25114010

  13. The Key Genes of Chronic Pancreatitis which Bridge Chronic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Can be Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuang; Li, Rui; Wang, Heping; Li, Lisha; Li, Huiyu; Li, Yulin

    2018-04-01

    An important question in systems biology is what role the underlying molecular mechanisms play in disease progression. The relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer needs further exploration in a system view. We constructed the disease network based on gene expression data and protein-protein interaction. We proposed an approach to discover the underlying core network and molecular factors in the progression of pancreatic diseases, which contain stages of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer core network and key factors were revealed and then verified by gene set enrichment analysis of pathways and diseases. The key factors provide the microenvironment for tumor initiation and the change of gene expression level of key factors bridge chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Some new candidate genes need further verification by experiments. Transcriptome profiling-based network analysis reveals the importance of chronic pancreatitis genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer development on a system level by computational method and they can be therapeutic targets.

  14. A CROSS-SECTIONAL SURVEY ON LIPID ABNORMALITIES ASSOCIATED WITH NONDIABETIC SUBJECTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE, STAGE III-V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibi N. S

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. The adverse outcomes of chronic kidney disease, such as kidney failure, cardiovascular disease and premature death can be prevented or delayed. Chronic renal disease is accompanied by characteristic abnormalities of lipid metabolism. High cholesterol and triglyceride plasma levels have been demonstrated to be independent risk factors for progression of renal disease in humans. The pattern of lipid abnormalities in chronic renal disease patients in Kerala, India, has not been studied. The primary aim of the study is to describe the pattern of lipid profile in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease patients. The secondary objective is to determine the proportion of patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease who have lipid abnormalities. MATERIALS AND METHODS Our study is a cross-sectional study conducted in Department of Internal Medicine, Government Medical College, Trivandrum, during the time period of 22-08-2014 to 22-08-2015. The study was conducted after clearance from Institutional Ethics Committee and written informed consent was obtained from all study participants. 134 nondiabetic patients who were diagnosed to have Chronic Kidney disease (CKD according to KDOQI and NKF criteria with a GFR 70 years showed significantly higher serum creatinine value and lower EGFR. Significantly, higher values of Total Cholesterol (TC, Low-Density Lipoproteins (LDL, Triglycerides (TG and Very Low-Density Lipoproteins (VLDL were seen in the age group >70 years and in stage V CKD compared to other groups. CONCLUSION Dyslipidaemia is common in nondiabetic CKD patients (67.91%. Higher stages of CKD were associated with more dyslipidaemia.

  15. The prevalence of osteoporosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cross sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Schwarz, Peter; Holme, I

    2007-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease, where the initial symptoms are often cough as a result of excessive mucus production and dyspnea. With disease progression several other symptoms may develop, and patients with moderate to severe COPD have often multiorganic disease...... sufficient daily intake of calcium and vitamin D. In 15 patients, X-ray revealed compression fractures previously not diagnosed. Bone density measurements showed osteoporosis in 22 patients and osteopenia in 16. In total, 26 of the COPD patients were osteoporotic as evaluated from both X-ray and bone density...

  16. Prevention programs for chronic kidney disease in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important determinant of the poor health outcome for major noncommunicable diseases that are the leading cause of death worldwide. Early recognition with screening programs of CKD and co-morbid conditions, like hypertension, diabetes, or toxic environments, can potentially slow progression to renal failure, improve quality of life and reduce healthcare cost. Effective multimodal tools are available to prevent CKD by managing its risk factors, and to slow or even halt disease progression to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). They can be adapted even to poor-resource settings of low- and middle-income countries for individual at high risk of CKD. CKD is also linked to acute kidney injury (AKI), that in poorest part of Africa, Asia and Latin America is preventable, treatable and often reversible, if managed adequately and in timely manner as proposed by the program "AKI 0by25" launched by the international Society of Nephrology in 2013. In addition to saving lives, prevention programs will create major heath gains, eventually reducing the current health inequity that arises from unaffordable or unobtainable renal replacement therapies in many part of the developing world if ESRF is not prevented.

  17. [Chronic prostatitis and Bechterew's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlicek, J; Svec, V

    1977-11-01

    A group of patients between 35 and 65 years old with chronic prostatitis were examined for the presence of Becherew's disease. In this connection the New York and Roman criterions for morbus Bechterew were applied. There were found one ankyosing spondylarthritis, one ankylosis of the sacroiliac joint, and 11 times a tentative sacroileitis were stated. Altogether the proved and tentative findings were only 3.68 per cent of all examinations. In our countries the morbus Bechterew is found in 0,21 per cent of the normal population. So the protion of the Bechterew's disease in patients with chronic prostatitis is indeed a little higher than average, but not so frequent as often pretended in recent times. After a second series 58 patients being treated because of Bechterew's disease of different stages and different terms were examined for the possibility of a simultaneously elapsing chronic prostatitis. A chronic prostatitis was found in 38 per cent of these patients which correspondents to the incidence published in literature for the medium-age manhood. Nobody of the test persons had complaints on the part of the urologenital tract.

  18. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button NCHS Home Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Includes: Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema Recommend on Facebook ... Percent of visits to office-based physicians with COPD indicated on the medical record: 3.2% Source: ...

  19. Chronic diseases and mental disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaak, P.F.M.; Heijmans, M.J.W.M.; Peters, L.; Rijken, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to achieve a better understanding of the relationship between chronic medical illness and mental distress. Therefore, the association between chronic medical illness and mental distress was analysed, taking into account the modifying effects of generic disease

  20. Management of adynamic bone disease in chronic kidney disease: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K. Sista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO work group released recommendations in 2006 to define the bone-related pathology associated with chronic kidney disease as renal osteodystrophy. In 2009, KDIGO released revised clinical practice guidelines which redefined systemic disorders of bone and mineral metabolism due to chronic kidney disease as chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Conditions under this overarching term include osteitis fibrosa cystica, osteomalacia, and adynamic bone disease. We aim to provide a brief review of the histopathology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and diagnostic features of adynamic bone disease, focusing on current trends in the management of this complex bone disorder.

  1. Chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections of the skin, the airways, the lymph nodes, the liver, the brain and the bones. Frequently found pathogens are Staphylococcus aureus, Aspergillus species,

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter your blood. They remove wastes and ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  3. Radiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rand, T.; Trattnig, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Imhof, H.; Wagesreither, S.

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of chronic diseases of the ankle joint comprises a wide spectrum including chronic inflammatory processes and chronic degenerative, tumorous and neuropathic processes, as well as some specific syndromes based on chronic changes of the ankle joint. Of the inflammatory processes, chronic juvenile arthritis (JVC) is the most common disease. However, also Reiter disease, psoriasis or chronic monoarthritid diseases such as gout, as well as granulomatous diseases (tuberculosis, sarcoidosis) and fungal infections, may affect the ankle joint in a chronic course. Chronic degenerative changes are usually secondary due to abnormal positioning of the joint constituents or repetitive trauma. Neuropathic changes, as frequently seen in the course of diabetes, present with massive osseous destruction and malposition of the articular constituents. Chronic osseous as well as cartilaginous and synovial changes are seen in hemoplici patients. Chronic traumatic changes are represented by pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), and chondromatosis, both with a predilection for the ankle joint. Due to the possibilities of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diagnosis of chronic ankle changes includes chronic ligamentous, tendinous and soft tissue changes. With the use MRI, specific syndromes can be defined which particularly affect the ankle joint in a chronic way, such as the os trigonum syndrome, the anterolateral impingement syndrome and the sinus tarsi syndrome. Nevertheless, plain film radiographs are still the basic element of any investigation. MRI, however, can be potentially used as a second investigation, saving an unnecessary cascade of investigations with ultrasound and CT. The latter investigations are used only with very specific indications, for instance CT for subtle bone structures and sonography for a limited investigation of tendons or evaluation of fluid. Particularly due to the possibilities of MRI and the development of special gradient-echo imaging or

  4. Stem cell treatment for chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzouvelekis, Argyris; Ntolios, Paschalis; Bouros, Demosthenes

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cystic fibrosis or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a considerable human, societal and financial burden. In view of the current disappointing status of available pharmaceutical agents, there is an urgent need for alternative more effective therapeutic approaches that will not only help to relieve patient symptoms but will also affect the natural course of the respective disease. Regenerative medicine represents a promising option with several fruitful therapeutic applications in patients suffering from chronic lung diseases. Nevertheless, despite relative enthusiasm arising from experimental data, application of stem cell therapy in the clinical setting has been severely hampered by several safety concerns arising from the major lack of knowledge on the fate of exogenously administered stem cells within chronically injured lung as well as the mechanisms regulating the activation of resident progenitor cells. On the other hand, salient data arising from few 'brave' pilot investigations of the safety of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases seem promising. The main scope of this review article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the application status of stem cell treatment in chronic lung diseases, address important safety and efficacy issues and present future challenges and perspectives. In this review, we argue in favor of large multicenter clinical trials setting realistic goals to assess treatment efficacy. We propose the use of biomarkers that reflect clinically inconspicuous alterations of the disease molecular phenotype before rigid conclusions can be safely drawn. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Chronic Disease Cost not Transferable: Colombian Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Gallardo Solarte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim is to reflect on the social and economic costs of chronic non-communicable disease (NCD in Colombia to display a charging indicator of these pathologies. Material and methods: In a review of 50 studies, 27 were selected since these met the inclusion criteria, like chronical disease, studies conducted between 2002 and 2011 related to costs, chronic disease, and being Colombian. Results: This is a review study of chronic diseases vs. their costs, being here cardiovascular diseases part of the group of high cost and higher incidence diseases, thus repre­senting a great risk to the financial stability of healthcare companies. There are few studies that address the costs generated by the treatment of ncds patients that show the economic impact experienced by public and private institutions providing and promoting health services. Most of them forget the economic, family and social costs the affected population must suffer. Conclu­sions: ncds represent a burden to the health service system for their very high costs, untimely intervention and reduced significant benefit for this population and their families.

  6. Enalapril dosage in progressive chronic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, Thomas; Heisterberg, Jens; Sonne, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In chronic renal failure, clearance of enalapril is reduced. Hence, a renoprotective effect may be achieved with lower doses than conventionally used. Since marked inter-patient variation in concentrations of enalaprilat has been shown in patients with renal failure despite equivalent...... dosage of enalapril, a direct comparison of the effect of high versus low plasma concentrations of enalaprilat on the progression of renal failure was undertaken. METHODS: Forty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 17 (6-35) ml/min/1.73 m2 were studied in an open-label, randomised...... intervals by the plasma clearance of 51Cr-EDTA, and the individual rates of progression of renal failure were calculated as the slope of GFR versus time plot. RESULTS: In the high-concentration group, the median enalaprilat trough concentration was 92.9 ng/ml (21.8-371.0 ng/ml) and in the low...

  7. Eleven reasons to control the protein intake of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2007-07-01

    For many years patients with chronic kidney disease have been advised to control the protein content of their diet. This advice has been given on the basis of a number of reported metabolic effects of lowering protein intake, such as lowering serum urea nitrogen levels, improving phosphocalcic metabolism and insulin resistance and, more recently, ameliorating proteinuria (independent of antiproteinuric medications). The effects on the progression of kidney disease, although spectacular in experimental studies, have been less convincing in humans. It is possible that flawed design of clinical trials is responsible for this discrepancy. In this Review, we comment on experimental findings that indicate that limiting protein intake protects the kidney and ameliorates uremic symptoms, outline how the body adapts to a reduction in protein intake, and describe the metabolic benefits to the patient. We then review the evidence from randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses that pertains to the effects of low-protein diets in adults with chronic kidney disease.

  8. Clinical utility of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melki, P.S.; Halimi, P.; Wibault, P.; Doyon, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the diagnostic and prognostic value of MR imaging in chronic progressive radiation myelopathy 9CPRM). In this series, MR imaging showed excellent sensitivity (199%) for the demonstration of radiation-induced lesions of the spinal cord. Fifty percent of the cases showed spinal cord hypertrophy (pseudotumoral, 33%; cystic, 17%) occurring within 8 months of the clinical onset of myelopathy. The remaining 50% showed spinal cord atrophy, which occurred more than 8 months following the onset of myelopathy. These medullary lesions were located at least partially in the radiation field but extended beyond its boundaries in 73% of the cases. MR imaging helped to establish disease prognosis: spinal cord hypertrophy was usually associated with neurologic deterioration and fatal outcome within a mean of 11.5 months; in spinal atrophy, neurologic deficit was often static and survival rates were better

  9. Radiological features of progressive tumoral calcinosis in chronic renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, P

    2012-02-03

    We present the case of a young adult patient with chronic renal failure who developed painful subcutaneous nodules after failed renal transplant and recommencing dialysis. These nodules were juxta-articular in location and initially located over both shoulders. Radiological evaluation suggested tumoral calcinosis. The patient was placed on a strict dialysis and dietary regimen but was suboptimally compliant with same. The patient developed progressive disease with an increase in size and number of juxta-articular calcified soft-tissue masses. However, 6 months following a second renal transplant clinical and radiological follow up demonstrated marked resolution both in symptomatology and radiographic findings. We present the plain radiographic, CT and MRI findings which demonstrate the typical radiological features of tumoral calcinosis. We correlate these findings with clinical course and histological findings following surgical excision of one of these masses.

  10. Impact of chronic kidney disease stage on lower-extremity arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Brian F; Richard, Raveesh D; Bowen, Thomas R; Perkins, Robert M; Graham, Jove H; Foltzer, Michael A

    2014-07-01

    End-stage renal disease and dialysis is commonly associated with poor outcomes after joint replacement surgery. The goal of this study was to evaluate postoperative complications in patients with less advanced chronic kidney disease undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) or total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patients who underwent THA or TKA between 2004 and 2011 with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease were retrospectively reviewed via an electronic medical record. The authors compared 377 patients who had stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease with 402 patients who had stage 3 chronic kidney disease. No significant differences in 90-day readmission or revision rates were found between the stage 1 to 2 and stage 3 patient groups. For patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease, the overall mortality rate was greater than that in patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease. However, when adjusted for comorbid disease, no significant increases were seen in joint infection, readmission, or early revision between patients with stage 1 to 2 chronic kidney disease vs patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease. The overall incidence of infection was high (3.5%) but far less than reported for patients with end-stage renal disease, dialysis, and kidney transplant. In conclusion, patients with stage 1, 2, or 3 chronic kidney disease may have a higher than expected rate of prosthetic joint infection (3.5%) after total joint arthroplasty. Patients with stage 3 chronic kidney disease are at higher risk for postoperative mortality compared with those with lesser stages of kidney disease. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  12. Recognizing the importance of chronic disease in driving healthcare expenditure in Tanzania: analysis of panel data from 1991 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, Christopher J; Skordis-Worrall, Jolene

    2016-05-01

     Despite the growing chronic disease burden in low- and middle-income countries, there are significant gaps in our understanding of the financial impact of these illnesses on households. As countries make progress towards universal health coverage, specific information is needed about how chronic disease care drives health expenditure over time, and how this spending differs from spending on acute disease care.  A 19-year panel dataset was constructed using data from the Kagera Health and Development Surveys. Health expenditure was modelled using multilevel regression for three different sub-populations of households: (1) all households that spent on healthcare, (2) households affected by chronic disease and (3) households affected by acute disease. Explanatory variables were identified from a review of the health expenditure literature, and all variables were analysed descriptively.  Households affected by chronic disease spent 22% more on healthcare than unaffected households. Catastrophic expenditure and zero expenditure are both common in chronic disease-affected households. Expenditure predictors were different between households affected by chronic disease and those unaffected. Expenditure over time is highly heterogeneous and household-dependent.  The financial burden of healthcare is greater for households affected by chronic disease than those unaffected. Households appear unable to sustain high levels of expenditure over time, likely resulting in both irregular chronic disease treatment and impoverishment. The Tanzanian government's current efforts to develop a National Health Financing Strategy present an important opportunity to prioritize policies that promote the long-term financial protection of households by preventing the catastrophic consequences of chronic disease care payments. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-08-16

    Aug 16, 2007 ... chronic dialysis or transplantation due to significant extrarenal disease, mainly .... including coronary heart disease, silent myocardial ischaemia and left ... diabetics and should be kept in mind: • renal papillary necrosis.

  14. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    episode of acute pancreatitis leads to recurrent pancreatitis in 17% of patients, and almost 8% of patients progress to CP within 5 years. Progression was associated independently with alcoholic etiology, smoking, and a history of pancreatic necrosis. Smoking is the predominant risk factor for recurrent disease, whereas the combination of alcohol abuse and smoking produces the highest cumulative risk for chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Blood responses under chronic low daily dose gamma irradiation: Pt. 2; Differential preclinical responses of irradiated female dogs in progression to either aplastic anemia or myeloproliferative disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed, T.; Carnes, B.; Tolle, D.; Fritz, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Biological and Medical Research Div.)

    1993-05-01

    Female beagle dogs were chronically exposed to low daily doses of [sup 60]Co gamma rays and responded in one of three distinct hemopathological patterns. These patterns, reflective of distinct subgroups, were characterized by (a) low radioresistance resulting in progressive hematopoietic suppression, terminal aplastic anemia (AA), and relatively short (<400 days) survival ([sup -]S-AA subgroups); (b) high radioresistance, initially coupled with strong but aberrant regenerative hematopoiesis, and later with the development of myeloproliferative disease (MPD) ([sup +]-R-MPD subgroup); and (c) high radioresistance, coupled with an early phase of strong regenerative hematopoiesis, but later with no myeloproliferative disease ([sup +]R-nonMPD subgroup). In this study, the changes in circulating blood cells levels (granulocytes, monotcytes, erythrocytes, lymphocytes and platelets) were sequentially assessed in time and fitted to a flexible, quadratic-linear-type response model previously developed. The results are consistent with our earlier observations of blood responses of chronically irradiated male dogs, in the subgroups of female dogs prone to specific radiogenic hematopathologies (i.e. AA and MPD) can be readily identified and staged in specific preclinical periods by a series of marked differential blood responses. (Author).

  16. Supplemental Oxygen During High-Intensity Exercise Training in Nonhypoxemic Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neunhäuserer, Daniel; Steidle-Kloc, Eva; Weiss, Gertraud; Kaiser, Bernhard; Niederseer, David; Hartl, Sylvia; Tschentscher, Marcus; Egger, Andreas; Schönfelder, Martin; Lamprecht, Bernd; Studnicka, Michael; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-11-01

    Physical exercise training is an evidence-based treatment in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patients' peak work rate is associated with reduced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mortality. We assessed whether supplemental oxygen during exercise training in nonhypoxemic patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease might lead to superior training outcomes, including improved peak work rate. This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover trial. Twenty-nine patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (aged 63.5 ± 5.9 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second percent predicted, 46.4 ± 8.6) completed 2 consecutive 6-week periods of endurance and strength training with progressive intensity, which was performed 3 times per week with supplemental oxygen or compressed medical air (flow via nasal cannula: 10 L/min). Each session of electrocardiography-controlled interval cycling lasted 31 minutes and consisted of a warm-up, 7 cycles of 1-minute intervals at 70% to 80% of peak work rate alternating with 2 minutes of active recovery, and final cooldown. Thereafter, patients completed 8 strength-training exercises of 1 set each with 8 to 15 repetitions to failure. Change in peak work rate was the primary study end point. The increase in peak work rate was more than twice as high when patients exercised with supplemental oxygen compared with medical air (0.16 ± 0.02 W/kg vs 0.07 ± 0.02 W/kg; P work rate was 39.1% of the overall training effect, whereas it had no influence on strength gain (P > .1 for all exercises). We report that supplemental oxygen in nonhypoxemic chronic obstructive pulmonary disease doubled the effect of endurance training but had no effect on strength gain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsahli, Mazen; Gerich, John E

    2014-11-01

    Hypoglycemia is a major problem associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in patients with diabetes and is often a major barrier to achieving optimal glycemic control. Chronic kidney disease not only is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia but also augments the risk of hypoglycemia that is already present in people with diabetes. This article summarizes our current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and morbidity of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease and reviews therapeutic considerations in this situation. PubMed and MEDLINE were searched for literature published in English from January 1989 to May 2014 for diabetes mellitus, hypoglycemia, chronic kidney disease, and chronic renal insufficiency. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Living With Chronic Lower Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Pooler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I present a phenomenological study of individuals’ experiences of living with moderate to very severe chronic lower pulmonary disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or both. Phenomenology is a philosophy, distinct from descriptive or thematic research, which is useful as a foundation for scientific inquiry. In this study, I used the lens of Merleau-Ponty to understand and interpret participants’ experiences of living with pulmonary disease, and the approach of van Manen for analysis. I conclude that in chronic pulmonary disease, awareness of breathing and the body is experienced in the sounds, sensations, and signals of breathing and the body, and in the experiences of the body-in-the-world. Central themes of being-in-the-world from the study describe the disruption of the embodied phenomenological self: Participants experienced slowing down, doing less, and having to stop due to shortness of breath. Both chronic and acute dyspnea were prevalent and the taken-for-granted aspects of daily activities were disrupted. Findings of this study have implications for public and patient education, and opportunities for integration of experiential aspects within nursing education and practice.

  19. Living With Chronic Lower Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooler, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    In this article, I present a phenomenological study of individuals’ experiences of living with moderate to very severe chronic lower pulmonary disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or both). Phenomenology is a philosophy, distinct from descriptive or thematic research, which is useful as a foundation for scientific inquiry. In this study, I used the lens of Merleau-Ponty to understand and interpret participants’ experiences of living with pulmonary disease, and the approach of van Manen for analysis. I conclude that in chronic pulmonary disease, awareness of breathing and the body is experienced in the sounds, sensations, and signals of breathing and the body, and in the experiences of the body-in-the-world. Central themes of being-in-the-world from the study describe the disruption of the embodied phenomenological self: Participants experienced slowing down, doing less, and having to stop due to shortness of breath. Both chronic and acute dyspnea were prevalent and the taken-for-granted aspects of daily activities were disrupted. Findings of this study have implications for public and patient education, and opportunities for integration of experiential aspects within nursing education and practice. PMID:28462289

  20. Pathogenesis of hyperinflation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Philippe; Guenette, Jordan A; Langer, Daniel; Laviolette, Louis; Mainguy, Vincent; Maltais, François; Ribeiro, Fernanda; Saey, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a preventable and treatable lung disease characterized by airflow limitation that is not fully reversible. In a significant proportion of patients with COPD, reduced lung elastic recoil combined with expiratory flow limitation leads to lung hyperinflation during the course of the disease. Development of hyperinflation during the course of COPD is insidious. Dynamic hyperinflation is highly prevalent in the advanced stages of COPD, and new evidence suggests that it also occurs in many patients with mild disease, independently of the presence of resting hyperinflation. Hyperinflation is clinically relevant for patients with COPD mainly because it contributes to dyspnea, exercise intolerance, skeletal muscle limitations, morbidity, and reduced physical activity levels associated with the disease. Various pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions have been shown to reduce hyperinflation and delay the onset of ventilatory limitation in patients with COPD. The aim of this review is to address the more recent literature regarding the pathogenesis, assessment, and management of both static and dynamic lung hyperinflation in patients with COPD. We also address the influence of biological sex and obesity and new developments in our understanding of hyperinflation in patients with mild COPD and its evolution during progression of the disease. PMID:24600216

  1. Silymarin/Silybin and Chronic Liver Disease: A Marriage of Many Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Federico

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silymarin is the extract of Silybum marianum, or milk thistle, and its major active compound is silybin, which has a remarkable biological effect. It is used in different liver disorders, particularly chronic liver diseases, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic power. Indeed, the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effect of silymarin is oriented towards the reduction of virus-related liver damages through inflammatory cascade softening and immune system modulation. It also has a direct antiviral effect associated with its intravenous administration in hepatitis C virus infection. With respect to alcohol abuse, silymarin is able to increase cellular vitality and to reduce both lipid peroxidation and cellular necrosis. Furthermore, silymarin/silybin use has important biological effects in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. These substances antagonize the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, by intervening in various therapeutic targets: oxidative stress, insulin resistance, liver fat accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction. Silymarin is also used in liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma that represent common end stages of different hepatopathies by modulating different molecular patterns. Therefore, the aim of this review is to examine scientific studies concerning the effects derived from silymarin/silybin use in chronic liver diseases, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Epithelial and endothelial cell plasticity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh

    2017-03-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is mainly caused by smoking and presents with shortness of breath that is progressive and irreversible. It is a worldwide health problem and the fourth most common cause of chronic disability and mortality (even in developed countries). It is a complex disease involving both the airway and lung parenchyma. Small-airway fibrosis is the main contributor to physiological airway dysfunction in COPD. One potential mechanism contributing to small-airway fibrosis is epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). When associated with angiogenesis (EMT-type-3), EMT may well also be linked to the development of airway epithelial cancer, which is closely associated with COPD and predominantly observed in large airways. Vascular remodeling has also been widely reported in smokers and patients with COPD but the mechanisms behind it are poorly understood. It is quite possible that the process of endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EndMT) is also active in COPD lungs, in addition to EMT. Understanding these pathological mechanisms will greatly enhance our knowledge of the immunopathology of smoking-related lung disease. Only by understanding these processes can new therapies be developed. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Danish Register of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Tøttenborg, Sandra Søgaard; Sorknæs, Anne Dichmann

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Register of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (DrCOPD) is a nationwide database aiming to describe the quality of treatment of all patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: DrCOPD comprises data on all patients...

  4. Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and the progression of chronic kidney disease in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)123

    OpenAIRE

    Bomback, Andrew S; Katz, Ronit; He, Ka; Shoham, David A; Burke, Gregory L; Klemmer, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have examined sugar-sweetened soda consumption in relation to early markers of kidney disease, but to date there have been no investigations of whether sugar-sweetened beverage consumption affects preexistent chronic kidney disease (CKD).

  5. Chronic disease management: does the disease affect likelihood of care planning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitry, Agnes I; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Ramsay, Emmae N; Ryan, Philip; Caughey, Gillian E; Esterman, Adrian; Shakib, Sepehr; Gilbert, Andrew L; McDermott, Robyn

    2012-11-01

    To compare the demographic, socioeconomic, and medical characteristics of patients who had a General Practitioner Management Plan (GPMP) with those for patients without GPMP. Cohort study of patients with chronic diseases during the time period 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2008 using the Australian Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) claims database. Of the 88 128 veterans with chronic diseases included in the study, 23 015 (26%) veterans had a GPMP and 11 089 (13%) had a Team Care Arrangement (TCA). Those with a GPMP had a higher number of comorbidities (P<0.001), and a higher use of services such as health assessment and medicine review (P<0.001) than did those without GPMP. Diabetes was associated with a significantly increased use of GPMP compared with all other chronic diseases except heart failure. GPMPs are used in a minority of patients with chronic diseases. Use is highest in people with diabetes.

  6. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a case of chronic arsenic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somnath Bhattacharya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42-year-old housewife, the resident of rural part of West Bengal, presented with gradually progressive exertional dyspnea associated with a dry cough for last 3 years clinical features were suggestive of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD. Her chest X-ray posteroanterior view and high resolution computed tomography scan of the thorax showed bilateral patchy ground glass opacities and reticulonodular pattern. Search for the etiology revealed classical skin findings of chronic arsenic exposure in the form of generalized darkening and thickening of skin and keratotic lesions over the palms and soles and classical raindrop pigmentation over leg which was present for last 7 years subsequently her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, hair, nail, and drinking water showed significant amount of arsenic contamination. By exclusion of all known causes of DPLD, we concluded that it was a case of DPLD due to chronic arsenic exposure. To the best of our knowledge, only few case report of DPLD in chronic arsenicosis has been reported till date.

  7. Cys34-cysteinylated human serum albumin is a sensitive plasma marker in oxidative stress-related chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Nagumo

    Full Text Available The degree of oxidized cysteine (Cys 34 in human serum albumin (HSA, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, is correlated with oxidative stress related pathological conditions. In order to further characterize the oxidation of Cys34-HSA at the molecular level and to develop a suitable analytical method for a rapid and sensitive clinical laboratory analysis, the use of electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-TOFMS was evaluated. A marked increase in the cysteinylation of Cys34 occurs in chronic liver and kidney diseases and diabetes mellitus. A significant positive correlation was observed between the Cys-Cys34-HSA fraction of plasma samples obtained from 229 patients, as determined by ESI-TOFMS, and the degree of oxidized Cys34-HSA determined by HPLC. The Cys-Cys34-HSA fraction was significantly increased with the progression of liver cirrhosis, and was reduced by branched chain amino acids (BCAA treatment. The changes in the Cys-Cys34-HSA fraction were significantly correlated with the alternations of the plasma levels of advanced oxidized protein products, an oxidative stress marker for proteins. The binding ability of endogenous substances (bilirubin and tryptophan and drugs (warfarin and diazepam to HSA purified from chronic liver disease patients were significantly suppressed but significantly improved by BCAA supplementation. Interestingly, the changes in this physiological function of HSA in chronic liver disease were correlated with the Cys-Cys34-HSA fraction. In conclusion, ESI-TOFMS is a suitable high throughput method for the rapid and sensitive quantification of Cys-Cys34-HSA in a large number of samples for evaluating oxidative stress related chronic disease progression or in response to a treatment.

  8. Patient and Disease Characteristics Associated with Activation for Self-Management in Patients with Diabetes, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Heart Failure and Chronic Renal Disease: A Cross-Sectional Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  9. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Touwen, Irene; Schuurmans, Marieke; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Korpershoek, Yvonne; Spruit-Bentvelzen, Lotte; Ertugrul-van der Graaf, Inge; de Wit, Niek; Trappenburg, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD). Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13) and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate); 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain the greater

  10. Patient and disease characteristics associated with activation for self-management in patients with diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic heart failure and chronic renal disease: a cross-sectional survey study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Bos-Touwen

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of chronic disease patients do not respond to self-management interventions, which suggests that one size interventions do not fit all, demanding more tailored interventions. To compose more individualized strategies, we aim to increase our understanding of characteristics associated with patient activation for self-management and to evaluate whether these are disease-transcending. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (DM-II, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, Chronic Heart Failure (CHF and Chronic Renal Disease (CRD. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we analyzed associations between self-management activation (13-item Patient Activation Measure; PAM-13 and a wide range of socio-demographic, clinical, and psychosocial determinants. Furthermore, we assessed whether the associations between the determinants and the PAM were disease-transcending by testing whether disease was an effect modifier. In addition, we identified determinants associated with low activation for self-management using logistic regression analysis. We included 1154 patients (53% response rate; 422 DM-II patients, 290 COPD patients, 223 HF patients and 219 CRD patients. Mean age was 69.6±10.9. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed 9 explanatory determinants of activation for self-management: age, BMI, educational level, financial distress, physical health status, depression, illness perception, social support and underlying disease, explaining a variance of 16.3%. All associations, except for social support, were disease transcending. This study explored factors associated with varying levels of activation for self-management. These results are a first step in supporting clinicians and researchers to identify subpopulations of chronic disease patients less likely to be engaged in self-management. Increased scientific efforts are needed to explain

  11. The Role of Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells in the Immunopathogenesis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Damayanti, Triya; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the airways and lungs that results in limitations of continuous airflow and is caused by exposure to noxious gasses and particles. A major cause of morbidity and mortality in adults, COPD is a complex disease pathologically mediated by many inflammatory pathways. Macrophages, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and CD8+ T-lymphocytes are the key inflammatory cells involved in COPD. Recently, the non-coding small RNA, micro-RNA, have also been intensively investigated and evidence suggest that it plays a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. Here, we discuss the accumulated evidence that has since revealed the role of each inflammatory cell and their involvement in the immunopathogenesis of COPD. Mechanisms of steroid resistance in COPD will also be briefly discussed.

  12. Experimental chronic hepatitis B infection of neonatal tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri chinensis: A model to study molecular causes for susceptibility and disease progression to chronic hepatitis in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Qi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection continues to be an escalating global health problem. Feasible and effective animal models for HBV infection are the prerequisite for developing novel therapies for this disease. The tree shrew (Tupaia is a small animal species evolutionary closely related to humans, and thus is permissive to certain human viral pathogens. Whether tree shrews could be chronically infected with HBV in vivo has been controversial for decades. Most published research has been reported on adult tree shrews, and only small numbers of HBV infected newborn tree shrews had been observed over short time periods. We investigated susceptibility of newborn tree shrews to experimental HBV infection as well as viral clearance over a protracted time period. Results Forty-six newborn tree shrews were inoculated with the sera from HBV-infected patients or tree shrews. Serum and liver samples of the inoculated animals were periodically collected and analyzed using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Southern blot, and immunohistochemistry. Six tree shrews were confirmed and four were suspected as chronically HBV-infected for more than 48 (up to 228 weeks after inoculation, including three that had been inoculated with serum from a confirmed HBV-infected tree shrew. Conclusions Outbred neonatal tree shrews can be long-term chronically infected with HBV at a frequency comparable to humans. The model resembles human disease where also a smaller proportion of infected individuals develop chronic HBV related disease. This model might enable genetic and immunologic investigations which would allow determination of underlying molecular causes favoring susceptibility for chronic HBV infection and disease establishment vs. viral clearance.

  13. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, calprotectin and YKL-40 in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Allan Klitgaard; Holmgaard, Dennis Back; Mygind, Lone Hagens

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic inflammation and progressive decline in pulmonary function. Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), YKL-40 and calprotectin are biomarkers of inflammation and predict mortality in patients with different inflammatory...... diseases. We aimed to investigate the correlation between levels of these three biomarkers and neutrophil granulocyte and lymphocyte count in patients with moderate to very severe COPD stratified by use of systemic glucocorticoids. Furthermore, we studied the ability of these biomarkers to predict all......- and multivariate Cox regression analyses with hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Plasma calprotectin was positively correlated with neutrophil granulocyte count and NLR. No significant association was found between plasma YKL-40 and the cellular biomarkers, irrespective...

  14. Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management for older adults: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellefson, Michael; Chaney, Beth; Barry, Adam E; Chavarria, Enmanuel; Tennant, Bethany; Walsh-Childers, Kim; Sriram, P S; Zagora, Justin

    2013-02-14

    Participatory Web 2.0 interventions promote collaboration to support chronic disease self-management. Growth in Web 2.0 interventions has led to the emergence of e-patient communication tools that enable older adults to (1) locate and share disease management information and (2) receive interactive healthcare advice. The evolution of older e-patients contributing to Web 2.0 health and medical forums has led to greater opportunities for achieving better chronic disease outcomes. To date, there are no review articles investigating the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Web 2.0 chronic disease self-management interventions for older adults. To review the planning, implementation, and overall effectiveness of Web 2.0 self-management interventions for older adults (mean age ≥ 50) with one or more chronic disease(s). A systematic literature search was conducted using six popular health science databases. The RE-AIM (Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance) model was used to organize findings and compute a study quality score (SQS) for 15 reviewed articles. Most interventions were adopted for delivery by multidisciplinary healthcare teams and tested among small samples of white females with diabetes. Studies indicated that Web 2.0 participants felt greater self-efficacy for managing their disease(s) and benefitted from communicating with health care providers and/or website moderators to receive feedback and social support. Participants noted asynchronous communication tools (eg, email, discussion boards) and progress tracking features (eg, graphical displays of uploaded personal data) as being particularly useful for self-management support. Despite high attrition being noted as problematic, this review suggests that greater Web 2.0 engagement may be associated with improvements in health behaviors (eg, physical activity) and health status (eg, HRQoL). However, few studies indicated statistically significant improvements in medication

  15. [Salt intake and the progression of renal failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaha, Mayuko; Ohashi, Yasushi; Sakai, Ken; Aikawa, Atsushi; Mizuiri, Sonoo

    2010-01-01

    Salt intake not only elevates the levels of blood pressure, glomerular capillary pressure and proteinuria, but also increases oxidative stress within the renal cortex in animal models. We examined the effect of salt intake on the rate of renal function decline, urinary protein and oxidative stress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical data including systolic blood pressure (SBP)and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), serum creatinine, uric acid, total cholesterol, triglyceride, urinary protein, salt intake, protein intake of non-diabetic CKD 53 patients were observed for one year. At the end of the observation period, we measured 8-hydroxydeoxy guanosine (8-OHdG) in spot urine. We calculated the slope of reciprocal serum creatinine as the rate of renal function decline (delta1/Cr). We then investigated the relationship between those clinical factors and delta1/Cr, and urinary 8-OHdG, and also selected clinical factors that significantly influence delta1/Cr and urinary 8-OHdG by stepwise multiple regression analysis. In addition, we investigated the gender difference in urinary 8-OHdG. Annual mean SBP and DBP of all patients were 121.5 +/- 9.3 mmHg and 72.5+/- 6.2 mmHg, respectively. delta1/Cr was negatively correlated with salt intake, urinary protein and urinary protein was a significant predictor of delta1/Cr in a multiple regression analysis. Salt intake was positively correlated with protein intake and urinary protein. Urinary 8-OHdG of all patients was positively correlated with urinary protein and it was a significant predictor. Urinary 8-OHdG of male patients was positively correlated with salt intake and was a significant predictor; in female patients, it was positively correlated with urinary protein and total cholesterol and these two factors were significant predictors. Salt intake increases urinary protein and promotes the progression of renal failure in CKD patients.

  16. Food Insecurity and Chronic Disease123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laraia, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Household food insecurity has been previously hypothesized to promote dependence on inexpensive, highly palatable foods that are energy dense. Such dependence, and the cyclical nature of having enough food in the beginning of the month followed by food scarcity at the end of the month, could lead to weight gain over a short period of time. Such dependence on energy-dense foods and weight gain may play a direct role in the development of chronic conditions. Other compounding factors that result from exposure to household food insecurity have been well described, including pathways by which stress promotes visceral fat accumulation and chronic disease. This symposium review paper summarizes the literature on the link between food insecurity and the following: 1) diet, 2) weight gain, and 3) chronic disease, especially among women. This paper also proposes a framework for considering how the lived experience of household food insecurity may potentiate the development of chronic disease by activating the stress response among individuals at critical developmental periods in a food-impoverished environment. PMID:23493536

  17. Pathogenesis of hyperinflation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagnon P

    2014-02-01

    progression of the disease. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hyperinflation, expiratory flow limitation, operational lung volumes

  18. Impact of chronic kidney disease on the natural history of alkaptonuria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Bernardo; Vidinha, Joana; Pêgo, Cátia; Correia, Hugo; Sousa, Tânia

    2012-01-01

    In alkaptonuria, deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase leads to the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its metabolites in the body, resulting in ochronosis. Reports of patients with alkaptonuria who have decreased kidney function are rare, but this seems to play an important role in the natural history of the disease. We describe a 68-year-old female with chronic kidney disease (CKD) of unknown etiology who started peritoneal dialysis (PD) after 5 years of follow-up and who was diagnosed with alkaptonuria at this time. Progressive exacerbation of ochronotic manifestations had been noted during these last few years, as kidney function worsened. After PD initiation, the disease continued to progress, and death occurred after one year and a half, due to severe aortic stenosis-related complications. Her 70-year-old sister was evaluated and also diagnosed with alkaptonuria. She had no renal dysfunction. Higher HGA excretion and significantly milder ochronosis than that of her sister were found. We present two alkaptonuric sisters with similar comorbidities except for the presence of CKD, who turned out to have totally different evolutions of their disease. This report confirms that kidney dysfunction may be an important factor in determining the natural history of alkaptonuria. PMID:25874097

  19. Disease-related mortality exceeds treatment-related mortality in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia on second-line or later therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Edward; McGarry, Lisa; Gala, Smeet; Nieset, Christopher; Nanavaty, Merena; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Levy, Yair

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of newly-diagnosed patients with chronic-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CP-CML) with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) results in near-normal life expectancy. However, CP-CML patients resistant to initial TKIs face a poorer prognosis and significantly higher CML-related mortality. We conducted a systematic literature review to evaluate the specific causes of deaths (diseases progression versus drug-related) in CP-CML patients receiving second- or third-line therapy. We identified eight studies based on our criteria that reported causes of death. Overall, 5% of second-line and 10% of third-line patients died during the study follow-up period. For second-line, (7 studies, n=1926), mortality was attributed to disease progression for 41% of deaths, 2% to treatment-related causes, 3% were treatment-unrelated, and 50% were unspecified adverse events (AEs), not likely related to study drug. In third-line, (2 studies, n=144), 71% deaths were attributed to disease progression, 7% treatment-related AEs, 14% treatment-unrelated and 7% unspecified AEs. Annual death rates for second- and third-line therapy were significantly higher than for general population in similar age group. Our findings suggest death attributed to disease progression is approximately 10 times that due to treatment-related AEs in patients with CP-CML receiving second- or third-line therapy. Therefore, the potential benefits of effective treatment for these patients with the currently available TKIs outweigh the risks of treatment-induced AEs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dietary protein intake and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gang Jee; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tortorici, Amanda R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-01-01

    High-protein intake may lead to increased intraglomerular pressure and glomerular hyperfiltration. This can cause damage to glomerular structure leading to or aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, a low-protein diet (LPD) of 0.6-0.8 g/kg/day is often recommended for the management of CKD. We reviewed the effect of protein intake on incidence and progression of CKD and the role of LPD in the CKD management. Actual dietary protein consumption in CKD patients remains substantially higher than the recommendations for LPD. Notwithstanding the inconclusive results of the 'Modification of Diet in Renal Disease' (MDRD) study, the largest randomized controlled trial to examine protein restriction in CKD, several prior and subsequent studies and meta-analyses appear to support the role of LPD on retarding progression of CKD and delaying initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy. LPD can also be used to control metabolic derangements in CKD. Supplemented LPD with essential amino acids or their ketoanalogs may be used for incremental transition to dialysis especially on nondialysis days. The LPD management in lieu of dialysis therapy can reduce costs, enhance psychological adaptation, and preserve residual renal function upon transition to dialysis. Adherence and adequate protein and energy intake should be ensured to avoid protein-energy wasting. A balanced and individualized dietary approach based on LPD should be elaborated with periodic dietitian counseling and surveillance to optimize management of CKD, to assure adequate protein and energy intake, and to avoid or correct protein-energy wasting.

  1. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detect CKD: blood pressure, urine albumin and serum creatinine. What causes CKD? The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure , which are responsible for up to ...

  2. The crosstalk of gut microbiota and chronic kidney disease: role of inflammation, proteinuria, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanbay, Mehmet; Onal, Emine M; Afsar, Baris; Dagel, Tuncay; Yerlikaya, Aslihan; Covic, Adrian; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-05-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been shown to result in profound changes in the composition and functions of the gut microbial flora which by disrupting intestinal epithelial barrier and generating toxic by-products contributes to systemic inflammation and the associated complications. On the other hand, emerging evidence points to the role of the gut microbiota in the development and progression of CKD by provoking inflammation, proteinuria, hypertension, and diabetes. These observations demonstrate the causal interconnection between the gut microbial dysbiosis and CKD. The gut microbiota closely interacts with the inflammatory, renal, cardiovascular, and endocrine systems via metabolic, humoral, and neural signaling pathways, events which can lead to chronic systemic inflammation, proteinuria, hypertension, diabetes, and kidney disease. Given the established role of the gut microbiota in the development and progression of CKD and its complications, favorable modification of the composition and function of the gut microbiome represents an appealing therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of CKD. This review provides an overview of the role of the gut microbial dysbiosis in the pathogenesis of the common causes of CKD including hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria as well as progression of CKD.

  3. Burden of chronic kidney disease in resource-limited settings from Peru: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Elizabeth R; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Nessel, Lisa; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Miranda, J Jaime; Feldman, Harold I

    2015-07-24

    The silent progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and its association with other chronic diseases, and high treatment costs make it a great public health concern worldwide. The population burden of CKD in Peru has yet to be fully described. We completed a cross sectional study of CKD prevalence among 404 participants (total study population median age 54.8 years, 50.2 % male) from two sites, highly-urbanized Lima and less urbanized Tumbes, who were enrolled in the population-based CRONICAS Cohort Study of cardiopulmonary health in Peru. Factors potentially associated with the presence of CKD were explored using Poisson regression, a statistical methodology used to determine prevalence ratios. In total, 68 participants (16.8 %, 95 % CI 13.5-20.9 %) met criteria for CKD: 60 (14.9%) with proteinuria, four (1%) with eGFR diabetes and hypertension was 19.1 % and 42.7 %, respectively. After multivariable adjustment, CKD was associated with older age, female sex, greater wealth tertile (although all wealth strata were below the poverty line), residence in Lima, and presence of diabetes and hypertension. The high prevalence rates of CKD identified in Lima and Tumbes are similar to estimates from high-income settings. These findings highlight the need to identify occult CKD and implement strategies to prevent disease progression and secondary morbidity.

  4. Growth failure and nutrition considerations in chronic childhood wasting diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Ursula G; Shekerdemian, Lara S; Coss-Bu, Jorge A

    2015-04-01

    Growth failure is a common problem in many children with chronic diseases. This article is an overview of the most common causes of growth failure/growth retardation that affect children with a number of chronic diseases. We also briefly review the nutrition considerations and treatment goals. Growth failure is multifactorial in children with chronic conditions, including patients with cystic fibrosis, chronic kidney disease, chronic liver disease, congenital heart disease, human immunodeficiency virus, inflammatory bowel disease, short bowel syndrome, and muscular dystrophies. Important contributory factors to growth failure include increased energy needs, increased energy loss, malabsorption, decreased energy intake, anorexia, pain, vomiting, intestinal obstruction, and inflammatory cytokines. Various metabolic and pathologic abnormalities that are characteristic of chronic diseases further lead to significant malnutrition and growth failure. In addition to treating disease-specific abnormalities, treatment should address the energy and protein deficits, including vitamin and mineral supplements to correct deficiencies, correct metabolic and endocrinologic abnormalities, and include long-term monitoring of weight and growth. Individualized, age-appropriate nutrition intervention will minimize the malnutrition and growth failure seen in children with chronic diseases. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  5. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up

  6. Pesticides and human chronic diseases: Evidences, mechanisms, and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad, E-mail: Mohammad.Abdollahi@UToronto.Ca

    2013-04-15

    Along with the wide use of pesticides in the world, the concerns over their health impacts are rapidly growing. There is a huge body of evidence on the relation between exposure to pesticides and elevated rate of chronic diseases such as different types of cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson, Alzheimer, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), birth defects, and reproductive disorders. There is also circumstantial evidence on the association of exposure to pesticides with some other chronic diseases like respiratory problems, particularly asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), cardiovascular disease such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease, chronic nephropathies, autoimmune diseases like systemic lupus erythematous and rheumatoid arthritis, chronic fatigue syndrome, and aging. The common feature of chronic disorders is a disturbance in cellular homeostasis, which can be induced via pesticides' primary action like perturbation of ion channels, enzymes, receptors, etc., or can as well be mediated via pathways other than the main mechanism. In this review, we present the highlighted evidence on the association of pesticide's exposure with the incidence of chronic diseases and introduce genetic damages, epigenetic modifications, endocrine disruption, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), impairment of ubiquitin proteasome system, and defective autophagy as the effective mechanisms of action. - Highlights: ► There is a link between exposure to pesticides and incidence of chronic diseases. ► Genotoxicity and proteotoxicity are two main involved mechanisms. ► Epigenetic knowledge may help diagnose the relationships. ► Efficient policies on safe use of pesticides should be set up.

  7. The clinical usefulness of portal venous flow ratio by hepatic angiography with 99mTc-Sn colloid in chronic liver diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegoshi, Kunio; Tohyama, Tatsuhiko; Okuda, Kohji; Seto, Hikaru; Nakanuma, Yasuni.

    1989-01-01

    The ratio of portal venous to hepatic blood flow was measured in chronic liver diseases by radionuclide angiography with 99m Tc-Sn colloid and its clinical value was discussed. The ratio was proportionally decreased to the progression of the diseases (normal 74.5±7.3%, chronic hepatitis 58.8±9.2%, compensated liver cirrhosis 49.0±10.4%, and decokmpensated liver cirrhosis 29.3±19.3%). In alcoholic liver diseases, the standard deviation of the ratio was large as 52.7±23.7%, and the low ratio in the early period of the disease increased within one or two months as the disease recovered. In comparison with the histological findings of the liver, the ratio in the alcoholic liver diseases was well correlated with the severity of liver fibrosis and liver cell swelling. In conclusion, this noninvasive and simple method is valuable in diagnosing the chronic liver disease, especially alcoholic liver diseases, and also in estimating its clinical course. (author)

  8. The Spectrum of Disease in Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Ann C.; Stein, Thor D.; Nowinski, Christopher J.; Stern, Robert A.; Daneshvar, Daniel H.; Alvarez, Victor E.; Lee, Hyo-Soon; Hall, Garth; Wojtowicz, Sydney M.; Baugh, Christine M.; Riley, David O.; Kubilus, Caroline A.; Cormier, Kerry A.; Jacobs, Matthew A.; Martin, Brett R.; Abraham, Carmela R.; Ikezu, Tsuneya; Reichard, Robert Ross; Wolozin, Benjamin L.; Budson, Andrew E.; Goldstein, Lee E.; Kowall, Neil W.; Cantu, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy is a progressive tauopathy that occurs as a consequence of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury. We analysed post-mortem brains obtained from a cohort of 85 subjects with histories of repetitive mild traumatic brain injury and found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in 68 subjects: all males, ranging…

  9. Precision medicine for managing chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwczynski, Andrzej; Orlewska, Ewa

    2016-08-18

    Precision medicine (PM) is an important modern paradigm for combining new types of metrics with big medical datasets to create prediction models for prevention, diagnosis, and specific therapy of chronic diseases. The aim of this paper was to differentiate PM from personalized medicine, to show potential benefits of PM for managing chronic diseases, and to define problems with implementation of PM into clinical practice. PM strategies in chronic airway diseases, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases show that the key to developing PM is the addition of big datasets to the course of individually profiling diseases and patients. Integration of PM into clinical practice requires the reengineering of the health care infrastructure by incorporating necessary tools for clinicians and patients to enable data collection and analysis, interpretation of the results, as well as to facilitate treatment choices based on new understanding of biological pathways. The size of datasets and their large variability pose a considerable technical and statistical challenge. The potential benefits of using PM are as follows: 1) broader possibilities for physicians to use the achievements of genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and other "omics" disciplines in routine clinical practice; 2) better understanding of the pathogenesis and epidemiology of diseases; 3) a revised approach to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic diseases; 4) better integration of electronic medical records as well as data from sensors and software applications in an interactive network of knowledge aimed at improving the modelling and testing of therapeutic and preventative strategies, stimulating further research, and spreading information to the general public.

  10. The acute effect of cigarette smoking on the high-sensitivity CRP and fibrinogen biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Wouter D; Akkermans, Reinier; Heijdra, Yvonne; Weel, Chris van; Schermer, Tjard R J; Scheepers, Paul T J; Lenders, Jacques W M

    2013-04-01

    The evidence on the acute effects of smoking on biomarkers is limited. Our aim was to study the acute effect of smoking on disease-related biomarkers. The acute effect of smoking on serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) and plasma fibrinogen and its association with disease severity was studied by challenging 31 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with cigarette smoking and repeatedly measuring these biomarkers before and after smoking. Fibrinogen and hs-CRP increased directly after smoking by 9.4 mg/dl (95% CI: 4.2-14.5) and 0.13 mg/l (95% CI: 0.03-0.23), respectively. Fibrinogen levels remained elevated after 35 min, whereas hs-CRP normalized. Pearson's correlation coefficient between the hs-CRP change and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity was 0.25 (p = 0.06). Fibrinogen and hs-CRP increased directly after smoking in the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Their association with disease risk and/or progression remains to be demonstrated.

  11. The Progressive BSSG Rat Model of Parkinson's: Recapitulating Multiple Key Features of the Human Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackalina M Van Kampen

    Full Text Available The development of effective neuroprotective therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD has been severely hindered by the notable lack of an appropriate animal model for preclinical screening. Indeed, most models currently available are either acute in nature or fail to recapitulate all characteristic features of the disease. Here, we present a novel progressive model of PD, with behavioural and cellular features that closely approximate those observed in patients. Chronic exposure to dietary phytosterol glucosides has been found to be neurotoxic. When fed to rats, β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG triggers the progressive development of parkinsonism, with clinical signs and histopathology beginning to appear following cessation of exposure to the neurotoxic insult and continuing to develop over several months. Here, we characterize the progressive nature of this model, its non-motor features, the anatomical spread of synucleinopathy, and response to levodopa administration. In Sprague Dawley rats, chronic BSSG feeding for 4 months triggered the progressive development of a parkinsonian phenotype and pathological events that evolved slowly over time, with neuronal loss beginning only after toxin exposure was terminated. At approximately 3 months following initiation of BSSG exposure, animals displayed the early emergence of an olfactory deficit, in the absence of significant dopaminergic nigral cell loss or locomotor deficits. Locomotor deficits developed gradually over time, initially appearing as locomotor asymmetry and developing into akinesia/bradykinesia, which was reversed by levodopa treatment. Late-stage cognitive impairment was observed in the form of spatial working memory deficits, as assessed by the radial arm maze. In addition to the progressive loss of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra, the appearance of proteinase K-resistant intracellular α-synuclein aggregates was also observed to develop progressively, appearing first in the

  12. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients.

  13. Rural-urban differences in the prevalence of chronic disease in northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shibin; Kou, Changgui; Liu, Yawen; Li, Bo; Tao, Yuchun; D'Arcy, Carl; Shi, Jieping; Wu, Yanhua; Liu, Jianwei; Zhu, Yingli; Yu, Yaqin

    2015-05-01

    Rural-urban differences in the prevalence of chronic diseases in the adult population of northeast China are examined. The Jilin Provincial Chronic Disease Survey used personal interviews and physical measures to research the presence of a range of chronic diseases among a large sample of rural and urban provincial residents aged 18 to 79 years (N = 21 435). Logistic regression analyses were used. After adjusting for age and gender, rural residents had higher prevalence of hypertension, chronic ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, chronic low back pain, arthritis, chronic gastroenteritis/peptic ulcer, chronic cholecystitis/gallstones, and chronic lower respiratory disease. Low education, low income, and smoking increased the risk of chronic diseases in rural areas. Reducing rural-urban differences in chronic disease presents a formidable public health challenge for China. The solution requires focusing attention on issues endemic to rural areas such as poverty, lack of chronic disease knowledge, and the inequality in access to primary care. © 2014 APJPH.

  14. Dietary management of chronic kidney disease: protein restriction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goraya, Nimrit; Wesson, Donald E

    2012-11-01

    More kidney protective strategies are needed to reduce the burden of complete kidney failure from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinicians sometimes use protein restriction as kidney protection despite its demonstrated lack of effectiveness in the only large-scale study. Small-scale studies support that dietary acid reduction is kidney-protective, including when done with base-inducing foods like fruits and vegetables. We review these studies in light of current kidney-protective recommendations. Animal models of CKD show that acid-inducing dietary protein exacerbates and base-inducing protein ameliorates nephropathy progression, and that increased intake of acid-inducing but not base-inducing dietary protein exacerbates progression. Clinical studies show that dietary acid reduction with Na-based alkali reduces kidney injury and slows nephropathy progression in patients with CKD and reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR); base-inducing fruits and vegetables reduce kidney injury in patients with reduced GFR; and base-inducing fruits and vegetables improve metabolic acidosis in CKD. Protein type rather than amount might more importantly affect nephropathy progression. Base-inducing foods might be another way to reduce dietary acid, a strategy shown in small studies to slow nephropathy progression. Further studies will determine if CKD patients should be given base-inducing food as part of their management.

  15. IL-35, a hallmark of immune-regulation in cancer progression, chronic infections and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymouri, Manouchehr; Pirro, Matteo; Fallarino, Francesca; Gargaro, Marco; Sahebkar, Amirhosein

    2018-03-25

    Cytokine members of the IL-12 family have attracted enormous attention in the last few years, with IL-35 being the one of the most attractive-suppressive cytokine. IL-35 is an important mediator of regulatory T cell function. Regulatory T cells play key roles in restoring immune homeostasis after facing challenges such as infection by specific pathogens. Moreover, a crucial role for regulatory T cell populations has been demonstrated in several physiological processes, including establishment of fetal-maternal tolerance, maintenance of self-tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases. However, a deleterious involvement of immune regulatory T cells has been documented in specific inhibition of immune responses against tumor cells, promotion of chronic infections and establishment of chronic inflammatory disorders. In this review, we attempt to shed light on the concept of immune-homoeostasis on the aforementioned issues, taking IL-35 as the hallmark of regulatory responses. The dilemma between immune-mediated cancer treatment and inflammation is discussed. Histopathological indications of chronic vs. acute infections are elaborated. Moreover, the evidence that IL-35 requires additional immune-regulatory cytokines, such as IL-10 and TGF-β, to induce effective and maximal anti-inflammatory effects suggest that immune-regulation requires multi-factorial analysis of many immune playmakers rather than a specific immune target. © 2018 UICC.

  16. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...

  17. Chronic disease prevalence among elderly Saudi men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquib, Nazmus; Saquib, Juliann; Alhadlag, Abdulrahman; Albakour, Mohamad Anas; Aljumah, Bader; Sughayyir, Mohammed; Alhomidan, Ziad; Alminderej, Omar; Aljaser, Mohamed; Al-Mazrou, Abdulrahman

    2017-01-01

    Saudi demographic composition has changed because of increased life expectancy and decreased fertility rates. Little data are available about health conditions among older adults in Saudi Arabia, who are expected to represent 20% of the population by 2050. The study aim was to assess the prevalence and risk factors for chronic conditions among older Saudi men. The sample pertained to 400 men (age ≥55 years) from Buraidah, Al-Qassim. Research assistants recruited participants in all the mosques from the randomly selected neighborhoods (16 of 95). They administered a structured questionnaire that assessed self-reported disease history (heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, asthma, gastric/peptic ulcer, and cancer), and medication use; participants' height, weight, blood pressure, and random blood glucose (glucometer) were measured. Multinomial logistic regressions were employed to assess correlates of number of chronic diseases. The mean and standard deviation for age and body mass index (BMI) were 63.0 ± 7.5 years and 28.9 ± 4.8 (kg/m 2 ), respectively. 78% (77.8%) were overweight or obese, 35.0% were employed, 54.5% walked daily, 9.3% were current smokers, and 85.0% belonged to the middle class. The prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, asthma, ulcer, and cancer were: 71.3% 27.3%, 16.4%, 9.7%, 8.9%, and 2.0%, respectively. Of the participants, 31.0% had one, 34.5% had two or more, and 34.5% did not have any chronic diseases. The likelihood of chronic diseases increased with increased age, higher BMI, and current smoking. The chronic disease prevalence among the Saudi elderly men is substantial.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  19. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilce Mitiko Matsuda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer.

  20. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease and progression of disease over time among patients enrolled in the Houston West Nile virus cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa S Nolan

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In experimental models of West Nile virus (WNV infection, animals develop chronic kidney infection with histopathological changes in the kidney up to 8-months post-infection. However, the long term pathologic effects of acute infection in humans are largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to assess renal outcomes following WNV infection, specifically the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: In a cohort of 139 study participants with a previous diagnosis of WNV infection, we investigated the prevalence of CKD using the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (KDOQI criteria based on the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula and urinary abnormalities, and assessed various risk factors and biomarkers. RESULTS: Study participants were primarily male (60% and non-Hispanic white (86% with a mean age of 57 years. Most (83% were four to nine years post-infection at the time of this study. Based on the KDOQI definition, 40% of participants had evidence of CKD, with 10% having Stage III or greater and 30% having Stage I-II. By urinary dipstick testing, 26% of patients had proteinuria and 23% had hematuria. Plasma NGAL levels were elevated in 14% of participants while MCP-1 levels were increased in 12%. Over 1.5 years, the average change in eGFR was -3.71 mL/min/1.73 m(2. Only a history of Neuroinvasive WNV disease was independently associated with CKD following multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION: We found a high prevalence of CKD after long term follow-up in a cohort of participants previously infected with WNV. The majority of those with CKD are in Stage I-II indicating early stages of renal disease. Traditional risk factors were not associated with the presence of CKD in this population. Therefore, clinicians should regularly evaluate all patients with a history of WNV for evidence of CKD.

  1. Triumph and tragedy: anemia management in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, James E; Szczech, Lynda A

    2008-11-01

    Recent trial data have resulted in a reevaluation of the management of anemia in chronic kidney disease, including the use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, intravenous iron, and novel pharmaceuticals. In this review, we evaluate the latest research on anemia management in chronic kidney disease. Clinical trials of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents indicate that targeting the complete correction of anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease results in a greater risk of morbidity and mortality despite improved hemoglobin and quality of life. Conversely, intravenous iron has been found effective and relatively well tolerated in treating anemia in chronic kidney disease, even in patients with elevated ferritin. New agents to manage anemia, including long-acting erythropoietin derivatives, are also in active development. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents should be used to target hemoglobin 11-12 g/dl in patients with chronic kidney disease. Intravenous iron may be beneficial for patients with hemoglobin less than 11 g/dl and transferrin saturation less than 25% despite elevated ferritin (500-1200 ng/ml). An upcoming placebo-controlled trial of darbepoetin should help to define the role of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in chronic kidney disease.

  2. Osteoporosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Schwarz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence.......The purpose of this review is to examine the state of knowledge and clinical practice in the association of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to osteoporosis and fracture incidence....

  3. Temporal dynamics of hippocampal neurogenesis in chronic neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzzi, Stefano; Vargas-Caballero, Mariana; Fransen, Nina L.; Al-Malki, Hussain; Cebrian-Silla, Arantxa; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose Manuel; Riecken, Kristoffer; Fehse, Boris; Perry, V. Hugh

    2014-01-01

    The study of neurogenesis during chronic neurodegeneration is crucial in order to understand the intrinsic repair mechanisms of the brain, and key to designing therapeutic strategies. In this study, using an experimental model of progressive chronic neurodegeneration, murine prion disease, we define the temporal dynamics of the generation, maturation and integration of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, using dual pulse-chase, multicolour γ-retroviral tracing, transmission electron microscopy and patch-clamp. We found increased neurogenesis during the progression of prion disease, which partially counteracts the effects of chronic neurodegeneration, as evidenced by blocking neurogenesis with cytosine arabinoside, and helps to preserve the hippocampal function. Evidence obtained from human post-mortem samples, of both variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and Alzheimer’s disease patients, also suggests increased neurogenic activity. These results open a new avenue into the exploration of the effects and regulation of neurogenesis during chronic neurodegeneration, and offer a new model to reproduce the changes observed in human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24941947

  4. Chronic Liver Disease : Value of Sonographic Study of the Liver Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Myeong Jin; Han, Kwang Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Ki Whang

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of sonographic irregularities of liver surface in the differentiation of chronic liver disease. Fifty-eight patients with either chronic hepatitis or early stage of liver cirrhosis were examined with 5 MHz linear array transducer by observing the liver surface.We compared the sonographic findings with peritoneoscopic and pathologic findings. Thirty-five patients with smooth surface showed variable pathological results, including chronic active and persistent hepatitis, inactive hepatitis and alcoholic hepatitis without any evidence of cirrhosis. Nineteen patients with micronodules mostly revealed chronic active hepatitis and cirrhosis. All 4 patients with macronodules were proved pathologically ascirrhosis. High resolution ultrasonography(HRUS) showed smooth liver surface in 35 patients(60.3%),micronodular surface in l9(32.8%), and macronodular surface in 4 (6.9%). Twenty-one cases(60.0%) among 35 patients with smooth surface were peritoneoscopically normal and 12 cases(34.3%) showed dimpling surface. However among l9 patients with micronodular surface, only 5 cases(26.3%) showed micronodular surface on peritoneoscopy. while 8 cases(42.l%) showed nracronodular surface and 6 cases(3l.6%) dimpling surface. All 4 patients with macronodulesrevealed peritoneoscopically nracronodular surface. Observation of liver surface by HRUS was useful in predicting the progression of chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis. However, it was not helpful in the differentiation between normal liver and chronic hepatrtrs

  5. Genetics Home Reference: chronic granulomatous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other common areas of infection in people with chronic granulomatous disease include the skin, liver , and lymph nodes . Inflammation can occur in ... Other common areas of inflammation in people with chronic granulomatous ... and skin. Additionally, granulomas within the gastrointestinal tract can lead ...

  6. Chronic kidney disease in congenital heart disease patients: a narrative review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Catherine; Al-Aklabi, Mohammed; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease have a number of risk factors for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is well known that CKD has a large negative impact on health outcomes. It is important therefore to consider that patients with congenital heart disease represent a population in whom long-term primary and secondary prevention strategies to reduce CKD occurrence and progression could be instituted and significantly change outcomes. There are currently no clear guidelines for clinicians in terms of renal assessment in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Consolidation of knowledge is critical for generating such guidelines, and hence is the purpose of this view. This review will summarize current knowledge related to CKD in patients with congenital heart disease, to highlight important work that has been done to date and set the stage for further investigation, development of prevention strategies, and re-evaluation of appropriate renal follow-up in patients with congenital heart disease. The literature search was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. Current epidemiological evidence suggests that CKD occurs in patients with congenital heart disease at a higher frequency than the general population and is detectable early in follow-up (i.e. during childhood). Best evidence suggests that approximately 30 to 50 % of adult patients with congenital heart disease have significantly impaired renal function. The risk of CKD is higher with cyanotic congenital heart disease but it is also present with non-cyanotic congenital heart disease. Although significant knowledge gaps exist, the sum of the data suggests that patients with congenital heart disease should be followed from an early age for the development of CKD. There is an opportunity to mitigate CKD progression and negative renal outcomes by instituting interventions such as stringent blood pressure control and reduction of proteinuria. There is a need to

  7. The urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio is a reliable indicator for evaluating complications of chronic kidney disease and progression in IgA nephropathy in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Huan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the correlation between the albumin-to-creatinine ratio in the urine and 24-hour urine proteinuria and whether the ratio can predict chronic kidney disease progression even more reliably than 24-hour proteinuria can, particularly in primary IgA nephropathy. METHODS: A total of 182 patients with primary IgA nephropathy were evaluated. Their mean urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and 24-hour proteinuria were determined during hospitalization. Blood samples were also analyzed. Follow-up data were recorded for 44 patients. A cross-sectional study was then conducted to test the correlation between these parameters and their associations with chronic kidney disease complications. Subsequently, a canonical correlation analysis was employed to assess the correlation between baseline proteinuria and parameters of the Oxford classification. Finally, a prospective observational study was performed to evaluate the association between proteinuria and clinical outcomes. Our study is registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry, and the registration number is ChiCTR-OCH-14005137. RESULTS: A strong correlation (r=0.81, p<0.001 was found between the ratio and 24-hour proteinuria except in chronic kidney disease stage 5. First-morning urine albumin-to-creatinine ratios of ≥125.15, 154.44 and 760.31 mg/g reliably predicted equivalent 24-hour proteinuria ‘thresholds’ of ≥0.15, 0.3 and 1.0 g/24 h, respectively. In continuous analyses, the albumin-to-creatinine ratio was significantly associated with anemia, acidosis, hypoalbuminemia, hyperphosphatemia, hyperkalemia, hypercholesterolemia and higher serum cystatin C. However, higher 24-hour proteinuria was only associated with hypoalbuminemia and hypercholesterolemia. Higher tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis scores were also associated with a greater albumin-to-creatinine ratio, as observed in the canonical correlation analysis. Finally, the albumin

  8. Granulomatous cystitis in chronic granulomatous disease: Ultrasound diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, D.R.; Glasier, C.M.; McConnell, J.R.; Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock

    1987-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a fatal hereditary disease of childhood characterized by chronic recurrent bacterial infections. Involvement of the genitourinary tract is uncommon. We report a child with CGD with granulomatous cystitis demonstrated by both ultrasound and computed tomography. (orig.)

  9. Skin autofluorescence as a measure of advanced glycation endproduct deposition: a novel risk marker in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Andries J; Gerrits, Esther G

    2010-11-01

    Skin autofluorescence (SAF) is a new method to noninvasively assess accumulation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in a tissue with low turnover. Recent progress in the clinical application of SAF as a risk marker for diabetic nephropathy as well as cardiovascular disease in nondiabetic end-stage kidney disease, less advanced chronic kidney disease, and renal transplant recipients is reviewed. Experimental studies highlight the fundamental role of the interaction of AGEs with the receptor for AGEs (RAGEs), also called the AGE-RAGE axis, in the pathogenesis of vascular and chronic kidney disease. SAF predicts (cardiovascular) mortality in renal failure and also chronic renal transplant dysfunction. Long-term follow-up results from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial and UK Prospective Diabetes Study suggest that AGE accumulation is a key carrier of metabolic memory and oxidative stress. Short-term intervention studies in diabetic nephropathy with thiamine, benfotiamine and angiotensin-receptor blockers aimed at reducing AGE formation have reported mixed results. SAF is a noninvasive marker of AGE accumulation in a tissue with low turnover, and thereby of metabolic memory and oxidative stress. SAF independently predicts cardiovascular and renal risk in diabetes, as well as in chronic kidney disease. Further long-term studies are required to assess the potential benefits of interventions to reduce AGE accumulation.

  10. Regulatory T-cell and T-helper 17 balance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia progression and autoimmune cytopenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lad, Deepesh P; Varma, Subhash; Varma, Neelam; Sachdeva, Man Updesh Singh; Bose, Parveen; Malhotra, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    The reasons for progression and autoimmune cytopenias (AIC) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are not entirely clear, with previous studies suggesting a role for regulatory T-cells (Treg). In this study we prospectively studied Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25highCD127low), interleukin-10 (IL-10) producing Treg and T-helper 17 (Th17) (CD3+CD4+IL-17+) cells in 40 treatment-naive patients with CLL. The percentage of Th17 and not Treg cells was significantly higher in the AIC cohort than in those without AIC (pcells are responsible for AIC of CLL. Analysis of lymph-node aspirates showed that the percentage of Treg and IL-10 expression in Treg and not Th17 was significantly higher than in peripheral blood (pcells play a major role in the microenvironment where disease progression occurs. This shows the importance of maintaining the Treg:Th17 equilibrium, for imbalance leads to CLL progression or AIC.

  11. Association between Daytime Napping and Chronic Diseases in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Junmin; Kessler, Asia Sikora; Su, Dejun

    2016-03-01

    To explore the relationship between daytime napping and incidence of chronic diseases over the past 6 months among adults in China. Based on data collected from 13,469 respondents over age 40 in the Chinese Family Panel Studies in 2010, logistic regression models were estimated to examine the association between daytime napping and the incidence of any chronic diseases and 3 specific chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease) after adjusting for confounders. Differences of risks by sex and age were also investigated. In the sample, 50.8% were women and 32.2% were over 60 years old. Adjusted estimates show respondents with daytime napping had elevated odds of developing any chronic diseases, hypertension, and diabetes compared to those who did not nap; having over 60 minutes of daytime napping had weaker association compared with shorter duration of daytime napping. The association between daytime napping and hypertension was found in women but not in men. Daytime napping appears to be associated with elevated risk of incidence of any chronic diseases, hypertension, and diabetes.

  12. Meaning of living with severe chronic obstructive lung disease: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Gabriella; Nasse, Maximilian; Stanze, Henrikje; Boakye, Sonja Owusu; Nauck, Friedemann; Schneider, Nils

    2016-12-08

    To explore what it means for patients to live with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as an incurable and constantly progressing disease. Qualitative longitudinal study using narrative and semistructured interviews. This paper presents findings of the initial interviews. Analysis using grounded theory. Lung care clinics and community care in Lower Saxony, Germany. 17 patients with advanced-stage COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) III/IV). Analysis shows that these patients have difficulties accepting their life situation and feel at the mercy of the disease, which could be identified as a core-experienced phenomenon. Over a long period of time, patients have only a vague feeling of being ill, caused by uncertain knowledge, slow progress and doubtful attribution of clinical symptoms of the disease (causal conditions). As an action strategy, patients try to maintain daily routines for as long as possible after diagnosis. Both effective standard and rescue medication, which helps to reduce breathlessness and other symptoms, and the feeling of being faced with one's own responsibility (intervening conditions) support this strategy, whereby patients' own responsibility is too painful to acknowledge. As a consequence, patients try to deny the threat to life for a long period of time. Frequently, they need to experience facing their own limits, often in the form of an acute crisis, to realise their health situation. The experience of the illness is contextualised by a continuous increase in limited mobility and social isolation. In order to help patients to improve disease awareness, to accept their life situation and to improve their reduced quality of life, patients may benefit from the early integration of palliative care (PC), considering its multiprofessional patient-centred and team-centred approach. Psychological support and volunteer work, which are relevant aspects of PC, should be appropriate to address psychosocial

  13. of chronic kidney disease advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Szeliga-Król

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . Chronic kidney disease (CKD is at present a worldwide health problem. According to the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF KDOQI, chronic kidney disease has five stages of advancement based on the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. The formulas that are most frequently used in determining eGFR are the Cockroft–Gault (CG formula, the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD formula, and the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology (CKD-EPI Collaboration formula, which is considered the most accurate formula. Objectives . The aim of our study was to compare the CG, simplified MDRD and CKD-EPI formulas for determining eGFR and thus CKD advancement. Material and methods. The study was conducted on a group of 202 patients with previously diagnosed CKD. To calculate the eGFR, the CG, simplified MDRD, and CKD-EPI formulas were used. Patients were assigned a disease stage (from 1 to 5 according to the NKF KDOQI guidelines. Results . The calculated eGFR values varied depending on the formula, which resulted different assignations of patients to CKD stages. The largest difference regarded the qualification of the patients to the first and the fifth stage. A similar number of patients were classed as stage three by all formulas. Differences were also seen in how the formulas classified patients to the second and fourth stages. Conclusions . GFR estimation remains a problematic clinical concern. The CKD stage assigned to patients varies depending on the formula used, a fact which may be particularly significant for general practitioners. Laboratories should apply the CKD-EPI formula for eGFR calculation, as it gives the least false results.

  14. Clinical relevance of precore mutations of hepatitis B virus in chronic liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaloska-Ivanova Viktorija

    2014-07-01

    highly responsible for the development of hepatitis B e antigen-negative chronic liver disease in our patients. These mutations are associated with more progressive liver disease and with older age of the patients.

  15. "Promises and Betrayals": A Radio Novella Focused on Chronic Disease Education

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-02

    The occurrence of diabetes and other chronic diseases among the Hispanic community living in the United States continues to increase. In this podcast, the authors of an article published in CDC’s Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) describe how they used a unique entertainment education model to develop a Spanish-language radio novella aimed at reducing the risk factors for chronic diseases among this population.  Created: 8/2/2012 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 8/2/2012.

  16. Sexual behavior, body image, and partnership in chronic illness: a comparison of Huntington's disease and multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininghaus, Eva; Reininghaus, Bernd; Fitz, Werner; Hecht, Karen; Bonelli, Raphael Maria

    2012-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are both chronic progressive illnesses posing a serious challenge to affected patients and families. Sexual dysfunction in HD as well as in MS is a very common problem, although it is unclear whether the dysfunction is caused by the chronic illness itself or by the sociopsychiatric burden related to the illness. Twenty-nine patients with HD and 27 patients with MS each participated in a semistructured interview and several standardized questionnaires concerning partnership, sexual function, and body image. The results display significant differences in both patient groups, displaying higher sexual desire and activity in HD patients, but MS patients also reported fewer sexual problems compared to the norming values. Conversely, the MS patients' relationships seemed to be stable despite subjectively perceived lower initiative on sexual activities. The results are discussed under the possible influences of the underlying organic changes and the psychosocial consequences of chronic progressive disorders.

  17. Natural Besnoitia besnoiti infections in cattle: chronology of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollnick, Nicole S; Scharr, Julia C; Schares, Gereon; Langenmayer, Martin C

    2015-02-14

    Bovine besnoitiosis is an emerging protozoan disease in cattle. Neither vaccines nor chemotherapeutic drugs are currently available for prevention and treatment of Besnoitia besnoiti infections. Therefore the implementation of appropriate disease management strategies is of utmost importance. The aim of this longitudinal study was to complement current knowledge on the chronology of disease progression. This was realized by correlating clinical findings in early stages of naturally acquired bovine besnoitiosis with results of real-time PCR of skin biopsies and of two western immunoblots and an immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Animals for this study were obtained by i) closely monitoring a cow-calf operation with a high prevalence of bovine besnoitiosis for cases of acute disease, and by ii) conducting a 12-week cohabitation experiment on pasture with five healthy heifers, a healthy bull and five B. besnoiti infected cows. A control group of six healthy heifers was kept at a minimal distance of 20 m. Further, the spectrum of potential insect vectors was determined. Infected cattle were followed up to a maximum of 221 days after first detection of B. besnoiti antibodies. Two severely affected cows developed visible and palpable alterations of skin, a decrease in body condition despite good feed intake, and chronic bovine besnoitiosis-associated laminitis leading to non-healing sole ulcers. The cows also had high reciprocal IFAT titers and high loads of parasite DNA in skin samples. Two heifers developed a mild clinical course characterized by few parasitic cysts visible in the scleral conjunctivae and vestibula vaginae. Both heifers became infected during the time of high insect activity of the species Musca domestica, Musca autumnalis, Haematobia irritans, and Stomoxys calcitrans. When a third heifer became subclinically infected, low insect activity was recorded. None of the six control heifers contracted a B. besnoiti infection. In chronic besnoitiosis

  18. Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Lori; Clark, Alexander M

    2012-03-01

    Understanding health decisions using critical realism: home-dialysis decision-making during chronic kidney disease This paper examines home-dialysis decision making in people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) from the perspective of critical realism. CKD programmes focus on patient education for self-management to delay the progression of kidney disease and the preparation and support for renal replacement therapy e.g.) dialysis and transplantation. Home-dialysis has clear health, societal and economic benefits yet service usage is low despite efforts to realign resources and educate individuals. Current research on the determinants of modality selection is superficial and insufficient to capture the complexities embedded in the process of dialysis modality selection. Predictors of home-dialysis selection and the effect of chronic kidney disease educational programmes provide a limited explanation of this experience. A re-conceptualization of the problem is required in order to fully understand this process. The epistemology and ontology of critical realism guides our knowledge and methodology particularly suited for examination of these complexities. This approach examines the deeper mechanisms and wider determinants associated with modality decision making, specifically who chooses home dialysis and under what circumstances. Until more is known regarding dialysis modality decision making service usage of home dialysis will remain low as interventions will be based on inadequate epistemology. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Implementation of a Tool to Modify Behavior in a Chronic Disease Management Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole D. Gillespie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia continue to be a significant burden on the US health care system. As a result, many healthcare providers are implementing strategies to prevent the incidence of heart disease and other chronic conditions. Among these strategies are proper drug therapy and lifestyle modifications. Behavior change is often the rate-limiting step in the prevention and maintenance of lifestyle modifications. The purpose of this paper is to describe a tool used to guide the progression and assess the effectiveness of a cardiovascular risk reduction program. The tool uses the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change to determine the readiness and confidence to change specific lifestyle behaviors pertinent to cardiovascular health. The tool aids the practitioner in developing a patient-centered plan to implement and maintain lifestyle changes and can be tailored to use in any situation requiring a behavior change on the part of the patient.

  20. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection. Copyright © 2016

  1. Influence of risk factors on development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and legislative foundations for copd medical care in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykhalchuk, Vasyl M; Vasyliev, Averian G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Out of all respiratory diseases COPD is the leading cause of death and is characterized with diffuse non-reversible airway obstruction. Many various components play role in development and progression of this disease, while COPD risk factors play the most prominent role. Further progress in healthcare system development around COPD in Ukraine requires analysis of legislation, regulating pulmonological medical service in Ukraine. The aim: To analyze the influence of major risk factors on the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and to determine key legislative aspects of the organization of medical care for COPD patients in Ukraine. Materials and methods: 50 medical literature sources were systematically reviewed as the material for the research of COPD risk factors and their impact on studies disease. Also, an analysis of existing legislative acts regulating the pulmonological medical care in Ukraine, specifically, in patients with COPD, was conducted. Conclusions: There is a need to develop and implement a set of organizational and medical measures aiming at addressing the priorities of public healthcare, and specifically improvement of the quality of medical care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Ukraine.

  2. Treatable traits: toward precision medicine of chronic airway diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agusti, Alvar; Bel, Elisabeth; Thomas, Mike; Vogelmeier, Claus; Brusselle, Guy; Holgate, Stephen; Humbert, Marc; Jones, Paul; Gibson, Peter G.; Vestbo, Jørgen; Beasley, Richard; Pavord, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two prevalent chronic airway diseases that have a high personal and social impact. They likely represent a continuum of different diseases that may share biological mechanisms (i.e. endotypes), and present similar clinical, functional,

  3. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugenia Portilla Franco

    2016-11-01

    Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  4. Dietary Protein Intake and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Gang Jee; Obi, Yoshitsugu; Tortoricci, Amanda R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review High protein intake may lead to increased intraglomerular pressure and glomerular hyperfiltration. This can cause damage to glomerular structure leading to or aggravating chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hence, a low protein diet (LPD) of 0.6–0.8 g/kg/day is often recommended for the management of CKD. We reviewed the effect of protein intake on incidence and progression of CKD and the role of LPD the CKD management. Recent findings Actual dietary protein consumption in CKD patients remain substantially higher than the recommendations for LPD. Notwithstanding the inconclusive results of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) study, the largest randomized controlled trial to examine protein restriction in CKD, several prior and subsequent studies and meta-analyses including secondary analyses of the MDRD data appear to support the role of LPD on retarding progression of CKD and delaying initiation of maintenance dialysis therapy. LPD can also be used to control metabolic derangements in CKD. Supplemented LPD with essential amino acids or their keto-analogs may be used for incremental transition to dialysis especially in non-dialysis days. An LPD management in lieu of dialysis therapy can reduce costs, enhance psychological adaptation, and preserve residual renal function upon transition to dialysis. Adherence and adequate protein and energy intake should be ensured to avoid protein-energy wasting. Summary A balanced and individualized dietary approach based on LPD should be elaborated with periodic dietitian counselling and surveillance to optimize management of CKD, to assure adequate protein and energy intake and to avoid or correct protein-energy wasting. PMID:27801685

  5. Hyperhomocysteinemia in patients with chronic kidney disease and its relationship with the functional status of the cardiovascular system

    OpenAIRE

    K. P. Postovitenko; I. A. Iliuk; S. V. Shevchuk; G. V. Bezsmertna; І. O. Bezsmertnyi; I. V. Kurylenko

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important medical, social and economic problem nowadays. Patients with CKD are known to have an increased risk of development and progression of cardiovascular diseases. However, the causes and pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications are not well understood. One of the recently recognized “non-traditional” risk factors for the increased development of cardiovascular pathology in severe stages of CKD is hyperhomocysteinemia (HHC). The article presents th...

  6. Primary immunodeficiency disease: a model for case management of chronic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Janet; Murphy, Elyse; Riley, Patty

    2010-01-01

    Patient-centered chronic care management is a new model for the management of rare chronic diseases such as primary immunodeficiency disease (PIDD). This approach emphasizes helping patients become experts on the management of their disease as informed, involved, and interactive partners in healthcare decisions with providers. Because only a few patients are affected by rare illnesses, these patients are forced to become knowledgeable about their disease and therapies and to seek treatment from a healthcare team, which includes physicians and nurse specialists who are equipped to manage the complexity of the disease and its comorbidities. Importantly, therapy for PIDD can be self-administered at home, which has encouraged the transition toward a proactive stance that is at the heart of patient-centered chronic care management. We discuss the evolution of therapy, the issues with the disease, and challenges with its management within the framework of other chronic disease management programs. Suggestions and rationale to move case management of PIDD forward are presented with the intent that sharing our experiences will improve process and better manage outcomes in this patient population. The patient-centered model for the management of PIDD is applicable to the primary care settings, where nurse case managers assist patients through education, support them and their families, and facilitate access to community resources in an approach, which has been described as "guided care." The model also applies specifically to immunology centers where patients receive treatment or instruction on its self-administration at home. Patient-centered management of PIDD, with its emphasis on full involvement of patients in their treatment, has the potential to improve compliance with treatment, and thus patient outcomes, as well as patients' quality of life. The patient-centered model expands the traditional model of chronic disease management, which relies on evidence

  7. Nucleic acid metabolism in human chronic liver disease by in vitro autoradiography. I. Altered RNA metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, T [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-06-01

    Biopsy liver specimens from healthy control subjects (N=5) and patients with various liver diseases (N=43) were investigated by the vitro autoradiography. The Leevy technique of adding /sup 3/H-5-uridine (/sup 3/H-U) to the incubation medium was used. In healthy subjects labeling with /sup 3/H-U was observed mostly in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells and the frequency of /sup 3/H-U labeled cells was extremely high. Higher frequencies of labeled fibrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood vessel were found in acute hepatitis than in control subjects. In the active form of chronic hepatitis, significantly higher counts of labeled fibrocytes, ductular cells and lymphocytes were found. In patients with acute hepatitis or the inactive form of chronic hepatitis, only a few labeled lymphocytes were observed. Larger numbers of labeled fibrocytes were found in patients with chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, than in patients with the active form of chronic hepatitis. In cirrhotic livers, marked increases of labeled ductular cells, fibrocytes and bile duct cells were found. No significant labeling differences were observed in the hepatocytes of various liver diseases. In chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, a more significant decrease of labeled Kupffer cells was present than in the inactive form of chronic hepatitis. Labeled ductular cells and fibrocytes increased as the disease progressed from acute hepatitis to liver cirrhosis. The labeling index of rosettes cells was intermediate between the hepatocytes and ductular cells. The ratio of labeled parenchymal to non-parenchymal cells decreased proportionally from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis.

  8. A etiological factors of chronic liver disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, A.; Malik, F.R.; Akhtar, P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronicity of liver disease is determined either by duration of liver disease or by evidence of either severe liver disease or physical stigmata of chronic liver disease. Chronic liver disease may be caused commonly by persistent viral infections, metabolic diseases, drugs, autoimmune hepatitis, or unknown factors. The objective of this study was to find out the aetiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in children. Methodology: It was a descriptive, prospective study which used a structured proforma designed to collect data of cases of CLD from both indoor and outdoor Paediatrics units of Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, and Children Hospital, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad. All children under 12 years having either clinical or biochemical evidence of liver disease and/or elevated liver enzymes for more than 3 months were included in this study. Results: Sixty cases of CLD were enrolled from indoor and outdoor units from January 2010 to July 201. Thirty nine (65%) cases were male and 21 (35%) were female. Eleven children were less than 1 year, 18 were 1-5 years old and 31 were 5-12 years of age. Viral hepatitis was the most common cause found in 22 (36.7%) cases. Out of these 22 patients with viral aetiology 19 (31.66%) patients had Hepatitis C and 3 (5%) had Hepatitis B. Glycogen storage disease was seen in 8.3% cases, and biliary atresia and Wilson disease in 6.7% each. Other less commonly found cases were autoimmune hepatitis, TORCH infections, hepatoma and drug induced hepatitis (1.7% each). Cause couldn't be established in 35% cases which remained idiopathic. Conclusion: Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in children, with the highest incidence of chronic Hepatitis C followed by metabolic disorders (glycogen storage disease and Wilson disease) and biliary atresia. Chronic viral hepatitis was most prevalent between 11 months to 12 years of age. Wilson disease was common in 3-7 years age group, and

  9. [Condition of neurohumoral regulation of bronchial tone and gallbladder in patients with chronic cholecystitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudka, T V; Khukhlina, O S; Dudka, I V

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The paper presents data from a study of the neuroendocrine regulation of nonstriated muscles, bronchial tree and the gallbladder tones by means of an assessment of the adrenergic and cholinergic systems state in patients, suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic acalculous cholecystitis. Adrenergic and cholinergic activities as well as cortisol secretion have significantly changed. To study the features of adrenergic and cholinergic regulations of bronchial tone and that of the gallbladder in patients with combined course of chronic acalculous cholecystitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. 92 patients were involved in the study: 30 patients with COPD (1st group), 30 patients with COPD of comorbid CAC in the acute phase (2nd group), 32 patients with CAC in the acute phase (3rd group) and a control group--30 practically healthy individuals (PHI) of the respective age. All the patients with COPD and COPD combined with CAC had a marked predominance of the parasympathetic nervous system, as evidenced by the established significant decrease of CDE (Table) in patients with isolated COPD is 1.4 times (p instance, the CDA in the individuals of groups 1 and 2 was lower by 1.6 and 2.4 times respectively (p instance, the first group patients' blood contained 2.7 times (p base of regulatory neuroendocrine and paracrine mecganisms imbalance, contributing to a development of COPD, is the cholinergic imbalance (reduction in blood acetylcholinesterase activity, hypertensive sphincter of Oddi dysfunction), adrenergic imbalance, reduction in catecholamine-depositing erythrocytes function, hypokinetic gallbladder dysfunction, adrenal dysfunction (decreased cortisol levels) that contribute to the development and progression of chronic cholecystitis against a background of hypokinetic gallbladder dysfunction.

  10. [Research progress on a nanodrug delivery system for prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaling, Jiang; Mingye, Feng; Lei, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Dental caries and periodontal diseases are common chronic infectious diseases that cause serious damage to oral health. Bacteria is the primary factor leading to such conditions. As a dental plaque control method, chemotherapeutic agents face serious challenges in dental care because of the specific physiological and anatomical characteristics of the oral cavity. Nanodrug delivery system is a series of new drug delivery systems at nanoscale, and it can target cells, promote sustainedrelease effects, and enhance biodegradation. This review focuses on research progress on nanodrug delivery systems for prevention and control of dental caries and periodontal diseases.

  11. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Bover

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular (CV calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD–MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc., we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions.

  12. A global framework for action to improve the primary care response to chronic non-communicable diseases: a solution to a neglected problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachariah Rony

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although in developing countries the burden of morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases has often overshadowed that due to chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs, there is evidence now of a shift of attention to NCDs. Discussion Decreasing the chronic NCD burden requires a two-pronged approach: implementation of the multisectoral policies aimed at decreasing population-level risks for NCDs, and effective and affordable delivery of primary care interventions for patients with chronic NCDs. The primary care response to common NCDs is often unstructured and inadequate. We therefore propose a programmatic, standardized approach to the delivery of primary care interventions for patients with NCDs, with a focus on hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic airflow obstruction, and obesity. The benefits of this approach will extend to patients with related conditions, e.g. those with chronic kidney disease caused by hypertension or diabetes. This framework for a "public health approach" is informed by experience of scaling up interventions for chronic infectious diseases (tuberculosis and HIV. The lessons learned from progress in rolling out these interventions include the importance of gaining political commitment, developing a robust strategy, delivering standardised interventions, and ensuring rigorous monitoring and evaluation of progress towards defined targets. The goal of the framework is to reduce the burden of morbidity, disability and premature mortality related to NCDs through a primary care strategy which has three elements: 1 identify and address modifiable risk factors, 2 screen for common NCDs and 3 and diagnose, treat and follow-up patients with common NCDs using standard protocols. The proposed framework for NCDs borrows the same elements as those developed for tuberculosis control, comprising a goal, strategy and targets for NCD control, a package of interventions for quality care, key operations for

  13. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Major and chronic diseases, report 2007.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giampaoli, S.; Oyen, H. van; Devillé, W.; Verschuuren, M.

    2008-01-01

    Blind spots in European health information On June 6th 2008 the European Commission has published the Major and Chronic Diseases Report 2007. This report describes the state of the art of health information in Europe on 13 prevalent chronic conditions. Large differences between the Member States of

  15. Depression and Chronic Liver Diseases: Are There Shared Underlying Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of depression is higher in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD than that in the general population. The mechanism described in previous studies mainly focused on inflammation and stress, which not only exists in CLD, but also emerges in common chronic diseases, leaving the specific mechanism unknown. This review was to summarize the prevalence and risk factors of depression in CLD including chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and to point out the possible underlying mechanism of this potential link. Clarifying the origins of this common comorbidity (depression and CLD may provide more information to understand both diseases.

  16. Life style factors and number of chronic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustehsan, Huma

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People all around the world are more concerned with living a long and healthy life, rather than just living longer. Many studies have examined the effects of lifestyle on the risk of developing chronic diseases, but typically, they focus on only one specific behavior. Individuals often follow a lifestyle pattern which combines more than one behavior. This paper examines the combined effect of several lifestyle factors on the number of chronic diseases.OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study was to determine how different lifestyle factors influence the number of chronic diseases a person can have.METHODS: Data from the survey “Health and Well-being in the Transitions” (2000 were used. Dependent variable was number of chronic diseases which ranged from zero to five. Independent variables included the level of physical activity, variables based on food frequency questions, and other behavioral activities, adjusted for age and gender. Generalized linear model with Poisson distribution was used for analysis.RESULTS: The analysis showed that males have more diseases than females if other factors are controlled (B=0.182, p=0.001. Diseases increase by age (B=0.021, p=0.000. Those who used dairy products daily had smaller number of diseases (B= -0.145, p=0.012. Those who used vegetable oil 3-7 days a week had smaller number of diseases than those who use it 0-2 days a week (B= -0.224, p=0.058. Other food frequencies and ever smoking had no clear association with number of diseases.CONCLUSION: Increasing age and male gender are two factors which are associated with larger number of chronic diseases. Regular use of vegetable oil and dairy products seems to be important towards the path of a healthier life.

  17. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  18. Lineage-specific function of Engrailed-2 in the progression of chronic myelogenous leukemia to T-cell blast crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abollo-Jiménez, Fernando; Campos-Sánchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; González-Herrero, Inés; Alonso-Escudero, Esther; González, Marcos; Segura, Víctor; Blanco, Oscar; Martínez-Climent, José Angel; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Cobaleda, César

    2014-01-01

    In hematopoietic malignancies, oncogenic alterations interfere with cellular differentiation and lead to tumoral development. Identification of the proteins regulating differentiation is essential to understand how they are altered in malignancies. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is a biphasic disease initiated by an alteration taking place in hematopoietic stem cells. CML progresses to a blast crisis (BC) due to a secondary differentiation block in any of the hematopoietic lineages. However, the molecular mechanisms of CML evolution to T-cell BC remain unclear. Here, we have profiled the changes in DNA methylation patterns in human samples from BC-CML, in order to identify genes whose expression is epigenetically silenced during progression to T-cell lineage-specific BC. We have found that the CpG-island of the ENGRAILED-2 (EN2) gene becomes methylated in this progression. Afterwards, we demonstrate that En2 is expressed during T-cell development in mice and humans. Finally, we further show that genetic deletion of En2 in a CML transgenic mouse model induces a T-cell lineage BC that recapitulates human disease. These results identify En2 as a new regulator of T-cell differentiation whose disruption induces a malignant T-cell fate in CML progression, and validate the strategy used to identify new developmental regulators of hematopoiesis.

  19. Chronic parotitis: a challenging disease entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbison, John M; Liess, Benjamin D; Templer, Jerry W; Zitsch, Robert P; Wieberg, Jessica A

    2011-03-01

    Chronic parotitis is a troubling clinical condition characterized by repeated infection and inflammation of the parotid gland caused by decreased salivary flow or obstruction. Unilateral swelling, pain, and other associated symptoms occur during acute exacerbations of the disease. A variety of laboratory and radiographic tools are available to aid in the diagnosis. Multiple treatment options have been proposed, ranging from conservative medical management to surgical interventions. We present 2 patients with bilateral chronic parotitis who attempted prolonged medical management and ultimately required surgical parotidectomy for control of their disease.

  20. The associations of Bmi-1 with progression of glomerular chronic kidney disease
.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Bai, Ming; Ning, Xiaoxuan; Ma, Feng; Liu, Limin; Liu, Ting; Liu, Minna; Wang, Hanmin; Sun, Shiren

    2018-02-01

    Our previous studies indicated that Bmi-1 plays an important role in hypoxia-induced tubular epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the development of kidney fibrosis in cellular and animal models. However, circulating Bmi-1 levels in human chronic kidney disease (CKD) and their relation to progression remains unknown. We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a prospective cohort study. The blood samples and clinical data of 230 patients with glomerular CKD and 67 healthy adults were prospectively collected between January 2010 and June 2012. Serum Bmi-1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). CKD patients had significantly higher serum Bmi-1 concentrations than the healthy controls (496.4 (363.1 - 675.4) pg/mL compared with 257.3 (235.4 - 303.8) pg/mL, p Bmi-1 level inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (r = -0.346, p Bmi-1 levels and serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, cystatin C concentration, and the severity of tubulointerstitial fibrosis (r = 0.248, p Bmi-1 level was associated with a shorter duration of renal survival. Cox multivariate analyses further demonstrated that serum Bmi-1 concentration was an independent prognostic factor for CKD patients (HR = 6.48, p Bmi-1 levels were associated with adverse kidney disease outcome, suggesting that Bmi-1 is a novel biomarker for glomerular CKD progression. More data from larger longitudinal studies are required to validate our findings.
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  1. [A plan for the improvement in the quality of life of people suffering from chronic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portal, Stéphanie

    2011-10-01

    In 2007, the French Ministry of Health launched a plan devoted to the improvement of the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic diseases. Over the last four years this plan has resulted in a number of concrete actions: events and seminars have been organised, patients' education has obtained legislative recognition and several partnerships have been created. Time for a progress report.

  2. Tackling Africa's chronic disease burden: from the local to the global

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Catherine

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Africa faces a double burden of infectious and chronic diseases. While infectious diseases still account for at least 69% of deaths on the continent, age specific mortality rates from chronic diseases as a whole are actually higher in sub Saharan Africa than in virtually all other regions of the world, in both men and women. Over the next ten years the continent is projected to experience the largest increase in death rates from cardiovascular disease, cancer, respiratory disease and diabetes. African health systems are weak and national investments in healthcare training and service delivery continue to prioritise infectious and parasitic diseases. There is a strong consensus that Africa faces significant challenges in chronic disease research, practice and policy. This editorial reviews eight original papers submitted to a Globalization and Health special issue themed: "Africa's chronic disease burden: local and global perspectives". The papers offer new empirical evidence and comprehensive reviews on diabetes in Tanzania, sickle cell disease in Nigeria, chronic mental illness in rural Ghana, HIV/AIDS care-giving among children in Kenya and chronic disease interventions in Ghana and Cameroon. Regional and international reviews are offered on cardiovascular risk in Africa, comorbidity between infectious and chronic diseases and cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe. We discuss insights from these papers within the contexts of medical, psychological, community and policy dimensions of chronic disease. There is an urgent need for primary and secondary interventions and for African health policymakers and governments to prioritise the development and implementation of chronic disease policies. Two gaps need critical attention. The first gap concerns the need for multidisciplinary models of research to properly inform the design of interventions. The second

  3. Severe chronic allergic (and related) diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bousquet, J; Anto, J M; Demoly, P

    2012-01-01

    -up. Control is the degree to which therapy goals are currently met. These concepts have evolved over time for asthma in guidelines, task forces or consensus meetings. The aim of this paper is to generalize the approach of the uniform definition of severe asthma presented to WHO for chronic allergic...... and associated diseases (rhinitis, chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic urticaria and atopic dermatitis) in order to have a uniform definition of severity, control and risk, usable in most situations. It is based on the appropriate diagnosis, availability and accessibility of treatments, treatment responsiveness...... and associated factors such as comorbidities and risk factors. This uniform definition will allow a better definition of the phenotypes of severe allergic (and related) diseases for clinical practice, research (including epidemiology), public health purposes, education and the discovery of novel therapies....

  4. Global strategies to prevent chronic diseases1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    leading global causes of death and disability, are ... global strategies for the prevention and control of chronic ... Preventing Chronic Diseases: A Vital Investment, will ..... Millennium Development Goals for Health In Europe and Central Asia.

  5. CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE RAAS blockade and diastolic heart failure in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, Casper F. M.; Navis, Gerjan

    New data from Ahmed et al. show that discharge prescriptions for renin-angiotensin-aldosterone inhibitor therapy are associated with a significant reduction in all-cause mortality in elderly patients with diastolic heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD). These observational data support the

  6. Airway distensibility in Chronic Obstructive Airway Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler Wille, Mathilde Marie; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Dirksen, Asger

    2013-01-01

    Rationale – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a combination of chronic bronchitis and emphysema, which both may lead to airway obstruction. Under normal circumstances, airway dimensions vary as a function of inspiration level. We aim to study the influence of COPD and emphysema......-20% (mild), 20%-30% (moderate) or >30% (severe). Spirometry was performed annually and participants were divided into severity groups according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD). Data were analysed in a mixed effects regression model with log(airway lumen diameter...... and emphysema, respectively. Conclusions – Airway distensibility decreases significantly with increasing severity of both GOLD status and emphysema, indicating that in COPD the dynamic change in airway calibre during respiration is compromised. Chronic bronchitis and emphysema appear to be interacting...

  7. Role of Proteases in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailash C. Pandey

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is generally associated with progressive destruction of airways and lung parenchyma. Various factors play an important role in the development and progression of COPD, like imbalance of proteases, environmental and genetic factors and oxidative stress. This review is specifically focused on the role of proteases and their imbalance in COPD. There are three classes (serine, mettalo, and cysteine of proteases involved in COPD. In serine proteases, neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, and proteinase-3 are involved in destruction of alveolar tissue. Matrix-mettaloproteinase-9, 12, 13, plays an influential role in severity of COPD. Among cysteine proteases, caspase-3, caspases-8 and caspase-9 play an important role in controlling apoptosis. These proteases activities can be regulated by inhibitors like α-1-antitrypsin, neutrophil elastase inhibitor, and leukocyte protease inhibitor. Studies suggest that neutrophil elastase may be a therapeutic target for COPD, and specific inhibitor against this enzyme has potential role to control the disease. Current study suggests that Dipeptidyl Peptidase IV is a potential marker for COPD. Since the expression of proteases and its inhibitors play an important role in COPD pathogenesis, therefore, it is worth investigating the role of proteases and their regulation. Understanding the biochemical basis of COPD pathogenesis using advanced tools in protease biochemistry and aiming toward translational research from bench-to-bedside will have great impact to deal with this health problem.

  8. Pulmonary artery hypertension in chronic obstructive lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinkel, E.; Mundinger, A.; Reinbold, W.D.; Wuertemberger, G.

    1989-01-01

    Standard biplane chest X-rays were tested for the validity of morphometric criteria in the diagnosis of pulmonary artery hypertension. Twenty-seven patients suffering from chronic obstructive lung disease were examined and compared with a control group without cardiopulmonary disease. The diameter of the right and left pulmonary artery, pulmonary conus and the hilar-to-thoracic ratio were significantly increased in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (p [de

  9. Inhaled Antibiotic Therapy in Chronic Respiratory Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego J. Maselli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of patients with chronic respiratory diseases affected by difficult to treat infections has become a challenge in clinical practice. Conditions such as cystic fibrosis (CF and non-CF bronchiectasis require extensive treatment strategies to deal with multidrug resistant pathogens that include Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Burkholderia species and non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM. These challenges prompted scientists to deliver antimicrobial agents through the pulmonary system by using inhaled, aerosolized or nebulized antibiotics. Subsequent research advances focused on the development of antibiotic agents able to achieve high tissue concentrations capable of reducing the bacterial load of difficult-to-treat organisms in hosts with chronic respiratory conditions. In this review, we focus on the evidence regarding the use of antibiotic therapies administered through the respiratory system via inhalation, nebulization or aerosolization, specifically in patients with chronic respiratory diseases that include CF, non-CF bronchiectasis and NTM. However, further research is required to address the potential benefits, mechanisms of action and applications of inhaled antibiotics for the management of difficult-to-treat infections in patients with chronic respiratory diseases.

  10. IGEA--a chronic disease management project for people with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggini, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Chronic diseases can be prevented and controlled using available knowledge. Moreover, the solutions are not only effective but can be highly cost-effective. Chronic care model and disease management have emerged, in the last decades, as new models of care delivery. The two models share the objective of improving the quality of care for people with chronic diseases while optimizing health care expenditure. In Italy, within the National Prevention Plan, the Italian Centre for Disease Prevention and Control of the Ministry of Health, and the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) are developing the IGEA project, which defines a comprehensive strategy for implementing a chronic disease management intervention for people with diabetes.

  11. Molecular mechanisms of disorders of lipid metabolism in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Hamid; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive condition marked by protracted kidney damage which over time can lead to end stage renal disease (ESRD). CKD can be categorized into different stages based on the extent of renal damage and degree of renal dysfunction with ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy considered the final stage. It is important to note that CKD in all of its forms is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (CV) disease and poor CV outcomes. While a number of factors contribute to the high risk of CV mortality in this patient population, dyslipidemia is considered to be a key player in the pathogenesis of CV disease in CKD. Molecular mechanisms responsible for CKD-associated lipid disorders are unique and greatly influenced by the stage of renal disease, presence and degree of proteinuria and in patients with ESRD, modality of renal replacement therapy. This article provides a detailed overview of the molecular mechanisms which cause dyslipidemia and the nature of lipid disorders associated with CKD and ESRD.

  12. Thyroid gland in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miłkowska-Dymanowska, Joanna; Białas, Adam J; Laskowska, Paulina; Górski, Paweł; Piotrowski, Wojciech J

    2017-01-01

    The risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), as well as thyroid diseases increases with age. COPD is a common systemic disease associated with chronic inflammation. Many endocrinological disorders, including thyroid gland diseases are related to systemic inflammation. Epidemiological studies suggest that patients with COPD are at higher risk of thyroid disorders. These associations are not well-studied and thyroid gland diseases are not included on the broadly acknowledged list of COPD comorbidities. They may seriously handicap quality of life of COPD patients. Unfortunately, the diagnosis may be difficult, as many signs are masked by the symptoms of the index disease. The comprehension of the correlation between thyroid gland disorders and COPD may contribute to better care of patients. In this review, we attempt to revise available literature describing existing links between COPD and thyroid diseases.

  13. Prognostic significance of urinary NGAL in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel ML

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Munna Lal Patel,1 Rekha Sachan,2 Ravi Misra,3 Ritul Kamal,4 Radhey Shyam,5 Pushpalata Sachan6 1Department of Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 3Department of Internal Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 4Epidemiology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR, Lucknow, India; 5Department of Geriatric Intensive Care Unit, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 6Department of Physiology, Career Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Recently urinary NGAL (uNGAL has been proven to be a useful (potentially ideal biomarker for early detection of CKD. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of uNGAL with severity of renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. Methods: This was a prospective study carried out over a period of 24 months in subjects with CKD due to primary chronic glomerulonephritis. New cases of CKD stage II, III, IV aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled as per KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines 2012. A total of 90 subjects completed the study up to the end-point. The primary follow-up end-point was 18 months, or decreased glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 mL/min. Secondary follow-up end-point was the number of subjects who expired during this period. Results: Multiple regression model of estimated glomerular filtration rate showed significant associations with log uNGAL (β=0.38, P<0.001, Ca×PO4 (β=0.60, P<0.001, hemoglobin (β=0.37, P<0.001, urine protein (β=0.34, P<0.001, serum albumin (β=0.48, P<0.001, and systolic blood pressure (β=0.76, P<0.001. Receiver operator curve for uNGAL considering the progression of CKD showed area under the curve

  14. Vitamin D supplementation for chronic liver diseases in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelakovic, Goran; Nikolova, Dimitrinka; Bjelakovic, Marko

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vitamin D deficiency is often reported in people with chronic liver diseases. Therefore, improving vitamin D status could have a beneficial effect on people with chronic liver diseases. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial and harmful effects of vitamin D supplementation in people...... with chronic liver diseases. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index Expanded, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science. We also searched databases...... that compared vitamin D at any dose, duration, and route of administration versus placebo or no intervention in adults with chronic liver diseases. Vitamin D could have been administered as supplemental vitamin D (vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) or vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol)), or an active form of vitamin D (1α...

  15. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease among patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad A; Quinlan, Amy; Heck-Kanellidis, Jennifer; Calderon, Dawn; Patel, Tejas; Gandhi, Bhavika; Patel, Shrinil; Hetavi, Mahida; Costanzo, Eric J; Cosentino, James; Patel, Chirag; Dewan, Asa; Kuo, Yen-Hong; Salman, Loay; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2018-03-01

    While transradial approach to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions offers multiple advantages, the procedure can cause radial artery damage and occlusion. Because radial artery is the preferred site for the creation of an arteriovenous fistula to provide dialysis, patients with chronic kidney disease are particularly dependent on radial artery for their long-term survival. In this retrospective study, we investigated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in patients undergoing coronary interventions via radial artery. Stage of chronic kidney disease was based on estimated glomerular filtration rate and National Kidney Foundation - Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. A total of 497 patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions were included. Over 70.4% (350/497) of the patients had chronic kidney disease. Stage II chronic kidney disease was observed in 243 (69%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 76.0 ± 8.4 mL/min). Stage III was observed in 93 (27%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 49 ± 7.5 mL/min). Stage IV chronic kidney disease was observed in 5 (1%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 25.6 ± 4.3 mL/min) and Stage V chronic kidney disease was observed in 9 (3%) patients (estimated glomerular filtration rate = 9.3 ± 3.5 mL/min). Overall, 107 of 350 patients (30%) had advanced chronic kidney disease, that is, stage III-V chronic kidney disease. Importantly, 14 of the 107 (13%) patients had either stage IV or V chronic kidney disease. This study finds that nearly one-third of the patients undergoing transradial percutaneous coronary interventions have advanced chronic kidney disease. Because many of these patients may require dialysis, the use of radial artery to conduct percutaneous coronary interventions must be carefully considered in chronic kidney disease population.

  16. The Effect of Diet on the Survival of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna

    2017-05-13

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and it is gradually increasing. Individuals with CKD should introduce appropriate measures to hamper the progression of kidney function deterioration as well as prevent the development or progression of CKD-related diseases. A kidney-friendly diet may help to protect kidneys from further damage. Patients with kidney damage should limit the intake of certain foods to reduce the accumulation of unexcreted metabolic products and also to protect against hypertension, proteinuria and other heart and bone health problems. Despite the fact that the influence of certain types of nutrients has been widely studied in relation to kidney function and overall health in CKD patients, there are few studies on the impact of a specific diet on their survival. Animal studies demonstrated prolonged survival of rats with CKD fed with protein-restricted diets. In humans, the results of studies are conflicting. Some of them indicate slowing down of the progression of kidney disease and reduction in proteinuria, but other underline significant worsening of patients' nutritional state, which can be dangerous. A recent systemic study revealed that a healthy diet comprising many fruits and vegetables, fish, legumes, whole grains, and fibers and also the cutting down on red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake was associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results of studies concerning the impact of diet on the survival of CKD patients.

  17. The Effect of Diet on the Survival of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rysz, Jacek; Franczyk, Beata; Ciałkowska-Rysz, Aleksandra; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is high and it is gradually increasing. Individuals with CKD should introduce appropriate measures to hamper the progression of kidney function deterioration as well as prevent the development or progression of CKD-related diseases. A kidney-friendly diet may help to protect kidneys from further damage. Patients with kidney damage should limit the intake of certain foods to reduce the accumulation of unexcreted metabolic products and also to protect against hypertension, proteinuria and other heart and bone health problems. Despite the fact that the influence of certain types of nutrients has been widely studied in relation to kidney function and overall health in CKD patients, there are few studies on the impact of a specific diet on their survival. Animal studies demonstrated prolonged survival of rats with CKD fed with protein-restricted diets. In humans, the results of studies are conflicting. Some of them indicate slowing down of the progression of kidney disease and reduction in proteinuria, but other underline significant worsening of patients’ nutritional state, which can be dangerous. A recent systemic study revealed that a healthy diet comprising many fruits and vegetables, fish, legumes, whole grains, and fibers and also the cutting down on red meat, sodium, and refined sugar intake was associated with lower mortality in people with kidney disease. The aim of this paper is to review the results of studies concerning the impact of diet on the survival of CKD patients. PMID:28505087

  18. Theory in Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael; Elise, Eifert

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality related to chronic diseases are a primary concern of health professionals, including Health Educators. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over one half of the adult population in the United States suffer from one or more chronic conditions. Understanding the health risk behaviors that contribute to…

  19. Dose-dependent striatal changes in dopaminergic terminals and alpha-synuclein reactivity in a porcine model of progressive Parkinson’s disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Slot; Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Møller, Arne

    2011-01-01

    to discover effective compounds halting PD progression have so far failed in clinical trials, perhaps because current animal models do not imitate the neuropathological progression of PD well enough. We recently established a progressive large animal PD model in Göttingen minipigs based on chronic infusion......Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder, resulting from a progressive dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra (SN). Alpha-synuclein positive neuronal inclusion bodies and progressive loss of dopaminergic striatal terminals is also well described in PD. Attempts...... the SN were paraffin embedded and immunohistochemically stained for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and alpha-synuclein. Stereological examination of the SN showed progressive nigral neuron loss with increased MPTP dosages. Occasional neuronal staining confined to the cytoplasm and cell membrane was observed...

  20. Chronic fluorosis: The disease and its anaesthetic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri S Kurdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fluorosis is a widespread disease-related to the ingestion of high levels of fluoride through water and food. Prolonged ingestion of fluoride adversely affects the teeth, bones and other organs and alters their anatomy and physiology. Fluoride excess is a risk factor in cardiovascular disease and other major diseases, including hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity. Although anaesthesiologists may be aware of its skeletal and dental manifestations, other systemic manifestations, some of which may impact anaesthetic management are relatively unknown. Keeping this in mind, the topic of chronic fluorosis was hand searched from textbooks, scientific journals and electronically through Google, PubMed and other scientific databases. This article concentrates on the effect of chronic fluorosis on various organ systems, its clinical features, diagnosis and the anaesthetic implications of the disease.

  1. [Chronic disease management: mistaken approach in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veras, Renato Peixoto

    2012-12-01

    Lifestyle changes, including unhealthy eating habits and high rates of physical inactivity and stress, along with an increase in life expectancy have been accompanied by increasing rates of chronic non-communicable diseases. Chronic diseases are the main causes of death and disability in Brazil. Chronic disease management is one of the most important challenges facing health managers who are constantly seeking interventions and strategies to reduce costs and hospital admissions and to prevent other conditions. However, most existing models of health care have focused exclusively on disease, but it is a mistaken approach. An integrated approach is required to effectively meet patient needs. The purpose of this article was to further discuss policies and strategies for the development of new models of care for the elderly with an emphasis on prevention and resolution actions.

  2. Current concepts in chronic inflammatory diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garn, Holger; Bahn, Sabine; Baune, Bernhard T

    2016-01-01

    Recent research indicates that chronic inflammatory diseases, including allergies and autoimmune and neuropsychiatric diseases, share common pathways of cellular and molecular dysregulation. It was the aim of the International von-Behring-Röntgen Symposium (October 16-18, 2014, in Marburg, Germany...

  3. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  4. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : a proteomics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre, Bruno Miguel Coelho, 1980-

    2011-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Biologia (Biologia Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2012 Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by chronic airflow limitation that is not fully reversible even under bronchodilators effect, caused by a mixture of small airway disease – obstructive bronchiolitis – and parenchymal destruction – emphysema. At the present time, COPD is the fourth leading cause of death and its prevalence and mortality are expected to contin...

  5. Identification of genetic variants associated with Huntington's disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensman Moss, Davina J; Pardiñas, Antonio F; Langbehn, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    indivduals in the TRACK-HD cohort of Huntington's disease gene mutation carriers (data collected 2008-11). We generated a parallel progression score using data from 1773 previously genotyped participants from the European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY study of Huntington's disease mutation carriers...... in TRACK-HD participants, justifying use of a single, cross-domain measure of disease progression in both studies. The TRACK-HD and REGISTRY progression measures were correlated with each other (r=0·674), and with age at onset (TRACK-HD, r=0·315; REGISTRY, r=0·234). The meta-analysis of progression......BACKGROUND: Huntington's disease is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene, HTT. Age at onset has been used as a quantitative phenotype in genetic analysis looking for Huntington's disease modifiers, but is hard to define and not always available. Therefore, we aimed to generate...

  6. A Perspective on the Maillard Reaction and the Analysis of Protein Glycation by Mass Spectrometry: Probing the Pathogenesis of Chronic Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Metz, Thomas O.

    2008-12-18

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide on overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  7. A perspective on the Maillard reaction and the analysis of protein glycation by mass spectrometry: probing the pathogenesis of chronic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qibin; Ames, Jennifer M; Smith, Richard D; Baynes, John W; Metz, Thomas O

    2009-02-01

    The Maillard reaction, starting from the glycation of protein and progressing to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), is implicated in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus, as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular, renal, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this perspective review, we provide an overview on the relevance of the Maillard reaction in the pathogenesis of chronic disease and discuss traditional approaches and recent developments in the analysis of glycated proteins by mass spectrometry. We propose that proteomics approaches, particularly bottom-up proteomics, will play a significant role in analyses of clinical samples leading to the identification of new markers of disease development and progression.

  8. Predictive risk factors for chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Erhan Arif; Kocer, Bilge Gonenli

    2018-01-01

    Although previous studies have reported that the prevalence of low back pain in Parkinson's disease was over 50% and low back pain was often classified as chronic, risk factors of chronic low back pain have not been previously investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive risk factors of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. One hundred and sixty-eight patients with Parkinson's disease and 179 controls were consecutively included in the study. Demographic data of the two groups and disease characteristics of Parkinson's disease patient group were recorded. Low back pain lasting for ≥3 months was evaluated as chronic. Firstly, the bivariate correlations were calculated between chronic low back pain and all possible risk factors. Then, a multivariate regression was used to evaluate the impact of the predictors of chronic low back pain. The frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease patients and controls were 48.2% and 26.7%, respectively (p chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease were general factors including age (odds ratio = 1.053, p = 0.032) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale - Depression subscore (odds ratio = 1.218, p = 0.001), and Parkinson's disease-related factors including rigidity (odds ratio = 5.109, p = 0.002) and posture item scores (odds ratio = 5.019, p = 0.0001). The chronic low back pain affects approximately half of the patients with Parkinson's disease. Prevention of depression or treatment recommendations for managing depression, close monitoring of anti- parkinsonian medication to keep motor symptoms under control, and attempts to prevent, correct or reduce abnormal posture may help reduce the frequency of chronic low back pain in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Oral health in patients with chronic kidney disease - emphasis on periodontitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nylund, Karita

    2017-01-01

    ORAL HEALTH IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE - EMPHASIS ON PERIODONTITIS Background: Periodontitis is a common bacteria-induced chronic inflammatory disease with mild symptoms. It leads to destruction of the periodontium and finally to tooth loss in a susceptible patient. Periodontitis is associated with many systemic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic kidney disease (CKD) through low-grade systemic inflammation. However, no causality c...

  10. Different Relevance of Peripheral, Central or Nighttime Blood Pressure Measurements in the Prediction of Chronic Kidney Disease Progression in Patients with Mild or No-Proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczera, Piotr; Kwiecień, Katarzyna; Adamczak, Marcin; Bączkowska, Teresa; Gozdowska, Jolanta; Madziarska, Katarzyna; Augustyniak-Bartosik, Hanna; Klinger, Marian; Durlik, Magdalena; Ritz, Eberhard; Wiecek, Andrzej

    2018-05-10

    Arterial hypertension is one of the leading factors aggravating the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD). It seems that the novel parameters used in the assessment of the blood pressure (BP) load (i.e. central blood pressure, nighttime blood pressure) may be more precise in predicting the cardiovascular risk and the progression of CKD in comparison with the traditional peripheral blood pressure measurements in the office conditions. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of the central, or nighttime blood pressure on the progression of CKD in patients with mild or no-proteinuria (autosomal, dominant polycystic kidney disease or IgA nephropathy). In each of the enrolled 46 patients with CKD stage 3 or 4, serum creatinine concentration was assessed, eGFR (MDRD) was calculated, also central blood pressure and pulse wave velocity (PWV) was assessed and the 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) was conducted at the beginning of the study and then repeated after one-year observation period. During the observation period mean eGFR decreased from 44.1 (33.2-50.6) mL/min to 36.7 (29.7-46.3) mL/min. No significant differences were observed in the peripheral blood pressure or central blood pressure parameters. After one-year observation period the values of diastolic blood pressure dipping during the night significantly decreased from 16 (13-19) mmHg to 12 (10-15) mmHg; pblood pressure did not change significantly during a one-year observation period despite the significant decline of eGFR and seems not to participate in the CKD progression. 2. Reduced magnitude of the diastolic dipping, which reflects the increase of diastolic blood pressure load during the nighttime, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of deterioration of kidney function in these patients. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Antibodies to elastin peptides in sera of Belgian Draught horses with chronic progressive lymphoedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Brantegem, L; de Cock, H E V; Affolter, V K; Duchateau, L; Hoogewijs, M K; Govaere, J; Ferraro, G L; Ducatelle, R

    2007-09-01

    Chronic progressive lymphoedema (CPL) is a recently recognised disease of the lymphatic system characterised by lesions in the skin of the lower legs in several draught horse breeds, including the Belgian Draught hourse. Clinical signs slowly progress and result in severe disfigurement of the limbs. Ideally, supportive treatment should be started early in the disease process. However early diagnosis and monitoring progression of CPL is still a challenge. Elastin changes, characterised by morphological alterations as well as increased desmosine levels, in the skin of the distal limbs of horses affected with CPL are probably associated with a marked release of elastin degradation products, which elicit production of circulating anti-elastin antibodies (AEAbs) in the serum. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of serum AEAbs may document elastin breakdown. An ELISA technique was used to evaluate levels of AEAbs in sera of 97 affected Belgian Draught horses that were clinically healthy except for possible skin lesions, associated with CPL in their distal limbs. The horses were divided into 5 groups according to the severity of these skin lesions: normal horses (Group 1, n = 36), horses with mild lesions (Group 2, n = 43), horses with moderate lesions (Group 3, n = 8), horses with severe lesions (Group 4, n = 10) and, as a control, healthy Warmblood horses, unaffected by the disease (Group 5, n = 83). Horses with clinical signs of CPL had significantly higher AEAb levels compared to clinically normal Belgian Draught horses and to healthy Warmblood horses. These levels correlated with severity of lesions. CPL in draught horses is associated with an increase of serum AEAbs. Evaluation of serum levels of AEAbs by ELISA might be a useful diagnostic aid for CPL. Pathological degradation of elastic fibres, resulting in deficient support of the distal lymphatics, is proposed as a contributing factor for CPL in Belgian Draught horses.

  12. CLINICO-HAEMATOLOGICAL STUDY OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathi Gorla

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a major public health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetes mellitus (DM and hypertension are common causes and anaemia is a common complication. It is important to identify the cause and complication, to treat it and prevent its progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. AIM To identify the haematological pattern in chronic kidney disease patients and to study the clinical presentation. MATERIALS AND METHODS 72 cases of CKD were studied for a period of 6 months and thorough assessment of clinical features and haematological examinations were done. RESULTS CKD is observed in all age groups and predominantly in older age group greater than 50 yrs., with male preponderance. DM and hypertension are common causes. 89% of the patients presented with anaemia and 4 cases of sickle cell anaemia were observed. Neutrophilic leucocytosis was seen in 29.2% and thrombocytopenia in 8.3% of cases. CONCLUSION CKD is seen in all age groups with a male predominance, common in older age group, anaemia being the most common and important haematological complication. Few cases of sickle cell anaemia (SCA were seen presenting with CKD. Knowledge and treatment of these conditions has proved to improve the quality of life.

  13. Effect of Chronic Diseases on Work Productivity: A Propensity Score Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, Ahmed Mahmoud; Waheed, Amani; Gamal, Amira; Amer, Shaimaa Ahmed; Abdellah, Rasha Farouk; Shebl, Fatma Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chronic disease(s) on work productivity. Using the Health & Work Performance Questionnaire, information was collected from 516 workers on chronic disease status and work productivity. Propensity-score matching was performed to identify matched-pairs of workers. In the propensity-score matched sample, workers with chronic diseases were more likely to have increased absenteeism and presenteeism rates, 6.34 and 2.36 times the rates if no chronic diseases, respectively. In addition, they had greater odds for getting negative critical work incidents and less odds for positive incidents than none or balanced status. Multimorbidity showed more significant increase in absenteeism and presenteeism rates, as well as increased odds for excess negative critical work incidents. Chronic disease(s) can significantly reduce work productivity by increasing absenteeism, presenteeism, and net negative critical incidents.

  14. National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Heui-Sug; Kim, Dong Ik; Oh, Moo-Kyung

    2015-12-01

    By November 2013, a total of 125 clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed in Korea. However, despite the high burden of diseases and the clinical importance of CPGs, most chronic diseases do not have available CPGs. Merely 83 CPGs are related to chronic diseases, and only 40 guidelines had been developed in the last 5 yr. Considering the rate of the production of new evidence in medicine and the worsening burden from chronic diseases, the need for developing CPGs for more chronic diseases is becoming increasingly pressing. Since 2011, the Korean Academy of Medical Sciences and the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have been jointly developing CPGs for chronic diseases. However, priorities have to be set and resources need to be allocated within the constraint of a limited funding. This study identifies the chronic diseases that should be prioritized for the development of CPGs in Korea. Through an objective assessment by using the analytic hierarchy process and a subjective assessment with a survey of expert opinion, high priorities were placed on ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, osteoarthritis, neck pain, chronic kidney disease, and cirrhosis of the liver.

  15. A Mouse Model of Chronic West Nile Virus Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica B Graham

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Infection with West Nile virus (WNV leads to a range of disease outcomes, including chronic infection, though lack of a robust mouse model of chronic WNV infection has precluded identification of the immune events contributing to persistent infection. Using the Collaborative Cross, a population of recombinant inbred mouse strains with high levels of standing genetic variation, we have identified a mouse model of persistent WNV disease, with persistence of viral loads within the brain. Compared to lines exhibiting no disease or marked disease, the F1 cross CC(032x013F1 displays a strong immunoregulatory signature upon infection that correlates with restraint of the WNV-directed cytolytic response. We hypothesize that this regulatory T cell response sufficiently restrains the immune response such that a chronic infection can be maintained in the CNS. Use of this new mouse model of chronic neuroinvasive virus will be critical in developing improved strategies to prevent prolonged disease in humans.

  16. Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Oyvind; Würtz, Else Toft; Aasen, Tor Børvig

    2014-01-01

    Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures....

  17. M2 Macrophages Play Critical Roles in Progression of Inflammatory Liver Disease in Hepatitis C Virus Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Kimura, Kiminori; Tokunaga, Yuko; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Tateno, Chise; Hayashi, Yukiko; Hishima, Tsunekazu; Kohara, Michinori

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages in liver tissue are widely defined as important inflammatory cells in chronic viral hepatitis due to their proinflammatory activity. We reported previously that interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play significant roles in causing chronic hepatitis in hepatitis C virus (HCV) transgenic mice (S. Sekiguchi et al., PLoS One 7:e51656, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0051656). In addition, we showed that recombinant vaccinia viruses expressing an HCV nonstructural protein (rVV-N25) could protect against the progression of chronic hepatitis by suppression of macrophage activation. Here, we focus on the role of macrophages in liver disease progression in HCV transgenic mice and examine characteristic features of macrophages following rVV-N25 treatment. The number of CD11b(+) F4/80(+) CD11c(-) CD206(+) (M2) macrophages in the liver of HCV transgenic mice was notably increased compared to that of age-matched control mice. These M2 macrophages in the liver produced elevated levels of IL-6 and TNF-α. rVV-N25 infection suppressed the number and activation of M2 macrophages in liver tissue. These results suggested that inflammatory cytokines produced by M2-like macrophages contribute to the induction of chronic liver inflammation in HCV transgenic mice. Moreover, the therapeutic effect of rVV-N25 might be induced by the suppression of the number and activation of hepatic macrophages. HCV causes persistent infections that can lead to chronic liver diseases, liver fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma; the search for an HCV curative is the focus of ongoing research. Recently, effective anti-HCV drugs have been developed; however, vaccine development still is required for the prevention and therapy of infection by this virus. We demonstrate here that M2 macrophages are important for the pathogenesis of HCV-caused liver diseases and additionally show that M2 macrophages contribute to the therapeutic mechanism observed following r

  18. Iron Status and Inflammation in Early Stages of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Łukaszyk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: One of the most common causes of anemia of chronic disease (ACD is chronic kidney disease. The main pathomechanism responsible for ACD is subclinical inflammation. The key element involved in iron metabolism is hepcidin, however, studies on new indices of iron status are in progress.The aim of the study was to assess the iron status in patients in early stages of chronic kidney disease, iron correlation with inflammation parameters and novel biomarkers of iron metabolism. Methods: The study included 69 patients. Standard laboratory measurements were used to measure the iron status, complete blood count, fibrinogen, prothrombin index, C-reactive protein concentration (CRP, creatinine, urea, uric acid. Commercially available kits were used to measure high-sensitivity CRP, interleukin 6 (IL-6, hepcidin-25, hemojuvelin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15 and zonulin. Results: Absolute iron deficiency was present in 17% of the patients, functional iron deficiency was present in 12% of the patients. Functional iron deficiency was associated with significantly higher serum levels of fibrinogen, ferritin, transferrin saturation, total iron binding capacity, hepcidin and older age relative to patients with absolute iron deficiency. In comparison with patients without iron deficiency, patients with functional iron deficiency were older, with lower prothrombin index, higher fibrinogen, CRP, hsCRP, sTfR, GDF-15, urea and lower eGFR. Hepcidin was predicted by markers of inflammation:ferritin, fibrinogen and IL-6. Conclusion: Inflammation is correlated with iron status. Novel biomarkers of iron metabolism might be useful to distinguish iron deficiency anemia connected with inflammation and absolute iron deficiency.

  19. Airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a true paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Mathew Suji; Myers, Stephen; Walters, Eugene Haydn; Sohal, Sukhwinder Singh

    2017-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is primarily an airway condition, which mainly affects cigarette smokers and presents with shortness of breath that is progressive and poorly reversible. In COPD research, there has been a long held belief that airway disease progression is due to inflammation. Although this may be true in the airway lumen with innate immunity activated by the effect of smoke or secondary to infection, the accurate picture of inflammatory cells in the airway wall, where the pathophysiological COPD remodeling occurs, is uncertain and debatable. Areas covered: The current review provides a comprehensive literature survey of the changes in the main inflammatory cells in human COPD patients and focuses on contrarian views that affect the prevailing dogma on inflammation. The review also delves into the role of oxidative stress and inflammasomes in modulating the immune response in COPD. Further, the effects of inflammation in affecting the epithelium, fibroblasts, and airway remodeling are discussed. Expert commentary: Inflammation as a driving force for airway wall damage and remodelling in early COPD is at the very least 'oversimplified' and is likely to be misleading. This has serious implications for rational thinking about the illness, including pathogenesis and designing therapy.

  20. Inflammatory biomarkers and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette; Ingebrigtsen, Truls Sylvan; Marott, Jacob Louis

    2013-01-01

    Exacerbations of respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have profound and long-lasting adverse effects on patients.......Exacerbations of respiratory symptoms in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have profound and long-lasting adverse effects on patients....

  1. Autoimmune Demyelinating Polyneuropathy as a Manifestation of Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Adult Cord Blood Transplantation in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrick Hogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune mediated demyelinating disease after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is a rare entity with unclear etiology. Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP has been reported after related and adult unrelated allogeneic stem cell transplantation but no such case has been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We hereby present the first case of AIDP after double umbilical cord blood transplantation (DUCBT. A 55-year-old man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL received a cord blood transplant for relapsed refractory disease with high risk cytogenetics. On day 221, patient presented with skin rash, tingling in both lower extremites, and ascending paralysis that progressed rapidly over the course of 2 days. The workup resulted in a diagnosis of AIDP and administration of intravenous immunoglobulins plus steroids was initiated. Motor and sensory powers were fully recovered and his chronic GVHD was managed for several months with single agent sirolimus.

  2. Linking the microbiota, chronic disease and the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Timothy W.; Vujkovic-Cvijin, Ivan; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Belkaid, Yasmine

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are the most important causes of mortality in the world today and are on the rise. We now know that immune-driven inflammation is critical in the etiology of these diseases, though the environmental triggers and cellular mechanisms that lead to their development are still mysterious. Many chronic inflammatory diseases are associated with significant shifts in the microbiota towards inflammatory configurations, which can affect the host both by inducing local and systemic inflammation and by alterations in microbiota-derived metabolites. This review discusses recent findings suggesting that shifts in the microbiota may contribute to chronic disease via effects on the immune system. PMID:27623245

  3. Contraception for adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Lourenço

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Contraception is an important issue and should be a matter of concern in every medical visit of adolescent and young patients with chronic rheumatic diseases. This narrative review discusses contraception methods in adolescents with juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus (JSLE, antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA and juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM. Barrier methods are safe and their use should be encouraged for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases. Combined oral contraceptives (COC are strictly prohibited for JSLE and APS patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies. Reversible long-acting contraception can be encouraged and offered routinely to the JSLE adolescent patient and other rheumatic diseases. Progestin-only pills are safe in the majority of rheumatic diseases, although the main concern related to its use by adolescents is poor adherence due to menstrual irregularity. Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate injections every three months is a highly effective contraception strategy, although its long-term use is associated with decreased bone mineral density. COC or other combined hormonal contraceptive may be options for JIA and JDM patients. Oral levonorgestrel should be considered as an emergency contraception method for all adolescents with chronic rheumatic diseases, including patients with contraindication to COC.

  4. Nutrition and prevention of chronic diseases: a unifying eco-nutritional strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, M L

    2004-02-01

    Increasing efforts are being made to address, in public health policy (PHP), both the persistence of nutritional deprivation in economically disadvantaged communities, and the increase in so-called "chronic disease" (abdominal obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, certain cancers, osteoporosis, arthritides, and inflammatory disease) in communities at all stages of economic development. The problems in the "chronic disease" descriptor are that its origins may be as early as conception, rather than during the postnatal lifespan, or even in previous generations; it may appear abruptly or slowly; and it may be amenable to environmental and behavioural intervention well into its course and in older age groups. It is also not necessarily "non-communicable", a qualifier often used for "chronic disease" (chronic non-communicable disease or CNCD) and often has inflammatory features, for example the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein is a predictor of macrovascular disease and ischaemic events can, in part, be prevented in the affected by influenzal vaccination. The nexus between immunodeficiency, inflammatory processes and nutritional status which is characteristic of "infective" and food-borne illness, is also more and more evident in "chronic disease". It may be more helpful to consider "chronic disease" as "eco-disease" with its environmental and behavioural contributors, and to regard that which is clearly nutritionally dependent as "eco-nutritional disease".

  5. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD...... applied a multivariable Cox regression analysis with adjustment for well-established risk factors associated with COPD exacerbations or gastro-esophageal reflux disease, including COPD severity, and symptoms. RESULTS: Individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease had more chronic bronchitis...... and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We...

  6. Transvascular lipoprotein transport in patients with chronic renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Krogsgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While increased plasma cholesterol is a well-established cardiovascular risk factor in the general population, this is not so among patients with chronic renal disease. We hypothesized that the transvascular lipoprotein transport, in addition to the lipoprotein concentration in plasma......, determines the degree of atherosclerosis among patients with chronic renal disease. METHODS: We used an in vivo method for measurement of transvascular transport of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in 21 patients with chronic renal disease and in 42 healthy control patients. Autologous 131-iodinated LDL...... was reinjected intravenously, and the 1-hour fractional escape rate was taken as index of transvascular transport. RESULTS: Transvascular LDL transport tended to be lower in patients with chronic renal disease than in healthy control patients [3.3 (95% CI 2.4-4.2) vs. 4.2 (3.7-4.2)%/hour; NS]. However...

  7. Emerging therapies for the treatment of skeletal muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Samantha L; Hansen, Michelle J; Bozinovski, Steven; McDonald, Christine F; Holland, Anne E; Vlahos, Ross

    2016-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive lung disease that constitutes a major global health burden. A significant proportion of patients experience skeletal muscle wasting and loss of strength as a comorbidity of their COPD, a condition that severely impacts on their quality of life and survival. At present, the lung pathology is considered to be largely irreversible; however, the inherent adaptability of muscle tissue offers therapeutic opportunities to tackle muscle wasting and potentially reverse or delay the progression of this aspect of the disease, to improve patients' quality of life. Muscle wasting in COPD is complex, with contributions from a number of factors including inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, growth and anabolic hormones, nutritional status, and physical activity. In this review, we discuss current and emerging therapeutic approaches to treat muscle wasting in COPD, including a number of pharmacological therapies that are in development for muscle atrophy in other pathological states that could be of relevance for treating muscle wasting in COPD patients. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilflingseder, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  9. Strategies for Worksite Health Interventions to Employees with Elevated Risk of Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Meng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic disease rates have become more prevalent in the modern American workforce, which has negative implications for workplace productivity and healthcare costs. Offering workplace health interventions is recognized as an effective strategy to reduce chronic disease progression, absenteeism, and healthcare costs as well as improve population health. This review documents intervention and evaluation strategies used for health promotion programs delivered in workplaces. Using predetermined search terms in five online databases, we identified 1,131 published items from 1995 to 2014. Of these items, 27 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria; reporting data from completed United States-based workplace interventions that recruited at-risk employees based on their disease or disease-related risk factors. A content rubric was developed and used to catalogue these 27 published field studies. Selected workplace interventions targeted obesity (n = 13, cardiovascular diseases (n = 8, and diabetes (n = 6. Intervention strategies included instructional education/counseling (n = 20, workplace environmental change (n = 6, physical activity (n = 10, use of technology (n = 10, and incentives (n = 13. Self-reported data (n = 21, anthropometric measurements (n = 17, and laboratory tests (n = 14 were used most often in studies with outcome evaluation. This is the first literature review to focus on interventions for employees with elevated risk for chronic diseases. The review has the potential to inform future workplace health interventions by presenting strategies related to implementation and evaluation strategies in workplace settings. These strategies can help determine optimal worksite health programs based on the unique characteristics of work settings and the health risk factors of their employee populations.

  10. Strategies for Worksite Health Interventions to Employees with Elevated Risk of Chronic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lu; Wolff, Marilyn B; Mattick, Kelly A; DeJoy, David M; Wilson, Mark G; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-06-01

    Chronic disease rates have become more prevalent in the modern American workforce, which has negative implications for workplace productivity and healthcare costs. Offering workplace health interventions is recognized as an effective strategy to reduce chronic disease progression, absenteeism, and healthcare costs as well as improve population health. This review documents intervention and evaluation strategies used for health promotion programs delivered in workplaces. Using predetermined search terms in five online databases, we identified 1,131 published items from 1995 to 2014. Of these items, 27 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria; reporting data from completed United States-based workplace interventions that recruited at-risk employees based on their disease or disease-related risk factors. A content rubric was developed and used to catalogue these 27 published field studies. Selected workplace interventions targeted obesity ( n   =  13), cardiovascular diseases ( n   =  8), and diabetes ( n   =  6). Intervention strategies included instructional education/counseling ( n   =  20), workplace environmental change ( n   =  6), physical activity ( n   =  10), use of technology ( n   =  10), and incentives ( n   =  13). Self-reported data ( n   =  21), anthropometric measurements ( n   =  17), and laboratory tests ( n   =  14) were used most often in studies with outcome evaluation. This is the first literature review to focus on interventions for employees with elevated risk for chronic diseases. The review has the potential to inform future workplace health interventions by presenting strategies related to implementation and evaluation strategies in workplace settings. These strategies can help determine optimal worksite health programs based on the unique characteristics of work settings and the health risk factors of their employee populations.

  11. A report with consensus statements of the International Society of Nephrology 2004 Consensus Workshop on Prevention of Progression of Renal Disease, Hong Kong, June 29, 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Weening, Jan J.; Dirks, John; Lui, Sing Leung; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Tang, Sydney; Atkins, Robert C.; Mitch, William E.; Chow, Kai Ming; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Freedman, Barry I.; Harris, David C.; Hooi, Lai-Seong; de Jong, Paul E.; Kincaid-Smith, Priscilla; Lai, Kar Neng; Lee, Evan; Li, Fu-Keung; Lin, Shan-Yan; Lo, Wai-Kei; Mani, M. K.; Mathew, Timothy; Murakami, Mutsumi; Qian, Jia-Qi; Ramirez, Sylvia; Reiser, Thomas; Tomino, Yasuhiko; Tong, Matthew K.; Tsang, Wai-Kay; Tungsanga, Kriang; Wang, Haiyan; Wong, Andrew K.; Wong, Kim Ming; Yang, Wu-Chang; de Zeeuw, Dick; Yu, Alex W.; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) 2004 Consensus Workshop on Prevention of Progression of Renal Disease, which was held in Hong Kong on June 29, 2004. Three key areas were discussed during the workshop: (1) screening for chronic kidney disease;

  12. Chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaguer, Miguel; Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M

    2014-04-01

    In recent years, Central America, Egypt, India and Sri Lanka have reported a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease of unknown etiology in agricultural communities, predominantly among male farmworkers. This essay examines the disease's case definitions, epidemiology (disease burden, demographics, associated risk factors) and causal hypotheses, by reviewing published findings from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Sri Lanka, Egypt and India. The range of confirmed chronic kidney disease prevalence was 17.9%-21.1%. Prevalence of reduced glomerular filtration (homemade alcohol use and family history of chronic kidney disease. There is no strong evidence for a single cause, and multiple environmental, occupational and social factors are probably involved. Further etiological research is needed, plus interventions to reduce preventable risk factors.

  13. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  14. Progression of Late-Onset Stargardt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambertus, Stanley; Lindner, Moritz; Bax, Nathalie M; Mauschitz, Matthias M; Nadal, Jennifer; Schmid, Matthias; Schmitz-Valckenberg, Steffen; den Hollander, Anneke I; Weber, Bernhard H F; Holz, Frank G; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Fleckenstein, Monika; Hoyng, Carel B

    2016-10-01

    Identification of sensitive biomarkers is essential to determine potential effects of emerging therapeutic trials for Stargardt disease. This study aimed to describe the natural history of late-onset Stargardt, and demonstrates the accuracy of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) atrophy progression as an outcome measure. We performed a retrospective cohort study collecting multicenter data from 47 patients (91 eyes) with late-onset Stargardt, defined by clinical phenotype, at least one ABCA4 mutation, and age at disease onset ≥ 45 years. We analyzed RPE atrophy progression on fundus autofluorescence and near-infrared reflectance imaging using semiautomated software and a linear mixed model. We performed sample size calculations to assess the power in a simulated 2-year interventional study and assessed visual endpoints using time-to-event analysis. Over time, progression of RPE atrophy was observed (mean: 0.22 mm/year, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-0.27). By including only patients with bilateral RPE atrophy in a future trial, 32 patients are needed to reach a power of 83.9% (95% CI: 83.1-84.6), assuming a fixed therapeutic effect size of 30%. We found a median interval between disease onset and visual acuity decline to 20/32, 20/80, and 20/200 of 2.74 (95% CI: 0.54-4.41), 10.15 (95% CI: 6.13-11.38), and 11.38 (95% CI: 6.13-13.34) years, respectively. We show that RPE atrophy represents a robust biomarker to monitor disease progression in future therapeutic trials. In contrast, the variability in terms of the course of visual acuity was high.

  15. Chronic venous disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinsky, Claire D; Waldorf, Heidi

    2009-11-01

    Identifying characteristic cutaneous findings is important in determining the appropriate management of certain venous diseases. The health care provider should be familiar with the classic description of patterns and distributions of skin manifestations, such as varicose veins, stasis dermatitis, palpable cord, petechiae, and telangiectasias. In addition to the gross appearance of the skin, a skin biopsy may help elucidate a diagnosis. General treatment and prevention of the underlying venous pathology is essential. Furthermore, specific management of skin findings should include therapy to ameliorate progression of disease and symptomatology when warranted.

  16. Lifestyle modification and progressive renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritz, Eberhard; Schwenger, Vedat

    2005-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that lifestyle factors impact on the risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) and the risk of progression of CKD. Equally important is the consideration that patients with CKD are more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than to reach the stage of end-stage renal failure. It is advantageous that manoeuvres that interfere with progression at the same time also reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Lifestyle factors that aggravate progression include, among others, smoking, obesity and dietary salt intake. Alcohol consumption, according to some preliminary information, has a bimodal relationship to cardiovascular risk and progression, with moderate consumption being protective.

  17. Angiopoietin-like protein 2 increases renal fibrosis by accelerating transforming growth factor-β signaling in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Jun; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Miyata, Keishi; Endo, Motoyoshi; Terada, Kazutoyo; Tian, Zhe; Sugizaki, Taichi; Tanigawa, Hiroki; Zhao, Jiabin; Zhu, Shunshun; Sato, Michio; Araki, Kimi; Iyama, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Mukoyama, Masashi; Tomita, Kimio; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Renal fibrosis is a common pathological consequence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) with tissue fibrosis closely associated with chronic inflammation in numerous pathologies. However, molecular mechanisms underlying that association, particularly in the kidney, remain unclear. Here, we determine whether there is a molecular link between chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis in CKD progression. Histological analysis of human kidneys indicated abundant expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) in renal tubule epithelial cells during progression of renal fibrosis. Numerous ANGPTL2-positive renal tubule epithelial cells colocalized with cells positive for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, a critical mediator of tissue fibrosis. Analysis of M1 collecting duct cells in culture showed that TGF-β1 increases ANGPTL2 expression by attenuating its repression through microRNA-221. Conversely, ANGPTL2 increased TGF-β1 expression through α5β1 integrin-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Furthermore, ANGPTL2 deficiency in a mouse unilateral ureteral obstruction model significantly reduced renal fibrosis by decreasing TGF-β1 signal amplification in kidney. Thus, ANGPTL2 and TGF-β1 positively regulate each other as renal fibrosis progresses. Our study provides insight into molecular mechanisms underlying chronic inflammation and tissue fibrosis and identifies potential therapeutic targets for CKD treatment. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Ellen Fischer; Hannerz, Harald; Tüchsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009.......To estimate standardised hospitalisation ratios (SHR) for chronic lower respiratory diseases among demolition and cement workers in Denmark, 1995-2009....

  19. Rheumatic heart disease: infectious disease origin, chronic care approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenellenbogen, Judith M; Ralph, Anna P; Wyber, Rosemary; Carapetis, Jonathan R

    2017-11-29

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a chronic cardiac condition with an infectious aetiology, causing high disease burden in low-income settings. Affected individuals are young and associated morbidity is high. However, RHD is relatively neglected due to the populations involved and its lower incidence relative to other heart diseases. In this narrative review, we describe how RHD care can be informed by and integrated with models of care developed for priority non-communicable diseases (coronary heart disease), and high-burden communicable diseases (tuberculosis). Examining the four-level prevention model (primordial through tertiary prevention) suggests primordial and primary prevention of RHD can leverage off existing tuberculosis control efforts, given shared risk factors. Successes in coronary heart disease control provide inspiration for similarly bold initiatives for RHD. Further, we illustrate how the Chronic Care Model (CCM), developed for use in non-communicable diseases, offers a relevant framework to approach RHD care. Systems strengthening through greater integration of services can improve RHD programs. Strengthening of systems through integration/linkages with other well-performing and resourced services in conjunction with policies to adopt the CCM framework for the secondary and tertiary prevention of RHD in settings with limited resources, has the potential to significantly reduce the burden of RHD globally. More research is required to provide evidence-based recommendations for policy and service design.

  20. A review of halotherapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashleigh R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rachael Rashleigh,1 Sheree MS Smith,1,2 Nicola J Roberts3 1Family and Community Health University Research Group, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Western Sydney, Campbelltown Campus, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 2Centre for Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Division of Experimental Medicine, Imperial College, South Kensington, London, United Kingdom; 3Institute of Applied Health Research, School of Health and Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, Scotland Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a chronic, progressive disease and is treated with inhaled medication to optimize the patient's lung health through decreasing their symptoms, especially breathlessness. Halotherapy is the inhalation of micronized dry salt within a chamber that mimics a salt cave environment. Recent media reports suggest that this therapy may help with the symptoms of COPD. Objective: To critically evaluate and summarize the evidence for the use of halotherapy as a treatment for COPD. Design: A review using systematic approach and narrative synthesis. Data sources: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar were searched. Two reviewers independently reviewed abstracts and selected eligible studies based on predetermined selection criteria. Results: Of the 151 articles retrieved from databases and relevant reference lists, only one randomized controlled trial met the inclusion criteria. A meta-analysis was unable to be conducted due to the limited number of published studies. Inclusion criteria were subsequently expanded to allow three case-control studies to be included, ensuring that a narrative synthesis could be completed. From the pooled data of the four studies, there were 1,041 participants (661 in the intervention group and 380 in the control group. The assessment of methodological quality raised issues associated with randomization and patient selection

  1. Minimal residual disease in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vela, José Antonio; García Marco, José Antonio

    2018-02-23

    Minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment is an important endpoint in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). It is highly predictive of prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival and could be considered a surrogate for PFS in the context of chemoimmunotherapy based treatment. Evaluation of MRD level by flow cytometry or molecular techniques in the era of the new BCR and Bcl-2 targeted inhibitors could identify the most cost-effective and durable treatment sequencing. A therapeutic approach guided by the level of MRD might also determine which patients would benefit from an early stop or consolidation therapy. In this review, we discuss the different MRD methods of analysis, which source of tumour samples must be analysed, the future role of the detection of circulating tumour DNA, and the potential role of MRD negativity in clinical practice in the modern era of CLL therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Research progress in antiviral therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Guoying

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral therapy is the most important treatment for chronic hepatitis C. This paper reviews the progress in antiviral treatment over recent years, including the combination therapy with polyethylene glycol-Interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin (RBV, specific target therapy, and gene therapy. The paper believes that the anti-hepatitis C virus treatment needs more effective drug combination therapies, shorter courses, less side effect, higher drug resistance threshold, etc.

  3. Onco-nephrology: an appraisal of the cancer and chronic kidney disease links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzedine, Hassan; Perazella, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    A bidirectional relationship has been observed for kidney disease and cancer. On the one hand, cancer is an important complication noted in kidney disease as well as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in this group. On the other hand, improved cancer treatment has prolonged survival, but also increased the development of acute and chronic kidney disease. The combination of cancer and kidney disease makes it challenging for clinicians to provide comprehensive and safe therapies for this group of patients. As such, clinicians caring for this group must develop expertise and become competent in the practice of a newly evolving subspecialty of nephrology known as 'onco-nephrology'. This brief narrative review will focus on the cancer risk in patients with underlying kidney disease, the therapies such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents on cancer progression and other outcomes, and the appropriate dosing of anti-cancer agents in patients with underlying kidney disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  4. Alcoholic Beverage Consumption and Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Zhou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental studies have consistently linked alcoholic beverage consumption with the development of several chronic disorders, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and obesity. The impact of drinking is usually dose-dependent, and light to moderate drinking tends to lower risks of certain diseases, while heavy drinking tends to increase the risks. Besides, other factors such as drinking frequency, genetic susceptibility, smoking, diet, and hormone status can modify the association. The amount of ethanol in alcoholic beverages is the determining factor in most cases, and beverage types could also make an influence. This review summarizes recent studies on alcoholic beverage consumption and several chronic diseases, trying to assess the effects of different drinking patterns, beverage types, interaction with other risk factors, and provide mechanistic explanations.

  5. [Disease management for chronic heart failure patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bläuer, Cornelia; Pfister, Otmar; Bächtold, Christa; Junker, Therese; Spirig, Rebecca

    2011-02-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) are limited in their quality of life, have a poor prognosis and face frequent hospitalisations. Patient self-management was shown to improve quality of life, reduce rehospitalisations and costs in patients with chronic HF. Comprehensive disease management programmes are critical to foster patient self-management. The chronic care model developed by the WHO serves as the basis of such programmes. In order to develop self-management skills a needs orientated training concept is mandatory, as patients need both knowledge of the illness and the ability to use the information to make appropriate decisions according to their individual situation. Switzerland has no established system for the care of patients with chronic diseases in particular those with HF. For this reason a group of Swiss experts for HF designed a model for disease management for HF patients in Switzerland. Since 2009 the Swiss Heart Foundation offers an education programme based on this model. The aim of this programme is to offer education and support for practitioners, patients and families. An initial pilot evaluation of the program showed mixed acceptance by practitioners, whereas patient assessed the program as supportive and in line with their requirements.

  6. Interrelationship of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling pathways in chronic metabolic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Ian; Malgor, Ramiro

    2018-01-01

    Chronic diseases account for approximately 45% of all deaths in developed countries and are particularly prevalent in countries with the most sophisticated and robust public health systems. Chronic metabolic diseases, specifically lifestyle-related diseases pertaining to diet and exercise, continue to be difficult to treat clinically. The most prevalent of these chronic metabolic diseases include obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease and will be the focus of this review. Wnt proteins are highly conserved glycoproteins best known for their role in development and homeostasis of tissues. Given the importance of Wnt signalling in homeostasis, aberrant Wnt signalling likely regulates metabolic processes and may contribute to the development of chronic metabolic diseases. Expression of Wnt proteins and dysfunctional Wnt signalling has been reported in multiple chronic diseases. It is interesting to speculate about an interrelationship between the Wnt signalling pathways as a potential pathological mechanism in chronic metabolic diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize reported findings on the contrasting roles of Wnt signalling in lifestyle-related chronic metabolic diseases; specifically, the contribution of Wnt signalling to lipid accumulation, fibrosis and chronic low-grade inflammation.

  7. HIV and chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmania, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 – 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune comple...

  8. Pregnancy across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladunewich, Michelle A; Melamad, Nir; Bramham, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Management of the pregnant woman with chronic kidney disease is difficult for both nephrologists and obstetricians. Prepregnancy counselling with respect to risk stratification, optimization of maternal health prior to pregnancy, as well as management of the many potential pregnancy-associated complications in this complex patient population remains challenging due to the paucity of large, well-designed clinical studies. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of disease and the relative infrequency of pregnancy, particularly in more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, leaves many clinicians feeling ill prepared to manage these pregnancies. As such, counselling is imprecise and management varies substantially across centers. All pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease can benefit from a collaborative multidisciplinary approach with a team that consists of nephrologists experienced in the management of kidney disease in pregnancy, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, high-risk pregnancy nursing staff, dieticians, and pharmacists. Further access to skilled neonatologists and neonatal intensive care unit support is essential given the risks for preterm delivery in this patient population. The goal of this paper is to highlight some of the data that currently exist in the literature, provide management strategies for the practicing nephrologist at all stages of chronic kidney disease, and explore some of the knowledge gaps where future multinational collaborative research efforts should concentrate to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with kidney disease across the globe. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Awareness Status of Chronic Disabling Neurological Diseases among Elderly Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ji-Ping; Zhu, Lin-Qi; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Shi-Min; Lan, Xiao-Yang; Cui, Bo; Deng, Yu-Cheng; Li, Ying-Hao; Ye, Guang-Hua; Wang, Lu-Ning

    2015-05-20

    The awareness, treatment and prevention of chronic diseases are generally poor among the elderly population of China, whereas the prevention and control of chronic diseases in elderly veteran communities have been ongoing for more than 30 years. Therefore, investigating the awareness status of chronic disabling neurological diseases (CDND) and common chronic diseases (CCD) among elderly veterans may provide references for related programs among the elderly in the general population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among veterans ≥60 years old in veteran communities in Beijing. The awareness of preventive strategies against dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), sleep disorders, cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and CCD such as hypertension, and the approaches used to access this information, including media, word of mouth (verbal communication among the elderly) and health care professionals, were investigated via face-to-face interviews. The awareness rates for CCD and CVD were approximately 100%, but that for AD was the lowest at word-of-mouth peer education.

  10. Natural histories of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    Concepts relating to the natural history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) arise most importantly from the classic study of Fletcher and colleagues (The Natural History of Chronic Bronchitis and Emphysema, Oxford University Press, New York, 1976). This study, which evaluated working...

  11. Correlates and management of anaemia of chronic kidney disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease. There is paucity of published local and regional data regarding its associated factors and management. Objective: To assess the correlates and management of anaemia in chronic kidney disease. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study