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Sample records for chronic metabolic alkalosis

  1. Effect of metabolic alkalosis on respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Bear, R.; Goldstein, M.; Phillipson, E.; Ho, M.; Hammeke, M.; Feldman, R.; Handelsman, S.; Halperin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven instances of a mixed acid-base disorder consisting of chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis were recognized in eight patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention. Correction of the metabolic alkalosis led to substantial improvement in blood gas values and clinical symptoms. Patients with mixed chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis constitute a common subgroup of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention; these patients benefit from correction of the metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21028

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid ionic regulation, cerebral blood flow, and glucose use during chronic metabolic alkalosis

    Schroeck, H.K.; Kuschinsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Chronic metabolic alkalosis was induced in rats by combining a low K+ diet with a 0.2 M NaHCO3 solution as drinking fluid for either 15 or 27 days. Local cerebral blood flow and local cerebral glucose utilization were measured in 31 different structures of the brain in conscious animals by means of the iodo-[14C]antipyrine and 2-[14C]deoxy-D-glucose method. The treatment induced moderate [15 days, base excess (BE) 16 mM] to severe (27 days, BE 25 mM) hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis and K+ depletion. During moderate metabolic alkalosis no change in cerebral glucose utilization and blood flow was detectable in most brain structures when compared with controls. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) K+ and H+ concentrations were significantly decreased. During severe hypochloremic alkalosis, cerebral blood flow was decreased by 19% and cerebral glucose utilization by 24% when compared with the control values. The decrease in cerebral blood flow during severe metabolic alkalosis is attributed mainly to the decreased cerebral metabolism and to a lesser extent to a further decrease of the CSF H+ concentration. CSF K+ concentration was not further decreased. The results show an unaltered cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a decrease in CSF H+ and K+ concentrations at moderate metabolic alkalosis and a decrease in cerebral blood flow and glucose utilization together with a further decreased CSF H+ concentration at severe metabolic alkalosis

  3. Acetazolamide for the management of chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants.

    Tam, Bonnie; Chhay, Annie; Yen, Lilly; Tesoriero, Linda; Ramanathan, Rangasamy; Seri, Istvan; Friedlich, Philippe S

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of acetazolamide in the management of chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants with chronic respiratory insufficiency. A retrospective chart review of 90 patients treated with acetazolamide between 2006 and 2007 admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit was performed. Blood gases and electrolytes obtained at baseline and by 24 hours after acetazolamide administration were compared. Compared with baseline and after 24 hours of acetazolamide, mean measured serum bicarbonate (29.5±3.7 vs. 26.9±3.8 mEq/L, Prespiratory acidosis developed in 4 (3.1%) treatment courses. Acetazolamide may be effective in decreasing serum bicarbonate in carefully selected patients. Its use and safety as an adjunctive therapy for chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants with chronic respiratory insufficiency needs further study.

  4. Alkalosis

    ... different types of alkalosis. These are described below. Respiratory alkalosis is caused by a low carbon dioxide level ... test, such as basic metabolic panel to confirm alkalosis and show ... respiratory or metabolic alkalosis. Other tests may be needed ...

  5. Renal responses of trout to chronic respiratory and metabolic acidoses and metabolic alkalosis.

    Wood, C M; Milligan, C L; Walsh, P J

    1999-08-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia (500-600 torr) or low pH (4.5) for 72 h or NaHCO(3) infusion for 48 h were used to create chronic respiratory (RA) or metabolic acidosis (MA) or metabolic alkalosis in freshwater rainbow trout. During alkalosis, urine pH increased, and [titratable acidity (TA) - HCO(-)(3)] and net H(+) excretion became negative (net base excretion) with unchanged NH(+)(4) efflux. During RA, urine pH did not change, but net H(+) excretion increased as a result of a modest rise in NH(+)(4) and substantial elevation in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] efflux accompanied by a large increase in inorganic phosphate excretion. However, during MA, urine pH fell, and net H(+) excretion was 3.3-fold greater than during RA, reflecting a similar increase in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] and a smaller elevation in phosphate but a sevenfold greater increase in NH(+)(4) efflux. In urine samples of the same pH, [TA - HCO(-)(3)] was greater during RA (reflecting phosphate secretion), and [NH(+)(4)] was greater during MA (reflecting renal ammoniagenesis). Renal activities of potential ammoniagenic enzymes (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and plasma levels of cortisol, phosphate, ammonia, and most amino acids (including glutamine and alanine) increased during MA but not during RA, when only alanine aminotransferase increased. The differential responses to RA vs. MA parallel those in mammals; in fish they may be keyed to activation of phosphate secretion by RA and cortisol mobilization by MA.

  6. [Cardiac arrest in chronic metabolic alkalosis due to sodium bicarbonate abuse].

    Niewiński, Grzegorz; Korta, Teresa; Debowska, Małgorzata; Kosiński, Cezary; Kubik, Tomasz; Romanik, Wojciech; Kański, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Moderate metabolic alkalosis has not been considered as a life-threatening situation by many authors, but when it persists and pH increases above 7.65, the situation may become critical. We present a case of a 61-yr-old alcoholic male patient, who had been consuming approximately 200 g of sodium bicarbonate daily for twenty years, due to persisitent heartburn and abdominal pains. The patient was admitted to the ITU after home cardiac arrest and resuscitation. On admission he was unconscious and in respiratory distress, with a GCS of 5. Blood gases revealed that his pH was 7.64, HCO3 44 mmol L(-1), K+ 2.4 mmol L(-1)l, Cl- 44 mmol L(-1), and lactate concentration over 15 mmol L(-1). He was treated with controlled hypercapnia, up to a PaCO2 of 63 mm Hg, sedation, and administration of a large amount of chloride (864 mmol during the first day). The patient regained consciousness after 48 h, was extubated and transferred to the internal medicine department where he died 3 days later. Chronic alkali abuse can lead to various metabolic disturbances, neurologic disturbances and cardiovascular compromise. In the described case, the exact cause of cardiac arrest remained unknown, but may have been caused by alkalosis combined with hypoxia, hypokalemia and poor general condition. The extreme metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.8) could also have been enhanced by the administration of i.v. sodium bicarbonate during resuscitation. The treatment of choice in such cases should consist of vigorous chloride containing fluid resuscitation, ammonium chloride and hemodialysis.

  7. [Alkalosis].

    Kościelska, Malgorzata; Mieczkowski, Mariusz

    2013-01-01

    An elevation of arterial blood pH called alkalosis remains an underestimated condition in hospitalized patients. Serious alkalosis can be associated with high risk of death. The disorder can be caused by increased concentration of bicarbonate (metabolic alkalosis) or decreased concentration of carbon dioxide (respiratory alkalosis). In most cases of metabolic alkalosis it is generated by vomiting or diuretic use, whereas respiratory alkalosis is provoked by hyperventilation associated with respiratory or neurological disorder. Maintenance of metabolic alkalosis is possible only in patients with impaired renal base excretion which is most often produced by hypochloremia. In both respiratory and metabolic alkaloses treatment depends on the underlying factor. In hyperventilation syndrome is based on behavioral therapy. In most cases of metabolic alkalosis the administration of sodium and potassium chloride forms a substantial part of therapy.

  8. Relationship of metabolic alkalosis, azotemia and morbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypercapnia.

    Ucgun, Irfan; Oztuna, Funda; Dagli, Canan Eren; Yildirim, Huseyin; Bal, Cengiz

    2008-01-01

    Exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality, but the effect of metabolic compensation of respiratory acidosis (RA) on mortality is not fully understood. To investigate the relationship between metabolic compensation and mortality in COPD patients with RA. We prospectively investigated all COPD patients with RA admitted to the respiratory intensive care unit between February 2001 and March 2007. Two hundred and thirteen patients (159 male, 54 female; mean age 65 +/- 10.8 years) were divided into three groups (71 patients each) according to base excess (BE) levels: (1) low BE, (2) medium BE, and (3) high BE. H(+) concentration was calculated according to their standard formula and BE was calculated according to the Van Slyke equation. The overall mortality rate was 24.9%. The group mortality rates were 32, 17 and 25% in the low, medium and high BE groups, respectively (p = 0.001). When patients were divided into three groups according to the HCO(3)(-) levels, the group mortality rate was 59.1% in the low HCO(3)(-) group and 19.8% in the high HCO(3)(-) group. Based on univariate analysis, six factors affecting mortality were identified. However, multivariate analysis showed that the levels of serum HCO(3)(-) (p = 0.013; OR: 0.552; CI: 0.345-0.882) and creatinine (p = 0.019; OR: 2.114; CI: 1.132-3.949) had an independent effect. In patients with COPD exacerbation and hypercapnia, the development of sufficient metabolic compensation and adequate renal function significantly decreases mortality. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Baking soda induced severe metabolic alkalosis in a haemodialysis patient.

    Solak, Yalcin; Turkmen, Kultigin; Atalay, Huseyin; Turk, Suleyman

    2009-08-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a rare occurence in hemodialysis population compared to metabolic acidosis unless some precipitating factors such as nasogastric suction, vomiting and alkali ingestion or infusion are present. When metabolic alkalosis develops, it may cause serious clinical consequences among them are sleep apnea, resistent hypertension, dysrhythmia and seizures. Here, we present a 54-year-old female hemodialysis patient who developed a severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion to relieve dyspepsia. She had sleep apnea, volume overload and uncontrolled hypertension due to metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was corrected and the patient's clinical condition was relieved with negative-bicarbonate hemodialysis.

  10. Extreme metabolic alkalosis in intensive care.

    Tripathy, Swagata

    2009-10-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is a commonly seen imbalance in the intensive care unit (ICU). Extreme metabolic alkalemia, however, is less common. A pH greater than 7.65 may carry a high risk of mortality (up to 80%). We discuss the entity of life threatening metabolic alkalemia by means of two illustrative cases - both with a pH greater than 7.65 on presentation. The cause, modalities of managing and complications of this condition is discussed from the point of view of both the traditional method of Henderson and Hasselbalch and the mathematical model based on physiochemical model described by Stewart. Special mention to the pitfalls in managing patients of metabolic alkalosis with concomitant renal compromise is made.

  11. Metabolic alkalosis in children: Study of patients admitted to pediatrics center

    Sobhani A; Radmehr B; Raji AR

    2001-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by high HCO3- as it is seen in chronic respiratory acidosis, but PH differentiates the two disorders. There is no characteristic symptom or sign. Orthostatic hypotension may be encountered. Weakness and hyporeflexia occur if serum K+ is markerdly low. Tetany and neuromuscular irritability occur rarely. We report the results of retrospective data analysis of metabolic alkalosis in 15463 patients hospitalized Pediatric Medical Center in Tehran during years 1...

  12. [Severe metabolic alkalosis following hypokalemia from a paraneoplastic Cushing syndrome].

    Dubé, L; Daenen, S; Kouatchet, A; Soltner, C; Alquier, P

    2001-12-01

    Metabolic alkalosis is frequently observed in critically ill patients. Etiologies are numerous but endocrinal causes are rare. We report a case of a patient with severe respiratory insufficiency, metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia. The evolution was fatal. Further explorations revealed an ectopic Adrenocorticotropine Hormone syndrome. The initial tumor was probably a small cell lung carcinoma.

  13. Metabolic alkalosis in children: Study of patients admitted to pediatrics center

    Sobhani A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by high HCO3- as it is seen in chronic respiratory acidosis, but PH differentiates the two disorders. There is no characteristic symptom or sign. Orthostatic hypotension may be encountered. Weakness and hyporeflexia occur if serum K+ is markerdly low. Tetany and neuromuscular irritability occur rarely. We report the results of retrospective data analysis of metabolic alkalosis in 15463 patients hospitalized Pediatric Medical Center in Tehran during years 1995-1997. We found 50 cases of metabolic alkalosis (rate of 0.32 percent. 64 precent male and 36 percent female. Most of them had growth failure (40% were bellow 3 percentile of height by age, 44% bellow 5 percentile of weight by height. More than 60 percent had hypokalemia, hypocloremia and hyponatremia. The most common cause of Metabolic alkalosis was cystic fibrosis and pyloric stenosis. Fifty percent of cystic fibrosis patients and Bartter cases had metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis should be considered in every pediatric patient presented with projectile vomitting.

  14. Metabolic alkalosis in children: Study of patients admitted to pediatrics center1

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by high HCO3- as it is seen in chronic respiratory acidosis, but PH differentiates the two disorders. There is no characteristic symptom or sign. Orthostatic hypotension may be encountered. Weakness and hyporeflexia occur if serum K+ is markerdly low. Tetany and neuromuscular irritability occur rarely. We report the results of retrospective data analysis of metabolic alkalosis in 15463 patients hospitalized Pediatric Medical Center in Tehran during years 1995-1997. We found 50 cases of metabolic alkalosis (rate of 0.32 percent. 64 precent male and 36 percent female. Most of them had growth failure (40% were bellow 3 percentile of height by age, 44% bellow 5 percentile of weight by height. More than 60 percent had hypokalemia, hypocloremia and hyponatremia. The most common cause of Metabolic alkalosis was cystic fibrosis and pyloric stenosis. Fifty percent of cystic fibrosis patients and Bartter cases had metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis should be considered in every pediatric patient presented with projectile vomitting.

  15. Metabolic alkalosis in adults with stable cystic fibrosis.

    Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Faughnan, Marie E; Tullis, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of metabolic alkalosis among adults with stable severe CF-lung disease is unknown. Retrospective chart review. Fourteen CF and 6 COPD (controls) patients were included. FEV1 was similar between the two groups. PaO2 was significantly higher in the COPD (mean ± 2 SD is 72.0 ± 6.8 mmHg,) than in the CF group (56.1 ± 4.1 mmHg). The frequency of metabolic alkalosis in CF patients (12/14, 86%) was significantly greater (p=0.04) than in the COPD group (2/6, 33%). Mixed respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis was evident in 4 CF and 1 COPD patients. Primary metabolic alkalosis was observed in 8 CF and none of the COPD patients. One COPD patient had respiratory and metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis is more frequent in stable patients with CF lung disease than in COPD patients. This might be due to defective CFTR function with abnormal electrolyte transport within the kidney and/ or gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Respiratory compensation to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans.

    Feldman, Mark; Alvarez, Naiara M; Trevino, Michael; Weinstein, Gary L

    2012-11-01

    There is limited and disparate information about the extent of the respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) that occurs in response to a primary metabolic alkalosis in humans. Our aim was to examine the influence of the plasma bicarbonate concentration, the plasma base excess, and the arterial pH on the arterial carbon dioxide tension in 52 adult patients with primary metabolic alkalosis, mostly due to diuretic use or vomiting. Linear regression analysis was used to correlate degrees of alkalosis with arterial carbon dioxide tensions. In this alkalotic cohort, whose arterial plasma bicarbonate averaged 31.6 mEq/l, plasma base excess averaged 7.8 mEq/l, and pH averaged 7.48, both plasma bicarbonate and base excess correlated closely with arterial carbon dioxide tensions (r = 0.97 and 0.96, respectively; p respiratory compensation (hypoventilation) to primary metabolic alkalosis than has been reported in prior smaller studies.

  17. Hypocapnic but not metabolic alkalosis impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption.

    Myrianthefs, Pavlos M; Briva, Arturo; Lecuona, Emilia; Dumasius, Vidas; Rutschman, David H; Ridge, Karen M; Baltopoulos, George J; Sznajder, Jacob Iasha

    2005-06-01

    Acid-base disturbances, such as metabolic or respiratory alkalosis, are relatively common in critically ill patients. We examined the effects of alkalosis (hypocapnic or metabolic alkalosis) on alveolar fluid reabsorption in the isolated and continuously perfused rat lung model. We found that alveolar fluid reabsorption after 1 hour was impaired by low levels of CO2 partial pressure (PCO2; 10 and 20 mm Hg) independent of pH levels (7.7 or 7.4). In addition, PCO2 higher than 30 mm Hg or metabolic alkalosis did not have an effect on this process. The hypocapnia-mediated decrease of alveolar fluid reabsorption was associated with decreased Na,K-ATPase activity and protein abundance at the basolateral membranes of distal airspaces. The effect of low PCO2 on alveolar fluid reabsorption was reversible because clearance normalized after correcting the PCO2 back to normal levels. These data suggest that hypocapnic but not metabolic alkalosis impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption. Conceivably, correction of hypocapnic alkalosis in critically ill patients may contribute to the normalization of lung ability to clear edema.

  18. Metabolic alkalosis during immobilization in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    Young, D. R.; Yeh, I.; Swenson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The systemic and renal acid-base response of monkeys during ten weeks of immobilization was studied. By three weeks of immobilization, arterial pH and bicarbonate concentrations were elevated (chronic metabolic alkalosis). Net urinary acid excretion increased in immobilized animals. Urinary bicarbonate excretion decreased during the first three weeks of immobilization, and then returned to control levels. Sustained increases in urinary ammonium excretion were seen throughout the time duration of immobilization. Neither potassium depletion nor hypokalemia was observed. Most parameters returned promptly to the normal range during the first week of recovery. Factors tentatively associated with changes in acid-base status of monkeys include contraction of extracellular fluid volume, retention of bicarbonate, increased acid excretion, and possible participation of extrarenal buffers.

  19. Metabolic Acidosis or Respiratory Alkalosis? Evaluation of a Low Plasma Bicarbonate Using the Urine Anion Gap.

    Batlle, Daniel; Chin-Theodorou, Jamie; Tucker, Bryan M

    2017-09-01

    Hypobicarbonatemia, or a reduced bicarbonate concentration in plasma, is a finding seen in 3 acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis, chronic respiratory alkalosis and mixed metabolic acidosis and chronic respiratory alkalosis. Hypobicarbonatemia due to chronic respiratory alkalosis is often misdiagnosed as a metabolic acidosis and mistreated with the administration of alkali therapy. Proper diagnosis of the cause of hypobicarbonatemia requires integration of the laboratory values, arterial blood gas, and clinical history. The information derived from the urinary response to the prevailing acid-base disorder is useful to arrive at the correct diagnosis. We discuss the use of urine anion gap, as a surrogate marker of urine ammonium excretion, in the evaluation of a patient with low plasma bicarbonate concentration to differentiate between metabolic acidosis and chronic respiratory alkalosis. The interpretation and limitations of urine acid-base indexes at bedside (urine pH, urine bicarbonate, and urine anion gap) to evaluate urine acidification are discussed. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A patient with foot ulcer and severe metabolic alkalosis.

    John, Ruby Samuel; Simoes, Sonia; Reddi, Alluru S

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of triple acid-base disorder with metabolic alkalosis as the primary disorder in a 65-year-old man due to ingestion and application to leg ulcers of baking soda (calcium bicarbonate). The blood pH was 7.65 with hypochloremia, hypokalemia, and prerenal azotemia. He was treated with isotonic saline with K replacement, and the patient improved without any adverse clinical consequences. We discuss the causes, mechanisms, and management of Cl-responsive (depletion) metabolic alkalosis.

  1. Metabolic Alkalosis in Adults with Stable Cystic Fibrosis

    Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Faughnan, Marie E; Tullis, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background: The frequency of metabolic alkalosis among adults with stable severe CF-lung disease is unknown. Methods: Retrospective chart review. Results: Fourteen CF and 6 COPD (controls) patients were included. FEV1 was similar between the two groups. PaO2 was significantly higher in the COPD (mean ± 2 SD is 72.0 ± 6.8 mmHg,) than in the CF group (56.1 ± 4.1 mmHg). The frequency of metabolic alkalosis in CF patients (12/14, 86%) was significantly greater (p=0.04) than in the COPD group (2/6...

  2. Girl with hypokaliemia and metabolic alkalosis: a case report

    Ksenja Marguč Kirn

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: In cases of unexplained hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis associated with a normal or low blood pressure a tubulopathy, e.g., Gitelman syndrome, must be excluded. The identification and recognition of correct diagnosis is extremely important since a proper treatment can reduce the risk of life-threatening events, e.g. arrhythmias.

  3. Citrate metabolism in blood transfusions and its relationship due to metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis.

    Li, Kai; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis commonly results from excessive hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium (K(+)) and water (H2O) loss from the stomach or through the urine. The plasma anion gap increases in non-hypoproteinemic metabolic alkalosis due to an increased negative charge equivalent on albumin and the free ionized calcium (Ca(++)) content of plasma decreases. The mean citrate load in all patients was 8740±7027 mg from 6937±6603 mL of transfused blood products. The citrate load was significantly higher in patients with alkalosis (9164±4870 vs. 7809±3967, P alkalosis + respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop, blood transfusions may result in certain complications.

  4. Direct suppressive effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis on parathyroid hormone secretion in the dog.

    Lopez, Ignacio; Rodriguez, Mariano; Felsenfeld, Arnold J; Estepa, Jose Carlos; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico

    2003-08-01

    Acute alkalosis may directly affect PTH secretion. The effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis was studied in 20 dogs. PTH values were lower in the metabolic (5.6 +/- 0.8 pg/ml) and respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml). Acute alkalosis is an independent factor that decreases PTH values during normocalcemia and delays the PTH response to hypocalcemia. We recently showed that acute metabolic and respiratory acidosis stimulated PTH secretion. This study was designed to evaluate whether acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis suppressed parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Three groups of 10 dogs were studied: control, acute metabolic alkalosis, and acute respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was induced with an infusion of sodium bicarbonate and respiratory alkalosis by hyperventilation. Calcium chloride was infused to prevent alkalosis-induced hypocalcemia during the first 60 minutes. During the next 30 minutes, disodium EDTA was infused to induce hypocalcemia and to evaluate the PTH response to hypocalcemia. Because the infusion of sodium bicarbonate resulted in hypernatremia, the effect of hypernatremia was studied in an additional group that received hypertonic saline. After 60 minutes of a normocalcemic clamp, PTH values were less (p respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml); the respective blood pH values were 7.61 +/- 0.01, 7.59 +/- 0.02, and 7.39 +/- 0.02. The maximal PTH response to hypocalcemia was similar among the three groups. However, the maximal PTH response was observed after a decrease in ionized calcium of 0.20 mM in the control group but not until a decrease of 0.40 mM in the metabolic and respiratory alkalosis groups. In contrast to the metabolic alkalosis group, hypernatremia (157 +/- 2 mEq/liter) in the hypertonic saline group was associated with an increased PTH value (46 +/- 4 pg/ml). Finally, the half-life of intact PTH

  5. Acetazolamide Therapy for Metabolic Alkalosis in Pediatric Intensive Care Patients.

    López, Carolina; Alcaraz, Andrés José; Toledo, Blanca; Cortejoso, Lucía; Gil-Ruiz, Maite Augusta

    2016-12-01

    Patients in PICUs frequently present hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis secondary to loop diuretic treatment, especially those undergoing cardiac surgery. This study evaluates the effectiveness of acetazolamide therapy for metabolic alkalosis in PICU patients. Retrospective, observational study. A tertiary care children's hospital PICU. Children receiving at least a 2-day course of enteral acetazolamide. None. Demographic variables, diuretic treatment and doses of acetazolamide, urine output, serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine, acid-base excess, pH, and use of mechanical ventilation during treatment were collected. Patients were studied according to their pathology (postoperative cardiac surgery, decompensated heart failure, or respiratory disease). A total of 78 episodes in 58 patients were identified: 48 were carried out in cardiac postoperative patients, 22 in decompensated heart failure, and eight in respiratory patients. All patients received loop diuretics. A decrease in pH and PCO2 in the first 72 hours, a decrease in serum HCO3 (mean, 4.65 ± 4.83; p alkalosis secondary to diuretic therapy. Cardiac postoperative patients present a significant increase in urine output after acetazolamide treatment.

  6. Severe metabolic alkalosis due to pyloric obstruction: case presentation, evaluation, and management.

    McCauley, Meredith; Gunawardane, Manjula; Cowan, Mark J

    2006-12-01

    A 46-year-old man presented to the emergency room with severe metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, and respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. The cause of his acid-base disorder was initially unclear. Although alkalosis is common in the intensive care unit, metabolic alkalosis of this severity is unusual, carries a very high mortality rate, and requires careful attention to the pathophysiology and differential diagnosis to effectively evaluate and treat the patient. A central concept in the diagnosis of metabolic alkalosis is distinguishing chloride responsive and chloride nonresponsive states. Further studies are then guided by the history and physical examination in most cases. By using a systematic approach to the differential diagnosis, we were able to determine that a high-grade gastric outlet obstruction was the cause of the patients' alkalosis and to offer effective therapy for his condition. A literature review and algorithm for the diagnosis and management of metabolic alkalosis are also presented.

  7. Effectiveness of acetazolamide for reversal of metabolic alkalosis in weaning COPD patients from mechanical ventilation.

    Faisy, Christophe; Mokline, Amel; Sanchez, Olivier; Tadié, Jean-Marc; Fagon, Jean-Yves

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of a single daily dose of acetazolamide (ACET) on metabolic alkalosis and respiratory parameters in weaning chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from invasive mechanical ventilation. Case-control study. An 18-bed intensive care unit (ICU) in a university hospital. Twenty-six intubated COPD patients with mixed metabolic alkalosis (serum bicarbonate >26 mmol/l and arterial pH >or=7.38) were compared with a historical control group (n = 26) matched for serum bicarbonate, arterial pH, age, and severity of illness at admission to ICU. ACET administration (500 mg intravenously) was monitored daily according to arterial blood gas analysis from readiness to wean until extubation. ACET was administered 4 (1-11) days throughout the weaning period. Patients with ACET treatment significantly decreased their serum bicarbonate (p = 0.01 versus baseline) and arterial blood pH (p respiratory parameters except PaO(2)/FiO(2) ratio (p = 0.03). ACET patients and their matched controls had similar duration of weaning. Extubation success rate was not significantly different between groups, and causes of reintubation were comparable. ACET used at the dosage of 500 mg per day reduces metabolic alkalosis but has no benefit in terms of improving PaCO(2) or respiratory parameters in weaning COPD patients from mechanical ventilation.

  8. Incidence, nature, and etiology of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats.

    Ha, Y-S; Hopper, K; Epstein, S E

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and causes of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats have not been fully investigated. To describe the incidence, nature, and etiology of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats undergoing blood gas analysis at a veterinary teaching hospital. Dogs and cats at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Acid-base and electrolyte results for dogs and cats measured during a 13-month period were retrospectively collected from a computer database. Only the first measured (venous or arterial) blood gas analyzed in a single hospitalization period was included. Animals with a base excess above the reference range for the species were included. A total of 1,805 dogs and cats were included. Of these, 349 (19%) were identified as having an increased standardized base excess, 319 dogs and 30 cats. The mixed acid-base disorder of metabolic alkalosis with respiratory acidosis was the most common abnormality identified in both dogs and cats. Hypokalemia and hypochloremia were more common in animals with metabolic alkalosis compared to animals without metabolic alkalosis. The 4 most commonly identified underlying diseases were respiratory disease, gastrointestinal tract obstruction, furosemide administration, and renal disease. Metabolic alkalosis was less common than metabolic acidosis in the same population of animals. Evidence of contraction alkalosis was present in many patients in this study. Hypokalemia and hypochloremia were more frequent in patients with metabolic alkalosis and suggest the importance of evaluation of acid-base status in conjunction with serum electrolyte concentrations. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  9. Clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    Sweetser, Lisel J; Douglas, James A; Riha, Renata L; Bell, Scott C

    2005-03-01

    In subtropical and tropical climates, dehydration is common in cystic fibrosis patients with respiratory exacerbations. This may lead to a clinical presentation of metabolic alkalosis with associated hyponatraemia and hypochloraemia. An adult cystic fibrosis patient who presented with a severe respiratory exacerbation accompanied by metabolic alkalosis is presented and the effects of volume correction are reported.

  10. The effect of metabolic alkalosis on the ventilatory response in healthy subjects

    Mos-Oppersma, Eline; Doorduin, Jonne; van der Hoeven, J.G.; Veltink, Petrus H.; van Hees, H.W.H.; Heunks, L.M.A.

    Background Patients with acute respiratory failure may develop respiratory acidosis. Metabolic compensation by bicarbonate production or retention results in posthypercapnic alkalosis with an increased arterial bicarbonate concentration. The hypothesis of this study was that elevated plasma

  11. Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome presenting as hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and hypertension

    Mansoor C Abdulla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH syndrome is an uncommon cause of hypercortisolism, which should be considered in patients with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in the context of lung neoplasm. We report a 60-year-old male patient with severe hypertension, metabolic alkalosis, and hypokalemia as the initial manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell lung carcinoma. Ectopic Cushing's syndrome should always be ruled out in patients with severe hypertension and hypokalemia.

  12. Severe metabolic alkalosis due to baking soda ingestion: case reports of two patients with unsuspected antacid overdose.

    Fitzgibbons, L J; Snoey, E R

    1999-01-01

    Oral ingestion of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) has been used for decades as a home remedy for acid indigestion. Excessive bicarbonate ingestion places patients at risk for a variety of metabolic derangements including metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hypernatremia, and even hypoxia. The clinical presentation is highly variable but can include seizures, dysrhythmias, and cardiopulmonary arrest. We present two cases of severe metabolic alkalosis in patients with unsuspected antacid overdose. The presentation and pathophysiology of antacid-related metabolic alkalosis is reviewed.

  13. Respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis in a child treated with sulthiame.

    Weissbach, Avichai; Tirosh, Irit; Scheuerman, Oded; Hoffer, Vered; Garty, Ben Zion

    2010-10-01

    To report on severe acid-base disturbance in a child with symptomatic epilepsy treated with sulthiame. A 9.5-year-old boy with chronic generalized tonic-clonic seizures was treated with carbamazepine and valproic acid. Because of poor seizure control, sulthiame was added to the treatment. Two months later, he presented at the emergency department with severe weakness, headache, dizziness, dyspnea, anorexia, and confusional state. Arterial blood gas analysis showed mixed respiratory alkalosis with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Sulthiame-induced acid-base disturbance was suspected. The drug was withheld for the first 24 hours and then restarted at a reduced dosage. The arterial blood gases gradually normalized, the confusion disappeared, and the patient was discharged home.Three months later, 4 weeks after an increase in sulthiame dosage, the patient was once again admitted with the same clinical picture. Improvement was noted after the drug dosage was reduced. This is the first report of mixed respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis in a child treated with sulthiame. Monitoring of the acid-base status should be considered in patients treated with sulthiame.

  14. A Quick Reference on Respiratory Alkalosis.

    Johnson, Rebecca A

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory alkalosis, or primary hypocapnia, occurs when alveolar ventilation exceeds that required to eliminate the carbon dioxide produced by tissues. Concurrent decreases in Paco 2 , increases in pH, and compensatory decreases in blood HCO 3 - levels are associated with respiratory alkalosis. Respiratory alkalosis can be acute or chronic, with metabolic compensation initially consisting of cellular uptake of HCO 3 - and buffering by intracellular phosphates and proteins. Chronic respiratory alkalosis results in longer-lasting decreases in renal reabsorption of HCO 3 - ; the arterial pH can approach near-normal values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic alkalosis from unsuspected ingestion: use of urine pH and anion gap.

    Yi, Joo-Hark; Han, Sang-Woong; Song, June-Seok; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2012-04-01

    Underlying causes of metabolic alkalosis may be evident from history, evaluation of effective circulatory volume, and measurement of urine chloride concentration. However, identification of causes may be difficult for certain conditions associated with clandestine behaviors, such as surreptitious vomiting, use of drugs or herbal supplements with mineralocorticoid activity, abuse of laxatives or diuretics, and long-term use of alkalis. In these circumstances, clinicians often are bewildered by unexplained metabolic alkalosis from an incomplete history or persistent deception by the patient, leading to misdiagnosis and poor outcome. We present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia with a borderline urine chloride concentration in an alcoholic patient treated with a thiazide. The cause of the patient's metabolic alkalosis eventually was linked to surreptitious ingestion of baking soda. This case highlights the necessity of a high index of suspicion for the diverse clandestine behaviors that can cause metabolic alkalosis and the usefulness of urine pH and anion gap in its differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Acid-base homeostasis: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis].

    Dussol, Bertrand

    2014-07-01

    Acid-base homeostasis ensured by the kidneys, which maintain the equilibrium between proton generation by cellular metabolism and proton excretion in urine. This requirement is lifesaving because of the protons' ability to bind to anionic proteins in the extracellular space, modifying their structure and functions. The kidneys also regenerate bicarbonates. The kidney is not the sole organ in charge of maintaining blood pH in a very narrow range; lungs are also involved since they allow a large amount of volatile acid generated by cellular respiration to be eliminated. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Metabolic alkalosis with multiple salt unbalance: an atypical onset of cystic fibrosis in a child

    Dimitri Poddighe

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dehydration with multiple salt abnormalities is frequently encountered in the paediatric emergency department, during acute illnesses complicated by loss of body fluids. Metabolic alkalosis is not a common finding in dehydrated children. The presence of unusual electrolyte unbalance, such as metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, hypochloremia and hypokalemia, without evidence of renal tubular defects, is named as pseudo-Bartter syndrome. It can occur in several clinical settings and, in infancy, it is described as a potential complication of cystic fibrosis. We report a case of pseudo-Bartter syndrome representing the onset of cystic fibrosis in childhood.

  18. Hypernatremia and metabolic alkalosis as a consequence of the therapeutic misuse of baking soda.

    Fuchs, S; Listernick, R

    1987-12-01

    When used appropriately, baking soda (sodium bicarbonate, USP) is a nontoxic, readily available, multipurpose product found in many households. We report an infant who presented with hypernatremia and metabolic alkalosis due to the addition of baking soda to her water. This case represents the possible dangerous use of a common household product in infants owing to the lack of proper warning labels.

  19. Metabolic alkalosis contributes to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in adult cystic fibrosis.

    Holland, Anne E; Wilson, John W; Kotsimbos, Thomas C; Naughton, Matthew T

    2003-08-01

    and study objectives: Patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis (CF) develop respiratory failure and hypercapnia. In contrast to COPD patients, altered electrolyte transport and malnutrition in CF patients may predispose them to metabolic alkalosis and, therefore, may contribute to hypercapnia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic alkalosis in adults with hypercapnic respiratory failure in the setting of acute exacerbations of CF compared with COPD. Levels of arterial blood gases, plasma electrolytes, and serum albumin from 14 consecutive hypercapnic CF patients who had been admitted to the hospital with a respiratory exacerbation were compared with 49 consecutive hypercapnic patients with exacerbations of COPD. Hypercapnia was defined as a PaCO(2) of > or = 45 mm Hg. Despite similar PaCO(2) values, patients in the CF group were significantly more alkalotic than were those in the COPD group (mean [+/- SD] pH, 7.43 +/- 0.03 vs 7.37 +/- 0.05, respectively; p respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis was evident in 71% of CF patients and 22% of COPD patients (p alkalosis contributes to hypercapnic respiratory failure in adults with acute exacerbations of CF. This acid-base disturbance occurs in conjunction with reduced total body salt levels and hypoalbuminemia.

  20. Baking soda pica: a case of hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and rhabdomyolysis in pregnancy.

    Grotegut, Chad A; Dandolu, Vani; Katari, Sunita; Whiteman, Valerie E; Geifman-Holtzman, Ossie; Teitelman, Melissa

    2006-02-01

    We report a case of baking soda pica in a woman at 31 weeks of pregnancy causing severe hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and rhabdomyolysis. A multigravida at 31 weeks of gestation presented with weakness and muscle pain. She was found to have severe hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis and rhabdomyolysis, with elevation in serum transaminases and hypertension. We initially thought the patient had an atypical presentation of preeclampsia until it was realized that she was ingesting 1 full box of baking soda (454 g sodium bicarbonate) per day. Symptoms and abnormal laboratory findings resolved with discontinuation of the patient's pica practices. Pica is a common but often overlooked practice that can potentially lead to life-threatening disorders. A thorough evaluation of a patient's dietary intake is extremely important, especially in the setting of atypical presentations of disease in pregnancy.

  1. [Dehydration and metabolic alkalosis: an unusual presentation of cystic fibrosis in an infant].

    Aranzamendi, Roberto J; Breitman, Fanny; Asciutto, Carolina; Delgado, Norma; Castaños, Claudio

    2008-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) may present during neonatal period with classic clinic symptoms related to the disease. The severity of the disease is multifactorial, one of the factors depends on the level of activity of the CFTR protein, which is related with the mutation type that affects the patient. An infant is presented who developed recurrent episodes of vomiting, anorexia, weight loss, dehydration and electrolyte abnormalities, such as metabolic alkalosis, hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypochloremia. CF was diagnosed after the third episode showing an unusual and not very publicized presentation of the disease. Mutations !F 508 and 2789+5G-A were found. CF should be considered in patients of any age, but particularly in infants, presenting with anorexia, vomiting, failure to thrive, that are associated with recurrent episodes of hyponatremic hypochloremic, dehydration with metabolic alkalosis unexplained by other causes, even in the absence of respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms or failure to thrive.

  2. Sleep apnoea during upper respiratory infection and metabolic alkalosis in infancy.

    Abreu e Silva, F A; MacFadyen, U M; Williams, A; Simpson, H

    1986-01-01

    Three to four hour polygraphic sleep studies were carried out in 10 infants, five with upper respiratory infection and five with metabolic alkalosis secondary to vomiting during and after recovery from illness. During upper respiratory infection, the main abnormality detected was brief (greater than 3 less than 6 seconds) or prolonged (greater than 6 seconds) attacks of obstructive apnoea. Other indices of apnoea were similar to recovery data. Gross body movements were also increased. In infants with metabolic alkalosis indices of central apnoea were significantly increased when compared with recovery or case control data. Prolonged (greater than 15 seconds) attacks of central apnoea and obstructive apnoea (greater than 6 seconds) were only observed during illness. Gross body movements and periodic breathing were also increased. These findings suggest that the functional consequences of apparently 'mild' illnesses in young infants may be greater than is generally suspected and perhaps relevant to mechanism(s) of death in sudden infant death syndrome. PMID:3789786

  3. Changes in bone sodium and carbonate in metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in the dog

    Burnell, James M.

    1971-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis and alkalosis were produced in adult dogs over 5- to 10-day periods. Midtibial cortical bone was analyzed for calcium, sodium, phosphorus, and carbonate. In acidosis bone CO3/Ca decreased 9.5% and bone Na/Ca decreased 6.3%. In alkalosis bone CO3/Ca increased 3.1% and bone Na/Ca increased 3.0%. Previous attempts to account for changes in net acid balance by summation of extra- and intracellular acid-base changes have uniformly resulted in about 40-60% of acid gained or lost being “unaccounted for.” If it is assumed that changes in tibial cortex reflect changes in the entire skeletal system, changes in bone CO3= are sufficiently large to account for the “unaccounted for” acid change without postulating changes in cellular metabolic acid production. PMID:5540172

  4. Metabolic alkalosis secondary to baking soda treatment of a diaper rash.

    Gonzalez, J; Hogg, R J

    1981-06-01

    A 4-month-old infant was seen with hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis that was associated with prior application of liberal amounts of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) to a diaper rash. After exclusion of other etiologies of the infant's acid-base disturbance, a complete resolution occurred following discontinuation of the baking soda applications. This case report provides a reminder of the significant side effects that may result from the excessive use of a seemingly harmless household substance.

  5. Acetazolamide improves oxygenation in patients with respiratory failure and metabolic alkalosis.

    Gulsvik, Ragnhild; Skjørten, Ingunn; Undhjem, Kenneth; Holø, Lars; Frostad, Anne; Saure, Eirunn Waatevik; Lejlic, Vasvija; Humerfelt, Sjur; Hansen, Gunnar; Bruun Wyller, Torgeir

    2013-10-01

    Coexistent respiratory failure and metabolic alkalosis is a common finding. Acidotic diuretics cause a fall in pH that may stimulate respiration. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of short-term treatment with acetazolamide for combined respiratory failure and metabolic alkalosis. A randomised, placebo-controlled and double-blind parallel group trial where oral acetazolamide 250 mg three times a day for 5 days were administered to patients hospitalised for respiratory failure because of a pulmonary disease (Pa O2 ≤ 8 kPa and/or Pa CO2 ≥ 7 kPa) who had concurrent metabolic alkalosis [base excess (BE) ≥ 8 mmol/L]. Pa O2 after 5 days was the primary effect variable. Secondary effect variables were Pa CO2 , BE and pH on day 5, and the total number of days in hospital. Of 70 patients enrolled (35 in each group), data from 54 were analysed per protocol, while last observation carried forward was used for the remaining 16. During the 5-day treatment, Pa O2 increased on average 0.81 kPa in the placebo group and 1.41 kPa in the acetazolamide group. After adjustment for baseline skewness, the difference was statistically significant (adjusted mean difference 0.55 kPa, 95% confidence interval 0.03-1.06). Pa CO2 decreased in both groups, but the difference was not statistically significant. As expected, pH and BE decreased markedly in the acetazolamide group. Acetazolamide may constitute a useful adjuvant treatment mainly to be considered in selected patients with respiratory failure combined with prominent metabolic alkalosis or where non-invasive ventilation is insufficient or infeasible. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Acidosis, but Not Alkalosis, Affects Anaerobic Metabolism and Performance in a 4-km Time Trial.

    Correia-Oliveira, Carlos Rafaell; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Romulo; McConell, Glenn K; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal'molin

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of preexercise metabolic acidosis and alkalosis on power output (PO) and aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure during a 4-km cycling time trial (TT). Eleven recreationally trained cyclists (V˙O2peak 54.1 ± 9.3 mL·kg·min) performed a 4-km TT 100 min after ingesting in a double-blind matter 0.15 g·kg of body mass of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, acidosis), 0.3 g·kg of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, alkalosis), or 0.15 g·kg of CaCO3 (placebo). A preliminary study (n = 7) was conducted to establish the optimal doses to promote the desirable preexercise blood pH alterations without gastrointestinal distress. Data for PO, aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure, and blood and respiratory parameters were averaged for each 1 km and compared between conditions using two-way repeated-measures ANOVA (condition and distance factors). Gastrointestinal discomfort was analyzed qualitatively. Compared with placebo (pH 7.37 ± 0.02, [HCO3]: 27.5 ± 2.6 mmol·L), the NaHCO3 ingestion resulted in a preexercise blood alkalosis (pH +0.06 ± 0.04, [HCO3]: +4.4 ± 2.0 mmol·L, P 0.05). Minimal gastrointestinal distress was noted in all conditions. Preexercise acidosis, but not alkalosis, affects anaerobic metabolism and PO during a 4-km cycling TT.

  7. Respiratory alkalosis

    Alkalosis - respiratory ... leads to shortness of breath can also cause respiratory alkalosis (such as pulmonary embolism and asthma). ... Treatment is aimed at the condition that causes respiratory alkalosis. Breathing into a paper bag -- or using ...

  8. Effects of early administration of acetazolamide on the duration of mechanical ventilation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or obesity-hypoventilation syndrome with metabolic alkalosis. A randomized trial.

    Rialp Cervera, G; Raurich Puigdevall, J M; Morán Chorro, I; Martín Delgado, M C; Heras la Calle, G; Mas Serra, A; Vallverdú Perapoch, I

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic alkalosis (MA) inhibits respiratory drive and may delay weaning from mechanical ventilation (MV). MA is common in CO 2 -retainer patients that need MV. Acetazolamide (ACTZ) decreases serum bicarbonate concentration and stimulates respiratory drive. This study evaluated the effects of ACTZ on the duration of MV in patients with MA and COPD or obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) intubated with acute respiratory failure. Multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-blind study, with COPD or OHS patients with MV 28 mmol/L and pH > 7.35. Test-treatment, ACTZ 500 mg or placebo, was daily administered if pH > 7.35 and bicarbonate >26 mmol/L. Clinical, respiratory and laboratory parameters were recorded. 47 patients (36 men) were randomized. There were no significant differences between groups in comorbidities, baseline characteristics or arterial blood gases at inclusion. The mean difference in the duration of MV between placebo and ACTZ group was 1.3 days (95%CI, -2.1-4.8; p = 0.44). Kaplan-Meier curves showed no differences in the duration of MV (Log-Rank p = 0.41). Between-group comparison of estimated marginal means (CI 95%) during MV were, respectively: PaCO 2 55 (51-59) vs 48 (47-50) mm Hg, p = 0.002; bicarbonate concentration 34 (32-35) vs 29 (28-30) mmol/L, p < 0.0001; and minute volume 9.7 (8.9-10.4) vs 10.6 (9.2-12.0) L/min, p = 0.26. There were no severe adverse effects with ACTZ administration. Among patients with MA and COPD or OHS, early treatment with ACTZ did not shorten significantly the duration of MV compared with placebo. clinical.trials.gov; NCT01499485; URL:.www.clinicaltrials.gov. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Self-treatment with baking soda can lead to severe metabolic alkalosis].

    Jensen, Sara; Skriver, Signe

    2014-12-15

    This case report describes a 66-year-old man, previously healthy besides mild hypertension. He ingested a self-made folk remedy consisting of baking soda and water against acid reflux in dosages that resulted in severe metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.8). Diagnosing and treating MA is easy and cheap, but if the condition is not treated, consequences can be severe. The challenge is to uncover patients' use of non prescription medications and folk remedies in the diagnostic process. Having this information it is possible to prevent MA in both high- and low-risk patients.

  10. Effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at the onset of submaximal exercise.

    LeBlanc, P J; Parolin, M L; Jones, N L; Heigenhauser, G J F

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of respiratory alkalosis on human skeletal muscle metabolism at rest and during submaximal exercise. Subjects exercised on two occasions for 15 min at 55 % of their maximal oxygen uptake while either hyperventilating (R-Alk) or breathing normally (Con). Muscle biopsies were taken at rest and after 1 and 15 min of exercise. At rest, no effects on muscle metabolism were observed in response to R-Alk. In the first minute of exercise, there was a delayed activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) in R-Alk compared with Con, resulting in a reduced rate of pyruvate oxidation. Also, glycogenolysis was higher in R-Alk compared with Con, which was attributed to a higher availability of the monoprotonated form of inorganic phosphate (P(i)), resulting in an elevated rate of pyruvate production. The mismatch between pyruvate production and its oxidation resulted in net lactate accumulation. These effects were not seen after 15 min of exercise, with no further differences in muscle metabolism between conditions. The results from the present study suggest that respiratory alkalosis may play an important role in lactate accumulation during the transition from rest to exercise in acute hypoxic conditions, but that other factors mediate lactate accumulation during steady-state exercise.

  11. The effect of metabolic alkalosis on the ventilatory response in healthy subjects.

    Oppersma, E; Doorduin, J; van der Hoeven, J G; Veltink, P H; van Hees, H W H; Heunks, L M A

    2018-02-01

    Patients with acute respiratory failure may develop respiratory acidosis. Metabolic compensation by bicarbonate production or retention results in posthypercapnic alkalosis with an increased arterial bicarbonate concentration. The hypothesis of this study was that elevated plasma bicarbonate levels decrease respiratory drive and minute ventilation. In an intervention study in 10 healthy subjects the ventilatory response using a hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) test was assessed, before and after administration of high dose sodium bicarbonate. Total dose of sodiumbicarbonate was 1000 ml 8.4% in 3 days. Plasma bicarbonate increased from 25.2 ± 2.2 to 29.2 ± 1.9 mmol/L. With increasing inspiratory CO 2 pressure during the HCVR test, RR, V t , Pdi, EAdi and V E increased. The clinical ratio ΔV E /ΔP et CO 2 remained unchanged, but Pdi, EAdi and V E were significantly lower after bicarbonate administration for similar levels of inspired CO 2 . This study demonstrates that in healthy subjects metabolic alkalosis decreases the neural respiratory drive and minute ventilation, as a response to inspiratory CO 2 . Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An infant with poor weight gain and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis: a case report

    Alhammadi AH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed H Alhammadi, Mohamed Khalifa, Lolwa Alnaimi Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Bartter syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease manifested by a defect in chloride transport in the thick loop of Henle, with different genetic origins and molecular pathophysiology. Children with Bartter syndrome generally present in early infancy with persistent polyuria and associated dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and failure to thrive. Although early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of Bartter syndrome may improve the outcome, some children will progress to renal failure. We report a case of an 8-week-old infant who was admitted for electrolyte imbalance and failure to thrive. Laboratory studies revealed hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis with severe hypokalemia. Health care providers should consider Bartter syndrome when excessive chloride losses appear to be renal in origin and the patient has normal blood pressure and high levels of serum renin and aldosterone. Treatments, including indomethacin, spironolactone, and aggressive fluid and electrolyte replacement, may prevent renal failure in children with Bartter syndrome. Molecular genetics studies are indicated to identify the primary genetic defect. Keywords: Bartter syndrome, failure to thrive, metabolic alkalosis 

  13. Anesthetic management of a patient with sustained severe metabolic alkalosis and electrolyte abnormalities caused by ingestion of baking soda.

    Soliz, Jose; Lim, Jeffrey; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  14. Anesthetic Management of a Patient with Sustained Severe Metabolic Alkalosis and Electrolyte Abnormalities Caused by Ingestion of Baking Soda

    Jose Soliz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative medicine is prevalent worldwide. However, its effect on intraoperative anesthetic care is underreported. We report the anesthetic management of a patient who underwent an extensive head and neck cancer surgery and presented with a severe intraoperative metabolic alkalosis from the long term ingestion of baking soda and other herbal remedies.

  15. [Metabolic alkalosis despite hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia. Interpretation and therapy with help of the Stewart concept].

    Chappell, D; Hofmann-Kiefer, K; Jacob, M; Conzen, P; Rehm, M

    2008-02-01

    Acid-base disturbances are commonly found in critically ill patients and are often associated with fatal complications. The basis of a successful treatment is a thorough understanding of the causes of these disorders. The "classical methods" to explain acid-base disorders--pH, base excess and bicarbonate concentration--mostly do not provide a causal correlation to the underlying pathology. An unusual case of a combined respiratory-metabolic disorder with hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia is presented. An acidosis masked by hypochloremic and hypoalbuminemic alkalosis was identified with the help of Stewart's concept and finally permitted a successful therapy. The modern Stewart concept provides enhanced information, enabling an exact diagnosis and causal therapy even in complex cases.

  16. Citrate metabolism and its complications in non-massive blood transfusions: association with decompensated metabolic alkalosis+respiratory acidosis and serum electrolyte levels.

    Bıçakçı, Zafer; Olcay, Lale

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic alkalosis, which is a non-massive blood transfusion complication, is not reported in the literature although metabolic alkalosis dependent on citrate metabolism is reported to be a massive blood transfusion complication. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of elevated carbon dioxide production due to citrate metabolism and serum electrolyte imbalance in patients who received frequent non-massive blood transfusions. Fifteen inpatients who were diagnosed with different conditions and who received frequent blood transfusions (10-30 ml/kg/day) were prospectively evaluated. Patients who had initial metabolic alkalosis (bicarbonate>26 mmol/l), who needed at least one intensive blood transfusion in one-to-three days for a period of at least 15 days, and whose total transfusion amount did not fit the massive blood transfusion definition (alkalosis+respiratory acidosis developed as a result of citrate metabolism. There was a positive correlation between cumulative amount of citrate and the use of fresh frozen plasma, venous blood pH, ionized calcium, serum-blood gas sodium and mortality, whereas there was a negative correlation between cumulative amount of citrate and serum calcium levels, serum phosphorus levels and amount of urine chloride. In non-massive, but frequent blood transfusions, elevated carbon dioxide production due to citrate metabolism causes intracellular acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis+respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop. This situation may contribute to the increase in mortality. In conclusion, it should be noted that non-massive, but frequent blood transfusions may result in certain complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inherited renal tubulopathies associated with metabolic alkalosis: effects on blood pressure.

    Ariceta, Gema; Rodríguez-Soriano, Juan

    2006-11-01

    Inherited tubular disorders associated with metabolic alkalosis are caused by several gene mutations encoding different tubular transporters responsible for NaCl renal handling. Body volume and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system status are determined by NaCl reabsorption in the distal nephron. Two common hallmarks in affected individuals: hypokalemia and normal / high blood pressure, support the differential diagnosis. Bartter's syndrome, characterized by hypokalemia and normal blood pressure, is a heterogenic disease caused by the loss of function of SLC12A1 (type 1), KCNJ1 (type 2), CLCNKB (type 3), or BSND genes (type 4). As a result, patients present with renal salt wasting and hypercalciuria. Gitelman's syndrome is caused by the loss of funcion of the SLC12A3 gene and may resemble Bartter's syndrome, though is associated with the very low urinary calcium. Liddle's syndrome, also with similar phenotype but with hypertension, is produced by the gain of function of the SNCC1B or SNCC1G genes, and must be distinguished from other entities of inherited hypertension such as Apparently Mineralocorticoid Excess, of glucocorticoid remediable hypertension.

  18. Hyperventilation of pregnancy presenting with flaccid quadriparesis due to hypokalaemia secondary to respiratory alkalosis.

    Santra, Gouranga; Paul, Rudrajit; Das, Shubhabrata; Pradhan, Sourav

    2014-06-01

    Hyperventilation in pregnancy is a cause of chronic respiratory alkalosis. Alkalosis either metabolic or respiratory may cause intracellular shift of potassium ions that may lead to hypokalaemia. However, the resultant hypokalaemia in respiratory alkalosis is usually mild and does not cause much clinical features. A five-months-pregnant female of the age 25 years presented with sudden onset flaccid weakness of both lower limbs associated with thigh muscle pain followed by weakness of both upper limbs within three days. Subsequent investigation revealed severe hypokalaemia due to acute exacerbation of chronic respiratory alkalosis secondary to hyperventilation of pregnancy, other causes of hypokalaemia being ruled out. Respiratory alkalosis causes tetany and other clinical manifestations. But hypokalaemia and such weakness is rarely found. Thisis probably the first report of this type from India.

  19. Post-prandial metabolic alkalosis in the seawater-acclimated trout: the alkaline tide comes in.

    Bucking, Carol; Fitzpatrick, John L; Nadella, Sunita R; Wood, Chris M

    2009-07-01

    The consequences of feeding and digestion on acid-base balance and regulation in a marine teleost (seawater-acclimated steelhead trout; Oncorhynchus mykiss) were investigated by tracking changes in blood pH and [HCO3-], as well as alterations in net acid or base excretion to the water following feeding. Additionally the role of the intestine in the regulation of acid-base balance during feeding was investigated with an in vitro gut sac technique. Feeding did not affect plasma glucose or urea concentrations, however, total plasma ammonia rose during feeding, peaking between 3 and 24 h following the ingestion of a meal, three-fold above resting control values (approximately 300 micromol ml(-1)). This increase in plasma ammonia was accompanied by an increase in net ammonia flux to the water (approximately twofold higher in fed fish versus unfed fish). The arterial blood also became alkaline with increases in pH and plasma [HCO3-] between 3 and 12 h following feeding, representing the first measurement of an alkaline tide in a marine teleost. There was no evidence of respiratory compensation for the measured metabolic alkalosis, as Pa CO2 remained unchanged throughout the post-feeding period. However, in contrast to an earlier study on freshwater-acclimated trout, fed fish did not exhibit a compensating increase in net base excretion, but rather took in additional base from the external seawater, amounting to approximately 8490 micromol kg(-1) over 48 h. In vitro experiments suggest that at least a portion of the alkaline tide was eliminated through increased HCO3- secretion coupled to Cl- absorption in the intestinal tract. This did not occur in the intestine of freshwater-acclimated trout. The marked effects of the external salinity (seawater versus freshwater) on different post-feeding patterns of acid-base balance are discussed.

  20. Effect of acetazolamide on post-NIV metabolic alkalosis in acute exacerbated COPD patients.

    Fontana, V; Santinelli, S; Internullo, M; Marinelli, P; Sardo, L; Alessandrini, G; Borgognoni, L; Ferrazza, A M; Bonini, M; Palange, P

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is an effective treatment in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD). However, it may induce post-hypercapnic metabolic alkalosis (MA). This study aims to evaluate the effect of acetazolamide (ACET) in AECOPD patients treated with NIV. Eleven AECOPD patients, with hypercapnic respiratory failure and MA following NIV, were treated with ACET 500 mg for two consecutive days and compared to a matched control group. Patients and controls were non invasively ventilated in a bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) mode to a standard maximal pressure target of 15-20 cmH2O. ACET intra-group analysis showed a significant improvement for PaCO2 (63.9 ± 9.8 vs. 54.9 ± 8.3 mmHg), HCO3- (43.5 ± 5.9 vs. 36.1 ± 5.4 mmol/L) and both arterial pH (7.46 ± 0.06 vs. 7.41 ± 0.06) and urinary pH (6.94 ± 0.77 vs 5.80 ± 0.82), already at day 1. No significant changes in endpoints considered were observed in the control group at any time-point. Inter-group analysis showed significant differences between changes in PaCO2 and HCO3- (delta), both at day 1 and 2. Furthermore, the length of NIV treatment was significantly reduced in the ACET group compared to controls (6 ± 8 vs. 19 ± 19 days). No adverse events were recorded in the ACET and control groups. ACET appears to be effective and safe in AECOPD patients with post-NIV MA.

  1. Metabolic Alkalosis, Acute Renal Failure and Epileptic Seizures as Unusual Manifestations of an Upside-Down Stomach

    Johannes Stephani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Upside-down stomach represents a critical and rare manifestation of hiatal hernias. Here we report on a 60-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with epileptic seizures and dehydration. Laboratory tests revealed severe metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.56 with low potassium (2.7 mmol/l, hypochloremia (<60 mmol/l, increased hematocrit (53% and high levels of serum creatinine (651 µmol/l. Based on a history of recurrent vomiting, gastroscopy and computed tomography were performed. Both diagnostics showed an upside-down stomach with signs of incarceration. Upon infusion of sodium chloride 0.9%, acid-base state, electrolyte balance and renal function became improved. Subsequently, the patient was referred to the department of surgery for hiatoplasty with fundoplication. This case report highlights severe metabolic and neurological disorders as unusual and life-threatening complications of an upside-down stomach.

  2. Effects of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis on myocardial blood flow and metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Kazmaier, S; Weyland, A; Buhre, W; Stephan, H; Rieke, H; Filoda, K; Sonntag, H

    1998-10-01

    Variation of the arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) is not uncommon in anesthetic practice. However, little is known about the myocardial consequences of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, particularly in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of variation in PaCO2 on myocardial blood flow (MBF), metabolism, and systemic hemodynamics in patients before elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In 10 male anesthetized patients, measurements of MBF, myocardial contractility, metabolism, and systemic hemodynamics were made in a randomized sequence at PaCO2 levels of 30, 40, and 50 mmHg, respectively. The MBF was measured using the Kety-Schmidt technique with argon as a tracer. End-diastolic left ventricular pressure and the maximal increase of left ventricular pressure were assessed using a manometer-tipped catheter. The cardiac index significantly changed with varying PaCO2 levels (hypocapnia, - 9%; hypercapnia, 13%). This reaction was associated with inverse changes in systemic vascular resistance index levels. The MBF significantly increased by 15% during hypercapnia, whereas no change was found during hypocapnia. Myocardial oxygen and glucose uptake and the maximal increase of left ventricular pressure were not affected by varying PaCO2 levels. In anesthetized patients with coronary artery disease, short-term variations in PaCO2 have significant effects on MBF but do not influence global myocardial oxygen and glucose uptake. Changes in systemic hemodynamics associated with respiratory alkalosis and acidosis are caused by changes in systemic vascular resistance rather than by alterations in myocardial contractility.

  3. Acute Metabolic Alkalosis Enhances Response of C3H Mouse Mammary Tumors to the Weak Base Mitoxantrone

    Natarajan Raghunand

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of weak acid and weak base chemotherapeutic drugs by tumors is greatly influenced by the tumor extracellular/interstitial pH (pHe, the intracellular pH (pHi maintained by the tumor cells, and by the ionization properties of the drug itself. The acid-outside plasmalemmal pH gradient in tumors acts to exclude weak base drugs like the anthracyclines, anthraquinones, and vinca alkaloids from the cells, leading to a substantial degree of “physiological drug resistance” in tumors. We have induced acute metabolic alkalosis in C3H tumor-bearing C3H/hen mice, by gavage and by intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of NaHCO3. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopic measurements of 3-aminopropylphosphonate show increases of up to 0.6 pH units in tumor pHe, and 0.2 to 0.3 pH units in hind leg tissue pHe, within 2 hours of i.p. administration of NaHCO3. Theoretical calculations of mitoxantrone uptake into tumor and normal (hind leg tissue at the measured pH, and pHI values indicate that a gain in therapeutic index of up to 3.3-fold is possible with NaHCO3 pretreatment. Treatment of C3H tumor-bearing mice with 12 mg/kg mitoxantrone resulted in a tumor growth delay of 9 days, whereas combined NaHCO3mitoxantrone therapy resulted in an enhancement of the TGD to 16 days.

  4. Sodium acetate induces a metabolic alkalosis but not the increase in fatty acid oxidation observed following bicarbonate ingestion in humans.

    Smith, Gordon I; Jeukendrup, Asker E; Ball, Derek

    2007-07-01

    We conducted this study to quantify the oxidation of exogenous acetate and to determine the effect of increased acetate availability upon fat and carbohydrate utilization in humans at rest. Eight healthy volunteers (6 males and 2 females) completed 2 separate trials, 7 d apart in a single-blind, randomized, crossover design. On each occasion, respiratory gas and arterialized venous blood samples were taken before and during 180 min following consumption of a drink containing either sodium acetate (NaAc) or NaHCO3 at a dose of 2 mmol/kg body mass. Labeled [1,2 -13C] NaAc was added to the NaAc drink to quantify acetate oxidation. Both sodium salts induced a mild metabolic alkalosis and increased energy expenditure (P < 0.05) to a similar magnitude. NaHCO3 ingestion increased fat utilization from 587 +/- 83 kJ/180 min to 693 +/- 101 kJ/180 min (P = 0.01) with no change in carbohydrate utilization. Following ingestion of NaAc, the amount of fat and carbohydrate utilized did not differ from the preingestion values. However, oxidation of the exogenous acetate almost entirely (90%) replaced the additional fat that had been oxidized during the bicarbonate trial. We determined that 80.1 +/- 2.3% of an exogenous source of acetate is oxidized in humans at rest. Whereas NaHCO3 ingestion increased fat oxidation, a similar response did not occur following NaAc ingestion despite the fact both sodium salts induced a similar increase in energy expenditure and shift in acid-base balance.

  5. Shakuyaku-kanzo-to induces pseudoaldosteronism characterized by hypokalemia, rhabdomyolysis, metabolic alkalosis with respiratory compensation, and increased urinary cortisol levels.

    Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Okabayashi, Misako; Kaneko, Masakazu; Yasuda, Mutsuko; Abe, Keisuke; Machida, Akira; Ohkubo, Takuya; Kamata, Tomoyuki; Yakushiji, Fumiatsu

    2009-04-01

    Licorice, the primary ingredient of the Japanese herbal medicine shakuyaku-kanzo-to, can cause pseudoaldosteronism. Thus, shakuyaku-kanzo-to can cause this condition. A 79-year-old woman was brought to the emergency room. She had been experiencing general fatigue, numbness in the hands, and weakness in the lower limbs and could not stand up without assistance. She presented with hypokalemia (potassium level, 1.7 mEq/L), increased urinary excretion of potassium (fractional excretion of K, 21.2%), abnormalities on an electrocardiogram (flat T waves in II, III, AVF, and V1-6), rhabdomyolysis (creatine kinase level, 28,376 U/L), myopathy, metabolic alkalosis with respiratory compensation (O(2) flow rate, 2 L/min; pH, 7.473; pco(2), 61.0 mm Hg; po(2), 78.0 mm Hg; HCO(3), 44.1 mmol/L), hypertension (174/93 mm Hg), hyperglycemia (blood glucose level, 200-300 mg/dL), frequent urination, suppressed plasma renin activity (0.1 ng/mL/hour), decreased aldosterone levels (2.6 ng/dL), and increased urinary cortisol levels (600.6 microg/day; reference range, 26.0-187.0 microg/day). In this case, the observed reduction in the urinary cortisol levels, from 600.6 to 37.8 microg/day, led to a definitive diagnosis of pseudoaldosteronism instead of the apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome. Discontinuing shakuyaku-kanzo-to treatment and administering spironolactone and potassium proved effective in improving the patient's condition. Medical practitioners prescribing shakuyaku-kanzo-to should take into account the association between licorice, which is its main ingredient, and pseudoaldosteronism.

  6. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  7. Severe metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, and respiratory acidosis induced by the Chinese herbal medicine yokukansan in an elderly patient with muscle weakness and drowsiness.

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Tokumoto, Masanori; Kansui, Yasuo; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Uchizono, Yuji; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Ooboshi, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    Yokukansan is a Chinese herbal medicine containing licorice that has been shown to alleviate the behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, with few adverse effects. Increasing numbers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Japan are now being treated with this drug. However, yokukansan should be used with caution because of its potential to induce pseudoaldosteronism through the inhibition of 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, which metabolizes cortisol into cortisone. We present the case of an 88-year-old woman with a history of Alzheimer's disease who was transferred to our emergency department because of drowsiness, anorexia, and muscle weakness. Her blood pressure was 168/90 mmHg. Laboratory data showed serum potassium of 1.9 mmol/l, metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.54; HCO 3 - , 50.5 mmol/l; chloride, 81 mmol/l; sodium, 140 mmol/l), and respiratory disorders (pCO 2 , 60.5 mmHg; pO 2 , 63.8 mmHg). Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration were suppressed, and urinary potassium excretion was 22 mmol/l (calculated transtubular potassium gradient 12.9). An electrocardiogram showed flat T-waves and U-waves with ventricular premature contractions. Echocardiography denied volume depletion. Medical interview disclosed that she had been treated with a Chinese herbal medicine (yokukansan) containing licorice. The final diagnosis was pseudoaldosteronism and respiratory acidosis induced by licorice. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and respiratory acidosis all subsided shortly after the discontinuation of yokukansan and initiation of intravenous potassium replacement. This case highlights the need for nephrologists to consider the possible involvement of Chinese herbal medicines, including yokukansan, when they encounter hypokalemia in elderly patients.

  8. Newborn ventilatory response to maternal chronic hypercapnia.

    DeLuca, L; Holzman, I; Gibbs, K

    2012-10-01

    This is a case of a neonate born with a respiratory acidosis with a compensatory metabolic alkalosis. This case demonstrates placental physiology of gas exchange as well as the blunted ventilatory response in the neonate from chronic hypercapnia.

  9. Preexercise metabolic alkalosis induced via bicarbonate ingestion accelerates Vo2 kinetics at the onset of a high-power-output exercise in humans.

    Zoladz, Jerzy A; Szkutnik, Zbigniew; Duda, Krzysztof; Majerczak, Joanna; Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2005-03-01

    The present study investigated the effect of preexercise metabolic alkalosis on the primary component of oxygen uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, characterized by tau(1). Seven healthy physically active nonsmoking men, aged 22.4 +/- 1.8 (mean +/- SD) yr, maximum Vo(2) (Vo(2 max)) 50.4 +/- 4 ml.min(-1).kg(-1), performed two bouts of cycling, corresponding to 40 and 87% of Vo(2 max), lasting 6 min each, separated by a 20-min pause, once as a control study and a few days later at approximately 90 min after ingestion of 3 mmol/kg body wt of NaHCO(3). Blood samples for measurements of bicarbonate concentration and hydrogen ion concentration were taken from antecubital vein via catheter. Pulmonary Vo(2) was measured continuously breath by breath. The values of tau(1) were calculated by using six various approaches published in the literature. Preexercise level of bicarbonate concentration after ingestion of NaHCO(3) was significantly elevated (P < 0.01) compared with the control study (28.96 +/- 2.11 vs. 24.84 +/- 1.18 mmol/l; P < 0.01), and [H(+)] was significantly (P < 0.01) reduced (42.79 +/- 3.38 nmol/l vs. 46.44 +/- 3.51 nmol/l). This shift (P < 0.01) was also present during both bouts of exercise. During cycling at 40% of Vo(2 max), no significant effect of the preexercise alkalosis on the magnitude of tau(1) was found. However, during cycling at 87% of Vo(2 max), the tau(1) calculated by all six approaches was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced, compared with the control study. The tau(1) calculated as in Borrani et al. (Borrani F, Candau R, Millet GY, Perrey S, Fuchsloscher J, and Rouillon JD. J Appl Physiol 90: 2212-2220, 2001) was reduced on average by 7.9 +/- 2.6 s, which was significantly different from zero with both the Student's t-test (P = 0.011) and the Wilcoxon's signed-ranks test (P = 0.014).

  10. Incidence of hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats with and without nasogastric tubes over a period of up to 36 hours in the intensive care unit.

    Chih, Annie; Rudloff, Elke; Waldner, Cheryl; Linklater, Andrew K J

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the incidence of hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis (HCMA) in dogs and cats in the ICU that had intermittent nasogastric tube (NGT) aspiration for up to 36 hours. Prospective cohort study (December 2013 to October 2014). Privately owned emergency and referral teaching hospital. Forty-nine client-owned dogs and 16 client-owned cats. Patients wherein NGT placement was recommended and client consent was obtained were included in the interventional group. Those with an NGT placed (NGT group) had the NGT aspirated every 4 hours. Patients for whom placement of a NGT was declined by the owner served as a reference group (NoNGT). Venous blood gas and electrolyte values were obtained every 12 hours. Thirty-five dogs and cats had an NGT placed. Thirty dogs and cats did not have an NGT placed. The serum venous blood gas and electrolyte changes were compared over time within the NGT group and between the NGT and NoNGT groups. No cases developed HCMA. In the NGT group, blood pH increased over time. There was no significant difference between the NGT and the NoNGT group in the average value of pH, HCO 3 - , base excess, chloride, or corrected chloride. Serum venous blood gas, chloride, and corrected chloride changes were not associated with the volumes of gastric fluid aspirated over time. In this small population of dogs and cats, intermittent NGT aspiration was not associated with the development of HCMA over a period of up to 36 hours after NGT placement. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2018.

  11. Acute respiratory acidosis and alkalosis – A modern quantitative interpretation

    Andraž Stožer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three different approaches for assessing the acid-base status of a patient exist, i.e. the Boston, Copenhagen, and Stewart´s approach, and they employ different parameters to assess a given acid-base disturbance. Students, researchers, and clinicians are getting confused by heated debates about which of these performs best and by the fact that during their curricula, they typically get acquainted with one of the approaches only, which prevents them to understand sources employing other approaches and to critically evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In this paper, the authors introduce and define the basic parameters characterizing each of the approaches and point out differences and similarities between them. Special attention is devoted to how the different approaches assess the degree of change in the concentration of plasma bicarbonate that occurs during primary respiratory changes; proper understanding of these is necessary to correctly interpret chronic respiratory and metabolic acid-base changes.Conclusion: During acute respiratory acidosis the concentration of bicarbonate rises and during acute respiratory alkalosis it falls, depending on the buffering strength of non-bicarbonate buffers. During acute respiratory acid-base disturbances, buffer base (employed by the Copenhagen approach, apparent and effective strong ion difference, as well as strong ion gap (employed by the Stewart approach remain unchanged; the anion gap (employed by the Boston and Copenhagen approach falls during acute respiratory acidosis and rises during acute respiratory alkalosis.

  12. A case report of uncompensated alkalosis induced by daily plasmapheresis in a patient with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Nagai, Yoshiko; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Mizutani, Mayuko; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Yumura, Wako; Tsuchiya, Ken; Nitta, Kosaku

    2008-02-01

    Plasmapheresis (PP) is widely known as the standard therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). Citrate is used as an anticoagulant in fresh frozen plasma, and the large amount of citrate infused during PP induces metabolic alkalosis. A 29-year-old woman was diagnosed with TTP associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, and was treated by daily PP in addition to a steroid, an immunosuppressant, vincristine, and cyclophosphamide. Uncompensated alkalosis caused by a combination of metabolic and respiratory alkalosis developed after artificial ventilation was discontinued. Her metabolic status improved after controlling her respiratory status and the activity of the TTP. Metabolic alkalosis is a common complication in TTP patients treated by frequent PP, but several factors that affect metabolic status may aggravate the alkalosis and induce uncompensated alkalosis.

  13. Metformin-associated respiratory alkalosis.

    Bryant, Sean M; Cumpston, Kirk; Lipsky, Martin S; Patel, Nirali; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2004-01-01

    We present an 84-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, and bladder cancer who presented to the emergency department after the police found him disoriented and confused. Metformin therapy began 3 days before, and he denied any overdose or suicidal ideation. Other daily medications included glipizide, fluticasone, prednisone, aspirin, furosemide, insulin, and potassium supplements. In the emergency department, his vital signs were significant for hypertension (168/90), tachycardia (120 bpm), and Kussmaul respirations at 24 breaths per minute. Oxygen saturation was 99% on room air, and a fingerstick glucose was 307 mg/dL. He was disoriented to time and answered questions slowly. Metformin was discontinued, and by day 3, the patient's vital signs and laboratory test results normalized. He has been asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up visits. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis is a well-known phenomenon. Respiratory alkalosis may be an early adverse event induced by metformin prior to the development of lactic acidosis.

  14. Respiratory alkalosis in children with febrile seizures.

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Hauck, Sarah; Henning, Stephan; Grüters-Kieslich, Annette; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kaila, Kai

    2011-11-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common type of convulsive events in children. FS are suggested to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying FS remain unclear. Using an animal model of experimental FS, it was demonstrated that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis with consequent brain alkalosis and seizures. Here we examine the acid-base status of children who were admitted to the hospital for FS. Children who were admitted because of gastroenteritis (GE), a condition known to promote acidosis, were examined to investigate a possible protective effect of acidosis against FS. We enrolled 433 age-matched children with similar levels of fever from two groups presented to the emergency department. One group was admitted for FS (n = 213) and the other for GE (n = 220). In the FS group, the etiology of fever was respiratory tract infection (74.2%), otitis media (7%), GE (7%), tonsillitis (4.2%), scarlet fever (2.3%) chickenpox (1.4%), urinary tract infection (1.4%), postvaccination reaction (0.9%), or unidentified (1.4%). In all patients, capillary pH and blood Pco(2) were measured immediately on admission to the hospital. Respiratory alkalosis was found in children with FS (pH 7.46 ± 0.04, [mean ± standard deviation] Pco(2) 29.5 ± 5.5 mmHg), whereas a metabolic acidosis was seen in all children admitted for GE (pH 7.31 ± 0.03, Pco(2) 37.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p respiratory alkalosis, irrespective of the severity of the underlying infection as indicated by the level of fever. The lack of FS in GE patients is attributable to low pH, which also explains the fact that children with a susceptibility to FS do not have seizures when they have GE-induced fever that is associated with acidosis. The present demonstration of a close link between FS and respiratory alkalosis may pave the way for further clinical studies and attempts to design novel therapies for the treatment of FS by controlling the

  15. Uteroplacental blood flow during alkalosis in the sheep

    Buss, D.D.; Bisgard, G.E.; Rawlings, C.A.; Rankin, J.H.G.

    1975-01-01

    Uteroplacental blood flow was measured by the radioactive-microsphere technique in eight near-term pregnant ewes during a normal control period and during maternal metabolic alkalosis. All measurements were made on awake, unanesthetized animals. Alkalosis, defined for this study as an arterial pH of 7.60 or greater, was produced by the oral administration of sodium bicarbonate, 3 g/kg body wt. The rise in pH thus produced was unaccompanied by significant changes in systemic arterial blood pressure and cardiac output, while maternal arterial P/sub CO 2 / rose slightly from control levels. Cotyledonary blood flow declined from a control value of 1.177 ml/min to 1.025 ml/min during alkalosis. This decline of 13 percent in cotyledonary blood flow is significant (P less than 0.02). Blood flow to the remaining uterine tissue, or noncotyledonary uterus, did not change with alkalosis, being maintained at approximately 195 ml/min. It is concluded that maternal alkalosis, unaccompanied by major changes in P /sub CO 2 / and systemic arterial pressure, causes a small increase in the resistance of the uteroplacental circulation

  16. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Chronic pancreatitis, metabolic bone disease, osteomalacia, osteopenia ... with malabsorption, and endocrine dysfunction results in diabetes .... of insufficiency and deficiency were not assessed separately due ...

  17. Chronic mesenteric volvulus in a dog

    Spevakow, Andrea B.; Nibblett, Belle Marie D.; Carr, Anthony P.; Linn, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    A chronic, partial mesenteric volvulus was found on laparotomy of an adult Bernese mountain dog with a 4-month history of intermittent vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. The dog had elevated cholestatic and hepatocellular leakage enzymes, increased bile acids, azotemia, isosthenuria, and a hypokalemic, hypochloremic, metabolic alkalosis. The dog recovered fully following reduction of the volvulus. PMID:20357947

  18. Evaluation and treatment of respiratory alkalosis.

    Palmer, Biff F

    2012-11-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is the most frequent acid-base disturbance encountered in clinical practice. This is particularly true in critically ill patients, for whom the degree of hypocapnia directly correlates with adverse outcomes. Although this acid-base disturbance often is considered benign, evidence suggests that the alkalemia of primary hypocapnia can cause clinically significant decreases in tissue oxygen delivery. Mild respiratory alkalosis often serves as a marker of an underlying disease and may not require therapeutic intervention. In contrast, severe respiratory alkalosis should be approached with a sense of urgency and be aggressively corrected. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactate metabolism in chronic liver disease

    Jeppesen, Johanne B; Mortensen, Christian; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Background. In the healthy liver there is a splanchnic net-uptake of lactate caused by gluconeogenesis. It has previously been shown that patients with acute liver failure in contrast have a splanchnic release of lactate caused by a combination of accelerated glycolysis in the splanchnic region...... and a reduction in hepatic gluconeogenesis. Aims. The aims of the present study were to investigate lactate metabolism and kinetics in patients with chronic liver disease compared with a control group with normal liver function. Methods. A total of 142 patients with chronic liver disease and 14 healthy controls...... underwent a liver vein catheterization. Blood samples from the femoral artery and the hepatic and renal veins were simultaneously collected before and after stimulation with galactose. Results. The fasting lactate levels, both in the hepatic vein and in the femoral artery, were higher in the patients than...

  20. Tetany: quantitative interrelationships between calcium and alkalosis.

    Edmondson, J W; Brashear, R E; Li, T K

    1975-04-01

    Tetany occurs with hypocalcemia and alkalosis or both. The interrelationship of calcium and acid-base balance necessary for inducing tetany, the role of the central nervous system, and the rate of development of hypocalcemia have been investigated. Tetany occurred in less than 50 percent of one group of dogs made alkalotic by hyperventilation or made hypocalcemic by infusion of ethylene glycol-bis(beta-amino ethyl ether) N, N'-tetraacetate. In contrast, hypocalcemia combined with hypocapnic alkalosis always produced tetany. Slowly evolving hypocalcemia was achieved inanother group of dogs by thyroparathyroidectomy, and tetany was induced postoperatively by hypocapnic alkalosis. An identical relationship between serum calcium ion concentration and arterial pH or CO2 tension was found in both groups. Tetany could not be related to the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) calcium ion content in either group. Hypocalcemia and alkalosis are therefore coparticipants in the development of tetany and are independent of the rate of development of hypocalcemia and of CSF calcium ion concentration. The importance of alkalosis in tetany with hypoparathyroidism is emphasized.

  1. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  2. Time course of hemolysis in respiratory alkalosis

    A. Babaknia

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood pH and plasma hemoglobin concentration were measured in dog undergoing hyperventilation with or without 6 %CO 2. Blood pH rose in the first minutes in the alkalotic group and hemolysis appeared mostly during second hour after alkalosis was established. It increased gradually during the following hours of hyperventilation. No hemolysis was observed in the group undergoing hyperventilation with 6% C02. It is concluded thal hemolysis is unrelated to mechanical action of hyperventilatroi n and in due to alkalosis. the possible cause of hemo lysis and related Iitrature is discussed.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Renal Disease

    Vaia D. Raikou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS on kidneys is related to many complications. We aimed to assess the association between MetS and chronic renal disease defined by a poor estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and/or the presence of microalbuminuria/macroalbuminuria. Methods: 149 patients (77 males/72 females were enrolled in the study. Chronic renal disease was defined according to KDIGO 2012 criteria based on eGFR category and classified albuminuria. MetS was studied as a dichotomous variable (0 to 5 components including hypertension, waist circumference, low HDL-cholesterol, high triglycerides, and high glucose. Results: The association between clustering MetS and both classified eGFR and classified albuminuria (x2 = 50.3, p = 0.001 and x2 = 26.9, p = 0.003 respectively was found to be significant. The MetS presence showed an odds 5.3-fold (1.6–17.8 higher for low eGFR and 3.2-fold (1.2–8.8 higher for albuminuria in combination with the presence of diabetes mellitus, which also increased the risk for albuminuria by 3.5-fold (1.1–11.3. Albuminuria was significantly associated with high triglycerides, hypertension, high glucose (x2 = 11.8, p = 0.003, x2 = 11.4, p = 0.003 and x2 = 9.1, p = 0.01 respectively, and it was mildly associated with a low HDL-C (x2 = 5.7, p = 0.06. A significant association between classified eGFR and both high triglycerides and hypertension (x2 = 9.7, p = 0.04 and x2 = 16.1, p = 0.003 respectively was found. Conclusion: The clustering of MetS was significantly associated with chronic renal disease defined by both classified eGFR and albuminuria. The definition of impaired renal function by classified albuminuria was associated with more MetS components rather than the evaluation of eGFR category. MetS may contribute to the manifestation of albuminuria in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  4. [An unexpected stage of alkalosis in the dynamics of the early posthemorrhagic period].

    Beliaev, A V

    2000-01-01

    A study was made on acid-base metabolism in early posthemorrhagic period as exemplified by examination of patients presenting with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It has been ascertained that hemorrhage is accompanied by a mixed variant of the acid-base state (ABS) deviation, namely metabolic lactate-acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. In the time-related course of posthemorrhagic period such deviations persist in patients with lethal outcome; with the disease running a favourable course the above deviations are found to return to normal quite soon. The development of complications leads to staging in ABC, its stages being as follows: stage I--the initial stage, stage II--persisting metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis, stage III--alkalosis, stage IV--normalization, with stage III of ABS being encouraged by hypocapnia caused by function disorders of the lungs in early posthemorrhagic period, normalization of cell metabolism, increase in the rate of urination as a reflection of the third earlier identified stage of water metabolism, with the H+ excretion in the urine at the previous level. The identified ABS stage III threatens coming trouble, being accompanied by metabolic deviations together with a risk of function disorder of the myocardium.

  5. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Siener, Roswitha

    2018-04-20

    Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid⁻base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8⁻1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  6. Dietary Treatment of Metabolic Acidosis in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Roswitha Siener

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease and reduced glomerular filtration rate are risk factors for the development of chronic metabolic acidosis. The prevention or correction of chronic metabolic acidosis has been found to slow progression of chronic kidney disease. Dietary composition can strongly affect acid–base balance. Major determinants of net endogenous acid production are the generation of large amounts of hydrogen ions, mostly by animal-derived protein, which is counterbalanced by the metabolism of base-producing foods like fruits and vegetables. Alkali therapy of chronic metabolic acidosis can be achieved by providing an alkali-rich diet or oral administration of alkali salts. The primary goal of dietary treatment should be to increase the proportion of fruits and vegetables and to reduce the daily protein intake to 0.8–1.0 g per kg body weight. Diet modifications should begin early, i.e., even in patients with moderate kidney impairment, because usual dietary habits of many developed societies contribute an increased proportion of acid equivalents due to the high intake of protein from animal sources.

  7. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis | Hari Kumar ...

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP. Materials and Methods: ...

  8. [Chronic mild inflammation links obesity, metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis and diabetes].

    Andel, M; Polák, J; Kraml, P; Dlouhý, P; Stich, V

    2009-01-01

    Chronic low grade inflammation is relatively new concept in metabolic medicine. This concept describes the relations between the inflammation and adipose tissue, insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Macrophages and lymphocytes deposed in adipose tissue produce proinflammatory cytokines which directly or through the CRP liver secretion are targeting endothelial cells, hepatocytes and beta cells of Langerhans islets of pancreas. The dysfunction of these cells follows often further disturbances and in case of beta cells - the cell death. The connection between the adipose tissue insulin resistence, atherosclerosis and type 2 diabetes was earlier described with endocrine and metabolic descriptors. The concept of chronic low grade inflammation creates also another description of multilateral connections in metabolic syndome. The salicylates and the drugs related to them seem to have some glucose lowering properties. The recent development in the field ofchronic low grade inflammation represents also certain therapeutic hope for antiinflammatory intervention in type 2 diabetes.

  9. Dietary fatty acids linking postprandial metabolic response and chronic diseases.

    Ortega, Almudena; Varela, Lourdes M; Bermudez, Beatriz; Lopez, Sergio; Abia, Rocio; Muriana, Francisco J G

    2012-01-01

    Chronic diseases are by far one of the main causes of mortality in the world. One of the current global recommendations to counteract disability and premature death resulting from chronic diseases is to decrease the consumption of energy-dense high-fat diets, particularly those rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA). The most effective replacement for SFA in terms of risk factor outcomes for chronic disease are polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA). The biochemical basis for healthy benefits of such a dietary pattern has been widely evaluated under fasting conditions. However, the increasing amount of data available from multiple studies suggest that the postprandial state, i.e., "the period that comprises and follows a meal", plays an important, yet underappreciated, role in the genesis of numerous pathological conditions. In this review, the potential of MUFA, PUFA, and SFA to postprandially affect selected metabolic abnormalities related to chronic diseases is discussed.

  10. Effect of chronic renal failure with metabolic acidosis on alanine metabolism in isolated liver cells

    Cano, N.; Sturm, J. M.; Meijer, A. J.; El-Mir, M. Y.; Novaretti, R.; Reynier, J. P.; Leverve, X. M.

    2004-01-01

    Background Et aims: Decreased ureagenesis and gluconeogenesis from atanine have been reported during chronic renal failure in rat. This study addressed the respective roles of plasma-membrane transport and intracellular metabolism in these abnormalities of alanine pathways. Methods: In hepatocytes

  11. Chronic alcoholism-mediated metabolic disorders in albino rat testes.

    Shayakhmetova, Ganna M; Bondarenko, Larysa B; Matvienko, Anatoliy V; Kovalenko, Valentina M

    2014-09-01

    There is good evidence for impairment of spermatogenesis and reductions in sperm counts and testosterone levels in chronic alcoholics. The mechanisms for these effects have not yet been studied in detail. The consequences of chronic alcohol consumption on the structure and/or metabolism of testis cell macromolecules require to be intensively investigated. The present work reports the effects of chronic alcoholism on contents of free amino acids, levels of cytochrome P450 3A2 (CYP3A2) mRNA expression and DNA fragmentation, as well as on contents of different cholesterol fractions and protein thiol groups in rat testes. Wistar albino male rats were divided into two groups: I - control (intact animals), II - chronic alcoholism (15% ethanol self-administration during 150 days). Following 150 days of alcohol consumption, testicular free amino acid content was found to be significantly changed as compared with control. The most profound changes were registered for contents of lysine (-53%) and methionine (+133%). The intensity of DNA fragmentation in alcohol-treated rat testes was considerably increased, on the contrary CYP3A2 mRNA expression in testis cells was inhibited, testicular contents of total and etherified cholesterol increased by 25% and 45% respectively, and protein SH-groups decreased by 13%. Multidirectional changes of the activities of testicular dehydrogenases were detected. We thus obtained complex assessment of chronic alcoholism effects in male gonads, affecting especially amino acid, protein, ATP and NADPH metabolism. Our results demonstrated profound changes in testes on the level of proteome and genome. We suggest that the revealed metabolic disorders can have negative implication on cellular regulation of spermatogenesis under long-term ethanol exposure.

  12. Cerebral circulation and metabolism with recovery of chronic poststroke aphasia

    Yamada, Tomoyuki; Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Michitaka; Hibino, Hiroaki; Kamimoto, Kaoru; Fukagawa, Kazutoshi

    2004-01-01

    The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the particular brain areas responsible for poststroke aphasia are necessary for recovery. This study was undertaken to investigate changes in cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism corresponding to improvement of aphasia. Twenty-nine right-handed chronic aphasic patients with left hemispheric stroke were studied. Aphasia was evaluated as the score of fluency, comprehension, repetition and naming by the Western Aphasia Battery (Japanese version). Concurrent with the evaluation of aphasia, positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed. After several months of speech therapy, PET scans and evaluation of aphasia were reperformed. Both regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, and in the left upper inferior frontal gyrus in the fair recovery group for comprehension, repetition and naming. In the fair recovery group for fluency, the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen significantly increased in the left upper superior and middle temporal gyri, but regional cerebral blood flow increased insignificantly in these areas. In the lower white matter of the right parietal lobe, both the regional cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen were significantly increased in the fair recovery group for all aphasic features. The recruitment of cerebral circulation and oxygen metabolism in the left temporo-parietal area, in the left inferior frontal area, and in the right deep parietal area are essentially responsible for the recovery of aphasia. (author)

  13. Exaggerated compensatory response to acute respiratory alkalosis in panic disorder is induced by increased lactic acid production.

    Ueda, Yoshiyasu; Aizawa, Masayo; Takahashi, Atsushi; Fujii, Masamitsu; Isaka, Yoshitaka

    2009-03-01

    In acute respiratory alkalosis, the severity of alkalaemia is ameliorated by a decrease in plasma [HCO(3)(-)] of 0.2 mEq/L for each 1 mmHg decrease in PaCO(2). Although hyperventilation in panic disorder patients is frequently encountered in outpatients, the drop in plasma [HCO(3)(-)] sometimes surpasses the expectation calculated from the above formula. The quantitative relationship between reduced PaCO(2) and plasma [HCO(3)(-)] in acute respiratory alkalosis has not been studied in panic disorder patients. Our objective was to provide reference data for the compensatory metabolic changes in acute respiratory alkalosis in panic disorder patients. In 34 panic disorder patients with hyperventilation attacks, we measured arterial pH, PaCO(2), plasma [HCO(3)(-)] and lactate on arrival at the emergency room. For each decrease of 1 mmHg in PaCO(2), plasma [HCO(3)(-)] decreased by 0.41 mEq/L. During hypocapnia, panic disorder patients exhibited larger increases in serum lactate levels (mean +/- SD; 2.59 +/- 1.50 mmol/L, range; 0.78-7.78 mmol/L) than previously reported in non-panic disorder subjects. Plasma lactate accumulation was correlated with PaCO(2) (P respiratory alkalosis is exaggerated by increased lactic acid production in panic disorder patients. Here, we call attention to the diagnosis of acid-base derangements by means of plasma [HCO(3)(-)] and lactate concentration in panic disorder patients.

  14. Acid-Base and Electrolyte Disorders in Patients with and without Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update.

    Dhondup, Tsering; Qian, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Kidneys play a pivotal role in the maintenance and regulation of acid-base and electrolyte homeostasis, which is the prerequisite for numerous metabolic processes and organ functions in the human body. Chronic kidney diseases compromise the regulatory functions, resulting in alterations in electrolyte and acid-base balance that can be life-threatening. In this review, we discuss the renal regulations of electrolyte and acid-base balance and several common disorders including metabolic acidosis, alkalosis, dysnatremia, dyskalemia, and dysmagnesemia. Common disorders in chronic kidney disease are also discussed. The most recent and relevant advances on pathophysiology, clinical characteristics, diagnosis, and management of these conditions have been incorporated.

  15. Hepatic folate metabolism in the chronic alcoholic monkey

    Tamura, T.; Romero, J.J.; Watson, J.E.; Gong, E.J.; Halsted, C.H.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the role of altered hepatic folate metabolism in the pathogenesis of the folate deficiency of chronic alcoholism, the hepatic metabolism of a tracer dose of 3 H-PteGlu was compared in monkeys given 50% of energy as ethanol for 2 years and in control monkeys. Long-term ethanol feeding resulted in mild hepatic injury, with a significant decrease in hepatic folate levels. Chromatographic studies of liver biopsies obtained after the tracer dose indicated that the processes of reduction, methylation, and formylation of reduced folate and the synthesis of polyglutamyl folates were not affected by long-term ethanol feeding. Hepatic tritium levels were significantly decreased in the ethanol-fed group. These studies suggest that the decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decrease in hepatic folate levels observed after long-term ethanol ingestion is due to a decreased ability to retain folates in the liver, whereas reduction and further metabolism of folates is not affected

  16. Metabolic Disturbances in Children with Chronic Liver Disease

    A Rezaeian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Liver disease results in complex pathophysiologic disturbances affecting nutrient digestion, absorption, distribution, storage, and use. This article aimed to present a classification of metabolic disturbances in chronic liver disease in children?   Materials and Methods: In this review study databases including proquest, pubmedcentral, scincedirect, ovid, medlineplus were been searched with keyword words such as” chronic liver disease"  ” metabolic disorder””children” between 1999 to 2014. Finally, 8 related articles have been found.   Results: Metabolic disorder in this population could be categorized in four set: 1carbohydrates, 2proteins,3 fats and 4vitamins. 1 Carbohydrates: Children with CLD are at increased risk for fasting hypoglycemia, because the capacity for glycogen storage and gluconeogenesis is reduced as a result of abnormal hepatocyte function and loss of hepatocyte mass. 2 Proteins: The liver’s capacity for plasma protein synthesis is impaired by reduced substrate availability, impaired hepatocyte function, and increased catabolism. This results in hypoalbuminemia, leading to peripheral edema and contributing to ascites. Reduced synthesis of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and its binding protein IGF-BP3 by the chronically diseased liver results in growth hormone resistance and may contribute to the poor growth observed in these children. 3 Fats: There is increased fat oxidation in children with end-stage liver disease in the fed and fasting states compared with controls, which is probably related to reduced carbohydrate availability. The increased lipolysis results in a decrease in fat stores, which may not be easily replenished in the setting of the fat malabsorption that accompanies cholestasis. Reduced bile delivery to the gut results in impaired fat emulsification, and hence digestion. The products of fat digestion are also poorly absorbed, because bile is also required for micelle formation

  17. Hyperthermic-induced hyperventilation and associated respiratory alkalosis in humans.

    Abbiss, Chris R; Nosaka, Kazunori; Laursen, Paul B

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if increased environmental heat leads to hyperthermic-induced hypocapnia and associated alkalosis during prolonged self-paced cycling. Nine male cyclists completed three 100 km stochastic time trials in hot (34 degrees C), neutral (22 degrees C) and cold (10 degrees C) environments. Intermittent measurements of rectal and skin temperature, expired gases, blood pH, PaCO(2), PaO(2), and bicarbonate were made throughout. Rectal temperature increased significantly throughout all trials (P respiratory alkalosis.

  18. Hepcidin: an important iron metabolism regulator in chronic kidney disease

    Sandra Azevedo Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production. The elevation of hepcidin has been associated with infection, inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Some strategies were tested to reduce the effects of hepcidin in patients with CKD, however more studies are necessary to assess the impact of its modulation in the management of anemia in this population.

  19. Interrelationship of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling pathways in chronic metabolic diseases.

    Ackers, Ian; Malgor, Ramiro

    2018-01-01

    Chronic diseases account for approximately 45% of all deaths in developed countries and are particularly prevalent in countries with the most sophisticated and robust public health systems. Chronic metabolic diseases, specifically lifestyle-related diseases pertaining to diet and exercise, continue to be difficult to treat clinically. The most prevalent of these chronic metabolic diseases include obesity, diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease and will be the focus of this review. Wnt proteins are highly conserved glycoproteins best known for their role in development and homeostasis of tissues. Given the importance of Wnt signalling in homeostasis, aberrant Wnt signalling likely regulates metabolic processes and may contribute to the development of chronic metabolic diseases. Expression of Wnt proteins and dysfunctional Wnt signalling has been reported in multiple chronic diseases. It is interesting to speculate about an interrelationship between the Wnt signalling pathways as a potential pathological mechanism in chronic metabolic diseases. The aim of this review is to summarize reported findings on the contrasting roles of Wnt signalling in lifestyle-related chronic metabolic diseases; specifically, the contribution of Wnt signalling to lipid accumulation, fibrosis and chronic low-grade inflammation.

  20. Bone metabolism of male rats chronically exposed to cadmium

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M.; Moniuszko-Jakoniuk, Janina

    2005-01-01

    Recently, based on a female rat model of human exposure, we have reported that low-level chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) has an injurious effect on the skeleton. The purpose of the current study was to investigate whether the exposure may also affect bone metabolism in a male rat model and to estimate the gender-related differences in the bone effect of Cd. Young male Wistar rats received drinking water containing 0, 1, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 12 months. The bone effect of Cd was evaluated using bone densitometry and biochemical markers of bone turnover. Renal handling of calcium (Ca) and phosphate, and serum concentrations of vitamin D metabolites, calcitonin, and parathormone were estimated as well. At treatment with 1 mg Cd/l, corresponding to the low environmental exposure in non-Cd-polluted areas, the bone mineral content (BMC) and density (BMD) at the femur and lumbar spine (L1-L5) and the total skeleton BMD did not differ compared to control. However, from the 6th month of the exposure, the Z score BMD indicated osteopenia in some animals and after 12 months the bone resorption very clearly tended to an increase. The rats' exposure corresponding to human moderate (5 mg Cd/l) and especially relatively high (50 mg Cd/l) exposure dose- and duration-dependently disturbed the processes of bone turnover and bone mass accumulation leading to formation of less dense than normal bone tissue. The effects were accompanied by changes in the serum concentration of calciotropic hormones and disorders in Ca and phosphate metabolism. It can be concluded that low environmental exposure to Cd may be only a subtle risk factor for skeletal demineralization in men. The results together with our previous findings based on an analogous model using female rats give clear evidence that males are less vulnerable to the bone effects of Cd compared to females

  1. Association of metabolic syndrome and chronic periodontitis in Colombians.

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Contreras, Adolfo; Lafaurie, Gloria Inés; Duque, Andrés; Ardila, Carlos Martín; Duarte, Silvia; Osorio, Lyda

    2017-06-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a common chronic condition that increases the cardiovascular disease risk and is also linked to periodontitis. The study aim was to determine if a relationship exists between MetS and chronic periodontitis in adult Colombians. Participants were 220 healthy-gingivitis subjects and 431 periodontitis patients coming from the three largest Colombian cities. Periodontal status and MetS were determined in subjects. Univariate analysis and odds ratio were calculated within the 95 % confidence intervals and chi 2 test compared the groups. Variables were compared among the clinical periodontal groups and MetS by Wilcoxon and multivariate analysis, and logistic regression was performed for MetS and periodontitis. MetS had higher prevalence in periodontitis group (6.3 %) versus controls (3.2 %). In multivariate analysis, periodontitis was associated with MetS (adjusted OR = 2.72, 95 % CI 1.09-6.79), glucose intolerance with another component of MetS (adjusted OR = 1.78, 1.16 to 2.72), glucose resistance (adjusted OR = 11.46, 95 % CI 1.41-92.88), smoking (OR = 1.72, 95 % CI 1.09-2.71), and city of origin (2.69, 95 % CI 1.79-4.04). The study confirmed the positive association between MetS and periodontitis, being glucose sensitivity the strongly associated component. MetS must be taken into account by the dentist when evaluating risk factors for periodontitis, being useful for dentists to evaluate glycemia, lipidic profile, central obesity, and high blood pressure in patients. Interdisciplinary treatment must be recommended when a patient with MetS and periodontitis is being treated.

  2. Prevalence of chronic kidney disease in adults with metabolic syndrome

    P C Emem-Chioma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD and other non- communicable diseases continues to rise globally, and recent studies suggest that metabolic syndrome (MS may add to this burden by contributing to the development of CKD. Given that reports on the prevalence of CKD in patients with MS in this environment are scanty, this study was undertaken with the sole aim of determining the prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS as defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF and the National Cholesterol Education Project Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III. A total of 240 consenting adults (18-70 years attending the general out- patient clinic of the General Hospital Okrika for various ailments were studied. Subjects were screened for MS as per the above- mentioned criteria. Estimated GFR (eGFR was determined with Modification of Diet for Renal Disease (MDRD formula and CKD was defined as eGFR less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 . Data was analyzed using SPSS version 12.0 and Epi info version 4.06d; P 0.05. CKD was more common in subjects with MS compared with those without, although the difference was not statistically significant. The prevalence of CKD in subjects with MS in our study population did not differ significantly when the different MS definitions were employed.

  3. Cardiorenal metabolic syndrome in the African diaspora: rationale for including chronic kidney disease in the metabolic syndrome definition.

    Lea, Janice P; Greene, Eddie L; Nicholas, Susanne B; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is more likely to progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans while the reasons for this are unclear. The metabolic syndrome is a risk factor for the development of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and has been recently linked to incident CKD. Historically, fewer African Americans meet criteria for the definition of metabolic syndrome, despite having higher rates of cardiovascular mortality than Caucasians. The presence of microalbuminuria portends increased cardiovascular risks and has been shown to cluster with the metabolic syndrome. We recently reported that proteinuria is a predictor of CKD progression in African American hypertensives with metabolic syndrome. In this review we explore the potential value of including CKD markers--microalbuminuria/proteinuria or low glomerular filtration rate (GFR)-in refining the cluster of factors defined as metabolic syndrome, ie, "cardiorenal metabolic syndrome."

  4. Study of bone metabolism in patients with chronic HIV infection.

    Coaccioli, S; Del Giorno, R; Crapa, G; Sabatini, C; Panaccione, A; Di Cato, L; Lavagna, A; Fatati, G; Paladini, A; Frongillo, R; Puxeddu, A

    2009-01-01

    Various studies have confirmed the high incidence of skeletal homeostasis modifications in subjects who are carriers of chronic HIV infections, and specific pharmacological treatments, which modify the metabolism and condition both the weight loss and the reshaping of the bones. The presence of a reduction in body mass index seems to contribute to the progressive deterioration of the skeletal framework. The aim of this study was to see whether the presence of HIV-seropositivity could constitute a risk factor for the development of osteoporosis/osteopenia, even in the light of the fact that our group was composed of patients with a concentrated age span well under the limit for both post-menopausal and senile osteoporosis, and with a median age superimposable for both sexes. Our study involved 26 HIV+ patients with an average duration of infection equal to 6.7 +/- 4.8 years, and a range of seropositive duration between 6 months to 16 years. The prominent ultrasonometrical parameters are as follows: Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation, Speed of Sound, Stiffness Index or Quantitative Ultra-sound Index, Bone Mineral Density, and T-score. The biochemical study was carried out by assessing a marker of neoformation such as seric osteocalcine, and uninary pyridinoline and deoxipyridonoline as resorption markers. The results confirmed the presence of osteoporosis/osteopenia in 46% of the samples (11%, and 35%, respectively), with a progressive reduction in bone mineral density in relation to the duration of HIV infection. Assessment of the marker for bone metabolism showed a significant increase in osteocalcine in the female population compared to the males, without any significant variations in the normal values. Extreme variability in the morphological appearance at bone level during the course of HIV infection would lead us to believe that in the genesis of various forms, depending on the mechanisms and the time involved only in the parts defined, other attributable factors

  5. Pulmonary vascular responses during acute and sustained respiratory alkalosis or acidosis in intact newborn piglets.

    Gordon, J B; Rehorst-Paea, L A; Hoffman, G M; Nelin, L D

    1999-12-01

    Acute alkalosis-induced pulmonary vasodilation and acidosis-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction have been well described, but responses were generally measured within 5-30 min of changing pH. In contrast, several in vitro studies have found that relatively brief periods of sustained alkalosis can enhance, and sustained acidosis can decrease, vascular reactivity. In this study of intact newborn piglets, effects of acute (20 min) and sustained (60-80 min) alkalosis or acidosis on baseline (35% O2) and hypoxic (12% O2) pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were compared with control piglets exposed only to eucapnia. Acute alkalosis decreased hypoxic PVR, but sustained alkalosis failed to attenuate either baseline PVR or the subsequent hypoxic response. Acute acidosis did not significantly increase hypoxic PVR, but sustained acidosis markedly increased both baseline PVR and the subsequent hypoxic response. Baseline PVR was similar in all piglets after resumption of eucapnic ventilation, but the final hypoxic response was greater in piglets previously exposed to alkalosis than in controls. Thus, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was not attenuated during sustained alkalosis, but was accentuated during sustained acidosis and after the resumption of eucapnia in alkalosis-treated piglets. Although extrapolation of data from normal piglets to infants and children with pulmonary hypertension must be done with caution, this study suggests that sustained alkalosis may be of limited efficacy in treating acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and the risks of pulmonary hypertension must be considered when using ventilator strategies resulting in permissive hypercapnic acidosis.

  6. Physical Activity Protects the Human Brain against Metabolic Stress Induced by a Postprandial and Chronic Inflammation

    Pruimboom, Leo; Raison, Charles L.; Muskiet, Frits A. J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, it has become clear that chronic systemic low-grade inflammation is at the root of many, if not all, typically Western diseases associated with the metabolic syndrome. While much focus has been given to sedentary lifestyle as a cause of chronic inflammation, it is less often

  7. Association between the dietary factors and metabolic syndrome with chronic kidney disease in Chinese adults

    Bi, Hui; Wu, Yiqing; Zhao, Chunjie; Long, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of study was to examine the relationship between the dietary nutrition and the prevalence and risk of renal damage in patients with metabolic syndrome. Methods: 260 patients with metabolic syndrome and chronic renal disease meeting criterion were recruited in this cross-sectional study. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to NCEP-ATPIII guidelines. Food-frequency questionnaire was performed to collect the information on dietary nutrition. Anthropometric measurements, i...

  8. Hepcidin: an important iron metabolism regulator in chronic kidney disease.

    Antunes, Sandra Azevedo; Canziani, Maria Eugênia Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production. The elevation of hepcidin has been associated with infection, inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Some strategies were tested to reduce the effects of hepcidin in patients with CKD, however more studies are necessary to assess the impact of its modulation in the management of anemia in this population. Resumo Anemia é uma complicação frequente e seu impacto na morbimortalidade é bem conhecido em pacientes com doença renal crônica (DRC). A descoberta da hepcidina e de suas funções contribuíram para melhor compreensão dos distúrbios do metabolismo de ferro na anemia da DRC. Hepcidina é um peptídeo produzido principalmente pelos hepatócitos, e através de sua ligação com a ferroportina, regula a absorção de ferro no duodeno e sua liberação das células de estoque. Altas concentrações de hepcidina descritas em pacientes com DRC, principalmente em estádios mais avançados, são atribuídas à diminuição da excreção renal e ao aumento de sua produção. Elevação de hepcidina tem sido associada à ocorrência de infecção, inflamação, aterosclerose, resistência à insulina e estresse oxidativo. Algumas estratégias foram testadas para diminuir os efeitos da hepcidina em pacientes com DRC, entretanto, serão necessários mais estudos para avaliar o impacto de sua modulação no manejo da anemia nessa população.

  9. Metabolic syndrome in hospitalized patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Evgeni Mekov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The metabolic syndrome (MS affects 21–53% of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with a higher prevalence in the early stages of COPD, with results being highly variable between studies. MS may also affect natural course of COPD—number of exacerbations, quality of life and lung function.Aim. To examine the prevalence of MS and its correlation with comorbidities and COPD characteristics in patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation.Material and methods. 152 patients with COPD admitted for exacerbation were studied for presence of MS. All of them were also assessed for vitamin D status and diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM. Data were gathered for smoking status and exacerbations during the last year. All patients completed CAT (COPD assessment test and mMRC (Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea scale questionnaires and underwent spirometry. Duration of current hospital stay was recorded.Results. 25% of patients have MS. 23.1% of the male and 29.5% of the female patients have MS (p > 0.05. The prevalence of MS in this study is significantly lower when compared to a national representative study (44.6% in subjects over 45 years. 69.1% of all patients and 97.4% from MS patients have arterial hypertension. The presence of MS is associated with significantly worse cough and sleep (1st and 7th CAT questions; p = 0.002 and p = 0.001 respectively and higher total CAT score (p = 0.017. Average BMI is 27.31. None of the patients have MS and BMI <25. There is a correlation between the presence of MS and DM (p = 0.008 and with the number of exacerbations in the last year (p = 0.015. There is no correlation between the presence of MS and the pulmonary function.Conclusion. This study among hospitalized COPD patients finds comparable but relatively low prevalence of MS (25% compared to previously published data (21–53% and lower prevalence compared to general population (44.6%. MS may impact quality of life and the

  10. Features of Mineral Metabolism and Parathyroid Glands Functioning in Chronic Renal Disease

    L.P. Martynyuk

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The calcium phosphoric metabolism was analyzed depending on the severity of renal functioning disorders. Chronic renal disease is known to be associated with impaired mineral metabolism in terms of hypocalcaemia, hyperphosphatemia and enhanced level of Ca × P product that aggravates in chronic renal failure progression. The majority of patients with nephropathy have parathyroid hormone concentration to be different from target one recommended by NKF-K/DOQI (2003, at that secondary hyperparathyroidism prevails on pre-dialysis stage of chronic renal disease, the relative hypoparathyroidism is common among the patients received dialysis.

  11. Biochemical association of metabolic profile and microbiome in chronic pressure ulcer wounds.

    Mary Cloud B Ammons

    Full Text Available Chronic, non-healing wounds contribute significantly to the suffering of patients with co-morbidities in the clinical population with mild to severely compromised immune systems. Normal wound healing proceeds through a well-described process. However, in chronic wounds this process seems to become dysregulated at the transition between resolution of inflammation and re-epithelialization. Bioburden in the form of colonizing bacteria is a major contributor to the delayed headlining in chronic wounds such as pressure ulcers. However how the microbiome influences the wound metabolic landscape is unknown. Here, we have used a Systems Biology approach to determine the biochemical associations between the taxonomic and metabolomic profiles of wounds colonized by bacteria. Pressure ulcer biopsies were harvested from primary chronic wounds and bisected into top and bottom sections prior to analysis of microbiome by pyrosequencing and analysis of metabolome using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. Bacterial taxonomy revealed that wounds were colonized predominantly by three main phyla, but differed significantly at the genus level. While taxonomic profiles demonstrated significant variability between wounds, metabolic profiles shared significant similarity based on the depth of the wound biopsy. Biochemical association between taxonomy and metabolic landscape indicated significant wound-to-wound similarity in metabolite enrichment sets and metabolic pathway impacts, especially with regard to amino acid metabolism. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a statistically robust correlation between bacterial colonization and metabolic landscape within the chronic wound environment.

  12. Associations between Zinc Deficiency and Metabolic Abnormalities in Patients with Chronic Liver Disease

    Takashi Himoto

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zinc (Zn is an essential trace element which has favorable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and apoptotic effects. The liver mainly plays a crucial role in maintaining systemic Zn homeostasis. Therefore, the occurrence of chronic liver diseases, such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, or fatty liver, results in the impairment of Zn metabolism, and subsequently Zn deficiency. Zn deficiency causes plenty of metabolic abnormalities, including insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Inversely, metabolic abnormalities like hypoalbuminemia in patients with liver cirrhosis often result in Zn deficiency. Recent studies have revealed the putative mechanisms by which Zn deficiency evokes a variety of metabolic abnormalities in chronic liver disease. Zn supplementation has shown beneficial effects on such metabolic abnormalities in experimental models and actual patients with chronic liver disease. This review summarizes the pathogenesis of metabolic abnormalities deriving from Zn deficiency and the favorable effects of Zn administration in patients with chronic liver disease. In addition, we also highlight the interactions between Zn and other trace elements, vitamins, amino acids, or hormones in such patients.

  13. The association between rehabilitation programs and metabolic syndrome in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Lai, Chien-Liang; Chan, Hung-Yu

    2017-12-02

    The correlation between different rehabilitation programs and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in people with schizophrenia is unclear. We tested the association in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia of a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan. Patients with schizophrenia and age from 20 to 65 years old were included. The criteria of metabolic syndrome were according to the adapted Adult Treatment Protocol for Asians. According to different types of rehabilitations, patients were divided into work group, occupational therapy group and daily activities group. A total of 359 chronic inpatients with schizophrenia were recruited. Participants had a mean age of 45.9 years and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 37.3%. There was a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the work group than in the daily activity group (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.019-3.564, p metabolic syndrome included old age, female gender, low psychotic symptoms severity and clozapine user. This study identified a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia especially in patients with good occupational function. Further investigation of the relationship between the occupational function and metabolic syndrome is necessary for chronic inpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metabolic syndrome criteria as predictors of insulin resistance, inflammation and mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Vogt, Barbara Perez; Souza, Priscilla L; Minicucci, Marcos Ferreira; Martin, Luis Cuadrado; Barretti, Pasqual; Caramori, Jacqueline Teixeira

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and metabolic syndrome are characterized by overlapping disorders, including glucose intolerance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and, in some cases, obesity. However, there are no specific criteria for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in CKD. Metabolic syndrome can also be associated with increased risk of mortality. Some traditional risk factors may protect dialysis patients from mortality, known as "reverse epidemiology." Metabolic syndrome might undergo reverse epidemiology. The objectives were to detect differences in frequency and metabolic characteristics associated with three sets of diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome, to evaluate the accuracy of insulin resistance (IR) and inflammation to identify patients with metabolic syndrome, and to investigate the effects of metabolic syndrome by three sets of diagnostic criteria on mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. An observational study was conducted. Diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome proposed by National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III), International Diabetes Federation (IDF), and Harmonizing the Metabolic Syndrome (HMetS) statement were applied to 98 hemodialysis patients. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 51%, 66.3%, and 75.3% according to NCEP ATP III, IDF, and HMetS criteria, respectively. Diagnosis of metabolic syndrome by HMetS was simultaneously capable of revealing both inflammation and IR, whereas NCEP ATP III and IDF criteria were only able to identify IR. Mortality risk increased in the presence of metabolic syndrome regardless of the criteria used. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in hemodialysis varies according to the diagnostic criteria used. IR and inflammation predict metabolic syndrome only when diagnosed by HMetS criteria. HMetS was the diagnostic criteria that can predict the highest risk of mortality.

  15. [Metabolic disturbances and ways of their pharmacological correction in acute poisoning with ethanol in patients with chronic alcoholism].

    Livanov, G A; Lodyagin, A N; Lubsanova, S V; Kovalenko, A L; Batotsyrenov, B V; Sergeev, O A; Loladze, A T; Andrianov, A Yu

    2015-01-01

    To study an influence of chronic alcoholism on the clinical course and severity of metabolic disturbances in patients with acute poisoning with ethanol and to improve the treatment. Authors examined 93 patients stratified into three groups (acute poisoning with ethanol in patients with chronic alcoholism, without chronic alcoholism and those treated with reamberin). The presence of chronic alcoholism significantly augmented metabolic disturbances and influenced the disturbance of oxygen-transport function and free-radical processes in patients with acute intoxication with ethanol. Using of reamberin in the complex intensive therapy led to the decrease in metabolic disorders, which improved the clinical course of acute poisoning with ethanol in patients with chronic alcoholism.

  16. Persistence of cerebral metabolic abnormalities in chronic schizophrenia as determined by positron emission tomography

    Wolkin, A.; Jaeger, J.; Brodie, J.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.; Rotrosen, J.; Gomez-Mont, F.; Cancro, R.

    1985-01-01

    Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined by positron emission tomography and the deoxyglucose method in a group of 10 chronic schizophrenic subjects before and after somatic treatment and in eight normal subjects. Before treatment, schizophrenic subjects had markedly lower absolute metabolic activity than did normal controls in both frontal and temporal regions and a trend toward relative hyperactivity in the basal ganglia area. After treatment, their metabolic rates approached those seen in normal subjects in nearly all regions except frontal. Persistence of diminished frontal metabolism was manifested as significant relative hypofrontality. These findings suggest specific loci of aberrant cerebral functioning in chronic schizophrenia and the utility of positron emission tomography in characterizing these abnormalities

  17. Water metabolism in rats subjected to chronic alcohol administration

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Pohl, C.; Bode, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: While the diuretic action of acute ingestion of alcohol has been studied extensively, the effect of chronic alcohol consumption has received less attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the balance of water intake and excretion ...... the body as hidden water loss increases after alcohol consumption by up to 25-26% over control values.......AIM: While the diuretic action of acute ingestion of alcohol has been studied extensively, the effect of chronic alcohol consumption has received less attention. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on the balance of water intake and excretion...... and certain renal functions in rats during a period of 12 months. ANIMALS AND STUDY DESIGN: Male Wistar rats received either alcohol (15% v/v; group A, n = 65) or tap water (group C, n = 35) as drinking fluid. Urine and faeces were collected from 6 rats of each group during 7 days, at monthly intervals...

  18. Genetic polymorphisms in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and chronic pancreatitis.

    Verlaan, M.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Peters, W.H.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: Alcohol misuse is now regarded as an important risk factor for development of chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, not every alcohol misuser develops CP and it therefore might be suggested that susceptibility could be further influenced by inter-individual variations in the activities of

  19. Post-hypercapnic alkalosis is associated with ventilator dependence and increased ICU stay.

    Banga, Amit; Khilnani, G C

    2009-12-01

    Posthypercapnic alkalosis (PHA) is frequently overlooked as a complication of mechanical ventilation in patients with exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current study was conducted to determine the incidence, risk factors for development and effect on outcome of PHA. Eighty-four patients (62 +/- 11 years, range 42-78 years, M:F 58: 26) with exacerbation of COPD with underlying chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation were included in a retrospective fashion. PHA was defined as static or rising serum bicarbonate levels, 72 hours or more after return of PaCO2 to baseline, with concurrent pH > 7.44. Development of PHA was noted in 17 patients (20.2%). Corticosteroid use >or=10 days during the hospital stay was an independent risk factor for development of PHA (Adjusted OR, 95% CI: 9.4, 1.6-55.3; P = 0.013). Development of PHA was associated with an increased incidence of ventilator dependence (64.7% vs. 37.3%, OR, 95% CI: 3.1, 1.1-9.4, P = 0.04) and duration of ICU stay (14.7 +/- 6.7 vs. 9.5 +/- 5.9, P = 0.01) but no increase in hospital mortality (43.3% vs. 41.2%, P = NS). It is concluded that PHA is a common complication in patients with exacerbation of COPD requiring mechanical ventilation and is associated with increased incidence of ventilator dependence and ICU stay.

  20. Metabolic fate of blueberry anthocyanins after chronic supplementation in healthy older adults

    Plant derived anthocyanin rich foods play a protective role against chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Anthocyanins are absorbed in their intact form and can be metabolized to a wide array of phenolic metabolites/conjugates. Blueberries...

  1. Adaptive changes in basal metabolic rate and thermogenesis in chronic undernutrition

    Shetty, P.S.

    1993-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation during chronic undernutrition represents a complex integration of several processes which affect the total energy expenditure of the individual. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) is reduced; reductions in BMR per unit fat free mass (FFM) is difficult to demonstrate. BMR changes in undernutrition reflect the low body weight as well as alterations in the composition of the FFM; more specifically changes in the ratio of viscera to muscle compartments of the FFM. Thermogenic responses to norepinephrine are transiently suppressed but recover rapidly on repeated stimulation. Dietary thermogenesis is enhanced possible the result of increases in tissue synthesis within the body. Changes in BMR and thermogenesis suggestive of an increase in metabolic efficiency is thus difficult to demonstrate in chronic undernutrition. (author). 15 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  2. Nucleic acid metabolism in human chronic liver disease by in vitro autoradiography. I. Altered RNA metabolism

    Yoshida, T [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-06-01

    Biopsy liver specimens from healthy control subjects (N=5) and patients with various liver diseases (N=43) were investigated by the vitro autoradiography. The Leevy technique of adding /sup 3/H-5-uridine (/sup 3/H-U) to the incubation medium was used. In healthy subjects labeling with /sup 3/H-U was observed mostly in hepatocytes and Kupffer cells and the frequency of /sup 3/H-U labeled cells was extremely high. Higher frequencies of labeled fibrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood vessel were found in acute hepatitis than in control subjects. In the active form of chronic hepatitis, significantly higher counts of labeled fibrocytes, ductular cells and lymphocytes were found. In patients with acute hepatitis or the inactive form of chronic hepatitis, only a few labeled lymphocytes were observed. Larger numbers of labeled fibrocytes were found in patients with chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, than in patients with the active form of chronic hepatitis. In cirrhotic livers, marked increases of labeled ductular cells, fibrocytes and bile duct cells were found. No significant labeling differences were observed in the hepatocytes of various liver diseases. In chronic hepatitis with sublobular hepatic necrosis, a more significant decrease of labeled Kupffer cells was present than in the inactive form of chronic hepatitis. Labeled ductular cells and fibrocytes increased as the disease progressed from acute hepatitis to liver cirrhosis. The labeling index of rosettes cells was intermediate between the hepatocytes and ductular cells. The ratio of labeled parenchymal to non-parenchymal cells decreased proportionally from chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis.

  3. Chronic treatment with olanzapine increases adiposity by changing fuel substrate and causes desensitization of the acute metabolic side effects

    Girault, Elodie M.; Guigas, Bruno; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries

    2014-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these metabolic side-effects are unknown at the moment. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes induced by a chronic

  4. Chronic treatment with olanzapine increases adiposity by changing fuel substrate and causes desensitization of the acute metabolic side effects

    Girault, Elodie M; Guigas, Bruno; Alkemade, Anneke; Foppen, Ewout; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; la Fleur, Susanne E; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, A.

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as olanzapine induce weight gain and metabolic changes associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The mechanisms underlying these metabolic side-effects are unknown at the moment. In this study, we investigated the metabolic changes induced by a chronic

  5. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease candidate gene prioritization based on metabolic networks and functional information.

    Xinyan Wang

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a multi-factor disease, in which metabolic disturbances played important roles. In this paper, functional information was integrated into a COPD-related metabolic network to assess similarity between genes. Then a gene prioritization method was applied to the COPD-related metabolic network to prioritize COPD candidate genes. The gene prioritization method was superior to ToppGene and ToppNet in both literature validation and functional enrichment analysis. Top-ranked genes prioritized from the metabolic perspective with functional information could promote the better understanding about the molecular mechanism of this disease. Top 100 genes might be potential markers for diagnostic and effective therapies.

  6. Resveratrol Ameliorates the Depressive-Like Behaviors and Metabolic Abnormalities Induced by Chronic Corticosterone Injection

    Yu-Cheng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic glucocorticoid exposure is known to cause depression and metabolic disorders. It is critical to improve abnormal metabolic status as well as depressive-like behaviors in patients with long-term glucocorticoid therapy. This study aimed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on the depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by chronic corticosterone injection. Male ICR mice were administrated corticosterone (40 mg/kg by subcutaneous injection for three weeks. Resveratrol (50 and 100 mg/kg, fluoxetine (20 mg/kg and pioglitazone (10 mg/kg were given by oral gavage 30 min prior to corticosterone administration. The behavioral tests showed that resveratrol significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by corticosterone, including the reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. Moreover, resveratrol also increased the secretion of insulin, reduced serum level of glucose and improved blood lipid profiles in corticosterone-treated mice without affecting normal mice. However, fluoxetine only reverse depressive-like behaviors, and pioglitazone only prevent the dyslipidemia induced by corticosterone. Furthermore, resveratrol and pioglitazone decreased serum level of glucagon and corticosterone. The present results indicated that resveratrol can ameliorate depressive-like behaviors and metabolic abnormalities induced by corticosterone, which suggested that the multiple effects of resveratrol could be beneficial for patients with depression and/or metabolic syndrome associated with long-term glucocorticoid therapy.

  7. Ferrokinetic Parameters and Regulation of Iron Metabolism in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    T.Y. Boiko

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Article presents parameters of iron metabolism and cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases (CIBD. The material for the study was the blood of 69 patients with CIBD and anemia and 26 — without anemia. We have studied the features of main ferrokinetic parameters — iron, total iron-binding capacity of serum, transferrin saturation, ferritin, transferrin receptor, erythropoietin, hepcidin depending on hemoglobin level and the type of anemia. The relationship of iron metabolism disorders with the level of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α is shown.

  8. A Case of Chronic Ethylene Glycol Intoxication Presenting without Classic Metabolic Derangements

    Stephanie M. Toth-Manikowski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute ethylene glycol ingestion classically presents with high anion gap acidosis, elevated osmolar gap, altered mental status, and acute renal failure. However, chronic ingestion of ethylene glycol is a challenging diagnosis that can present as acute kidney injury with subtle physical findings and without the classic metabolic derangements. We present a case of chronic ethylene glycol ingestion in a patient who presented with acute kidney injury and repeated denials of an exposure history. Kidney biopsy was critical to the elucidation of the cause of his worsening renal function.

  9. Chronic High Fat Diet Consumption Impairs Metabolic Health of Male Mice.

    Morselli, Eugenia; Criollo, Alfredo; Rodriguez-Navas, Carlos; Clegg, Deborah J

    We show that chronic high fat diet (HFD) feeding affects the hypothalamus of male but not female mice. In our study we demonstrate that palmitic acid and sphingolipids accumulate in the central nervous system of HFD-fed males. Additionally, we show that HFD-feeding reduces proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) thus reducing estrogen receptor α (ERα) and driving hypothalamic inflammation in male but not female mice. Hypothalamic inflammation correlates with markers of metabolic dysregulation as indicated by dysregulation in glucose intolerance and myocardial function. Lastly, we demonstrate that there are blockages in mitophagy and lipophagy in hypothalamic tissues in males. Our data suggest there is a sexually dimorphic response to chronic HDF exposure, females; despite gaining the same amount of body weight following HFD-feeding, appear to be protected from the adverse metabolic effects of the HFD.

  10. Chronic myeloid leukemia patients sensitive and resistant to imatinib treatment show different metabolic responses.

    Jiye A

    Full Text Available The BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib is highly effective for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, some patients gradually develop resistance to imatinib, resulting in therapeutic failure. Metabonomic and genomic profiling of patients' responses to drug interventions can provide novel information about the in vivo metabolism of low-molecular-weight compounds and extend our insight into the mechanism of drug resistance. Based on a multi-platform of high-throughput metabonomics, SNP array analysis, karyotype and mutation, the metabolic phenotypes and genomic polymorphisms of CML patients and their diverse responses to imatinib were characterized. The untreated CML patients (UCML showed different metabolic patterns from those of healthy controls, and the discriminatory metabolites suggested the perturbed metabolism of the urea cycle, tricarboxylic acid cycle, lipid metabolism, and amino acid turnover in UCML. After imatinib treatment, patients sensitive to imatinib (SCML and patients resistant to imatinib (RCML had similar metabolic phenotypes to those of healthy controls and UCML, respectively. SCML showed a significant metabolic response to imatinib, with marked restoration of the perturbed metabolism. Most of the metabolites characterizing CML were adjusted to normal levels, including the intermediates of the urea cycle and tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA. In contrast, neither cytogenetic nor metabonomic analysis indicated any positive response to imatinib in RCML. We report for the first time the associated genetic and metabonomic responses of CML patients to imatinib and show that the perturbed in vivo metabolism of UCML is independent of imatinib treatment in resistant patients. Thus, metabonomics can potentially characterize patients' sensitivity or resistance to drug intervention.

  11. [Corticotropic axis and chronic stress in abdominal obesity and metabolic syndrome].

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Verger, P; Bocquier, A; Oliver, C

    2005-12-03

    Several indicators of corticotropic axis hyperactivity have been observed in common abdominal obesity, which is clinically similar to the obesity found in Cushing's syndrome. Corticotropic axis hyperactivity may be involved in the development and metabolic and cardiovascular complications of abdominal obesity. Several mechanisms may be responsible for this hormonal dysregulation: genetic, lifestyle, and nutritional factors, and chronic stress. We note the necessity of methodologically-impeccable clinical studies for an objective evaluation of the role of stress in obesity.

  12. Brain energy metabolism is activated after acute and chronic administration of fenproporex in young rats.

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Jeremias, Isabela C; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Morais, Meline O S; Gomes, Lara M; Martinello, Otaviana B; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-12-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multiple etiologies, including genetic, metabolic, environmental, social, and other factors. Pharmaceutical strategies in the treatment of obesity include drugs that regulate food intake, thermo genesis, fat absorption, and fat metabolism. Fenproporex is the second most commonly consumed amphetamine-based anorectic worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine. Studies suggest that amphetamine induces neurotoxicity through generation of free radicals and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by cytochrome c release, accompanied by a decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that play a crucial role in ATP production. Thus, in the present study we evaluated the activities of some enzymes of Krebs cycle, mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and creatine kinase in the brain of young rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of fenproporex. In the acute administration, the animals received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.) or tween. In the chronic administration, the animals received a single injection daily for 14 days of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/Kg i.p.). Two hours after the last injection, the rats were sacrificed by decapitation and the brain was removed for evaluation of biochemical parameters. Our results showed that the activities of citrate synthase, malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase were increased by acute and chronic administration of fenproporex. Complexes I, II, II-III and IV and creatine kinase activities were also increased after acute and chronic administration of the drug. Our results are consistent with others reports that showed that some psychostimulant drugs increased brain energy metabolism in young rats. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    Adeva-Andany, María M.; Fernández-Fernández, Carlos; Mouriño-Bayolo, David; Castro-Quintela, Elvira; Domínguez-Montero, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated. PMID:25405229

  14. Sodium Bicarbonate Therapy in Patients with Metabolic Acidosis

    María M. Adeva-Andany

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic acidosis occurs when a relative accumulation of plasma anions in excess of cations reduces plasma pH. Replacement of sodium bicarbonate to patients with sodium bicarbonate loss due to diarrhea or renal proximal tubular acidosis is useful, but there is no definite evidence that sodium bicarbonate administration to patients with acute metabolic acidosis, including diabetic ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis, septic shock, intraoperative metabolic acidosis, or cardiac arrest, is beneficial regarding clinical outcomes or mortality rate. Patients with advanced chronic kidney disease usually show metabolic acidosis due to increased unmeasured anions and hyperchloremia. It has been suggested that metabolic acidosis might have a negative impact on progression of kidney dysfunction and that sodium bicarbonate administration might attenuate this effect, but further evaluation is required to validate such a renoprotective strategy. Sodium bicarbonate is the predominant buffer used in dialysis fluids and patients on maintenance dialysis are subjected to a load of sodium bicarbonate during the sessions, suffering a transient metabolic alkalosis of variable severity. Side effects associated with sodium bicarbonate therapy include hypercapnia, hypokalemia, ionized hypocalcemia, and QTc interval prolongation. The potential impact of regular sodium bicarbonate therapy on worsening vascular calcifications in patients with chronic kidney disease has been insufficiently investigated.

  15. Calcium Regulation and Bone Mineral Metabolism in Elderly Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Vickram Tejwani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The elderly chronic kidney disease (CKD population is growing. Both aging and CKD can disrupt calcium (Ca2+ homeostasis and cause alterations of multiple Ca2+-regulatory mechanisms, including parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, fibroblast growth factor-23/Klotho, calcium-sensing receptor and Ca2+-phosphate product. These alterations can be deleterious to bone mineral metabolism and soft tissue health, leading to metabolic bone disease and vascular calcification and aging, termed CKD-mineral and bone disorder (MBD. CKD-MBD is associated with morbid clinical outcomes, including fracture, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. In this paper, we comprehensively review Ca2+ regulation and bone mineral metabolism, with a special emphasis on elderly CKD patients. We also present the current treatment-guidelines and management options for CKD-MBD.

  16. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    2-[14C]deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine

  17. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. (Univ. of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu (USA))

    1991-01-01

    2-(14C)deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine.

  18. Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests

    Débora Rebechi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Low malathion concentrations influence metabolism in Chironomus sancticaroli (Diptera, Chironomidae in acute and chronic toxicity tests. Organophosphate compounds are used in agro-systems, and in programs to control pathogen vectors. Because they are continuously applied, organophosphates often reach water sources and may have an impact on aquatic life. The effects of acute and chronic exposure to the organophosphate insecticide malathion on the midge Chironomus sancticaroli are evaluated. To that end, three biochemical biomarkers, acetylcholinesterase (AChE, alpha (EST-α and beta (EST-β esterase were used. Acute bioassays with five concentrations of malathion, and chronic bioassays with two concentrations of malathion were carried out. In the acute exposure test, AChE, EST-α and EST-β activities declined by 66, 40 and 37%, respectively, at 0.251 µg L-1 and more than 80% at 1.37, 1.96 and 2.51 µg L-1. In chronic exposure tests, AChE and EST-α activities declined by 28 and 15% at 0.251 µg L-1. Results of the present study show that low concentrations of malathion can influence larval metabolism, indicating high toxicity for Chironomus sancticaroli and environmental risk associated with the use of organophosphates.

  19. The appraisal of chronic stress and the development of the metabolic syndrome

    Bergmann, N; Gyntelberg, F; Faber, J

    2014-01-01

    . Thirty-nine studies were included. An association between chronic psychosocial stress and the development of MES was generally supported. Regarding the four elements of MES: i) weight gain: the prospective studies supported etiological roles for relationship stress, perceived stress, and distress, while...... the studies on work-related stress (WS) showed conflicting results; ii) dyslipidemi: too few studies on psychosocial stress as a risk factor for dyslipidemia were available to draw a conclusion; however, a trend toward a positive association was present; iii) type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2): prospective......Chronic psychosocial stress has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of the metabolic syndrome (MES). This review gives a systematic overview of prospective cohort studies investigating chronic psychosocial stress as a risk factor for incident MES and the individual elements of MES...

  20. Effects of chronic ethanol ingestion on arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in rat macrophages

    Chanmugam, P.; Boudreau, M.; Hymel, G.; Jeffers, G.; Hwang, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous report, preincubation of rat platelets with ethanol resulted in dose dependent inhibition of AA metabolites whereas chronic ingestion of ethanol enhanced the synthesis of AA metabolites. Thus, the authors studied whether chronic ethanol ingestion also affects AA metabolism in MACS. Two groups of rats (10 each) were fed DeCarli/Lieber liquid diet containing 36 caloric % ethanol for 3 weeks. The control group was pair fed the same diet made isocaloric with dextrin-maltose. Resident MACS were collected by peritoneal lavage. The monolayers of MACS were incubated for 20 min with calcium ionophore (5μg/ml), and the incubation stopped with 4 vol. of ethanol. PGE 2 , LTB 4 and 5-HETE were assayed by radioimmunoassay. The results indicated that chronic ethanol ingestion did not affect the capacity of MACS to synthesize AA metabolites. There was also no difference in the levels of AA metabolites in heart and lung homogenates between the two groups

  1. Bone mineral metabolism, bone mineral density, and body composition in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    Haaber, Anne Birgitte; Rosenfalck, A M; Hansen, B

    2000-01-01

    Calcium and vitamin D homeostasis seem to be abnormal in patients with exocrine pancreatic dysfunction resulting from cystic fibrosis. Only a few studies have evaluated and described bone mineral metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic insufficiency....

  2. The hemodynamic effects of prolonged respiratory alkalosis in anesthetized newborn piglets.

    Jundi, K; Barrington, K J; Henderson, C; Allen, R G; Finer, N N

    2000-04-01

    To test the hypothesis that prolonged alkalosis decreases cardiac output and, furthermore, exacerbates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, as respiratory alkalosis is frequently induced as a therapy for persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn despite a lack of controlled evidence of improved outcomes. Potential adverse effects of prolonged alkalosis have been demonstrated. Two groups (control, n = 6, and hypocapnic alkalosis, n = 6) of 1-3 day old fentanyl-anesthetized, vecuronium-paralyzed piglets were instrumented to measure cardiac index (CI) and mean systemic (MAP) and pulmonary (PAP) arterial pressures. Baseline values were recorded. Alveolar hypoxia was then induced to achieve an arterial oxygen saturation of between 50 and 60% for 15 min. Respiratory alkalosis was then induced, by increasing ventilation to achieve a pH between 7.55-7.60, and was continued for 240 min. Inspired carbon dioxide was used with hyperventilation in the control group to maintain pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) at 35-45 mmHg and pH of 7.35-7.45. Hypoxia was induced again at 15 and 240 min. Pulmonary and systemic vascular resistances (PVR and SVR) were calculated. Prolonged alkalosis led to a significant and progressive fall in mean MAP from 61 (SD 7) mmHg at the start of the study falling to 50 (SD 6.9, p = 0.043), with no effect on CI. Calculated SVR decreased (0.45 SD 0.03 vs 0.36 SD 0.05). There were no statistically significant changes in any of the variables in the control group. Neither acute nor prolonged respiratory alkalosis had a significant effect on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. Prolonged hyperventilation leads to systemic hypotension, however it does not exacerbate hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  3. Metabolic, respiratory, and cardiological measurements during exercise and rest

    1971-01-01

    Low concentration effects of CO2 on metabolic respiration and circulation were measured during work and at rest. The relationship between heart rate and metabolic rate is examined, as well as calibration procedures, and rate measurement during submaximal and standard exercise tests. Alterations in acid base and electrolytes were found during exhaustive exercise, including changes in ECG and metabolic alkalosis effects.

  4. Hepatic cholesterol metabolism following a chronic ingestion of cesium-137 starting at fetal stage in rats

    Racine, R.; Grandcolas, L.; Blanchardon, E.; Gourmelon, P.; Souidi, M.; Veyssiere, G.

    2010-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident released many radionuclides in the environment. Some are still contaminating the ground and thus the people through dietary intake. The long-term sanitary consequences of this disaster are still unclear and several biological systems remain to be investigated. Cholesterol metabolism is of particular interest, with regard to the link established between atherosclerosis and exposure to high-dose ionizing radiations. This study assesses the effect of cesium-137 on cholesterol metabolism in rats, after a chronic exposure since fetal life. To achieve this, rat dams were contaminated with cesium-137-supplemented water from two weeks before mating until the weaning of the pups. Thereafter, the weaned rats were given direct access to the contaminated drinking water until the age of 9 months. After the sacrifice, cholesterol metabolism was investigated in the liver at gene expression and protein level. The cholesterolemia was preserved, as well as the cholesterol concentration in the liver. At molecular level, the gene expressions of ACAT 2 (a cholesterol storage enzyme), of Apolipoprotein A-I and of RXR (a nuclear receptor involved in cholesterol metabolism) were significantly decreased. In addition, the enzymatic activity of CYP27A1, which catabolizes cholesterol, was increased. The results indicate that the rats seem to adapt to the cesium-137 contamination and display modifications of hepatic cholesterol metabolism only at molecular level and within physiological range. (author)

  5. Metabolic markers and microecological characteristics of tongue coating in patients with chronic gastritis

    2013-01-01

    Background In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), tongue diagnosis has been an important diagnostic method for the last 3000 years. Tongue diagnosis is a non-invasive, simple and valuable diagnostic tool. TCM treats the tongue coating on a very sensitive scale that reflects physiological and pathological changes in the organs, especially the spleen and stomach. Tongue coating can diagnose disease severity and determine the TCM syndrome (“Zheng” in Chinese). The biological bases of different tongue coating appearances are still poorly understood and lack systematic investigation at the molecular level. Methods Tongue coating samples were collected from 70 chronic gastritis patients and 20 normal controls. 16S rRNA denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (16S rRNA–DGGE) and liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC–MS) were designed to profile tongue coatings. The statistical techniques used were principal component analysis and partial least squares–discriminate analysis. Results Ten potential metabolites or markers were found in chronic gastritis patients, including UDP-D-galactose, 3-ketolactose, and vitamin D2, based on LC–MS. Eight significantly different strips were observed in samples from chronic gastritis patients based on 16S rRNA–DGGE. Two strips, Strips 8 and 10, were selected for gene sequencing. Strip 10 sequencing showed a 100% similarity to Rothia mucilaginosa. Strip 8 sequencing showed a 96.2% similarity to Moraxella catarrhalis. Conclusions Changes in glucose metabolism could possibly form the basis of tongue coating conformation in chronic gastritis patients. The study revealed important connections between metabolic components, microecological components and tongue coating in chronic gastritis patients. Compared with other diagnostic regimens, such as blood tests or tissue biopsies, tongue coating is more amenable to, and more convenient for, both patients and doctors. PMID:24041039

  6. Expression changes of hippocampal energy metabolism enzymes contribute to behavioural abnormalities during chronic morphine treatment

    Xiao-Lan Chen; Jing-Gen Liu; Gang Lu; Ying-Xia Gong; Liang-Cai Zhao; Jie Chen; Zhi-Qiang Chi; Yi-Ming Yang; Zhong Chen; Qing-lin Li

    2007-01-01

    Dependence and impairment of learning and memory are two well-established features caused by abused drugs such as opioids. The hippocampus is an important region associated with both drug dependence and learning and memory. However, the molecular events in hippocampus following exposure to abused drugs such as opioids are not well understood. Here we examined the effect of chronic morphine treatment on hippocampal protein expression by proteomic analyses. We found that chronic exposure of mice to morphine for 10 days produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment, and also resulted in a significant downregulation of hippocampal protein levels of three metabolic enzymes, including Fe-S protein 1 of NADH dehydrogenase, dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase or E2 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and lactate dehydrogenase 2. Further real-time quantitative PCR analyses confirmed that the levels of the corresponding mRNAs were also remarkably reduced. Consistent with these findings, lower ATP levels and an impaired ability to convert glucose into ATP were also observed in the hippocampus of chronically treated mice. Opioid antagonist naltrexone administrated concomitantly with morphine significantly suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and reversed the downregulation of these proteins. Acute exposure to morphine also produced robust morphine withdrawal jumping and significant memory impairment, but failed to decrease the expression of these three proteins. Intrahippocampal injection of D-glucose before morphine administration significantly enhanced ATP levels and suppressed morphine withdrawal jumping and memory impairment in acute morphine-treated but not in chronic morphine-treated mice. Intraperitoneal injection of high dose of D-glucose shows a similar effect on morphine-induced withdrawal jumping as the central treatment. Taken together, our results suggest that reduced expression of the three metabolic enzymes in the hippocampus as

  7. Chloride Test

    ... metabolic acidosis ) or when a person hyperventilates (causing respiratory alkalosis ). A decreased level of blood chloride (called hypochloremia) ... disease , emphysema or other chronic lung diseases (causing respiratory ... metabolic alkalosis). An increased level of urine chloride can indicate ...

  8. Chronic contamination with 137Cesium affects Vitamin D3 metabolism in rats

    Tissandie, E.; Gueguen, Y.; Lobaccaro, J.M.A.; Aigueperse, J.; Gourmelon, P.; Paquet, F.; Souidi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years after Chernobyl disaster, many people are still chronically exposed to low dose of 137 Cs, mainly through the food consumption. A large variety of diseases have been described in highly exposed people with 137 Cs, which include bone disorders. The aim of this work was to investigate the biological effects of a chronic exposure to 137 Cs on Vitamin D 3 metabolism, a hormone essential in bone homeostasis. Rats were exposed to 137 Cs in their drinking water for 3 months at a dose of 6500 Bq/l (approximately 150 Bq/rat/day), a similar concentration ingested by the population living in contaminated territories in the former USSR countries. Cytochromes P450 enzymes involved in Vitamin D 3 metabolism, related nuclear receptors and Vitamin D 3 target genes were assessed by real time PCR in liver, kidney and brain. Vitamin D, PTH, calcium and phosphate levels were measured in plasma. An increase in the expression level of cyp2r1 (40%, p 137 Cs-exposed rats. However a significant decrease of Vitamin D (1,25(OH)D 3 ) plasma level (53%, p = 0.02) was observed. In brain, cyp2r1 mRNA level was decreased by 20% (p 137 Cs contamination. In conclusion, this study showed for the first time that chronic exposure with post-accidental doses of 137 Cs affects Vitamin D 3 active form level and induces molecular modifications of CYPs enzymes involved its metabolism in liver and brain, without leading to mineral homeostasis disorders

  9. Multiparameter rodent chronic model for complex evaluation of alcoholism-mediated metabolic violations.

    Shayakhmetova, Ganna M; Bondarenko, Larysa B; Kovalenko, Valentina M; Kharchenko, Olga I; Bohun, Larisa I; Omelchenko, Yuliya O

    2015-01-01

    Despite of the wide spectrum of alcoholism experimental models, the majority of them are very specialized on the short list of investigated parameters and could not provide reproduction of complex metabolic changes in the rats. The aim of the present study was to estimate whether rats selected by high alcohol preference, allowed free access to 15% alcohol for 150 days, develop simultaneous multilevel disturbances of cell macromolecules structure, metabolism and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Wistar albino male rats were divided into groups: I - rats selected by preferences to alcohol were used for chronic alcoholism modeling by replacing water with 15% ethanol (150 days), II - control. Contents of amino acids in serum, liver mRNA CYP2E1 and CYP3A2 expression, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation levels, the reduced glutathione content, superoxide dismutase, catalase, iNOS and cNOS activities were evaluated. In serum of ethanol-treated rats contents of aspartic acid, serine, glycine, alanine and valine were decreased whereas contents of histidine, methionine and phenylalanine were increased. Liver CYP2E1, CYP3A2 mRNA expression, DNA fragmentation levels significantly elevated. Level of cNOS in ethanol-treated rat's hepatocytes was within the normal limits, whereas iNOS activity was raised 1.6 times. Liver pro- and anti-oxidant system alterations were shown. Rats' chronic 15% alcohol consumption (150 days) led solely to complex metabolomic changes at different levels, which simultaneously characterized cell macromolecules structure, metabolism, and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Rodent model of chronic alcoholism in the proposed modification could be an adequate and reasonably priced tool for further preclinical development and testing of pharmacotherapeutic agents.

  10. Population pharmacodynamic model of bicarbonate response to acetazolamide in mechanically ventilated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acetazolamide is commonly given to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with metabolic alkalosis. Little is known of the pharmacodynamics of acetazolamide in the critically ill. We undertook the pharmacodynamic modeling of bicarbonate response to acetazolamide in COPD patients under mechanical ventilation. Methods This observational, retrospective study included 68 invasively ventilated COPD patients who received one or multiple doses of 250 or 500 mg of acetazolamide during the weaning period. Among the 68 investigated patients, 207 time-serum bicarbonate observations were available for analysis. Population pharmacodynamics was modeled using a nonlinear mixedeffect model. The main covariates of interest were baseline demographic data, Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II) at ICU admission, cause of respiratory failure, co-prescription of drugs interfering with the acid-base equilibrium, and serum concentrations of protein, creatinin, potassium and chloride. The effect of acetazolamide on serum bicarbonate levels at different doses and in different clinical conditions was subsequently simulated in silico. Results The main covariates interacting with acetazolamide pharmacodynamics were SAPS II at ICU admission (P = 0.01), serum chloride (P 500 mg twice daily is required to reduce serum bicarbonate concentrations > 5 mmol/L in the presence of high serum chloride levels or coadministration of systemic corticosteroids or furosemide. Conclusions This study identified several covariates that influenced acetazolamide pharmacodynamics and could allow a better individualization of acetazolamide dosing when treating COPD patients with metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21917139

  11. Chronic Stress Contributes to Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Metabolic Abnormalities in APP/PS1 Mice

    Bing Han

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Stress response is determined by the brain, and the brain is a sensitive target for stress. Our previous experiments have confirmed that once the stress response is beyond the tolerable limit of the brain, particularly that of the hippocampus, it will have deleterious effects on hippocampal structure and function; however, the metabolic mechanisms for this are not well understood. Methods: Here, we used morris water maze, elisa and gas chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry to observe the changes in cognition, neuropathology and metabolomics in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (C57 mice caused by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, we also further explored the correlation between cognition and metabolomics. Results: We found that 4 weeks of CUMS aggravated cognitive impairment and increased amyloid-β deposition in APP/PS1 mice, but did not affect C57 mice. Under non-stress conditions, compared with C57 mice, there were 8 different metabolites in APP/PS1 mice. However, following CUMS, 3 different metabolites were changed compared with untreated C57 mice. Compared to APP/PS1 mice, there were 7 different metabolites in APP/PS1+CUMS mice. Among these alterations, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, valine, serine, beta-alanine and o-phosphorylethanolamine, which are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism. Conclusion: The results indicate that APP/PS1 mice are more vulnerable to stress than C57 mice, and the metabolic mechanisms of stress-related cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice are related to multiple pathways and networks, including sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism.

  12. Organization of metabolic pathways in vastus lateralis of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Green, Howard J; Bombardier, Eric; Burnett, Margaret; Iqbal, Sobia; D'Arsigny, Christine L; O'Donnell, Dennis E; Ouyang, Jing; Webb, Katherine A

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD) display differences in organization of the metabolic pathways and segments involved in energy supply compared with healthy control subjects. Metabolic pathway potential, based on the measurement of the maximal activity (V(max)) of representative enzymes, was assessed in tissue extracted from the vastus lateralis in seven patients with COPD (age 67 +/- 4 yr; FEV(1)/FVC = 44 +/- 3%, where FEV(1) is forced expiratory volume in 1 s and FVC is forced vital capacity; means +/- SE) and nine healthy age-matched controls (age 68 +/- 2 yr; FEV(1)/FVC = 75 +/- 2%). Compared with control, the COPD patients displayed lower (P chain and glycogenolysis and glycolysis relative to beta-oxidation.

  13. Grocery store baking soda. A source of sodium bicarbonate in the management of chronic metabolic acidosis.

    Booth, B E; Gates, J; Morris, R C

    1984-02-01

    Oral sodium bicarbonate is used to treat metabolic acidosis in patients with renal tubular acidosis. Since infants and young children are unable to swallow tablets, those affected must ingest sodium bicarbonate in a powder or liquid form. Pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate is expensive and inconvenient to obtain; some pharmacists are reluctant to provide it. We determined that the sodium bicarbonate contained in 8-oz boxes of Arm and Hammer Baking Soda was sufficiently constant in weight that, dissolved in water to a given volume, it yielded a quantitatively acceptable therapeutic solution of sodium bicarbonate at a cost of approximately 3 percent of that of pharmacy-weighed sodium bicarbonate. Grocery store baking soda can be a safe, economical, and convenient source of sodium bicarbonate for the treatment of chronic metabolic acidosis in infants and young children.

  14. Metabolic adaptation of a human pathogen during chronic infections - a systems biology approach

    Thøgersen, Juliane Charlotte

    modeling to uncover how human pathogens adapt to the human host. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in cystic fibrosis patients are used as a model system for under-­‐ standing these adaptation processes. The exploratory systems biology approach facilitates identification of important phenotypes...... by classical molecular biology approaches where genes and reactions typically are investigated in a one to one relationship. This thesis is an example of how mathematical approaches and modeling can facilitate new biologi-­‐ cal understanding and provide new surprising ideas to important biological processes....... and metabolic pathways that are necessary or related to establishment of chronic infections. Archetypal analysis showed to be successful in extracting relevant phenotypes from global gene expression da-­‐ ta. Furthermore, genome-­‐scale metabolic modeling showed to be useful in connecting the genotype...

  15. Prevalence of chronic complications, metabolic control and nutritional intake in type 1 diabetes

    Toeller, M; Buyken, A E; Heitkamp, G

    1999-01-01

    and proliferative retinopathy were more common. Persons from the eastern European and the German centres consumed undesirably high amounts of cholesterol, total and saturated fat. Overall, improvements in the prevention, detection and management of diabetes complications in persons with type 1 diabetes......) and chronic diabetes complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular disease) were all considerably more frequent in the eastern European centres. HbA1c was lower in the German centres than in the total EURODIAB cohort or in the north-western European centres, but severe hypoglycaemia......This study compares the prevalence of chronic complications, the quality of metabolic control and the nutritional intake in people with type 1 diabetes in different European regions. The EURODIAB Complications Study included a sample of 3250 European patients with type 1 diabetes stratified...

  16. Acute respiratory alkalosis occurring after endoscopic third ventriculostomy -A case report-.

    Sung, Hui-Jin; Sohn, Ju-Tae; Kim, Jae-Gak; Shin, Il-Woo; Ok, Seong-Ho; Lee, Heon-Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun

    2010-12-01

    An endoscopic third ventriculostomy was performed in a 55-year-old man with an obstructive hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. The vital signs and laboratory studies upon admission were within the normal limits. Anesthesia was maintained with nitrous oxide in oxygen and 6% desflurane. The patient received irrigation with approximately 3,000 ml normal saline during the procedure. Anesthesia and operation were uneventful. However, he developed postoperative hyperventilation in the recovery room, and arterial blood gas analysis revealed acute respiratory alkalosis. We report a rare respiratory alkalosis that occurred after an endoscopic third ventriculostomy.

  17. Effects of the Acute and Chronic Ethanol Intoxication on Acetate Metabolism and Kinetics in the Rat Brain.

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Wu, Liang-Chih; Ke, Chien-Chih; Chang, Chi-Wei; Kuo, Jung-Wen; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Du; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tai, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2018-02-01

    Ethanol (EtOH) intoxication inhibits glucose transport and decreases overall brain glucose metabolism; however, humans with long-term EtOH consumption were found to have a significant increase in [1- 11 C]-acetate uptake in the brain. The relationship between the cause and effect of [1- 11 C]-acetate kinetics and acute/chronic EtOH intoxication, however, is still unclear. [1- 11 C]-acetate positron emission tomography (PET) with dynamic measurement of K 1 and k 2 rate constants was used to investigate the changes in acetate metabolism in different brain regions of rats with acute or chronic EtOH intoxication. PET imaging demonstrated decreased [1- 11 C]-acetate uptake in rat brain with acute EtOH intoxication, but this increased with chronic EtOH intoxication. Tracer uptake rate constant K 1 and clearance rate constant k 2 were decreased in acutely intoxicated rats. No significant change was noted in K 1 and k 2 in chronic EtOH intoxication, although 6 of 7 brain regions showed slightly higher k 2 than baseline. These results indicate that acute EtOH intoxication accelerated acetate transport and metabolism in the rat brain, whereas chronic EtOH intoxication status showed no significant effect. In vivo PET study confirmed the modulatory role of EtOH, administered acutely or chronically, in [1- 11 C]-acetate kinetics and metabolism in the rat brain. Acute EtOH intoxication may inhibit the transport and metabolism of acetate in the brain, whereas chronic EtOH exposure may lead to the adaptation of the rat brain to EtOH in acetate utilization. [1- 11 C]-acetate PET imaging is a feasible approach to study the effect of EtOH on acetate metabolism in rat brain. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. The kidney of chicken adapts to chronic metabolic acidosis: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Craan, A G; Lemieux, G; Vinay, P; Gougoux, A

    1982-08-01

    Renal adaptation to chronic metabolic acidosis was studies in Arbor Acre hens receiving ammonium chloride by stomach tube 0.75 g/kg/day during 6 days. During a 14-day study, it was shown that the animals could excrete as much as 60% of the acid load during ammonium chloride administration. At the same time urate excretion fell markedly but the renal contribution to urate excretion (14%) did not change. During acidosis, blood glutamine increased twofold and the tissue concentration of glutamine rose in both liver and kidney. Infusion of L-glutamine led to increased ammonia excretion and more so in acidotic animals. Glutaminase I, glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase (GPT), and malic enzyme activities increased in the kidney during acidosis but phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity did not change. Glutaminase I was not found in the liver, but hepatic glutamine synthetase rose markedly during acidosis. Glutamine synthetase was not found in the kidney. Renal tubules incubated with glutamine and alanine were ammoniagenic and gluconeogenic to the same degree as rat tubules with the same increments in acidosis. Lactate was gluconeogenic without increment during acidosis. The present study indicates that the avian kidney adapts to chronic metabolic acidosis with similarities and differences when compared to dog and rat. Glutamine originating from the liver appears to be the major ammoniagenic substrate. Our data also support the hypothesis that hepatic urate synthesis is decreased during acidosis.

  19. Leptin and Adiponectin Levels in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C with Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Disorders

    T. V. Antonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to analyze leptin and adiponectin serum levels in patients with chronic hepatitis C in comparison with metabolic syndrome components, biochemical features and stage of hepatitis.Materials and methods: In 93 patients with chronic HCV in age 20-55 with a few symptomatic HCV-infection and minimal liver fibrosis stage serum leptin and adiponectin was measured. Associations between leptin, adiponectin and metabolic abnormalities, biochemical features, and hepatic fibrosis were determined.Results: Abdominal obesity was revealed at 40% patients, overweight – at 41%, insulin resistance – at 36,6% cases. The leptin and adiponectin levels were within normal limits range at most patients. Patients with minimal liver fibrosis had higher index of leptin by comparison to patients with moderate and severe fibrosis (r= – 0,402, р= 0,018. In patients with HCV genotype 3a the adiponectin level was below, than in HCV genotype 1b. Patients with abdominal obesity and overweight had higher leptin and lower adiponectin indexes by comparison to patients without these metabolic abnormalities. Direct cross-correlation between the leptin level and body mass index (r=0,358, p=0,001, waist circumference (r=0,292, p=0,01; negative cross-correlation between the adiponectin level and body mass index (r=- 0,435, р <0,021, waist circumference (r=- 0,386, р =0,001 were displayed.Conclusion: Leptin and adiponectin blood levels in HCVpatientis associated with abdominal obesity and overweight. The connection of leptin level and liver fibrosis stage was revealed. Difference of adiponectin level in HCV-patients with 3a and 1b genotypes of virus was found.

  20. Dynamic Responses of Phosphorus Metabolism to Acute and Chronic Dietary Phosphorus-Limitation in Daphnia

    Nicole D. Wagner

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Food quality is highly dynamic within lake ecosystems and varies spatially and temporally over the growing season. Consumers may need to continuously adjust their metabolism in response to this variation in dietary nutrient content. However, the rates of metabolic responses to changes in food nutrient content has received little direct study. Here, we examine responses in two metabolic phosphorus (P pools, ribonucleic acids (RNA and adenosine triphosphate (ATP, along with body mass and body P content in Daphnia magna exposed to chronic and acute dietary P-limitation. First, we examined food quality effects on animals consuming different food carbon (C:P quality over a 14 day period. Then, we raised daphnids on one food quality for 4 days, switched them to contrasting dietary treatments, and measured changes in their metabolic responses at shorter time-scales (over 48 h. Animal P, RNA, and ATP content all changed through ontogeny with adults containing relatively less of these pools with increasing body mass. Irrespective of age, Daphnia consuming high C:P diets had lower body %P, %RNA, %ATP, and mass compared to animals eating low C:P diets. Diet switching experiments revealed diet dependent changes in body %P, %RNA, %ATP, and animal mass within 48 h. We found that Daphnia switched from low to high C:P diets had some metabolic buffering capacity with decreases in body %P occurring after 24 h but mass remaining similar to initial diet conditions for 36 h after the diet switch. Switching Daphnia from low to high C:P diets caused a decrease in the RNA:P ratio after 48 h. Daphnia switched from high to low C:P diets increased their body P, RNA, and ATP content within 8–24 h. This switch from high to low C:P diets also led to increased RNA:P ratios in animal bodies. Overall, our study revealed that consumer P metabolism reflects both current and past diet due to more dynamic and rapid changes in P biochemistry than total body mass. This metabolic

  1. The Impact of Host Metabolic Factors on Treatment Outcome in Chronic Hepatitis C

    Savvidou Savvoula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent data suggest that chronic hepatitis C has to be considered a metabolic disease further to a viral infection. The aim of this study was to elaborate on the complex interactions between hepatitis C virus, host metabolic factors, and treatment response. Methods. Demographic, virological, and histological data from 356 consecutive patients were analyzed retrospectively. Hepatic steatosis, obesity, and insulin resistance were examined in relation to their impact on treatment outcome. Comparison between genotype 1 and 3 patients was performed to identify differences in the determinants of hepatic steatosis. Results. Histological evidence of hepatic steatosis was found in 113 patients, distributed in 20.3%, 9.0%, and 2.5% for grades I, II, and III, respectively. Hepatic steatosis was associated with past alcohol abuse (P=0.003 and histological evidence of advanced fibrosis (P<0.001. Older age (OR 2.51, P=0.002, genotype (OR 3.28, P<0.001, cirrhosis (OR 4.23, P=0.005, and hepatic steatosis (OR 2.48, P=0.001 were independent predictors for nonresponse. Correlations of hepatic steatosis with alcohol, insulin resistance, and fibrosis stage were found similar for both genotypes 1 and 3. Conclusions. Host metabolic factors may predict treatment outcome, and this impact remains significant even in genotype 3, where steatosis has been believed to be exclusively virus related.

  2. PET Imaging Reveals Brain Metabolic Changes in Adolescent Rats Following Chronic Escalating Morphine Administration.

    Chen, Qing; Hou, Haifeng; Feng, Jin; Zhang, Xiaohui; Chen, Yao; Wang, Jing; Ji, Jianfeng; He, Xiao; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Hong

    2018-04-10

    Non-medical use of prescription opioids, especially among adolescents, has been substantially increased in recent years. However, the neuromechanism remains largely unexplored. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the brain metabolic changes in adolescent rats following chronic escalating morphine administration using positron emission tomography (PET). 2-Deoxy-2-[ 18 F]Fluoro-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG) microPET imaging was performed, and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used for image analysis. Glucose transporter 3 (Glut-3), dopamine D 2 receptor (D 2 R), and Mμ-opioid receptor (μ-OR) were used for immunostaining analysis. Cerebral glucose metabolism was increased in the corpus callosum (CC) and right retrosplenial dysgranular cortex (rRSD), while it was decreased in the right ventral pallidum (rVP). The expressions of Glut-3, D 2 R, and μ-OR were increased in CC and rRSD, while they were decreased in rVP. Furthermore, glucose metabolism and Glut-3 expression were positively correlated with the expressions of D 2 R or μ-OR in CC, rRSD, and rVP. [ 18 F]FDG microPET brain imaging study in combination with immunohistological investigation revealed that CC, rRSD, and rVP were specifically involved in opioid dependence in adolescents. Our findings provided valuable insights into the neuromechanism of adolescent addiction of prescription opioids and might have important implications for the development of prevention and intervention approaches.

  3. CYP2C8 Genotype Significantly Alters Imatinib Metabolism in Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia Patients.

    Barratt, Daniel T; Cox, Hannah K; Menelaou, Andrew; Yeung, David T; White, Deborah L; Hughes, Timothy P; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the CYP2C8*3 and *4 polymorphisms on imatinib metabolism and plasma imatinib concentrations in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. We genotyped 210 CML patients from the TIDELII trial receiving imatinib 400-800 mg/day for CYP2C8*3 (rs11572080, rs10509681) and *4 (rs1058930). Steady-state trough total plasma N-desmethyl imatinib (major metabolite):imatinib concentration ratios (metabolic ratios) and trough total plasma imatinib concentrations were compared between genotypes (one-way ANOVA with Tukey post hoc). CYP2C8*3 (n = 34) and *4 (n = 15) carriers had significantly higher (P  50% higher for CYP2C8*1/*4 than for CYP2C8*1/*1 and CYP2C8*3 carriers (2.18 ± 0.66 vs. 1.45 ± 0.74 [P < 0.05] and 1.36 ± 0.98 μg/mL [P < 0.05], respectively). CYP2C8 genotype significantly alters imatinib metabolism in patients through gain- and loss-of-function mechanisms.

  4. The consequences of chronic kidney disease on bone metabolism and growth in children.

    Bacchetta, Justine; Harambat, Jérôme; Cochat, Pierre; Salusky, Isidro B; Wesseling-Perry, Katherine

    2012-08-01

    Growth retardation, decreased final height and renal osteodystrophy (ROD) are common complications of childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD), resulting from a combination of abnormalities in the growth hormone (GH) axis, vitamin D deficiency, hyperparathyroidism, hypogonadism, inadequate nutrition, cachexia and drug toxicity. The impact of CKD-associated bone and mineral disorders (CKD-MBD) may be immediate (serum phosphate/calcium disequilibrium) or delayed (poor growth, ROD, fractures, vascular calcifications, increased morbidity and mortality). In 2012, the clinical management of CKD-MBD in children needs to focus on three main objectives: (i) to provide an optimal growth in order to maximize the final height with an early management with recombinant GH therapy when required, (ii) to equilibrate calcium/phosphate metabolism so as to obtain acceptable bone quality and cardiovascular status and (iii) to correct all metabolic and clinical abnormalities that can worsen bone disease, growth and cardiovascular disease, i.e. metabolic acidosis, anaemia, malnutrition and 25(OH)vitamin D deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the mineral, bone and vascular abnormalities associated with CKD in children in terms of pathophysiology, diagnosis and clinical management.

  5. [Abnormal metabolism of triglycerides fractions in chronic pancreatitis and results after the operation treatment].

    Diakowska, Dorota; Knast, Witold; Diakowski, Witold; Grabowski, Krzysztof; Szelachowski, Piotr; Pelczar, Piotr

    2005-06-01

    This study was undertaken to determine how fats digestion processes were damaged due to chronic pancreatitis, and identify, whether lipid metabolism improved after surgical treatment the patients with chronic pancreatitis. Total lipids, triglycerides, diglycerides and free fatty acids levels in serum and stool were analysed, using chemical tests, thin-layer chromatography and electrophoresis of serum lipoproteins. The patients before the operations showed higher total lipids and triglycerides concentrations, and lower concentrations of diglycerides and free fatty acids in stool. These patients had high triglycerides, chylomicrons, VLDL, LDL-CH concentrations, and low-diglycerides, free fatty acids, HDL-CH concentrations in serum. These data were statistically significant. After the operations and substitution therapy it was observed normalization of the total lipids and lipids fractions levels in stool and in serum. Concentrations of LDL-CH and HDL-CH fractions were irregular. We conclude, that these lipids parameters could be used in diagnosing and monitoring the results of chronic pancreatitis surgical treatment.

  6. Acetaminophen induces xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes in rat: Impact of a uranium chronic exposure.

    Rouas, Caroline; Souidi, Maâmar; Grandcolas, Line; Grison, Stephane; Baudelin, Cedric; Gourmelon, Patrick; Pallardy, Marc; Gueguen, Yann

    2009-11-01

    The extensive use of uranium in civilian and military applications increases the risk of human chronic exposure. Uranium is a slightly radioactive heavy metal with a predominantly chemical toxicity, especially in kidney but also in liver. Few studies have previously shown some effects of uranium on xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XME) that might disturb drug pharmacokinetic. The aim of this study was to determine whether a chronic (9 months) non-nephrotoxic low dose exposure to depleted uranium (DU, 1mg/rat/day) could modify the liver XME, using a single non-hepatotoxic acetaminophen (APAP) treatment (50mg/kg). Most of XME analysed were induced by APAP treatment at the gene expression level but at the protein level only CYP3A2 was significantly increased 3h after APAP treatment in DU-exposed rats whereas it remained at a basal level in unexposed rats. In conclusion, these results showed that a chronic non-nephrotoxic DU exposure specially modify CYP3A2 after a single therapeutic APAP treatment. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of chronic periodontitis with metabolic syndrome: A cross-sectional study

    Naresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MeS is high among Asians, including Indians and is rising, particularly with the adoption of modernized lifestyle. Various studies have reported a significant relationship between periodontal status and MeS. The objective of this study is to investigate the association between periodontitis and MeS. Materials and Methods: The study included 259 subjects (130 cases with chronic periodontitis, 129 controls without chronic periodontitis who underwent medical and periodontal checkup. Five components (obesity, high blood pressure, low- and high-density lipoproteins, cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, and high plasma glucose of MeS were evaluated, and individuals with ≥3 positive components were defined as having MeS. The periodontal parameter was clinical attachment level (CAL on the basis of which cases were selected with moderate (CAL loss 3–4 mm and severe (CAL loss ≥5 mm generalized chronic periodontitis. The association between chronic periodontitis and MeS components was investigated using odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Results: The association of MeS and chronic periodontitis was strong and significant with OR: 2.64, 95% CI: 1.36–5.18, and P< 0.003. Comparison of mean values of components of MeS between cases and controls reveals that the mean waist circumference (mean difference: −4.8 [95% CI: 7.75–−1.84], P< 0.002 and mean triglycerides level (mean difference: −25.75 [95% CI: −49.22–−2.28], P< 0.032 were significantly higher in cases than in control groups. Although mean systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and fasting blood sugar level were higher in cases (125.77, 82.99 and 86.38, respectively compared with control (122.81, 81.3 and 83.68, respectively, it was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that there is a strong association between chronic periodontitis and MeS. The association was independent

  8. Comparison of SPET brain perfusion and 18F-FDG brain metabolism in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Abu-Judeh, H H; Levine, S; Kumar, M; el-Zeftawy, H; Naddaf, S; Lou, J Q; Abdel-Dayem, H M

    1998-11-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a clinically defined condition of uncertain aetiology. We compared 99Tcm-HMPAO single photon emission tomography (SPET) brain perfusion with dual-head 18F-FDG brain metabolism in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Eighteen patients (14 females, 4 males), who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of the Centers for Disease Control for chronic fatigue syndrome, were investigated. Thirteen patients had abnormal SPET brain perfusion scans and five had normal scans. Fifteen patients had normal glucose brain metabolism scans and three had abnormal scans. We conclude that, in chronic fatigue syndrome patients, there is discordance between SPET brain perfusion and 18F-FDG brain uptake. It is possible to have brain perfusion abnormalities without corresponding changes in glucose uptake.

  9. Insulin resistance and protein energy metabolism in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Siew, Edward D; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR), the reciprocal of insulin sensitivity is a known complication of advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with a number of metabolic derangements. The complex metabolic abnormalities observed in CKD such as vitamin D deficiency, obesity, metabolic acidosis, inflammation, and accumulation of "uremic toxins" are believed to contribute to the etiology of IR and acquired defects in the insulin-receptor signaling pathway in this patient population. Only a few investigations have explored the validity of commonly used assessment methods in comparison to gold standard hyperinsulinemic hyperglycemic clamp technique in CKD patients. An important consequence of insulin resistance is its role in the pathogenesis of protein energy wasting, a state of metabolic derangement characterized by loss of somatic and visceral protein stores not entirely accounted for by inadequate nutrient intake. In the general population, insulin resistance has been associated with accelerated protein catabolism. Among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients, enhanced muscle protein breakdown has been observed in patients with Type II diabetes compared to ESRD patients without diabetes. In the absence of diabetes mellitus (DM) or severe obesity, insulin resistance is detectable in dialysis patients and strongly associated with increased muscle protein breakdown, primarily mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Recent epidemiological data indicate a survival advantage and better nutritional status in insulin-free Type II DM patients treated with insulin sensitizer thiazolidinediones. Given the high prevalence of protein energy wasting in ESRD and its unequivocal association with adverse clinical outcomes, insulin resistance may represent an important modifiable target for intervention in the ESRD population.

  10. Metabolic and vascular pattern in medial pterygoid muscle is altered by chronic stress in an animal model of hypodontia.

    Fernández, Rodrigo Alberto Restrepo; Pereira, Yamba Carla Lara; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Calzzani, Ricardo Alexandre; Leite-Panissi, Christie Ramos Andrade; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Nascimento, Glauce Crivelaro

    2018-03-01

    Psychological stress is an important perpetuating, worsening and risk factor for temporomandibular disorders of muscular or articular origin. Occlusion instability, by the way, is considered a risk factor of this pathology and can be reproduced in some experimental animal models. The exact physiologic mechanism underlying these relations however, remains unclear. Our purpose was to test the hypothesis that chronic stress and unilateral exodontia induce metabolic and vascular changes in the medial pterygoid muscle of rats. Adult Wistar rats were submitted to chronic unpredictable stress and/or unilateral exodontia and their plasma and medial pterygoid muscle were removed for analysis. The parameters evaluated included plasma levels of corticosterone, metabolic activity by succinate dehydrogenase, oxidative capacity by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide diaphorase, capillary density by laminin and alfa-CD staining and reactive oxidative species production. Chronic unpredictable stress as an isolated factor, increased oxidative metabolism, capillary density and reactive oxygen species production at medial pterygoid muscle. Conversely, exodontia has a main effect in metabolism, promoting glycolytic transformation of muscle fibers. Association of both factors induced a major glycolytic pattern in muscle and vascular changes. Our findings provide insights into the mechanisms, possibly inducing metabolic and vascular alterations on medial pterygoid muscle of rats, by which chronic stress and occlusal instabilities might be involved as risk factors in the pathophysiology of temporomandibular disorders with muscular components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic syndrome impairs notch signaling and promotes apoptosis in chronically ischemic myocardium.

    Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Sabe, Ashraf A; Lassaletta, Antonio D; Chu, Louis M; Kondra, Katelyn; Sturek, Michael; Sellke, Frank W

    2014-09-01

    Impaired angiogenesis is a known consequence of metabolic syndrome (MetS); however, the mechanism is not fully understood. Recent studies have shown that the notch signaling pathway is an integral component of cardiac angiogenesis. We tested, in a clinically relevant swine model, the effects of MetS on notch and apoptosis signaling in chronically ischemic myocardium. Ossabaw swine were fed either a regular diet (control [CTL], n = 8) or a high-cholesterol diet (MetS, n = 8) to induce MetS. An ameroid constrictor was placed to induce chronic myocardial ischemia. Eleven weeks later, the wine underwent cardiac harvest of the ischemic myocardium. Downregulation of pro-angiogenesis proteins notch2, notch4, jagged2, angiopoietin 1, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase were found in the MetS group compared with the CTL group. Also, upregulation of pro-apoptosis protein caspase 8 and downregulation of anti-angiogenesis protein phosphorylated forkhead box transcription factor 03 and pro-survival proteins phosphorylated P38 and heat shock protein 90 were present in the MetS group. Cell death was increased in the MetS group compared with the CTL group. Both CTL and MetS groups had a similar arteriolar count and capillary density, and notch3 and jagged1 were both similarly concentrated in the smooth muscle wall. MetS in chronic myocardial ischemia significantly impairs notch signaling by downregulating notch receptors, ligands, and pro-angiogenesis proteins. MetS also increases apoptosis signaling, decreases survival signaling, and increases cell death in chronically ischemic myocardium. Although short-term angiogenesis appears unaffected in this model of early MetS, the molecular signals for angiogenesis are impaired, suggesting that inhibition of notch signaling might underlie the decreased angiogenesis in later stages of MetS. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of lead induces metabolic disorder and dysbiosis of the gut microbiota in mice.

    Xia, Jizhou; Jin, Cuiyuan; Pan, Zihong; Sun, Liwei; Fu, Zhengwei; Jin, Yuanxiang

    2018-08-01

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most prevalent toxic, nonessential heavy metals that can contaminate food and water. In this study, effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of Pb on metabolism and gut microbiota were evaluated in mice. It was observed that exposure of mice to 0.1mg/L Pb, supplied via drinking water, for 15weeks increased hepatic TG and TCH levels. The levels of some key genes related to lipid metabolism in the liver increased significantly in Pb-treated mice. For the gut microbiota, at the phylum level, the relative abundance of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes changed obviously in the feces and the cecal contents of mice exposed to 0.1mg/L Pb for 15weeks. In addition, 16s rRNA gene sequencing further discovered that Pb exposure affected the structure and richness of the gut microbiota. Moreover, a 1 H NMR metabolic analysis unambiguously identified 31 metabolites, and 15 metabolites were noticeably altered in 0.1mg/L Pb-treated mice. Taken together, the data indicate that chronic Pb exposure induces dysbiosis of the gut microbiota and metabolic disorder in mice. Chronic Pb exposure induces metabolic disorder, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota and hepatic lipid metabolism disorder in mice. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic syndrome is associated with poor treatment response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 patients.

    Aziz, Hafsa; Gill, Uzma; Raza, Abida; Gill, Muzaffar L

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection is caused by an RNA virus. HCV infection is considered to induce systemic disease that causes steatosis, alters lipid metabolism, and results in metabolic syndrome. This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic outcome in HCV genotype 3 patients with metabolic syndrome. A total of 621 HCV-positive patients who visited the hospital for treatment were screened. Among these, 441 patients were enrolled for antiviral therapy. These enrolled patients were assessed for metabolic syndrome according to the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Group A included patients with metabolic syndrome and group B included patients without metabolic syndrome. All patients received peginterferon-α2a (180 μg/week) and ribavirin (10 mg/kg/day) for 6 months. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in chronic HCV patients was 37.9%. We observed that metabolic syndrome was more common among female compared with male participants (43.9 vs. 28.8%, P=0.005). It was found that sustained virologic response (SVR) rates were significantly higher in the patients in group B (without metabolic syndrome) compared with the patients in group A who had metabolic syndrome (72.2 vs. 43.7%, Pmetabolic syndrome and a correlation of metabolic syndrome with nonresponse to antiviral therapy was observed. An interesting correlation among metabolic syndrome, age, and SVR was found: with age, SVR decreases, while metabolic syndrome increases. Metabolic syndrome has an influence on therapeutic outcomes in terms of SVR. Moreover, this information can identify patients who might have a low chance of attaining an SVR and a timely decision may protect the patients from the adverse effects of therapy.

  14. [Microbiocenosis of subgingival biofilm and intestinal content in chronic periodontal disease in patients with metabolic syndrome].

    Petrukhina, N B; Zorina, O A; Shikh, E V; Kartysheva, E V

    The aim of the study was to assess correlations of subgingival biofilm and intestinal microbiota in patients with chronic periodontal disease (CPD) and metabolic syndrome (MS). The study included 80 patients divided in 2 groups: 40 healthy individuals with no signs of periodontal disease and 40 patients with CPD and MS. Oral and intestinal microbial consortia compositions were revealed using deep sequencing libraries of 16S rDNA. The study showed than the qualitative composition of the intestinal microbiome in patients with CPD differ significantly from the microbiome of controls. Real-time PCR of subgingival microflora in CPD patients revealed high content of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia and T. denticola, while in intestinal microbiome dominated representatives of Enterobacteriaceae and Eubacteriaceae families with signs of intestinal dysbiosis mostly associated with the decrease of protective species.

  15. Chronic thyroiditis in patients with advanced breast carcinoma: metabolic and morphologic changes on PET-CT

    Tateishi, Ukihide [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Gamez, Cristina; Yeung, Henry W.D.; Macapinlac, Homer A. [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Dawood, Shaheenah; Cristofanilli, Massimo [University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Division of Breast Medical Oncology, Houston, TX (United States); Inoue, Tomio [Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    To investigate clinical implications of FDG uptake in the thyroid glands in patients with advanced breast carcinoma by comparing metabolic and morphologic patterns on positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). The institutional review board waived the requirement for informed consent. A retrospective analysis was performed in 146 women (mean age 54 years) with advanced breast carcinoma who received systemic treatment. All patients underwent PET-CT before and after treatment. All PET-CT studies were reviewed in consensus by two reviewers. Morphologic changes including volume and mean parenchymal density of the thyroid glands were evaluated. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) were determined to evaluate metabolic changes. These parameters were compared between patients with chronic thyroiditis who received thyroid hormone replacement therapy and those who did not. Of the 146 patients, 29 (20%) showed bilaterally diffuse uptake in the thyroid glands on the baseline PET-CT scan. The SUVmax showed a linear relationship with volume (r = 0.428, p = 0.021) and the mean parenchymal density (r = -0.385, p = 0.039) of the thyroid glands. In 21 of the 29 patients (72%) with hypothyroidism who received thyroid hormone replacement therapy, the volume, mean parenchymal density, SUVmax, and TLG of the thyroid glands showed no significant changes. In contrast, 8 of the 29 patients (28%) who did not receive thyroid hormone replacement therapy showed marked decreases in SUVmax and TLG. Diffuse thyroid uptake on PET-CT represents active inflammation caused by chronic thyroiditis in patients with advanced breast carcinoma. Diffuse thyroid uptake may also address the concern about subclinical hypothyroidism which develops into overt disease during follow-up. (orig.)

  16. Hierarchical Status Predicts Behavioral Vulnerability and Nucleus Accumbens Metabolic Profile Following Chronic Social Defeat Stress.

    Larrieu, Thomas; Cherix, Antoine; Duque, Aranzazu; Rodrigues, João; Lei, Hongxia; Gruetter, Rolf; Sandi, Carmen

    2017-07-24

    Extensive data highlight the existence of major differences in individuals' susceptibility to stress [1-4]. While genetic factors [5, 6] and exposure to early life stress [7, 8] are key components for such neurobehavioral diversity, intriguing observations revealed individual differences in response to stress in inbred mice [9-12]. This raised the possibility that other factors might be critical in stress vulnerability. A key challenge in the field is to identify non-invasively risk factors for vulnerability to stress. Here, we investigated whether behavioral factors, emerging from preexisting dominance hierarchies, could predict vulnerability to chronic stress [9, 13-16]. We applied a chronic social defeat stress (CSDS) model of depression in C57BL/6J mice to investigate the predictive power of hierarchical status to pinpoint which individuals will exhibit susceptibility to CSDS. Given that the high social status of dominant mice would be the one particularly challenged by CSDS, we predicted and found that dominant individuals were the ones showing a strong susceptibility profile as indicated by strong social avoidance following CSDS, while subordinate mice were not affected. Data from 1 H-NMR spectroscopy revealed that the metabolic profile in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) relates to social status and vulnerability to stress. Under basal conditions, subordinates show lower levels of energy-related metabolites compared to dominants. In subordinates, but not dominants, levels of these metabolites were increased after exposure to CSDS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that identifies non-invasively the origin of behavioral risk factors predictive of stress-induced depression-like behaviors associated with metabolic changes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chronic innate immune activation of TBK1 suppresses mTORC1 activity and dysregulates cellular metabolism.

    Hasan, Maroof; Gonugunta, Vijay K; Dobbs, Nicole; Ali, Aktar; Palchik, Guillermo; Calvaruso, Maria A; DeBerardinis, Ralph J; Yan, Nan

    2017-01-24

    Three-prime repair exonuclease 1 knockout (Trex1 -/- ) mice suffer from systemic inflammation caused largely by chronic activation of the cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-stimulator of interferon genes-TANK-binding kinase-interferon regulatory factor 3 (cGAS-STING-TBK1-IRF3) signaling pathway. We showed previously that Trex1-deficient cells have reduced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity, although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we performed detailed metabolic analysis in Trex1 -/- mice and cells that revealed both cellular and systemic metabolic defects, including reduced mitochondrial respiration and increased glycolysis, energy expenditure, and fat metabolism. We also genetically separated the inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes by showing that Sting deficiency rescued both inflammatory and metabolic phenotypes, whereas Irf3 deficiency only rescued inflammation on the Trex1 -/- background, and many metabolic defects persist in Trex1 -/- Irf3 -/- cells and mice. We also showed that Leptin deficiency (ob/ob) increased lipogenesis and prolonged survival of Trex1 -/- mice without dampening inflammation. Mechanistically, we identified TBK1 as a key regulator of mTORC1 activity in Trex1 -/- cells. Together, our data demonstrate that chronic innate immune activation of TBK1 suppresses mTORC1 activity, leading to dysregulated cellular metabolism.

  18. Mechanism of potassium depletion during chronic metabolic acidosis in the rat

    Scandling, J.D.; Ornt, D.B.

    1987-01-01

    Pair-fed rats on a normal K diet were given either 1.5% NH 4 Cl or water for 4 days. The acid-fed animals developed metabolic acidosis, negative K balance, and K depletion. Urinary Na excretion and urinary flow were not different between the groups beyond the first day. After the 4 days, isolated kidneys from animals in each of these groups were perfused at normal pH and bicarbonate concentrations. Urinary K excretion was similar between the groups despite the potassium depletion in the acid-fed animals. In contrast, isolated kidneys from animals with comparable K depletion induced by dietary K restriction readily conserved K. Sodium excretion and urinary flow were similar among the three groups of isolated kidneys. Plasma aldosterone concentrations were greater in the acid-fed rats after the 4 days of NH 4 Cl ingestion than in the control animals. Adrenalectomized rats were treated with either normal (4 μg/day) or high (22 μg/day) aldosterone replacement while ingesting NH 4 Cl for 4 days. Only in the presence of high aldosterone replacement did the acid-fed adrenalectomized animals develop K depletion. The authors conclude that chronic metabolic acidosis stimulates aldosterone secretion, and that aldosterone maintains the inappropriately high urinary potassium excretion and K depletion seen in this acid-base disorder

  19. Relationship between chronic disturbance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate metabolism in erythrocytes and Alzheimer disease.

    Kosenko, Elena A; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Kaminsky, Yury G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders widely occurring among the elderly. The pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of this disease are still unknown. In AD, in addition to brain, a number of peripheral tissues and cells are affected, including erythrocytes. In this study, we analyzed glycolytic energy metabolism, antioxidant status, glutathione, adenylate and proteolytic systems in erythrocytes from patients with AD and compared with those from age-matched controls and young adult controls. Glycolytic enzymes hexokinase, phosphofructokinase, bisphosphoglycerate mutase and bisphosphoglycerate phosphatase displayed lower activities in agematched controls, and higher activities in AD patients, as compared to those in young adult control subjects. In both aging and AD, oxidative stress is increased in erythrocytes whereas elevated concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides as well as decreased glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio and glutathione transferase activity can be detected. These oxidative disturbances are also accompanied by reductions in ATP levels, adenine nucleotide pool size and adenylate energy charge. Caspase-3 and calpain activities in age-matched controls and AD patients were about three times those of young adult controls. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were significantly decreased in AD patients. Taken together these data suggest that AD patients are associated with chronic disturbance of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate metabolism in erythrocytes. These defects may play a central role in pathophysiological processes predisposing elderly subjects to dementia.

  20. Metabolic Syndrome in Chemical Warfare Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Shahrzad M. Lari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction: Sulfur mustard (SM, a toxic alkylating gas, can cause serious long-term pulmonary complications such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Metabolic syndrome (MetS is one of the important comorbidities of COPD. This study was designed to evaluate the frequency of metabolic syndrome in Iranian chemical warfare patients (CWPs with COPD. Materials and Methods: Thirty CWPs with a mean age of 46.93± 6.8 were enrolled in this study. The following parameters were studied in: complete pulmonary function tests, health-related quality of life, serum triglycerides (TG, high density lipoprotein (HDL and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels. Additionally, 32 COPD patients and 56 healthy persons were considered as control groups who were matched to CWPs. Results: We found a statistically significant difference in the frequency of MetS between the COPD patients and the healthy control group (p=0.04. Additionally, we observed a statistically significant difference in the mean HDL levels among these groups (p=

  1. Impact of metabolic syndrome on resting energy expenditure in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Rodrigues, Carolina Q D; Santos, Jacqueline A P; Quinto, Beata M R; Marrocos, Mauro S M; Teixeira, Andrei A; Rodrigues, Cássio J O; Batista, Marcelo C

    2016-10-01

    Resting energy expenditure (REE) changes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) may contribute to mortality increase. The obesity and inflammation is associated with high REE and when not compensated by adequate intake, may determine an unfavorable clinical outcome in this population. We aimed to evaluate the influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on REE in CKD patients. One hundred eighty-three patients were stratified according to glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and divided in groups: without CKD (GFR > 60 ml/min/1.73 m 2 ) and CKD (GFR Patients without MetS, REE correlated with estimated GFR and the protein equivalent (r = 0.33, P patients, these correlations were not observed. The presence of CKD is independently associated with reduced REE. The observed decrease in REE is reversed in patients with MetS independent of renal function. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be one of the terminal end points of metabolic syndrome

    Helvaci, M.R.; Aydin, L.Y.; Aydin, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tried to understand presence of any effect of excess weight on respiratory system by means of excessive adipose tissue functioning as an endocrine organ and causing a Methodology: Mild (stage 1), moderate (stage 2), and severe (stage 3 and 4) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were detected, and compared according to the metabolic parameters in between. Results: There were 145, 56, and 34 patients in the mild, moderate, and severe COPD groups, respectively. The mean age increased gradually (52.4, 56.4, and 60.0 years) from the mild towards the severe COPD groups, respectively (p<0.05 nearly in all steps). Similarly, the mean direction (p<0.05 nearly in all steps). Parallel to them, the mean body mass index increased Conclusion: The metabolic syndrome includes some reversible indicators such as overweight, hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and white coat hypertension for the development of terminal diseases including obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke. In our opinion, COPD may be one of the terminal end points of the syndrome. (author)

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may be one of the terminal end points of metabolic syndrome

    Helvaci, M R; Aydin, L Y; Aydin, Y

    2012-04-15

    Objective: We tried to understand presence of any effect of excess weight on respiratory system by means of excessive adipose tissue functioning as an endocrine organ and causing a Methodology: Mild (stage 1), moderate (stage 2), and severe (stage 3 and 4) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were detected, and compared according to the metabolic parameters in between. Results: There were 145, 56, and 34 patients in the mild, moderate, and severe COPD groups, respectively. The mean age increased gradually (52.4, 56.4, and 60.0 years) from the mild towards the severe COPD groups, respectively (p<0.05 nearly in all steps). Similarly, the mean direction (p<0.05 nearly in all steps). Parallel to them, the mean body mass index increased Conclusion: The metabolic syndrome includes some reversible indicators such as overweight, hyperbetalipoproteinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, dyslipidemia, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, and white coat hypertension for the development of terminal diseases including obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, peripheral artery disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke. In our opinion, COPD may be one of the terminal end points of the syndrome. (author)

  4. Features of lipid metabolism in chronic heart failure of different genesis with concomitant overweight and obesity

    Р. P. Bidzilya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently clinical studies demonstrated reciprocal association between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, in particular, hyperlipidemia and obesity, with worse clinical outcomes in CHF. Unlike ischemic heart disease (IHD, where high levels of atherogenic and low of antiatherogenic lipids fraction traditionally associated with worsening of prognosis and course of disease, in conditions of the CHF proven negative impact of the reduction of lipid levels and body mass index. Demonstrated the phenomena called "cholesterol paradox" and "obesity paradox". Aim. To study the features of lipid metabolism in CHF of different genesis with concomitant overweight and obesity. Materials and methods. 240 patients with I–III functional class (FC of the disease with concomitant overweight and abdominal obesity I–III degree were examined. FC of the disease was established according to the classification of New York Heart Association (NYHA.Normal, overweight and the degree of abdominal obesity was identified by calculating the body mass index. Etiologic factors of CHF were chronic forms of IHD, arterial hypertension, and/or a combination of both. With the help of biochemical blood tests lipid metabolism were assessed. Results. The maximum values as atherogenic and antiatherogenic lipid indicators are investigated in non-ischemic (hypertensive CHF. Patients with CHF of ischemic genesis are characterized by minimal values of atherogenic fractions of lipids. Patients with combined etiology of CHF occupy the intermediate position of atherogenic fractions content, while they demonstrate the minimum value in the antiatherogenic HDL-cholesterol. Conclusion. Changes of lipid metabolism are varied depending on the etiology of CHF in patients with concomitant overweight and obesity and the most unfavorable in ischemic form of the disease.

  5. Associated Factors for Metabolic Syndrome in the Older Adults with Chronic Virus Hepatitis in the Community.

    Yuan-Hung Kuo

    Full Text Available This study was to evaluate the association between metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic virus hepatitis elders in the community. Those subjects with positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg and/or anti-hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV screened in the community before were invited to this study and 451 responded. All participants underwent anthropometric measurements, blood tests, ultrasound and fibroscan examinations. The cut-off of liver stiffness measurement-liver cirrhosis (LSM-LC was 10 kPa for chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients and 12 kPa for chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients, respectively. Among 451 responders, 56 were excluded due to negative HBsAg or anti-HCV. Three hundreds and ninety-five subjects included 228 CHB patients, 156 CHC patients and 11 dual hepatitis patients, had a mean age of 62±12.6 years. Fifty-four (23.7% CHB patients coexisted with MetS whereas 40 (25.6% CHC patients also had MetS. Those patients with MetS had more LSM-LC cases than those without (20.4% vs 9.8%, p = 0.04 in CHB patients; 28.2% vs 13.5%, p = 0.037 in CHC patients, respectively. In multivariate logistic analysis, detectable viremia was reversely associated with MetS in CHB patients after adjustment for age, gender and body mass index (odds ratio (OR: 0.42; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.18-0.99; p = 0.047. Regarding CHC patients, higher LSM level was the only factor contributed to MetS (OR: 1.1; 95% CI: 1.02-1.19; p = 0.012. In conclusion, elder CHB patients coexisted with MetS might experience an inactive virus replication but have an advanced liver fibrosis. In elder CHC patients, only higher LSM level was associated with MetS.

  6. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS-or IL-1β-induced chronic inflammation

    Liang, W.; Lindeman, J.H.; Menke, A.L.; Koonen, D.P.; Morrison, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Hoek, A.M. van den; Kleemann, R.

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1β

  7. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS- or IL-1 beta-induced chronic inflammation

    Liang, Wen; Lindeman, Jan H.; Menke, Aswin L.; Koonen, Debby P.; Morrison, Martine; Havekes, Louis M.; van den Hoek, Anita M.; Kleemann, Robert

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1 beta

  8. Effects of chronic ammonia exposure on ammonia metabolism and excretion in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma.

    Gao, Na; Zhu, Limei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Yi, Meisheng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ammonia is highly toxic to aquatic organisms, but whether ammonia excretion or ammonia metabolism to less toxic compounds is the major strategy for detoxification in marine fish against chronic ammonia exposure is unclear to date. In this study, we investigated the metabolism and excretion of ammonia in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma during chronic ammonia exposure. The fish were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl spiked seawater for 8 weeks. Exposure of 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl had deleterious effects on the fish, including significant reductions in growth, feed intake, and total protein content. However, the fish could take strategies to detoxify ammonia. The tissue ammonia (T Amm ) in the 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments was significantly higher than those in the 0 and 0.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments after 2 weeks of exposure, but it recovered with prolonged exposure time, ultimately reaching the control level after 8 weeks. The amino acid catabolic rate decreased to reduce the gross ammonia production with the increasing ambient ammonia concentration. The concentrations of most metabolites remained constant in the 0-0.6 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments, whereas 5 amino acids and 3 energy metabolism-related metabolites decreased in the 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatment. J Amm steadily increased in ambient ammonia from 0 to 0.6 mmol l -1 and slightly decreased when the ambient ammonia concentration increased to 1.1 mmol l -1 . Overall, marine medaka cope with sublethal ammonia environment by regulating the tissue T Amm via reducing the ammonia production and increasing ammonia excretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Respiratory alkalosis may impair the production of vitamin D and lead to significant morbidity, including the fibromyalgia syndrome.

    Lewis, John M; Fontrier, Toinette H; Coley, J Lynn

    2017-05-01

    Hyperventilation caused by physical and/or psychological stress may lead to significant respiratory alkalosis and an elevated systemic pH. The alkalotic pH may in turn suppress the normal renal release of phosphate into the urine, thereby interrupting the endogenous production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (calcitriol). This could cause a shortfall in its normal production, leading to a variety of adverse consequences. It might partially explain the pathogenesis of acute mountain sickness, a treatable disease characterized by severe hyperventilation secondary to the hypoxia of high altitude exposure. Milder degrees of hyperventilation due to different forms of stress may produce other conditions which share characteristics with acute mountain sickness. One of these may be the fibromyalgia syndrome, a chronic painful disorder for which no satisfactory treatment exists. Should fibromyalgia and acute mountain sickness have a common etiology, may they also share a common form of treatment? Evidence is presented to support this hypothesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chronic condition as a mediator between metabolic syndrome and cognition among community-dwelling older adults: The moderating role of sex.

    Foong, Hui Foh; Hamid, Tengku Aizan; Ibrahim, Rahimah; Haron, Sharifah Azizah; Shahar, Suzana

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome and chronic conditions are significant predictors of cognition; however, few studies have examined how they work together in predicting cognition in old age. Therefore, the present study examines whether a chronic condition mediates the association between metabolic syndrome and cognition. In addition, it discusses the moderating role of sex in the relationships between metabolic syndrome, chronic conditions and cognition. Secondary analysis was carried out of data from the Malaysian national survey that involved 2322 community residents aged 60 years or older in Peninsular Malaysia. Cognition was measured by the digit symbol substitution test. Metabolic syndrome was assessed by five biomarkers: triglyceride, fasting blood sugar, systolic blood pressure, cholesterol ratio and body mass index. Chronic conditions were assessed by self-reported medical history. The structural equation modeling technique was used to analyze the mediation and moderation tests. The number of chronic conditions partially mediated the association between metabolic syndrome and cognition. Men and women did not differ in the relationship between metabolic syndrome and cognition; however, the number of chronic conditions was found to be negatively associated with cognition in older women, but not in men. Metabolic syndrome might increase the likelihood of older adults to suffer from more chronic conditions; these responses might reduce their cognition. To prevent cognitive decline in old age, specific intervention to minimize the number of chronic conditions by reducing their vascular risk factors is warranted, especially among older women. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; 17: 1914-1920. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  11. [The role of oxidative metabolism disturbance in the development of NO-related endothelial dysfunction during chronic hearth failure].

    Goishvili, N; Kakauridze, N; Sanikidze, T

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the work was to establish the oxidative metabolism changes and NO data in Chronic Hearth Failure (HF). 52 patients were included in the investigation, among them 37 patients with CHD and chronic HF (II-IV functional class by NIHA) and 17 without it (control group). For revealing of organism redox-status (ceruloplasmine, Fe3+-transfferine, Mn2+, methemoglobine) the blood paramagnetic centers was studied by electron paramagnetic resonance method. For revealing of blood free NO, the diethyldithiocarbamat (SIGMA) was used. In chronic HF the oxidative process intensification and organism compensate reaction reduction with low Fe3+-transferine levels, increased Mn2++, methaemoglobin and inactivation of erythrocytes membranes adrenergic receptors were revealed. In chronic HF the accumulation of reactive oxygen levels provoke NO transformation in peroxynitrote with following decreases of blood free NO and develop the endothelial dysfunction.

  12. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after chronic tritiated water intakes in humans

    Trivedi, A.; Lamothe, E.; Galeriu, D.

    2001-01-01

    Our earlier study of acute tritiated water intakes in humans has demonstrated that the dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium is less than 10% of the body water dose. To further demonstrate that the dose contribution from the organically bound tritium per unit intake of tritiated water is the same, regardless of whether the intake is acute (all at once) or chronic (spread over time), urine samples from six male radiation workers with chronic tritiated water intakes were collected and analyzed for tritium. These workers have a well-documented dose history and a well-controlled tritium bioassay database, providing assurance that their tritium intakes were in the form of tritiated water. Each month for a full calendar year, urine samples were collected from each exposed worker. The monthly concentration of tritium-in-urine for each exposed worker was no lower than 104 Bq L -1 but no higher than 105 Bq L -1 . These urine samples were analyzed for tritiated water and organically bound tritium to determine the ratio of these tritiated species in urine. The average ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine for each exposed worker was 330-129 (range, 297-589). In calculating the dose to these workers, we assumed that, under steady-state conditions, the ratio of the specific activity of tritium ( 3 H activity per gH) in the organic matter and water fractions of urine is representative of the ratio of the specific activity of tritium in the organic matter and water fractions of soft tissue. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium based on the ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine. The resulting average dose from the organically bound tritium was 6.9-3.1% (range, 4.7-9.9%) of the body water dose for the six male workers, and agrees well with the value obtained from our acute tritiated water intakes study in humans. The observed

  13. Low sodium intake does not impair renal compensation of hypoxia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Höhne, Claudia; Boemke, Willehad; Schleyer, Nora; Francis, Roland C; Krebs, Martin O; Kaczmarczyk, Gabriele

    2002-05-01

    Acute hypoxia causes hyperventilation and respiratory alkalosis, often combined with increased diuresis and sodium, potassium, and bicarbonate excretion. With a low sodium intake, the excretion of the anion bicarbonate may be limited by the lower excretion rate of the cation sodium through activated sodium-retaining mechanisms. This study investigates whether the short-term renal compensation of hypoxia-induced respiratory alkalosis is impaired by a low sodium intake. Nine conscious, tracheotomized dogs were studied twice either on a low-sodium (LS = 0.5 mmol sodium x kg body wt-1 x day-1) or high-sodium (HS = 7.5 mmol sodium x kg body wt-1 x day-1) diet. The dogs breathed spontaneously via a ventilator circuit during the experiments: first hour, normoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction = 0.21); second to fourth hour, hypoxia (inspiratory oxygen fraction = 0.1). During hypoxia (arterial PO2 34.4 +/- 2.1 Torr), plasma pH increased from 7.37 +/- 0.01 to 7.48 +/- 0.01 (P respiratory alkalosis was not impaired by a low sodium intake. The increased sodium excretion during hypoxia seems to be combined with a decrease in plasma aldosterone and angiotensin II in LS as well as in HS dogs. Other factors, e.g., increased mean arterial blood pressure, minute ventilation, and renal blood flow, may have contributed.

  14. Molecular modifications of cholesterol metabolism in the liver and the brain after chronic contamination with cesium 137.

    Racine, R; Grandcolas, L; Grison, S; Gourmelon, P; Guéguen, Y; Veyssière, G; Souidi, M

    2009-07-01

    Twenty years after Chernobyl accident, the daily ingestion of foodstuff grown on contaminated grounds remains the main source for internal exposure to ionizing radiations, and primarily to cesium 137 ((137)Cs). Though the effects of a long-term internal contamination with radionuclides are poorly documented, several non-cancerous pathologies have been described in this population. However, lipid metabolism was never investigated after chronic internal contamination although disturbances were observed in externally-exposed people. In this regard, we assessed the effects of a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs on hepatic and cerebral cholesterol metabolism. To mimic a chronically-exposed population, rats were given (137)Cs-supplemented water at a post-accidental dose (150 Bq/rat/day) during 9 months. The plasma profile, and brain and liver cholesterol concentrations were unchanged. A decrease of ACAT 2, Apo E, and LXRmRNA levels was recorded in the liver. In the brain, a decrease of CYP27A1 and ACAT 1 gene expression was observed. These results clearly show that cholesterol metabolism is not disrupted by a chronic ingestion of (137)Cs, although several molecular alterations are observed. This work would be interestingly completed by studying the influence of (137)Cs in models likely more sensitive to contaminants, such as the fetus or individuals susceptible to a lipidic disease.

  15. Can we rely on predicted basal metabolic rate in chronic pancreatitis outpatients?

    Olesen, Søren Schou; Holst, Mette; Køhler, Marianne; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rasmussen, Henrik Højgaard

    2015-04-01

    Malnutrition is a common complication to chronic pancreatitis (CP) and many patients need nutritional support. An accurate estimation of the basal metabolic rate (BMR) is essential when appropriate nutritional support is to be initiated, but in the clinical settings BMR is cumbersome to measure. We therefore investigated whether BMR can be reliable predicted from a standard formula (the Harris-Benedict equation) in CP outpatients. Twenty-eight patients with clinical stable CP and no current alcohol abuse were enrolled. Patients were stratified according to nutritional risk using the Nutrition Risk Screening 2002 system. Body composition was estimated using bioelectrical impedance. BMR was measured using indirect calorimetry and predicted using the Harris-Benedict equation based on anthropometric data. The average predicted BMR was 1371 ± 216 kcal/day compared to an average measured BMR of 1399 ± 231 kcal/day (P = 0.4). The corresponding limits of agreement were -347 to 290 kcal/day. Twenty-two patients (79%) had a measured BMR between 85 and 115% of the predicted BMR. When analysing patients stratified according to nutritional risk profiles, no differences between predicted and measured BMR were evident for any of the risk profile subgroups (all P > 0.2). The BMR was correlated to fat free mass determined by bioelectrical impedance (rho = 0.55; P = 0.003), while no effect modification was seen from nutritional risk stratification in a linear regression analysis (P = 0.4). The Harris-Benedict equation reliable predicts the measured BMR in four out of five clinical stable CP outpatients with no current alcohol abuse. Copyright © 2015 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A gut microbiota-targeted dietary intervention for amelioration of chronic inflammation underlying metabolic syndrome.

    Xiao, Shuiming; Fei, Na; Pang, Xiaoyan; Shen, Jian; Wang, Linghua; Zhang, Baorang; Zhang, Menghui; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Chenhong; Li, Min; Sun, Lifeng; Xue, Zhengsheng; Wang, Jingjing; Feng, Jie; Yan, Feiyan; Zhao, Naisi; Liu, Jiaqi; Long, Wenmin; Zhao, Liping

    2014-02-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by endotoxin from a dysbiotic gut microbiota contributes to the development of obesity-related metabolic disorders. Modification of gut microbiota by a diet to balance its composition becomes a promising strategy to help manage obesity. A dietary scheme based on whole grains, traditional Chinese medicinal foods, and prebiotics (WTP diet) was designed to meet human nutritional needs as well as balance the gut microbiota. Ninety-three of 123 central obese volunteers (BMI ≥ 28 kg m(-2) ) completed a self-controlled clinical trial consisting of 9-week intervention on WTP diet followed by a 14-week maintenance period. The average weight loss reached 5.79 ± 4.64 kg (6.62 ± 4.94%), in addition to improvement in insulin sensitivity, lipid profiles, and blood pressure. Pyrosequencing of fecal samples showed that phylotypes related to endotoxin-producing opportunistic pathogens of Enterobacteriaceae and Desulfovibrionaceae were reduced significantly, while those related to gut barrier-protecting bacteria of Bifidobacteriaceae increased. Gut permeability, measured as lactulose/mannitol ratio, was decreased compared with the baseline. Plasma endotoxin load as lipopolysaccharide-binding protein was also significantly reduced, with concomitant decrease in tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and an increase in adiponectin. These results suggest that modulation of the gut microbiota via dietary intervention may enhance the intestinal barrier integrity, reduce circulating antigen load, and ultimately ameliorate the inflammation and metabolic phenotypes. © 2013 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Ecology pubished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  17. Involvement of glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism and signaling in rat visceral adipose tissue lipid metabolism after chronic stress combined with high-fructose diet.

    Bursać, Biljana; Djordjevic, Ana; Veličković, Nataša; Milutinović, Danijela Vojnović; Petrović, Snježana; Teofilović, Ana; Gligorovska, Ljupka; Preitner, Frederic; Tappy, Luc; Matić, Gordana

    2018-05-03

    Both fructose overconsumption and increased glucocorticoids secondary to chronic stress may contribute to overall dyslipidemia. In this study we specifically assessed the effects and interactions of dietary fructose and chronic stress on lipid metabolism in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of male Wistar rats. We analyzed the effects of 9-week 20% high fructose diet and 4-week chronic unpredictable stress, separately and in combination, on VAT histology, glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism, glucocorticoid receptor subcellular redistribution and expression of major metabolic genes. Blood triglycerides and fatty acid composition were also measured to assess hepatic Δ9 desaturase activity. The results showed that fructose diet increased blood triglycerides and Δ9 desaturase activity. On the other hand, stress led to corticosterone elevation, glucocorticoid receptor activation and decrease in adipocyte size, while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, adipose tissue triglyceride lipase, FAT/CD36 and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) were increased, pointing to VAT lipolysis and glyceroneogenesis. The combination of stress and fructose diet was associated with marked stimulation of fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA level and with increased 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase protein levels, suggesting a coordinated increase in hexose monophosphate shunt and de novo lipogenesis. It however did not influence the level of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, SREBP-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein. In conclusion, our results showed that only combination of dietary fructose and stress increase glucocorticoid prereceptor metabolism and stimulates lipogenic enzyme expression suggesting that interaction between stress and fructose may be instrumental in promoting VAT expansion and dysfunction. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. ASSOSIATION BETWEEN PARAMETERS OF MINERAL BONE METABOLISM AND SURVIVAL IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING CHRONIC HEMODIALYSIS

    Branislav Apostolović

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Beside the traditional risk factors which have an effect on cardiovascular diseases, hemodialysis patients are exposed to metabolic factors, such as malnutrition, microinflammation and oxidative stress, along with mineral bone disorder. The aim of this study was to determine a three-year survival in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis and to analyse correlation with parameters of mineral bone metabolism. During the three-year follow-up 186 patients were included, of which 115 men (61.83% and 71 women, with a mean age 61.47±12.42. The exact date and the direct cause of death were recorded and mineral bone metabolism parameters were analysed. Out of 67 dead patients, 33 (49.25% died from cardiovascular cause. Out of the total number of deaths in our study, only 11.9% of patients had a target PTH values. Patients with PTH>600 pg/ml are exposed to an increased risk from the overall mortality (RR=0.48, 95% CI (0.24-0.95, p=0.04, but also from cardiovascular mortality (RR=0.34, 95% CI (0.12-0.93, p=0.034 compared to patients with normal serum PTH. These patients have a statistically significant higher serum phosphorus in comparison with patients with normal PTH levels (1.72±0.42 vs. 1.39±0.36, p=0.032. Phosphorus above 2.10 mmol/L increases the relative risk for the overall mortality rate by 60% (RR=0.59, 95% CI (0.35-0.89, p=0.049. In our study, 2-fold higher risk of all-cause mortality (RR=2.00, 95% CI (0.92-4.36, p=0.048, and even 3-fold higher risk of cardiovascular mortality (RR=3.03, 95% CI (0.71-1.29, p=0.039 were found in patients with CaxP levels above 4.50 mmol2/L2. Three-year mortality rate of patients undergoing hemodialysis was 36.02%, while half of the patients died from cardiovascular disease. Patients with hyperparathyroidism and elevated calcium phosphorus product are at the highest risk, both for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Patients with hyperphosphatemia are at higher risk for all-cause mortality.

  19. Interaction of IFNL3 with insulin resistance, steatosis and lipid metabolism in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Eslam, Mohammed; Booth, David R; George, Jacob; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2013-11-07

    Metabolic changes are inextricably linked to chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Recently polymorphisms in the IFNL3 (IL28B) region have been shown to be strongly associated with spontaneous and treatment induced recovery from hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Further, circumstantial evidence suggests a link between IFNL3 single nucleotide polymorphisms and lipid metabolism, steatosis and insulin resistance in CHC. The emerging picture suggests that the responder genotypes of IFNL3 polymorphisms are associated with a higher serum lipid profile, and less frequent steatosis and insulin resistance. This review analyzes the current data regarding this interaction and its meaning for HCV pathogenesis and disease progression.

  20. Metabolic Disorder in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Patients: Towards a Personalized Approach Using Marine Drug Derivatives.

    Lamonaca, Palma; Prinzi, Giulia; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; Cardaci, Vittorio; Fini, Massimo; Russo, Patrizia

    2017-03-20

    Metabolic disorder has been frequently observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. However, the exact correlation between obesity, which is a complex metabolic disorder, and COPD remains controversial. The current study summarizes a variety of drugs from marine sources that have anti-obesity effects and proposed potential mechanisms by which lung function can be modulated with the anti-obesity activity. Considering the similar mechanism, such as inflammation, shared between obesity and COPD, the study suggests that marine derivatives that act on the adipose tissues to reduce inflammation may provide beneficial therapeutic effects in COPD subjects with high body mass index (BMI).

  1. THE DIFFERENCES OF BONE METABOLISM IN MALES WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE AND POSTMENOPAUSAL FEMALES

    O. A. Mardanova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim — to compare bone metabolism activity in males with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and postmenopausal females.Materials and methods. The prospective cohort study was conducted. 33 male patients with COPD over 55 years old and 33 female patients without respiratory diseases over 55 were included. General examination, clinical and biochemical blood analyses, densitometry of lumbar spine and proximal part of left femoral bone, respiratory function, osteocalcin and C-telopeptids blood levels have been performed to the patients.Results. Male patients with COPD had lower T-score for the femoral neck than postmenopausal female patients without pulmonary disorders,(–1.05 ± 0.85 SD and –0.36 ± 1.24 SD respectively, р < 0.05. Osteocalcin level in males with COPD was significantly higher and C‑telopeptids level was significantly lower than in postmenopausal females (р < 0.05.Conclusion. Male patients with COPD have lower T‑score for the femoral neck than postmenopausal females without pulmonary disorders of the same age. Furthermore osteoclasts in COPD patients seem to be more activated than in postmenopausal females, on the contrary osteoblasts activity is significantly depressed. Therefore it is necessary to use another approach of prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in patients with COPD.

  2. Relationship between Fibroblast Growth Factor-23 and Mineral Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Kosaku Nitta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor- (FGF-23 is a recently discovered regulator of calcium-phosphate metabolism. FGF-23 appears to decrease in synthesis and accelerated degradation of 1,25(OH2D. Together with its cofactor Klotho, FGF-23 maintains serum phosphate levels within the normal range by increasing renal phosphate excretion. In chronic kidney disease (CKD, FGF-23 levels rise in parallel with the decline in renal function long before a significant increase in serum phosphate concentration occurs. Both Klotho and FGF-23, linked by a receptor mechanism, affect vitamin D synthesis and parathyroid hormone (PTH secretion. Previous studies have shown a close association between reduced FGF-23 or Klotho activities and vascular calcification. The possible association of FGF-23 and left ventricular hypertrophy or vascular dysfunction has been proposed. Finally, prospective studies have shown that high serum FGF-23 concentrations predict more rapid disease progression in CKD patients who were not on dialysis and increased mortality in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. FGF-23 may therefore prove to be an important therapeutic target for the management of CKD.

  3. Possible Link between Metabolic Syndrome and Chronic Kidney Disease in the Development of Cardiovascular Disease

    Kosaku Nitta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a clinical syndrome that consists of visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and impaired insulin sensitivity. Although individual components of MetS have been implicated in the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD, few studies have examined the effect of combinations of the components of MetS on the development of CKD and cardiovascular disease (CVD. The prevalence of MetS is increasing worldwide in both developing and developed countries, and early detection and treatment of MetS would be a cost-effective strategy for preventing the development of CKD. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are two important features of MetS that may be associated with renal damage. Lifestyle modifications, including caloric restriction and exercise, are necessary to treat MetS. Initial antihypertensive therapy should consist of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker. An improved understanding of the mechanism responsible for the association between MetS and renal damage should be helpful in determining the treatment regimens directed at cardiovascular and renal protection.

  4. Chronic heat improves mechanical and metabolic response of trained rat heart on ischemia and reperfusion.

    Levy, E; Hasin, Y; Navon, G; Horowitz, M

    1997-05-01

    Cardiac mechanics and metabolic performance were studied in isolated perfused hearts of rats subjected to a combined chronic stress of heat acclimation and swimming training (EXAC) or swimming training alone (EX). Diastolic (DP) and systolic pressures (SP), coronary flow (CF), and oxygen consumption were measured during normoperfusion (80 mmHg), and the appearance of ischemic contracture (IC), DP, and SP were measured during progressive graded ischemia, total ischemia (TI), and reperfusion insults. ATP, phosphocreatine, and intracellular pH were measured during TI and reperfusion with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During normoperfusion, SP and cardiac efficiency (derived from rate-pressure product-oxygen consumption relationships) were the highest in the 2-mo EXAC hearts (P pool and there was a delayed decline in intracellular pH. On reperfusion, these hearts also displayed improved ATP and phosphocreatine recovery, the 2-mo EXAC heart demonstrating significantly faster high-energy phosphate salvage, improved diastolic function, and pulse pressure recovery. The data attest to the beneficial effects of heat acclimation on cardiac mechanics of trained rats during normoperfusion and cardiac protection on ischemia and reperfusion. Possibly, energy sparing, lesser acidosis, and shorter duration of IC on ischemia and improved energy salvage on reperfusion contribute synergistically to this potent beneficial effect.

  5. Metabolism

    ... Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes Metabolic Syndrome Your Child's Weight Healthy Eating Endocrine System Blood Test: Basic Metabolic Panel (BMP) Activity: Endocrine System Growth Disorders Diabetes Center Thyroid Disorders Your Endocrine System Movie: Endocrine ...

  6. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works.

  7. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric...... turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity......./min/ 1.73m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Results: Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum...

  8. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses

    Shivendra D. Shukla

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4% for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart. Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9, dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10, and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10 and H3 ser 28 (H3S28 increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease.

  9. Cardiovascular risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome are more prevalent in people reporting chronic pain: results from a cross-sectional general population study.

    Goodson, Nicola J; Smith, Blair H; Hocking, Lynne J; McGilchrist, Mark M; Dominiczak, Anna F; Morris, Andrew; Porteous, David J; Goebel, Andreas

    2013-09-01

    To explore whether chronic pain is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and identify whether increased distribution or intensity of pain is associated with cardiovascular risk, participants in Generation Scotland: The Scottish Family Health study completed pain questionnaires recording the following: presence of chronic pain, distribution of pain, and intensity of chronic pain. Blood pressure, lipids, blood glucose, smoking history, waist-hip ratio, and body mass index were recorded; Framingham 10-year coronary heart disease (CHD) risk scores were calculated and a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome derived. Associations between chronic pain and cardiovascular risk were explored. Of 13,328 participants, 1100 (8.3%) had high CHD risk. Chronic pain was reported by 5209 (39%), 1294 (9.7%) reported widespread chronic pain, and 707 (5.3%) reported high-intensity chronic pain. In age- and gender-adjusted analyses, chronic pain was associated with elevated CHD risk scores (odds ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.01-1.23) and the metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 1.42, 95% confidence interval 1.24-1.62). Multivariate analyses identified dyslipidaemia, age, gender, smoking, obesity, and high waist-hip ratio as independently associated with chronic pain. Within the chronic pain subgroup, widespread pain did not confer any additional cardiovascular disease risk. However, cardiovascular disease risk factors contributing to metabolic syndrome were more prevalent in those reporting high-intensity chronic pain. This large population-based study has demonstrated that chronic pain, and in particular high-intensity chronic pain, is associated with an increased prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic syndrome. The 10-year CHD risk score and metabolic syndrome correlate well with increased pain intensity, but not with widespread pain. Copyright © 2013 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between patients' perception of the importance of diabetes and metabolic control and pursuing chronic complications of disease

    Mohammad Ebrahim Khamseh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type II diabetes is a metabolic disorder. Environmental factors and patient awareness have major roles on chronic complications. The purpose of this study was to determine the association of patients' perception of t the importance of diabetes and metabolic- control and pursuing of chronic complications. Material and Methods: 194 patients with diabetes enrolled from diabetes clinic of Institute Endocrinology & Metabolism in a cross-sectional study, from February to March 2010. Data were collected using a questionnaire to assess the personal demographics, individual approach in pursuit of complications, and glycemic control, as well as patient perception and attitude toward the importance of disease process and follow-up. Level of perceptions was determined as well, moderate and weak. Results: Out of 194 patients, 77(39.7% were male and 117(60.3% female. Mean age was 52.18±10.17years. 69.2% did not know what the glycosylated hemoglobin was. In 71.4%, willing to participate in decisions making on medical treatment was good and they knew that with initiation of insulin therapy, they would have better metabolic control. 68.9% of patients had regular follow-up for eye complications, and 51% for cardiac complications. Follow-up for diabetic foot complication was poor. Patients with good perception had regular follow-up regarding cardiac, eye and renal complications. Conclusion: These results indicate that better perception of diabetic patients might improve their compliance for regular follow- up regarding the pursuit of chronic complications, especially cardiac, eye and renal problems. Although, the metabolic- control of patients had not the association with patient perception about the importance of diabetes

  11. Fatty liver associated with metabolic derangement in patients with chronic kidney disease: A controlled attenuation parameter study

    Chang-Yun Yoon

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatic steatosis measured with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP using transient elastography predicts metabolic syndrome in the general population. We investigated whether CAP predicted metabolic syndrome in chronic kidney disease patients. Methods: CAP was measured with transient elastography in 465 predialysis chronic kidney disease patients (mean age, 57.5 years. Results: The median CAP value was 239 (202–274 dB/m. In 195 (41.9% patients with metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus was more prevalent (105 [53.8%] vs. 71 [26.3%], P < 0.001, with significantly increased urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio (184 [38–706] vs. 56 [16–408] mg/g Cr, P = 0.003, high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (5.4 [1.4–28.2] vs. 1.7 [0.6–9.9] mg/L, P < 0.001, and CAP (248 [210–302] vs. 226 [196–259] dB/m, P < 0.001. In multiple linear regression analysis, CAP was independently related to body mass index (β = 0.742, P < 0.001, triglyceride levels (β = 2.034, P < 0.001, estimated glomerular filtration rate (β = 0.316, P = 0.001, serum albumin (β = 1.386, P < 0.001, alanine aminotransferase (β = 0.064, P = 0.029, and total bilirubin (β = −0.881, P = 0.009. In multiple logistic regression analysis, increased CAP was independently associated with increased metabolic syndrome risk (per 10 dB/m increase; odds ratio, 1.093; 95% confidence interval, 1.009–1.183; P = 0.029 even after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. Conclusion: Increased CAP measured with transient elastography significantly correlated with and could predict increased metabolic syndrome risk in chronic kidney disease patients.

  12. Chronic fluoxetine treatment directs energy metabolism towards the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in rat hippocampal nonsynaptic mitochondria.

    Filipović, Dragana; Costina, Victor; Perić, Ivana; Stanisavljević, Andrijana; Findeisen, Peter

    2017-03-15

    Fluoxetine (Flx) is the principal treatment for depression; however, the precise mechanisms of its actions remain elusive. Our aim was to identify protein expression changes within rat hippocampus regulated by chronic Flx treatment versus vehicle-controls using proteomics. Fluoxetine-hydrohloride (15mg/kg) was administered daily to adult male Wistar rats for 3weeks, and cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial hippocampal proteomes were analyzed. All differentially expressed proteins were functionally annotated according to biological process and molecular function using Uniprot and Blast2GO. Our comparative study revealed that in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions, 60 and 3 proteins respectively, were down-regulated, and 23 and 60 proteins, respectively, were up-regulated. Proteins differentially regulated in cytosolic and nonsynaptic mitochondrial fractions were primarily related to cellular and metabolic processes. Of the identified proteins, the expressions of calretinin and parvalbumine were confirmed. The predominant molecular functions of differentially expressed proteins in both cell hippocampal fractions were binding and catalytic activity. Most differentially expressed proteins in nonsynaptic mitochondria were catalytic enzymes involved in the pyruvate metabolism, citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, ATP synthesis, ATP transduction and glutamate metabolism. Results indicate that chronic Flx treatment may influence proteins involved in calcium signaling, cytoskeletal structure, chaperone system and stimulates energy metabolism via the upregulation of GAPDH expression in cytoplasm, as well as directing energy metabolism toward the citric acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation in nonsynaptic mitochondria. This approach provides new insight into the chronic effects of Flx treatment on protein expression in a key brain region associated with stress response and memory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Rat brain CYP2D enzymatic metabolism alters acute and chronic haloperidol side-effects by different mechanisms.

    Miksys, Sharon; Wadji, Fariba Baghai; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Remington, Gary; Nobrega, Jose N; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-08-01

    Risk for side-effects after acute (e.g. parkinsonism) or chronic (e.g. tardive dyskinesia) treatment with antipsychotics, including haloperidol, varies substantially among people. CYP2D can metabolize many antipsychotics and variable brain CYP2D metabolism can influence local drug and metabolite levels sufficiently to alter behavioral responses. Here we investigated a role for brain CYP2D in acutely and chronically administered haloperidol levels and side-effects in a rat model. Rat brain, but not liver, CYP2D activity was irreversibly inhibited with intracerebral propranolol and/or induced by seven days of subcutaneous nicotine pre-treatment. The role of variable brain CYP2D was investigated in rat models of acute (catalepsy) and chronic (vacuous chewing movements, VCMs) haloperidol side-effects. Selective inhibition and induction of brain, but not liver, CYP2D decreased and increased catalepsy after acute haloperidol, respectively. Catalepsy correlated with brain, but not hepatic, CYP2D enzyme activity. Inhibition of brain CYP2D increased VCMs after chronic haloperidol; VCMs correlated with brain, but not hepatic, CYP2D activity, haloperidol levels and lipid peroxidation. Baseline measures, hepatic CYP2D activity and plasma haloperidol levels were unchanged by brain CYP2D manipulations. Variable rat brain CYP2D alters side-effects from acute and chronic haloperidol in opposite directions; catalepsy appears to be enhanced by a brain CYP2D-derived metabolite while the parent haloperidol likely causes VCMs. These data provide novel mechanistic evidence for brain CYP2D altering side-effects of haloperidol and other antipsychotics metabolized by CYP2D, suggesting that variation in human brain CYP2D may be a risk factor for antipsychotic side-effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aged interleukin-10tm1Cgn chronically inflamed mice have substantially reduced fat mass, metabolic rate, and adipokines.

    Reyhan M Westbrook

    Full Text Available Interleukin 10tm1Cgn (IL 10tm mice have been utilized as a model of chronic inflammation and declining health span because of their propensity to develop chronic activation in NFkB pathways, skeletal muscle and cardiac changes, and mitochondrial dysfunction. We hypothesized that older IL 10tm frail mice would have alterations similar to frail, older humans in measured parameters of glucose metabolism, oxygen consumption (VO2, respiratory quotient (RQ, spontaneous locomotor activity, body composition and plasma adipokine levels. To test this hypothesis, we investigated these metabolic parameters in cohorts of 3, 10, and 20 month old IL 10tm female mice and age and gender matched C57Bl/6 mice. Insulin sensitivity, glucose homeostasis, locomotor activity and RQ were not significantly altered between the two strains of mice. Interestingly, old IL 10tm mice had significantly decreased VO2 when normalized by lean mass, but not when normalized by fat mass or the lean/fat mass ratio. NMR based body composition analysis and dissection weights show that fat mass is decreased with age in IL 10tm mice compared to controls. Further, plasma adiponectin and leptin were also decreased in IL 10tm.These findings suggest that frailty observed in this mouse model of chronic inflammation may in part be driven by alterations in fat mass, hormone secretion and energy metabolism.

  15. Paroxetine ameliorates changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in chronic mild stress-exposed rats

    Khedr LH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lobna H Khedr, Noha N Nassar, Ezzeldin S El-Denshary, Ahmed M Abdel-tawab 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Misr International University, 2Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, 3Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Abstract: The molecular mechanisms underlying stress-induced depression have not been fully outlined. Hence, the current study aimed at testing the link between behavioral changes in chronic mild stress (CMS model and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism and the role of paroxetine (PAROX in ameliorating these changes. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: vehicle control, CMS-exposed rats, and CMS-exposed rats receiving PAROX (10 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally. Sucrose preference, open-field, and forced swimming tests were carried out. Corticosterone (CORT was measured in serum, while adenosine triphosphate and its metabolites, cytosolic cytochrome-c (Cyt-c, caspase-3 (Casp-3, as well as nitric oxide metabolites (NOx were measured in hippocampal tissue homogenates. CMS-exposed rats showed a decrease in sucrose preference as well as body weight compared to control, which was reversed by PAROX. The latter further ameliorated the CMS-induced elevation of CORT in serum (91.71±1.77 ng/mL vs 124.5±4.44 ng/mL, P<0.001 as well as the changes in adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (3.76±0.02 nmol/mg protein vs 1.07±0.01 nmol/mg protein, P<0.001. Furthermore, PAROX reduced the expression of Cyt-c and Casp-3, as well as restoring NOx levels. This study highlights the role of PAROX in reversing depressive behavior associated with stress-induced apoptosis and changes in hippocampal energy metabolism in the CMS model of depression. Keywords: rats, CMS, hippocampus, paroxetine, apoptosis, adenine nucleotides, cytochrome-c, caspase-3

  16. Impact of a chronic ingestion of radionuclides on cholesterol metabolism in the rat: example of depleted uranium and cesium 137

    Racine, Radjini

    2009-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) and cesium-137 ( 137 Cs) are radionuclides spread in the environment due to industrial activities, incidents or accidents. This pollution sets a risk of human exposure to low levels of radiations through contaminated foodstuff. The impact of a chronic ingestion of DU or 137 Cs on cholesterol metabolism in the liver and the brain has been studied. Indeed, cholesterol is crucial in physiology, being a component of cell membranes and a precursor to numerous molecules (bile acids...). Disruption of its metabolism is associated to many pathologies such as atherosclerosis or Alzheimer disease. Rats daily ingested a low level of DU or 137 Cs over 9 months. For each radionuclide, a reference model (rats contaminated since adulthood) and a more sensitive model (hypercholesterolemic or contaminated since fetal life) were studied. The effects mainly consist of changes in gene expression or enzymatic activity of various actors of cholesterol metabolism. DU mainly affects one catabolism enzyme in both models, as well as membrane transporters and regulation factors. 137 Cs mainly affects the storage enzyme in both models as well as catabolism enzymes, apolipoproteins, and regulation factors. No change in the plasma profile or in the tissue concentration of cholesterol (hepatic/cerebral) is recorded, whatever the model and the radionuclide. Thus, a chronic internal contamination with DU or 137 Cs induces molecular modifications in cholesterol metabolism in the rat, without affecting its homeostasis or the general health status in all of our experimental models. (author)

  17. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  18. Characterisation of the maternal response to chronic phase shifts during gestation in the rat: implications for fetal metabolic programming.

    Tamara J Varcoe

    Full Text Available Disrupting maternal circadian rhythms through exposure to chronic phase shifts of the photoperiod has lifelong consequences for the metabolic homeostasis of the fetus, such that offspring develop increased adiposity, hyperinsulinaemia and poor glucose and insulin tolerance. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms by which these poor metabolic outcomes arise, we investigated the impact of chronic phase shifts (CPS on maternal and fetal hormonal, metabolic and circadian rhythms. We assessed weight gain and food consumption of dams exposed to either CPS or control lighting conditions throughout gestation. At day 20, dams were assessed for plasma hormone and metabolite concentrations and glucose and insulin tolerance. Additionally, the expression of a range of circadian and metabolic genes was assessed in maternal, placental and fetal tissue. Control and CPS dams consumed the same amount of food, yet CPS dams gained 70% less weight during the first week of gestation. At day 20, CPS dams had reduced retroperitoneal fat pad weight (-15%, and time-of-day dependent decreases in liver weight, whereas fetal and placental weight was not affected. Melatonin secretion was not altered, yet the timing of corticosterone, leptin, glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, triglycerides and cholesterol concentrations were profoundly disrupted. The expression of gluconeogenic and circadian clock genes in maternal and fetal liver became either arrhythmic or were in antiphase to the controls. These results demonstrate that disruptions of the photoperiod can severely disrupt normal circadian profiles of plasma hormones and metabolites, as well as gene expression in maternal and fetal tissues. Disruptions in the timing of food consumption and the downstream metabolic processes required to utilise that food, may lead to reduced efficiency of growth such that maternal weight gain is reduced during early embryonic development. It is these perturbations that may contribute to

  19. Characterisation of the maternal response to chronic phase shifts during gestation in the rat: implications for fetal metabolic programming.

    Varcoe, Tamara J; Boden, Michael J; Voultsios, Athena; Salkeld, Mark D; Rattanatray, Leewen; Kennaway, David J

    2013-01-01

    Disrupting maternal circadian rhythms through exposure to chronic phase shifts of the photoperiod has lifelong consequences for the metabolic homeostasis of the fetus, such that offspring develop increased adiposity, hyperinsulinaemia and poor glucose and insulin tolerance. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms by which these poor metabolic outcomes arise, we investigated the impact of chronic phase shifts (CPS) on maternal and fetal hormonal, metabolic and circadian rhythms. We assessed weight gain and food consumption of dams exposed to either CPS or control lighting conditions throughout gestation. At day 20, dams were assessed for plasma hormone and metabolite concentrations and glucose and insulin tolerance. Additionally, the expression of a range of circadian and metabolic genes was assessed in maternal, placental and fetal tissue. Control and CPS dams consumed the same amount of food, yet CPS dams gained 70% less weight during the first week of gestation. At day 20, CPS dams had reduced retroperitoneal fat pad weight (-15%), and time-of-day dependent decreases in liver weight, whereas fetal and placental weight was not affected. Melatonin secretion was not altered, yet the timing of corticosterone, leptin, glucose, insulin, free fatty acids, triglycerides and cholesterol concentrations were profoundly disrupted. The expression of gluconeogenic and circadian clock genes in maternal and fetal liver became either arrhythmic or were in antiphase to the controls. These results demonstrate that disruptions of the photoperiod can severely disrupt normal circadian profiles of plasma hormones and metabolites, as well as gene expression in maternal and fetal tissues. Disruptions in the timing of food consumption and the downstream metabolic processes required to utilise that food, may lead to reduced efficiency of growth such that maternal weight gain is reduced during early embryonic development. It is these perturbations that may contribute to the programming of

  20. Metabolic Syndrome as a Factor Affecting Systemic Inflammation in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Rubinsztajn, R; Przybyłowski, T; Maskey-Warzęchowska, M; Paplińska-Goryca, M; Nejman-Gryz, P; Karwat, K; Chazan, R

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a systemic disease which may be associated with other comorbidities. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MS) in COPD patients and to assess its impact on systemic inflammation and lung function. MS was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Polish Forum for the Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases. The study group consisted of 267 patients with stable COPD in all stages of severity. All patients underwent spirometry with bronchial reversibility testing and 6 min walk test (6MWT). The following blood tests were evaluated: lipid profile, glucose and C-reactive protein as well as serum concentration of IL-6, leptin, adiponectin, and endothelin. MS was diagnosed in 93 patients (35.8%). No differences were observed in the incidence of MS in relation to airflow limitation severity (mild; moderate; severe and very severe: 38.9; 36.3; 35.2 and 25.0%, respectively). FEV 1 (% predicted), FVC (% predicted), 6MWT distance (6MWD), age, and the number of pack-years were similar in patients with and without MS. MS was more frequent in males than females (38.7 vs. 28.4%, p > 0.05). Serum concentrations of IL-6, endothelin, leptin, and CRP were higher in the MS group, contrary to adiponectin concentration which was lower (p < 0.01). MS was more frequent in male COPD patients, but there were no differences in its frequency between patients with different severity of airflow limitation. We conclude that MS, as a comorbidity, occurs in all COPD stages and affects systemic inflammation. MS incidence does not depend on COPD severity.

  1. The metabolic syndrome and risk of coronary artery disease in patients with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in a chronic mental institute

    Ping-Tao Tseng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of metabolic syndrome (MS and coronary artery disease (CAD has been found to be high in patients with chronic schizophrenia. Current evidence shows that CAD is underdiagnosed in this group. Our study evaluated the prevalence of MS and the risk of CAD in patients with chronic schizophrenia in a chronic care mental hospital in southern Taiwan. We included all patients with the diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. We collected all laboratory, physical examination, psychiatric interview, and chart review data. We also evaluated the risk of CAD in these patients using the Framingham point system. There was no significant age difference in the MS prevalence rate in these patients. The young patients with schizophrenia in our study tended to have a higher prevalence of MS than the general population. In addition, female patients had a higher prevalence rate of MS than males. Based on the Framingham point system, we found the 10-year risk of CAD to be higher among the patients with schizophrenia than in the general population. Our study highlights the importance of the high risk of MS in both younger and older patients with schizophrenia, without a significant relationship to the use of antipsychotics. More complete cohort studies are needed to confirm these findings. Psychiatrists may want to establish more specific and detailed clinical guidelines for patients with chronic schizophrenia with comorbid physical diseases, especially MS and CAD.

  2. Metabolism

    ... lin), which signals cells to increase their anabolic activities. Metabolism is a complicated chemical process, so it's not ... how those enzymes or hormones work. When the metabolism of body chemicals is ... Hyperthyroidism (pronounced: hi-per-THIGH-roy-dih-zum). Hyperthyroidism ...

  3. Mechanisms controlling the oxygen consumption in experimentally induced hypochloremic alkalosis in calves.

    Cambier, Carole; Clerbaux, Thierry; Amory, Hélène; Detry, Bruno; Florquin, Sandra; Marville, Vincent; Frans, Albert; Gustin, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    The study was carried out on healthy Friesian calves (n = 10) aged between 10 and 30 days. Hypochloremia and alkalosis were induced by intravenous administration of furosemide and isotonic sodium bicarbonate. The venous and arterial blood samples were collected repeatedly. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), hemoglobin and plasmatic chloride concentrations were determined. The red blood cell chloride concentration was also calculated. pH, PCO2 and PO2 were measured in arterial and mixed venous blood. The oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) was measured in standard conditions. The correspondence of the OEC to the arterial and mixed venous compartments was calculated, taking blood temperature, pH and PCO2 values into account. The oxygen exchange fraction (OEF%), corresponding to the degree of blood desaturation between the arterial and mixed venous compartments and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 mL of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated from the arterial and mixed venous OEC, combined with PO2 and hemoglobin concentration. Oxygen delivery (DO2) was calculated using the arterial oxygen content, the cardiac output measured by thermodilution, and the body weight of the animal. The oxygen consumption (VO2) was derived from the cardiac output, OEF Vol% and body weight values. Despite the plasma hypochloremia, the erythrocyte chloride concentration was not influenced by furosemide and sodium bicarbonate infusion. Due to the alkalosis-induced increase in the 2,3-DPG, the standard OEC was shifted to the right, allowing oxygen to dissociate from hemoglobin more rapidly. These changes opposed the increased affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen induced by alkalosis. Moreover, respiratory acidosis, hemoconcentration, and the slight decrease in the partial oxygen pressure in mixed venous blood (Pvo2) tended to improve the OEF Vol% and maintain the oxygen consumption in a physiological range while the cardiac output, and the oxygen delivery were significantly decreased

  4. Detection of new human metabolic urinary markers in chronic alcoholism and their reversal by aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia stem.

    Mittal, Ashwani; Dabur, Rajesh

    2015-05-01

    We have studied urine metabolic signature of chronic alcoholism (CA) before and after treatment with an Ayurvedic drug Tinospora cordifolia aqueous extract (TCE). Urinary metabolites of chronic alcoholics and apparently healthy subjects were profiled using HPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Discrimination models from the initial data sets were able to correctly assign the unknown samples to the CA, treated or healthy groups in validation sets with r(2) > 0.98. Metabolic signature in CA patients include changed tryptophan, fatty acids and pyrimidines metabolism. Several novel biomarkers of alcoholism were observed in urine for the first time which includes, 5-hydroxyindole, phenylacetic acid, picolinic acid, quinaldic acid, histidine, cystathionine, riboflavin, tetrahydrobiopterin and chenodeoxyglycocholic acid, in addition to previously reported biomarkers. Treatment of CA with TCE reverted the levels of most of the biomarkers except tetrahydrobiopterin levels. These results suggested that the measurement of these urine metabolites could be used as a non-invasive diagnostic method for the detection of CA. As TCE treatment significantly reversed the affected pathways without any side effect. Overall, the present data depicts that TCE may be used either alone or adjunct in reducing alcohol-induced disorders. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigating the Burden of Chronic Pain: An Inflammatory and Metabolic Composite

    Kimberly T. Sibille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chronic pain is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, predominated by cardiovascular disease and cancer. Investigating related risk factor measures may elucidate the biological burden of chronic pain. Objectives. We hypothesized that chronic pain severity would be positively associated with the risk factor composite. Methods. Data from 12,982 participants in the 6th Tromsø study were analyzed. Questionnaires included demographics, health behaviors, medical comorbidities, and chronic pain symptoms. The risk factor composite was comprised of body mass index, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, and triglycerides. Chronic pain severity was characterized by frequency, intensity, time/duration, and total number of pain sites. Results. Individuals with chronic pain had a greater risk factor composite than individuals without chronic pain controlling for covariates and after excluding inflammation-related health conditions (p<0.001. A significant “dose-response” relationship was demonstrated with pain severity (p<0.001. In individuals with chronic pain, the risk factor composite varied by health behavior, exercise, lower levels and smoking, and higher levels. Discussion. The risk factor composite was higher in individuals with chronic pain, greater with increasing pain severity, and influenced by health behaviors. Conclusions. Identification of a biological composite sensitive to pain severity and adaptive/maladaptive behaviors would have significant clinical and research utility.

  6. Nutritional Ketosis Affects Metabolism and Behavior in Sprague-Dawley Rats in Both Control and Chronic Stress Environments

    Milene L. Brownlow

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional ketosis may enhance cerebral energy metabolism and has received increased interest as a way to improve or preserve performance and resilience. Most studies to date have focused on metabolic or neurological disorders while anecdotal evidence suggests that ketosis may enhance performance in the absence of underlying dysfunction. Moreover, decreased availability of glucose in the brain following stressful events is associated with impaired cognition, suggesting the need for more efficient energy sources. We tested the hypotheses that ketosis induced by endogenous or exogenous ketones could: (a augment cognitive outcomes in healthy subjects; and (b prevent stress-induced detriments in cognitive parameters. Adult, male, Sprague Dawley rats were used to investigate metabolic and behavioral outcomes in 3 dietary conditions: ketogenic (KD, ketone supplemented (KS, or NIH-31 control diet in both control or chronic stress conditions. Acute administration of exogenous ketones resulted in reduction in blood glucose and sustained ketosis. Chronic experiments showed that in control conditions, only KD resulted in pronounced metabolic alterations and improved performance in the novel object recognition test. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis response revealed that KD-fed rats maintained peripheral ketosis despite increases in glucose whereas no diet effects were observed in ACTH or CORT levels. Both KD and KS-fed rats decreased escape latencies on the third day of water maze, whereas only KD prevented stress-induced deficits on the last testing day and improved probe test performance. Stress-induced decrease in hippocampal levels of β-hydroxybutyrate was attenuated in KD group while both KD and KS prevented stress effects on BDNF levels. Mitochondrial enzymes associated with ketogenesis were increased in both KD and KS hippocampal samples and both endothelial and neuronal glucose transporters were affected by stress but only in the

  7. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes.

  8. Respiratory acidosis prolongs, while alkalosis shortens, the duration and recovery time of vecuronium in humans.

    Yamauchi, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiromi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2002-03-01

    To determine the effects of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis by mechanical ventilation on the onset, duration, and recovery times of vecuronium. Randomized, prospective study. Operating rooms in the Sapporo Medical University Hospital and Kitami Red Cross Hospital. 90 ASA physical status I and II patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups by arterial carbon dioxide tension level (PaCO2; mmHg) after induction: hyperventilation group (PaCO2 = 25-35), normoventilation group (PaCO2 = 35-45), and hypoventilation group (PaCO2 = 45-55). Anesthesia was maintained by spinal block with inhalation of 50% to 66% nitrous oxide in oxygen and intermittent intravenous administration of fentanyl and midazolam with tracheal intubation. After vecuronium 0.08 mg/kg was given, onset, duration, and recovery time were measured by mechanomyography (Biometer Myograph 2,000, Odense, Denmark). There were significant differences in the duration and recovery time of vecuronium among the normoventilation group (12.7 +/- 3.3 min and 11.8 +/- 2.8 min, respectively), the hyperventilation group (10.6 +/- 3.5 min and 9.2 +/- 2.7 min, respectively; p respiratory acidosis and shortened in respiratory alkalosis.

  9. Cardiovascular and metabolic consequences of the association between chronic stress and high-fat diet in rats.

    Simas, Bruna B; Nunes, Everson A; Crestani, Carlos C; Speretta, Guilherme F

    2018-05-01

    Obesity and chronic stress are considered independent risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and changes in autonomic system activity. However, the cardiovascular consequences induced by the association between high-fat diet (HFD) and chronic stress are not fully understood. We hypothesized that the association between HFD and exposure to a chronic variable stress (CVS) protocol for four weeks might exacerbate the cardiovascular and metabolic disturbances in rats when compared to these factors singly. To test this hypothesis, male Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control-standard chow diet (SD; n = 8); control-HFD (n = 8); CVS-SD (n = 8); and CVS-HFD (n = 8). The CVS consisted of repeated exposure of the rats to different inescapable and unpredictable stressors (restraint tress; damp sawdust, cold, swim stress and light cycle inversion). We evaluated cardiovascular function, autonomic activity, dietary intake, adiposity and metabolism. The HFD increased body weight, adiposity and blood glucose concentration (∼15%) in both control and CVS rats. The CVS-HFD rats showed decreased insulin sensitivity (25%) compared to CVS-SD rats. The control-HFD and CVS-HFD rats presented increased intrinsic heart rate (HR) values (∼8%). CVS increased cardiac sympathetic activity (∼65%) in both SD- and HFD-fed rats. The HFD increased basal HR (∼10%). Blood pressure and baroreflex analyzes showed no differences among the experimental groups. In conclusion, the present data indicate absence of interaction on autonomic imbalance evoked by either CVS or HFD. Additionally, HFD increased HR and evoked metabolic disruptions which are independent of stress exposure.

  10. Markers of bone metabolism are affected by renal function and growth hormone therapy in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Doyon, Anke; Fischer, Dagmar-Christiane; Bayazit, Aysun Karabay; Canpolat, Nur; Duzova, Ali; Sözeri, Betül; Bacchetta, Justine; Balat, Ayse; Büscher, Anja; Candan, Cengiz; Cakar, Nilgun; Donmez, Osman; Dusek, Jiri; Heckel, Martina; Klaus, Günter; Mir, Sevgi; Özcelik, Gül; Sever, Lale; Shroff, Rukshana; Vidal, Enrico; Wühl, Elke; Gondan, Matthias; Melk, Anette; Querfeld, Uwe; Haffner, Dieter; Schaefer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The extent and relevance of altered bone metabolism for statural growth in children with chronic kidney disease is controversial. We analyzed the impact of renal dysfunction and recombinant growth hormone therapy on a panel of serum markers of bone metabolism in a large pediatric chronic kidney disease cohort. Bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b (TRAP5b), sclerostin and C-terminal FGF-23 (cFGF23) normalized for age and sex were analyzed in 556 children aged 6-18 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 10-60 ml/min/1.73 m2. 41 children receiving recombinant growth hormone therapy were compared to an untreated matched control group. Standardized levels of BAP, TRAP5b and cFGF-23 were increased whereas sclerostin was reduced. BAP was correlated positively and cFGF-23 inversely with eGFR. Intact serum parathormone was an independent positive predictor of BAP and TRAP5b and negatively associated with sclerostin. BAP and TRAP5B were negatively affected by increased C-reactive protein levels. In children receiving recombinant growth hormone, BAP was higher and TRAP5b lower than in untreated controls. Sclerostin levels were in the normal range and higher than in untreated controls. Serum sclerostin and cFGF-23 independently predicted height standard deviation score, and BAP and TRAP5b the prospective change in height standard deviation score. Markers of bone metabolism indicate a high-bone turnover state in children with chronic kidney disease. Growth hormone induces an osteoanabolic pattern and normalizes osteocyte activity. The osteocyte markers cFGF23 and sclerostin are associated with standardized height, and the markers of bone turnover predict height velocity.

  11. [Pathophysiology of hormonal, immune, metabolic changes in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Experimental and clinical studies].

    Trubitsyna, I E; Chikunova, B Z; Tkachenko, E V; Tsaregorodtseva, T M; Vinokurova, L V; Varvanina, G G

    2008-01-01

    There is literature review of the acute and chronic pancreatitis experimental models. Patogenetic necrosis mechanisms with fibrosis progress in pancreas were revealed. The stimulation of the proteolytic enzymes synthesis and secretion, that was examined in experiments were compared with clinical examinations. The patients with chronic pancreatitis were investigated in the Central Research Institute of Gastroenterology.

  12. The appraisal of chronic stress and the development of the metabolic syndrome: a systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    Bergmann, N; Gyntelberg, F; Faber, J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic psychosocial stress has been proposed as a risk factor for the development of the metabolic syndrome (MES). This review gives a systematic overview of prospective cohort studies investigating chronic psychosocial stress as a risk factor for incident MES and the individual elements of MES. Thirty-nine studies were included. An association between chronic psychosocial stress and the development of MES was generally supported. Regarding the four elements of MES: i) weight gain: the prospective studies supported etiological roles for relationship stress, perceived stress, and distress, while the studies on work-related stress (WS) showed conflicting results; ii) dyslipidemi: too few studies on psychosocial stress as a risk factor for dyslipidemia were available to draw a conclusion; however, a trend toward a positive association was present; iii) type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2): prospective studies supported perceived stress and distress as risk factors for the development of DM2 among men, but not among women, while WS was generally not supported as a risk factor among neither men nor women; iv) hypertension: marital stress and perceived stress might have an influence on blood pressure (BP), while no association was found regarding distress. Evaluating WS the results were equivocal and indicated that different types of WS affected the BP differently between men and women. In conclusion, a longitudinal association between chronic psychosocial stress and the development of MES seems present. However, the number of studies with sufficient quality is limited and the design of the studies is substantially heterogeneous. PMID:24743684

  13. Metabolic Consequences of Chronic Alcohol Abuse in Non-Smokers: A Pilot Study.

    Obiamaka Obianyo

    Full Text Available An alcohol use disorder (AUD is associated with an increased susceptibility to respiratory infection and injury and, upon hospitalization, higher mortality rates. Studies in model systems show effects of alcohol on mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism and antioxidant systems. The present study applied high-resolution metabolomics to test for these changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF of subjects with an AUD. Smokers were excluded to avoid confounding effects and compliance was verified by cotinine measurements. Statistically significant metabolic features, differentially expressed by control and AUD subjects, were identified by statistical and bioinformatic methods. The results show that fatty acid and acylcarnitine concentrations were increased in AUD subjects, consistent with perturbed mitochondrial and lipid metabolism. Decreased concentrations of methyl-donor compounds suggest altered one-carbon metabolism and oxidative stress. An accumulation of peptides suggests proteolytic activity, which could reflect altered epithelial barrier function. Two metabolites of possible microbial origin suggest subclinical bacterial infection. Furthermore, increased diacetylspermine suggests additional metabolic perturbations, which could contribute to dysregulated alveolar macrophage function and vulnerability to infection. Together, the results show an extended metabolic consequence of AUD in the bronchoalveolar space.

  14. The effect of early-life stress and chronic high-sucrose diet on metabolic outcomes in female rats.

    Maniam, Jayanthi; Antoniadis, Christopher P; Morris, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    Early-life stress affects metabolic outcomes and choice of diet influences the development of metabolic disease. Here we tested the hypothesis that chronic sugar intake exacerbates metabolic deficits induced by early-life stress. Early-life stress was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats using limited nesting material in early lactation (LN, postnatal days 2-9), and siblings were given chow alone or with additional sucrose post weaning (n = 9-17 per group). Female control and LN siblings had unlimited access to either chow plus water, or chow and water plus 25% sucrose solution (Sucrose), from 3-15 weeks of age. Weekly body weight and food intake were measured. Glucose and insulin tolerance were tested at 13 and 14 weeks of age, respectively. Rats were killed at 15 weeks. Hepatic triglyceride and markers of lipid synthesis - fatty acid synthase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase alpha and oxidation - and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (Pgc-1α) were examined. Mediators of hepatic glucocorticoid metabolism, specifically 11-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (11βHSD-1), 5-α reductase, and glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptor mRNAs were also measured. Sucrose increased caloric intake in both groups, but overall energy intake was not altered by LN exposure. LN exposure had no further impact on sucrose-induced glucose intolerance and increased plasma and liver triglycerides. Hepatic markers of fat synthesis and oxidation were concomitantly activated and 11βHSD-1 mRNA expression was increased by 53% in LN-Sucrose versus Con-Sucrose rats. Adiposity was increased by 26% in LN-Sucrose versus Con-Sucrose rats. Thus, LN exposure had minimal adverse metabolic effects despite high-sugar diet postweaning.

  15. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury.

    Evans, Nicholas; Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity.

  16. Acute Cardiorespiratory and Metabolic Responses During Exoskeleton-Assisted Walking Overground Among Persons with Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

    Hartigan, Clare; Kandilakis, Casey; Pharo, Elizabeth; Clesson, Ismari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity robotic exoskeleton technology is being developed with the promise of affording people with spinal cord injury (SCI) the opportunity to stand and walk. The mobility benefits of exoskeleton-assisted walking can be realized immediately, however the cardiorespiratory and metabolic benefits of this technology have not been thoroughly investigated. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses associated with exoskeleton-assisted walking overground and to determine the degree to which these responses change at differing walking speeds. Methods: Five subjects (4 male, 1 female) with chronic SCI (AIS A) volunteered for the study. Expired gases were collected during maximal graded exercise testing and two, 6-minute bouts of exoskeleton-assisted walking overground. Outcome measures included peak oxygen consumption (V̇O2peak), average oxygen consumption (V̇O2avg), peak heart rate (HRpeak), walking economy, metabolic equivalent of tasks for SCI (METssci), walk speed, and walk distance. Results: Significant differences were observed between walk-1 and walk-2 for walk speed, total walk distance, V̇O2avg, and METssci. Exoskeleton-assisted walking resulted in %V̇O2peak range of 51.5% to 63.2%. The metabolic cost of exoskeleton-assisted walking ranged from 3.5 to 4.3 METssci. Conclusion: Persons with motor-complete SCI may be limited in their capacity to perform physical exercise to the extent needed to improve health and fitness. Based on preliminary data, cardiorespiratory and metabolic demands of exoskeleton-assisted walking are consistent with activities performed at a moderate intensity. PMID:26364281

  17. Metabolically induced liver inflammation leads to NASH and differs from LPS- or IL-1β-induced chronic inflammation.

    Liang, Wen; Lindeman, Jan H; Menke, Aswin L; Koonen, Debby P; Morrison, Martine; Havekes, Louis M; van den Hoek, Anita M; Kleemann, Robert

    2014-05-01

    The nature of the chronic inflammatory component that drives the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is unclear and possible inflammatory triggers have not been investigated systematically. We examined the effect of non-metabolic triggers (lipopolysaccharide (LPS), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), administered by slow-release minipumps) and metabolic dietary triggers (carbohydrate, cholesterol) of inflammation on the progression of bland liver steatosis (BS) to NASH. Transgenic APOE3*Leiden.huCETP (APOE3L.CETP) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) developed BS after 10 weeks. Then, inflammatory triggers were superimposed or not (control) for six more weeks. Mouse livers were analyzed with particular emphasis on hallmarks of inflammation which were defined in human liver biopsies with and without NASH. Livers of HFD-treated control mice remained steatotic and did not progress to NASH. All four inflammatory triggers activated hepatic nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) significantly and comparably (≥5-fold). However, HFD+LPS or HFD+IL-1β did not induce a NASH-like phenotype and caused intrahepatic accumulation of almost exclusively mononuclear cells. By contrast, mice treated with metabolic triggers developed NASH, characterized by enhanced steatosis, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and formation of mixed-type inflammatory foci containing myeloperoxidase-positive granulocytes (neutrophils) as well as mononuclear cells, essentially as observed in human NASH. Specific for the metabolic inducers was an activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1), neutrophil infiltration, and induction of risk factors associated with human NASH, that is, dyslipidemia (by cholesterol) and insulin resistance (by carbohydrate). In conclusion, HFD feeding followed by NF-κB activation per se (LPS, IL-1β) does not promote the transition from BS to NASH. HFD feeding followed by metabolically evoked inflammation induces additional inflammatory components

  18. Pathophysiological aspect of metabolic acid-base disorders

    Nešović-Ostojić Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaing the arterial pH values (in normal range of 7,35-7,45 is one of the main principles of homeostasis. Regulatory responses, including chemical buffering (extracellular, intracellular, sceletal, the regulation of pCO2 by the respiratory system, and the regulation of [HCO3-] by the kidneys, act in concert to maintain normal arterial pH value. The main extracellular chemical buffer is bicarbonate-carbonic acid buffer system. The kidneys contribute to the regulation of hydrogen (and bicarbonate in body fluids in two ways. Proximal tubules are important in bicarbonate reabsorption and distal tubules excrete hydrogen ion (as ammonium ion or titratable acid. There are four simple acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis and metabolic alkalosis; respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis can occur because of an increase in endogenous acid production (such as lactate and ketoacids, loss of bicarbonate (as in diarrhea, or accumulation of endogenous acids (as in renal failure. Metabolic acidosis can also be with high and normal (hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis anion gap. Renal tubular acidosis (RTA is a form of hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis which occurs when the renal damage primarily affects tubular function. The main problem in distal RTA is reduced H+ excretion in distal tubule. Type 2 RTA is also called proximal RTA because the main problem is greatly impaired reabsorption of bicarbonate in proximal tubule. Impaired cation exchange in distal tubule is the main problem in RTA type 4. Metabolic alkalosis occurs as a result of net gain of [HCO3-] or loss of nonvolatile acid from extracellular fluids. Metabolic alkalosis can be associated with reduced or increased extracellular volume.

  19. [Changes in mineral metabolism in stage 3, 4, and 5 chronic kidney disease (not on dialysis)].

    Lorenzo Sellares, V; Torregrosa, V

    2008-01-01

    With progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD), disorders of mineral metabolism appear. The classic sequence of events begins with a deficit of calcitriol synthesis and retention of phosphorus. As a result of this, serum calcium decreases and parathyroid hormone (PTH) is stimulated, producing in the bone the high turnover (HT) bone disease known as osteitis fibrosa while on the other extreme we find the forms of low turnover (LT) bone disease. Described later and initially associated with aluminum intoxication, these diseases are now seen primarily in older and/or diabetic patients, who in a uremic setting have relatively low levels of PTH to maintain normal bone turnover. Osteomalacia is also included in this group, which after the disappearance of aluminum intoxication is rarely observed. LT forms of hyperparathyroidism facilitate the exit of calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) from bone, whereas the adynamic bone limits the incorporation of Ca and P into bone tissue. Therefore, both forms facilitate the availability of Ca and P, which ends up being deposited in soft tissues such as arteries. The link between bone disease and vascular calcifications in CKD is now a well-established phenomenon. 2. Diagnostic strategies Calcium, Phosphorus They have little capacity to predict underlying bone disease, but their regular measurement is decisive for therapeutic management of the patient, especially in the dose titration stages of intestinal phosphorus binders, vitamin D analogs or calcimimetics. Ideally, Ca++ should be used, but total Ca is routinely used. It is recommended to adjust albumin levels in the event of hypoalbuminemia (for each g/dL of decrease in albumin, total serum Ca decreases 0.9 mg/dL). The following formula facilitates rapid calculation of corrected total calcium: Corrected total Ca (mg/dL) = total Ca (mg/dL) + 0.8 [4-albumina (g/dL)]. Parathyroid hormone "Intact" PTH is the biochemical parameter that best correlates with bone histology (levels

  20. Effects of sub-chronic exposure to SO{sub 2} on lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in rats

    Lovati, M.R. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Manzoni, C. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Daldossi, M. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Spolti, S. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy); Sirtori, C.R. [Institute of Pharmacological Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    1996-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) is a ubiquitous air pollutant, present in low concentrations in the urban air, and in higher concentrations in the working environment. While toxicological reports on SO{sub 2} have extensively dealt with the pulmonary system, essentially no data are available on the effects of chronic exposure to this pollutant on intermediary metabolism, although some biochemical changes in lipid metabolism have been detected. The present investigation was aimed at evaluating the effects of sub-chronic exposure to SO{sub 2} on concentrations of serum lipids/lipoproteins and on glucose metabolism, in animal models of hypercholesterolemia and diabetes. A specially designed controlinert atmosphere chamber was used, where male Sprague-Dawley rats fed on either standard or cholesterol enriched (HC) diets, as well as streptozotocin diabetics, were exposed to SO{sub 2} at 5 and 10 ppm, 24 h per day for 14 days. In rats, both on a standard diet and on a HC regimen, SO{sub 2} exposure determined a significant dose-dependent increase in plasma triglycerides, up to +363% in the 10 ppm HC exposed animals. This same gas concentration significantly reduced HDL cholesterol levels. In contrast, exposure of diabetic animals to 10 ppm SO{sub 2} resulted in a fall (-41%) of plasma and liver triglycerides and in a concomitant increase (+62%) of plasma HDL cholesterol. This discrepancy could apparently be related to diverging effects of SO{sub 2} exposure on plasma insulin levels in the different animal groups. Kinetic analyses of triglyceride synthesis carried out in rats on a standard diet revealed, in exposed animals, a significant reduction in the secretory rate, in spite of the concomitant hypertriglyceridemia. These findings suggest that SO{sub 2} exposure can markedly modify major lipid and glycemic indices, also indicating a differential response in normo/hyperlipidemic versus diabetic animals. (orig.)

  1. Effects of Chronic Consumption of Sugar-Enriched Diets on Brain Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity in Adult Yucatan Minipigs.

    Melissa Ochoa

    Full Text Available Excessive sugar intake might increase the risk to develop eating disorders via an altered reward circuitry, but it remains unknown whether different sugar sources induce different neural effects and whether these effects are dependent from body weight. Therefore, we compared the effects of three high-fat and isocaloric diets varying only in their carbohydrate sources on brain activity of reward-related regions, and assessed whether brain activity is dependent on insulin sensitivity. Twenty-four minipigs underwent 18FDG PET brain imaging following 7-month intake of high-fat diets of which 20% in dry matter weight (36.3% of metabolisable energy was provided by starch, glucose or fructose (n = 8 per diet. Animals were then subjected to a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to determine peripheral insulin sensitivity. After a 7-month diet treatment, all groups had substantial increases in body weight (from 36.02±0.85 to 63.33±0.81 kg; P<0.0001, regardless of the diet. All groups presented similar insulin sensitivity index (ISI = 1.39±0.10 mL·min-1·μUI·kg. Compared to starch, chronic exposure to fructose and glucose induced bilateral brain activations, i.e. increased basal cerebral glucose metabolism, in several reward-related brain regions including the anterior and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the caudate and putamen. The lack of differences in insulin sensitivity index and body weight suggests that the observed differences in basal brain glucose metabolism are not related to differences in peripheral insulin sensitivity and weight gain. The differences in basal brain metabolism in reward-related brain areas suggest the onset of cerebral functional alterations induced by chronic consumption of dietary sugars. Further studies should explore the underlying mechanisms, such as the availability of intestinal and brain sugar transporter, or the appearance of addictive-like behavioral

  2. Tryptophan Metabolism in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Secondary to Type 2 Diabetes: Relationship to Inflammatory Markers

    Subrata Debnath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is the primary case of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Inflammation is associated with metabolic dysregulation in patients with T2D and CKD. Tryptophan (TRP metabolism may have relevance to the CKD outcomes and associated symptoms. We investigated the relationships of TRP metabolism with inflammatory markers in patients with T2D and CKD. Methods: Data were collected from a well-characterized cohort of type 2 diabetic individuals with all stages of CKD, including patients on hemodialysis. Key TRP metabolites (kynurenine [KYN], kynurenic acid [KYNA], and quinolinic acid [QA], proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α] and interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein were measured in plasma. The KYN/TRP ratio was utilized as a surrogate marker for indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1 enzyme activity. Results: There was a significant inverse association between circulating TRP level and stages of CKD ( P  < 0.0001. Downstream bioactive TRP metabolites KYN, KYNA, and QA were positively and robustly correlated with the severity of kidney disease ( P  < 0.0001. In multiple linear regression, neither TNF-α nor IL-6 was independently related to KYN/TRP ratio after adjusting for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Only TNF-α was independently related to KYN after taking into account the effect of eGFR. Conclusions: Chronic kidney disease secondary to T2D may be associated with accumulation of toxic TRP metabolites due to both inflammation and impaired kidney function. Future longitudinal studies to determine whether the accumulation of KYN directly contributes to CKD progression and associated symptoms in patients with T2D are warranted.

  3. Relationships between Electrokinetic Index of buccal epithelium and some functional and metabolic parameters at men with chronic pyelonephrite

    Iryna G. Kyrylenko

    2016-01-01

      Abstracts   Background. Known for a number of parameters of the body, which through regression equations derived can assess biological age. We examined relationships between electrokinetic mobility buccal epithelium cell nuclei, named Electrokinetic Index (EKI, and some functional and metabolic parameters of body. Methods. Under a observations were 23 men by age 24-70 years with chronic pyelonephrite in the phase of remission. We estimated the EKI, state of the vegetative and hormonal regulation as well as metabolism of cholesterol. Results. We confirned closely correlation (r=-0,89 between Metric Age and EKI. Baevskiy’s Adaptation Potential and Stange’s Test together determines EKI on 28%. RMSSD, VLF and Baevskiy’s Stress Index determines EKI on 31%. Plasma Colesterol and Klimov’s Atherogenicity Coefficient determines EKI on 56%. In summary model of multiple regression with stepwise excluding are currently two last parameters as well as Plasma Testosterone and relative Power Spectral VLF HRV, which together determines EKI on 73%: R=0,868; R2=0,754; Adjusted R2=0,730;F(4,4=31,4; χ2(4=58,9; p<10-5. Conclusion. Electrokinetic Index of buccal epithelium really rellects neuro-endocrine regulation and metabolism of Cholesterol.   Keywords: Electrokinetic Index, Biological Age, HRV, Cholesterol, Testosterone, Cortisol, Relationships.

  4. Analysis of relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    You Fengjian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between blood lipid metabolism levels and hs-CRP levels in the patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Methods: The levels of plasma blood lipid (with biochemistry) and serum hs-CRP(with high-sensitive immuno turbidimetry) were determined in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as well as 68 normal controls. Results: The plasma blood lipid levels in 96 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were significantly lower than those in 68 controls, plasma TC and LDL-C levels were not much difference (P>0.05), plasma HDL-C level was significantly difference (P<0.05), but TG and Lp (a) levels were very prominently difference (P<0.01). And the plasma hs-CRP level was significantly increased also (P<0.01). The close relationship was between blood lipid and hs-CRP levels. Conclusion: The study of relationship between blood lipid levels and hs-CRP levels in patients with COPD was helpful for understand the disease process as well as possible mechanisms. (authors)

  5. Effects of subacute and chronic lead treatment on glucose homestasis and renal cyclic AMP metabolism in rats

    Stevenson, A; Merali, Z; Kacew, S; Singhal, R L

    1976-01-01

    The effects of chronic oral ingestion of lead in doses ranging from 20 to 80 ppM were compared with those seen after the subacute exposure of rats to a 10 mg/kg daily dose of the heavy metal for 7 days. Irrespective of the treatment regimen used, lead treatment significantly increased the activities of renal pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase. The observed enhancement of kidney gluconeogenic enzymes in chronically treated animals was associated with a stimulation of the adenylate cyclase-cyclic AMP system, a rise in blood glucose and urea as well as a depression in hepatic glycogen and serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels. In contrast, subacute exposure to lead failed to significantly alter cyclic AMP metabolism and the concentrations of liver glycogen, blood glucose, serum urea or IRI. Whereas the insulinogenic index (the ratio of serum IRI to blood glucose concentration) was markedly suppressed in chronically treated rats, this ratio remained within normal limits following subacute exposure to the heavy metal. However, a marked decrease in the insulinogenic index was observed in subacutely treated rats 15 min after the administration of a glucose load. The data provide evidence to show that increased glucose synthesis as well as suppressed pancreatic function may be responsible for lead-induced disturbances in glucose homeostasis.

  6. Risk of development of chronic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes having metabolic syndrome

    Moin, S.; Gondal, G.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    To measure the relation of creatinine clearance in type-2 diabetic patients with different components of metabolic syndrome and to quantify the relationship of frequency of incident CKD with increasing number of metabolic syndrome components while controlling for age, gender and duration of diabetes. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients having type-2 Diabetes for more than 5 years were enrolled. Information regarding age, gender, duration of diabetes, type of diabetes, treatment taking, complete fasting lipid profile, fasting blood glucose, Body Mass Index (BMI), 24 hours urinary proteins and creatinine clearance, co-existent risk factors like hypertension and ischemic heart disease was taken. Patients were divided into groups having one to all five metabolic syndrome traits. Progressive increase in the metabolic syndrome traits was compared with decline in creatinine clearance. Pearson correlation test and multiple logistic regression were applied to determine correlation with significance at r and p <0.05. Out of 104 evaluated female and male patients, 70% had hypertension, ischemic heart disease and a family history of diabetes. While 20% had normal creatinine clearance, 37% had a creatinine clearance between 60-90 ml/min, 19% had a creatinine clearance of 30-59 ml/min, 18% had a creatinine clearance of less than 30 ml/min and 10% were already in stage 5 CKD. The decline in renal function was more severe in subjects evaluated who had a higher number of features of the metabolic syndrome. Age was the only significant determinant of development of CKD (p=0.05). The renal function progressively declined with 3 or more features of the metabolic syndrome. (author)

  7. Dopamine enhances the phosphaturic effect of PTH during acute respiratory alkalosis.

    Berndt, T J; Tucker, R R; Kent, P D; Streiff, P C; Tyce, G M; Knox, F G

    1999-12-01

    The phosphaturic response to parathyroid hormone (PTH) is blunted during acute respiratory alkalosis. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of dopamine on the blunted phosphaturic response to PTH during acute respiratory alkalosis. The phosphaturic response to PTH was determined in thyroparathyroidectomized (TPTX) normocapnic and respiratory alkalotic rats in the absence and presence of the infusion of exogenous dopamine (25 microg/kg/min) or of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA, 250 microg/kg/min) to increase endogenous dopamine synthesis. In normocapnic rats, PTH infusion (33 U/kg plus 1 U/kg/min) significantly increased the fractional excretion of phosphate (FE(Pi)), from 1.5%+/-0.5% to 28.4%+/-4.0%, (deltaFE(Pi) 26.9%+/-4.1%, n = 11, Prespiratory alkalotic rats, the increase was from 0.4%+/-0.1% to 11.4%+/-1.7% (deltaFE(Pi) 11.0%+/-1.8%, n = 13, Prespiratory alkalotic rats (deltaFE(Pi) 26.9%+/-4.1% vs 11.0%+/-1.9%, Prespiratory alkalotic rats, in the presence of dopamine infusion, PTH significantly increased the FE(Pi), from 0.6%+/-0.2% to 19.3%+/-3.3% (deltaFE(Pi) 18.7%+/-3.3%, n = 6); in the presence of L-DOPA infusion it increased from 1.0%+/-0.3% to 20.5%+/-2.8% (deltaFE(Pi) 19.5%+/-2.9%, n = 8, Prespiratory alkalotic rats was enhanced by stimulation of endogenous dopamine synthesis by the infusion of L-DOPA.

  8. Expression profiling of skeletal muscle following acute and chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation: implications for hypertrophy, metabolism and circadian rhythm

    Lynch Gordon S

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR agonists has been found to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and significant metabolic changes. In the context of energy homeostasis, the importance of β-AR signaling has been highlighted by the inability of β1-3-AR-deficient mice to regulate energy expenditure and susceptibility to diet induced obesity. However, the molecular pathways and gene expression changes that initiate and maintain these phenotypic modulations are poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify differential changes in gene expression in murine skeletal muscle associated with systemic (acute and chronic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol. Results Skeletal muscle gene expression (from murine tibialis anterior was profiled at both 1 and 4 hours following systemic administration of the β2-AR agonist formoterol, using Illumina 46K mouse BeadArrays. Illumina expression profiling revealed significant expression changes in genes associated with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, metabolism, circadian rhythm, transcription, histones, and oxidative stress. Differentially expressed genes relevant to the regulation of muscle mass and metabolism (in the context of the hypertrophic phenotype were further validated by quantitative RT-PCR to examine gene expression in response to both acute (1-24 h and chronic administration (1-28 days of formoterol at multiple timepoints. In terms of skeletal muscle hypertrophy, attenuation of myostatin signaling (including differential expression of myostatin, activin receptor IIB, phospho-Smad3 etc was observed following acute and chronic administration of formoterol. Acute (but not chronic administration of formoterol also significantly induced the expression of genes involved in oxidative metabolism, including hexokinase 2, sorbin and SH3 domain containing 1, and uncoupling protein 3. Interestingly, formoterol

  9. Chronic REM-sleep deprivation of rats elevates metabolic rate and increases UCP1 gene expression in brown adipose tissue.

    Koban, Michael; Swinson, Kevin L

    2005-07-01

    A cluster of unique pathologies progressively develops during chronic total- or rapid eye movement-sleep deprivation (REM-SD) of rats. Two prominent and readily observed symptoms are hyperphagia and decline in body weight. For body weight to be lost despite a severalfold increase in food consumption suggests that SD elevates metabolism as the subject enters a state of negative energy balance. To test the hypothesis that mediation of this hypermetabolism involves increased gene expression of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which dissipates the thermodynamic energy of the mitochondrial proton-motive force as heat instead of ATP formation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), we 1) established the time course and magnitude of change in metabolism by measuring oxygen consumption, 2) estimated change in UCP1 gene expression in BAT by RT-PCR and Western blot, and 3) assayed serum leptin because of its role in regulating energy balance and food intake. REM-SD of male Sprague-Dawley rats was enforced for 20 days with the platform (flowerpot) method, wherein muscle atonia during REM sleep causes contact with surrounding water and awakens it. By day 20, rats more than doubled food consumption while losing approximately 11% of body weight; metabolism rose to 166% of baseline with substantial increases in UCP1 mRNA and immunoreactive UCP1 over controls; serum leptin decreased and remained suppressed. The decline in leptin is consistent with the hyperphagic response, and we conclude that one of the mediators of elevated metabolism during prolonged REM-SD is increased gene expression of UCP1 in BAT.

  10. Effect of personalized dietary intervention on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Lai, S; Molfino, A; Coppola, B; De Leo, S; Tommasi, V; Galani, A; Migliaccio, S; Greco, E A; Gnerre Musto, T; Muscaritoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) present a markedly increased cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality since the early stages of the disease and a high prevalence of malnutrition, inflammation, and accelerated atherosclerosis. Personalized nutritional intervention, with of a low-protein diet (LPD), since the early stages of CKD should be able to achieve significant metabolic improvements. In our study we have verified the effects of a personalized dietary intervention in patients in the CKD stages 3/4 KDOQI on nutritional, metabolic and vascular indices. We have evaluated renal function, lipid profile, mineral metabolism, inflammatory indices, and acid-base balance of 16 patients with CKD (stages 3/4 KDOQI). Assessment of nutritional status, body composition, bone mineral density and muscle mass, using body mass index (BMI), handgrip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was performed. Vascular indices and endothelial dysfunction such as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and the brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (baFMD) were also analyzed. After dietary interventions, we observed a significant increase in plasma bicarbonate (p = 0.004) and vitamin D levels (p = 0.03) and a concomitant significant reduction of phosphorus concentration (p = 0.001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (p = 0.01). Nutritional intervention potentially plays a major role in reducing the progression of CKD and systemic complications of predialysis patients. A low-protein diet (LPD) ensuring vegetable protein intake and a reduced amount of specific micronutrients should be recommended to stage 3/4 CKD patients in order to ameliorate metabolic profile, renal outcome, and reduce cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Functional and metabolic changes in the brain in neuropathic pain syndrome against the background of chronic epidural electrostimulation of the spinal cord.

    Sufianov, A A; Shapkin, A G; Sufianova, G Z; Elishev, V G; Barashin, D A; Berdichevskii, V B; Churkin, S V

    2014-08-01

    Changes in functional and metabolic activities of the brain were evaluated by EEG and positron-emission/computer tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose in patients with neuropathic pain syndrome previous to and 3 months after implantation of a system for chronic epidural spinal cord stimulation. In most cases, the use of a nerve stimulator was followed by alleviation of neuropathic pain and partial normalization of functional and metabolic activities of brain structures responsible for pain perception, emotiogenic, behavioral, and autonomic responses.

  12. Effect of acute metabolic acid/base shifts on the human airway calibre.

    Brijker, F.; Elshout, F.J.J. van den; Heijdra, Y.F.; Bosch, F.H.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2001-01-01

    Acute metabolic alkalosis (NaHCO(3)), acidosis (NH(4)Cl), and placebo (NaCl) were induced in 15 healthy volunteers (12 females, median age 34 (range 24-56) years) in a double blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the presence of the effects on airway calibre. Acid-base shifts were determined

  13. Aspects of protein metabolism in children in acute and chronic illness

    Geukers, V.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    In critically ill children, a negative protein balance is associated with an increased incidence of infections, fewer ventilator-free days, and increased length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit. Additionally, a malnourished state due to chronic illness increases the risk of respiratory

  14. Vitamin K metabolism in a rat model of chronic kidney disease

    Background: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have very high levels of uncarboxylated, inactive, extra-hepatic vitamin K-dependent proteins measured in circulation, putting them at risk for complications of vitamin K deficiency. The major form of vitamin K found in the liver is phylloquinon...

  15. Glucose metabolism in chronic diabetic foot ulcers measured in vivo using microdialysis

    Simonsen, L; Holstein, P; Larsen, K

    1998-01-01

    Ten subjects with diabetes mellitus and unilateral chronic foot ulcer were investigated. Local tissue concentrations of glucose and lactate were measured using the microdialysis method at a distance of 0.5-1 cm from the edge of the ulcer and in normal skin in the contralateral foot. Subcutaneous...

  16. Disordered APP metabolism and neurovasculature in trauma and aging: Combined risks for chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

    Ikonomovic, Milos D; Mi, Zhiping; Abrahamson, Eric E

    2017-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), advanced age, and cerebral vascular disease are factors conferring increased risk for late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD). These conditions are also related pathologically through multiple interacting mechanisms. The hallmark pathology of AD consists of pathological aggregates of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and tau proteins. These molecules are also involved in neuropathology of several other chronic neurodegenerative diseases, and are under intense investigation in the aftermath of TBI as potential contributors to the risk for developing AD and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The pathology of TBI is complex and dependent on injury severity, age-at-injury, and length of time between injury and neuropathological evaluation. In addition, the mechanisms influencing pathology and recovery after TBI likely involve genetic/epigenetic factors as well as additional disorders or comorbid states related to age and central and peripheral vascular health. In this regard, dysfunction of the aging neurovascular system could be an important link between TBI and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, either as a precipitating event or related to accumulation of AD-like pathology which is amplified in the context of aging. Thus with advanced age and vascular dysfunction, TBI can trigger self-propagating cycles of neuronal injury, pathological protein aggregation, and synaptic loss resulting in chronic neurodegenerative disease. In this review we discuss evidence supporting TBI and aging as dual, interacting risk factors for AD, and the role of Aβ and cerebral vascular dysfunction in this relationship. Evidence is discussed that Aβ is involved in cyto- and synapto-toxicity after severe TBI, and that its chronic effects are potentiated by aging and impaired cerebral vascular function. From a therapeutic perspective, we emphasize that in the fields of TBI- and aging-related neurodegeneration protective strategies should include preservation of

  17. 5-HT2A receptor deficiency alters the metabolic and transcriptional, but not the behavioral, consequences of chronic unpredictable stress

    Minal Jaggar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress enhances risk for psychiatric disorders, and in animal models is known to evoke depression-like behavior accompanied by perturbed neurohormonal, metabolic, neuroarchitectural and transcriptional changes. Serotonergic neurotransmission, including serotonin2A (5-HT2A receptors, have been implicated in mediating specific aspects of stress-induced responses. Here we investigated the influence of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS on depression-like behavior, serum metabolic measures, and gene expression in stress-associated neurocircuitry of the prefrontal cortex (PFC and hippocampus in 5-HT2A receptor knockout (5-HT2A−/− and wild-type mice of both sexes. While 5-HT2A−/− male and female mice exhibited a baseline reduced anxiety-like state, this did not alter the onset or severity of behavioral despair during and at the cessation of CUS, indicating that these mice can develop stress-evoked depressive behavior. Analysis of metabolic parameters in serum revealed a CUS-evoked dyslipidemia, which was abrogated in 5-HT2A−/− female mice with a hyperlipidemic baseline phenotype. 5-HT2A−/− male mice in contrast did not exhibit such a baseline shift in their serum lipid profile. Specific stress-responsive genes (Crh, Crhr1, Nr3c1, and Nr3c2, trophic factors (Bdnf, Igf1 and immediate early genes (IEGs (Arc, Fos, Fosb, Egr1-4 in the PFC and hippocampus were altered in 5-HT2A−/− mice both under baseline and CUS conditions. Our results support a role for the 5-HT2A receptor in specific metabolic and transcriptional, but not behavioral, consequences of CUS, and highlight that the contribution of the 5-HT2A receptor to stress-evoked changes is sexually dimorphic. Keywords: 5-HT2A−/− mice, Prefrontal cortex, Hippocampus, Gene expression, Sexual dimorphism, Despair

  18. Deciphering the Differential Effective and Toxic Responses of Bupleuri Radix following the Induction of Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress and in Healthy Rats Based on Serum Metabolic Profiles

    Xiaoxia Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The petroleum ether fraction of Bupleuri Radix which is contained in the traditional Chinese medicine prescription of Xiaoyaosan (XYS may have a therapeutic effect in depressed subjects based on the results of our previous study. It has been reported that Bupleuri Radix can cause liver toxicity following overdosing or long-term use. Therefore, this study aimed to decipher the differential effective and toxic responses of Bupleuri Radix in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS (with depression and healthy rats based on serum metabolic profiles. Serum metabolic profiles were obtained using the UHPLC- Q Exactive Orbitrap-MS technique. Our results demonstrated that the petroleum ether fraction of Bupleuri Radix (PBR produces an antidepressant effect through regulating glycometabolism, amino acid metabolism, sphingolipid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, and fatty acid metabolism. It also induces more severe toxic reactions in the liver or kidney in healthy rats than in CUMS rats, which exhibited a comparatively mild drug-induced toxic reaction. The altered lysine degradation, sphingolipid metabolism, glycerophospholipid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and bile acid metabolism could be at least partly responsible for the PBR toxic responses in healthy rats. The differential effective and toxic response of PBR in CUMS rats and healthy rats provide a new standard for the more rational and safer application of clinical drugs in the future.

  19. Abnormal glucose metabolism is associated with reduced left ventricular contractile reserve and exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure

    Egstrup, M; Kistorp, C N; Schou, M

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the associations between glucose metabolism, left ventricular (LV) contractile reserve, and exercise capacity in patients with chronic systolic heart failure (HF). METHODS AND RESULTS: From an outpatient HF clinic, 161 patients with systolic HF were included (mean age 70 ± 10...... or new DM. All patients completed low-dose dobutamine echocardiography (LDDE) and 154 patients a 6-min walking distance test (6MWD). Compared with patients with NGT, patients with known DM had lower resting LVEF (33.4 vs. 39.1%, P ... in LVEF could be observed in all glycemic groups (mean 8.2% absolute increase), but the contractile reserve was lower in patients with known DM (-5.4%, P = 0.001) and new DM (-3.5%, P = 0.035) compared to patients with NGT. 6MWD was lower in known DM (349 m) and new DM (379 m) compared with NGT (467 m) (P...

  20. Influence of chronic low intensively irradiation on the basic metabolic processes in leguminous plants (fabaceae)

    Goncharova, N.V.

    2011-01-01

    Effect of the incorporated radionuclides on the basic metabolic processes in leguminous plants growth in inspected conditions was studied. There were findings of the accelerated course of a stage development in ontogenesis, increase of the photosynthetic activity of leaf and peroxidase activity along with a rise of the contents of photosynthetic pigments and lipid peroxidation products. The data are indicative of the distinct stimulation effect induced by the incorporated radionuclides. (authors)

  1. Neurochemical Metabolomics Reveals Disruption to Sphingolipid Metabolism Following Chronic Haloperidol Administration.

    McClay, Joseph L; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Crowley, James J; Vann, Robert E; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J

    2015-09-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p < 0.05 level. Top compounds were robust to analytical method, also being identified via partial least squares discriminant analysis. Four compounds (sphinganine, N-acetylornithine, leucine and adenosine diphosphate) survived correction for multiple testing in a non-parametric analysis using false discovery rate threshold < 0.1. Pathway analysis of nominally significant compounds (p < 0.05) revealed significant findings for sphingolipid metabolism (p = 0.015) and protein biosynthesis (p = 0.024). Altered sphingolipid metabolism is suggestive of disruptions to myelin. This interpretation is supported by our observation of elevated N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate in the haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects.

  2. Chronic chlorpyrifos exposure elicits diet-specific effects on metabolism and the gut microbiome in rats.

    Fang, Bing; Li, Jin Wang; Zhang, Ming; Ren, Fa Zheng; Pang, Guo Fang

    2018-01-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a commonly-used pesticide which was reported to interfere with hormone signaling and metabolism, however, little is known about its effect on gut microbiota. In this study, adult male rats fed a normal (NF) or high fat (HF) diet were exposed to 0.3 or 3.0 mg chlorpyrifos/kg bodyweight/day or vehicle alone for 9 weeks. Effects on bodyweight, serum levels of glucose, lipid, cytokines, and gut microbiome community structure were measured. The effects of chlorpyrifos on metabolism were dose- and diet-dependent, with NF-fed rats administered the low dose showing the largest metabolic changes. NF-fed rats exposed to chlorpyrifos exhibited a pro-obesity phenotype compared with their controls, whereas there was no difference in pro-obesity phenotype between HF-fed groups. Chlorpyrifos exposure significantly reduced serum insulin, C-peptide, and amylin concentrations in NF- and HF-fed rats, leaving serum glucose and lipid profiles unaffected. Chlorpyrifos exposure also significantly altered gut microbiota composition, including the abundance of opportunistic pathogens, short chain fatty acid-producing bacteria and other bacteria previously associated with obese and diabetic phenotypes. The abundance of bacteria associated with neurotoxicity and islet injury was also significantly increased by chlorpyrifos. Our results suggest risk assessments for chlorpyrifos exposure should consider other effects in addition to neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of intermittent fasting and chronic swimming exercise on body composition and lipid metabolism.

    Moraes, Ruan Carlos Macedo de; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Ferraz, Alex Soares Marreiros; da Silva, Tiago Eugênio Oliveira; Marocolo, Moacir

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent fasting protocol (IFP) has been suggested as a strategy to change body metabolism and improve health. The effects of IFP seem to be similar to aerobic exercise, having a hormetic adaptation according to intensity and frequency. However, the effects of combining both interventions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IFP with and without endurance-exercise training on body composition, food behavior, and lipid metabolism. Twenty-week-old Wistar rats were kept under an inverted circadian cycle of 12 h with water ad libitum and assigned to 4 different groups: control group (ad libitum feeding and sedentary), exercise group (ad libitum feeding and endurance training), intermittent fasting group (IF; intermittent fasting and sedentary), and intermittent fasting and exercise group (IFEX; intermittent fasting and endurance training). After 6 weeks, the body weight of IF and IFEX animals decreased without changes in food consumption. Yet, the body composition between the 2 groups was different, with the IFEX animals containing higher total protein and lower total fat content than the IF animals. The IFEX group also showed increases in total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased intramuscular lipid content. The amount of brown adipose tissue was higher in IF and IFEX groups; however, the IFEX group showed higher expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 in this tissue, indicating a greater thermogenesis. The IFP combined with endurance training is an efficient method for decreasing body mass and altering fat metabolism, without inflicting losses in protein content.

  4. Pericardial adipose tissue and the metabolic syndrome is increased in patients with chronic major depressive disorder compared to acute depression and controls.

    Kahl, K G; Herrmann, J; Stubbs, B; Krüger, T H C; Cordes, J; Deuschle, M; Schweiger, U; Hüper, K; Helm, S; Birkenstock, A; Hartung, D

    2017-01-04

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with an estimated fourfold risk for premature death, largely attributed to cardiovascular disorders. Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT), a fat compartment surrounding the heart, has been implicated in the development of coronary artery disease. An unanswered question is whether people with chronic MDD are more likely to have elevated PAT volumes versus acute MDD and controls (CTRL). The study group consists of sixteen patients with chronic MDD, thirty-four patients with acute MDD, and twenty-five CTRL. PAT and adrenal gland volume were measured by magnetic resonance tomography. Additional measures comprised factors of the metabolic syndrome, cortisol, relative insulin resistance, and pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6; IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, TNF-α). PAT volumes were significantly increased in patients with chronic MDD>patients with acute MDD>CTRL. Adrenal gland volume was slightly enlarged in patients with chronic MDD>acute MDD>CTRL, although this difference failed to reach significance. The PAT volume was correlated with adrenal gland volume, and cortisol concentrations were correlated with depression severity, measured by BDI-2 and MADRS. Group differences were found concerning the rate of the metabolic syndrome, being most frequent in chronic MDD>acute MDD>CTRL. Further findings comprised increased fasting cortisol, increased TNF-α concentration, and decreased physical activity level in MDD compared to CTRL. Our results extend the existing literature in demonstrating that patients with chronic MDD have the highest risk for developing cardiovascular disorders, indicated by the highest PAT volume and prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The correlation of PAT with adrenal gland volume underscores the role of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal system as mediator for body-composition changes. Metabolic monitoring, health advices and motivation for the improvement of physical fitness may be recommended in

  5. Alterations to mitochondrial fatty-acid use in skeletal muscle after chronic exposure to hypoxia depend on metabolic phenotype.

    Malgoyre, Alexandra; Chabert, Clovis; Tonini, Julia; Koulmann, Nathalie; Bigard, Xavier; Sanchez, Hervé

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the effects of chronic hypoxia on the maximal use of and sensitivity of mitochondria to different substrates in rat slow-oxidative (soleus, SOL) and fast-glycolytic (extensor digitorum longus, EDL) muscles. We studied mitochondrial respiration in situ in permeabilized myofibers, using pyruvate, octanoate, palmitoyl-carnitine (PC), or palmitoyl-coenzyme A (PCoA). The hypophagia induced by hypoxia may also alter metabolism. Therefore, we used a group of pair-fed rats (reproducing the same caloric restriction, as observed in hypoxic animals), in addition to the normoxic control fed ad libitum. The resting respiratory exchange ratio decreased after 21 days of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (simulated elevation of 5,500 m). The respiration supported by pyruvate and octanoate were unaffected. In contrast, the maximal oxidative respiratory rate for PCoA, the transport of which depends on carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT-1), decreased in the rapid-glycolytic EDL and increased in the slow-oxidative SOL, although hypoxia improved affinity for this substrate in both muscle types. PC and PCoA were oxidized similarly in normoxic EDL, whereas chronic hypoxia limited transport at the CPT-1 step in this muscle. The effects of hypoxia were mediated by caloric restriction in the SOL and by hypoxia itself in the EDL. We conclude that improvements in mitochondrial affinity for PCoA, a physiological long-chain fatty acid, would facilitate fatty-acid use at rest after chronic hypoxia independently of quantitative alterations of mitochondria. Conversely, decreasing the maximal oxidation of PCoA in fast-glycolytic muscles would limit fatty-acid use during exercise. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Affinity for low concentrations of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) in mitochondria skeletal muscles increases after chronic hypoxia. Combined with a lower respiratory exchange ratio, this suggests facility for fatty acid utilization at rest. This fuel preference is related to caloric

  6. Basis of aggravated hepatic lipid metabolism by chronic stress in high-fat diet-fed rat.

    Han, Ying; Lin, Min; Wang, Xiaobin; Guo, Keke; Wang, Shanshan; Sun, Mengfei; Wang, Jiao; Han, Xiaoyu; Fu, Ting; Hu, Yang; Fu, Jihua

    2015-03-01

    Our previous study has demonstrated that long-term stress, known as chronic stress (CS), can aggravate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed rat. In this study, we tried to figure out which lipid metabolic pathways were impacted by CS in the HFD-fed rat. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age, n = 8 per group) were fed with either standard diet or HFD with or without CS exposure for 8 weeks. Hepatic lipidosis, biochemical, hormonal, and lipid profile markers in serum and liver, and enzymes involved in de novo lipogenesis (DNL) of fatty acids (FAs) and cholesterol, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, triglycerides synthesis, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) assembly in the liver were detected. CS exposure reduced hepatic lipidosis but further elevated hepatic VLDL content with aggravated dyslipidemia in the HFD-fed rats. There was a synergism between CS and HFD on VLDL production and dyslipidemia. PCR and western blot assays showed that CS exposure significantly promoted hepatic VLDL assembly in rats, especially in the HFD-fed rats, while it had little impact on DNL, β-oxidation, FAs uptake, and triglycerides synthesis in the HFD-fed rats. This phenomenon was in accordance with elevated serum glucocorticoid level. The critical influence of CS exposure on hepatic lipid metabolism in the HFD-fed rats is VLDL assembly which might be regulated by glucocorticoid.

  7. Characterization of a protein-bound polysaccharide from Herba Epimedii and its metabolic mechanism in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Chi, Aiping; Shen, Zhimei; Zhu, Wenfei; Sun, Yuliang; Kang, Yijiang; Guo, Fei

    2017-05-05

    Herba Epimedii is one of the famous Traditional Chinese Medicines used to treat the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). The polysaccharides are the main active components in H. epimedii. The aim of this study is to discover the therapeutic effect and metabolic mechanism of H. epimedii polysaccharides against CFS. The polysaccharide conjugates named HEP2-a were isolated from the leaves of H. epimedii using a water extraction method, and the general physicochemical properties of HEP2-a were analysed. In addition, a CFS rat model was established, and then, urinary metabonomic studies were performed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) in combination with multivariate statistical analysis. The physicochemical properties revealed that HEP2-a had an average molecular weight of 13.6×10 4 Da and consisted of mannose (4.41%), rhamnose (5.43%), glucose (31.26%), galactose (27.07%), arabinose (23.43%), and galacturonic acid (8.40%). The amino acids in HEP2-a include glutamate, cysteine, leucine, tyrosine, lysine, and histidine. Molecular morphology studies revealed many highly curled spherical particles with diameters of 5-10µm in solids and 100-200nm for particles in water. Five metabolites in the HEP2-a group were oppositely and significantly changed compared to the CFS model group. Two metabolic pathways were identified as significant metabolic pathways involved with HEP2-a. The therapeutic effects of HEP2-a on CFS were partially due to the restoration of these disturbed pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetically Engineered Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 Synbiotics Reduce Metabolic Effects Induced by Chronic Consumption of Dietary Fructose.

    Chaudhari Archana Somabhai

    Full Text Available To assess protective efficacy of genetically modified Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 (EcN on metabolic effects induced by chronic consumption of dietary fructose.EcN was genetically modified with fructose dehydrogenase (fdh gene for conversion of fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose and mannitol-2-dehydrogenase (mtlK gene for conversion to mannitol, a prebiotic. Charles foster rats weighing 150-200 g were fed with 20% fructose in drinking water for two months. Probiotic treatment of EcN (pqq, EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK, EcN (pqq-fdh was given once per week 109 cells for two months. Furthermore, blood and liver parameters for oxidative stress, dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia were estimated. Fecal samples were collected to determine the production of short chain fatty acids and pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ production.EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK, EcN (pqq-fdh transformants were confirmed by restriction digestion and functionality was checked by PQQ estimation and HPLC analysis. There was significant increase in body weight, serum glucose, liver injury markers, lipid profile in serum and liver, and decrease in antioxidant enzyme activity in high-fructose-fed rats. However the rats treated with EcN (pqq-glf-mtlK and EcN (pqq-fdh showed significant reduction in lipid peroxidation along with increase in serum and hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities. Restoration of liver injury marker enzymes was also seen. Increase in short chain fatty acids (SCFA demonstrated the prebiotic effects of mannitol and gluconic acid.Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of probiotic EcN producing PQQ and fructose metabolizing enzymes against the fructose induced hepatic steatosis suggesting that its potential for use in treating fructose induced metabolic syndrome.

  9. Metabolic syndrome and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): The interplay among smoking, insulin resistance and vitamin D.

    Piazzolla, Giuseppina; Castrovilli, Anna; Liotino, Vito; Vulpi, Maria Rosaria; Fanelli, Margherita; Mazzocca, Antonio; Candigliota, Mafalda; Berardi, Elsa; Resta, Onofrio; Sabbà, Carlo; Tortorella, Cosimo

    2017-01-01

    A close relationship between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) has been described, but the exact nature of this link remains unclear. Current epidemiological data refer exclusively to the MetS prevalence among patients with COPD and data about the prevalence of COPD in MetS patients are still unavailable. To analyse and compare risk factors, clinical and metabolic characteristics, as well as the main respiratory function parameters, among patients affected by MetS, COPD or both diseases. We recruited 59 outpatients with MetS and 76 outpatients with COPD. After medical history collection, physical examination, blood sampling for routine analysis, spirometric evaluation, they were subdivided into MetS (n = 46), MetS+COPD (n = 60), COPD (n = 29). A MetS diagnosis was assigned to 62% of COPD patients recruited in the COPD Outpatients Clinic of the Pneumology Department, while the COPD prevalence in MetS patients enrolled in the Internal Medicine Metabolic Disorders Outpatients Clinic was 22%. More than 60% of subjects enrolled in each Department were unaware that they suffered from an additional disease. MetS+COPD patients exhibited significantly higher C-peptide levels. We also found a positive relation between C-peptide and pack-years in all subjects and a negative correlation between C-peptide and vitamin D only in current smokers. Finally, a negative association emerged between smoking and vitamin D. We have estimated, for the first time, the COPD prevalence in MetS and suggest a potential role of smoking in inducing insulin resistance. Moreover, a direct effect of smoking on vitamin D levels is proposed as a novel mechanism, which may account for both insulin resistance and COPD development.

  10. Evaluation of hepatic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of ibuprofen in rats under chronic hypobaric hypoxia for targeted therapy at high altitude.

    Gola, Shefali; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Nath, Madhu; Velpandian, Thirumurthy

    2016-03-20

    With studies indicative of altered drug metabolism and pharmacokinetics (DMPK) under high altitude (HA)-induced hypobaric hypoxia, consideration of better therapeutic approaches has continuously been aimed in research for HA related illness management. DMPK of drugs like ibuprofen may get affected under hypoxia which establishes the requirement of different therapeutic dose regimen to ensure safe and effective therapy at HA. This study examined the effects of the chronic hypobaric hypoxia (CHH) on hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen in rats. Experimental animals were exposed to simulated altitude of 7620 m (∼25,000 ft) for CHH exposure (7 or 14 days) in decompression chamber and administered with ibuprofen (80 mg/kg, body weight, p.o.). Results demonstrated that CHH significantly altered PK variables of ibuprofen and activities of both phase-I and II hepatic metabolic enzymes as compared to the animals under normoxic conditions. Hepatic histopathological observations also revealed marked alterations. Increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines viz. IL-1β, IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α exhibited close relevance with diminished CYP2C9 expression under CHH. Moreover, the down-regulated CYP2C9 level further supported the underlying mechanism for reduced metabolism of ibuprofen and as a result, increased retention of parent drug in the system. Increased mean retention time, Vd, T½ of ibuprofen, and decreased AUC, Cmax and clearance during CHH further strengthened the present findings. In conclusion, CHH exposure significantly affects hepatic DMPK of ibuprofen, which may further influence the usual therapeutic dose-regimen. Further, there is requirement of human studies to evaluate their susceptibility toward hypobaric hypoxia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term trends of changes in pine and oak foliar nitrogen metabolism in response to chronic nitrogen amendments at Harvard Forest, MA

    Rakesh Minocha; Swathi A. Turlapati; Stephanie Long; William H. McDowell; Subhash C. Minocha

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term (1995-2008) trends in foliar and sapwood metabolism, soil solution chemistry and tree mortality rates in response to chronic nitrogen (N) additions to pine and hardwood stands at the Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Common stress-related metabolites like polyamines (PAs), free amino acids (AAs) and inorganic elements...

  12. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO 2 ) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49±3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113±26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61±2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3±1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62±2 years old, SCr of 0.9±0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p 2 in both HD (1.82±0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95±0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23±0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6±2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1±2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8±1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7±1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5±1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7±1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure patients on or before hemodialysis treatment. The cause for the depressed brain oxygen metabolism is considered to be due either to the dysregulation of cerebral circulation or to lower brain cell activity. (author)

  13. Investigating depression-like and metabolic parameters in a chronic low-grade inflammation model

    Fischer, C. W.; Elfving, B.; Lund, S.

    2012-01-01

    that elevated markers of inflammation predict a poor response to treatment. Furthermore, increasing evidences show that metabolic abnormalities such as obesity and diabetes mellitus type 2 are associated with a low-grade inflammation. Objectives: The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of a systemic...... levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6) together with the expression of enzymes involved in the tryptophan-kynurenine pathway, will be analyzed in specific brain regions using real-time qPCR. Body weight and food intake was measured once a week, while fasting glucose and insulin...

  14. Clinical characterization and diagnosis of cystic fibrosis through exome sequencing in Chinese infants with Bartter-syndrome-like hypokalemia alkalosis.

    Qiu, Liru; Yang, Fengjie; He, Yonghua; Yuan, Huiqing; Zhou, Jianhua

    2018-03-09

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a fatal autosomal-recessive disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. CF is characterized by recurrent pulmonary infection with obstructive pulmonary disease. CF is common in the Caucasian population but is rare in the Chinese population. The symptoms of early-stage CF are often untypical and may sometimes manifest as Bartter syndrome (BS)-like hypokalemic alkalosis. Therefore, the ability of doctors to differentiate CF from BS-like hypokalemic alkalosis in Chinese infants is a great challenge in the timely and accurate diagnosis of CF. In China, sporadic CF has not been diagnosed in children younger than three years of age to date. Three infants, who were initially admitted to our hospital over the period of June 2013 to September 2014 with BS-like hypokalemic alkalosis, were diagnosed with CF through exome sequencing and sweat chloride measurement. The compound heterozygous mutations of the CFTR gene were detected in two infants, and a homozygous missense mutation was found in one infant. Among the six identified mutations, two are novel point mutations (c.1526G > C and c.3062C > T) that are possibly pathogenic. The three infants are the youngest Chinese patients to have been diagnosed with sporadic CF at a very early stage. Follow-up examination showed that all of the cases remained symptom-free after early intervention, indicating the potential benefit of very early diagnosis and timely intervention in children with CF. Our results demonstrate the necessity of distinguishing CF from BS in Chinese infants with hypokalemic alkalosis and the significant diagnostic value of powerful exome sequencing for rare genetic diseases. Furthermore, our findings expand the CFTR mutation spectrum associated with CF.

  15. Neurochemical metabolomics reveals disruption to sphingolipid metabolism following chronic haloperidol administration

    McClay, Joseph L.; Vunck, Sarah A.; Batman, Angela M.; Crowley, James J.; Vann, Robert E.; Beardsley, Patrick M.; van den Oord, Edwin J.

    2015-01-01

    Haloperidol is an effective antipsychotic drug for treatment of schizophrenia, but prolonged use can lead to debilitating side effects. To better understand the effects of long-term administration, we measured global metabolic changes in mouse brain following 3 mg/kg/day haloperidol for 28 days. These conditions lead to movement-related side effects in mice akin to those observed in patients after prolonged use. Brain tissue was collected following microwave tissue fixation to arrest metabolism and extracted metabolites were assessed using both liquid and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (MS). Over 300 unique compounds were identified across MS platforms. Haloperidol was found to be present in all test samples and not in controls, indicating experimental validity. Twenty-one compounds differed significantly between test and control groups at the p haloperidol-treated mice (p = 0.004), a marker previously associated with demyelination. This study further demonstrates the utility of murine neurochemical metabolomics as a method to advance understanding of CNS drug effects. PMID:25850894

  16. Metabolic profiles in serum of mouse after chronic exposure to drinking water.

    Zhang, Yan; Wu, Bing; Zhang, Xuxiang; Li, Aimin; Cheng, Shupei

    2011-08-01

    The toxicity of Nanjing drinking water on mouse (Mus musculus) was detected by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabonomic method. Three groups of mice were fed with drinking water (produced by Nanjing BHK Water Plant), 3.8 μg/L benzo(a)pyrene as contrast, and clean water as control, respectively, for 90 days. It was observed that the levels of lactate, alanine, and creatinine in the mice fed with drinking water were increased and that of valine was decreased. The mice of drinking water group were successfully separated from control. The total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phthalates (PAEs), and other organic pollutants in the drinking water were 0.23 μg/L, 4.57 μg/L, and 0.34 μg/L, respectively. In this study, Nanjing drinking water was found to induce distinct perturbations of metabolic profiles on mouse including disorders of glucose-alanine cycle, branched-chain amino acid and energy metabolism, and dysfunction of kidney. This study suggests that metabonomic method is feasible and sensitive to evaluate potential toxic effects of drinking water.

  17. Integrating metabolic performance, thermal tolerance, and plasticity enables for more accurate predictions on species vulnerability to acute and chronic effects of global warming.

    Magozzi, Sarah; Calosi, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Predicting species vulnerability to global warming requires a comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of sublethal and lethal thermal tolerances. To date, however, most studies investigating species physiological responses to increasing temperature have focused on the underlying physiological traits of either acute or chronic tolerance in isolation. Here we propose an integrative, synthetic approach including the investigation of multiple physiological traits (metabolic performance and thermal tolerance), and their plasticity, to provide more accurate and balanced predictions on species and assemblage vulnerability to both acute and chronic effects of global warming. We applied this approach to more accurately elucidate relative species vulnerability to warming within an assemblage of six caridean prawns occurring in the same geographic, hence macroclimatic, region, but living in different thermal habitats. Prawns were exposed to four incubation temperatures (10, 15, 20 and 25 °C) for 7 days, their metabolic rates and upper thermal limits were measured, and plasticity was calculated according to the concept of Reaction Norms, as well as Q10 for metabolism. Compared to species occupying narrower/more stable thermal niches, species inhabiting broader/more variable thermal environments (including the invasive Palaemon macrodactylus) are likely to be less vulnerable to extreme acute thermal events as a result of their higher upper thermal limits. Nevertheless, they may be at greater risk from chronic exposure to warming due to the greater metabolic costs they incur. Indeed, a trade-off between acute and chronic tolerance was apparent in the assemblage investigated. However, the invasive species P. macrodactylus represents an exception to this pattern, showing elevated thermal limits and plasticity of these limits, as well as a high metabolic control. In general, integrating multiple proxies for species physiological acute and chronic responses to increasing

  18. Ziprasidone's effect on metabolic markers in patients with diabetes and chronic schizophrenia.

    Lindenmayer, Jean Pierre; Tedeschi, Frank; Yusim, Anna; Khan, Anzalee; Kaushik, Saurabh; Smith, Robert C; Parakadavil, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous studies of diabetes mellitus type II (DM-II) in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, there have been no studies on the glycemic effects of switching patients with long-standing symptomatic DM-II from their current antipsychotic regimen to ziprasidone. An open-label, prospective inpatient study was conducted with 26 suboptimally responding inpatients with DSM-IV diagnoses of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and comorbid DM-II who were switched to ziprasidone monotherapy and followed for 8 weeks. Outcome measures were fasting glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin levels, capillary blood glucose levels and weight. After a 3-week cross-titration period, patients were treated with ziprasidone up to a dose of 320 mg daily. Of the 26 study participants, 16 completed the entire study period of 63 days and 10 (38.46%) discontinued participation, primarily due to psychotic relapse. There was a statistically significant reduction in fasting glucose (F=4.43, p=0.05; 14.68 mg/dL mean reduction), capillary blood glucose levels (F=8.90, p=0.01; 25.36 mg/dL mean reduction), weight (F=4.46, p=0.05; 4.68 lb mean weight loss) and Body Mass Index (F=4.40, p=0.05; 3.62 kg/m(2) mean reduction). There was also a reduction in the use of antidiabetic medications after the switch to ziprasidone. Nine (34.62%) patients met criteria for metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline, as compared to 4 (15.38%) at endpoint. No change was observed in positive symptoms (F=0.62, p=0.44), negative symptoms (F=1.47, p=0.24) and in total PANSS score (F=0.12, p=0.74). This study suggests significant improvement in metabolic side effects and MetS in the subset of the patients who were able to tolerate switching from a polypharmacy regimen to ziprasidone. There was a large discontinuation rate, which limited the sustained beneficial effects of ziprasidone. The decision to switch to ziprasidone in patients with prior suboptimal response has to balance the potential

  19. Disposition and metabolism of codeine after single and chronic doses in one poor and seven extensive metabolisers.

    Chen, Z R; Somogyi, A A; Reynolds, G; Bochner, F

    1991-04-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics, metabolism and partial clearances of codeine to morphine, norcodeine and codeine-6-glucuronide after single (30 mg) and chronic (30 mg 8 h for seven doses) administration of codeine were studied in eight subjects (seven extensive and one poor metaboliser of dextromethorphan). Codeine, codeine-6-glucuronide, morphine and norcodeine were measured by high performance liquid chromatographic assays. 2. After the single dose, the time to achieve maximum plasma codeine concentrations was 0.97 +/- 0.31 h (mean +/- s.d.) and for codeine-6-glucuronide it was 1.28 +/- 0.49 h. The plasma AUC of codeine-6-glucuronide was 15.8 +/- 4.5 times higher than that of codeine. The AUC of codeine in saliva was 3.4 +/- 1.1 times higher than that in plasma. The elimination half-life of codeine was 3.2 +/- 0.3 h and that of codeine-6-glucuronide was 3.2 +/- 0.9 h. 3. The renal clearance of codeine was 183 +/- 59 ml min-1 and was inversely correlated with urine pH (r = 0.81). These data suggest that codeine undergoes filtration at the glomerulus, tubular secretion and passive reabsorption. The renal clearance of codeine-6-glucuronide was 55 +/- 21 ml min-1, and was not correlated with urine pH. Its binding to human plasma was less than 10%. These data suggest that codeine-6-glucuronide undergoes filtration at the glomerulus and tubular reabsorption. This latter process is unlikely to be passive. 4. After chronic dosing, the pharmacokinetics of codeine and codeine-6-glucuronide were not significantly different from the single dose pharmacokinetics. 5. After the single dose, 86.1 +/- 11.4% of the dose was recovered in urine, of which 59.8 +/- 10.3% was codeine-6-glucuronide, 7.1 +/- 1.1% was total morphine, 6.9 +/- 2.1% was total norcodeine and 11.8 +/- 3.9% was unchanged codeine. These recoveries were not significantly different (P greater than 0.05) after chronic administration. 6. After the single dose, the partial clearance to morphine was 137 +/- 31 ml min-1 in

  20. Effect of chronic ethanol administration on iron metabolism in the rat

    Sanchez, J.; Casas, M.; Rama, R.

    1988-01-01

    This study shows that the ingestion of ethanol provokes alterations in iron metabolism which may lead to iron overload. Impaired release of reticuloendothelial iron was shown by a decrease of the maximum red blood cell utilization when radioactive iron was supplied as colloidal iron. An impairment in the erythropoietic activity of ethanoltreated animals was also observed, as can be seen from the reduced plasma iron turnover and red blood cell utilization within 24 h of iron administration. A rise in marrow transit time was also observed. In ethanol-treated rats there was an increase in the amount of iron retained both in the liver and the spleen. This was observed in both sexes and also in the offspring from ethanol-treated mothers. (author)

  1. Depressed cerebral oxygen metabolism in patients with chronic renal failure. A positron emission tomography study

    Hirakata, Hideki; Kanai, Hidetoshi; Nakane, Hiroshi; Fujii, Ken-ichiro; Hirakata, Eriko; Ibayashi, Setsuro; Kuwabara, Yasuo; Deenitchna, S.S.; Fujishima, Masatoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Graduate School of Medical Sciences

    2001-07-01

    In order to elucidate brain oxygen metabolism in uremic patients, the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction (rOEF) and oxygen metabolism (rCMRO{sub 2}) were measured by positron emission tomography (PET) in both 10 hemodialysis patients (HD: male [m]/female [f]=2/8, age of 49{+-}3 [SEM] years old, HD duration of 113{+-}26 months) and 13 pre-dialysis renal failure patients (CRF: m/f=10/3, age of 61{+-}2 years old, serum creatinine (SCr) of 6.3{+-}1.0 mg/dl). Data were compared with 20 non-uremic subjects (Control: m/f=7/13, age of 62{+-}2 years old, SCr of 0.9{+-}0.1 mg/dl). They had no neurological abnormalities, congestive heart failure, history of cerebrovascular accident, diabetes mellitus, or symptomatic brain lesion on magnetic resonance imaging. The age of HD was significantly younger than the other groups (p<0.02) and the hemoglobin (Hb) levels in both HD (10.5{+-}0.5 g/dl) and CRF (9.8{+-}0.9) were significantly lower than that in Control (13.3{+-}0.3) (p<0.02). In the hemisphere, rCMRO{sub 2} in both HD (1.82{+-}0.10 ml/min/100 g) and CRF (1.95{+-}0.09) showed significantly lower values as compared to Control (2.23{+-}0.05) (p<0.01, respectively). Hemispheric rCBF in HD (35.6{+-}2.1 ml/100 g/min) and in CRF (36.1{+-}2.1) were not different from that in Control (31.8{+-}1.4). Hemispheric rOEF in CRF (45.7{+-}1.6%) was significantly higher than that in Control (40.5{+-}1.2%) (p<0.02), but that in HD (43.7{+-}1.9%) did not increase significantly. These tendencies were similar in all regions of interest, especially in the cerebral cortices, but not in the cerebellum. All PET parameters in the frontal cortices tended to show the lowest value in renal failure patients. For all HD patients, rCBF in both the frontal cortex and the white matter correlated inversely with HD duration (frontal cortex: r=-0.649, p<0.05; white matter: r=-0.706, p<0.02). Based on these data, it is concluded that brain oxygen metabolism is depressed in renal failure

  2. The effect of L-carnitine on lipid metabolism in patients on chronic haemodialysis

    Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Pedersen, Fritz Bangsgaard; Dragsholt, C.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-one patients (median 49 years; range 20-72 years) on chronic haemodialysis (median: 54 months; range 16-154 months) were examined in a clinical controlled trial for the effect of carnitine on hyperlipoproteinaemia. Initial values of serum carnitine were within the normal range. Carnitine...... was added to the dialysis fluid to a final concentration of 100 mumol/l. The trial was carried out for 6 months, and the serum of fasting patients was analysed at monthly intervals for carnitine, triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein A and B. The loss of carnitine...... to the dialysis fluid also was examined, as was the retained amount in those receiving carnitine. We could not confirm the findings of others that carnitine produces lowering of serum triglycerides and increases of serum HDL-cholesterol. The study was extended for another year with ten patients; however...

  3. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  4. Increased oxidative metabolism and myoglobin expression in zebrafish muscle during chronic hypoxia

    Richard T. Jaspers

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish may be extremely hypoxia resistant. We investigated how muscle fibre size and oxidative capacity in zebrafish (Danio rerio adapt during severe chronic hypoxia. Zebrafish were kept for either 3 or 6 weeks under chronic constant hypoxia (CCH (10% air/90%N2 saturated water. We analyzed cross-sectional area (CSA, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH activity, capillarization, myonuclear density, myoglobin (Mb concentration and Mb mRNA expression of high and low oxidative muscle fibres. After 3 weeks of CCH, CSA, SDH activity, Mb concentration, capillary and myonuclear density of both muscle fibre types were similar as under normoxia. In contrast, staining intensity for Mb mRNA of hypoxic high oxidative muscle fibres was 94% higher than that of normoxic controls (P<0.001. Between 3 and 6 weeks of CCH, CSA of high and low oxidative muscle fibres increased by 25 and 30%, respectively. This was similar to normoxic controls. Capillary and myonuclear density were not changed by CCH. However, in high oxidative muscle fibres of fish maintained under CCH, SDH activity, Mb concentration as well as Mb mRNA content were higher by 86%, 138% and 90%, respectively, than in muscle fibres of fish kept under normoxia (P<0.001. In low oxidative muscle fibres, SDH activity, Mb and Mb mRNA content were not significantly changed. Under normoxia, the calculated interstitial oxygen tension required to prevent anoxic cores in muscle fibres (PO2crit of high oxidative muscle fibres was between 1.0 and 1.7 mmHg. These values were similar at 3 and 6 weeks CCH. We conclude that high oxidative skeletal muscle fibres of zebrafish continue to grow and increase oxidative capacity during CCH. Oxygen supply to mitochondria in these fibres may be facilitated by an increased Mb concentration, which is regulated by an increase in Mb mRNA content per myonucleus.

  5. Roles of renal ammonia metabolism other than in acid-base homeostasis.

    Weiner, I David

    2017-06-01

    The importance of renal ammonia metabolism in acid-base homeostasis is well known. However, the effects of renal ammonia metabolism other than in acid-base homeostasis are not as widely recognized. First, ammonia differs from almost all other solutes in the urine in that it does not result from arterial delivery. Instead, ammonia is produced by the kidney, and only a portion of the ammonia produced is excreted in the urine, with the remainder returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. In normal individuals, systemic ammonia addition is metabolized efficiently by the liver, but in patients with either acute or chronic liver disease, conditions that increase the addition of ammonia of renal origin to the systemic circulation can result in precipitation and/or worsening of hyperammonemia. Second, ammonia appears to serve as an intrarenal paracrine signaling molecule. Hypokalemia increases proximal tubule ammonia production and secretion as well as reabsorption in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, thereby increasing delivery to the renal interstitium and the collecting duct. In the collecting duct, ammonia decreases potassium secretion and stimulates potassium reabsorption, thereby decreasing urinary potassium excretion and enabling feedback correction of the initiating hypokalemia. Finally, the stimulation of renal ammonia metabolism by hypokalemia may contribute to the development of metabolic alkalosis, which in turn can stimulate NaCl reabsorption and contribute to the intravascular volume expansion, increased blood pressure and diuretic resistance that can develop with hypokalemia. The evidence supporting these novel non-acid-base roles of renal ammonia metabolism is discussed in this review.

  6. IDO chronic immune activation and tryptophan metabolic pathway: A potential pathophysiological link between depression and obesity.

    Chaves Filho, Adriano José Maia; Lima, Camila Nayane Carvalho; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Lucena, David Freitas; Maes, Michael; Macedo, Danielle

    2018-01-03

    Obesity and depression are among the most pressing health problems in the contemporary world. Obesity and depression share a bidirectional relationship, whereby each condition increases the risk of the other. By inference, shared pathways may underpin the comorbidity between obesity and depression. Activation of cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a key factor in the pathophysiology of depression. CMI cytokines, including IFN-γ, TNFα and IL-1β, induce the catabolism of tryptophan (TRY) by stimulating indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) resulting in the synthesis of kynurenine (KYN) and other tryptophan catabolites (TRYCATs). In the CNS, TRYCATs have been related to oxidative damage, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, cytotoxicity, excitotoxicity, neurotoxicity and lowered neuroplasticity. The pathophysiology of obesity is also associated with a state of aberrant inflammation that activates aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a pathway involved in the detection of intracellular or environmental changes as well as with increases in the production of TRYCATs, being KYN an agonists of AHR. Both AHR and TRYCATS are involved in obesity and related metabolic disorders. These changes in the TRYCAT pathway may contribute to the onset of neuropsychiatric symptoms in obesity. This paper reviews the role of immune activation, IDO stimulation and increased TRYCAT production in the pathophysiology of depression and obesity. Here we suggest that increased synthesis of detrimental TRYCATs is implicated in comorbid obesity and depression and is a new drug target to treat both diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Metabolic therapy with iodine 131 in patients with chronic renal failure. Clinical case].

    Vázquez-Rodríguez Barbero, Inmaculada; Espadas-Maeso, María José; Muñoz-Morales, Ana; Flores-Gómez, Pilar; Serrano-Carretero, María Belén; Castedo-Sal, Juan José; Sánchez Rey-Castro, Elena; Zamorano-Córdoba, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    62 year-old male with CKD stage 5 in dialysis program since 2012 who underwent surgery for papillary thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. Subsequently, the patient was admitted to the Unit of Metabolic Therapy at his reference hospital, where he is administered 80 millicuries of iodine-131 as a treatment associated with the surgery, unable to have his conventional dialysis, nursing interventions required in various stages of implementation of the continuous extrarenal clearance techniques (TCDE) were performed. The following care values were addressed targeted to patients undergoing treatment with I(131): specific equipment, personal protective measures and major diagnoses and nursing interventions. TCDE, despite being attributed to very critical patients, they can be extrapolated to other patients in a given time. TCDE allowed these patients to undergo dialysis in a safe environment for staff, ensuring proper disposal of contaminated liquids. TCDE were an effective treatment for the removal of I131, a single ssesion being necessary to normalize the levels of radioactivity. Coordination between services allewed ensure proper and effective treatment for the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolic manipulation in chronic heart failure: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Leon Francisco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in society. Current medical therapy centres on neurohormonal modulation with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and β-blockers. There is growing evidence for the use of metabolic manipulating agents as adjunctive therapy in patients with heart failure. We aim to determine the effect of perhexiline on cardiac energetics and alterations in substrate utilisation in patients with non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy. Methods A multi-centre, prospective, randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of 50 subjects with non-ischaemic dilated cardiomyopathy recruited from University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust and Cardiff and Vale NHS Trust. Baseline investigations include magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess cardiac energetic status, echocardiography to assess left ventricular function and assessment of symptomatic status. Subjects are then randomised to receive 200 mg perhexiline maleate or placebo daily for 4 weeks with serum drug level monitoring. All baseline investigations will be repeated at the end of the treatment period. A subgroup of patients will undergo invasive investigations with right and left heart catheterisation to calculate respiratory quotient, and mechanical efficiency. The primary endpoint is an improvement in the phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate ratio at 4 weeks. Secondary end points are: i respiratory quotient; ii mechanical efficiency; iii change in left ventricular (LV function. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00841139 ISRCTN: ISRCTN2887836

  9. THE EFFECT OF ADRENAL MEDULLECTOMY ON METABOLIC RESPONSES TO CHRONIC INTERMITTENT HYPOXIA

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Han, Woobum; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C.; Punjabi, Naresh M.; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. IH increases plasma catecholamine levels, which may increase insulin resistance and suppress insulin secretion. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenal medullectomy (MED) prevents metabolic dysfunction in IH. MED or sham surgery was performed in 60 male C57BL/6J mice, which were then exposed to IH or control conditions (intermittent air) for 6 weeks. IH increased plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, increased fasting blood glucose and lowered basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. MED decreased baseline epinephrine and prevented the IH induced increase in epinephrine, whereas the norepinephrine response remained intact. MED improved glucose tolerance in mice exposed to IH, attenuated the impairment in basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but did not prevent IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia or insulin resistance. We conclude that the epinephrine release from the adrenal medulla during IH suppresses insulin secretion causing hyperglycemia. PMID:25179887

  10. Longitudinal changes in body composition and metabolic profile between exercise clinical trials in men with chronic spinal cord injury

    Gorgey, Ashraf S.; Martin, Heather; Metz, Alyse; Khalil, Refka E.; Dolbow, David R.; Gater, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Study design Longitudinal design. Objectives The study was undertaken to determine the effects of cessation of exercise interventions on body composition and metabolic profiles in men with chronic SCI. Settings Clinical trials within a Medical Center. Methods Eleven men with motor complete SCI were followed on average over a period of 2.5 years. Six men were involved in two different exercise interventions (functional electrical stimulation cycling versus arm cycling ergometer), 5 days/week for 16 weeks (exercise group), and five men served as a control (control group). Anthropometrics and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) were captured to measure changes in lean mass (LM), fat mass (FM), percentage FM before, immediately after exercise, and after a period of 2.5 years. Basal metabolic rate (BMR) and lipid panel were also measured. Results Thigh circumference increased by 8.5% following exercise (P = 0.042) and remained 6.4% greater than baseline measurements (P = 0.012). Leg LM increased by 9% following the exercise intervention (P = 0.03) and decreased by 16% in the follow-up visit (P = 0.02). Percentage trunk and total body FM increased by 4.5% (P = 0.008) and 3.5% (P = 0.019) in the follow-up visit, respectively, and whole body LM increased by 8.4% and decreased back by 5.4% following a 2.5 year-period. BMR significantly decreased by 15.5% following the exercise (P = 0.029) interventions. Conclusion Exercise training is accompanied with positive changes in body composition as well as compensatory decrease in BMR, that regressed back following 2.5 years of exercise cessation. Participation in an exercise trial is unlikely to confound the measurements of a follow-up trial. PMID:27077574

  11. Molecular mechanisms of disorders of lipid metabolism in chronic kidney disease.

    Moradi, Hamid; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2018-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a progressive condition marked by protracted kidney damage which over time can lead to end stage renal disease (ESRD). CKD can be categorized into different stages based on the extent of renal damage and degree of renal dysfunction with ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy considered the final stage. It is important to note that CKD in all of its forms is associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, cardiovascular (CV) disease and poor CV outcomes. While a number of factors contribute to the high risk of CV mortality in this patient population, dyslipidemia is considered to be a key player in the pathogenesis of CV disease in CKD. Molecular mechanisms responsible for CKD-associated lipid disorders are unique and greatly influenced by the stage of renal disease, presence and degree of proteinuria and in patients with ESRD, modality of renal replacement therapy. This article provides a detailed overview of the molecular mechanisms which cause dyslipidemia and the nature of lipid disorders associated with CKD and ESRD.

  12. A study of cerebral circulation, metabolism and MRI findings in patients with chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency

    Kondo, Susumu

    1995-01-01

    Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency (CCCI) is a recently proposed clinical entity characterized by symptoms such as dizziness, a feeling of heavy-headedness or vague numbness without any neurological signs or organic vascular lesions on CT. In order to elucidate its pathogenesis, ultrasonic quantitative blood flow measurement system, positron emission tomography (PET) and MRI were employed to study three groups of subjects: 60 subjects with CCCI (group A), 44 subjects with risk factors for cerebrovascular disease but without neurological abnormalities (group B), and 40 normal healthy volunteers (group C). The results are summarized as follows: Mean common carotid blood flow decreased with age in all groups. Common carotid blood flow was lowest in group A and second lowest in group B in every decade of patient age. PET study revealed that CBF and CMRO 2 in all regions examined were significantly lower in group A than in group C. The incidence of MR signal abnormalities in the white matter increased with age. Group A had the highest incidence, and group C had the lowest. Reduction in mean common carotid blood flow and cerebral blood flow was associated with increasing incidence and severity of MR signal abnormalities. These findings indicate that CCCI is a pathologic condition closely related to diffuse cerebral low perfusion resulting from cerebral arteriosclerosis. The symptoms seen in this condition, which are apt to be taken lightly, may warn of impending ischemic stroke. (author)

  13. Prevalence of cachexia in chronic heart failure and characteristics of body composition and metabolic status

    Christensen, Heidi Marie; Kistorp, Caroline Michaela Nervil; Schou, Morten

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiac cachexia has previously been estimated to 8-42 %. However, novel treatment strategies for chronic heart failure (CHF) have improved and decreased morbidity and mortality. Therefore, we aimed to reassess the prevalence of cachexia in an outpatient CHF clinic...... and to characterize a CHF population with and without cachexia with respect to body composition and related biomarkers. From 2008 to 2011, we screened 238 optimally treated, non-diabetic CHF patients for cardiac cachexia, defined as unintentional non-oedematous weight loss of >5 % over ≥6 months. CHF patients (LVEF...... 45 % (n = 19). The groups were matched for age, sex, and kidney function. Body composition was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The prevalence of cachexia was 10.5 %. Abdominal fat ± SD (%) was reduced in cachectic CHF: 27.4 ± 10.0 versus 37.5 ± 10.6 % (CHF, no cachexia) and 40...

  14. Metabolomics insights into activated redox signaling and lipid metabolism dysfunction in chronic kidney disease progression

    Hua Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Early detection is critical in prevention and treatment of kidney disease. However currently clinical laboratory and histopathological tests do not provide region-specific and accurate biomarkers for early detection of kidney disease. The present study was conducted to identify sensitive biomarkers for early detection and progression of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy in aristolochic acid I-induced rats at weeks 4, 8 and 12. Biomarkers were validated using aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN rats at week 24, adenine-induced chronic kidney disease (CKD rats and CKD patients. Compared with control rats, AAN rats showed anemia, increased serum urea and creatinine, progressive renal interstitial fibrosis, activation of nuclear factor-kappa B, and up-regulation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant, and pro-fibrotic proteins at weeks 8 and 12. However, no significant difference was found at week 4. Metabolomics identified 12-ketodeoxycholic acid, taurochenodesoxycholic acid, LPC(15:0 and docosahexaenoic acid as biomarkers for early detection of tubulo-interstitial nephropathy. With prolonging aristolochic acid I exposure, LPE(20:2, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid and LPC(17:0 were identified as biomarkers for progression from early to advanced AAN and lysoPE(22:5, indoxyl sulfate, uric acid and creatinine as biomarkers of advanced AAN. These biomarkers were reversed by treatment of irbesartan and ergone in AAN rats at week 24 and adenine-induced CKD rats. In addition, these biomarkers were also reversed by irbesartan treatment in CKD patients.

  15. Effect of thyroid status on the expression of metabolic enzymes during chronic stimulation.

    Hood, D A; Simoneau, J A; Kelly, A M; Pette, D

    1992-10-01

    The effect of thyroid status on the expression of cytochrome c oxidase (CYTOX) and the activities of citrate synthase (CS) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) were examined in chronically stimulated (10 Hz; 35 days) and contralateral, nonstimulated rat tibialis anterior muscle of hypothyroid, hyperthyroid, and euthyroid animals. Stimulation increased CYTOX activity by 2.7-, 3.2-, and 4.9-fold in hyperthyroid, euthyroid, and hypothyroid animals, respectively, to similar absolute values. CS displayed similar increases. Stimulation reduced PFK activity in hypothyroid and euthyroid animals to 45% and 60% of control values. This effect was abolished with hyperthyroidism. Thus stimulation and thyroid hormone act antagonistically on PFK activity. Stimulation increased CYTOX subunit III (mitochondrially encoded) mRNA by 2.5- and 2.9-fold in hyperthyroid and euthyroid animals. Similar increases were observed in the nuclear-encoded mRNAs of CYTOX subunit VIc in euthyroid muscle. In hyperthyroid and euthyroid conditions, the mRNA changes paralleled the increases in enzyme activity. In hypothyroid muscle, the increase in mRNA was less for subunit VIc than III, suggesting that hypothyroidism upsets the coordinate expression of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. Further, the increases in CYTOX activity exceeded that of both subunit mRNAs in hypothyroid muscle.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Muscle contractile and metabolic dysfunction is a common feature of sarcopenia of aging and chronic diseases: from sarcopenic obesity to cachexia.

    Biolo, Gianni; Cederholm, Tommy; Muscaritoli, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal muscle is the most abundant body tissue accounting for many physiological functions. However, muscle mass and functions are not routinely assessed. Sarcopenia is defined as skeletal muscle loss and dysfunction in aging and chronic diseases. Inactivity, inflammation, age-related factors, anorexia and unbalanced nutrition affect changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms are difficult to distinguish in individual subjects due to the multifactorial character of the condition. Sarcopenia includes both muscle loss and dysfunction which induce contractile impairment and metabolic and endocrine abnormalities, affecting whole-body metabolism and immune/inflammatory response. There are different metabolic trajectories for muscle loss versus fat changes in aging and chronic diseases. Appetite regulation and physical activity affect energy balance and changes in body fat mass. Appetite regulation by inflammatory mediators is poorly understood. In some patients, inflammation induces anorexia and fat loss in combination with sarcopenia. In others, appetite is maintained, despite activation of systemic inflammation, leading to sarcopenia with normal or increased BMI. Inactivity contributes to sarcopenia and increased fat tissue in aging and diseases. At the end of the metabolic trajectories, cachexia and sarcopenic obesity are paradigms of the two patient categories. Pre-cachexia and cachexia are observed in patients with cancer, chronic heart failure or liver cirrhosis. Sarcopenic obesity and sarcopenia with normal/increased BMI are observed in rheumatoid arthritis, breast cancer patients with adjuvant chemotherapy and in most of patients with COPD or chronic kidney disease. In these conditions, sarcopenia is a powerful prognostic factor for morbidity and mortality, independent of BMI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  17. [Metabolic syndrome prevalence in Chilean children and adolescent with family history of chronic noncommunicable diseases].

    Burrows, Raquel; Atalah, Eduardo; Leiva, Laura; Rojas, Pamela; Maza, María Pía de la; Vásquez, Fabian; Lera, Lydia; Díaz, Erick

    2012-06-01

    Family history (FH+) of non transmisible chronic diseases (NTCD) increase MetS risk. In Chile, the MetS affects 27% of overweight children, and fasting hyperglycemia is very low prevalent (4,0%). The objective was to study the prevalence of MetS and the cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in overweight children with a family background of NTCD and analyze its association with the number of relatives witth NTCD and with parental history (PH). In 183 overweight children (BMI > or = p85) mean age 11,8 +/- 1,8 (86 males) with a FH+ (parental or grandparental) of NTCD, were assessed the BMI z (CDC / NCHS), waist circumference, blood arterial pressure, fasting Glucose and Insulin (RIA), triglycerides, HDL chol. The MetS and the CVRF were diagnosed using the Cook phenotype and the insulin resistance (IR) through the HOMA-IR. Chi2, ANOVA, t Student and Willcoxon test were performed. The frequency of FH+ of DM2, hypertension and dyslipidemia were 81,4%, 88,0% and 71,6 % respectively. The MeTS prevalence was 46,5 % associated to overweight magnitude an parental history of NTCD. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was 54,6%, while fasting hyperglycemia affected 31,4% of the sample. There was no association between number of relatives with NTCD and CV risk profile. We conclude that in overweight children with FH+ of NTCD, the prevalence of MetS, dyslipidemia and fasting hyperglycemia are significantly higher, than those observed in the general population of obese children.

  18. The correlation between dental calculus and disturbed mineral metabolism in paediatric patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Davidovich, Esti; Davidovits, Miriam; Peretz, Benny; Shapira, Joseph; Aframian, Doron J

    2009-08-01

    Vascular calcifications have been documented in children with end-stage renal disease. However, only a few reports have described abundant dental calculus formation in children suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, dental calculus scores (DCS) and their correlation with renal disease severity have not been studied. DCS in 74 young CKD patients were evaluated: 25 pre-dialytic (PrD), 18 on dialysis (D) and 31 with transplants (T) compared to 32 healthy participants (C). Saliva and serum analysis included creatinine (Cr), urea (U), calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), magnesium (Mg) as well as intraoral pH levels. All patient groups presented high DCS. DCS and pH levels were higher in the D group with a positive correlation between pH and lower incisor DCS (r = 0.56, P = 0.017). The highest salivary Ca was found in the PrD group. Salivary P in the PrD group was found to be higher than in the T and C groups. The lowest salivary Mg was found in the D group while the highest salivary Ca x P product was found in the PrD group. In all patient groups, salivary U was higher than in the C group with a 2.5-fold increase in the D group. Salivary Cr resembled the U salivary concentrations. Alterations in salivary Ca, P, Mg, U, Cr and intraoral pH levels were observed in the patient groups. DCS correlated with renal disease severity and therefore may be a reflection of other tissue calcification pathologies found in these patients.

  19. [Effect of tumour necrosis factor α blockade on bone metabolism in chronic inflammatory joint diseases].

    Aguilar Del Rey, Francisco Javier; García Portales, Rosa; Haro Liger, Manuel; Rodríguez Andreu, José; Casals Sánchez, José Luis; Pérez González, Rita

    2016-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of anti-TNF treatments on bone mineral density (BMD), bone remodelling markers (BRM) and receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in patients with chronic inflammatory joint diseases. A longitudinal prospective study was performed under clinical practice conditions on 31 patients diagnosed of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthropathy and ankylosing spondylitis who had received treatment with anti-TNF alpha drugs for one year. BMD, OPG and RANKL soluble form (sRANKL) were studied at the onset and end of the study. During the study (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 month), disease activity (SDAI, BASDAI and CRP), functional capacity (HAQ, BASFI), BRM and vitamin D were studied. BMD was not modified after one year of treatment. The patients who took corticosteroids had a mean bone mass loss of 3% in the lumbar spine (±1.6, P=.02). In regards to the BRM, did not experience significant changes over the course of the study. Disease activity, both SDAI (P=.002) and BASDAI (P=.002), decreased. OPG was maintained without changes during the year of treatment while both the sRANKL (0.28±0.22, P=.013) and sRANKL/OPG ratio significantly decreased (0.04±0.03, P=.031). The patients being treated with anti-TNF did not present with a significant loss of DMO during the study (one year), at the same time experiencing an improvement in disease activity. This protection has been clearer in the responding patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Reversed electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 is the major acid loader during recovery from cytosolic alkalosis in mouse cortical astrocytes.

    Theparambil, Shefeeq M; Naoshin, Zinnia; Thyssen, Anne; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2015-08-15

    The regulation of H(+) i from cytosolic alkalosis has generally been attributed to the activity of Cl(-) -coupled acid loaders/base extruders in most cell types, including brain cells. The present study demonstrates that outwardly-directed sodium bicarbonate cotransport via electrogenic sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1) mediates the major fraction of H(+) i regulation from cytosolic alkalosis in mouse cortical astrocytes. Cl(-) -coupled acid-loading transporters play only a minor role in the regulation of H(+) i from alkalosis in mouse cortical astrocytes. NBCe1-mediated H(+) i regulation from alkalosis was dominant, with the support of intracellular carbonic anhydrase II, even when the intra- and extracellular [HCO3 (-) ] was very low (sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 1 (NBCe1) and for carbonic anhydrase (CA) isoform II. An acute cytosolic alkalosis was induced by the removal of either CO2 /HCO3 (-) or butyric acid, and the subsequent acid loading was analysed by monitoring changes in cytosolic H(+) or Na(+) using ion-sensitive fluorescent dyes. We have identified that NBCe1 reverses during alkalosis and contributes more than 70% to the rate of recovery from alkalosis by extruding Na(+) and HCO3 (-) . After CA inhibition or in CAII-knockout (KO) cells, the rate of recovery was reduced by 40%, and even by 70% in the nominal absence of CO2 /HCO3 (-) . Increasing the extracellular K(+) concentration modulated the rate of acid loading in wild-type cells, but not in NBCe1-KO cells. Removing chloride had only a minor effect on the recovery from alkalosis. Reversal of NBCe1 by reducing pH/[HCO3 (-) ] was demonstrated in astrocytes and in Xenopus oocytes, in which human NBCe1 was heterologously expressed. The results obtained suggest that reversed NBCe1, supported by CAII activity, plays a major role in acid-loading cortical astrocytes to support recovery from cytosolic alkalosis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  1. The effects of dietary fish oil on exercising skeletal muscle vascular and metabolic control in chronic heart failure rats.

    Holdsworth, Clark T; Copp, Steven W; Hirai, Daniel M; Ferguson, Scott K; Sims, Gabrielle E; Hageman, Karen S; Stebbins, Charles L; Poole, David C; Musch, Timothy I

    2014-03-01

    Impaired vasomotor control in chronic heart failure (CHF) is due partly to decrements in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mediated vasodilation. Exercising muscle blood flow (BF) is augmented with polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation via fish oil (FO) in healthy rats. We hypothesized that FO would augment exercising muscle BF in CHF rats via increased NO-bioavailability. Myocardial infarction (coronary artery ligation) induced CHF in Sprague-Dawley rats which were subsequently randomized to dietary FO (20% docosahexaenoic acid, 30% eicosapentaenoic acid, n = 15) or safflower oil (SO, 5%, n = 10) for 6-8 weeks. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), blood [lactate], and hindlimb muscles BF (radiolabeled microspheres) were determined at rest, during treadmill exercise (20 m·min(-1), 5% incline) and exercise + N(G)-nitro-l-arginine-methyl-ester (l-NAME) (a nonspecific NOS inhibitor). FO did not change left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (SO: 14 ± 2; FO: 11 ± 1 mm Hg, p > 0.05). During exercise, MAP (SO: 128 ± 3; FO: 132 ± 3 mm Hg) and blood [lactate] (SO: 3.8 ± 0.4; FO: 4.6 ± 0.5 mmol·L(-1)) were not different (p > 0.05). Exercising hindlimb muscle BF was lower in FO than SO (SO: 120 ± 11; FO: 93 ± 4 mL·min(-1)·100 g(-1), p exercise but may lower metabolic cost.

  2. Chronic Electromagnetic Exposure at Occupational Safety Level Does Not Affect the Metabolic Profile nor Cornea Healing after LASIK Surgery

    David Crouzier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LASIK eye surgery has become a very common practice for myopic people, especially those in the military. Sometimes undertaken by people who need to keep a specific medical aptitude, this surgery could be performed in secret from the hierarchy and from the institute medical staff. However, even though the eyes have been previously described as one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic fields in the human body, no data exist on the potential deleterious effects of electromagnetic fields on the healing eye. The consequences of chronic long-lasting radar exposures at power density, in accordance with the occupational safety standards (9.71 GHz, 50 W/m2, were investigated on cornea healing. The metabolic and clinical statuses after experimental LASIK keratotomy were assessed on the different eye segments in a New Zealand rabbit model. The analysis methods were performed after 5 months of exposure (1 hour/day, 3 times/week. Neither clinical or histological examinations, nor experimental data, such as light scattering, 1H-NMR HRMAS metabolomics, 13C-NMR spectra of lipidic extracts, and antioxidant status, evidenced significant modifications. It was concluded that withdrawing the medical aptitude of people working in electromagnetic field environments (i.e., radar operators in the navy after eye surgery was not justified.

  3. Cerebral metabolic alterations and cognitive dysfunction in children with chronic kidney disease using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Wechsler intelligence scale.

    Youssef, Doaa Mohammed; Mohamed, Ahmed Hosny; Kamel Attia, Wafaa Mahmoud; Mohammad, Faten Fawzy; El Fatah, Nelly Rafaat Abd; Elshal, Amal Saeed

    2017-06-16

    Many studies described Impaired intelligence, attention, memory and executive function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) dialyzed and non-dialyzed, but there is still lacking the early and sensitive method of detection of these deficits. The purpose of this study is to investigate relation between the brain metabolic alteration [measured by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)] and cognitive dysfunction in CKD children (detected by psychometric analysis). One hundred and forty patients with CKD were included [ 40 patients with stage 5 CKD on dialysis, 30 patients with stage 4 to 5 CKD without dialysis, and 70 patients with stage 1 to 3 CKD]. All patients with previous neurological disorders were excluded. Conventional MRI, MRS and psychometric assessment by using Wechsler intelligence scale for children third edition was done in all subjects. We found a significant negative correlation between MRS abnormalities and Wechsler IQ Test scores. But there was a significantly positive correlation between the CKD stages and MRS abnormalities in patients with CKD and negative significant correlation between CKD stages and Wechsler IQ test scores in patients with CKD. There were correlations between "the electrolyte disturbance, blood hemoglobin and hypertension" and "the CKD staging, cognitive functions IQ scores and MRS parameter changes". We concluded that both MRS and psychometric tests are sensitive methods for detection of cognitive function affection in CKD children, particularly in dialyzed group and these findings appears before the clinical diagnosis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Chronic cigarette smoke exposure adversely alters 14C-arachidonic acid metabolism in rat lungs, aortas and platelets

    Lubawy, W.C.; Valentovic, M.A.; Atkinson, J.E.; Gairola, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    Male rats were exposed to freshly generated cigarette smoke once daily, 5 times a week for 10 weeks. Inhalation of smoke was verified by elevated carboxyhemoglobin in blood sampled immediately after smoke exposure and by increased lung aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity 24 hours after the last smoke exposure. Aortic rings isolated from smoke-exposed rats synthesized less prostacyclin (PGI2) from 14 C-arachidonic acid than rings from sham rats. Platelets from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more thromboxane (TXA2) from 14 C-arachidonic acid than platelets from room controls but not those from sham rats. Lung microsomes from smoke-exposed rats synthesized more TXA2 and had a lower PGI2/TXA2 ratio than lung microsomes from room controls and shams. It is concluded that chronic cigarette smoke exposure alters arachidonic acid metabolism in aortas, platelets and lungs in a manner resulting in decreased PGI2 and increased TXA2, thereby creating a condition favoring platelet aggregation and a variety of cardiovascular diseases

  5. Prevalence and determinants of the metabolic syndrome among subjects with advanced nondiabetes-related chronic kidney disease in Gran Canaria, Spain.

    Boronat, Mauro; Bosch, Elvira; Lorenzo, Dionisio; Quevedo, Virginia; López-Ríos, Laura; Riaño, Marta; García-Delgado, Yaiza; García-Cantón, César

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the metabolic syndrome and mild chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been extensively studied. This study was aimed to estimate the prevalence and factors associated with the metabolic syndrome among subjects with advanced stages of nondiabetes-related CKD. Study population was composed of incident patients with advanced CKD not related to diabetes in a tertiary hospital from Gran Canaria (Spain) since February 2011 to December 2014. Participants fulfilled a survey questionnaire and underwent physical examination and biochemical evaluation. The sample was composed of 167 subjects (mean age 63.9 ± 13.7 years; estimated glomerular filtration rate 21.9 ± 6.6 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome was 68.9% (65.2% in men and 73.3% in women). Highest rates were observed in groups with chronic interstitial nephropathy (80%), CKD of uncertain etiology (76.7%) and CKD related to vascular causes (76.2%). Subjects with metabolic syndrome were older, had higher values of C-reactive protein and more often reported to have first-degree relatives with diabetes and to be physically inactive. In multivariate analyses, age (OR: 1.034 [CI 95%: 1.004-1.065]; p  =  0.024) and family history of diabetes (OR: 2.550 [1.159-5.608]; p  =  0.020) were independently associated with the metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome among subjects with advanced nondiabetes-related CKD is high, and greater than that observed in general Canarian population of similar age groups. Age and family history of diabetes are the two factors more strongly associated with the metabolic syndrome in this population.

  6. Fetuin-A and its Relation to Calcium Metabolism and Vascular Calcification in Chronic Kidney Diseases

    El Nashar, N.A.

    2011-01-01

    Fetuin-A is a serum protein that inhibits ectopic vascular calcification and is present in lower concentrations in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) than in healthy controls. The association of altered calcium-phosphorus ratio with serum fetuin-A levels is still a matter of debate. The associations of several parameters of kidney function including serum creatinine, GFR, albumin, Ca, P and Ca-P product were assessed. The levels of Hb, parathyroid hormone, lipid profile, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs CRP) and serum interleukin (IL)-18 as a marker of inflammatory state and serum fetuin-A as an important inhibitor of vascular and soft tissue calcification were determined. Thirty chronic kidney diseased (CKD) patients were classified into different stages according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and compared with 20 healthy controls. Serum IL-18 and serum fetuin-A were determined using ELISA technique. The results showed that serum levels of hemoglobin and HDL were significantly decreased (P<0.05) in the CKD group whereas serum triglycerides, Ca, phosphorus and calcium-phosphorus product were significantly increased (P<0.05) than in control subjects. Regarding renal function tests, serum creatinine was very highly significantly increased (P<0.001) whereas GFR and serum albumin were very highly significantly decreased in patients as compared to healthy controls. Serum levels of hs CRP and IL-18 were increased in CKD group (5.55±0.43 mg/l and 265.4±169.65 pg/ml, respectively) than in control group (1.35±0.42 mg/l and 90.35±19.96 pg/ml, respectively). Serum levels of fetuin-A were significantly decreased in patients with CKD group (12.64±0.41 ng/ml) than in age and gender comparable healthy subjects (23.96 ±7.35 ng/ml). Moreover, serum fetuin-A levels were progressively decreased, and hs CRP and IL-18 levels were progressively increased (P<0.001 for both) along with the decreasing of renal function. Significant positive

  7. Effects of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on the distribution of cyanide into the rat brain.

    Djerad, A; Monier, C; Houzé, P; Borron, S W; Lefauconnier, J M; Baud, F J

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether respiratory acidosis favors the cerebral distribution of cyanide, and conversely, if respiratory alkalosis limits its distribution. The pharmacokinetics of a nontoxic dose of cyanide were first studied in a group of 7 rats in order to determine the distribution phase. The pharmacokinetics were found to best fit a 3-compartment model with very rapid distribution (whole blood T(1/2)alpha = 21.6 +/- 3.3 s). Then the effects of the modulation of arterial pH on the distribution of a nontoxic dose of intravenously administered cyanide into the brains of rats were studied by means of the determination of the permeability-area product (PA). The modulation of arterial blood pH was performed by variation of arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) in 3 groups of 8 anesthetized mechanically ventilated rats. The mean arterial pH measured 20 min after the start of mechanical ventilation in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups were 7.07 +/- 0.03, 7.41 +/- 0.01, and 7.58 +/- 0.01, respectively. The mean PAs in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups, determined 30 s after the intravenous administration of cyanide, were 0.015 +/- 0.002, 0.011 +/- 0.001, and 0.008 +/- 0.001 s(-1), respectively (one-way ANOVA; p < 0.0087). At alkalotic pH the mean permeability-area product was 43% of that measured at acidotic pH. This effect of pH on the rapidity of cyanide distribution does not appear to be limited to specific areas of the brain. We conclude that modulation of arterial pH by altering PaCO2 may induce significant effects on the brain uptake of cyanide.

  8. Respiratory alkalosis and associated electrolytes in long-term ventilator dependent persons with tetraplegia.

    Watt, J W; Silva, P

    2001-11-01

    A pilot case control study of the acid-base and electrolyte status in 30 long-term ventilator-dependent (LTVD) and 30 self ventilating persons with tetraplegia. To assess the extent of respiratory alkalosis and screen for associated hypokalaemia, hypomagnesaemia and/or hypophosphataemia. Medically stable persons with tetraplegia under the long-term care of the Southport Spinal Injuries Centre, England. Blood gases and electrolytes were sampled from 30 control patients with tetraplegia and from 30 patients having been LTVD for more than 12 months. All the blood gas measurements in the LTVD group lay outside both the reference range and the 95% confidence intervals (CI) of the control group: pH 7.46 (0.06); PCO(2) 3.46 (1.1) kPa; bicarbonate 18.3 (3.8) and base excess -3.2 (2.8) mmol/l; PO(2) 13.8 (2.8) kPa (means and standard deviations). The serum potassium, magnesium, phosphate, and sodium means lay within the reference ranges but the potassium, phosphate and calcium were at or below the 95% CI of the control values. One patient on part-time ventilatory support having less bicarbonate compensation had low serum electrolytes during ventilation. There was no evidence of biochemical jeopardy from long-term mechanical hyperventilation although acutely administered hyperventilation has the potential to cause falls in serum potassium, magnesium and phosphate and so caution should be exercised in part-time ventilated persons. The full range of electrolytes should be assayed during stabilisation in LTVD and periodically thereafter. Hyperventilation helps to maintain good oxygenation in LTVD persons with paralysis and normal lungs. None.

  9. Neuroendocrine and Cardiac Metabolic Dysfunction and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation in Adipose Tissue and Pancreas following Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in the Mouse

    Gregory E. Bigford

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available CVD (cardiovascular disease represents a leading cause of mortality in chronic SCI (spinal cord injury. Several component risk factors are observed in SCI; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to these risks have not been defined. Central and peripheral chronic inflammation is associated with metabolic dysfunction and CVD, including adipokine regulation of neuroendocrine and cardiac function and inflammatory processes initiated by the innate immune response. We use female C57 Bl/6 mice to examine neuroendocrine, cardiac, adipose and pancreatic signaling related to inflammation and metabolic dysfunction in response to experimentally induced chronic SCI. Using immunohistochemical, -precipitation, and -blotting analysis, we show decreased POMC (proopiomelanocortin and increased NPY (neuropeptide-Y expression in the hypothalamic ARC (arcuate nucleus and PVN (paraventricular nucleus, 1-month post-SCI. Long-form leptin receptor (Ob-Rb, JAK2 (Janus kinase/STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3/p38 and RhoA/ROCK (Rho-associated kinase signaling is significantly increased in the heart tissue post-SCI, and we observe the formation and activation of the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 inflammasome in VAT (visceral adipose tissue and pancreas post-SCI. These data demonstrate neuroendocrine signaling peptide alterations, associated with central inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI, and provide evidence for the peripheral activation of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiac, VAT and pancreatic inflammation and metabolic dysfunction post-SCI. Further understanding of biological mechanisms contributing to SCI-related inflammatory processes and metabolic dysfunction associated with CVD pathology may help to direct therapeutic and rehabilitation countermeasures.

  10. [Study on gene differential expressions of substance and energy metabolism in chronic superficial gastritis patients of Pi deficiency syndrome and of pi-wei hygropyrexia syndrome].

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wang, Ying-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the metabolic levels of energy and substance in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG) patients of Pi deficiency syndrome (PDS) and of Pi-Wei hygropyrexia syndrome (PWHS), including lipid, protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, trace element, and energy metabolism, and to study the pathogenesis mechanism of PDS from substance and energy metabolisms. Recruited were 8 CSG patients who visited at First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine from June 2004 to March 2005, including 4 patients of PDS and 4 of PWHS. Their gastric mucosae were used for experiments of DNA microarray. The dual-channel DNA microarray data were bioinformatically analyzed by BRB ArrayTools and IPA Software. Obtained were fifty-six differentially expressed genes involved in substance and energy metabolisms with the expression fold more than 2, including 11 genes up-regulated and 45 genes down-regulated. Of them, genes correlated to lipid metabolism included CRLS1, LRP11, FUT9, GPCPD1, PIGL, SULT1A4, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, and ACADVL, mainly involved in the metabolic processes of fatty acid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycolipid. Genes correlated to protein metabolism included ASRGL1, AARSD1, EBNA1BP2, PUM2, MRPL52, C120RF65, PSMB8, PSME2, UBA7, RNF11, FBXO44, ZFYVE26, CHMP2A, SSR4, SNX4, RAB3B, RABL2A, GOLGA2, KDELR1, PHPT1, ACPP, PTPRF, CRKL, HDAC7, ADPRHL2, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, DDOST, and FUT9, mainly involved in the biosynthesis processes of protein, ubiquitination, targeted transport and post-translation modification. Genes correlated to nucleic acid metabolism included DFFB, FLJ35220, TOP2A, SF3A3, CREB3, CRTC2, NR1D2, MED6, GTF2IRD1, C1ORF83, ZNF773, and ZMYND11, mainly involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription regulation. Genes correlated to carbohydrate metabolism included AGL, B3GNT1, FUT9, ST8SIA4, SULT1A4, DDOST, and PIGL, mainly involved in glucogen degradation and

  11. Excess ω-6 fatty acids influx in aging drives metabolic dysregulation, electrocardiographic alterations, and low-grade chronic inflammation.

    Kain, Vasundhara; Ingle, Kevin A; Kachman, Maureen; Baum, Heidi; Shanmugam, Gobinath; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S; Young, Martin E; Halade, Ganesh V

    2018-02-01

    Maintaining a balance of ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids is essential for cardiac health. Current ω-6 and ω-3 fatty acids in the American diet have shifted from the ideal ratio of 2:1 to almost 20:1; while there is a body of evidence that suggests the negative impact of such a shift in younger organisms, the underlying age-related metabolic signaling in response to the excess influx of ω-6 fatty acids is incompletely understood. In the present study, young (6 mo old) and aging (≥18 mo old) mice were fed for 2 mo with a ω-6-enriched diet. Excess intake of ω-6 enrichment decreased the total lean mass and increased nighttime carbohydrate utilization, with higher levels of cardiac cytokines indicating low-grade chronic inflammation. Dobutamine-induced stress tests displayed an increase in PR interval, a sign of an atrioventricular defect in ω-6-fed aging mice. Excess ω-6 fatty acid intake in aging mice showed decreased 12-lipoxygenase with a concomitant increase in 15-lipoxygenase levels, resulting in the generation of 15( S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, whereas cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 generated prostaglandin E 2 , leukotriene B 4, and thromboxane B 2 . Furthermore, excessive ω-6 fatty acids led to dysregulated nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2/antioxidant-responsive element in aging mice. Moreover, ω-6 fatty acid-mediated changes were profound in aging mice with respect to the eicosanoid profile while minimal changes were observed in the size and shape of cardiomyocytes. These findings provide compelling evidence that surplus consumption of ω-6 fatty acids, coupled with insufficient intake of ω-3 fatty acids, is linked to abnormal changes in ECG. These manifestations contribute to functional deficiencies and expansion of the inflammatory mediator milieu during later stages of aging. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Aging has a profound impact on the metabolism of fatty acids to maintain heart function. The excess influx of ω-6 fatty acids in aging perturbed

  12. Nonmonotonous changes of thymus nuclei lipid metabolism upon chronic gamma-radiation of rats at a dose-rate of 3 c Gy/Day

    Kulagina, T.P.; Kolomijtseva, I.K.; Moiseeva, S.A.; Kuzin, A.M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamics of changes in the thymus nuclei lipid metabolism under chronic gamma-radiation in low doses with the dose rate of 3 cGy/day is studied. It is shown, that at the 25 cGy dose rate there takes place activation of exchange in the fatly-acid part of the phospholipid molecule with simultaneous activation of the cholesterol and fatty acids synthesis. The synthesis of cholesterol and fatty acids at 50 cGy remains activated, whereas metabolism of the fatty-acid part of the phospholipids molecule is sharply depressed. The identified changes reveal the similarity with the processes, proceeding by the apoptose induction. At the same time the dynamics of the thymocyte nuclei lipid exchange in the process of adaptation to the long radiation effect as nonmonotonous metabolic response to low dose impact is characterized for the first time [ru

  13. Plasma Amino Acid Abnormalities in Chronic Heart Failure. Mechanisms, Potential Risks and Targets in Human Myocardium Metabolism

    Roberto Aquilani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to measure arterial amino acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF, and relate them to left ventricular function and disease severity. Amino acids (AAs play a crucial role for heart protein-energy metabolism. In heart failure, arterial AAs, which are the major determinant of AA uptake by the myocardium, are rarely measured. Forty-one subjects with clinically stable CHF (New York Heart Association (NYHA class II to IV were analyzed. After overnight fasting, blood samples from the radial artery were taken to measure AA concentrations. Calorie (KcalI, protein-, fat-, carbohydrate-intake, resting energy expenditure (REE, total daily energy expenditure (REE × 1.3, and cardiac right catheterization variables were all measured. Eight matched controls were compared for all measurements, with the exception of cardiac catheterization. Compared with controls, CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels, of which both their number and reduced rates are related to Heart Failure (HF severity. Arterial aspartic acid correlated with stroke volume index (r = 0.6263; p < 0.0001 and cardiac index (r = 0.4243; p = 0.0028. The value of arterial aspartic acid (µmol/L multiplied by the cardiac index was associated with left ventricular ejection fraction (r = 0.3765; p = 0.0076. All NYHA groups had adequate protein intake (≥1.1 g/kg/day and inadequate calorie intake (KcalI < REE × 1.3 was found only in class IV patients. This study showed that CHF patients had reduced arterial AA levels directly related to clinical disease severity and left ventricular dysfunction.

  14. Effect of Acetazolamide vs Placebo on Duration of Invasive Mechanical Ventilation Among Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Faisy, Christophe; Meziani, Ferhat; Planquette, Benjamin; Clavel, Marc; Gacouin, Arnaud; Bornstain, Caroline; Schneider, Francis; Duguet, Alexandre; Gibot, Sébastien; Lerolle, Nicolas; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Sanchez, Olivier; Djibre, Michel; Ricome, Jean-Louis; Rabbat, Antoine; Heming, Nicholas; Urien, Saïk; Esvan, Maxime; Katsahian, Sandrine

    2016-02-02

    Acetazolamide has been used for decades as a respiratory stimulant for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and metabolic alkalosis, but no large randomized placebo-controlled trial is available to confirm this approach. To determine whether acetazolamide reduces mechanical ventilation duration in critically ill patients with COPD and metabolic alkalosis. The DIABOLO study, a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, was conducted from October 2011 through July 2014 in 15 intensive care units (ICUs) in France. A total of 382 patients with COPD who were expected to receive mechanical ventilation for more 24 hours were randomized to the acetazolamide or placebo group and 380 were included in an intention-to treat analysis. Acetazolamide (500-1000 mg, twice daily) vs placebo administered intravenously in cases of pure or mixed metabolic alkalosis, initiated within 48 hours of ICU admission and continued during the ICU stay for a maximum of 28 days. The primary outcome was the duration of invasive mechanical ventilation via endotracheal intubation or tracheotomy. Secondary outcomes included changes in arterial blood gas and respiratory parameters, weaning duration, adverse events, use of noninvasive ventilation after extubation, successful weaning, the duration of ICU stay, and in-ICU mortality. Among 382 randomized patients, 380 (mean age, 69 years; 272 men [71.6%]; 379 [99.7%] with endotracheal intubation) completed the study. For the acetazolamide group (n = 187), compared with the placebo group (n = 193), no significant between-group differences were found for median duration of mechanical ventilation (-16.0 hours; 95% CI, -36.5 to 4.0 hours; P = .17), duration of weaning off mechanical ventilation (-0.9 hours; 95% CI, -4.3 to 1.3 hours; P = .36), daily changes of minute-ventilation (-0.0 L/min; 95% CI, -0.2 to 0.2 L/min; P = .72), or partial carbon-dioxide pressure in arterial blood (-0.3 mm Hg; 95% CI, -0.8 to 0.2 mm

  15. Respiratory alkalosis and primary hypocapnia in Labrador Retrievers participating in field trials in high-ambient-temperature conditions.

    Steiss, Janet E; Wright, James C

    2008-10-01

    To determine whether Labrador Retrievers participating in field trials develop respiratory alkalosis and hypocapnia primarily in conditions of high ambient temperatures. 16 Labrador Retrievers. At each of 5 field trials, 5 to 10 dogs were monitored during a test (retrieval of birds over a variable distance on land [1,076 to 2,200 m]; 36 assessments); ambient temperatures ranged from 2.2 degrees to 29.4 degrees C. For each dog, rectal temperature was measured and a venous blood sample was collected in a heparinized syringe within 5 minutes of test completion. Blood samples were analyzed on site for Hct; pH; sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, glucose, lactate, bicarbonate, and total CO2 concentrations; and values of PvO2 and PvCO2. Scatterplots of each variable versus ambient temperature were reviewed. Regression analysis was used to evaluate the effect of ambient temperature ( 21 degrees C) on each variable. Compared with findings at ambient temperatures 21 degrees C; rectal temperature did not differ. Two dogs developed signs of heat stress in 1 test at an ambient temperature of 29 degrees C; their rectal temperatures were higher and PvCO2 values were lower than findings in other dogs. When running distances frequently encountered at field trials, healthy Labrador Retrievers developed hyperthermia regardless of ambient temperature. Dogs developed respiratory alkalosis and hypocapnia at ambient temperatures > 21 degrees C.

  16. Severity of psychosis syndrome and change of metabolic abnormality in chronic schizophrenia patients: severe negative syndrome may be related to a distinct lipid pathophysiology.

    Chen, S-F; Hu, T-M; Lan, T-H; Chiu, H-J; Sheen, L-Y; Loh, E-W

    2014-03-01

    Metabolic abnormality is common among schizophrenia patients. Some metabolic traits were found associated with subgroups of schizophrenia patients. We examined a possible relationship between metabolic abnormality and psychosis profile in schizophrenia patients. Three hundred and seventy-two chronic schizophrenia patients treated with antipsychotics for more than 2 years were assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. A set of metabolic traits was measured at scheduled checkpoints between October 2004 and September 2006. Multiple regressions adjusted for sex showed negative correlations between body mass index (BMI) and total score and all subscales; triglycerides (TG) was negatively correlated with total score and negative syndrome, while HDLC was positively correlated with negative syndrome. When sex interaction was concerned, total score was negatively correlated with BMI but not with others; negative syndrome was negatively correlated with BMI and positively with HDLC. No metabolic traits were correlated with positive syndrome or general psychopathology. Loss of body weight is a serious health problem in schizophrenia patients with severe psychosis syndrome, especially the negative syndrome. Schizophrenia patients with severe negative syndrome may have a distinct lipid pathophysiology in comparison with those who were less severe in the domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of airway acidosis and alkalosis on airway vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to albuterol.

    Cancado, Jose E; Mendes, Eliana S; Arana, Johana; Horvath, Gabor; Monzon, Maria E; Salathe, Matthias; Wanner, Adam

    2015-04-02

    In vitro and animal experiments have shown that the transport and signaling of β2-adrenergic agonists are pH-sensitive. Inhaled albuterol, a hydrophilic β2-adrenergic agonist, is widely used for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. Acute exacerbations of obstructive airway diseases can be associated with changes in ventilation leading to either respiratory acidosis or alkalosis thereby affecting albuterol responsiveness in the airway. The purpose of this study was to determine if airway pH has an effect on albuterol-induced vasodilation in the airway. Ten healthy volunteers performed the following respiratory maneuvers: quiet breathing, hypocapnic hyperventilation, hypercapnic hyperventilation, and eucapnic hyperventilation (to dissociate the effect of pH from the effect of ventilation). During these breathing maneuvers, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH and airway blood flow response to inhaled albuterol (ΔQ̇aw) were assessed. Mean ± SE EBC pH (units) and ΔQ̇aw (μl.min(-1).mL(-1)) were 6.4 ± 0.1 and 16.8 ± 1.9 during quiet breathing, 6.3 ± 0.1 and 14.5 ± 2.4 during eucapnic hyperventilation, 6.6 ± 0.2 and -0.2 ± 1.8 during hypocapnic hyperventilation (p = 0.02 and <0.01 vs. quiet breathing), and 5.9 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 1.5 during hypercapnic hyperventilation (p = 0.02 and <0.02 vs quiet breathing). Albuterol responsiveness in the airway as assessed by ΔQ̇aw is pH sensitive. The breathing maneuver associated with decreased and increased EBC pH both resulted in a decreased responsiveness independent of the level of ventilation. These findings suggest an attenuated response to hydrophilic β2-adrenergic agonists during airway disease exacerbations associated with changes in pH. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01216748 .

  18. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin

    Rogers, Nicole H.; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin−/−) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr−/−), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin−/− and Ghsr−/− mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr−/− mice. CR of WT, Ghsr−/−, and Ghrelin−/− mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling. PMID:26812158

  19. Effect of U and 137Cs chronic contamination on dopamine and serotonin metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat

    Houpert, P.; Lestaevel, P.; Amourette, C.; Dhieux, B.; Bussy, C.; Paquet, F.

    2004-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the most significant problem for the population of the former Soviet Union for the next 50-70 years will be chronic internal contamination by radionuclides. One of the few experiments carried out in this field reported that neurotransmitter metabolism in the central nervous system of the rat was disturbed after feeding with oats contaminated by 137 Cs for 1 month. The present study assessed the effect of chronic contamination by depleted U or 137 Cs on the metabolism of two neurotransmitters in cerebral areas of rats. Dopamine and serotonin were chosen because their metabolism has been shown to be disturbed after external irradiation, even at moderate doses. Dopamine, serotonin, and some of their catabolites were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography coupled with an electrochemical detector in five cerebral structures of rats contaminated over a 1-month period by drinking water (40 mg U·L -1 or 6500 Bq 137 Cs·L -1 ). In the striatum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, thalamus, and cerebellum, the dopamine, serotonin, and catabolite levels were not significantly different between the control rats and rats contaminated by U or 137 Cs. These results are not in accordance with those previously described. (author)

  20. Effect of the omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E supplementation on subjective global assessment score, glucose metabolism, and lipid concentrations in chronic hemodialysis patients.

    Asemi, Zatollah; Soleimani, Alireza; Bahmani, Fereshteh; Shakeri, Hossein; Mazroii, Navid; Abedi, Fatemeh; Fallah, Melika; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad

    2016-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of omega-3 fatty acid plus vitamin E supplementation on subjective global assessment (SGA) score and metabolic profiles in chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among 120 chronic HD patients. Participants were randomly divided into four groups to receive: (i) 1250 mg/day omega-3 fatty acid containing 600 mg eicosapentaenoic acid and 300 mg docosahexaenoic acid + vitamin E placebo (n = 30), (ii) 400 IU/day vitamin E + omega-3 fatty acids placebo (n = 30), (iii) 1250 mg omega-3 fatty acids/day + 400 IU/day vitamin E (n = 30), and (iv) omega-3 fatty acids placebo + vitamin E placebo (n = 30) for 12 wk. Fasting blood samples were taken at baseline and after 12-wk intervention to measure metabolic profiles. Patients who received combined omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E supplements compared with vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and placebo had significantly decreased SGA score (p acids plus vitamin E supplementation for 12 wk among HD patients had beneficial effects on SGA score and metabolic profiles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. In vivo effects of a chronic contamination by uranium or cesium 137 on the pharmaceutical metabolism, of the vitamin D and cholesterol

    Souidi, M.

    2006-11-01

    In conclusion, an animal model, miming the chronic contamination of the populations exposed to the uranium, was used for the first time to show that the chronic ingestion of a weak dose of depleted uranium can affect the level of active vitamin D without modifying the mineral homeostasis. This study shows that this radionuclide can lead molecular modifications of the CYPs and the nuclear receivers involved in the metabolism of the vitamin D not only at the level of the liver and kidney but also at the level of the independent metabolism in the brain. The deficiency in vitamin D can provoke osseous diseases such as the rickets at the child and the osteomalacia at the adult. The three categories of population the most exposed to this deficiency are the infants, the pregnant women and the old persons. Strong prevalence of the vitamin D deficiency associated with a chronic exposure to uranium could lead to osseous disorders. To verify this hypothesis, it will be necessary secondly to realize this study on individuals animal models predisposed to the rickets or to the osteomalacia. (N.C.)

  2. Metabolic syndrome in chronic hepatitis C infection: does it still matter in the era of directly acting antiviral therapy?

    Lim TR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available TR Lim Centre for Liver Research and NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Liver Disease, University of Birmingham and Liver and Hepatobiliary Unit, Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, UK Abstract: Metabolic syndrome is prevalent in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Given the pandemic spread of HCV infection and metabolic syndrome, the burden of their interaction is a major public health issue. The presence of metabolic syndrome accelerates the progression of liver disease in patients with HCV infection. New drug development in HCV has seen an unprecedented rise in the last year, which resulted in better efficacy, better tolerance, and a shorter treatment duration. This review describes the underlying mechanisms and clinical effects of metabolic syndrome in HCV infection, as well as their importance in the era of new directly acting antiviral therapy. Keywords: HCV, genotype 3, metabolic syndrome, steatosis, directly acting antiviral agents

  3. Adaptive metabolic response to 4 weeks of sugar-sweetened beverage consumption in healthy, lightly active individuals and chronic high glucose availability in primary human myotubes.

    Sartor, Francesco; Jackson, Matthew J; Squillace, Cesare; Shepherd, Anthony; Moore, Jonathan P; Ayer, Donald E; Kubis, Hans-Peter

    2013-04-01

    Chronic sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption is associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Hyperglycaemia contributes to metabolic alterations observed in T2DM, such as reduced oxidative capacity and elevated glycolytic and lipogenic enzyme expressions in skeletal muscle tissue. We aimed to investigate the metabolic alterations induced by SSB supplementation in healthy individuals and to compare these with the effects of chronic hyperglycaemia on primary muscle cell cultures. Lightly active, healthy, lean subjects (n = 11) with sporadic soft drink consumption underwent a 4-week SSB supplementation (140 ± 15 g/day, ~2 g glucose/kg body weight/day, glucose syrup). Before and after the intervention, body composition, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), insulin sensitivity, muscle metabolic gene and protein expression were assessed. Adaptive responses to hyperglycaemia (7 days, 15 mM) were tested in primary human myotubes. SSB supplementation increased fat mass (+1.0 kg, P < 0.05), fasting RER (+0.12, P < 0.05), fasting glucose (+0.3 mmol/L, P < 0.05) and muscle GAPDH mRNA expressions (+0.94 AU, P < 0.05). PGC1α mRNA was reduced (-0.20 AU, P < 0.05). Trends were found for insulin resistance (+0.16 mU/L, P = 0.09), and MondoA protein levels (+1.58 AU, P = 0.08). Primary myotubes showed elevations in GAPDH, ACC, MondoA and TXNIP protein expressions (P < 0.05). Four weeks of SSB supplementation in healthy individuals shifted substrate metabolism towards carbohydrates, increasing glycolytic and lipogenic gene expression and reducing mitochondrial markers. Glucose-sensing protein MondoA might contribute to this shift, although further in vivo evidence is needed to corroborate this.

  4. Pulmonary O2 uptake and leg blood flow kinetics during moderate exercise are slowed by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis

    Chin, Lisa M. K.; Heigenhauser, George J. F.; Paterson, Donald H.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of hyperventilation-induced hypocapnic alkalosis (Hypo) on the adjustment of pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) and leg femoral conduit artery (“bulk”) blood flow (LBF) during moderate-intensity exercise (Mod) was examined in eight young male adults. Subjects completed four to six repetitions of alternate-leg knee-extension exercise during normal breathing [Con; end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PetCO2) ∼40 mmHg] and sustained hyperventilation (Hypo; PetCO2 ∼20 mmHg). Increases in work rate were made instantaneously from baseline (3 W) to Mod (80% estimated lactate threshold). V̇o2p was measured breath by breath by mass spectrometry and volume turbine, and LBF (calculated from mean femoral artery blood velocity and femoral artery diameter) was measured simultaneously by Doppler ultrasound. Concentration changes of deoxy (Δ[HHb])-, oxy (Δ[O2Hb])-, and total hemoglobin-myoglobin (Δ[HbTot]) of the vastus lateralis muscle were measured continuously by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The kinetics of V̇o2p, LBF, and Δ[HHb] were modeled using a monoexponential equation by nonlinear regression. The time constants for the phase 2 V̇o2p (Hypo, 49 ± 26 s; Con, 28 ± 8 s) and LBF (Hypo, 46 ± 16 s; Con, 23 ± 6 s) were greater (P alkalosis is associated with slower convective (i.e., slowed femoral artery and microvascular blood flow) and diffusive (i.e., greater fractional O2 extraction for a given ΔV̇o2p) O2 delivery, which may contribute to the hyperventilation-induced slowing of V̇o2p (and muscle O2 utilization) kinetics. PMID:20339012

  5. Lipid metabolism in rat tissues exposed to the chronic effects of γ-irradiation and ubiquinone Q9

    Novoselova, E.G.

    1992-01-01

    Chronic γ-irradiation of rats with the daily dose of 0.129 Gy activates the synthesis of various classes of lipids in the thymus, spleen and bone marrow cells and induces lipid accumulation in these tissues. Feeding of rats with the antioxidant, ubiquinone Q-9, under conditions of chronic irradiation causes a considerable normalization of lipogenesis and levels of the lipid concentration in the tissues of animals irradiated with the dose of 20 Gy

  6. Hippocampus and serum metabolomic studies to explore the regulation of Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San on metabolic network disturbances of rats exposed to chronic variable stress.

    Su, Zhi-heng; Jia, Hong-mei; Zhang, Hong-wu; Feng, Yu-Fei; An, Lei; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2014-03-04

    Chaihu-Shu-Gan-San (CSGS), a traditional Chinese medicine formula, has been effectively used for the treatment of depression. However, studies of its anti-depressive mechanism are challenging, due to the complex pathophysiology of depression, and complexity of CSGS with multiple constituents acting on different receptors. In the present work, metabolomic studies of biochemical changes in the hippocampus and serum of chronic variable stress (CVS)-induced depression rats after treatment with CSGS were performed using ultra performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS). Partial least squares-discriminate analysis indicated that the metabolic perturbation induced by CVS was reduced by treatment with CSGS. A total of twenty-six metabolites (16 from the hippocampus and 10 from serum) were considered as potential biomarkers involved in the development of depression. Among them, 11 were first reported to have potential relevance in the pathogenesis of depression, and 25 may correlate to the regulation of CSGS treatment on depression. The results combined with a previous study indicated that CSGS mediated synergistically abnormalities of the metabolic network, composed of energy metabolism, synthesis of neurotransmitters, tryptophan, phospholipids, fatty acid and bile acid metabolism, bone loss and liver detoxification, which may be helpful for understanding its mechanism of action. Furthermore, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal pathway, involved in the neuronal protective mechanism of depression related to energy metabolism, was investigated by western blot analysis. The results showed that CSGS reversed disruptions of BDNF, ERK1/2 and pERK1/2 in CVS rats, which provides the first evidence that the ERK signal system may be one of the targets related to the antidepressant action of CSGS.

  7. Transition between acute and chronic hepatotoxicity in mice is associated with impaired energy metabolism and induction of mitochondrial heme oxygenase-1.

    Aniket Nikam

    Full Text Available The formation of protein inclusions is frequently associated with chronic metabolic diseases. In mice, short-term intoxication with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC leads to hepatocellular damage indicated by elevated serum liver enzyme activities, whereas only minor morphological changes are observed. Conversely, chronic administration of DDC for several weeks results in severe morphological damage, characterized by hepatocellular ballooning, disruption of the intermediate filament cytoskeleton, and formation of Mallory-Denk bodies consisting predominantly of misfolded keratins, Sqstm1/p62, and heat shock proteins. To evaluate the mechanistic underpinnings for this dichotomy we dissected the time-course of DDC intoxication for up to 10 weeks. We determined body weight change, serum liver enzyme activities, morphologic alterations, induction of antioxidant response (heme oxygenase-1, HO-1, oxidative damage and ATP content in livers as well as respiration, oxidative damage and the presence and activity of HO-1 in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria (mtHO-1. Elevated serum liver enzyme activity and oxidative liver damage were already present at early intoxication stages without further subsequent increase. After 2 weeks of intoxication, mice had transiently lost 9% of their body weight, liver ATP-content was reduced to 58% of controls, succinate-driven respiration was uncoupled from ATP-production and antioxidant response was associated with the appearance of catalytically active mtHO-1. Oxidative damage was associated with both acute and chronic DDC toxicity whereas the onset of chronic intoxication was specifically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction which was maximal after 2 weeks of intoxication. At this transition stage, adaptive responses involving mtHO-1 were induced, indirectly leading to improved respiration and preventing further drop of ATP levels. Our observations clearly demonstrate principally different

  8. Prevention and treatment of protein energy wasting in chronic kidney disease patients: a consensus statement by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism.

    Ikizler, T Alp; Cano, Noel J; Franch, Harold; Fouque, Denis; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kuhlmann, Martin K; Stenvinkel, Peter; TerWee, Pieter; Teta, Daniel; Wang, Angela Yee-Moon; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-12-01

    Protein energy wasting (PEW) is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, especially in individuals receiving maintenance dialysis therapy. A multitude of factors can affect the nutritional and metabolic status of CKD patients requiring a combination of therapeutic maneuvers to prevent or reverse protein and energy depletion. These include optimizing dietary nutrient intake, appropriate treatment of metabolic disturbances such as metabolic acidosis, systemic inflammation, and hormonal deficiencies, and prescribing optimized dialytic regimens. In patients where oral dietary intake from regular meals cannot maintain adequate nutritional status, nutritional supplementation, administered orally, enterally, or parenterally, is shown to be effective in replenishing protein and energy stores. In clinical practice, the advantages of oral nutritional supplements include proven efficacy, safety, and compliance. Anabolic strategies such as anabolic steroids, growth hormone, and exercise, in combination with nutritional supplementation or alone, have been shown to improve protein stores and represent potential additional approaches for the treatment of PEW. Appetite stimulants, anti-inflammatory interventions, and newer anabolic agents are emerging as novel therapies. While numerous epidemiological data suggest that an improvement in biomarkers of nutritional status is associated with improved survival, there are no large randomized clinical trials that have tested the effectiveness of nutritional interventions on mortality and morbidity.

  9. Cardiac and metabolic effects of chronic growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor I excess in young adults with pituitary gigantism.

    Bondanelli, Marta; Bonadonna, Stefania; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Doga, Mauro; Gola, Monica; Onofri, Alessandro; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Giustina, Andrea; degli Uberti, Ettore C

    2005-09-01

    Chronic growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) excess is associated with considerable mortality in acromegaly, but no data are available in pituitary gigantism. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term effects of early exposure to GH and IGF-I excess on cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in adult patients with pituitary gigantism. Six adult male patients with newly diagnosed gigantism due to GH secreting pituitary adenoma were studied and compared with 6 age- and sex-matched patients with acromegaly and 10 healthy subjects. Morphologic and functional cardiac parameters were evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Glucose metabolism was assessed by evaluating glucose tolerance and homeostasis model assessment index. Disease duration was significantly longer (Pgigantism than in patients with acromegaly, whereas GH and IGF-I concentrations were comparable. Left ventricular mass was increased both in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, as compared with controls. Left ventricular hypertrophy was detected in 2 of 6 of both patients with gigantism and patients with acromegaly, and isolated intraventricular septum thickening in 1 patient with gigantism. Inadequate diastolic filling (ratio between early and late transmitral flow velocitygigantism and 1 of 6 patients with acromegaly. Impaired glucose metabolism occurrence was higher in patients with acromegaly (66%) compared with patients with gigantism (16%). Concentrations of IGF-I were significantly (Pgigantism who have cardiac abnormalities than in those without cardiac abnormalities. In conclusion, our data suggest that GH/IGF-I excess in young adult patients is associated with morphologic and functional cardiac abnormalities that are similar in patients with gigantism and in patients with acromegaly, whereas occurrence of impaired glucose metabolism appears to be higher in patients with acromegaly, although patients with gigantism are exposed to GH excess for a

  10. Bone mineral density, bone metabolism and body composition of children with chronic renal failure, with and without growth hormone treatment

    Boot, A. M.; Nauta, J.; de Jong, M. C.; Groothoff, J. W.; Lilien, M. R.; van Wijk, J. A.; Kist-van Holthe, J. E.; Hokken-Koelega, A. C.; Pols, H. A.; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Osteopenia has been reported in adult patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Only a few studies have been performed in children. The objective of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD), bone turnover, body composition in children with CRF and to study the effect of GH

  11. Chronic psychological stress seems associated with elements of the metabolic syndrome in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    Bergmann, Natasha; Ballegaard, Søren; Krogh, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    at the sternum known to be associated to elements of the chronic stress syndrome. Elements of MS were evaluated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, body weight, HOMA-IR and blood lipids. Results: Depressive symptoms were associated with a high percentage of body fat (β = 0.179, p =.001), and high level...

  12. A review of co-morbidity between infectious and chronic disease in Sub Saharan Africa: TB and diabetes mellitus, HIV and metabolic syndrome, and the impact of globalization.

    Young, Fiona; Critchley, Julia A; Johnstone, Lucy K; Unwin, Nigel C

    2009-09-14

    Africa is facing a rapidly growing chronic non-communicable disease burden whilst at the same time experiencing continual high rates of infectious disease. It is well known that some infections increase the risk of certain chronic diseases and the converse. With an increasing dual burden of disease in Sub Saharan Africa the associations between diseases and our understanding of them will become of increased public health importance. In this review we explore the relationships reported between tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus, human immunodeficiency virus, its treatment and metabolic risk. We aimed to address the important issues surrounding these associations within a Sub Saharan African setting and to describe the impact of globalization upon them. Diabetes has been associated with a 3-fold incident risk of tuberculosis and it is hypothesised that tuberculosis may also increase the risk of developing diabetes. During co-morbid presentation of tuberculosis and diabetes both tuberculosis and diabetes outcomes are reported to worsen. Antiretroviral therapy for HIV has been associated with an increased risk of developing metabolic syndrome and HIV has been linked with an increased risk of developing both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Globalization is clearly related to an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It may be exerting other negative and positive impacts upon infectious and chronic non-communicable disease associations but at present reporting upon these is sparse. The impact of these co-morbidities in Sub Saharan Africa is likely to be large. An increasing prevalence of diabetes may hinder efforts at tuberculosis control, increasing the number of susceptible individuals in populations where tuberculosis is endemic, and making successful treatment harder. Roll out of anti-retroviral treatment coverage within Sub Saharan Africa is an essential response to the HIV epidemic however it is likely to lead to a growing number of individuals

  13. Comparing the measured basal metabolic rates in patients with chronic disorders of consciousness to the estimated basal metabolic rate calculated from common predictive equations.

    Xiao, Guizhen; Xie, Qiuyou; He, Yanbin; Wang, Ziwen; Chen, Yan; Jiang, Mengliu; Ni, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Qinxian; Murong, Min; Guo, Yequn; Qiu, Xiaowen; Yu, Ronghao

    2017-10-01

    Accurately predicting the basal metabolic rate (BMR) of patients in a vegetative state (VS) or minimally conscious state (MCS) is critical to proper nutritional therapy, but commonly used equations have not been shown to be accurate. Therefore, we compared the BMR measured by indirect calorimetry (IC) to BMR values estimated using common predictive equations in VS and MCS patients. Body composition variables were measured using the bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA) technique. BMR was measured by IC in 82 patients (64 men and 18 women) with VS or MCS. Patients were classified by body mass index as underweight (BMR was estimated for each group using the Harris-Benedict (H-B), Schofield, or Cunningham equations and compared to the measured BMR using Bland-Altman analyses. For the underweight group, there was a significant difference between the measured BMR values and the estimated BMR values calculated using the H-B, Schofield, and Cunningham equations (p BMR values estimated using the H-B and Cunningham equations were different significantly from the measured BMR (p BMR in the normal-weight group. The Schofield equation showed the best concordance (only 41.5%) with the BMR values measured by IC. None of the commonly used equations to estimate BMR were suitable for the VS or MCS populations. Indirect calorimetry is the preferred way to avoid either over or underestimate of BMR values. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. A short-term supranutritional vitamin E supplementation alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat stressed pigs.

    Liu, Fan; Celi, Pietro; Chauhan, Surinder Singh; Cottrell, Jeremy James; Leury, Brian Joseph; Dunshea, Frank Rowland

    2018-02-01

    Heat stress (HS) triggers oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in pigs. The objective of this experiment was to study whether a short-term supranutritional amount of dietary vitamin E (VE) can mitigate oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in heat-stressed pigs. A total of 24 pigs were given either a control diet (17 IU/kg VE) or a high VE (200 IU/kg VE; HiVE) diet for 14 d, then exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 20°C, 45% humidity) or HS (35°C, 35% to 45% humidity, 8 h daily) conditions for 7 d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature were measured three times daily during the thermal exposure. Blood gas variables and oxidative stress markers were studied in blood samples collected on d 7. Although HiVE diet did not affect the elevated rectal temperature or respiration rate observed during HS, it alleviated (all prespiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

  15. Lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes with diabetic nephropathy depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the role and relationship of lipid metabolism and levels of proinflammatory cytokines in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2 with diabetic nephropathy (DN, depending on the stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Materials and Methods: a total of 240 patients with type 2 diabetes in the early stages of DN and CKD were studied. Results: in patients with type 2 diabetes development of DN was associated with an increased level of proinflammatory cytokines and lipid abnormalities (hypertriglyceridemia. We found a negative correlation between the level of triglycerides (TG and glomerular filtration rate (GFR (r = -0,43 and a direct correlation between the level of IL-6 and TG (r = 0,48. Conclusions: increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and triglycerides increase the risk of development and progression of DN and CKD.

  16. Etiology of the protein-energy wasting syndrome in chronic kidney disease: a consensus statement from the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM).

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Stenvinkel, Peter; Cuppari, Lilian; Ikizler, T Alp; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kaysen, George; Mitch, William E; Price, S Russ; Wanner, Christoph; Wang, Angela Y M; ter Wee, Pieter; Franch, Harold A

    2013-03-01

    Protein-energy wasting (PEW), a term proposed by the International Society of Renal Nutrition and Metabolism (ISRNM), refers to the multiple nutritional and catabolic alterations that occur in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and associate with morbidity and mortality. To increase awareness, identify research needs, and provide the basis for future work to understand therapies and consequences of PEW, ISRNM provides this consensus statement of current knowledge on the etiology of PEW syndrome in CKD. Although insufficient food intake (true undernutrition) due to poor appetite and dietary restrictions contribute, other highly prevalent factors are required for the full syndrome to develop. These include uremia-induced alterations such as increased energy expenditure, persistent inflammation, acidosis, and multiple endocrine disorders that render a state of hypermetabolism leading to excess catabolism of muscle and fat. In addition, comorbid conditions associated with CKD, poor physical activity, frailty, and the dialysis procedure per se further contribute to PEW. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor teneligliptin functions as antioxidant on human endothelial cells exposed to chronic hyperglycemia and metabolic high-glucose memory.

    Pujadas, Gemma; De Nigris, Valeria; Prattichizzo, Francesco; La Sala, Lucia; Testa, Roberto; Ceriello, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors are widely used in type 2 diabetes. Endothelium plays a crucial role maintaining vascular integrity and function. Chronic exposure to high glucose drives to endothelial dysfunction generating oxidative stress. Teneligliptin is a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor with antioxidant properties. This study is aimed to verify a potential protective action of teneligliptin in endothelial cells exposed to high glucose. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were cultured under normal (5 mmol/L) or high glucose (25 mmol/L) during 21 days, or at high glucose during 14 days followed by 7 days at normal glucose, to reproduce the high-metabolic memory state. During this period, different concentrations of teneligliptin (0.1, 1.0 and 3.0 µmol/L) or sitagliptin (0.5 µmol/L) were added to cells. Ribonucleic acid and protein expression were assessed for antioxidant response, proliferation, apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress markers. Teneligliptin promotes the antioxidant response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, reducing ROS levels and inducing Nrf2-target genes messenger ribonucleic acid expression. Teneligliptin, but not sitagliptin, reduces the expression of the nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase regulatory subunit P22 -phox , however, both blunt the high glucose-induced increase of TXNIP. Teneligliptin improves proliferation rates in human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to high glucose, regulating the expression of cell-cycle inhibitors markers (P53, P21 and P27), and reducing proapoptotic genes (BAX and CASP3), while promotes BCL2 expression. Teneligliptin ameliorates high glucose-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress reducing the expression of several markers (BIP, PERK, ATF4, CHOP, IRE1a and ATF6). Teneligliptin has antioxidant properties, ameliorates oxidative stress and apoptotic phenotype and it can overcome the metabolic memory effect, induced by chronic exposure to high

  18. Three types of gall-bladder motility at men with chronic cholecystitis and pyelonephritis and accompanying their parameters of kidney excretory function as well as metabolism

    Oksana M Ivanyts’ka

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previously it has been shown that balneotherapy in the spa Truskavets’ (Ukraїna in men with chronic cholecystitis combined with pyelonephritis causes changes in gall-bladder motility. This is combined with changes in diurese and urinary excretion of metabolites.Individual analysis revealed not only quantitative but also qualitative differences in the postprandial motility of the gall-bladder. The purpose of this study is to identify the parameters of kidney excretory function as well as metabolism under which three types of the gall-bladdermotility skills differ significantly from each other. Materialandmethods. The object of observationwere the same ones 22men aged24-70 years old,who cameto the spaTruskavets’ for the treatment of chronic cholecystitiscombined withpyelonephritis inremission. On thetone and motility of gall-bladder judged byits fasting and postprandial volume (echocamera “Radmir”. In the daily  determined content of oxalate and nitrogen metabolites: creatinine, urea and uric acid, electrolytes: phosphates, chloride, calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium. Nitrogenous metabolites in plasma of venous blood were determined also. The survey was conducted twice, before and after balneotherapy. Results. The method of cluster analysis has formed three homogeneous cholekinetics groups, namely:normokinesia as well as hypertonic-hyperkinetic and hyperkinetic-hypertonic dyskinesia.The method of discriminatory analysis revealed 13 parameters of daily urine and three parameters of blood, as well as body weight and height, electrokinetic index and Kerdoe’s index, in the totality of which three types of cholekinetics are clearly delineated.Conclusion. The type of postprandial cholekinetics is naturally associated with a number of parameters of the excretory renal function and metabolism.

  19. Chronic suppression of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 in beta-cells impairs insulin secretion via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism.

    Ronnebaum, Sarah M; Joseph, Jamie W; Ilkayeva, Olga; Burgess, Shawn C; Lu, Danhong; Becker, Thomas C; Sherry, A Dean; Newgard, Christopher B

    2008-05-23

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) currently is being investigated as a target for treatment of obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the effects of ACC1 inhibition on insulin secretion, three small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting ACC1 (siACC1) were transfected into the INS-1-derived cell line, 832/13; the most efficacious duplex was also cloned into an adenovirus and used to transduce isolated rat islets. Delivery of the siACC1 duplexes decreased ACC1 mRNA by 60-80% in 832/13 cells and islets and enzyme activity by 46% compared with cells treated with a non-targeted siRNA. Delivery of siACC1 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 70% in 832/13 cells and by 33% in islets. Surprisingly, siACC1 treatment decreased glucose oxidation by 49%, and the ATP:ADP ratio by 52%, accompanied by clear decreases in pyruvate cycling activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Exposure of siACC1-treated cells to the pyruvate cycling substrate dimethylmalate restored GSIS to normal without recovery of the depressed ATP:ADP ratio. In siACC1-treated cells, glucokinase protein levels were decreased by 25%, which correlated with a 36% decrease in glycogen synthesis and a 33% decrease in glycolytic flux. Furthermore, acute addition of the ACC1 inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) to beta-cells suppressed [(14)C]glucose incorporation into lipids but had no effect on GSIS, whereas chronic TOFA administration suppressed GSIS and glucose metabolism. In sum, chronic, but not acute, suppression of ACC1 activity impairs GSIS via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism. These findings raise concerns about the use of ACC inhibitors for diabetes therapy.

  20. Chronic Suppression of Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase 1 in β-Cells Impairs Insulin Secretion via Inhibition of Glucose Rather Than Lipid Metabolism*

    Ronnebaum, Sarah M.; Joseph, Jamie W.; Ilkayeva, Olga; Burgess, Shawn C.; Lu, Danhong; Becker, Thomas C.; Sherry, A. Dean; Newgard, Christopher B.

    2008-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1) currently is being investigated as a target for treatment of obesity-associated dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To investigate the effects of ACC1 inhibition on insulin secretion, three small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes targeting ACC1 (siACC1) were transfected into the INS-1-derived cell line, 832/13; the most efficacious duplex was also cloned into an adenovirus and used to transduce isolated rat islets. Delivery of the siACC1 duplexes decreased ACC1 mRNA by 60–80% in 832/13 cells and islets and enzyme activity by 46% compared with cells treated with a non-targeted siRNA. Delivery of siACC1 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) by 70% in 832/13 cells and by 33% in islets. Surprisingly, siACC1 treatment decreased glucose oxidation by 49%, and the ATP:ADP ratio by 52%, accompanied by clear decreases in pyruvate cycling activity and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates. Exposure of siACC1-treated cells to the pyruvate cycling substrate dimethylmalate restored GSIS to normal without recovery of the depressed ATP:ADP ratio. In siACC1-treated cells, glucokinase protein levels were decreased by 25%, which correlated with a 36% decrease in glycogen synthesis and a 33% decrease in glycolytic flux. Furthermore, acute addition of the ACC1 inhibitor 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid (TOFA) to β-cells suppressed [14C]glucose incorporation into lipids but had no effect on GSIS, whereas chronic TOFA administration suppressed GSIS and glucose metabolism. In sum, chronic, but not acute, suppression of ACC1 activity impairs GSIS via inhibition of glucose rather than lipid metabolism. These findings raise concerns about the use of ACC inhibitors for diabetes therapy. PMID:18381287

  1. From "Kidneys Govern Bones" to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science.

    Wang, Xiao-Qin; Zou, Xin-Rong; Zhang, Yuan Clare

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of "Kidneys Govern Bones." Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  2. From “Kidneys Govern Bones” to Chronic Kidney Disease, Diabetes Mellitus, and Metabolic Bone Disorder: A Crosstalk between Traditional Chinese Medicine and Modern Science

    Xiao-Qin Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and Western medicine have evolved on distinct philosophical foundations and reasoning methods, an increasing body of scientific data has begun to reveal commonalities. Emerging scientific evidence has confirmed the validity and identified the molecular mechanisms of many ancient TCM theories. One example is the concept of “Kidneys Govern Bones.” Here we discuss the molecular mechanisms supporting this theory and its potential significance in treating complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD and diabetes mellitus. Two signaling pathways essential for calcium-phosphate metabolism can mediate the effect of kidneys in bone homeostasis, one requiring renal production of bioactive vitamin D and the other involving an endocrine axis based on kidney-expressed Klotho and bone-secreted fibroblast growth factor 23. Disruption of either pathway can lead to calcium-phosphate imbalance and vascular calcification, accelerating metabolic bone disorder. Chinese herbal medicine is an adjunct therapy widely used for treating CKD and diabetes. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic effects and underlying mechanisms of a Chinese herbal formulation, Shen-An extracts, in diabetic nephropathy and renal osteodystrophy. We believe that the smart combination of Eastern and Western concepts holds great promise for inspiring new ideas and therapies for preventing and treating complications of CKD and diabetes.

  3. Metabolism of phospholipids in peripheral nerve from rats with chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes: increased turnover of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate

    Bell, M E; Peterson, R G; Eichberg, J

    1982-07-01

    The effect of chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes on phospholipid metabolism in rat sciatic nerve in vitro was investigated. In normal nerve incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer-bicarbonate buffer containing (/sup 32/P)orthophosphate, radioactivity was primarily incorporated into phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylcholine. Smaller amounts were present in phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid. As compared to controls, phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate in nerves from animals made diabetic 2, 10, and 20 weeks earlier accounted for 30-46% more of the isotope, expressed as a percentage, incorporated into all phospholipids. In contrast, the proportion of radioactivity in phosphatidylcholine decreased by 10-25%. When the results were expressed as the quantity of phosphorus incorporated into phospholipid, only phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate displayed a change. The amount of isotope which entered this lipid increased 60% and 67% for 2- and 10-week diabetic animals, respectively. Increased phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate labeling was observed when epineurial-free preparations were used or when the composition of the incubation medium was varied. Sciatic and caudal nerve conduction velocities were decreased after 10 and 20 weeks but were unchanged after 2 weeks. Researchers conclude that an increase in the turnover of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate in sciatic nerve from streptozotocin-diabetic rats appears relatively early and persists throughout the course of the disease. This metabolic alteration may be related to a primary defect responsible for the accompanying deficient peripheral nerve function.

  4. Pharmacologic properties, metabolism, and disposition of linaclotide, a novel therapeutic peptide approved for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation.

    Busby, Robert W; Kessler, Marco M; Bartolini, Wilmin P; Bryant, Alexander P; Hannig, Gerhard; Higgins, Carolyn S; Solinga, Robert M; Tobin, Jenny V; Wakefield, James D; Kurtz, Caroline B; Currie, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Linaclotide, a potent guanylate cyclase C agonist, is a therapeutic peptide approved in the United States for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation and chronic idiopathic constipation. We present for the first time the metabolism, degradation, and disposition of linaclotide in animals and humans. We examined the metabolic stability of linaclotide in conditions that mimic the gastrointestinal tract and characterized the metabolite MM-419447 (CCEYCCNPACTGC), which contributes to the pharmacologic effects of linaclotide. Systemic exposure to these active peptides is low in rats and humans, and the low systemic and portal vein concentrations of linaclotide and MM-419447 observed in the rat confirmed both peptides are minimally absorbed after oral administration. Linaclotide is stable in the acidic environment of the stomach and is converted to MM-419447 in the small intestine. The disulfide bonds of both peptides are reduced in the small intestine, where they are subsequently proteolyzed and degraded. After oral administration of linaclotide, intestinal loops, increased intraluminal cGMP, and caused a dose-dependent acceleration in gastrointestinal transit. These results demonstrate the importance of the active metabolite in contributing to linaclotide's pharmacology.

  5. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  6. The impact of peripheral serotonin on leptin-brain serotonin axis, bone metabolism and strength in growing rats with experimental chronic kidney disease.

    Pawlak, Dariusz; Domaniewski, Tomasz; Znorko, Beata; Oksztulska-Kolanek, Ewa; Lipowicz, Paweł; Doroszko, Michał; Karbowska, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Krystyna

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in decreased bone strength. Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the critical regulators of bone health, fulfilling distinct functions depending on its synthesis site: brain-derived serotonin (BDS) favors osteoblast proliferation, whereas gut-derived serotonin (GDS) inhibits it. We assessed the role of BDS and peripheral leptin in the regulation of bone metabolism and strength in young rats with 5/6 nephrectomy. BDS synthesis was accelerated during CKD progression. Decreased peripheral leptin in CKD rats was inversely related to BDS content in the hypothalamus, brainstem and frontal cortex. Serotonin in these brain regions affected bone strength and metabolism in the studied animals. The direct effect of circulating leptin on bone was not shown in uremia. At the molecular level, there was an inverse association between elevated GDS and the expression of cAMP responsive element-binding protein (Creb) gene in bone of CKD animals. In contrast, increased expression of activating transcription factor 4 (Atf4) was shown, which was associated with GDS-dependent transcription factor 1 (Foxo1), clock gene - Cry-1, cell cycle genes: c-Myc, cyclins, and osteoblast differentiation genes. These results identified a previously unknown molecular pathway, by which elevated GDS can shift in Foxo1 target genes from Creb to Atf4-dependent response, disrupting the leptin-BDS - dependent gene pathway in the bone of uremic rats. Thus, in the condition of CKD the effect of BDS and GDS on bone metabolism and strength can't be distinguished. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease in Non-Diabetic Older Adults: Associated Roles of the Metabolic Syndrome, Inflammation, and Insulin Resistance.

    Andrea R Zammit

    Full Text Available The aims of the study were to examine the association between CKD and the metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components in older adults. We also explored two possible pathways linking the metabolic syndrome with CKD: inflammation as measured by high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP and insulin resistance as measured by HOMA-IR.Community-dwelling non-diabetic 70+ adults from the Einstein Aging Study participated in the study. We defined CKD as eGFR below 60mL/min/1.73m2. MetS was defined according to recent guidelines from the National Cholesterol Education Program. Binary logistic regressions were used to assess the association between the metabolic syndrome, its components and CKD with adjustments for demographics, HOMA-IR and hsCRP.Of 616 participants (mean age = 79.3 years, 65.5% female, 25% had MetS and 26.5% had CKD. Participants with CKD had a significantly higher prevalence of the MetS than individuals without CKD (34.4% vs. 24.3%. Binary logistic regression models showed that CKD was associated with MetS (OR = 1.72, 95%CI = 1.13-2.61. The association was unaltered by adjustment for hsCRP but altered by adjustment for HOMA-IR. As the number of MetS components increased the relative odds of CKD also increased. None of the individual components was independently associated with CKD.MetS is associated with CKD in non-diabetic older adults. Results showed that as the number of MetS components increased so did the odds for CKD. HOMA-IR seems to be in the casual pathway linking MetS to CKD.

  8. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Cunningham, Jessie L.; McGeer, James C., E-mail: jmcgeer@wlu.ca

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Exposure to 18 nM waterborne Cd induced plasma Ca loss that recovered by day 30 for lake whitefish but not brown trout. • Ucrit measured after an initial swim to 85% of Ucrit and a 30 min rest period was reduced in 18 nM Cd exposed fish compared to controls. • Swimming to 85% of Ucrit resulted in decreased muscle glycogen and increased lactate that was not recovered in the 30 min recovery period. • Second swim impairment is not related to metabolic processes in white muscle. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18 nM) in moderately hard water (120 mg L{sup −1} CaCO{sub 3}) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (U{sub crit}) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the U{sub crit} of control fish, a 30 min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine U{sub crit}. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim U{sub crit} and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure

  9. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis)

    Cunningham, Jessie L.; McGeer, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Exposure to 18 nM waterborne Cd induced plasma Ca loss that recovered by day 30 for lake whitefish but not brown trout. • Ucrit measured after an initial swim to 85% of Ucrit and a 30 min rest period was reduced in 18 nM Cd exposed fish compared to controls. • Swimming to 85% of Ucrit resulted in decreased muscle glycogen and increased lactate that was not recovered in the 30 min recovery period. • Second swim impairment is not related to metabolic processes in white muscle. - Abstract: This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18 nM) in moderately hard water (120 mg L"−"1 CaCO_3) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (U_c_r_i_t) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the U_c_r_i_t of control fish, a 30 min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine U_c_r_i_t. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim U_c_r_i_t and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure where 31% and 38

  10. Association of Smoking, Sleep Apnea, and Plasma Alkalosis With Nocturnal Ventricular Arrhythmias in Men With Systolic Heart Failure

    Shukla, Rakesh; Wexler, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Background: Excess sudden death due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias remains a major mode of mortality in patients with systolic heart failure. The aim of this study was to determine the association of nocturnal ventricular arrhythmias in patients with low ejection fraction heart failure. We incorporated a large number of known pathophysiologic triggers to identify potential targets for therapy to reduce the persistently high incidence of sudden death in this population despite contemporary treatment. Methods: Eighty-six ambulatory male patients with stable low (≤ 45%) ejection fraction heart failure underwent full-night attendant polysomnography and simultaneous Holter recordings. Patients were divided into groups according to the presence or absence of couplets (paired premature ventricular excitations) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) (at least three consecutive premature ventricular excitations) during sleep. Results: In multiple regression analysis, four variables (current smoking status, increased number of arousals, plasma alkalinity, and old age) were associated with VT and two variables (apnea-hypopnea index and low right ventricular ejection fraction) were associated with couplets during sleep. Conclusions: We speculate that cessation of smoking, effective treatment of sleep apnea, and plasma alkalosis could collectively decrease the incidence of nocturnal ventricular tachyarrhythmias and the consequent risk of sudden death, which remains high despite the use of β blockades. PMID:22172636

  11. BMP (Basic Metabolic Panel)

    ... of Conditions Not Listed? Not Listed? Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer ... as kidney failure, insulin shock or diabetic coma, respiratory distress, or heart rhythm changes. What does the ...

  12. Effect of adrenal medullectomy on metabolic responses to chronic intermittent hypoxia in the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test.

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Han, Woobum; Joo, Hoon; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Shiota, Masakazu; Stefanovski, Darko; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2017-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with type 2 diabetes. We have previously developed a mouse model of intermittent hypoxia (IH) mimicking oxyhemoglobin desaturations in patients with sleep apnea and have shown that IH increases fasting glucose, hepatic glucose output, and plasma catecholamines. We hypothesize that adrenal medulla modulates glucose responses to IH and that such responses can be prevented by adrenal medullectomy. We performed adrenal medullectomy or sham surgery in lean C57BL/6J mice, which were exposed to IH or intermittent air (control) for 4 wk followed by the frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) in unanesthetized unrestrained animals. IH was administered during the 12-h light phase (9 AM to 9 PM) by decreasing inspired oxygen from 21 to 6.5% 60 cycles/h. Insulin sensitivity (S I ), insulin independent glucose disposal [glucose effectiveness (S G )], and the insulin response to glucose (AIR G ) were determined using the minimal model method. In contrast to our previous data obtained in restrained mice, IH did not affect fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels in sham-operated mice. IH significantly decreased S G but did not affect S I and AIR G Adrenal medullectomy decreased fasting blood glucose and plasma insulin levels and increased glycogen synthesis in the liver in hypoxic mice but did not have a significant effect on the FSIVGTT metrics. We conclude that, in the absence of restraints, IH has no effect on glucose metabolism in lean mice with exception of decreased S G , whereas adrenal medullectomy decreases fasting glucose and insulin levels in the IH environment. NEW & NOTEWORTHY To our knowledge, this is the first study examining the role of adrenal catecholamines in glucose metabolism during intermittent hypoxia (IH) in unanesthetized unrestrained C57BL/6J mice. We report that IH did not affect fasting glucose and insulin levels nor insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during, whereas glucose

  13. Diffusion MRI and MR spectroscopy reveal microstructural and metabolic brain alterations in chronic mild stress exposed rats: A CMS recovery study.

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Hansen, Brian; Wiborg, Ove; Kroenke, Christopher D; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2018-02-15

    Chronic mild stress (CMS) induced depression elicits several debilitating symptoms and causes a significant economic burden on society. High variability in the symptomatology of depression poses substantial impediment to accurate diagnosis and therapy outcome. CMS exposure induces significant metabolic and microstructural alterations in the hippocampus (HP), prefrontal cortex (PFC), caudate-putamen (CP) and amygdala (AM), however, recovery from these maladaptive changes are limited and this may provide negative effects on the therapeutic treatment and management of depression. The present study utilized anhedonic rats from the unpredictable CMS model of depression to study metabolic recovery in the ventral hippocampus (vHP) and microstructural recovery in the HP, AM, CP, and PFC. The study employed 1 H MR spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and in-vivo diffusion MRI (d-MRI) at the age of week 18 (week 1 post CMS exposure) week 20 (week 3 post CMS) and week 25 (week 8 post CMS exposure) in the anhedonic group, and at the age of week 18 and week 22 in the control group. The d-MRI data have provided an array of diffusion tensor metrics (FA, MD, AD, and RD), and fast kurtosis metrics (MKT, W L and W T ). CMS exposure induced a significant metabolic alteration in vHP, and significant microstructural alterations were observed in the HP, AM, and PFC in comparison to the age match control and within the anhedonic group. A significantly high level of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) was observed in vHP at the age of week 18 in comparison to age match control and week 20 and week 25 of the anhedonic group. HP and AM showed significant microstructural alterations up to the age of week 22 in the anhedonic group. PFC showed significant microstructural alterations only at the age of week 18, however, most of the metrics showed significantly higher value at the age of week 20 in the anhedonic group. The significantly increased NAA concentration may indicate impaired catabolism due to astrogliosis or

  14. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Kaphalia, Lata [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Boroumand, Nahal [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Hyunsu, Ju [Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S., E-mail: bkaphali@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States); Calhoun, William J. [Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 775555 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  15. Ethanol metabolism, oxidative stress, and endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in the lungs of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficient deer mice after chronic ethanol feeding

    Kaphalia, Lata; Boroumand, Nahal; Hyunsu, Ju; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Calhoun, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Consumption and over-consumption of alcoholic beverages are well-recognized contributors to a variety of pulmonary disorders, even in the absence of intoxication. The mechanisms by which alcohol (ethanol) may produce disease include oxidative stress and prolonged endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Many aspects of these processes remain incompletely understood due to a lack of a suitable animal model. Chronic alcohol over-consumption reduces hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), the principal canonical metabolic pathway of ethanol oxidation. We therefore modeled this situation using hepatic ADH-deficient deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol daily for 3 months. Blood ethanol concentration was 180 mg% in ethanol fed mice, compared to < 1.0% in the controls. Acetaldehyde (oxidative metabolite of ethanol) was minimally, but significantly increased in ethanol-fed vs. pair-fed control mice. Total fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol) were 47.6 μg/g in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to 1.5 μg/g in pair-fed controls. Histological and immunohistological evaluation showed perivascular and peribronchiolar lymphocytic infiltration, and significant oxidative injury, in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice compared to pair-fed controls. Several fold increases for cytochrome P450 2E1, caspase 8 and caspase 3 found in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice as compared to pair-fed controls suggest role of oxidative stress in ethanol-induced lung injury. ER stress and unfolded protein response signaling were also significantly increased in the lungs of ethanol-fed mice. Surprisingly, no significant activation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1α and spliced XBP1 was observed indicating a lack of activation of corrective mechanisms to reinstate ER homeostasis. The data suggest that oxidative stress and prolonged ER stress, coupled with formation and accumulation of cytotoxic FAEEs may contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic lung disease. - Highlights: • Chronic

  16. Cardiovascular and metabolic effects of 48-h glucagon-like peptide-1 infusion in compensated chronic patients with heart failure

    Halbirk, Mads; Nørrelund, Helene; Møller, Niels

    2010-01-01

    effects of 48-h GLP-1 infusions in patients with congestive HF. In a randomized, double-blind crossover design, 20 patients without diabetes and with HF with ischemic heart disease, EF of 30 +/- 2%, New York Heart Association II and III (n = 14 and 6) received 48-h GLP-1 (0.7 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1......)) and placebo infusion. At 0 and 48 h, LVEF, diastolic function, tissue Doppler regional myocardial function, exercise testing, noninvasive cardiac output, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured. Blood pressure, heart rate, and metabolic parameters were recorded. Fifteen patients completed...... patients. GLP-1 infusion increased circulating insulin levels and reduced plasma glucose concentration but had no major cardiovascular effects in patients without diabetes but with compensated HF. The impact of minor increases in heart rate and diastolic blood pressure during GLP-1 infusion requires...

  17. The effects of chronic cadmium exposure on repeat swimming performance and anaerobic metabolism in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    Cunningham, Jessie L; McGeer, James C

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of chronic Cd exposure on the ability to perform repeat swim challenges in brown trout (Salmo trutta) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis). Fish were exposed to waterborne Cd (18nM) in moderately hard water (120mgL(-1) CaCO3) for 30 days. This level of exposure has been shown to cause sublethal physiological disruption and acclimation responses but no impairment of sustained swimming capacity (Ucrit) in single swim challenges. Swim trials were done over the course of the exposure and each one consisted of an initial swim to 85% of the Ucrit of control fish, a 30min recovery period and finally a second swim challenge to determine Ucrit. Plasma and tissue samples were collected before and after each of the swim periods. As expected from previous studies, Cd exposure resulted in significant accumulation of Cd in gills, liver and kidney but not in white muscle. Exposure also induced a loss of plasma Ca followed by subsequent recovery (in lake whitefish but not brown trout) with few mortalities (100% survival for lake whitefish and 93% for brown trout). Both control and exposed fish swam to 85% of the single swim Ucrit and no differences in performance were seen. The Ucrit of unexposed controls in the second swim challenges were not different from the single swim Ucrit. However, second swim performance was significantly reduced in Cd exposed fish, particularly after a week of exposure where 31% and 38% reductions were observed for brown trout and lake whitefish respectively. Swimming to 85% Ucrit resulted in metabolic expenditure with little recovery after 30min. Few differences were observed between control and Cd exposed fish with the exception of a reduction in resting white muscle ATP stores of Cd exposed fish after 1 week of exposure. The results show that chronic sublethal Cd exposure results in an impairment of swimming ability in repeat swim challenges but this impairment is generally not related to metabolic processes

  18. Long-term trends of changes in pine and oak foliar nitrogen metabolism in response to chronic nitrogen amendments at Harvard Forest, MA.

    Minocha, Rakesh; Turlapati, Swathi A; Long, Stephanie; McDowell, William H; Minocha, Subhash C

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated the long-term (1995-2008) trends in foliar and sapwood metabolism, soil solution chemistry and tree mortality rates in response to chronic nitrogen (N) additions to pine and hardwood stands at the Harvard Forest Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site. Common stress-related metabolites like polyamines (PAs), free amino acids (AAs) and inorganic elements were analyzed for control, low N (LN, 50 kg NH4NO3 ha(-1) year(-1)) and high N (HN, 150 kg NH4NO3 ha(-1) year(-1)) treatments. In the pine stands, partitioning of excess N into foliar PAs and AAs increased with both N treatments until 2002. By 2005, several of these effects on N metabolites disappeared for HN, and by 2008 they were mostly observed for LN plot. A significant decline in foliar Ca and P was observed mostly with HN for a few years until 2005. However, sapwood data actually showed an increase in Ca, Mg and Mn and no change in PAs in the HN plot for 2008, while AAs data revealed trends that were generally similar to foliage for 2008. Concomitant with these changes, mortality data revealed a large number of dead trees in HN pine plots by 2002; the mortality rate started to decline by 2005. Oak trees in the hardwood plot did not exhibit any major changes in PAs, AAs, nutrients and mortality rate with LN treatment, indicating that oak trees were able to tolerate the yearly doses of 50 kg NH4NO3 ha(-1) year(-1). However, HN trees suffered from physiological and nutritional stress along with increased mortality in 2008. In this case also, foliar data were supported by the sapwood data. Overall, both low and high N applications resulted in greater physiological stress to the pine trees than the oaks. In general, the time course of changes in metabolic data are in agreement with the published reports on changes in soil chemistry and microbial community structure, rates of soil carbon sequestration and production of woody biomass for this chronic N study. This correspondence of selected metabolites

  19. Angiographically demonstrated coronary collaterals predict residual viable myocardium in patients with chronic myocardial infarction. A regional metabolic study

    Fukai, Masumi; Ii, Masaaki; Nakakoji, Takahiro

    2000-01-01

    Angiographical demonstration of coronary collateral circulation may suggest the presence of residual viable myocardium. The development of coronary collaterals was judged according to Rentrop's classification in 37 patients with old anteroseptal myocardial infarction and 13 control patients with chest pain syndrome. The subjects with myocardial infarction were divided into 2 groups: 17 patients with the main branch of the left coronary artery clearly identified by collateral blood flow from the contralateral coronary artery [Coll (+) group, male/female 10/7, mean age 56.6 years] and 20 patients with obscure coronary trunk [Coll (-) group, male/female 16/4, mean age 54.9 years]. Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy and examination of local myocardial metabolism were carried out by measuring the flux of lactic acid under dipyridamole infusion load. Coronary stenosis of 99% or total occlusion was found in only 5 of 20 patients (25%) in the Coll (-) group but in 16 of 17 patients (94%) in the Coll (+) group (p<0.001). Redistribution of myocardial scintigraphy was found in 11 of 15 patients (73%) in the Coll (+) group, but only 3 of 18 patients (17%) in the Coll (-) group (p<0.01). The myocardial lactic acid extraction rate was -13.2±17.0% in the Coll (+) group, but 9.1±13.2% in the Coll (-) group (p<0.001). These results suggest that coronary collateral may contribute to minimizing the infarct area and to prediction of the presence of viable myocardium. (author)

  20. Blood Pressure Associated with Arsenic Methylation and Arsenic Metabolism Caused by Chronic Exposure to Arsenic in Tube Well Water.

    Wei, Bing Gan; Ye, Bi Xiong; Yu, Jiang Ping; Yang, Lin Sheng; Li, Hai Rong; Xia, Ya Juan; Wu, Ke Gong

    2017-05-01

    The effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water, arsenic metabolism, and arsenic methylation on blood pressure (BP) were observed in this study. The BP and arsenic species of 560 participants were determined. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the odds ratios of BP associated with arsenic metabolites and arsenic methylation capability. BP was positively associated with cumulative arsenic exposure (CAE). Subjects with abnormal diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP), and pulse pressure (PP) usually had higher urinary iAs (inorganic arsenic), MMA (monomethylated arsenic), DMA (dimethylated arsenic), and TAs (total arsenic) than subjects with normal DBP, SBP, and PP. The iAs%, MMA%, and DMA% differed slightly between subjects with abnormal BP and those with normal BP. The PMI and SMI were slightly higher in subjects with abnormal PP than in those with normal PP. Our findings suggest that higher CAE may elevate BP. Males may have a higher risk of abnormal DBP, whereas females have a higher risk of abnormal SBP and PP. Higher urinary iAs may increase the risk of abnormal BP. Lower PMI may elevate the BP. However, higher SMI may increase the DBP and SBP, and lower SMI may elevate the PP. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  1. Acute and chronic effects of sprint interval exercise on postprandial lipemia in women at-risk for the metabolic syndrome.

    Freese, Eric C; Gist, Nicholas H; Acitelli, Rachelle M; McConnell, Whitni J; Beck, Catherine D; Hausman, Dorothy B; Murrow, Jonathan R; Cureton, Kirk J; Evans, Ellen M

    2015-04-01

    Individuals diagnosed with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) exhibit elevated postprandial lipemia (PPL). The aims of this investigation were to determine 1) if an acute bout of sprint interval training (SIT) attenuates PPL; and 2) if the attenuation of PPL following 6 wk of SIT is magnified compared with a single session of SIT prior to training in women at-risk for MetS (n = 45; 30-65 yr). Women were randomized to SIT (n = 22) or a nonexercise control (n = 23; CON) for 6 wk. Postprandial responses to a high-fat meal challenge (HFMC) were assessed in the CON group before (B-HFMC) and after (Post-HFMC) without prior exercise and in the SIT group at baseline (B-HFMC) without prior exercise, after an acute bout of SIT (four 30-s all-out sprints with 4-min recovery) prior to (Pre-HFMC), and after the 6-wk intervention (Post-HFMC). Responses to the HFMC were assessed by collecting venous blood samples in the fasted state and at 0, 30, 60, 120, and 180 min postprandial. Compared with baseline, an acute bout of SIT before (Pre-HFMC) and after the 6-wk intervention (Post-HFMC) significantly attenuated fasted TG (P exercise to reduce fasted and postprandial TG concentrations in women at-risk for MetS. Six weeks of SIT does not magnify the attenuation of PPL in response to a single session of SIT. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. The A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism influences hepcidin and iron metabolism in chronic hemodialysis patients: TMPRSS6 and hepcidin in hemodialysis

    Pelusi Serena

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aim of this study was to evaluate whether the A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism, a major genetic determinant of iron metabolism in healthy subjects, influences serum levels of hepcidin, the hormone regulating iron metabolism, and erythropoiesis in chronic hemodialysis (CHD. Methods To this end, we considered 199 CHD patients from Northern Italy (157 with hepcidin evaluation, and 188 healthy controls without iron deficiency, matched for age and gender. Genetic polymorphisms were evaluated by allele specific polymerase chain reaction assays, and hepcidin quantified by mass spectrometry. Results Serum hepcidin levels were not different between the whole CHD population and controls (median 7.1, interquartile range (IQR 0.55-17.1 vs. 7.4, 4.5-17.9 nM, respectively, but were higher in the CHD subgroup after exclusion of subjects with relative iron deficiency (p = 0.04. In CHD patients, the A736V TMPRSS6 polymorphism influenced serum hepcidin levels in individuals positive for mutations in the HFE gene of hereditary hemochromatosis (p 30 ng/ml; n = 86, hepcidin was associated with lower mean corpuscular volume (p = 0.002, suggesting that it contributed to iron-restricted erythropoiesis. In line with previous results, in patients without acute inflammation and severe iron deficiency the “high hepcidin” 736 V TMPRSS6 variant was associated with higher erythropoietin maintenance dose (p = 0.016, independently of subclinical inflammation (p = 0.02. Conclusions The A736V TMPRSS6 genotype influences hepcidin levels, erythropoiesis, and anemia management in CHD patients. Evaluation of the effect of TMPRSS6 genotype on clinical outcomes in prospective studies in CHD may be useful to predict the outcomes of hepcidin manipulation, and to guide treatment personalization by optimizing anemia management.

  3. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD) Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The "Nutritional Light Signal" of the Renal Acid Load.

    Di Iorio, Biagio Raffaele; Di Micco, Lucia; Marzocco, Stefania; De Simone, Emanuele; De Blasio, Antonietta; Sirico, Maria Luisa; Nardone, Luca

    2017-01-17

    Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD) and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2). We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL) and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP), inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T -test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP ( p protein intake ( p intake ( p intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and drinks-the "acid load dietary traffic light".

  4. A short-term supranutritional vitamin E supplementation alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat stressed pigs

    Fan Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective Heat stress (HS triggers oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in pigs. The objective of this experiment was to study whether a short-term supranutritional amount of dietary vitamin E (VE can mitigate oxidative stress and respiratory alkalosis in heat-stressed pigs. Methods A total of 24 pigs were given either a control diet (17 IU/kg VE or a high VE (200 IU/kg VE; HiVE diet for 14 d, then exposed to thermoneutral (TN; 20°C, 45% humidity or HS (35°C, 35% to 45% humidity, 8 h daily conditions for 7 d. Respiration rate and rectal temperature were measured three times daily during the thermal exposure. Blood gas variables and oxidative stress markers were studied in blood samples collected on d 7. Results Although HiVE diet did not affect the elevated rectal temperature or respiration rate observed during HS, it alleviated (all p<0.05 for diet×temperature the loss of blood CO2 partial pressure and bicarbonate, as well as the increase in blood pH in the heat-stressed pigs. The HS reduced (p = 0.003 plasma biological antioxidant potential (BAP and tended to increase (p = 0.067 advanced oxidized protein products (AOPP in the heat-stressed pigs, suggesting HS triggers oxidative stress. The HiVE diet did not affect plasma BAP or AOPP. Only under TN conditions the HiVE diet reduced the plasma reactive oxygen metabolites (p<0.05 for diet× temperature. Conclusion A short-term supplementation with 200 IU/kg VE partially alleviated respiratory alkalosis but did not reduce oxidative stress in heat-stressed pigs.

  5. Effects of chronic environmental cold on growth, health, and select metabolic and immunologic responses of preruminant calves.

    Nonnecke, B J; Foote, M R; Miller, B L; Fowler, M; Johnson, T E; Horst, R L

    2009-12-01

    The physiological response of the preruminant calf to sustained exposure to moderate cold has not been studied extensively. Effects of cold on growth performance and health of preruminant calves as well as functional measures of energy metabolism, fat-soluble vitamin, and immune responsiveness were evaluated in the present study. Calves, 3 to 10 d of age, were assigned randomly to cold (n = 14) or warm (n = 15) indoor environments. Temperatures in the cold environment averaged 4.7 degrees C during the study. Frequent wetting of the environment and the calves was used to augment effects of the cold environment. Temperatures in the warm environment averaged 15.5 degrees C during the study. There was no attempt to increase the humidity in the warm environment. Preventative medications or vaccinations that might influence disease resistance were not administered. Nonmedicated milk replacer (20% crude protein and 20% fat fed at 0.45 kg/d) and a nonmedicated starter grain fed ad libitum were fed to all calves. Relative humidity was, on average, almost 10% higher in the cold environment. Warm-environment calves were moderately healthier (i.e., lower respiratory scores) and required less antibiotics. Scour scores, days scouring, and electrolyte costs, however, were unaffected by environmental temperature. Growth rates were comparable in warm and cold environments, although cold-environment calves consumed more starter grain and had lower blood glucose and higher blood nonesterified fatty acid concentrations. The nonesterified fatty acid and glucose values for cold-stressed calves, however, did not differ sufficiently from normal values to categorize these calves as being in a state of negative-energy balance. Levels of fat-soluble vitamin, antibody, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and haptoglobin were unaffected by sustained exposure to moderate cold. These results support the contention that successful adaptation of the dairy calf to cold is dependent upon the availability

  6. {sup 18}F-FDG metabolism in a rat model of chronic infarction. A 17-sector semiquantitative analysis

    Penuelas, I. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; MicroPET Research Unit CIMA-CUN, Pamplona (Spain); Abizanda, G.; Mazo, M.; Prosper, F. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Hematology and Cell Therapy Service; Navarra Univ., Pamplona (Spain). Foundation for Applied Medical Research; Garcia-Velloso, M.J.; Marti-Climent, J.M.; Richter, J.A. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Gavira, J.J.; Barba, J. [Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain). Cardiology and Cardiovascular Surgery; Ecay, M.; Collantes, M. [MicroPET Research Unit CIMA-CUN, Pamplona (Spain); Garcia de Jalon, J.A.; Garcia-Rodriguez, A. [Zaragoza Univ. (Spain). Dept. of Animal Pathology

    2007-07-01

    Strategies to establish the functional benefit of cell therapy in cardiac regeneration and the potential mechanism are needed. Aims: Development of a semi-quantitative method for non invasive assessment of cardiac viability and function in a rat model of myocardial infarction (MI) based on the use of microPET. Animals, methods: Ten rats were subjected to myocardial imaging 2, 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90 days after left coronary artery ligation. Intravenous {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-2-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) was administered and regional {sup 18}F activity concentrations per unit area were measured in 17 regions of interest (ROIs) drawn on cardiac polar maps. By comparing the differences in {sup 18}F uptake between baseline and each of the follow up time points, parametric polar maps of statistical significance (PPMSS) were calculated. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was blindly assessed echocardiographically. All animals were sacrificed for histopathological analysis after 90 days. Results: The diagnostic quality of {sup 18}F-FDG microPET images was excellent. PPMSS demonstrated a statistically significant decrease in {sup 18}F concentrations as early as 48 hours after MI in 4 of the 17 ROIs (segments 7, 13, 16 and 17; p <0.05) that persisted throughout the study. Semi-quantitative analysis of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake correlated with echocardiographic decrease in LVEF (p <0.001). Conclusion: The use of PPMSS based on 18F-FDG-microPET provides valuable semi-quantitative information of heart glucose metabolism allowing for non-invasive follow up thus representing a useful strategy for assessment of novel therapies in cardiac regeneration. (orig.)

  7. The impact of pegylated interferon and ribavirin combination treatment on lipid metabolism and insulin resistance in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Jung, Hee Jae; Kim, Young Seok; Kim, Sang Gyune; Lee, Yun Nah; Jeong, Soung Won; Jang, Jae Young; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Hong Soo; Kim, Boo Sung

    2014-03-01

    Lipid profile and insulin resistance (IR) are associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and may predict the chronic hepatitis C (CHC) treatment response. The aim of this study was to determine the association between CHC treatment response and lipid profile and IR change during treatment. In total, 203 CHC patients were reviewed retrospectively between January 2005 and December 2011 at Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital. The lipid profile, homeostasis model for assessment (HOMA) of IR (HOMA-IR), and HOMA of β cells (HOMA-β) were evaluated before interferon plus ribavirin therapy (BTx), at the end of treatment (DTx), and 24 weeks after the end of treatment (ATx). A sustained virologic response (SVR) was achieved by 81% of all patients (49/60), 60% (n=36) of whom possessed genotype 1, with the remainder being non-genotype-1 (40%, n=24). Apart from age, which was significantly higher in the non-SVR group (SVR, 48.0 ± 11.2 years, mean ± SD; non-SVR, 56.6 ± 9.9 years; PC) had significantly changed at DTx and ATx compared to BTx. In addition, HOMA-IR and HOMA-β were significantly changed at DTx in the SVR group. Among those with a high baseline insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.5), HOMA-IR was significantly changed at DTx in the SVR group. LDL-C appears to be associated with HCV treatment in SVR patients. Furthermore, eradication of HCV may improve whole-body IR and insulin hypersecretion, as well as high baseline insulin resistance (HOMA-IR >2.5).

  8. Chronic SSRI stimulation of astrocytic 5-HT2B receptors change multiple gene expressions/editings and metabolism of glutamate, glucose and glycogen: a potential paradigm shift

    Leif eHertz

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is firmly believed that the mechanism of action of SSRIs in major depression is to inhibit the serotonin transporter, SERT, and increase extracellular concentration of serotonin. However, this undisputed observation does not prove that SERT inhibition is the mechanism, let alone the only mechanism, by which SSRI’s exert their therapeutic effects. It has recently been demonstrated that 5-HT2B receptor stimulation is needed for the antidepressant effect of fluoxetine in vivo. The ability of all 5 currently used SSRIs to stimulate the 5-HT2B receptor equipotentially incultured astrocyteshas been known for several years,and increasing evidence has shown the importance of astrocytes and astrocyte-neuronal interactions for neuroplasticity and complex brain activity. This paper reviews acute and chronic effects of 5-HT2B receptor stimulation in cultured astrocytes and in astrocytes freshly isolated from brains of mice treated with fluoxetine for 14 daystogether with effects ofanti-depressant therapy on turnover of glutamate and GABA and metabolism of glucose and glycogen. It is suggested that these events are causally related to the mechanism of action of SSRIs and of interest for development of newer antidepressant drugs.

  9. Alkalosis and Dialytic Clearance of Phosphate Increases Phosphatase Activity: A Hidden Consequence of Hemodialysis.

    Ricardo Villa-Bellosta

    Full Text Available Extracellular pyrophosphate is a potent endogenous inhibitor of vascular calcification, which is degraded by alkaline phosphatase (ALP and generated by hydrolysis of ATP via ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (eNPP1. ALP activity (as routinely measured in clinical practice represents the maximal activity (in ideal conditions, but not the real activity (in normal or physiological conditions. For the first time, the present study investigated extracellular pyrophosphate metabolism during hemodialysis sessions (including its synthesis via eNPP1 and its degradation via ALP in physiological conditions.45 patients in hemodialysis were studied. Physiological ALP activity represents only 4-6% of clinical activity. ALP activity increased post-hemodialysis by 2% under ideal conditions (87.4 ± 3.3 IU/L vs. 89.3 ± 3.6 IU/L and 48% under physiological conditions (3.5 ± 0.2 IU/L vs. 5.2 ± 0.2 IU/L. Pyrophosphate synthesis by ATP hydrolysis remained unaltered post-hemodialysis. Post-hemodialysis plasma pH (7.45 ± 0.02 significantly increased compared with the pre-dialysis pH (7.26 ± 0.02. The slight variation in pH (~0.2 units induced a significant increase in ALP activity (9%. Addition of phosphate in post-hemodialysis plasma significantly decreased ALP activity, although this effect was not observed with the addition of urea. Reduction in phosphate levels and increment in pH were significantly associated with an increase in physiological ALP activity post-hemodialysis. A decrease in plasma pyrophosphate levels (3.3 ± 0.3 μmol/L vs. 1.9 ± 0.1 μmol/L and pyrophosphate/ATP ratio (1.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.4 ± 0.1 post-hemodialysis was also observed.Extraction of uremic toxins, primarily phosphate and hydrogen ions, dramatically increases the ALP activity under physiological conditions. This hitherto unknown consequence of hemodialysis suggests a reinterpretation of the clinical value of this parameter.

  10. Is the alkaline tide a signal to activate metabolic or ionoregulatory enzymes in the dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias)?

    Wood, Chris M; Kajimura, Makiko; Mommsen, Thomas P; Walsh, Patrick J

    2008-01-01

    Experimental metabolic alkalosis is known to stimulate whole-animal urea production and active ion secretion by the rectal gland in the dogfish shark. Furthermore, recent evidence indicates that a marked alkaline tide (systemic metabolic alkalosis) follows feeding in this species and that the activities of the enzymes of the ornithine-urea cycle (OUC) for urea synthesis in skeletal muscle and liver and of energy metabolism and ion transport in the rectal gland are increased at this time. We therefore evaluated whether alkalosis and/or NaCl/volume loading (which also occurs with feeding) could serve as a signal for activation of these enzymes independent of nutrient loading. Fasted dogfish were infused for 20 h with either 500 mmol L(-1) NaHCO3 (alkalosis + volume expansion) or 500 mmol L(-1) NaCl (volume expansion alone), both isosmotic to dogfish plasma, at a rate of 3 mL kg(-1) h(-1). NaHCO3 infusion progressively raised arterial pH to 8.28 (control = 7.85) and plasma [HCO3-] to 20.8 mmol L(-1) (control = 4.5 mmol L(-1)) at 20 h, with unchanged arterial P(CO2), whereas NaCl/volume loading had no effect on blood acid-base status. Rectal gland Na+,K+-ATPase activity was increased 50% by NaCl loading and more than 100% by NaHCO3 loading, indicating stimulatory effects of both volume expansion and alkalosis. Rectal gland lactate dehydrogenase activity was elevated 25% by both treatments, indicating volume expansion effects only, whereas neither treatment increased the activities of the aerobic enzymes citrate synthase, NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase, or the ketone body-utilizing enzyme beta-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase in the rectal gland or liver. The activity of ornithine-citrulline transcarbamoylase in skeletal muscle was doubled by NaHCO3 infusion, but neither treatment altered the activities of other OUC-related enzymes (glutamine synthetase, carbamoylphosphate synthetase III). We conclude that both the alkaline tide and salt loading/volume expansion act as

  11. Chronic psychological stress and high-fat high-fructose diet disrupt metabolic and inflammatory gene networks in the brain, liver, and gut and promote behavioral deficits in mice.

    de Sousa Rodrigues, Maria Elizabeth; Bekhbat, Mandakh; Houser, Madelyn C; Chang, Jianjun; Walker, Douglas I; Jones, Dean P; Oller do Nascimento, Claudia M P; Barnum, Christopher J; Tansey, Malú G

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the association between chronic psychological stress, development of metabolic syndrome (MetS), and behavioral impairment in obesity are poorly understood. The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of mild chronic psychological stress on metabolic, inflammatory, and behavioral profiles in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that (1) high-fat high-fructose diet (HFHF) and psychological stress would synergize to mediate the impact of inflammation on the central nervous system in the presence of behavioral dysfunction, and that (2) HFHF and stress interactions would impact insulin and lipid metabolism. C57Bl/6 male mice underwent a combination of HFHF and two weeks of chronic psychological stress. MetS-related conditions were assessed using untargeted plasma metabolomics, and structural and immune changes in the gut and liver were evaluated. Inflammation was measured in plasma, liver, gut, and brain. Our results show a complex interplay of diet and stress on gut alterations, energetic homeostasis, lipid metabolism, and plasma insulin levels. Psychological stress and HFHF diet promoted changes in intestinal tight junctions proteins and increases in insulin resistance and plasma cholesterol, and impacted the RNA expression of inflammatory factors in the hippocampus. Stress promoted an adaptive anti-inflammatory profile in the hippocampus that was abolished by diet treatment. HFHF increased hippocampal and hepatic Lcn2 mRNA expression as well as LCN2 plasma levels. Behavioral changes were associated with HFHF and stress. Collectively, these results suggest that diet and stress as pervasive factors exacerbate MetS-related conditions through an inflammatory mechanism that ultimately can impact behavior. This rodent model may prove useful for identification of possible biomarkers and therapeutic targets to treat metabolic syndrome and mood disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Central lactic acidosis, hyperventilation, and respiratory alkalosis: leading clinical features in a 3-year-old boy with malignant meningeal melanoma.

    Blüher, Susann; Schulz, Manuela; Bierbach, Uta; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Schober, Ralf; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2008-04-01

    Meningeal tumors are extremely rare in children and are diagnostically as well as therapeutically challenging. Among the least common types of malignancies in childhood is malignant melanoma, counting for less than 1% of pediatric tumors. Due to the rarity and the wide spectrum of appearance, initial clinical features may be misleading. A 3-year-old boy was referred to our hospital with symptoms of hyperventilation, dyspnoea, tachycardia, respiratory alkalosis, inarticulate speech, and fatigue. Measurement of pH in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) yielded central lactic acidosis despite alkalosis in peripheral blood. Diagnostic imaging procedures as well as histology and immunohistochemistry revealed the diagnosis of a malignant meningeal melanoma. We hypothesize that central lactate production of the tumor nests might have induced central acidification, thus inducing hyperventilation by stimulation of central chemoreceptors. This case is a model example of the key role of central pH as an inducer/suppressor of ventilation in humans and illustrates the critical importance of central pH for regulating both ventilation and acid-base homeostasis. Thus, pH of CSF should be measured whenever a malignant brain tumor is suspected.

  13. Effects of Refined Xiaoyaosan on Depressive-Like Behaviors in Rats with Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress through Neurosteroids, Their Synthesis and Metabolic Enzymes

    Xiaoling Guo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: To observe the effects of refined Xiaoyaosan (XYS on the depressive-like behaviors in rats with chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, and to explore the relationship between the changes of neurosteroids and mRNA expressions of their synthesis and metabolic enzymes, and the mechanism of XYS in the treatment of depression. Methods: Eighty-four healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal group, model group, XYS group and fluoxetine group. The latter three groups were subjected to 21 days of CUMS to prepare the stress depression model. Rats in the XYS group, and fluoxetine group were given intragastric administration with refined XYS and fluoxetine, respectively. The behavioral changes of the rats were observed after 21 days. The contents of pregnenolone (PREG, progesterone (PROG and alloprognanolone (ALLO in the plasma of rats were measured by ELISA. The levels of PREG, PROG and ALLO in the hippocampus and amygdala tissues were measured by LC-MS/MS. The mRNA expressions of 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc and 5α-reductase (5a-R in the hippocampus and amygdala were detected by RT-qPCR methods. Results: There were changes in the model rats. The contents of PREG, PROG and ALLO changed similarly, which reflected in the decrease of PROG and ALLO, and the increase of PREG. The mRNA expression of P450scc was increased, and the mRNA expressions of 3α-HSD, 3β-HSD and 5a-R were decreased. Refined XYS could improve the behaviors of rats and the biological indicators. Conclusions: There is a neurosteroid dysfunction in the brain region of depression rat model animals, and the mechanism of refined XYS depression treatment may be related to the regulation of the control of mRNA expression of related synthesis and metabolic enzymes in the hippocampus and amygdala, further affecting the contents of neurosteroids.

  14. Assessment of 123I-β-methyl iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial scintigraphy in patients of chronic right ventricular overload. Fatty acid metabolism in right ventricular myocardium

    Mutoh, Hiroshi

    1997-01-01

    An investigation on the right ventricular pressure level and the abnormalities in the fatty acid metabolism of myocardium was made using 123 I-βmethyl-iodophenyl pentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) myocardial SPECT in patients with chronic right ventricular overloading. Twenty patients who presented with right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) of 35 mmHg or more were used as the subjects. Dual myocardial SPECT with 201 TlCl (Tl) and BMIPP was carried out for the subjects and RVc/LVc, a ratio of radioactivity count incorporated in the right ventricular free wall to the left one was determined for Tl and BMIPP. And the correlations between RVc/LVc and RVSP, and RVc/LVc and RVSP/LVSP were examined. The subjects were classified into 3 groups based on the RVSP levels and the count ratio, BMIPP/Tl was compared among the three groups. With respect of Tl uptake, there were significant, positive correlations between RVc/LVc and RVSP (correlation coefficient r=0.51, p<0.05) and between RVc/LVc and RVSP/LVSP (correlation coefficient r=0.59, p<0.01). On the other hand, no significant correlation was found between them with respect of the uptake of BMIPP. The BMIPP/Tl ratio in the group with higher than 80 mmHg of RVSP was 0.82±0.06, which was significantly lower than the ratio's for two groups of less than 80 mmHg; 0.91±0.07 and 0.98±0.04 in the group with 35-49 and 50-79 mmHg of RVSP, respectively. These results show that when compared with BMIPP, Tl is superior for the estimation of right ventricular pressure. For the patients with right ventricular overloading, it was suggested that when RVSP reaches 80 mmHg or more, there appear some disorders in the fatty acid metabolism in the right ventricular myocardium. (author)

  15. Very Low-Protein Diet (VLPD Reduces Metabolic Acidosis in Subjects with Chronic Kidney Disease: The “Nutritional Light Signal” of the Renal Acid Load

    Biagio Raffaele Di Iorio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic acidosis is a common complication of chronic kidney disease; current guidelines recommend treatment with alkali if bicarbonate levels are lower than 22 mMol/L. In fact, recent studies have shown that an early administration of alkali reduces progression of CKD. The aim of the study is to evaluate the effect of fruit and vegetables to reduce the acid load in CKD. Methods: We conducted a case-control study in 146 patients who received sodium bicarbonate. Of these, 54 patients assumed very low-protein diet (VLPD and 92 were controls (ratio 1:2. We calculated every three months the potential renal acid load (PRAL and the net endogenous acid production (NEAP, inversely correlated with serum bicarbonate levels and representing the non-volatile acid load derived from nutrition. Un-paired T-test and Chi-square test were used to assess differences between study groups at baseline and study completion. Two-tailed probability values ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: At baseline, there were no statistical differences between the two groups regarding systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, protein and phosphate intake, urinary sodium, potassium, phosphate and urea nitrogen, NEAP, and PRAL. VLPD patients showed at 6 and 12 months a significant reduction of SBP (p < 0.0001, DBP (p < 0.001, plasma urea (p < 0.0001 protein intake (p < 0.0001, calcemia (p < 0.0001, phosphatemia (p < 0.0001, phosphate intake (p < 0.0001, urinary sodium (p < 0.0001, urinary potassium (p < 0.002, and urinary phosphate (p < 0.0001. NEAP and PRAL were significantly reduced in VLPD during follow-up. Conclusion: VLPD reduces intake of acids; nutritional therapy of CKD, that has always taken into consideration a lower protein, salt, and phosphate intake, should be adopted to correct metabolic acidosis, an important target in the treatment of CKD patients. We provide useful indications regarding acid load of food and

  16. Exercise training in Tgαq*44 mice during the progression of chronic heart failure: cardiac vs. peripheral (soleus muscle) impairments to oxidative metabolism.

    Grassi, Bruno; Majerczak, Joanna; Bardi, Eleonora; Buso, Alessia; Comelli, Marina; Chlopicki, Stefan; Guzik, Magdalena; Mavelli, Irene; Nieckarz, Zenon; Salvadego, Desy; Tyrankiewicz, Urszula; Skórka, Tomasz; Bottinelli, Roberto; Zoladz, Jerzy A; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2017-08-01

    Cardiac function, skeletal (soleus) muscle oxidative metabolism, and the effects of exercise training were evaluated in a transgenic murine model (Tgα q *44) of chronic heart failure during the critical period between the occurrence of an impairment of cardiac function and the stage at which overt cardiac failure ensues (i.e., from 10 to 12 mo of age). Forty-eight Tgα q *44 mice and 43 wild-type FVB controls were randomly assigned to control groups and to groups undergoing 2 mo of intense exercise training (spontaneous running on an instrumented wheel). In mice evaluated at the beginning and at the end of training we determined: exercise performance (mean distance covered daily on the wheel); cardiac function in vivo (by magnetic resonance imaging); soleus mitochondrial respiration ex vivo (by high-resolution respirometry); muscle phenotype [myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform content; citrate synthase (CS) activity]; and variables related to the energy status of muscle fibers [ratio of phosphorylated 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to unphosphorylated AMPK] and mitochondrial biogenesis and function [peroxisome proliferative-activated receptor-γ coactivator-α (PGC-1α)]. In the untrained Tgα q *44 mice functional impairments of exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration were observed. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was related to the function of complex I of the respiratory chain, and it was not associated with differences in CS activity, MHC isoforms, p-AMPK/AMPK, and PGC-1α levels. Exercise training improved exercise performance and cardiac function, but it did not affect mitochondrial respiration, even in the presence of an increased percentage of type 1 MHC isoforms. Factors "upstream" of mitochondria were likely mainly responsible for the improved exercise performance. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Functional impairments in exercise performance, cardiac function, and soleus muscle mitochondrial respiration

  17. Transcriptome Analysis of Two Rice Varieties Contrasting for Nitrogen Use Efficiency under Chronic N Starvation Reveals Differences in Chloroplast and Starch Metabolism-Related Genes

    Subodh Kumar Sinha

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen use efficiency (NUE of crop plants is limited and enhancing it in rice, a major cereal crop, would be beneficial for farmers and the environment alike. Here we report the genome-wide transcriptome analysis of two rice genotypes, IR 64 (IR64 and Nagina 22 (N22 under optimal (+N and chronic starvation (-N of nitrogen (N from 15-day-old root and shoot tissues. The two genotypes were found to be contrasting in their response to -N; IR64 root architecture and root dry weight remained almost equivalent to that under +N conditions, while N22 showed high foraging ability but a substantial reduction in biomass under -N. Similarly, the photosynthetic pigments showed a drastic reduction in N22 under low N, while IR64 was more resilient. Nitrate reductase showed significantly low specific activity under -N in both genotypes. Glutamate synthase (GOGAT and citrate synthase CS activity were highly reduced in N22 but not in IR64. Transcriptome analysis of these genotypes revealed nearly double the number of genes to be differentially expressed (DEGs in roots (1016 compared to shoots (571. The response of the two genotypes to N starvation was distinctly different reflecting their morphological/biochemical response with just two and eight common DEGs in the root and shoot tissues. There were a total of 385 nitrogen-responsive DEGs (106 in shoots and 279 in roots between the two genotypes. Fifty-two of the 89 DEGs identified as specific to N22 root tissues were also found to be differentially expressed between the two genotypes under -N. Most of these DEGs belonged to starch and chloroplast metabolism, followed by membrane and signaling proteins. Physical mapping of DEGs revealed 95 DEGs in roots and 76 in shoots to be present in quantitative trait loci (QTL known for NUE.

  18. Branched-chain aminoacids and retraining of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Menier, R; Talmud, J; Laplaud, D; Bernard, M P

    2001-12-01

    The aim of this work was to improve the efficacy of rehabilitation by retraining, by oral supply in branched-chain aminoacids (BCAA). Patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency mainly suffer from obstructive bronchitis due to tobacco or asthma. Nutritional assessment is one of the components of respiratory rehabilitation, with retraining. Intense physical training for several days negativates the nitrogen balance, the beginning of a training programme for sedentary patients increases their need in proteins. An additional supply in branched-chain aminoacids increases proteic anabolism, by synthesis increase and catabolism slackening of proteins. Moreover it is known that exposure to high altitude reduces lean mass by inducing a muscular atrophy, which can be avoided by the BCAA provided. This leads to wonder if extra supply of BCAA could play similar role in muscular mass loss induced by pathological chronic hypoxia. The prospective and comparative survey carried out in Toki-Eder (private hospital in Cambo) consisted in supplying (during five weeks or more) 30 retrained patients suffering from chronic obstructive bronchitis, and in matching them with 30 witnesses (obstructive patients retrained without additional supply in BCAA). Their mean hypoxemia amounted to 7 torr for age. Each of them improved their reached maximal power, and their VO2 SL, very highly significantly. Each of them developed a moderate metabolic acidosis (whose possible mechanisms are discussed) and slightly increased their ventilation at rest. On the other hand only the supplied patients improved their PaO2 at rest highly significantly, a result which poses the question of the responsible mechanism, most likely a decrease of pulmonary shunt effect. The hypotheses concerning the acid load due to BCAA ingestion are discussed. Only the supplied patients developed hypocapnia expressing a gaseous alkalosis which might be due to a direct effect of BCAA on the respiratory centers. This observation

  19. Metabolic Syndrome

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  20. Chronic Mild Cold Conditioning Modulates the Expression of Hypothalamic Neuropeptide and Intermediary Metabolic-Related Genes and Improves Growth Performances in Young Chicks.

    Phuong Nguyen

    Full Text Available Low environmental temperatures are among the most challenging stressors in poultry industries. Although landmark studies using acute severe cold exposure have been conducted, still the molecular mechanisms underlying cold-stress responses in birds are not completely defined. In the present study we determine the effect of chronic mild cold conditioning (CMCC on growth performances and on the expression of key metabolic-related genes in three metabolically important tissues: brain (main site for feed intake control, liver (main site for lipogenesis and muscle (main site for thermogenesis.80 one-day old male broiler chicks were divided into two weight-matched groups and maintained in two different temperature floor pen rooms (40 birds/room. The temperature of control room was 32°C, while the cold room temperature started at 26.7°C and gradually reduced every day (1°C/day to reach 19.7°C at the seventh day of the experiment. At day 7, growth performances were recorded (from all birds and blood samples and tissues were collected (n = 10. The rest of birds were maintained at the same standard environmental condition for two more weeks and growth performances were measured.Although feed intake remained unchanged, body weight gain was significantly increased in CMCC compared to the control chicks resulting in a significant low feed conversion ratio (FCR. Circulating cholesterol and creatine kinase levels were higher in CMCC chicks compared to the control group (P<0.05. CMCC significantly decreased the expression of both the hypothalamic orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY and anorexigenic cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART in chick brain which may explain the similar feed intake between the two groups. Compared to the control condition, CMCC increased the mRNA abundance of AMPKα1/α2 and decreased mTOR gene expression (P<0.05, the master energy and nutrient sensors, respectively. It also significantly decreased the expression of fatty

  1. Nitric oxide-heat shock protein axis in menopausal hot flushes: neglected metabolic issues of chronic inflammatory diseases associated with deranged heat shock response.

    Miragem, Antônio Azambuja; Homem de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo

    2017-09-01

    Although some unequivocal underlying mechanisms of menopausal hot flushes have been demonstrated in animal models, the paucity of similar approaches in humans impedes further mechanistic outcomes. Human studies might show some as yet unexpected physiological mechanisms of metabolic adaptation that permeate the phase of decreased oestrogen levels in both symptomatic and asymptomatic women. This is particularly relevant because both the severity and time span of hot flushes are associated with increased risk of chronic inflammatory disease. On the other hand, oestrogen induces the expression of heat shock proteins of the 70 kDa family (HSP70), which are anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective protein chaperones, whose expression is modulated by different types of physiologically stressful situations, including heat stress and exercise. Therefore, lower HSP70 expression secondary to oestrogen deficiency increases cardiovascular risk and predisposes the patient to senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) that culminates in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as obesities, type 2 diabetes, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on HSP70 and its accompanying heat shock response (HSR), which is an anti-inflammatory and antisenescent pathway whose intracellular triggering is also oestrogen-dependent via nitric oxide (NO) production. The main goal of the manuscript was to show that the vasomotor symptoms that accompany hot flushes may be a disguised clue for important neuroendocrine alterations linking oestrogen deficiency to the anti-inflammatory HSR. Results from our own group and recent evidence on hypothalamic control of central temperature guided a search on PubMed and Google Scholar websites. Oestrogen elicits rapid production of the vasodilatory gas NO, a powerful activator of HSP70 expression. Whence, part of the protective effects of oestrogen over cardiovascular and neuroendocrine systems is tied to its capacity of inducing the NO

  2. Prevalence and severity of disordered mineral metabolism in patients with chronic kidney disease: A study from a tertiary care hospital in India

    Sanjay Vikrant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Disordered mineral metabolism is common complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD. However, there are limited data on the pattern of these disturbances in Indian CKD population. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective observational study of CKD-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD over a period of 3 years. The biochemical markers of CKD-MBD, namely, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH, and 25-hydoxyvitamin Vitamin D3 (25OHD, were measured in newly diagnosed CKD Stage 3–5 and prevalent CKD Stage 5D adult patients. Results: A total of 462 patients of CKD Stage 3–5D were studied. The frequency of various biochemical abnormalities was hypocalcemia (23.8%, hypercalcemia (5.4%, hypophosphatemia (2.8%, hyperphosphatemia (55.4%, raised alkaline phosphatase (56.9%, secondary hyperparathyroidism (82.7%, and hypoparathyroidism (1.5%. 25OHD was done in 335 (72.5% patients and 90.4% were found to have Vitamin D deficiency. About 70.6% of the patients had iPTH levels were above kidney disease outcomes quality initiative (KDOQI target range. Nondiabetic CKD as compared to diabetic CKD had a higher alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.016, a higher iPTH (P = 0.001 a higher proportion of patients with iPTH above KDOQI target range (P = 0.09, and an elevated alkaline phosphatase (P = 0.004. The 25OHD levels were suggestive of severe Vitamin D deficiency in 33.7%, Vitamin D deficiency in 45.4%, and Vitamin D insufficiency in 11.3% patients. There was a significant positive correlation between iPTH with alkaline phosphatase (r = 0.572, P = 0.001, creatinine (r = 0.424, P = 0.001, and phosphorus (r = 0.241, P = 0.001 and a significant negative correlation with hemoglobin (r = −0.325, 0.001, age (r = −0.169, P = 0.002, and 25OHD (r = −0.126, P = 0.021. On multivariate logistic regression analysis, an elevated alkaline phosphatase was a significant predictor of hyperparathyroidism (odds ratio 9.7, 95

  3. Prevalence and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome in ...

    Objective: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and metabolic syndrome (MS) share a ... patients with other known systemic disorders, long‑term intake of drugs that ... Keywords: Alcohol, chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome ...

  4. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  5. Gymnocypris przewalskii decreases cytosolic carbonic anhydrase expression to compensate for respiratory alkalosis and osmoregulation in the saline-alkaline lake Qinghai.

    Yao, Zongli; Guo, Wenfei; Lai, Qifang; Shi, Jianquan; Zhou, Kai; Qi, Hongfang; Lin, Tingting; Li, Ziniu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Naked carp (Gymnocypris przewalskii), endemic to the saline-alkaline Lake Qinghai, have the capacity to tolerate combined high salinity and alkalinity, but migrate to spawn in freshwater rivers each year. In this study, the full-length cDNA of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase c isoform of G. przewalskii (GpCAc) was amplified and sequenced; mRNA levels and enzyme activity of GpCAc and blood chemistry were evaluated to understand the compensatory responses as the naked carp returned to the saline-alkaline lake after spawning. We found that GpCAc had a total length of 1400 bp and encodes a peptide of 260 amino acids. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences and phylogenetic analysis showed that GpCAc was a member of the cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II-like c family. Cytosolic-carbonic-anhydrase-c-specific primers were used to analyze the tissue distribution of GpCAc mRNA expression. Expression of GpCAc mRNA was found in brain, gill, liver, kidney, gut, and muscle tissues, but primarily in the gill and posterior kidney; however, none was evident in red blood cells. Transferring fish from river water to lake water resulted in a respiratory alkalosis, osmolality, and ion rise in the blood, as well as significant decreases in the expression and enzyme activity of GpCAc in both the gill and kidney within 96 h. These results indicate that GpCAc may play an important role in the acclimation to both high salinity and carbonate alkalinity. Specifically, G. przewalskii decreases cytosolic carbonic anhydrase c expression to compensate for a respiratory alkalosis and to aid in osmoregulation during the transition from river to saline-alkaline lake.

  6. Do over 200 million healthy altitude residents really suffer from chronic Acid-base disorders?

    Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo; Zubieta-Castillo, Gustavo; Zubieta-Calleja, Luis; Ardaya-Zubieta, Gustavo; Paulev, Poul-Erik

    2011-01-01

    As the oxygen tension of inspired air falls with increasing altitude in normal subjects, hyperventilation ensues. This acute respiratory alkalosis, induces increased renal excretion of bicarbonate, returning the pH back to normal, giving rise to compensated respiratory alkalosis or chronic hypocapnia. It seems a contradiction that so many normal people at high altitude should permanently live as chronic acid-base patients. Blood gas analyses of 1,865 subjects at 3,510 m, reported a P(a)CO(2) (arterial carbon dioxide tension ± SEM) = 29.4 ± 0.16 mmHg and pH = 7.40 ± 0.005. Base excess, calculated with the Van Slyke sea level equation, is -5 mM (milliMolar or mmol/l) as an average, suggesting chronic hypocapnia. THID, a new term replacing "Base Excess" is determined by titration to a pH of 7.40 at a P(a)CO(2) of 5.33 kPa (40 mmHg) at sea level, oxygen saturated and at 37°C blood temperature. Since our new modified Van Slyke equations operate with normal values for P(a)CO(2) at the actual altitude, a calculation of THID will always result in normal values-that is, zero.

  7. Chronic pancreatitis

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  8. Metabolic effects of keto acid--amino acid supplementation in patients with chronic renal insufficiency receiving a low-protein diet and recombinant human erythropoietin--a randomized controlled trial.

    Teplan, V; Schück, O; Votruba, M; Poledne, R; Kazdová, L; Skibová, J; Malý, J

    2001-09-17

    Supplement with keto acids/amino acids (KA) and erythropoietin can independently improve the metabolic sequels of chronic renal insufficiency. Our study was designed to establish whether a supplementation with keto acids/amino acids (KA) exerts additional beneficial metabolic effects in patients with chronic renal insufficiency (CRF) treated with a low-protein diet (LPD) and recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO). In a prospective randomized controlled trial over a period of 12 months, we evaluated a total of 38 patients (20 M/18 F) aged 32-68 years with a creatinine clearance (CCr) of 20-36 ml/min. All patients were receiving EPO (40 U/kg twice a week s.c.) and a low-protein diet (0.6 g protein/kg/day and 145 kJ/kg/day). The diet of 20 patients (Group I) was supplemented with KA at a dosage of 100 mg/kg/day while 18 patients (Group II) received no supplementation. During the study period, the glomerular filtration rate slightly decreased (CCr from 28.2 +/- 3.4 to 26.4 +/- 4.1 ml/min and 29.6 +/- 4.8 to 23.4 +/- 4.4 ml/min in groups I and II, respectively and Cin); this however was more marked in Group II (Group I vs. Group II, p diet presents an effective treatment modality in the conservative management of CRF.

  9. Distinct mechanisms underlie adaptation of proximal tubule Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 in response to chronic metabolic and respiratory acidosis.

    Silva, Pedro Henrique Imenez; Girardi, Adriana Castello Costa; Neri, Elida Adalgisa; Rebouças, Nancy Amaral

    2012-04-01

    The Na(+/)H(+) exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) is essential for HCO(3)(-) reabsorption in renal proximal tubules. The expression and function of NHE3 must adapt to acid-base conditions. The goal of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for higher proton secretion in proximal tubules during acidosis and to evaluate whether there are differences between metabolic and respiratory acidosis with regard to NHE3 modulation and, if so, to identify the relevant parameters that may trigger these distinct adaptive responses. We achieved metabolic acidosis by lowering HCO(3)(-) concentration in the cell culture medium and respiratory acidosis by increasing CO(2) tension in the incubator chamber. We found that cell-surface NHE3 expression was increased in response to both forms of acidosis. Mild (pH 7.21 ± 0.02) and severe (6.95 ± 0.07) metabolic acidosis increased mRNA levels, at least in part due to up-regulation of transcription, whilst mild (7.11 ± 0.03) and severe (6.86 ± 0.01) respiratory acidosis did not up-regulate NHE3 expression. Analyses of the Nhe3 promoter region suggested that the regulatory elements sensitive to metabolic acidosis are located between -466 and -153 bp, where two consensus binding sites for SP1, a transcription factor up-regulated in metabolic acidosis, were localised. We conclude that metabolic acidosis induces Nhe3 promoter activation, which results in higher mRNA and total protein level. At the plasma membrane surface, NHE3 expression was increased in metabolic and respiratory acidosis alike, suggesting that low pH is responsible for NHE3 displacement to the cell surface.

  10. Application of dynamic metabolomics to examine in vivo skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in the chronically high-fat fed mouse

    Kowalski, Greg M., E-mail: greg.kowalski@deakin.edu.au [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); De Souza, David P. [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Burch, Micah L. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Hamley, Steven [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Kloehn, Joachim [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Selathurai, Ahrathy [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia); Tull, Dedreia; O' Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J. [Metabolomics Australia, Bio21 Institute of Molecular Science and Biotechnology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Bruce, Clinton R. [Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, Victoria 3125 (Australia)

    2015-06-19

    Rationale: Defects in muscle glucose metabolism are linked to type 2 diabetes. Mechanistic studies examining these defects rely on the use of high fat-fed rodent models and typically involve the determination of muscle glucose uptake under insulin-stimulated conditions. While insightful, they do not necessarily reflect the physiology of the postprandial state. In addition, most studies do not examine aspects of glucose metabolism beyond the uptake process. Here we present an approach to study rodent muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism under the dynamic and physiologically relevant setting of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methods and results: In vivo muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism was investigated following oral administration of [U-{sup 13}C] glucose. Quadriceps muscles were collected 15 and 60 min after glucose administration and metabolite flux profiling was determined by measuring {sup 13}C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. While no dietary effects were noted in the glycolytic pathway, muscle from mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibited a reduction in labelling in TCA intermediates. Interestingly, this appeared to be independent of alterations in flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, our findings suggest that TCA cycle anaplerosis is negligible in muscle during an OGTT. Conclusions: Under the dynamic physiologically relevant conditions of the OGTT, skeletal muscle from HFD fed mice exhibits alterations in glucose metabolism at the level of the TCA cycle. - Highlights: • Dynamic metabolomics was used to investigate muscle glucose metabolism in vivo. • Mitochondrial TCA cycle metabolism is altered in muscle of HFD mice. • This defect was not pyruvate dehydrogenase mediated, as has been previously thought. • Mitochondrial TCA cycle anaplerosis in muscle is virtually absent during the OGTT.

  11. Application of dynamic metabolomics to examine in vivo skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in the chronically high-fat fed mouse

    Kowalski, Greg M.; De Souza, David P.; Burch, Micah L.; Hamley, Steven; Kloehn, Joachim; Selathurai, Ahrathy; Tull, Dedreia; O'Callaghan, Sean; McConville, Malcolm J.; Bruce, Clinton R.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Defects in muscle glucose metabolism are linked to type 2 diabetes. Mechanistic studies examining these defects rely on the use of high fat-fed rodent models and typically involve the determination of muscle glucose uptake under insulin-stimulated conditions. While insightful, they do not necessarily reflect the physiology of the postprandial state. In addition, most studies do not examine aspects of glucose metabolism beyond the uptake process. Here we present an approach to study rodent muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism under the dynamic and physiologically relevant setting of the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Methods and results: In vivo muscle glucose and intermediary metabolism was investigated following oral administration of [U- 13 C] glucose. Quadriceps muscles were collected 15 and 60 min after glucose administration and metabolite flux profiling was determined by measuring 13 C mass isotopomers in glycolytic and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates via gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. While no dietary effects were noted in the glycolytic pathway, muscle from mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) exhibited a reduction in labelling in TCA intermediates. Interestingly, this appeared to be independent of alterations in flux through pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, our findings suggest that TCA cycle anaplerosis is negligible in muscle during an OGTT. Conclusions: Under the dynamic physiologically relevant conditions of the OGTT, skeletal muscle from HFD fed mice exhibits alterations in glucose metabolism at the level of the TCA cycle. - Highlights: • Dynamic metabolomics was used to investigate muscle glucose metabolism in vivo. • Mitochondrial TCA cycle metabolism is altered in muscle of HFD mice. • This defect was not pyruvate dehydrogenase mediated, as has been previously thought. • Mitochondrial TCA cycle anaplerosis in muscle is virtually absent during the OGTT

  12. Metabolic control and chronic complications during a 3-year follow-up period in a cohort of type 2 diabetic patients attended in primary care in the Community of Madrid (Spain).

    Arrieta, Francisco; Piñera, Marbella; Iglesias, Pedro; Nogales, Pedro; Salinero-Fort, Miguel Angel; Abanades, Juan Carlos; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio; Calañas, Alfonso; Balsa, José Antonio; Zamarrón, Isabel; Rovira, Adela; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze both metabolic control and chronic complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) patients regularly attended in primary care during a 3 years of follow-up in the Community of Madrid (Spain). From 2007 to 2010 we prospectively included 3268 patients with T2D attended by 153 primary care physicians from 51 family health centers. An prospective cohort study with annual evaluation over 3 years to the same population was performed. We measured the goals of control in diabetic patients and the incidence of chronic complications of diabetes during the study period. A significant decrease in serum glucose levels (143±42mg/dl vs 137±43mg/dl, p1.2% vs 7.02±1.2%, p191.4±38mg/dl vs 181.5±36mg/dl, p114.7±31mg/dl vs 105.5±30mg/dl, p144.5±93mg/dl vs 138±84mg/dl, p14mg/dl vs 49.9±16mg/dl, pdiabetic complications throughout the study period was low, with a incidence of coronary heart disease of 6.2%, peripheral arterial disease 3%, ischemic stroke 2.8%, diabetic foot 11.2%, nephropathy 5.9%, retinopathy 4.5%, and neuropathy 3%. Metabolic control in T2D patients attended in primary care in the Community of Madrid throughout 3 years is adequate and is accompanied by low percent of chronic diabetic complications during this period of follow-up. Copyright © 2013 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Metabolic syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection who do not have obesity or type 2 diabetes

    Lucivalda Pereira Magalhães Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The individual components of metabolic syndrome may be independent predictors of mortality in patients with liver disease. We aimed to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its related components in hepatitis C virus-infected patients who are not obese and do not have type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 125 patients infected with hepatitis C virus genotype 1. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to the International Diabetes Federation. Anthropometric data were measured according to standardized procedures. Bioimpedance analysis was performed on all patients. RESULTS: Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 21.6% of patients. Of the subjects with metabolic syndrome, 59.3% had hypertension, 77.8% had insulin resistance, 85.2% were overweight, 48.1% had a high waist circumference, 85.2% had an increased body fat percentage, and 92.3% had an elevated waist:hip ratio. In the bivariate analysis, female sex (OR 2.58; 95% CI: 1.09-6.25, elevated gamma-glutamyl transferase (γGT (OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.04-7.29, elevated fasting glucose (OR 8.05; 95% CI: 3.17-21.32, low HDL cholesterol (OR 2.80; 95% CI: 1.07-7.16, hypertriglyceridemia (OR 7.91; 95% CI: 2.88-22.71, elevated waist circumference (OR 10.33; 95% CI: 3.72-30.67, overweight (OR 11.33; 95% CI: 3.97-41.07, and increased body fat percentage (OR 8.34; 95% CI: 2.94-30.08 were independent determinants of metabolic syndrome. Using the final multivariate regression model, similar results were observed for abdominal fat (OR 9.98; 95% CI: 2.63-44.41 and total body fat percentage (OR 8.73; 95% CI: 2.33-42.34. However, metabolic syndrome risk was also high for those with blood glucose >5.55 mmol/L or HDL cholesterol <0.9 mmol/L (OR 16.69; 95% CI: 4.64-76.35; OR 7.23; 95% CI: 1.86-32.63, respectively. CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome is highly prevalent among hepatitis C virus-infected patients without type 2 diabetes or obesity. Metabolic syndrome was

  14. Acid-base status determines the renal expression of Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins.

    Nijenhuis, T.; Renkema, K.Y.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis results in renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ wasting, whereas chronic metabolic alkalosis is known to exert the reverse effects. It was hypothesized that these adaptations are mediated at least in part by the renal Ca2+ and Mg2+ transport proteins. The aim of this study, therefore, was

  15. Chronic free-choice drinking in crossed high alcohol preferring mice leads to sustained blood ethanol levels and metabolic tolerance without evidence of liver damage.

    Matson, Liana; Liangpunsakul, Suthat; Crabb, David; Buckingham, Amy; Ross, Ruth Ann; Halcomb, Meredith; Grahame, Nicholas

    2013-02-01

    Crossed high alcohol preferring (cHAP) mice were selectively bred from a cross of the HAP1 × HAP2 replicate lines, and we demonstrate blood ethanol concentrations (BECs) during free-choice drinking that are reminiscent of those observed in alcohol-dependent humans. Therefore, this line may provide an unprecedented opportunity to learn about the consequences of excessive voluntary ethanol (EtOH) consumption, including metabolic tolerance and liver pathology. Cytochrome p450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction plays a prominent role in driving both metabolic tolerance and EtOH-induced liver injury. In this report, we sought to characterize cHAP drinking by assessing whether pharmacologically relevant BEC levels are sustained throughout the active portion of the light-dark cycle. Given that cHAP intakes and BECs are similar to those observed in mice given an EtOH liquid diet, we assessed whether free-choice exposure results in metabolic tolerance, hepatic enzyme induction, and hepatic steatosis. In experiment 1, blood samples were taken across the dark portion of a 12:12 light-dark cycle to examine the pattern of EtOH accumulation in these mice. In experiments 1 and 2, mice were injected with EtOH following 3 to 4 weeks of access to water or 10% EtOH and water, and blood samples were taken to assess metabolic tolerance. In experiment 3, 24 mice had 4 weeks of access to 10% EtOH and water or water alone, followed by necropsy and hepatological assessment. In experiment 1, cHAP mice mean BEC values exceeded 80 mg/dl at all sampling points and approached 200 mg/dl during the middle of the dark cycle. In experiments 1 and 2, EtOH-exposed mice metabolized EtOH faster than EtOH-naïve mice, demonstrating metabolic tolerance (p alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These results demonstrate that excessive intake by cHAP mice results in sustained BECs throughout the active period, leading to the development of metabolic tolerance and evidence of CYP2E1 induction

  16. Chronic stress impairs performance, energy metabolism and welfare indicators in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax): The combined effects of fish crowding and water quality deterioration

    Santos, G.A.; Schrama, J.W.; Mamauag, R.E.P.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Rearing fish at high densities may act as a chronic stressor leading to a reduced performance. We hypothesise that this is due to an increase in energy requirements for maintenance and altered energy partitioning. To test this hypothesis, European seabass (mean initial weight 82.1 g) were stocked at

  17. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka [Nagoya City Rehabilitation and Sports Center (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with {sup 15}O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO{sub 2}) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO{sub 2} between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO{sub 2} of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO{sub 2} between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO{sub 2} of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the

  18. Cerebral circulation and metabolism in the patients with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic minor traumatic brain injury. A study by the positron emission tomography in twenty subjects with normal MRI findings

    Kabasawa, Hidehiro; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Iida, Akihiko; Matsubara, Michitaka

    2002-01-01

    Many individuals are affected on their higher brain functions, such as intelligence, memory, and attention, even after minor traumatic brain injury (MTBI). Although higher brain dysfunction is based on impairment of the cerebral circulation and metabolism, the precise relationship between them remains unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the relationship between the cerebral circulation or cerebral metabolism and higher brain dysfunction. Twenty subjects with higher brain dysfunction caused by chronic MTBI were studied. They had no abnormal MRI findings. The full-scale intelligence quotient (FIQ) were quantitatively evaluated by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), and the subjects were classified into the normal group and the impaired group. Concurrent with the evaluation of FIQ, positron emission tomography (PET) was performed by the steady state method with 15 O gases inhalation. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO 2 ) were calculated in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe. First, of all twenty subjects, we investigated rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 in all regions. Then we compared rCBF, OEF, and CMRO 2 between the normal group and the impaired group based on FIQ score. We also studied the change of FIQ score of 13 subjects 9.3 months after the first evaluation. In addition, we investigated the change of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 along with the improvement of FIQ score. Although rCBF and OEF of all subjects were within the normal range in all regions, CMRO 2 of more than half of subjects was under the lower normal limit in all regions except in the right occipital lobe, showing the presence of ''relative luxury perfusion''. Comparison of rCBF, OEF and CMRO 2 between normal group and impaired group revealed that CMRO 2 of the impaired group was significantly lower than that of the normal group in the bilateral frontal, temporal, and occipital

  19. The venous-arterial difference in CO2 should be interpreted with caution in case of respiratory alkalosis in healthy volunteers.

    Morel, Jerome; Gergelé, Laurent; Dominé, Alexandre; Molliex, Serge; Perrot, Jean-Luc; Labeille, Bruno; Costes, Frederic

    2017-08-01

    The venous-arterial difference in CO 2 (ΔCO 2 ) has been proposed as an index of the adequacy of tissue perfusion in shock states. We hypothesized that the variation in PaCO 2 (hyper- or hypocapnia) could impact ΔCO 2 , partly through microcirculation adaptations. Fifteen healthy males volunteered to participate. For hypocapnia condition (hCO 2 ), the subjects were asked to hyperventilate, while they were asked to breathe a gas mixture containing 8 % CO 2 for hypercapnia condition (HCO 2 ). The 2 conditions were randomly assigned. Blood gases were measured at baseline before each condition, and after 5-7 min of either hCO 2 or HCO 2 condition. Microcirculation was assessed by the muscle reoxygenation slope measured with near infrared spectroscopy following a vascular occlusion test and by skin circulation with in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy. ΔCO 2 was significantly increased with hCO 2 while it tended to decrease with HCO 2 (non-significant). HCO 2 induced a moderate increase of the resaturation slope of NIRS oxygenation. Skin microcirculatory blood flow significantly dropped with hCO 2 , while it remained unchanged with hypercapnia. Our results warrant cautious interpretation of ΔCO 2 as an indicator of tissue perfusion during respiratory alkalosis.

  20. Clinical characteristics of chronic kidney disease of nontraditional causes in Salvadoran farming communities.

    Herrera, Raúl; Orantes, Carlos M; Almaguer, Miguel; Alfonso, Pedro; Bayarre, Héctor D; Leiva, Irma M; Smith, Magaly J; Cubias, Ricardo A; Torres, Carlos G; Almendárez, Walter O; Cubias, Francisco R; Morales, Fabrizio E; Magaña, Salvador; Amaya, Juan C; Perdomo, Edgard; Ventura, Mercedes C; Villatoro, Juan F; Vela, Xavier F; Zelaya, Susana M; Granados, Delmy V; Vela, Eduardo; Orellana, Patricia; Hevia, Reynaldo; Fuentes, E Jackeline; Mañalich, Reinaldo; Bacallao, Raymed; Ugarte, Mario; Arias, María I; Chávez, Jackelin; Flores, Nelson E; Aparicio, Claudia E

    2014-04-01

    : hypermagnesuria (100%), hyperphosphaturia (50%), hypernatriuria (45.7%), hyperkaluria (23.9%), hypercalciuria (17.4%), electrolyte polyuria (43.5%), metabolic alkalosis (45.7%), hyponatremia (47.8%), hypocalcemia (39.1%), hypokalemia (30.4%), hypomagnesemia (19.6%). Imaging: Ultrasound showed fatty liver (93.5%) and vascular Doppler showed tibial artery damage (66.7%). Neurological symptoms: abnormal tendon reflexes (45.6%), Babinski sign and myoclonus (6.5%), sensorineural hearing loss (56.5%). This chronic kidney disease studied behaves clinically like chronic tubulointerstitial nephropathy, but with systemic manifestations not attributable to kidney disease. While male agricultural workers predominated, women and adolescents were also affected. Findings support a hypothesis of multifactorial etiology with a key role played by nephrotoxic environmental agents.

  1. Metabolic alterations in dialysis patients

    Drechsler, Christiane

    2010-01-01

    Assessing metabolic risk in dialysis patients, three main aspects are important: a) the pathophysiologic effects of metabolic disturbances as known from the general population are unlikely to completely reverse once patients reach dialysis. b) Specific additional problems related to chronic kidney

  2. Treatment with TUG891, a free fatty acid receptor 4 agonist, restores adipose tissue metabolic dysfunction following chronic sleep fragmentation in mice

    Gozal, D; Qiao, Z; Almendros, I

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sleep fragmentation (SF), a frequent occurrence in multiple sleep and other diseases leads to increased food intake and insulin resistance via increased macrophage activation and inflammation in visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT). Free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4) is reduced in pedi...... FFA4 activity may serve as potentially useful adjunctive therapies for sleep disorders accompanied by metabolic morbidity.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 16 March 2016. doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.37....

  3. Chronic Caloric Restriction and Exercise Improve Metabolic Conditions of Dietary-Induced Obese Mice in Autophagy Correlated Manner without Involving AMPK

    Mingxia Cui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the role of AMPK activation and autophagy in mediating the beneficial effects of exercise and caloric restriction in obesity. Methods. Dietary-induced obesity mice were made and divided into 5 groups; one additional group of normal mice serves as control. Mice in each group received different combinations of interventions including low fat diet, caloric restriction, and exercise. Then their metabolic conditions were assessed by measuring serum glucose and insulin, serum lipids, and liver function. AMPK phosphorylation and autophagy activity were detected by western blotting. Results. Obese mice models were successfully induced by high fat diet. Caloric restriction consistently improved the metabolic conditions of the obese mice, and the effects are more prominent than the mice that received only exercise. Also, caloric restriction, exercise, and low fat diet showed a synergistic effect in the improvement of metabolic conditions. Western blotting results showed that this improvement was not related with the activation of AMPK in liver, skeletal muscle, or heart but correlates well with the autophagy activity. Conclusion. Caloric restriction has more prominent beneficial effects than exercise in dietary-induced obese mice. These effects are correlated with the autophagy activity and may be independent of AMPK activation.

  4. Apparent brain temperature imaging with multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy compared with cerebral blood flow and metabolism imaging on positron emission tomography in patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease

    Nanba, Takamasa; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate (Japan); Yoshioka, Yoshichika [Osaka University, Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Makoto; Uwano, Ikuko [Iwate Medical University, Institute for Biomedical Science, Iwate (Japan); Terasaki, Kazunori [Iwate Medical University, Cyclotron Research Center, Iwate (Japan)

    2017-09-15

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy correlates with cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral chronic major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. Apparent brain temperature and CBF and metabolism imaging were measured using proton MR spectroscopy and {sup 15}O-positron emission tomography (PET), respectively, in 35 patients. A set of regions of interest (ROIs) of 5 x 5 voxels was placed on an MR image so that the voxel row at each edge was located in the deep white matter of the centrum semiovale in each cerebral hemisphere. PET images were co-registered with MR images with these ROIs and were re-sliced automatically using image analysis software. In 175 voxel pairs located in the deep white matter, the brain temperature difference (affected hemisphere - contralateral hemisphere: ΔBT) was correlated with cerebral blood volume (CBV) (r = 0.570) and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) ratios (affected hemisphere/contralateral hemisphere) (r = 0.641). We excluded voxels that contained ischemic lesions or cerebrospinal fluid and calculated the mean values of voxel pairs in each patient. The mean ΔBT was correlated with the mean CBF (r = - 0.376), mean CBV (r = 0.702), and mean OEF ratio (r = 0.774). Apparent brain temperature imaging using multi-voxel proton MR spectroscopy was correlated with CBF and metabolism imaging in the deep white matter of patients with unilateral major cerebral artery steno-occlusive disease. (orig.)

  5. Metabolic changes in malnutrition.

    Emery, P W

    2005-10-01

    This paper is concerned with malnutrition caused by inadequate intake of all the major nutrients rather than deficiency diseases relating to a single micronutrient. Three common situations are recognised: young children in third world countries with protein-energy malnutrition; adults in the same countries who are chronically adapted to subsisting on marginally inadequate diets; and patients who become malnourished as a result of chronic diseases. In all these situations infectious diseases are often also present, and this complicates the interpretation of biochemical and physiological observations. The metabolic response to starvation is primarily concerned with maintaining a supply of water-soluble substrates to supply energy to the brain. Thus there is an initial rise in metabolic rate, reflecting gluconeogenic activity. As fasting progresses, gluconeogenesis is suppressed to minimise muscle protein breakdown and ketones become the main fuel for the brain. With chronic underfeeding the basal metabolic rate per cell appears to fall, but the mechanistic basis for this is not clear. The main adaptation to chronic energy deficiency is slow growth and low adult body size, although the reduction in energy requirement achieved by this is partially offset by the preservation of the more metabolically active organs at the expense of muscle, which has a lower metabolic rate. The interaction between malnutrition and the metabolic response to trauma has been studied using an animal model. The rise in energy expenditure and urinary nitrogen excretion following surgery were significantly attenuated in malnourished rats, suggesting that malnutrition impairs the ability of the body to mobilise substrates to support inflammatory and reparative processes. However, the healing process in wounded muscle remained unimpaired in malnutrition, suggesting that this process has a high biological priority.

  6. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki [Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD.

  7. Abnormal brain glucose metabolism and depressive mood in patients with pre-dialytic chronic kidney disease: SPM analysis of F-18 FDG positron emission tomography

    Jun, Sung Min; Song, Sang Heon; Kim, Seong Jang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Kim, In Ju; Kim, Yong Ki

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between depressive mood and pre-dialytic CKD, to localize and quantify depressive mood -related lesions in pre-dialytic CKD patients through statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of brain positron emission tomography (PET), and to examine the usefulness of brain PET for early detection and proper treatment of depressive mood. Twenty one patients with stage 5 CKD and 22 healthy volunteers were analyzed by depressive mood assessment and statistical parametric mapping (SPM) analysis of 18F-FDG PET. Depressive mood assessment was done by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). The largest clusters were areas including precentral gyrus, prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulated cortex of left hemisphere. Other clusters were left transverse temporal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right prefrontal cortex, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA 46, 44), right inferior frontal gyrus, right inferior parietal lobule, left angular gyrus. In addition, correlation was found between hypometabolized areas and HDRS scores of CKD patients in right prefrontal cortex (BA 11) and right anterior cingulated gyrus (BA 24). In conclusion, this study demonstrated specific depressive mood-related abnormal metabolic lesion. Interestingly, in CKD patients with severe depressive mood, cerebral metabolism was similar to that of MDD

  8. Moderate chronic administration of Vineatrol-enriched red wines improves metabolic, oxidative, and inflammatory markers in hamsters fed a high-fat diet.

    Romain, Cindy; Bresciani, Letizia; Gaillet, Sylvie; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Calani, Luca; Bonafos, Béatrice; Vidé, Joris; Rugani, Nathalie; Ramos, Jeanne; Del Rio, Daniele; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Rouanet, Jean-Max

    2014-06-01

    High-fat (HF) diets contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases and the metabolic syndrome. This study was undertaken to investigate the beneficial effects of Vineatrol®-enriched red wines on blood lipids, oxidative stress and inflammation, and the role of some metabolic pathway regulatory proteins. Golden Syrian hamsters received an HF diet for 13 wk, in the presence or absence of red wines supplemented with Vineatrol® (RWV) or not. The HF diet increased plasma cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin, which were attenuated by RWV treatment. RWV protected against the HF-induced increase in liver nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity and spared antioxidant enzyme activities. RWV did not reduce either liver steatosis or increased plasma leptin due to the HF diet, but greatly improved adiponectinemia. In the liver, RWV affected the inflammatory response by decreasing polymorphonuclear cell number and lowering TNF-α and IL-6 levels. Moreover, the increase in NF-κB activity in the HF group liver was prevented by RWV. Finally, RWV partially corrected low SIRT1 levels due to the HF diet but had no influence on SIRT3 or p-AMPK protein levels. Our studies suggest that RWV is capable of reversing the atherogenic process induced by an HF diet in hamster tissues. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Effects of chronic ethanol intake on metabolic conversions of 14C erucic acid by the livers of rat fed with rapeseed or ground nut oil

    Lecerf, J.; Bezard, J.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of addition of ethanol to diets containing rapeseed or ground nut oil on the metabolic conversion of 14 14 C erudic and 9-10 3 H oleic acid were studied in the rat liver. Whatever the diet more 14 C than 3 H radioactivity was recovered in liver lipids 2 and 19 hours after injection of labelled fatty acids. Ethanol has little effect on this incorporation. Only small amounts of 3 H oleic acid were converted. In all cases, the metabolic conversion of erucic acid was identical: the main part of 14 C was not recovered as erucic acid but was present in other mono unsaturated fatty acids n-9:oleic acid (18:1), which was the most labelled acid, 16:1, 20:1 and nervonic acid (24:1). The amount of erucic acid converted to shorter chain fatty acids was unchanged by addition of ethanol but the alcohol increased the proportion of 14 C radioactivity recovered as nervonic acid. This latter effect was opposite to the effect of rapeseed oil diet, which consisted in a decrease in the conversion of erucic to nervonic acid. A high amount of 14 C radioactivity was recovered in the F.F.A. fraction of the liver as an unknown compound (13 and 80% of 14 C radioacitivty respectively after 2 and 19h). Its identification is presently under investigation [fr

  10. The metabolic syndrome among Danish seafarers

    Jepsen, Jørgen Riis; Rasmussen, Hanna Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Background: The metabolic syndrome (MS) represents a cluster of risk factors related to insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is a strong risk factor for chronic metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and is related to nutritional factors, sleep patterns, work-related stress, fatigue, and physical...

  11. Acute encephalopathy with concurrent respiratory and metabolic disturbances in first known parenteral human administration of flunixin meglumine and acepromazine maleate.

    Kamali, Michael F; Wilson, Anwar C; Acquisto, Nicole M; Spillane, Linda; Schneider, Sandra M

    2013-08-01

    Flunexin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved for veterinary use in horses and cattle. Acepromazine is a phenothiazine derivative used in horses, dogs, and cats. Human exposure to these substances is rare. We report a case of a human injection of two equine medications, flunixin and acepromazine, which resulted in altered mental status, respiratory alkalosis, gastrointestinal bleeding, and elevation of liver transaminases in a 43-year-old woman who worked as a horse trainer. The patient intentionally self-injected these medications and subsequently presented to the Emergency Department with altered mental status and lethargy. The patient required hospitalization for metabolic abnormalities, including respiratory alkalosis, and suffered a gastrointestinal bleed requiring blood transfusion. The patient ultimately recovered with supportive measures. We believe this to be the first case of concomitant injection of flunixin and acepromazine in a human. This report explains a case of parenteral administration of two equine medications and the subsequent complications in a patient that presented to the Emergency Department. Human exposure to veterinary medications cannot be predicted by their effect in animals due to variations in absorption, distribution, and metabolism. Physicians should be aware that individuals who work with animals may have access to large quantities of veterinary medicine. This case also exemplifies the challenges that Emergency Physicians face on a daily basis, and generates additional consideration for overdoses and intoxications from medications that are not considered commonplace in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Patients with Treatment-Requiring Chronic Graft versus Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation Have Altered Metabolic Profiles due to the Disease and Immunosuppressive Therapy: Potential Implication for Biomarkers

    Håkon Reikvam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic graft versus host disease (cGVHD is a common long-term complication after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The objective of our study was to compare the metabolic profiles for allotransplant recipients and thereby identify metabolic characteristics of patients with treatment-requiring cGVHD. The study included 51 consecutive patients (29 men and 22 women; median age: 44 years, range: 15–66 years transplanted with peripheral blood stem cells derived from human leukocyte antigen-matched family donors. All serum samples investigated by global metabolomic profiling were collected approximately 1 year posttransplant (median 358 days. Thirty-one of the 51 patients (61% had cGVHD 1 year posttransplant. The affected organs were (number of patients liver/bile duct (23, eyes (15, gastrointestinal tract (14, skin (13, mouth (10, lungs (3, and urogenital tract (1. We compared the metabolic profile for patients with and without cGVHD, and a Random Forrest Classification Analysis then resulted in 75% accuracy in differentiating the two groups. The 30 top-ranked metabolites from this comparison included increased levels of bile acids, several metabolites from the cytokine-responsive kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation, pro-inflammatory lipid metabolites, phenylalanine and tyrosine metabolites derived from the gut microbial flora, and metabolites reflecting increased oxidative stress. However, nine of these 30 top-ranked metabolites were probably altered due to cyclosporine or steroid treatment, and we therefore did a hierarchical clustering analysis including all 51 patients but only based on the other 21 cGVHD-specific metabolites. This analysis identified three patient subsets: one cluster included mainly patients without cGVHD and had generally low metabolite levels; another cluster included mainly patients with cGVHD (most patients with at least three affected organs and high metabolite levels, and the last

  13. Association of a variant in the regulatory region of NADPH oxidase 4 gene and metabolic syndrome in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Siqueira, Erika Rabelo Forte de; Pereira, Luciano Beltrao; Stefano, Jose Tadeu; Patente, Thiago; Cavaleiro, Ana Mercedes; Silva Vasconcelos, Luydson Richardson; Carmo, Rodrigo Feliciano; Moreira Beltrao Pereira, Leila Maria; Carrilho, Flair Jose; Corrêa-Giannella, Maria Lucia; Oliveira, Claudia P

    2015-03-28

    Given the important contribution of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase system to the generation of reactive oxygen species induced by hepatitis C virus (HCV), we investigated two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the putative regulatory region of the genes encoding NADPH oxidase 4 catalytic subunit (NOX4) and its regulatory subunit p22phox (CYBA) and their relation with metabolic and histological variables in patients with HCV. One hundred seventy eight naïve HCV patients (49.3% male; 65% HCV genotype 1) with positive HCV RNA were genotyped using specific primers and fluorescent-labeled probes for SNPs rs3017887 in NOX4 and -675 T → A in CYBA. No association was found between the genotype frequencies of NOX4 and CYBA SNPs and inflammation scores or fibrosis stages in the overall population. The presence of the CA + AA genotypes of the NOX4 SNP was nominally associated with a lower alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentration in the male population (CA + AA = 72.23 ± 6.34 U/L versus CC = 100.22 ± 9.85; mean ± SEM; P = 0.05). The TT genotype of the CYBA SNP was also nominally associated with a lower ALT concentration in the male population (TT = 84.01 ± 6.77 U/L versus TA + AA = 109.67 ± 18.37 U/L; mean ± SEM; P = 0.047). The minor A-allele of the NOX4 SNP was inversely associated with the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in the male population (odds ratio (OR): 0.15; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.79; P = 0.025). The results suggest that the evaluated NOX4 and CYBA SNPs are not direct genetic determinants of fibrosis in HCV patients, but nevertheless NOX4 rs3017887 SNP could indirectly influence fibrosis susceptibility due to its inverse association with MS in male patients.

  14. Therapeutic effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices and their mixture on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in a rat model of chronic alcohol consumption.

    Otunola, Gloria Aderonke; Afolayan, Anthony Jide

    2016-07-01

    The protective effect of aqueous extracts of three dietary spices, garlic, (Allium sativum), ginger (Zingiber officinale) and pepper (Capsicum frutescens) singly and combined was investigated using a rat model of chronic alcohol intake. Rats were given 30% ethanol, with or without aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or mixture of the three administered at 200mg/kg body weight by oral gavage for 28 days. Lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, oxidative and antioxidative profiles of serum, faecal, liver, kidney, heart and brain tissues of the rats were analyzed. Alcohol treatment significantly elevated liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation, depleted antioxidant system and induced histopathological changes in the liver. These alterations were markedly ameliorated by treatment with aqueous extracts of the three spices singly or mixed at 200mg/kg body weight. These results suggest that aqueous extracts of garlic, ginger, pepper or a blend of the three protects against alcohol- induced hypercholesterolemia, lipid peroxidation, oxidative stress and liver damage.

  15. Metabolic disorders in menopause

    Grzegorz Stachowiak

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disorders occurring in menopause, including dyslipidemia, disorders of carbohydrate metabolism (impaired glucose tolerance – IGT, type 2 diabetes mellitus – T2DM or components of metabolic syndrome, constitute risk factors for cardiovascular disease in women. A key role could be played here by hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance and visceral obesity, all contributing to dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, alter coagulation and atherosclerosis observed during the menopausal period. Undiagnosed and untreated, metabolic disorders may adversely affect the length and quality of women’s life. Prevention and treatment preceded by early diagnosis should be the main goal for the physicians involved in menopausal care. This article represents a short review of the current knowledge concerning metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, polycystic ovary syndrome or thyroid diseases in menopause, including the role of a tailored menopausal hormone therapy (HT. According to current data, HT is not recommend as a preventive strategy for metabolic disorders in menopause. Nevertheless, as part of a comprehensive strategy to prevent chronic diseases after menopause, menopausal hormone therapy, particularly estrogen therapy may be considered (after balancing benefits/risks and excluding women with absolute contraindications to this therapy. Life-style modifications, with moderate physical activity and healthy diet at the forefront, should be still the first choice recommendation for all patients with menopausal metabolic abnormalities.

  16. Biological alterations resulting from chronic lung irradiation. III. Effect of partial 60Co thoracic irradiation upon pulmonary collagen metabolism and fractionation in syrian hamsters

    Pickrell, J.A.; Harris, D.V.; Hahn, F.F.; Belasich, J.J.; Jones, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    Radiation-induced changes in pulmonary collagen metabolism were studied in Syrian hamsters given multiple thoracic doses of 60 Co radiation to achieve cumulative exposures of 6000, 4000, and 2000 R. At 13 to 14 wk after initial exposure, 6000- and 4000-R exposures had increased incorporation of injected [ 14 C]proline into pulmonary collagenous protein which suggested an increased collagen synthesis. By 21 to 22 wk after exposure, increased pulmonary soluble collagen was noted. Increased pulmonary scarring was indicated by a variable increase in native collagen at 13 to 36 wk. A collection of alveolar macrophages at 7 to 8 wk followed by inflammation at 13 to 14 wk and a beginning of pulmonary fibrosis at 13 to 19 wk were noted. At 21 to 22 wk after exposure a somewhat more marked pulmonary fibrosis and some epithelialization were observed. Hemosiderin deposits were also observed at 35 to 36 wk after exposure, but pathologic processes were lessened by this time. The early activation of collagen synthesis presumably caused the radiation-induced fibrosis. Later, when collagen tended to accumulate, the synthetic rate was normal. The activation of collagen synthesis caused by external thoracic irradiation resembles that caused by thoracic irradiation from the internal emitter, 144 Ce. Moreover, it demonstrates the usefulness of monitoring collagen biosynthesis by [ 14 C]proline incorporation into the lung. (U.S.)

  17. Acclimatory responses of the Daphnia pulex proteome to environmental changes. I. Chronic exposure to hypoxia affects the oxygen transport system and carbohydrate metabolism

    Madlung Johannes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planktonic crustaceans of the genus Daphnia show a remarkable plasticity to cope with environmental changes in oxygen concentration and temperature. One of the key proteins of adaptive gene control in Daphnia pulex under hypoxia is hemoglobin (Hb, which increases in hemolymph concentration by an order of magnitude and shows an enhanced oxygen affinity due to changes in subunit composition. To explore the full spectrum of adaptive protein expression in response to low-oxygen conditions, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to analyze the proteome composition of animals acclimated to normoxia (oxygen partial pressure [Po2]: 20 kPa and hypoxia (Po2: 3 kPa, respectively. Results The comparative proteome analysis showed an up-regulation of more than 50 protein spots under hypoxia. Identification of a major share of these spots revealed acclimatory changes for Hb, glycolytic enzymes (enolase, and enzymes involved in the degradation of storage and structural carbohydrates (e.g. cellubiohydrolase. Proteolytic enzymes remained constitutively expressed on a high level. Conclusion Acclimatory adjustments of the D. pulex proteome to hypoxia included a strong induction of Hb and carbohydrate-degrading enzymes. The scenario of adaptive protein expression under environmental hypoxia can be interpreted as a process to improve oxygen transport and carbohydrate provision for the maintenance of ATP production, even during short episodes of tissue hypoxia requiring support from anaerobic metabolism.

  18. Acupuncture regulates the glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in chronic stage ischemic stroke patients---a PET-CT cerebral functional imaging study

    Huang Yong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acupuncture has been applied to aid in the recovery of post-stroke patients, but its mechanism is unclear. This study aims to analyze the relationship between acupuncture and glucose metabolism in cerebral functional regions in post-stroke patients using 18 FDG PET-CT techniques. Forty-three ischemic stroke patients were randomly divided into 5 groups: the Waiguan (TE5 needling group, the TE5 sham needling group, the sham point needling group, the sham point sham needling group and the non-needling group. Cerebral functional images of all patients were then acquired using PET-CT scans and processed by SPM2 software. Results Compared with the non-needling group, sham needling at TE5 and needling/sham needling at the sham point did not activate cerebral areas. However, needling at TE5 resulted in the activation of Brodmann Area (BA 30. Needling/sham needling at TE5 and needling at the sham point did not deactivate any cerebral areas, whereas sham needling at the sham point led to deactivation in BA6. Compared with sham needling at TE5, needling at TE5 activated BA13, 19 and 47 and did not deactivate any areas. Compared with needling at the sham point, needling at TE5 had no associated activation but a deactivating effect on BA9. Conclusion Needling at TE5 had a regulating effect on cerebral functional areas shown by PET-CT, and this may relate to its impact on the recovery of post-stroke patients.

  19. Study on Renal Anemia: A Double Tracer Study on Metabolism and Red Cell Life Span in Chronic Renal Diseases using Radioactive Iron (59Fe) and Chromium (51Cr)

    Jung, Kyung Tae; Lee, Mun Ho

    1968-01-01

    The ferrokinetics and red cell life spans of the patients with chronic glomerulonephritis were investigated by the double tracing method using radioactive iron ( 59 Fe) and chromium ( 51 Cr). According to the serum NPN levels, the patients were subdivided into 3 groups: Group 1. 6 patients, had the levels below 40 mg/dl. Group 2. 6 patients, had the levels between 41 mg/dl to 80 mg/dl. Group 3. 10 patients had the levels above 80 mg/dl. The results were as follows: 1) Red blood cell, hematocrit and hemoglobin values were moderately reduced in patients with normal serum NPN levels, while markedly reduced in patients with elevated serum NPN levels. 2) The plasma volume was increased, while the red cell volume was decreased in patients with elevated serum NPN levels, hence, total blood volume was unchanged. 3) The serum iron level was slightly reduced in patients of groups 1 and 2, while was within the normal ranges in patients of group 3. 4) i) In patients with normal serum NPN levels, the plasma iron disappearance rate, red cell iron utilization rate, red cell iron turnover rate, daily red cell iron renewal rate, circulating red cell iron and red cell iron concentration were within the normal ranges, while the plasma iron turnover rate was slightly reduced. ii) In patients with elevated serum NPN levels, the plasma iron disappearance rate was delayed, while the plasma iron turnover rate was within the normal ranges. The red cell iron utilization rate, red cell iron turnover rate and circulating red cell iron were decreased and the period in which the red cell iron utilization rate reached its peak was delayed in Group 3 patients. The daily red cell iron renewal rate and the red cell iron concentration were unchanged. iii) The mean red cell life span was within the normal ranges in patients with normal serum NPN levels, while was shortened in patients with elevated serum NPN levels.

  20. Effects of acetazolamide and furosemide on ventilation and cerebral blood volume in normocapnic and hypercapnic patients with COPD.

    Ven, M.J.T. van de; Colier, W.N.J.M.; Sluijs, M.C. van der; Oeseburg, B.; Vis, P.; Folgering, H.T.M.

    2002-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Effects of chronic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis and their relation to central chemoregulation may differ between normocapnic and chronic hypercapnic patients with COPD. The relationship between responses of inspired ventilation (VI), mouth occlusion pressure (P(0.1)), and

  1. Neuroinflammatory basis of metabolic syndrome.

    Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Cai, Dongsheng

    2013-10-05

    Inflammatory reaction is a fundamental defense mechanism against threat towards normal integrity and physiology. On the other hand, chronic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and atherosclerosis, have been causally linked to chronic, low-grade inflammation in various metabolic tissues. Recent cross-disciplinary research has led to identification of hypothalamic inflammatory changes that are triggered by overnutrition, orchestrated by hypothalamic immune system, and sustained through metabolic syndrome-associated pathophysiology. While continuing research is actively trying to underpin the identity and mechanisms of these inflammatory stimuli and actions involved in metabolic syndrome disorders and related diseases, proinflammatory IκB kinase-β (IKKβ), the downstream nuclear transcription factor NF-κB and some related molecules in the hypothalamus were discovered to be pathogenically significant. This article is to summarize recent progresses in the field of neuroendocrine research addressing the central integrative role of neuroinflammation in metabolic syndrome components ranging from obesity, glucose intolerance to cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  3. [Endocrinological diseases, metabolic diseases, sexuality].

    Lemaire, Antoine

    2014-10-01

    Sexuality is regularly evaluated in media surveys. Relations between sexual problems and some chronic pathologies as diabetes or metabolic syndrome have been brought to light. Androgen deficiency in the aging male has become a topic of increasing interest. Hormones play an important role in sexual function and relation between hormonal status and metabolic data are now well established. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Out of Warburg effect: An effective cancer treatment targeting the tumor specific metabolism and dysregulated pH.

    Schwartz, Laurent; Seyfried, Thomas; Alfarouk, Khalid O; Da Veiga Moreira, Jorgelindo; Fais, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    As stated by Otto Warburg nearly a century ago, cancer is a metabolic disease, a fermentation caused by malfunctioning mitochondria, resulting in increased anabolism and decreased catabolism. Treatment should, therefore, aim at restoring the energy yield. To decrease anabolism, glucose uptake should be reduced (ketogenic diet). To increase catabolism, the oxidative phosphorylation should be restored. Treatment with a combination of α-lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate has been shown to be effective in multiple animal models. This treatment, in combination with conventional chemotherapy, has yielded extremely encouraging results in glioblastoma, brain metastasis and lung cancer. Randomized trials are necessary to confirm these preliminary data. The major limitation is the fact that the combination of α-lipoic acid and hydroxycitrate can only be effective if the mitochondria are still present and/or functional. That may not be the case in the most aggressive tumors. The increased intracellular alkalosis is a strong mitogenic signal, which bypasses most inhibitory signals. Concomitant correction of this alkalosis may be a very effective treatment in case of mitochondrial failure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The efficiency of metabolic impact of S-adenosylmethionine and meldonium on parameters of lipid profile and insulin resistance during comorbid course of nonalcocholic steatohepatitis, obesity and chronic kidney disease stage І-ІІ

    O. S. Khukhlina

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective – to investigate the influence of the complex of S-adenosylmethionine (Agepta and meldonium (Vasonat on the course of NASH with obesity and CKD, the state of the lipid profile of the blood, and the degree of insulin resistance. Materials and methods. The study involved 75 patients with NASH with comorbid obesity of the 1st degree and CKH of І–ІІ st. Three groups of patients were randomized by age, sex, obesity, activity of the cytolytic syndrome of NASH and the stage of CKN (chronic uncomplicated pyelonephritis with latent course in the phase of subsiding acute exacerbation to determine the treatment effectiveness. The control group (24 persons received hypocaloric diet, metformin 500 mg twice daily, rosuvastatin 10 mg 1 time per day, essentiale H as a hepatoprotective drug (1 capsule 3 times a day, canephron N (50 mg 3 times a day during 90 days. The second group (26 people received hypocaloric diet, metformin 500 mg twice daily, rosuvastatin 10 mg 1 time per day, canephron N (50 mg 3 times a day, S-adenosylmethionine (Agepta (SAM as hepatoprotective drug (200 mg 3 times daily sublingually during 90 days. The third group (25 people received hypocaloric diet, metformin 500 mg twice daily, rosuvastatin 10 mg 1 time per day, canephron N (50 mg 3 times a day, SAM (Agepta (200 mg 3 times a day sublingually and meldonium (Vazonat (250 mg 2 times a day during 90 days. The analysis of clinical manifestations of NASH and CKN of the III stage, biochemical, laboratory parameters of the functional state of the liver, kidneys, endothelium, ultrasonographic data were studied in dynamics in 30 and 90 days during treatment and in 3 months after the treatment. Results. The investigation found that S-adenosylmethionine (Agepta and meldonium (Vasonat in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with obesity and chronic kidney disease of I–II stage have positive metabolic effects which potentiate the effect of statins and insulin sensitizers

  6. Autism Spectrum Disorders May Be Due to Cerebral Toxoplasmosis Associated with Chronic Neuroinflammation Causing Persistent Hypercytokinemia that Resulted in an Increased Lipid Peroxidation, Oxidative Stress, and Depressed Metabolism of Endogenous and Exogenous Substances

    Prandota, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, approximately 2 billion people are chronically infected with "Toxoplasma gondii" with largely yet unknown consequences. Patients with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) similarly as mice with chronic toxoplasmosis have persistent neuroinflammation, hypercytokinemia with hypermetabolism associated with enhanced lipid peroxidation, and…

  7. Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrition, Epigenetics, and Metabolic Syndrome

    Wang, Junjun; Wu, Zhenlong; Li, Defa; Li, Ning; Dindot, Scott V.; Satterfield, M. Carey; Bazer, Fuller W.; Wu, Guoyao

    2012-01-01

    Significance: Epidemiological and animal studies have demonstrated a close link between maternal nutrition and chronic metabolic disease in children and adults. Compelling experimental results also indicate that adverse effects of intrauterine growth restriction on offspring can be carried forward to subsequent generations through covalent modifications of DNA and core histones. Recent Advances: DNA methylation is catalyzed by S-adenosylmethionine-dependent DNA methyltransferases. Methylation...

  9. Circadian physiology of metabolism.

    Panda, Satchidananda

    2016-11-25

    A majority of mammalian genes exhibit daily fluctuations in expression levels, making circadian expression rhythms the largest known regulatory network in normal physiology. Cell-autonomous circadian clocks interact with daily light-dark and feeding-fasting cycles to generate approximately 24-hour oscillations in the function of thousands of genes. Circadian expression of secreted molecules and signaling components transmits timing information between cells and tissues. Such intra- and intercellular daily rhythms optimize physiology both by managing energy use and by temporally segregating incompatible processes. Experimental animal models and epidemiological data indicate that chronic circadian rhythm disruption increases the risk of metabolic diseases. Conversely, time-restricted feeding, which imposes daily cycles of feeding and fasting without caloric reduction, sustains robust diurnal rhythms and can alleviate metabolic diseases. These findings highlight an integrative role of circadian rhythms in physiology and offer a new perspective for treating chronic diseases in which metabolic disruption is a hallmark. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Construction and validation of a decision tree for treating metabolic acidosis in calves with neonatal diarrhea

    Trefz Florian M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present prospective study was to investigate whether a decision tree based on basic clinical signs could be used to determine the treatment of metabolic acidosis in calves successfully without expensive laboratory equipment. A total of 121 calves with a diagnosis of neonatal diarrhea admitted to a veterinary teaching hospital were included in the study. The dosages of sodium bicarbonate administered followed simple guidelines based on the results of a previous retrospective analysis. Calves that were neither dehydrated nor assumed to be acidemic received an oral electrolyte solution. In cases in which intravenous correction of acidosis and/or dehydration was deemed necessary, the provided amount of sodium bicarbonate ranged from 250 to 750 mmol (depending on alterations in posture and infusion volumes from 1 to 6.25 liters (depending on the degree of dehydration. Individual body weights of calves were disregarded. During the 24 hour study period the investigator was blinded to all laboratory findings. Results After being lifted, many calves were able to stand despite base excess levels below −20 mmol/l. Especially in those calves, metabolic acidosis was undercorrected with the provided amount of 500 mmol sodium bicarbonate, which was intended for calves standing insecurely. In 13 calves metabolic acidosis was not treated successfully as defined by an expected treatment failure or a measured base excess value below −5 mmol/l. By contrast, 24 hours after the initiation of therapy, a metabolic alkalosis was present in 55 calves (base excess levels above +5 mmol/l. However, the clinical status was not affected significantly by the metabolic alkalosis. Conclusions Assuming re-evaluation of the calf after 24 hours, the tested decision tree can be recommended for the use in field practice with minor modifications. Calves that stand insecurely and are not able to correct their position if pushed

  11. Chronic Pericarditis

    ... surgery) and is considered subacute. Causes Usually, the cause of chronic effusive pericarditis is unknown. However, it may be caused by cancer, tuberculosis , or an underactive thyroid gland ( hypothyroidism ), and it occasionally occurs in people with chronic ...

  12. Chronic Pain

    ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. × ... pain. Psychotherapy, relaxation and medication therapies, biofeedback, and behavior modification may also be employed to treat chronic pain. ...

  13. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  14. Hypercholermic metabolic alcalsosis as a presentation of cystic fibrosis: presentation of two cases = Alcalosis metabólica hipoclorémica como presentación de la fibrosis quística. Informe de dos casos

    Olga Lucía Morales Múnera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We describe two cases of patients with hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis as an initial presentation of cystic fibrosis (CF or as part of a second CF exacerbation. Clinical Cases: Two patients, 6 and 9 months old, consulted for cough, fever, and dyspnea. The first had syndrome of recurrent bronchial obstruction, without a diagnosis of CF on admission. Both presented with difficulty breathing, dehydration, and malnutrition. Arterial blood gases showed metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, and severe hypochloremia. Treatment with sodium chloride and potassium improved their electrolyte balance and acid-base status. They did not present with renal or gastrointestinal losses of chloride. CF and pseudo-Barter’s Syndrome were diagnosed. Conclusion: Metabolic alkalosis can present as an initial manifestation of CF in infants with recurrent bronchiolitis and short stature suspected of having CF: equally it can be an acute exacerbation in patients with known CF. Your recognition and treatment are an opportunity to decrease morbidity.

  15. In vivo effects of a chronic contamination by uranium or cesium 137 on the pharmaceutical metabolism, of the vitamin D and cholesterol; Effets in vivo d'une contamination chronique par l'uranium ou le cesium 137 sur le metabolisme du medicament, de la vitamine D et du cholesterol

    Souidi, M

    2006-11-15

    In conclusion, an animal model, miming the chronic contamination of the populations exposed to the uranium, was used for the first time to show that the chronic ingestion of a weak dose of depleted uranium can affect the level of active vitamin D without modifying the mineral homeostasis. This study shows that this radionuclide can lead molecular modifications of the CYPs and the nuclear receivers involved in the metabolism of the vitamin D not only at the level of the liver and kidney but also at the level of the independent metabolism in the brain. The deficiency in vitamin D can provoke osseous diseases such as the rickets at the child and the osteomalacia at the adult. The three categories of population the most exposed to this deficiency are the infants, the pregnant women and the old persons. Strong prevalence of the vitamin D deficiency associated with a chronic exposure to uranium could lead to osseous disorders. To verify this hypothesis, it will be necessary secondly to realize this study on individuals animal models predisposed to the rickets or to the osteomalacia. (N.C.)

  16. Metabolic Syndrome and Outcomes after Renal Intervention

    Daynene Vykoukal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome significantly increases the risk for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. The increased risk for cardiovascular diseases can partly be caused by a prothrombotic state that exists because of abdominal obesity. Multiple observational studies have consistently shown that increased body mass index as well as insulin resistance and increased fasting insulin levels is associated with chronic kidney disease, even after adjustment for related disorders. Metabolic syndrome appears to be a risk factor for chronic kidney disease, likely due to the combination of dysglycemia and high blood pressure. Metabolic syndrome is associated with markedly reduced renal clinical benefit and increased progression to hemodialysis following endovascular intervention for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis. Metabolic syndrome is associated with inferior early outcomes for dialysis access procedures.

  17. Sleep and metabolic function.

    Morselli, Lisa L; Guyon, Aurore; Spiegel, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Evidence for the role of sleep on metabolic and endocrine function has been reported more than four decades ago. In the past 30 years, the prevalence of obesity and diabetes has greatly increased in industrialized countries, and self-imposed sleep curtailment, now very common, is starting to be recognized as a contributing factor, alongside with increased caloric intake and decreased physical activity. Furthermore, obstructive sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by recurrent upper airway obstruction leading to intermittent hypoxemia and sleep fragmentation, has also become highly prevalent as a consequence of the epidemic of obesity and has been shown to contribute, in a vicious circle, to the metabolic disturbances observed in obese patients. In this article, we summarize the current data supporting the role of sleep in the regulation of glucose homeostasis and the hormones involved in the regulation of appetite. We also review the results of the epidemiologic and laboratory studies that investigated the impact of sleep duration and quality on the risk of developing diabetes and obesity, as well as the mechanisms underlying this increased risk. Finally, we discuss how obstructive sleep apnea affects glucose metabolism and the beneficial impact of its treatment, the continuous positive airway pressure. In conclusion, the data available in the literature highlight the importance of getting enough good sleep for metabolic health.

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  19. [Metabolic acidosis].

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fani, Filippo; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Castellano, Giuseppe; Cremaschi, Elena; Greco, Paolo; Parenti, Elisabetta; Morabito, Santo; Sabatino, Alice; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is frequently observed in clinical practice, especially among critically ill patients and/or in the course of renal failure. Complex mechanisms are involved, in most cases identifiable by medical history, pathophysiology-based diagnostic reasoning and measure of some key acid-base parameters that are easily available or calculable. On this basis the bedside differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis should be started from the identification of the two main subtypes of metabolic acidosis: the high anion gap metabolic acidosis and the normal anion gap (or hyperchloremic) metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis, especially in its acute forms with elevated anion gap such as is the case of lactic acidosis, diabetic and acute intoxications, may significantly affect metabolic body homeostasis and patients hemodynamic status, setting the stage for true medical emergencies. The therapeutic approach should be first aimed at early correction of concurrent clinical problems (e.g. fluids and hemodynamic optimization in case of shock, mechanical ventilation in case of concomitant respiratory failure, hemodialysis for acute intoxications etc.), in parallel to the formulation of a diagnosis. In case of severe acidosis, the administration of alkalizing agents should be carefully evaluated, taking into account the risk of side effects, as well as the potential need of renal replacement therapy.

  20. Cerebral vascular control and metabolism in heat stress

    Bain, Anthony R; Nybo, Lars; Ainslie, Philip N

    2015-01-01

    implications and pathologies known to confound cerebral functioning during hyperthermia. A reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), derived primarily from a respiratory-induced alkalosis, underscores the cerebrovascular changes to hyperthermia. Arterial pressures may also become compromised because of reduced...

  1. Drug Metabolism

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  2. Drug Metabolism

    IAS Admin

    behind metabolic reactions, importance, and consequences with several ... required for drug action. ... lism, which is catalyzed by enzymes present in the above-men- ... catalyze the transfer of one atom of oxygen to a substrate produc-.

  3. Metabolic Myopathies.

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A

    2016-12-01

    Metabolic myopathies are genetic disorders that impair intermediary metabolism in skeletal muscle. Impairments in glycolysis/glycogenolysis (glycogen-storage disease), fatty acid transport and oxidation (fatty acid oxidation defects), and the mitochondrial respiratory chain (mitochondrial myopathies) represent the majority of known defects. The purpose of this review is to develop a diagnostic and treatment algorithm for the metabolic myopathies. The metabolic myopathies can present in the neonatal and infant period as part of more systemic involvement with hypotonia, hypoglycemia, and encephalopathy; however, most cases present in childhood or in adulthood with exercise intolerance (often with rhabdomyolysis) and weakness. The glycogen-storage diseases present during brief bouts of high-intensity exercise, whereas fatty acid oxidation defects and mitochondrial myopathies present during a long-duration/low-intensity endurance-type activity or during fasting or another metabolically stressful event (eg, surgery, fever). The clinical examination is often normal between acute events, and evaluation involves exercise testing, blood testing (creatine kinase, acylcarnitine profile, lactate, amino acids), urine organic acids (ketones, dicarboxylic acids, 3-methylglutaconic acid), muscle biopsy (histology, ultrastructure, enzyme testing), MRI/spectroscopy, and targeted or untargeted genetic testing. Accurate and early identification of metabolic myopathies can lead to therapeutic interventions with lifestyle and nutritional modification, cofactor treatment, and rapid treatment of rhabdomyolysis.

  4. Animal metabolism

    Walburg, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    Studies on placental transport included the following: clearance of tritiated water as a baseline measurement for transport of materials across perfused placentas; transport of organic and inorganic mercury across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation; and transport of cadmium across the perfused placenta of the guinea pig in late gestation. Studies on cadmium absorption and metabolism included the following: intestinal absorption and retention of cadmium in neonatal rats; uptake and distribution of an oral dose of cadmium in postweanling male and female, iron-deficient and normal rats; postnatal viability and growth in rat pups after oral cadmium administration during gestation; and the effect of calcium and phosphorus on the absorption and toxicity of cadmium. Studies on gastrointestinal absorption and mineral metabolism included: uptake and distribution of orally administered plutonium complex compounds in male mice; gastrointestinal absorption of 144 Ce in the newborn mouse, rat, and pig; and gastrointestinal absorption of 95 Nb by rats of different ages. Studies on iodine metabolism included the following: influence of thyroid status and thiocyanate on iodine metabolism in the bovine; effects of simulated fallout radiation on iodine metabolism in dairy cattle; and effects of feeding iodine binding agents on iodine metabolism in the calf

  5. Nutrigenetics of the lipoprotein metabolism.

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that lipid metabolism is a cornerstone in the development of the commonest important chronic diseases worldwide, such as obesity, cardiovascular disease, or metabolic syndrome. In this regard, the area of lipid and lipoprotein metabolism is one of the areas in which the understanding of the development and progression of those metabolic disorders has been studied in greater depth. Thus, growing evidence has demonstrated that while universal recommendations might be appropriate for the general population, in this area there is great variability among individuals, related to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Moreover, the interaction between genetic and dietary components has helped in understanding this variability. Therefore, with further study into the interaction between the most important genetic markers or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and diet, it may be possible to understand the variability in lipid metabolism, which could lead to an increase in the use of personalized nutrition as the best support to combat metabolic disorders. This review discusses some of the evidence in which candidate SNPs can affect the key players of lipid metabolism and how their phenotypic manifestations can be modified by dietary intake. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Chronic toxicology of cannabis.

    Reece, Albert Stuart

    2009-07-01

    Cannabis is the most widely used illicit drug worldwide. As societies reconsider the legal status of cannabis, policy makers and clinicians require sound knowledge of the acute and chronic effects of cannabis. This review focuses on the latter. A systematic review of Medline, PubMed, PsychInfo, and Google Scholar using the search terms "cannabis," "marijuana," "marihuana," "toxicity," "complications," and "mechanisms" identified 5,198 papers. This list was screened by hand, and papers describing mechanisms and those published in more recent years were chosen preferentially for inclusion in this review. There is evidence of psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, and bone toxicity associated with chronic cannabis use. Cannabis has now been implicated in the etiology of many major long-term psychiatric conditions including depression, anxiety, psychosis, bipolar disorder, and an amotivational state. Respiratory conditions linked with cannabis include reduced lung density, lung cysts, and chronic bronchitis. Cannabis has been linked in a dose-dependent manner with elevated rates of myocardial infarction and cardiac arrythmias. It is known to affect bone metabolism and also has teratogenic effects on the developing brain following perinatal exposure. Cannabis has been linked to cancers at eight sites, including children after in utero maternal exposure, and multiple molecular pathways to oncogenesis exist. Chronic cannabis use is associated with psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, and bone effects. It also has oncogenic, teratogenic, and mutagenic effects all of which depend upon dose and duration of use.

  7. [Metabolic myopathies].

    Papazian, Óscar; Rivas-Chacón, Rafael

    2013-09-06

    To review the metabolic myopathies manifested only by crisis of myalgias, cramps and rigidity of the muscles with decreased voluntary contractions and normal inter crisis neurologic examination in children and adolescents. These metabolic myopathies are autosomic recessive inherited enzymatic deficiencies of the carbohydrates and lipids metabolisms. The end result is a reduction of intra muscle adenosine triphosphate, mainly through mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, with decrease of available energy for muscle contraction. The one secondary to carbohydrates intra muscle metabolism disorders are triggered by high intensity brief (fatty acids metabolism disorders are triggered by low intensity prolonged (> 10 min) exercises. The conditions in the first group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of myophosforilase (GSD V), muscle phosphofructokinase (GSD VII), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (GSD X) and beta enolase (GSD XIII). The conditions in the second group in order of decreasing frequency are the deficiencies of carnitine palmitoyl transferase II and very long chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase. The differential characteristics of patients in each group and within each group will allow to make the initial presumptive clinical diagnosis in the majority and then to order only the necessary tests to achieve the final diagnosis. Treatment during the crisis includes hydration, glucose and alkalinization of urine if myoglobin in blood and urine are elevated. Prevention includes avoiding exercise which may induce the crisis and fasting. The prognosis is good with the exception of rare cases of acute renal failure due to hipermyoglobinemia because of severe rabdomyolisis.

  8. Metabolismo e distribuição do flúor em ovinos jovens tratados cronicamente com fluoreto de sódio Metabolism and distribution of fluor in lambs chronically treated with sodium fluoride

    Andreane R. Filappi

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar o metabolismo do flúor (F em ovinos. Para tanto, utilizaram-se 12 animais, com cinco meses de idade, os quais receberam como dieta base 3% do peso vivo de feno de alfafa e água ad libitum. Os animais foram divididos e constituíram um grupo Controle, que recebeu apenas sal iodado (5g de NaCl/animal + 0,2mg I/kg matéria seca e, um grupo Tratado, que recebeu sal iodado adicionado de fluoreto de sódio (4,7mg F/kg de peso corporal. Esses sais foram administrados via sonda oro-esofágica, diariamente por um período de 150 dias. Para análise de F, coletaram-se amostras de sangue, urina e fezes e, ao fim do período experimental, após a eutanásia dos animais, coletou-se a glândula pineal e amostras de osso. Também nesta ocasião, coletou-se uma amostra de rim para exame histopatológico. Analisando-se os teores séricos, urinários e ósseos de F, verificou-se que foram significativamente superiores nos animais Tratados em relação aos Controles. Quanto ao F contido na glândula pineal, não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos. Na análise histológica do rim, não foram observadas alterações. Conclui-se que a administração crônica de flúor induz ao acúmulo desse elemento nos ossos, mesmo havendo um alto teor de cálcio na alimentação e esse acúmulo parece não ser nocivo aos animais. Em ovinos, a capacidade orgânica de acúmulo ósseo e excreção urinária do flúor é diferente de outras espécies animais.The objective of the present study was to evaluate fluorine metabolism in growing lambs. Twelve 5-month-old male lambs maintained on alfalfa hay (3% BW and non-fluorinated water ad libitum were used. Animals were allocated into Control, receiving 5g NaCl/animal/day + 0.2mg I/kg dry matter and Treated group, receiving the same treatment plus sodium fluoride (4.7mg F/kg body weight. Mineral treatment was given by gavage, daily for 150 days. Blood, urine and fecal samples were

  9. Furosemide Induced Electrolyte Imbalance: A Real Danger of Overdiuresis in Patients with Heart Failure

    Yaseen Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic heart failure is one of the most common reasons for hospital admissions in the United States. There have been several approaches for treating heart failure but loop diuretics has been at the forefront to alleviate the symptoms. Loop diuretics have their own side effects as with any medication use, and a lesser known and monitored one is metabolic alkalosis. Case report: The patient was a 76 years old female with past medical history of diabetes, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, dyslipidemia and chronic heart failure who came to the hospital with progressive shortness of breath for the past few days and was started on aggressive diuresis with intravenous loop diuretics and well responded. On the morning of d 6 of her admission, she was kept on the floor and started on BIPAP to correct hypercarbia and respiratory acidosis due to metabolic alkalosis and back to baseline with normal mentation by the middle of the day. Conclusion: Hypokalemia due to the diuretic effect can cause alkalosis by resulting in the shift of hydrogen ions intracellularly, stimulating the apical H+/K+ ATPase in the collecting duct, stimulating renal ammonia genesis, reabsorption, and secretion, leading to impaired chloride ion reabsorption in the distal nephron and reducing the glomerular filtration rate (GFR. The patient improved after being started on oxygen therapy and switched to acetazolamide as an alternative diuretic, indicating that acetazolamide corrected the effect of metabolic alkalosis by causing metabolic acidosis due to decrease reclamation of bicarbonate at the level of proximal convoluted tubule.

  10. Efeitos da correção da acidose metabólica com bicarbonato de sódio sobre o catabolismo protéico na insuficiência renal crônica The effects of the correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate on protein catabolism in chronic kidney failure

    Denise MAFRA

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A desnutrição protéico-energética constitui problema comum aos pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica, influenciando diretamente na sua morbi-mortalidade. A acidose metabólica tem papel no catabolismo protéico, ativando a via proteolítica proteasoma-ubiquitina, dependente de adenosina trifosfato, e conjuntamente com glicocorticóides induz uma maior atividade na desidrogenase que degrada os aminoácidos de cadeia ramificada. Esta revisão teve como objetivo descrever o mecanismo pelo qual a acidose metabólica nos pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica promove o catabolismo protéico, favorecendo assim a desnutrição, bem como avaliar os efeitos do uso de bicarbonato de sódio na correção da acidose e conseqüentemente redução do catabolismo protéico. Pesquisas mostram melhora da acidose pelo uso de bicarbonato de sódio e conseqüente redução do catabolismo protéico na insuficiência renal crônica, podendo ser esta uma conduta promissora na atenuação da desnutrição nestes pacientes.Protein-Energy Malnutrition is common among patients with chronic kidney failure, thus increasing morbidity and mortality. Several studies have shown that metabolic acidosis is a major cause of muscle protein breakdown, and recently it was attributed to ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Acidosis, plus glucocorticoids, also respond to increasing branched-chain amino acids oxidation. In this review, the impact of metabolic acidosis on protein and amino acid metabolism is examined in order to understand its effect on lean body mass and the nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney failure. The study also observes whether or not sodium bicarbonate supplementation is beneficial to chronic kidney failure patients. In summary, there is a preliminary evidence suggesting that the correction of acidosis using sodium bicarbonate reduces protein degradation in chronic kidney failure patients, thus emerging as a

  11. ER Stress and Lipid Metabolism in Adipocytes

    Beth S. Zha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a rapidly emerging field of interest in the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. Recent studies have shown that chronic activation of ER stress is closely linked to dysregulation of lipid metabolism in several metabolically important cells including hepatocytes, macrophages, β-cells, and adipocytes. Adipocytes are one of the major cell types involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome. Recent advances in dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of adipogenesis and lipid metabolism indicate that activation of ER stress plays a central role in regulating adipocyte function. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of the potential role of ER stress in lipid metabolism in adipocytes. In addition, we touch upon the interaction of ER stress and autophagy as well as inflammation. Inhibition of ER stress has the potential of decreasing the pathology in adipose tissue that is seen with energy overbalance.

  12. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis.

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-04-07

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, but whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help in balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipid levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but also the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting that the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis.

  13. Metabolic learning and memory formation by the brain influence systemic metabolic homeostasis

    Zhang, Yumin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Jingqi; Zhang, Yalin; Li, Bo; Cai, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is regulated by the brain, whether this regulation involves learning and memory of metabolic information remains unexplored. Here we use a calorie-based, taste-independent learning/memory paradigm to show that Drosophila form metabolic memories that help balancing food choice with caloric intake; however, this metabolic learning or memory is lost under chronic high-calorie feeding. We show that loss of individual learning/memory-regulating genes causes a metabolic learning defect, leading to elevated trehalose and lipids levels. Importantly, this function of metabolic learning requires not only the mushroom body but the hypothalamus-like pars intercerebralis, while NF-κB activation in the pars intercerebralis mimics chronic overnutrition in that it causes metabolic learning impairment and disorders. Finally, we evaluate this concept of metabolic learning/memory in mice, suggesting the hypothalamus is involved in a form of nutritional learning and memory, which is critical for determining resistance or susceptibility to obesity. In conclusion, our data indicate the brain, and potentially the hypothalamus, direct metabolic learning and the formation of memories, which contribute to the control of systemic metabolic homeostasis. PMID:25848677

  14. Nucleotide Metabolism

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolis...

  15. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis.

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-11-14

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Alimentary, metabolic and toxic osteopathies in adults

    Ellegast, H.H.

    1986-12-01

    Skeletal changes in deficient or badly balanced nutrition (alimentary osteopathies) and osseous changes accompanying chronic desease of internal organs and metabolic disorders (metabolic osteopathies) are discussed. Basically, the classical generalised skeletal changes such as osteoporosis, osteomalacia, fibroosteoclacia and sklerosis of the bone can occur in their pure form or as a combination of two or more of these disorders. Finally the exogenic toxic osteopathies are discussed, nowadays fluorosis being the most important. Other external factors may be drugs like methotrexate and antiepileptic medications.

  17. [Comparative studies on toxicity of various dielectrics, petroleum derivatives, used in electroerosion technology. IV. Morphological and cytoenzymatic changes in the lungs and acid-base imbalance in rats chronically exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons].

    Starek, A; Kamiński, M

    1981-01-01

    In rats exposed to odourless kerosene of 75 and 300 mg/m3 concentration, for 14 weeks, morphologic and cytoenzymatic examinations of lungs have been carried out and acid-base equilibrium indices in blood have been determined. Passive congestion of lung parenchyma, subpleural blood extravasation, atelectasis foci, thickened interalveolar septa with infiltrates from neutrophils, lymphocytes, eosinophils and macrophages have been found. In addition a decrease in succinic dehydrogenase activity, NADPH -- tetrazolium reductase, and Mg++-ATP-ase and increase in acid phosphatase activity have been revealed. Those have been focal changes, involving, apart from bronchial tree (low exposure -- 75 mg/m3), the remaining lung parenchyma segments (high exposure -- 300 mg/m3). In addition, disturbances in acid-base equilibrium in form of compensated metabolic alkalosis (75 mg/m3) and compensated metabolic acidosis (300 mg/m3) have occurred. The obtained results demonstrate toxic effects of kerosene hydrocarbons on the function and structure of lungs.

  18. Enterovirus related metabolic myopathy: a postviral fatigue syndrome

    Lane, R; Soteriou, B; Zhang, H; Archard, L

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To detect and characterise enterovirus RNA in skeletal muscle from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and to compare efficiency of muscle energy metabolism in enterovirus positive and negative CFS patients.

  19. Metabolic Surgery

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    The alarming rise in the worldwide prevalence of obesity is paralleled by an increasing burden of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metabolic surgery is the most effective means of obtaining substantial and durable weight loss in individuals with obesity. Randomized trials have recently shown...... the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity....... Moreover, observational data suggest that the reduction in cardiovascular risk factors translates to better patient outcomes. This review describes commonly used metabolic surgical procedures and their current indications and summarizes the evidence related to weight loss and glycemic outcomes. It further...

  20. Cellular metabolism

    Hildebrand, C.E.; Walters, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: chromatin structure; the use of circular synthetic polydeoxynucleotides as substrates for the study of DNA repair enzymes; human cellular kinetic response following exposure to DNA-interactive compounds; histone phosphorylation and chromatin structure in cell proliferation; photoaddition products induced in chromatin by uv light; pollutants and genetic information transfer; altered RNA metabolism as a function of cadmium accumulation and intracellular distribution in cultured cells; and thymidylate chromophore destruction by water free radicals

  1. Cholinergic denervation of the hippocampal formation does not produce long-term changes in glucose metabolism

    Harrell, L.E.; Davis, J.N.

    1984-01-01

    Decreased glucose metabolism is found in Alzheimer's disease associated with a loss of cholinergic neurons. The relationship between the chronic cholinergic denervation produced by medial septal lesions and glucose metabolism was studied using 2-deoxy-D-[ 3 H]glucose in the rat hippocampal formation. Hippocampal glucose metabolism was increased 1 week after medial septal lesions. Three weeks after lesions, glucose metabolism was profoundly suppressed in all regions. By 3 months, intraregional hippocampal glucose metabolism had returned to control values. Our results demonstrate that chronic cholinergic denervation of the hippocampal formation does not result in permanent alterations of metabolic activity

  2. Chronic treatment of (R)-α-lipoic acid reduces blood glucose and lipid levels in high-fat diet and low-dose streptozotocin-induced metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Ghelani, Hardik; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Nammi, Srinivas

    2017-06-01

    (R)- α -lipoic acid ( ALA ), an essential cofactor in mitochondrial respiration and a potential antioxidant, possesses a wide array of metabolic benefits including anti-obesity, glucose lowering, insulin-sensitizing, and lipid-lowering effects. In this study, the curative effects of ALA (100 mg/kg) on a spectrum of conditions related to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes ( T2D ) were investigated in a high-fat diet (HFD)-fed and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ)-induced rat model of metabolic syndrome and T2D . The marked rise in the levels of glucose, triglycerides, total-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and VLDL-cholesterol in the blood of HFD-fed and low-dose STZ-injected rats were significantly reduced by ALA treatment. Furthermore, ALA treatment significantly increased the serum HDL-cholesterol levels and tended to inhibit diabetes-induced weight reduction. Mathematical computational analysis revealed that ALA also significantly improved insulin sensitivity and reduced the risk of atherosclerotic lesions and coronary atherogenesis. This study provides scientific evidence to substantiate the use of ALA to mitigate the glucose and lipid abnormality in metabolic syndrome and T2D .

  3. Metabolism during hypodynamia

    Federov, I. V.

    1980-01-01

    Physical immobilization, inaction due to space travel, a sedentary occupation, or bed confinement due to a chronic illness elicit similar alternations in the metabolism of man and animals (rat, rabbit, dog, mouse). After a preliminary period of weight loss, there is eventually weight gain due to increased lipid storage. Protein catabolism is enhanced and anabolism depressed, with elevated urinary excretion of amino acids, creatine, and ammonia. Glycogen stores are depleted and glyconeogenesis is accelerated. Polyuria develops with subsequent redistribution of body fluids in which the blood volume of the systemic circulation is decreased and that of pulmonary circulation increased. This results in depressed production of vasopressin by the posterior pituitary which further enhances urinary water and salt loss.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and asthma.

    Garmendia, Jenny V; Moreno, Dolores; Garcia, Alexis H; De Sanctis, Juan B

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a syndrome that involves at least three disorders dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, obesity and/or hypertension. MetS has been associated with several chronic diseases in the adulthood; however, in the recent years, the syndrome was redefined in children. Girls with early menarche and asthma, and children with MetS and asthma that reach adulthood appear to have higher risk to develop severe or difficult to control asthma and a higher probability to suffer cardiovascular diseases. It has been proposed that patients with MetS and endocrinological disorders should be considered a different entity in which pharmacologic treatment should be adjusted according to the individual. Recent patents on the field have addressed new issues on how endocrine control should be managed along with asthma therapeutics. In the near future, new approaches should decrease the high morbidity and mortality associated to these types of patients.

  5. [Pseudo-Bartter syndrome as manifestation of cystic fibrosis with DF508 mutation].

    Galaviz-Ballesteros, María de Jesús; Acosta-Rodríguez-Bueno, Carlos Patricio; Consuelo-Sánchez, Alejandra; Franco-Álvarez, Isidro; Olalla-Mora, Odilo Iván; Vázquez-Frias, Rodrigo

    Pseudo Bartter syndrome (PBS) is defined as hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis in the absence of renal tubular pathology. Children with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at risk of developing electrolyte abnormalities and even PBS may occur. 5 months old female infant with a history of two events of dehydration with vomit, refusal to eat, chronic cough, polyuria, malnutrition, metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypochloremia and acute renal failure. Chronic cough study was performed, discarding pulmonary tuberculosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and impaired swallowing. PBS was diagnosed due to hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis in the absence of renal tubular pathology. CF was corroborated by electrolytes in sweat and through molecular analysis of the delta F508 mutation. This is one of the few reported cases linking PBS and this mutation. In patients with hyponatremic dehydration episodes with hypokalaemic hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis, PBS should be considered as differential diagnosis. CF could be presented as PBS, mainly in patients younger than 2 years. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. [Chronic diarrhea].

    Stelzer, Teresa; Heuss, Ludwig Theodor

    2014-09-01

    Defined by lasting more than four weeks - is a common but often challenging clinical scenario. It is important to be aware that diarrhoea means different things to different patients. The evaluation of chronic diarrhoea depends on taking an excellent history and careful physical examination as well as planning investigations thoughtfully. Functional diarrhea ist the most common cause of chronic diarrhea in the developed countries and motility disorders are more common than inflammatory, osmotic or secretory causes. In some cases categorizing patients by their stool characteristics can be helpful in directing further evaluation.

  7. Autophagic pathways and metabolic stress.

    Kaushik, S; Singh, R; Cuervo, A M

    2010-10-01

    Autophagy is an essential intracellular process that mediates degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles in lysosomes. Autophagy was initially identified for its role as alternative source of energy when nutrients are scarce but, in recent years, a previously unknown role for this degradative pathway in the cellular response to stress has gained considerable attention. In this review, we focus on the novel findings linking autophagic function with metabolic stress resulting either from proteins or lipids. Proper autophagic activity is required in the cellular defense against proteotoxicity arising in the cytosol and also in the endoplasmic reticulum, where a vast amount of proteins are synthesized and folded. In addition, autophagy contributes to mobilization of intracellular lipid stores and may be central to lipid metabolism in certain cellular conditions. In this review, we focus on the interrelation between autophagy and different types of metabolic stress, specifically the stress resulting from the presence of misbehaving proteins within the cytosol or in the endoplasmic reticulum and the stress following a lipogenic challenge. We also comment on the consequences that chronic exposure to these metabolic stressors could have on autophagic function and on how this effect may underlie the basis of some common metabolic disorders. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Drug metabolism and ageing.

    Wynne, Hilary

    2005-06-01

    Older people are major consumers of drugs and because of this, as well as co-morbidity and age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, are at risk of associated adverse drug reactions. While age does not alter drug absorption in a clinically significant way, and age-related changes in volume of drug distribution and protein binding are not of concern in chronic therapy, reduction in hepatic drug clearance is clinically important. Liver blood flow falls by about 35% between young adulthood and old age, and liver size by about 24-35% over the same period. First-pass metabolism of oral drugs avidly cleared by the liver and clearance of capacity-limited hepatically metabolized drugs fall in parallel with the fall in liver size, and clearance of drugs with a high hepatic extraction ratio falls in parallel with the fall in hepatic blood flow. In normal ageing, in general, activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes is preserved, although a decline in frail older people has been noted, as well as in association with liver disease, cancer, trauma, sepsis, critical illness and renal failure. As the contribution of age, co-morbidity and concurrent drug therapy to altered drug clearance is impossible to predict in an individual older patient, it is wise to start any drug at a low dose and increase this slowly, monitoring carefully for beneficial and adverse effects.

  9. [Phosphate binders in chronic kidney disease: the positions of sevelamer].

    Fomin, V V; Shilov, E M; Svistunov, A A; Milovanov, Iu S

    2013-01-01

    The paper shows the role of phosphate binders in the correction of phosphorus and calcium metabolic disturbances in chronic kidney disease. The results of clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy and safety of sevelamer are discussed.

  10. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...

  11. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion...

  12. Adherence to two methods of education and metabolic control in ...

    BACKGROUND: Education in diabetes optimizes metabolic control, prevents acute and chronic complications, and improves quality of life. Our main objective was to evaluate if a better metabolic control is achieved in diabetic patients undergoing a program of intensive interactive care than in those with traditional care and ...

  13. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)

    CML; Chronic myeloid leukemia; Chronic granulocytic leukemia; Leukemia - chronic granulocytic ... nuclear disaster. It takes many years to develop leukemia from radiation exposure. Most people treated for cancer ...

  14. Chronic Meningococcaemia

    clinical features, complications, laboratory findings and treatment of this condition are discussed. The resemblance, both clinically and histologically, to allergic vasculitis is stressed. S. Air. Med. J., 48, 2154 (1974). Chronic meningococcaemia is an uncommon condition today, but was well recognised in the early decades of.

  15. Chronic gastritis.

    Sipponen, Pentti; Maaroos, Heidi-Ingrid

    2015-06-01

    Prevalence of chronic gastritis has markedly declined in developed populations during the past decades. However, chronic gastritis is still one of the most common serious pandemic infections with such severe killing sequelae as peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Globally, on average, even more than half of people may have a chronic gastritis at present. Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood is the main cause of chronic gastritis, which microbial origin is the key for the understanding of the bizarre epidemiology and course of the disease. A life-long and aggressive inflammation in gastritis results in destruction (atrophic gastritis) of stomach mucosa with time (years and decades). The progressive worsening of atrophic gastritis results subsequently in dysfunctions of stomach mucosa. Atrophic gastritis will finally end up in a permanently acid-free stomach in the most extreme cases. Severe atrophic gastritis and acid-free stomach are the highest independent risk conditions for gastric cancer known so far. In addition to the risks of malignancy and peptic ulcer, acid-free stomach and severe forms of atrophic gastritis may associate with failures in absorption of essential vitamins, like vitamin B12, micronutrients (like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc), diet and medicines.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis

    Betancur, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    It is presented a case of a man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, whose marked dilatation of the ducts reasoned the issue. The severe untreatable pain was the surgery indication, which was practiced without complications either during or after the surgery. By the way, a shallow revision of the literature is made, by mentioning classification, physiopatholoy, clinical square, medical, surgical and endoscopic treatment

  17. Impact of Hypoglycemia on Brain Metabolism During Diabetes.

    Rehni, Ashish K; Dave, Kunjan R

    2018-04-10

    Diabetes is a metabolic disease afflicting millions of people worldwide. A substantial fraction of world's total healthcare expenditure is spent on treating diabetes. Hypoglycemia is a serious consequence of anti-diabetic drug therapy, because it induces metabolic alterations in the brain. Metabolic alterations are one of the central mechanisms mediating hypoglycemia-related functional changes in the brain. Acute, chronic, and/or recurrent hypoglycemia modulate multiple metabolic pathways, and exposure to hypoglycemia increases consumption of alternate respiratory substrates such as ketone bodies, glycogen, and monocarboxylates in the brain. The aim of this review is to discuss hypoglycemia-induced metabolic alterations in the brain in glucose counterregulation, uptake, utilization and metabolism, cellular respiration, amino acid and lipid metabolism, and the significance of other sources of energy. The present review summarizes information on hypoglycemia-induced metabolic changes in the brain of diabetic and non-diabetic subjects and the manner in which they may affect brain function.

  18. translin is required for metabolic regulation of sleep

    Murakami, Kazuma; Yurgel, Maria E.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Masek, Pavel; Mehta, Aradhana; Heidker, Rebecca; Bollinger, Wesley; Gingras, Robert M.; Kim, Young-Joon; Ja, William W.; Suter, Beat; DiAngelo, Justin R.; Keene, Alex C.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of sleep or feeding has enormous health consequences. In humans, acute sleep loss is associated with increased appetite and insulin insensitivity, while chronically sleep-deprived individuals are more likely to develop obesity, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Conversely, metabolic state potently modulates sleep and circadian behavior; yet, the molecular basis for sleep-metabolism interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the iden...

  19. [The participation of ethanol in induction of carbohydrates metabolism disturbances].

    Orywal, Karolina; Jelski, Wojciech; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2009-07-01

    Alcohol and products of its metabolism lead to impairment of many organs functions, what cause systemic and local carbohydrates metabolism disturbances. Abusing of alcohol induces changes in pancreatic digestive enzymes secretion, what contributes to development of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Alcohol can cause secondary diabetes, what is result of pancreatic beta-cells damage and is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Alcohol cause liver cells degeneration and induction of many metabolic disturbances especially carbohydrates.

  20. Hypokalemic salt-losing tubulopathy with chronic renal failure and sensorineural deafness.

    Jeck, N; Reinalter, S C; Henne, T; Marg, W; Mallmann, R; Pasel, K; Vollmer, M; Klaus, G; Leonhardt, A; Seyberth, H W; Konrad, M

    2001-07-01

    To characterize a rare inherited hypokalemic salt-losing tubulopathy with linkage to chromosome 1p31. We conducted a retrospective analysis of the clinical data for 7 patients in whom cosegregation of the disease with chromosome 1p31 had been demonstrated. In addition, in 1 kindred, prenatal diagnosis in the second child was established, allowing a prospective clinical evaluation. Clinical presentation of the patients was homogeneous and included premature birth attributable to polyhydramnios, severe renal salt loss, normotensive hyperreninemia, hypokalemic alkalosis, and excessive hyperprostaglandin E-uria, which suggested the diagnosis of hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome. However, the response to indomethacin was only poor, accounting for a more severe variant of the disease. The patients invariably developed chronic renal failure. The majority had extreme growth retardation, and motor development was markedly delayed. In addition, all patients turned out to be deaf. The hypokalemic salt-losing tubulopathy with chronic renal failure and sensorineural deafness represents not only genetically but also clinically a disease entity distinct from hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome. A pleiotropic effect of a single gene defect is most likely causative for syndromic hearing loss.

  1. The Role of Androgen Excess in Metabolic Dysfunction in Women : Androgen Excess and Female Metabolic Dysfunction.

    Escobar-Morreale, Héctor F

    2017-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by the association of androgen excess with chronic oligoovulation and/or polycystic ovarian morphology, yet metabolic disorders and classic and nonclassic cardiovascular risk factors cluster in these women from very early in life. This chapter focuses on the mechanisms underlying the association of PCOS with metabolic dysfunction, focusing on the role of androgen excess on the development of visceral adiposity and adipose tissue dysfunction.

  2. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Chronic myelogenous leukemia Overview Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) is an uncommon type of cancer of the blood cells. The term "chronic" in chronic myelogenous leukemia indicates that this cancer ...

  3. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  4. [Review: plant polyphenols modulate lipid metabolism and related molecular mechanism].

    Dai, Yan-li; Zou, Yu-xiao; Liu, Fan; Li, Hong-zhi

    2015-11-01

    Lipid metabolism disorder is an important risk factor to obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes as well as other chronic metabolic disease. It is also a key target in preventing metabolic syndrome, chronic disease prevention. Plant polyphenol plays an important role in maintaining or improving lipid profile in a variety of ways. including regulating cholesterol absorption, inhibiting synthesis and secretion of triglyceride, and lowering plasma low density lipoprotein oxidation, etc. The purpose of this article is to review the lipid regulation effects of plant polyphenols and its related mechanisms.

  5. Influence balneotherapy on spa Truskavets’ with taking Canephron® N on urina lithogenicity and its metabolic and neuroendocrine-immune accompaniments in patients with chronic pyelonephrite and cholecystite

    Oleksandr V. Shulyak

    2015-11-01

    i.popovych@biph.kiev.ua   SUMMARY Objective. We know that balneotherapy on spa Truskavets' did not significantly affect the parameters of urina Lithogenicity, including Ca/Mg ratio, so search for means of reducing urina Lithogenicity remains relevant. We also know that Phytopreparation Canephron® N recommended for inclusion in complex therapy of chronic pyelonephrite as effective elimination of infectious kidney inflammation, prevention of recurrence of inflammation and lithogenese. Aim: to find out the possibility of reducing urina Lithogenicity influenced balneotherapy on spa Truskavets' by additional taking Canephron® N. Results. Standardized balneotherapy not significantly affect urina Lithogenicity in patients with chronic pyelonephrite and cholecystite, even showed a trend to increase, while additional use Canephron® N significantly reduces urina Lithogenicity by reducing the concentration of Uric acid and downward trend Calcium. Reducing urina Lithogenicity accompanied by a decrease urina concentration Chloride and Potassium, and Baevskiy’s Activity Regulatory Systems Index, Asymmetry δ-, θ- and α-rhythms of background EEG and α-rhythm normalized Power Spectrum Density (PSD in right loci Fp2, F8, T6 and O2, while HRV markers of vagal tone (RMSSD, pNN50, TI also Frequency Deviation θ- and β-rhythms, Amplitude β- and δ-rhythms, δ-rhythm PSD in loci Fp2, F8, T3, T5, O1, O2, β-rhythm PSD in loci Fp1, F4 and θ-rhythm PSD in loci T3 and F7 rising. However, Canephron® N prevent