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Sample records for chronic kidney failure

  1. Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure Small Text Medium Text Large Text Chronic Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure YESTERDAY One third of diabetic ...

  2. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

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    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  3. [Secondary cystic changes in the kidneys in chronic kidney failure].

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    Todorov, V; Lalev, I; Monov, A; Penkova, S

    1989-01-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure the presence and frequency of acquired cystic changes in the kidneys (acquired cystic renal disease) were studied. 46 patients, 21 to 62 years of age and duration of hemodialysis treatment from 2 up to 126 months, were examined. The patients with polycystic kidneys were excluded. Cysts were found in 67.4% of the patients. They were classified into five groups. Between the duration of the hemodialysis treatment (the chronic renal failure respectively) and the development of the cystic renal disease correlation was found. The correlation between the length of the kidneys and the cystic changes is statistically significant. There is no correlation with the sex, age, basic disease, hematologic indices, diuresis and arterial pressure of the patients. In 50% of the patients examined splenomegaly was found the cause of which is not known.

  4. Acute kidney injury in acute on chronic liver failure.

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    Maiwall, Rakhi; Sarin, S K; Moreau, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct clinical entity; however, there is still debate in the way it is defined in the East as compared to the West, especially with respect to incorporation of kidney dysfunction or failure in the definition of ACLF. Kidney dysfunction is defined as serum creatinine between 1.5 and 1.9 mg/dl and kidney failure as serum creatinine of more than 2 mg/dl or requirement of renal replacement therapy according to the EASL-CLIF Consortium. Kidney dysfunction or failure is universally present in patients with ACLF according to the definition by the EASL-CLIF Consortium while on the contrary the APASL definition of ACLF does not incorporate kidney dysfunction or failure in its definition. Recently, both the diagnosis and management of renal failure in patients with cirrhosis has changed with the advent of the acute kidney injury (AKI) criteria defined as an abrupt decline in renal functions, characterized by an absolute increase in serum creatinine of 0.3 mg/dl within 48 h or an increase of more than 50 % from baseline, which is known or presumed to have occurred in the previous 7 days. Further, recent studies in patients with cirrhosis have shown the utility of biomarkers for the diagnosis of AKI. The present review covers the pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnosis, prognosis as well as management of AKI in patients with ACLF from both a Western as well as an Eastern perspective. The review identifies an unmet need to diagnose AKI and prevent this ominous complication in patients with ACLF.

  5. Paraoxonase 1 in Chronic Kidney Failure

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    Alejandro Gugliucci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we summarize the findings from the literature and our own laboratory on the decreased PON1 activity in renal failure, the mechanisms proposed and the effect of interventions. In addition to profound alterations in lipoproteins, reduced serum PON1 activity has been clearly established in the past decade and could contribute to accelerated development of atherosclerosis in ESRD and in HD. PON1 lactonase activity is lower in ESRD patients. Hemodialysis partially restores PON1 lactonase and the other activities. PON1 activity recovery after dialysis suggests that uremic toxins may play a mechanistic role in PON1 inactivation. Lower PON1 activity in CRF patients is associated with low thiol concentration, high CRP, and is beneficially enhanced with vitamin C and flavonoids. Changes in HDL subclasses, namely lower HDL3 in these patients may also play a role in PON1 lower activity. Future research should focus on: (1 mechanistic studies on causes for low PON1 activity and mass; (2 prospective studies focusing on whether there is an added predictive value in measuring PON1 activity (and PON1 activity in HDL3 in this patient population; (3 intervention studies attempting to increase PON1 activity.

  6. Urinary sodium excretion and kidney failure in nondiabetic chronic kidney disease.

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    Fan, Li; Tighiouart, Hocine; Levey, Andrew S; Beck, Gerald J; Sarnak, Mark J

    2014-09-01

    Current guidelines recommend under 2 g/day sodium intake in chronic kidney disease, but there are a few studies relating sodium intake to long-term outcomes. Here we evaluated the association of mean baseline 24-h urinary sodium excretion with kidney failure and a composite outcome of kidney failure or all-cause mortality using Cox regression in 840 participants enrolled in the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study. Mean 24-h urinary sodium excretion was 3.46 g/day. Kidney failure developed in 617 participants, and the composite outcome was reached in 723. In the primary analyses, there was no association between 24-h urine sodium and kidney failure (HR 0.99 (95% CI 0.91-1.08)) nor on the composite outcome (HR 1.01 (95% CI 0.93-1.09)), each per 1 g/day higher urine sodium. In exploratory analyses, there was a significant interaction of baseline proteinuria and sodium excretion with kidney failure. Using a two-slope model, when urine sodium was under 3 g/day, higher urine sodium was associated with increased risk of kidney failure in those with baseline proteinuria under 1 g/day and with lower risk of kidney failure in those with baseline proteinuria of ⩾ 1 g/day. There was no association between urine sodium and kidney failure when urine sodium was ⩾ 3 g/day. Results were consistent using first baseline and time-dependent urinary sodium excretion. Thus, we noted no association of urine sodium with kidney failure. Results of the exploratory analyses need to be verified in additional studies and the mechanism explored.

  7. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  8. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  9. Clinical utility of biomarkers in chronic kidney disease and chronic heart failure.

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    Zachariah, Donah; Olechowski, Bartosz; Kalra, Paul R

    2013-09-01

    Biomarkers have an increasingly important clinical role in managing patients with heart failure as well as those with kidney disease, both common conditions with generally poor prognostic outcomes and huge impacts on healthcare economics. For patients with chronic heart failure, biomarkers have become centre place in streamlining diagnostic pathways as well as identifying those with worse prognosis. There is much interest in the role for biomarkers in identifying patients at risk of acute kidney injury, although a number of these currently remain as research tools or are in the early stages of evaluation in clinical practice. Patients with cardiorenal syndrome represent a particular challenge to the clinician, and recent studies have suggested a valuable clinical role for certain biomarkers in this setting, either on their own or in combination. This paper will focus on biomarkers with a current clinical role in patients with cardiorenal disease (natriuretic peptides and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin), although brief reference will be made to other biomarkers with potential future application.

  10. [Parenteral iron therapy in chronic kidney disease or chronic heart failure].

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    Eisenga, Michele F; Diepenbroek, Adry; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bakker, Stephan J L; van der Meer, Peter; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia occur frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or chronic heart failure (CHF) and are associated with lower quality of life and higher mortality. Treating anaemia with erythropoietic growth factors produces no improvement. In recent years, the focus has therefore shifted to correction of iron deficiency. Chronic inflammation in CKD increases the production of hepcidin, which blocks iron absorption from the intestine and leads to less efficient re-use of iron from the macrophages. In absolute iron deficiency the body's iron stores are depleted, whereas in functional iron deficiency the supply of iron is not sufficient to meet demand from the bone marrow. Normal or high ferritin levels do not exclude iron deficiency at tissue level. The iron saturation fraction is a more useful indicator. Parenteral iron therapy ameliorates in CHF the symptoms of iron deficiency, irrespective of the effect on haemoglobin levels. The long-term effects of intravenous iron on mortality and morbidity are still unknown.

  11. Acute Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out of balance. Acute kidney failure — also called acute renal failure or acute kidney injury — develops rapidly over ... 2015. Palevsky PM. Definition of acute kidney injury (acute renal failure). http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed April ...

  12. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  13. Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy kidneys clean your blood by removing excess fluid, minerals, and wastes. They also make hormones that keep your ... strong and your blood healthy. But if the kidneys are damaged, they don't work properly. Harmful ...

  14. Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure by Supplementing the Kidney and Invigorating Blood Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勉之; 张大宁; 张文柱; 刘树松; 张敏英

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment of chronic renal failure by supplementing the kidney and invigorating blood flow. Method: The eligible patients were assigned to a treatment group (N =120)treated with the above principle and a control group (N = 128) treated with western drugs, and the effectiveness was evaluated when the study was completed in one year. Results: The total effective rate of 92.5% was achieved in the treatment group, better than that in the control group (49.2%); the difference was significant (P<0.01), especially in patients of stage Ⅰ and Ⅱ. Conclusion: The treatment of chronic renal failure by supplementing the kidney and invigorating blood flow proved to be very effective.

  15. EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS MARKERS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURES OF SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

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    Kemidi Ilaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress defines an imbalance between the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. The existence of oxidative stress and higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in association with uraemia is proven from studies on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD patients. Non traditional risk factors like oxidative stress are being given special emphasis to explain high incidence and identification of new therapeutic interventions. Excess Reactive oxygen Species levels have been implicated to damage DNA, lipids, proteins etc., It may also affect the cells of host, particularly at the inflammation site contributing to proteinuria observed in Chronic Kidney Disease patients. The uremic status, oxidant and antioxidant levels were assessed in the present study. This prospective observational study was conducted for nine months. Patients meeting the study criteria were included. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, Protein thiols, Total proteins, Serum urea, creatinine, albumin and Haemoglobin levels were estimated using suitable methods. Study recruited 108 Chronic Kidney Disease patients, divided into three groups namely, patients without haemodialysis (54, patients with haemodialysis (54 and control population (50. Serum urea, creatinine, MDA and GST levels were found to be significantly increased (P<0.0001, and total proteins, albumin, proteinthiols, and Haemoglobin levels were found to be significantly decreased in Chronic Renal Failure patients compared to normal controls (P<0.0001. Our study confirms the presence of oxidative stress in Chronic Kidney Disease patient population. Our study also emphasises the need for anti-oxidant therapy in CKD patients.

  16. Acute Kidney Injury: Tubular Markers and Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease and End-Stage Kidney Failure.

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    Tan, Hon Liang; Yap, John Q; Qian, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common clinical syndrome directly related to patient short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. Over the last decade, the occurrence rate of AKI has been increasing, and there has also been a growing epidemic of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) and end-stage kidney disease (ESRD) linked to severe and repeated episodes of AKIs. The detection and management of AKI are currently far from satisfactory. A large proportion of AKI patients, especially those with preexisting CKD, are at an increased risk of non-resolving AKI and progressing to CKD and ESRD. Proposed pathological processes that contribute to the transition of AKI to CKD and ESRD include severity and frequency of kidney injury, alterations of tubular cell phenotype with cells predominantly in the G2/M phase, interstitial fibrosis and microvascular rarification related to loss of endothelial-pericyte interactions and pericyte dedifferentiation. Innate immune responses, especially dendritic cell responses related to inadequate adenosine receptor (2a)-mediated signals, autophagic insufficiency and renin-angiotensin system activation have also been implicated in the progression of AKI and transitions from AKI to CKD and ESRD. Although promising advances have been made in understanding the pathophysiology of AKI and AKI consequences, much more work needs to be done in developing biomarkers for detecting early kidney injury, prognosticating kidney disease progression and developing strategies to effectively treat AKI and to minimize AKI progression to CKD and ESRD.

  17. Effects of sodium citrate on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in chronic renal failure.

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    Kim, Sejoong; Yang, Jin Young; Jung, Eun Sook; Lee, Jeonghwan; Heo, Nam Ju; Lee, Jae Wook; Na, Ki Young; Han, Jin Suk

    2014-12-01

    Metabolic acidosis, which is observed in salt-sensitive hypertension, is also associated with kidney injury. Alkali therapy in chronic renal failure (CRF) may ameliorate the progression of kidney disease; however, few studies have examined the effects of alkali therapy on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in CRF. We randomly administered standard diet (SD), sodium chloride with 20% casein diet (NACL), or sodium citrate with 20% casein diet (NACT) to Sprague-Dawley rats after a CRF or a sham operation. Four weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy, serum bicarbonate levels were higher in the NACT-treated group. On the pressure-natriuresis curve, NACT-treated CRF rats were more salt-resistant than NACL-treated CRF rats. Additionally, the NACT-treated CRF group showed less tubulointerstitial damage than the NACL-treated CRF group. The expression and immunoreactivity of NHE3 in the kidney in the NACT-treated CRF group were lower than those in the NACL-treated CRF group. We observed that dietary NACT as alkali therapy in CRF might improve the altered salt-sensitivity and ameliorate the progression of kidney injury compared to the NACL diet, which may be related to reduced renal NHE3 expression.

  18. Exercise training upregulates nitric oxide synthases in the kidney of rats with chronic heart failure.

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    Ito, Daisuke; Ito, Osamu; Mori, Nobuyoshi; Cao, Pengyu; Suda, Chihiro; Muroya, Yoshikazu; Hao, Kiyotaka; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Kohzuki, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    There is an interaction between heart and kidney diseases, which is a condition termed cardiorenal syndrome. Exercise training has cardioprotective effects, involving upregulation of endothelial (e) nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the cardiovascular system. However, the effects of exercise training on NOS in the kidney with heart disease are unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether exercise training upregulates NOS in the kidney, left ventricle and aorta of rats with chronic heart failure (CHF). Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent left coronary artery ligation (LCAL) to induce CHF and were randomly assigned to sedentary or treadmill exercise groups 4 weeks after LCAL. Three days after exercising for 4 weeks, urine samples were collected for 24 h and blood samples were collected following decapitation. Nitric oxide synthase activity and protein expression were examined. Significant interactions between CHF and exercise training were observed on parameters of cardiac and renal function. Exercise training improved cardiac function, decreased plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels, decreased urinary albumin excretion and increased creatinine clearance in CHF rats. Nitric oxide synthase activity, eNOS expression and neuronal (n) NOS expression were significantly decreased in the left ventricle and kidney of CHF rats. Exercise training significantly increased NOS activity and eNOS and nNOS expression. Upregulation of NOS in the kidney and left ventricle may contribute, in part, to the renal and cardiac protective effects of exercise training in cardiorenal syndrome in CHF rats.

  19. Chronic Kidney Diseases

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    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Chronic Kidney Diseases KidsHealth > For Kids > Chronic Kidney Diseases Print ... re talking about your kidneys. What Are the Kidneys? Your kidneys are tucked under your lower ribs ...

  20. Effect of tolvaptan in patients with chronic kidney disease due to diabetic nephropathy with heart failure.

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    Sato, Eiichi; Nakamura, Tsukasa; Amaha, Mayuko; Nomura, Mayumi; Matsumura, Daisuke; Yamagishi, Hidetsugu; Ono, Yuko; Ueda, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of tolvaptan for treating heart failure has already been shown. Adequate data relating to the effect of tolvaptan on the correlation of water balance in renal disease are not available. A retrospective study was conducted on the efficacy and adverse reactions of tolvaptan for treating nephrotic syndrome.The subjects were 26 patients with chronic kidney failure due to diabetic nephropathy with heart failure who were administered tolvaptan and seen between December 2011 and October 2013. The endpoints were urinary output, physical findings, and blood analyses. The expression of aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct, which is related to the action of tolvaptan, was investigated by immunohistochemistry using the kidney tissue obtained for the diagnosis.Responses were seen in 19 of the patients. In the histopathological investigation there was severe glomerulosclerosis in patients with diabetic nephropathy, but the responders were noticeable in that they only had mild tubulointerstitial damage. Non-responders exhibited profound tubulointerstitial damage. The expression of aquaporin-2 was determined in 8 patients, of which 7 were responders who tested positive for aquaporin-2. The remaining case was a non-responder who showed no expression of aquaporin-2.Tolvaptan is considered effective for some cases of nephrotic syndrome. There are no clear parameters for predicting an effect, but the present study showed that aquaporin-2 was expressed in the epithelial cells of the collecting ducts of tolvaptan responders.

  1. Researching of cardos activity for chronic heart failure treatment in case of concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis

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    Chepurina N.G.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: comparative investigation of cardos (antibodies to angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT., C-terminal fragment, diovan (Valsartan or both drug combination effects (changing of clinical picture, physical exertion tolerance and quality of life for treatment chronic heart failure (CHF patients. Methods. 12-month open-label randomized research was performed. CHF patients (NYHA Class l-ll, n=30 with concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis were randomized (10 patients in each group for 6-month treatment by cardos (group I, average dose 1,8g/day, diovan (group II, average dose 80mg/dayorboth drug combination (group III, cardos 1,8g/day and diovan 80mg/day. CHD basic treatment was prescribed for all patients. In a 6-month drug crossover between groups I and I was performed, group III was divided into 2 subgroups (subgroup IIIA— cardos, subgroup NIB — diovan followed by next 6-month treatment. Results. Long-term treatment by cardos has improved functional class (NYHA of CHF patients with concomitant chronic kidney disease (stage V, conventional hemodialysis. cardos, diovan and both drug combination have demonstrated improvement of physical exertion tolerance, quality of life and patient clinical status during 6-min walking test. Conclusion. Cardos and diovan have shown the same efficacy. Cardos can be used as real alternative in case of ARA administration necessity

  2. Heart failure in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease: the GCKD study.

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    Hanna Beck

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a risk factor for development and progression of heart failure (HF. CKD and HF share common risk factors, but few data exist on the prevalence, signs and symptoms as well as correlates of HF in populations with CKD of moderate severity. We therefore aimed to examine the prevalence and correlates of HF in the German Chronic Kidney Disease (GCKD study, a large observational prospective study.We analyzed data from 5,015 GCKD patients aged 18-74 years with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR of 500 mg/d. We evaluated a definition of HF based on the Gothenburg score, a clinical HF score used in epidemiological studies (Gothenburg HF, and self-reported HF. Factors associated with HF were identified using multivariable adjusted logistic regression. The prevalence of Gothenburg HF was 43% (ranging from 24% in those with eGFR >90 to 59% in those with eGFR<30 ml/min/1.73m2. The corresponding estimate for self-reported HF was 18% (range 5%-24%. Lower eGFR was significantly and independently associated with the Gothenburg definition of HF (p-trend <0.001. Additional significantly associated correlates included older age, female gender, higher BMI, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, valvular heart disease, anemia, sleep apnea, and lower educational status.The burden of self-reported and Gothenburg HF among patients with CKD is high. The proportion of patients who meet the criteria for Gothenburg HF in a European cohort of patients with moderate CKD is more than twice as high as the prevalence of self-reported HF. However, because of the shared signs, symptoms and medications of HF and CKD, the Gothenburg score cannot be used to reliably define HF in CKD patients. Our results emphasize the need for early screening for HF in patients with CKD.

  3. [Kidney diseases with chronic renal failure in the Italian renal biopsy registries].

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    Lupo, A; Bernich, P; Antonucci, F; Dugo, M; Riegler, P; Carraro, M

    2008-01-01

    The prevalence of chronic renal failure (CRF) at the time of kidney biopsy ranges between 5% and 37% in different renal biopsy registries. This wide variability is mainly dependent on the different definitions of CRF. In the period 1998-2006, the Triveneto Renal Biopsy Registry recorded 816 cases with CRF (defined as serum creatinine persistently > or =1.5 mg/dL), accounting for a prevalence of 27%. At the time of biopsy, the average age and glomerular filtration rate were 54 years and 41 mL/min, respectively; 70% of CRF patients are men and the prevalence of CRF increases with age. IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the main histological form of glomerulonephritis, accounting for 23% of all cases of CRF. However, in subjects older than 65 years, membranous glomerulonephritis (MG) exceeds IgAN, thus becoming the main diagnosis in elderly patients with renal impairment. With a cutoff value for proteinuria of 3 g/day, the main diagnoses in cases with proteinuria below and above the cutoff are IgAN and MG, respectively. IgAN remains the main histological form of nephropathy throughout all levels of renal failure. These data confirm the findings of the Italian Registry of Renal Biopsies, but correspond only in part with data from other registries. The differences can to a certain extent be explained by the different criteria for the definition of renal impairment, patient selection, and differences in diagnosis among registries.

  4. Prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation on clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nileshkumar; J; Patel; Aashay; Patel; Kanishk; Agnihotri; Dhaval; Pau; Samir; Patel; Badal; Thakkar; Nikhil; Nalluri; Deepak; Asti; Ritesh; Kanotra; Sabeeda; Kadavath; Shilpkumar; Arora; Nilay; Patel; Achint; Patel; Azfar; Sheikh; Neil; Patel; Apurva; O; Badheka; Abhishek; Deshmukh; Hakan; Paydak; Juan; Viles-Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation(AF) is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia,which is now on course to reach epidemic proportions in the elderly population. AF is a commonly encountered comorbidity in patients with cardiac and major non-cardiac diseases. Morbidity and mortality associated with AF makes it a major healthcare burden. The objective of our article is to determine the prognostic impact of AF on acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Multiple studies have been conducted to determine if AF has an independent role in the overall mortality of such patients. Our review suggests that AF has an independent adverse prognostic impact on the clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

  5. A randomized controlled study of finerenone vs. eplerenone in patients with worsening chronic heart failure and diabetes mellitus and/or chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D; Böhm, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate oral doses of the non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist finerenone given for 90 days in patients with worsening heart failure and reduced ejection fraction and chronic kidney disease and/or diabetes mellitus. METHODS AND RESULTS: Miner Alocorticoid Receptor antagon...

  6. Chronic Kidney Disease

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    You have two kidneys, each about the size of your fist. Their main job is to filter wastes and excess water out of ... help control blood pressure, and make hormones. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are damaged ...

  7. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002442.htm Diet - chronic kidney disease To use the sharing features on this page, ... make changes to your diet when you have chronic kidney disease. These changes may include limiting fluids, eating a ...

  8. Chronic kidney disease: an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality for elderly Chinese patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Hui Fu; Ping Ye; Lei-Ming Luo; Bing Zhu; Yu-Xiao Zhang; Shuang-Yan Yi; Yuan Liu; Tie-Hui Xiao; Liang Wang; Yong-Yi Bai; Cai-Yi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the prognostic value of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in elderly Chinese patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods The study consisted of 327 elderly patients with CHF. All-cause mortality was chosen as an endpoint over the median follow-up period of 345 days. Cox regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors of mortality. Results The median age of the entire cohort was 85 years (60-100 years). The mortality for 168 elderly patients with CHF and CKD (51.4% of entire cohort) was 39.9%(67 deaths), which was higher than the mortality for CHF patients without CKD [25.2% (40/159 deaths)] and the mortality for entire cohort with CHF [32.7% (107/327 deaths)]. The Cox regression analysis showed that old age [hazard ratio (HR): 1.033; 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.004-1.064], CKD (HR: 1.705; 95% CI: 1.132-2.567), CHF New York Heart Association (NYHA) class IV (HR: 1.913; 95% CI:1.284-2.851), acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (HR: 1.696; 95% CI: 1.036-2.777), elevated resting heart rate (HR: 1.021; 95% CI:1.009-1.033), and decreased plasma albumin (HR: 0.883; 95% CI: 0.843-0.925) were independent risk factors of mortality for elderly patients with CHF. Conclusions CKD was an independent risk factor of mortality for elderly Chinese patients with CHF.

  9. Acute ischemia/reperfusion injury after isogeneic kidney transplantation is mitigated in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

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    Vercauteren, Sven R; Ysebaert, Dirk K; Van Rompay, An R; De Greef, Kathleen E; De Broe, Marc E

    2003-05-01

    The influence of chronic renal failure on renal susceptibility to an acute ischemic insult was evaluated. Recipient Lewis rats were randomly assigned to undergo 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure, CRF) or sham operation (normal renal function, NRF). After 11 weeks, normal kidneys of Lewis donor rats were transplanted in the recipients. The outcome of the isografts was assessed. Filtration capacity of the isografts in the CRF rats was preserved to approximately one-quarter of its normal capacity on the 1st day post-transplantation, whereas it fell to 0 in the NRF rats. This was reflected by a significantly higher increase in serum creatinine in the latter group. The isografts in the CRF rats had a significantly lower degree of acute tubular necrosis and no increase in the number of macrophages and T lymphocytes in the first 24 h in contrast to the NRF rats. Epithelial regeneration and repair started earlier in the CRF group. In conclusion, the present study indicated that CRF blunted ischemia/reperfusion injury of a transplanted kidney, and that its regeneration capacity was certainly not hampered by the presence of chronic uremia. These results will be the basis for studies on modulation of early leukocyte-endothelial interactions resulting from immunological disturbances inherent to the uremic environment.

  10. Sudden Visual Deterioration as the First Symptom of Chronic Kidney Failure

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    Weronika Pociej-Marciak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We report here a unique case of a sudden loss of vision as the first symptom of an advanced chronic nephropathy. Methods and Results: A 25-year-old man was referred to the Department of Ophthalmology with sudden visual deterioration presumptively diagnosed as bilateral retinitis. The patient had never been under any medical care before and had never had any clinical signs of any chronic disease. He underwent an ophthalmic examination with optical coherence tomography (OCT. Based on the clinical features, OCT scans and systemic blood pressure (BP assessment (225/145 mm Hg, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hypertensive retinopathy and choroidopathy due to hypertensive crisis. After urgent diagnostic procedures, the patient was diagnosed with a chronic kidney disease at stage 5 in the course of chronic glomerulonephritis. Immediately, a renal replacement therapy was started and the patient was qualified for renal transplantation. Conclusion: Adolescents with an unclear picture of retinal lesions, who have neither a history nor clinical signs of a systemic disease, should undergo careful systemic screening with BP assessment. A sudden deterioration of vision may be the first symptom of a previously undiagnosed severe systemic disease (very rare chronic that requires immediate treatment.

  11. Gender-related differences in kidney of rats with chronic renal failure.

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    Lemos, Carla C S; Mandarim-de-Lacerda, Carlos A; Carvalho, Jorge J; Bregman, Rachel

    2014-04-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterized by adaptive mechanisms secondary to the loss of functioning nephrons. Clinical and experimental studies suggest participation of gender-related hormones on renal function and progression of chronic renal failure. We evaluated the effect of castration on renal alterations in male and female Wistar control rats and after 30 days of chronic renal failure (CRF) induced by 5/6 nephrectomy. The CRF male group showed higher proteinuria. Glomerular hypertrophy was similar among groups. Podocyte morphology showed disorders of foot processes and thickening of the basement membrane in the CRF male group. The CRF female group showed fewer alterations compared to males. Castration changed the profile in CRF male animals and the filtration barrier was preserved. CRF males showed the presence of alfa-smooth muscle actin suggesting an early prefibrotic event in this group. After castration this phenomenon was not observed. Noteworthy, in females, castration exacerbated the presence of alfa-smooth muscle actin. In summary, proteinuria was higher in males and appeared early in the course of CRF, probably contributing to fibrotic events. Data were influenced by gender suggesting that male sex hormones aggravate renal alterations.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CKD treated? Kidney-friendly diet for CKD What causes chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Anyone can get CKD. Some people are ... and high blood pressure are the most common causes of CKD. If you have diabetes or high blood pressure, ...

  13. Icariin combined with human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells significantly improve the impaired kidney function in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Wang, Li; Chu, Xiaoqian; Cui, Huantian; Bian, Yuhong

    2017-01-23

    At present, the main therapy for chronic renal failure (CRF) is dialysis and renal transplantation, but neither obtains satisfactory results. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (huMSCs) are isolated from the fetal umbilical cord which has a high self-renewal and multi-directional differentiation potential. Icariin (ICA), a kidney-tonifying Chinese Medicine can enhance the multipotency of huMSCs. Therefore, this work seeks to employ the use of ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of chronic renal failure. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine (Cr) analyses showed amelioration of functional parameters in ICA-treated huMSCs for the treatment of CRF rats at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation. ICA-treated huMSCs can obviously increase the number of cells in injured renal tissues at 3, 7, and 14 days after transplantation by optical molecular imaging system. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the levels of fibrosis in CRF rats at 14 days after transplantation. Superoxide dismutase and Malondialdehyde analyses showed that ICA-treated huMSCs reduced the oxidative damage in CRF rats. Moreover, transplantation with ICA-treated huMSCs decreased inflammatory responses, promoted the expression of growth factors, and protected injured renal tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest that ICA-treated huMSCs could improve the kidney function in CRF rats.

  14. Maxillary brown tumor associated with chronic kidney failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stênio Medeiros Queiroz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The brown tumor is a bone lesion that may affect the entire skeleton, including the maxillary bones. These tumors are characterized as focal giant cell lesions that may be associated with primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT. Brown tumors are invasive in some cases and an association with chronic renal failure (CRF has been reported. With the aim to facilitate the differential diagnosis of bone lesions that may affect dialysis patients, this paper describes a case of brown tumor in a 36- year old patient with CRF, secondary HPT carrier, who had a lesion on the right maxilla for approximately five months.

  15. FAN1 mutations cause karyomegalic interstitial nephritis, linking chronic kidney failure to defective DNA damage repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Weibin; Otto, Edgar A; Cluckey, Andrew; Airik, Rannar; Hurd, Toby W; Chaki, Moumita; Diaz, Katrina; Lach, Francis P; Bennett, Geoffrey R; Gee, Heon Yung; Ghosh, Amiya K; Natarajan, Sivakumar; Thongthip, Supawat; Veturi, Uma; Allen, Susan J; Janssen, Sabine; Ramaswami, Gokul; Dixon, Joanne; Burkhalter, Felix; Spoendlin, Martin; Moch, Holger; Mihatsch, Michael J; Verine, Jerome; Reade, Richard; Soliman, Hany; Godin, Michel; Kiss, Denes; Monga, Guido; Mazzucco, Gianna; Amann, Kerstin; Artunc, Ferruh; Newland, Ronald C; Wiech, Thorsten; Zschiedrich, Stefan; Huber, Tobias B; Friedl, Andreas; Slaats, Gisela G; Joles, Jaap A; Goldschmeding, Roel; Washburn, Joseph; Giles, Rachel H; Levy, Shawn; Smogorzewska, Agata; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2012-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a major health burden. Its central feature of renal fibrosis is not well understood. By exome sequencing, we identified mutations in FAN1 as a cause of karyomegalic interstitial nephritis (KIN), a disorder that serves as a model for renal fibrosis. Renal histology in KIN is indistinguishable from that of nephronophthisis, except for the presence of karyomegaly. The FAN1 protein has nuclease activity and acts in DNA interstrand cross-link (ICL) repair within the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. We show that cells from individuals with FAN1 mutations have sensitivity to the ICL-inducing agent mitomycin C but do not exhibit chromosome breakage or cell cycle arrest after diepoxybutane treatment, unlike cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia. We complemented ICL sensitivity with wild-type FAN1 but not with cDNA having mutations found in individuals with KIN. Depletion of fan1 in zebrafish caused increased DDR, apoptosis and kidney cysts. Our findings implicate susceptibility to environmental genotoxins and inadequate DNA repair as novel mechanisms contributing to renal fibrosis and CKD.

  16. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Implications of Renal Failure for Antiarrhythmic Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potpara, Tatjana S; Jokic, Vera; Dagres, Nikolaos; Marin, Francisco; Prostran, Milica S; Blomstrom-Lundqvist, Carina; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-01-01

    The kidney has numerous complex interactions with the heart, including shared risk factors (e.g., hypertension, dyslipidemia, etc.) and mutual amplification of morbidity and mortality. Both cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease (CKD) may cause various alterations in cardiovascular system, metabolic homeostasis and autonomic nervous system that may facilitate the occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias. Also, pre-existent or incident cardiac arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation (AF) may accelerate the progression of CKD. Patients with CKD may experience various cardiac rhythm disturbances including sudden cardiac death. Contemporary management of cardiac arrhythmias includes the use of antiarrhythmic drugs (AADs), catheter ablation and cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). Importantly, AADs are not used only as the principal treatment strategy, but also as an adjunct therapy in combination with CIEDs, to facilitate their effects or to minimize inappropriate device activation in selected patients. Along with their principal antiarrhythmic effect, AADs may also induce cardiac arrhythmias and the risk for such proarrhythmic effect(s) is particularly increased in patients with reduced left ventricular systolic function or in the setting of electrolyte imbalance. Moreover, CKD itself can induce profound alterations in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of many drugs including AADs, thus facilitating the drug accumulation and increased exposure. Hence, the use of AADs in patients with CKD may be challenging. In this review article, we provide an overview of the characteristics of arrhythmogenesis in patients with CKD with special emphasis on the complexity of pharmacokinetics and risk for proarrhythmias when using AADs in patients with cardiac arrhythmias and CKD.

  17. Chronic kidney disease and worsening renal function in acute heart failure: different phenotypes with similar prognostic impact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; Lombardi, Carlo; Ruocco, Gaetano; Padeletti, Margherita; Nuti, Ranuccio; Metra, Marco; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-12-01

    Nearly a third of patients with acute heart failure experience concomitant renal dysfunction. This condition is often associated with increased costs of care, length of hospitalisation and high mortality. Although the clinical impact of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been well established, the exact clinical significance of worsening renal function (WRF) during the acute and post-hospitalisation phases is not completely understood. Therefore, it is still unclear which of the common laboratory markers are able to identify WRF at an early stage. Recent studies comparing CKD with WRF showed contradictory results; this could depend on a different WRF definition, clinical characteristics, haemodynamic disorders and the presence of prior renal dysfunction in the population enrolled. The current definition of acute cardiorenal syndrome focuses on both the heart and kidney but it lacks precise laboratory marker cut-offs and a specific diagnostic approach. WRF and CKD could represent different pathophysiological mechanisms in the setting of acute heart failure; the traditional view includes reduced cardiac output with systemic and renal vasoconstriction. Nevertheless, it has become a mixed model that encompasses both forward and backward haemodynamic dysfunction. Increased central venous pressure, renal congestion with tubular obliteration, tubulo-glomerular feedback and increased abdominal pressure are all potential additional contributors. The impact of WRF on patients who experience preserved renal function and individuals affected with CKD is currently unknown. Therefore it is extremely important to understand the origins, the clinical significance and the prognostic impact of WRF on CKD.

  18. Myeloperoxidase in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhana Rao, A.; Anand, Usha; Anand, C. V.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD...

  19. Arteriosclerotic changes in the myocardium, lung, and kidney in dogs with chronic congestive heart failure and myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Bo Torkel; Jönsson, Lennart; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier;

    2006-01-01

    Background: The occurrence of small vessel arteriosclerosis in the myocardium, kidney, and lung in dogs with naturally occurring myxomatous mitral valve disease has not been previously investigated systematically. Methods: Twenty-one dogs with naturally occurring congestive heart failure and 21 age...... and pulmonary artery. Results: Dogs with congestive heart failure had significantly more arterial narrowing in the left ventricle (Pkidney (p...-matched, sex-matched, and weight-matched control dogs underwent extensive pathological and histopathological examination. Morphometry and scoring of tissue sections were used to measure arterial narrowing and fibrosis in the myocardium, kidney, and lung; and intimal thickness and plaque formation in the aorta...

  20. Effects of perindopril on expression of kidney aquaporin-2 and urine aquaporin-2 excretion in chronic heart failure rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳邵

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the expression of kidneyaquaporin-2(AQP2) and urine AQP2 excretion in chronic heart failure(CHF) rats and investigate effects of perindopril on the expression and excretion of AQP2.Methods

  1. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  2. Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the feet and ankles Causes & Risk FactorsWhat causes CKD?The most common causes of CKD are high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease. ... caused by CKD.How else is CKD treated?Chronic kidney disease can cause other problems. Talk with your doctor about how ...

  3. PERFORMANCE OF DATA MINING TECHNIQUES TO PREDICT IN HEALTHCARE CASE STUDY: CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Boukenze

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the promises of predictive analytics in big data, and the use of machine learning algorithms, predicting future is no longer a difficult task, especially for health sector, that has witnessed a great evolution following the development of new computer technologies that gave birth to multiple fields of research. Many efforts are done to cope with medical data explosion on one hand, and to obtain useful knowledge from it, predict diseases and anticipate the cure on the other hand. This prompted researchers to apply all the technical innovations like big data analytics, predictive analytics, machine learning and learning algorithms in order to extract useful knowledge and help in making decisions. In this paper, we will present an overview on the evolution of big data in healthcare system, and we will apply three learning algorithms on a set of medical data. The objective of this research work is to predict kidney disease by using multiple machine learning algorithms that are Support Vector Machine (SVM, Decision Tree (C4.5, and Bayesian Network (BN, and chose the most efficient one.

  4. Understanding chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Matthew; Burch, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The key principles of chronic heart failure and the development of clinical management strategies are described. The physiological changes in chronic heart failure and the clinical management of children with heart failure are considered, but the treatment of heart failure related to congenital heart disease or the intensive care management of heart failure are not mentioned as both topics require consideration in their own right. A greater understanding of the maladaptive responses to chroni...

  5. Serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentration reflects severity of coronary artery disease in patients without heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katagiri, Mikako; Takahashi, Masao; Doi, Kent; Myojo, Masahiro; Kiyosue, Arihiro; Ando, Jiro; Hirata, Yasunobu; Komuro, Issei

    2016-10-01

    Serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is recognized as a useful biomarker for acute kidney injury. Recently, elevated NGAL levels were reported in patients with heart failure and cardiac events, but the association between serum NGAL and severity of coronary artery disease (CAD) has not been investigated adequately. This study aimed to evaluate the association between serum NGAL concentration and CAD severity in patients without heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Two-hundred thirteen patients [mean age: 66.2 ± 9.2 (SD)] without heart failure and chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate >60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) who underwent coronary angiography were retrospectively analyzed using the SYNTAX score. The mean concentration of serum NGAL was 134.3 ± 111.3 ng/mL. A statistically significant correlation was observed between serum NGAL levels and the SYNTAX score (R = 0.18, P = 0.0091). Multivariable analysis also showed elevated serum NGAL as an independent risk factor for a high SYNTAX score (P 100 ng/mL) and high levels of BNP (>25 pg/mL) had a higher SYNTAX score (low-low vs. high-high: 13.8 ± 13.4 vs. 20.8 ± 18.9, P heart failure. Serum NGAL might be a biomarker for CAD severity.

  6. Association of dialysis adequacy with nutritional and inflammatory status in patients with chronic kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayati, Roya; Lesanpezeshki, Mahboub; Seifi, Sepideh

    2015-11-01

    The number of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure has increased in the past years worldwide. Several parameters have been introduced for the quantitative assessment of dialysis adequacy. The National Cooperative Dialysis Study results indicated that Kt/V and time-averaged concentration of urea (TAC) are predictors of mortality in patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Also, the protein catabolic ratio (PCR), which is an indicator of nutritional status, can predict patients' mortality. Our aim was to assess the impact of parameters that show dialysis adequacy on indices of nutrition or inflammation. A total of 46 patients were included in the study; eight patients were excluded during the course of the study and 38 patients were enrolled in the final analysis. All patients were receiving HD for at least for three months. HD was administered three times per week and the study lasted for two months. Kt/V, TAC and PCR were assessed at the beginning of the study based on patients' urea and blood urea nitrogen in the first week of our study; these calculations were repeated at the end of the first and second months using the mean of the mentioned values in the month. Both adequacy indices significantly and positively correlated with changes in PCR (P protein. Based on the Kt/V values, patients with adequate dialysis had slower decrease in the PCR (P dialysis is correlated with patients' nutritional status. No correlation was observed between dialysis adequacy and inflammatory status.

  7. [Surgical treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in chronic kidney failure. Results of total parathyroidectomy with parathyroid autotransplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courant, O; Letessier, E; Moutel, M G; Hamy, A; Paineau, J; Visset, J

    1993-01-01

    Between 1978 and 1990, 68 patients, operated on for secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT), received a forearm intramuscular free autologous parathyroid graft (37 women and 31 men--mean age: 43 +/- 16 years). The transplantation (Wells technique) was performed in the same time as the total parathyroidectomy and the remaining parathyroid material after surgical resection was cryopreserved. The results were evaluated in term of clinical and/or radiological and/or biological response respectively 3 or 5.5 years later, depending of the realisation of a renal transplantation (n = 27) or not. Four patients were lost to follow-up and 4 died post-operatively, including a wrong diagnosis (60 patients evaluated). Mortality rate was 12% (5 cases out of 7 related to chronic renal insufficiency). In 3 patients (5%) the transplanted gland had to be removed because of recurrent HPT (1 graft hyperplasia; 2 wrong diagnosis: 1 cervical gland left over and 1 aluminium intoxication). Second cervicotomy was performed in 3 cases (5%) for remaining cervical parathyroid gland (2 cases) and false-positive Tallium-Technetium scan (1 case). Overall results were good or very good in 51 cases (85%). A review of the literature indicate that subtotal parathyroidectomy in not superior to the Wells technique and the latter remain the landmark technique in the authors' hands in order to treat secondary HPT.

  8. Association of dialysis adequacy with nutritional and inflammatory status in patients with chronic kidney failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Hemayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure has increased in the past years worldwide. Several parameters have been introduced for the quantitative assessment of dialysis adequacy. The National Cooperative Dialysis Study results indicated that Kt/V and time-averaged concentration of urea (TAC are predictors of mortality in patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Also, the protein catabolic ratio (PCR, which is an indicator of nutritional status, can predict patients′ mortality. Our aim was to assess the impact of parameters that show dialysis adequacy on indices of nutrition or inflammation. A total of 46 patients were included in the study; eight patients were excluded during the course of the study and 38 patients were enrolled in the final analysis. All patients were receiving HD for at least for three months. HD was administered three times per week and the study lasted for two months. Kt/V, TAC and PCR were assessed at the beginning of the study based on patients′ urea and blood urea nitrogen in the first week of our study; these calculations were repeated at the end of the first and second months using the mean of the mentioned values in the month. Both adequacy indices significantly and positively correlated with changes in PCR (P <0.001. However, no significant correlation was detectable between Kt/V and TAC with either body mass index and albumin or C-reactive protein. Based on the Kt/V values, patients with adequate dialysis had slower decrease in the PCR (P <0.001. Our results indicate that adequacy of dialysis is correlated with patients′ nutritional status. No correlation was observed between dialysis adequacy and inflammatory status.

  9. The puzzle of kidney dysfunction in heart failure : an introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure and kidney disease often coexist, and each of the two conditions may lead to progression of the other. Kidney dysfunction is an independent prognostic factor in patients with either acute or chronic heart failure. Worsening renal function may be related with poorer outcomes as well. Mu

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  11. Development of hypertension and effects of benazepril hydrochloride in a canine remnant kidney model of chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Mika; Watanabe, Toshifumi

    2008-05-01

    In order to determine whether hypertension would develop in dogs with chronic renal failure, we performed 7/8 renal ablation in 6 healthy dogs and compared pre- and post-ablation blood pressures determined by telemetry. One month after the renal ablation, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were significantly increased (pdogs with intact renal function. The dogs with induced renal failure and hypertension were administered an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, benazepril hydrochloride, once daily for 2 weeks at 2 mg/kg body weight, and changes in blood pressure and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system were determined. During the administration of benazepril hydrochloride, blood pressure, angiotensin II and aldosterone decreased significantly (pdogs with chronic renal failure through mechanisms involving the RAA system and demonstrate that benazepril hydrochloride improves renal hypertension in dogs.

  12. [Nutrition and chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta, A; Cordero Lorenzana, M L; Martínez-Puga y López, E; Gómez Seijo, A; Escudero Alvarez, E

    2000-01-01

    The causes of malnutrition in chronic terminal kidney failure are reviewed in the situation both before and after dialysis, as are the malnutrition rates in both circumstances and their treatment. Malnutrition has a high prevalence in terminal kidney patients, partly as a result of the therapeutic restriction on calories and proteins, but also due to the metabolic reactions typical of the disease and to anorexia. In patients subjected to dialytical methods, certain other mechanisms are added. In addition to malnutrition, there are alterations in the metabolism of calcium, phosphorus and potassium, as well as lipids, thus limiting nutritional therapy's ability to restore the nutritional status to normal. An awareness of energy expenditure in chronic terminal kidney failure and the consequences of malnutrition have led to new challenges in nutritional therapy, both in the dose and quality of the proteins, with a debate raging over the advantages of ketoanalogues, and also in the methods for providing nutrients. The ideal nutritional method for repletion is oral administration, but this can be enhanced with artificial support such as oral supplements, parenteral nutrition during dialysis or such alternatives as enteral nutrition at home in the case of chronic kidney problems in children, using percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG), in order to nourish the patients and minimize growth disorders.

  13. Pharm GKB: Kidney Failure, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available iew Alternate Names: Synonym ARF - Acute renal failure; Acute Kidney Failure; Acute Kidney Failures; Acute K...idney Insufficiencies; Acute Kidney Insufficiency; Acute Renal Failure; Acute Renal Failures; Acute... Renal Insufficiencies; Acute Renal Insufficiency; Acute renal failure syndrome, NOS; Failure, Acute... Kidney; Failure, Acute Renal; Failures, Acute Kidney; Failures, Acute Renal; Insufficiencies, Acute... Kidney; Insufficiencies, Acute Renal; Insufficiency, Acute Kidney; Insufficiency, Acute

  14. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Heart Disease Mineral & Bone Disorder Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ... function as well as they should. How is anemia related to chronic kidney disease? Anemia commonly occurs ...

  15. Myeloperoxidase in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V

    2011-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD stages II-V (end stage renal disease)]. Plasma MPO was assayed by a spectrophotometric method. Serum urea and creatinine were estimated on a clinical chemistry analyzer using standard laboratory procedures. The mean plasma MPO levels were significantly lower with advancing stages of renal failure (P < 0.001). There was a positive correlation between MPO and GFR (r = +0.89, P < 0.001) and a negative correlation with urea (r = -0.85, P < 0.001) and creatinine (r = -0.82, P < 0.001). While an inverse association was observed between plasma MPO and urea in CKD patients, such an association was not observed in control subjects (P = 0.43). In conclusion, the decline in plasma MPO levels may be due to the inhibitory effect of uraemic toxins on the enzyme.

  16. Axl tyrosine kinase protects against tubulo-interstitial apoptosis and progression of renal failure in a murine model of chronic kidney disease and hyperphosphataemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth D Hyde

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined as the progressive loss of renal function often involving glomerular, tubulo-interstitial and vascular pathology. CKD is associated with vascular calcification; the extent of which predicts morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular regulation of these events and the progression of chronic kidney disease are not fully elucidated. To investigate the function of Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in CKD we performed a sub-total nephrectomy and fed high phosphate (1% diet to Axl+/+ and Axl-/- mice. Plasma Gas6 (Axl' ligand, renal Axl expression and downstream Akt signalling were all significantly up-regulated in Axl+/+ mice following renal mass reduction and high phosphate diet, compared to age-matched controls. Axl-/- mice had significantly enhanced uraemia, reduced bodyweight and significantly reduced survival following sub-total nephrectomy and high phosphate diet compared to Axl+/+ mice; only 45% of Axl-/- mice survived to 14 weeks post-surgery compared to 87% of Axl+/+ mice. Histological analysis of kidney remnants revealed no effect of loss of Axl on glomerular hypertrophy, calcification or renal sclerosis but identified significantly increased tubulo-interstitial apoptosis in Axl-/- mice. Vascular calcification was not induced in Axl+/+ or Axl-/- mice in the time frame we were able to examine. In conclusion, we identify the up-regulation of Gas6/Axl signalling as a protective mechanism which reduces tubulo-interstitial apoptosis and slows progression to end-stage renal failure in the murine nephrectomy and high phosphate diet model of CKD.

  17. Axl tyrosine kinase protects against tubulo-interstitial apoptosis and progression of renal failure in a murine model of chronic kidney disease and hyperphosphataemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Gareth D; Taylor, Rebecca F; Ashton, Nick; Borland, Samantha J; Wu, Hon Sing Geoffrey; Gilmore, Andrew P; Canfield, Ann E

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is defined as the progressive loss of renal function often involving glomerular, tubulo-interstitial and vascular pathology. CKD is associated with vascular calcification; the extent of which predicts morbidity and mortality. However, the molecular regulation of these events and the progression of chronic kidney disease are not fully elucidated. To investigate the function of Axl receptor tyrosine kinase in CKD we performed a sub-total nephrectomy and fed high phosphate (1%) diet to Axl+/+ and Axl-/- mice. Plasma Gas6 (Axl' ligand), renal Axl expression and downstream Akt signalling were all significantly up-regulated in Axl+/+ mice following renal mass reduction and high phosphate diet, compared to age-matched controls. Axl-/- mice had significantly enhanced uraemia, reduced bodyweight and significantly reduced survival following sub-total nephrectomy and high phosphate diet compared to Axl+/+ mice; only 45% of Axl-/- mice survived to 14 weeks post-surgery compared to 87% of Axl+/+ mice. Histological analysis of kidney remnants revealed no effect of loss of Axl on glomerular hypertrophy, calcification or renal sclerosis but identified significantly increased tubulo-interstitial apoptosis in Axl-/- mice. Vascular calcification was not induced in Axl+/+ or Axl-/- mice in the time frame we were able to examine. In conclusion, we identify the up-regulation of Gas6/Axl signalling as a protective mechanism which reduces tubulo-interstitial apoptosis and slows progression to end-stage renal failure in the murine nephrectomy and high phosphate diet model of CKD.

  18. Measurement of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandilands, Euan A; Dhaun, Neeraj; Dear, James W; Webb, David J

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease affects millions of people worldwide and is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality as a result of kidney failure and cardiovascular disease. Accurate assessment of kidney function is important in the clinical setting as a screening tool and for monitoring disease progression and guiding prognosis. In clinical research, the development of new methods to measure kidney function accurately is important in the search for new therapeutic targets and the discovery of novel biomarkers to aid early identification of kidney injury. This review considers different methods for measuring kidney function and their contribution to the improvement of detection, monitoring and treatment of chronic kidney disease.

  19. Ultrasonography in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buturovic-Ponikvar, Jadranka E-mail: jadranka.buturovic@mf.uni-lj.si; Visnar-Perovic, Alenka

    2003-05-01

    Many chronic renal diseases lead to the final common state of decrease in renal size, parenchymal atrophy, sclerosis and fibrosis. The ultrasound image show a smaller kidney, thinning of the parenchyma and its hyperechogenicity (reflecting sclerosis and fibrosis). The frequency of renal cysts increases with the progression of the disease. Ultrasound generally does not allow for the exact diagnosis of an underlying chronic disease (renal biopsy is usually required), but it can help to determine an irreversible disease, assess prognosis and avoid unnecessary diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. The main exception in which the ultrasound image does not show a smaller kidney with parenchymal atrophy is diabetic nephropathy, the leading cause of chronic and end-stage renal failure in developed countries in recent years. In this case, both renal size and parenchymal thickness are preserved until end-stage renal failure. Doppler study of intrarenal vessels can provide additional information about microvascular and parenchymal lesions, which is helpful in deciding for or against therapeutic intervention and timely planning for optimal renal replacement therapy option.

  20. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results.

  1. Renal failure (chronic)

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterised by a gradual and sustained decline in renal clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Continued progression of renal failure will lead to renal function too low to sustain healthy life. In developed countries, such people will be offered renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Requirement for dialysis or transplantation is termed end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Diabetes, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, pyelone...

  2. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P failure (P chronic AMR. These findings suggest that the detection of DQ-DSA in nonsensitized patients is significantly associated with the development of chronic AMR and late allograft failure. Therefore monitoring of DQ-DSA not only in sensitized patients, but also nonsensitized patients may be necessary to improve long-term allograft outcomes.

  3. Multinational Assessment of Accuracy of Equations for Predicting Risk of Kidney Failure : A Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangri, Navdeep; Grams, Morgan E; Levey, Andrew S; Coresh, Josef; Appel, Lawrence J; Astor, Brad C; Chodick, Gabriel; Collins, Allan J; Djurdjev, Ognjenka; Elley, C Raina; Evans, Marie; Garg, Amit X; Hallan, Stein I; Inker, Lesley A; Ito, Sadayoshi; Jee, Sun Ha; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Kronenberg, Florian; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; Marks, Angharad; Nadkarni, Girish N; Navaneethan, Sankar D; Nelson, Robert G; Titze, Stephanie; Sarnak, Mark J; Stengel, Benedicte; Woodward, Mark; Iseki, Kunitoshi

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Identifying patients at risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression may facilitate more optimal nephrology care. Kidney failure risk equations, including such factors as age, sex, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and calcium and phosphate concentrations, were previously develop

  4. [Chronic kidney diseases, metformin and lactic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus represent a worldwide public health problem. The incidence of these diseases is gradually growing into epidemic proportions. In many cases they occur simultaneously, what leads to increased morbidity and mortality among the affected patients. The majority of the patients treated for diabetes mellitus are unaware of the presence of renal insufficiency. Vascular hypertrophy and diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes are the most common causes of kidney failure in countries with advanced healthcare systems. Metformin is a basic drug used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is excreted in an unchanged form by the kidneys. When administered to patients with renal insufficiency, sepsis, dehydration or after the parenteral administration of iodinated contrast agents, metformin can cause lactic acidosis, which is also associated with an increased mortality rate.

  5. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010;362(1):56-65. PMID: 20054047 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20054047 . Fogarty DG, Tall ... 5 Suppl 1):S1-S290. PMID: 15114537 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15114537 . Kidney Disease: Improving ...

  6. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  7. Complications of Diabetes: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) and Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    iyabet Dunyagoz Hospitals G

    2014-01-01

    Today, almost half of the patients who are on chronic kidney replacement therapy have diabetes. The enormous worldwide rise in these cases pose potential economic burden for every country and therefore monitoring kidney function should be a practice provided in outpatient settings. Poorly controlled diabetes will not only result in chronic renal failure, but also patients with chronic renal disease will have some metabolic abnormalities that will increase both morbidity and mortality of the p...

  8. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  9. Pregnancy and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, John M; Lindheimer, Marshall D

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the association of chronic renal disease and pregnancy. Included are discussions of guidelines for counseling pregnant women with underlying chronic renal disease who are considering conceiving as well as management of those already pregnant. Specifically highlighted are recent studies that question the validity of using estimated glomerular filtration rate and other formulae and questions of whether we should strive to replace the classic counseling approaches based primarily on serum creatinine levels with guidelines based on chronic kidney disease classification. The article concludes with a review as well as a critique of recent research on the prevalence of preeclampsia in women with underlying chronic renal disease, as well as if women with preeclampsia and underlying kidney disease have accelerated courses toward end-stage renal disease.

  10. Safety and tolerability of the novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist BAY 94-8862 in patients with chronic heart failure and mild or moderate chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitt, Bertram; Kober, Lars; Ponikowski, Piotr;

    2013-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF), but their use is limited by hyperkalaemia and/or worsening renal function (WRF). BAY 94-8862 is a highly selective and strongly potent non-steroida......Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF), but their use is limited by hyperkalaemia and/or worsening renal function (WRF). BAY 94-8862 is a highly selective and strongly potent non......-steroidal MRA. We investigated its safety and tolerability in patients with HFrEF associated with mild or moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD)....

  11. Chronic Kidney Isograft and Allograft Rejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严群; 张鹏; 杨传永

    2002-01-01

    Summary: In this study antigen-independent factor in the pathogenesis of chronic rejection of organ transplants was examined. Kidney isografts and allografts were transplanted orthotopically into bilaterally nephroectomized rat recipients and studied functionally, morphologically and immunohistologically, at serial intervals up to 52 weeks after transplantation. Allograft recipients developed progressive proteinuria after 12 weeks, with gradual renal failure ultimately leading to death. At the same time, morphological changes, including progressive arteriosclerosis and glomerulosclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis, developed. Immunohistologically, macrophages infiltrated glomeruli during this period and cytokines became unregulated. Our resuits showed that antigen-independent functional and morphological changes occurred in long-term kidney isografts and mimicked those appearing much earlier in allografts that reject chronically.Initial injury and extent of functioning renal mass is suggested to be important factor for such late changes.

  12. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after the transplant before they get any additional vaccines. Children who take immunosuppressive medications should not receive vaccines ... Children with kidney failure should receive the standard vaccinations recommended for all children, as well as vaccinations to prevent influenza and ...

  13. Association of periodontitis and chronic kidney disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Nabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of our study is to study the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis in chronic kidney disease and to identify a correlation between periodontitis and chronic kidney disease, with the help of periodontal exaamination, ultrasonographic and hematobiochemical analysis. Materials and Methods: 46 dogs with renal failure were studied and classified as presenting a slight (56.52%, moderate (36.95% and severe (47.8% degree of periodontal disease. Results: Marked gingival recession involving whole maxillary dental arcade, Oral mucosa ulcers and tissue necrosis and mobility of mandibular incisors was observed in dogs with chronic kidney disease. Dogs with normal renal function were observed to have minimal gingival recession of the mandibular teeth only. Conclusion: In view of the causative association between periodontal infection, generalized inflammation and important systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease, we hypothesize that targeted prophylaxis and careful treatment of oral diseases can prevent the progression of renal failure

  14. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hemodialysis treatments by avoiding high-potassium foods, including bananas, oranges, potatoes, and tomatoes. Read more in the NKDEP fact sheet Potassium: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease . ...

  15. RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN ACUTE KIDNEY FAILURE - AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treesa P. Varghese

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is the loss of renal function, either acute or chronic, that results in azotemia and syndrome of uremia. Acute renal failure, is also known as acute kidney injury (AKI, is defined as an abrupt (within 48 hours reduction in kidney function. The initial management of acute kidney failure involves treating the underlying cause, stopping nephrotoxic drugs and ensuring that the patient is euvolaemic with an adequate mean arterial blood pressure. However, no specific treatments have been shown to reverse the course AKF so Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT is the cornerstone of further management. RRT therapy can be administrated either intermittently or continuously. Multiple modalities of RRT are currently available. The purpose of this review is to familiarize different modalities of RRT for blood purification.

  16. The puzzle of kidney dysfunction in heart failure: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metra, Marco; Voors, Adriaan A

    2012-03-01

    Heart failure and kidney disease often coexist, and each of the two conditions may lead to progression of the other. Kidney dysfunction is an independent prognostic factor in patients with either acute or chronic heart failure. Worsening renal function may be related with poorer outcomes as well. Multiple mechanisms are involved in the cardio-renal interaction, including hemodynamic abnormalities, neurohormonal and inflammatory activation, oxidative stress, anemia, and abnormalities in mineral and vitamin D metabolism. Serum creatinine has limitations for the assessment of kidney function in patients with heart failure as its short-term changes are dependent on hemodynamic changes and fluid status. New biomarkers of glomerular and tubular function might allow an earlier and more accurate detection of worsening renal function.

  17. [Chronic pyelonephritis in polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V; Penkova, S; Monov, A

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of chronic pyelonephritis are studied in 37 patients out of a total of 53 patients with proved renal polycystosis. A group of 71 patients with chronic pyelonephritis selected at random are used as a control group. The frequency of chronic pyelonephritis among the patients with renal polycystosis is 69.8%. The difference between the mean age of the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis and the patients with renal polycystosis without chronic pyelonephritis is 8.6 years. A significant difference is established between these two groups of patients concerning the frequency of symptomatic hypertension--89.2% for the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis and 45% for the patients with uncomplicated renal polycystosis. A similar difference is established also for the renal failure--respectively 64.9% and 37.5%. The frequency of hypertension and chronic renal failure is lower in the control group of patients. 59% of the patients with renal polycystosis and chronic pyelonephritis have significant bacteriuria, E. coli and Proteus being the most frequently isolated bacteria but Pseudomonas shows the highest drug resistance. The isolated bacteria are most sensitive to nitroxoline and aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  18. Relation between Red Cell Distribution Width and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Cleaving in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenna van Breda

    Full Text Available In chronic kidney disease (CKD, both anemia and deregulated phosphate metabolism are common and predictive of adverse outcome. Previous studies suggest that iron status influences phosphate metabolism by modulating proteolytic cleavage of FGF23 into C-terminal fragments. Red cell distribution width (RDW was recently identified as a strong prognostic determinant for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, independently of iron status. We assessed whether RDW is associated with FGF23 cleaving in CKD patients with heart failure.The associations between RDW and either intact FGF23 (iFGF23, C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23, reflecting iFGF23 and C-terminal fragments together and the iFGF23/cFGF23 ratio were analyzed in 52 patients with CKD (eGFR 34,9 ± 13.9 ml/min/1.73m2 and chronic heart failure (CHF. Associations between RDW and FGF23 forms were studied by linear regression analysis adjusted for parameters of renal function, iron metabolism, phosphate metabolism and inflammation.Median cFGF23 levels were 197.5 [110-408.5] RU/ml, median iFGF23 levels were 107.3 [65.1-162.2] pg/ml and median FGF23 ratio was 0.80 [0.37-0.86]. Mean RDW was 14.1 ± 1.2%. cFGF23 and RDW were associated (β = 1.63 x 10(-3, P < 0.001, whereas iFGF23 and RDW were not (β = -1.38 x 10(-3, P = 0.336. The iFGF23/cFGF23 ratio was inversely associated with RDW. The difference between cFGF23 and iFGF23 (cFGF23- iFGF23 was positively associated with RDW (β = 1.74 x 10(-3, P < 0.001. The association between cFGF23 and RDW persisted upon multivariable linear regression analysis, adjusted for parameters of renal function, phosphate metabolism, iron metabolism and inflammation (β = 0.97 x 10(-3, P = 0.047.RDW is associated with cFGF23 but not with iFGF23 levels in patients with CKD and CHF. This suggests a connection between RDW and FGF23 catabolism, independent of iron status and inflammation. Future studies are needed to unravel underlying mechanisms and whether these pertain to the link

  19. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuccilli, Morgan; Chonchol, Michel

    2016-04-14

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  20. Relation between Red Cell Distribution Width and Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 Cleaving in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Heart Failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Breda, Fenna; Emans, Mireille E.; van der Putten, Karien; Braam, Branko; van Ittersum, Frans J.; Kraaijenhagen, Rob J.; de Borst, Martin H.; Vervloet, Marc; Gaillard, Carlo A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In chronic kidney disease (CKD), both anemia and deregulated phosphate metabolism are common and predictive of adverse outcome. Previous studies suggest that iron status influences phosphate metabolism by modulating proteolytic cleavage of FGF23 into C-terminal fragments. Red cell distribu

  1. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance.

  2. Sexual dysfunction in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffer, O

    1980-12-01

    Sexual dysfunction in end-stage renal disease is a troublesome, multifactorial disorder. Abnormality of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is but one of the causes leading to the impotence and infertility commonly encountered in chronic renal failure. Short of kidney transplantation, no therapy is available. Though infertility is the rule in end-stage renal disease, successful fatherhood and deliveries have occurred on rare occasions.

  3. [Chronic kidney disease in the source documentation of the outpatient clinic Department of Nephrology. Part I. Causes of renal failure and characteristics of the studied population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeć, Jerzy; Januszek, Rafał; Wieczorek-Surdacka, Ewa; Sułowicz, Władysław

    2009-01-01

    During the last years the incidence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is permanently increasing and has become a global social and economical problem in the world as well as in Poland. The aim of the study was the retrospective analysis of medical records of patients with renal failure under supervision at the outpatient clinic, Department of Nephrology, University Hospital in Cracow. The study population enclosed 1183 patients (640 men and 543 women) aged between 17 and 98 years (mean 64.7) with creatinine concentration >120 micromol/l and/or creatinine clearance population was 172.8 micromol/l (1.95 mg/dl). Hypertension was diagnosed in 65% of patients. In spite of treatment, more than half of the patients (51.9%) have increased systolic blood pressure and above 1/3 (35%) increased diastolic blood pressure. Mean hemoglobin concentration was 13.02 g/dl; more than 12% of patients had decreased hemoglobin below 11 g/dl. Mean values of parameters discovering calcium-phosphate metabolism were: calcium--2.33 mmol/l, phosphate--1.23 mmol/l and parathormon--169.3 pg/ml. Increased value of total serum cholesterol level was noted more than half of the patients (56.5%). Significant positive correlations were found between GFR calculated based on Cockcroft-Gault formula and BMI, hemoglobin, hematocrite, serum iron, diastolic blood pressure, total and LDL serum cholesterol, triglicerydes level, as well as AIAT activity and % values of HbA1c and negative with age, serum potassium, phosphorus, PTH and uric acid.

  4. HIV and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naicker, Saraladevi; Rahmanian, Sadaf; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a frequent complication of HIV infection, occurring in 3.5 - 48.5%, and occurs as a complication of HIV infection, other co-morbid disease and infections and as a consequence of therapy of HIV infection and its complications. The classic involvement of the kidney by HIV infection is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), occurring typically in young adults of African ancestry with advanced HIV disease in association with APOL1 high-risk variants. HIV-immune complex disease is the second most common diagnosis obtained from biopsies of patients with HIV-CKD. CKD is mediated by factors related to the virus, host genetic predisposition and environmental factors. The host response to HIV infection may influence disease phenotype through activation of cytokine pathways. With the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART), there has been a decline in the incidence of HIVAN, with an increasing prevalence of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Several studies have demonstrated the overall improvement in kidney function when initiating ART for HIV CKD. Progression to end stage kidney disease has been reported to be more likely when high grade proteinuria, severely reduced eGFR, hepatitis B and/C co-infection, diabetes mellitus, extensive glomerulosclerosis, and chronic interstitial fibrosis are present. Improved renal survival is associated with use of renin angiotensin system blockers and viral suppression. Many antiretroviral medications are partially or completely eliminated by the kidney and require dose adjustment in CKD. Certain drug classes, such as the protease inhibitors and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, are metabolized by the liver and do not require dose adjustment. HIV-infected patients requiring either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis, who are stable on ART, are achieving survival rates comparable to those of dialysis patients without HIV infection. Kidney transplantation has been performed successfully in HIV

  5. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  6. Familial Risks of Kidney Failure in Sweden: A Nationwide Family Study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of family history as a risk factor for kidney failure has not been determined in a nationwide setting. AIM: This nationwide family study aimed to determine familial risks for kidney failure in Sweden. METHODS: The Swedish multi-generation register on 0-78-year-old subjects were linked to the Swedish patient register and the Cause of death register for 1987-2010. Individuals diagnosed with acute kidney failure (n = 10063), chronic kidney failure (n = 18668), or unspecifie...

  7. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, AS; Eckardt, KU; Tsukamoto, Y; Levin, A; Coresh, J; Rossert, J; de Zeeuw, D; Hostetter, TH; Lameire, N; Eknoyan, G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  8. The studay on the blood flow in Kidney with Chronic Renal Failure Using Color Histogram%彩色直方图对慢性肾功能衰竭患者肾脏血流的分析研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨爽; 刘瑜; 祝艳秋

    2014-01-01

    目的:应用彩色直方图对正常肾脏和慢性肾功能衰竭患者肾脏的血流进行定量分析。方法慢性肾功能衰竭患者90例,应用彩色直方图软件测得肾脏内彩色血流占肾脏面积的百分比(Black and white color ratio,BCR),并与60例健康对照组对比。结果健康对照组与病例组之间BCR的均值在统计学上有显著意义(P<0.05)。结论应用彩色直方图可以得出慢性肾功能衰竭患者肾脏血流量化的客观指标,从而为临床进一步提高对慢性肾功能衰竭诊断提供参考价值。%Objective Color histogram for normal kidney and renal failure in patients with chronic renal blood flow for quantitative analysis.Methods 90 patients with chronic renal failure patients using color histogram software measured the percentage of color flow within the kidney kidney area (Black and white color ratio, BCR),and with 60 cases of healthy control group comparison.Results The mean BCR between healthy control group and patients groups was significant statistically (P<0.05).Conclusion Color histogram can be drawn with chronic renal failure in patients with renal blood flow quantification of objective indicators, so as to further improve clinical chronic renal failure diagnosis reference value.

  9. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease and Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Rebić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell layer is responsible for molecular traffic between the blood and surrounding tissue, and endothelial integrity plays a pivotal role in many aspects of vascular function. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the main cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and its incidence and severity increase in direct proportion with kidney function decline. Non-traditional risk factors for CVDs, including endothelial dysfunction (ED, are highly prevalent in this population and play an important role in cardiovascular (CV events. ED is the first step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events. Several risk markers have been associated with ED. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide plays a central role, linking kidney disease to ED, atherosclerosis, and CV events. Inflammation, loss of residual renal function, and insulin resistance are closely related to ED in CKD. ED may be followed by structural damage and remodelling that can precipitate both bleeding and thrombotic events. The endothelium plays a main role in vascular tone and metabolic pathways. ED is the first, yet potentially reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events.

  11. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases.

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Basics Page Content Chronic Kidney Disease: ... My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that ...

  13. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk......Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... of LA. It is suggested that introduction of metformin therapy to more advanced stages of CKD may bring therapeutic benefits that outweigh the possible risks....

  14. What I Need to Know about Living with Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) What Is Chronic Kidney Disease? Causes of CKD Tests & Diagnosis Managing CKD Eating Right Preventing CKD What If My Kidneys Fail? Clinical Trials Anemia High Blood Pressure Heart ... Nephropathy Kidney Disease in Children Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Hemolytic ...

  15. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progresses, specific histologic disturbances in the bone develop, which may or may not be predictable from the biochemical and hormonal changes that are associated with chronic kidney disease. In addition, patients may have had underlying bone disease before developing kidney failure or may have been treated with agents that will alter the classical pathologic findings of the bones in chronic kidney disease and their relation to parathyroid hormone. Thus, in stage 5 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy with quantitative histomorphometric analysis is considered the gold standard in the diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy. In contrast to stage 5 chronic kidney disease, there are very few data on the histologic changes in bone in earlier stages of chronic kidney disease. There also is no adequate information on the etiopathogenesis of bone disease in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease. Thus, because biochemical data cannot predict bone pathology in stages 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease, bone biopsy should be used to define these bone changes and to allow appropriate therapeutic approaches. PMID:18988703

  16. Aortic PWV in Chronic Kidney Disease: A CRIC Ancillary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.; Wimmer, Neil J.; Chirinos, Julio A.; Parsa, Afshin; Weir, Matthew; Perumal, Kalyani; Lash, James P.; Chen, Jing; Steigerwalt, Susan P.; Flack, John; Go, Alan S.; Rafey, Mohammed; Rahman, Mahboob; Sheridan, Angela; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Robinson, Nancy A.; Joffe, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Background Aortic PWV is a measure of arterial stiffness and has proved useful in predicting cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in several populations of patients, including the healthy elderly, hypertensives and those with end stage renal disease receiving hemodialysis. Little data exist characterizing aortic stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease who are not receiving dialysis, and in particular the effect of reduced kidney function on aortic PWV. Methods We performed measurements of aortic PWV in a cross-sectional cohort of participants enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study to determine factors which predict increased aortic PWV in chronic kidney disease. Results PWV measurements were obtained in 2564 participants. The tertiles of aortic PWV (adjusted for waist circumference) were 10.2 m/sec with an overall mean (± S.D.) value of 9.48 ± 3.03 m/sec [95% CI = 9.35–9.61 m/sec]. Multivariable regression identified significant independent positive associations of age, blood glucose concentrations, race, waist circumference, mean arterial blood pressure, gender, and presence of diabetes with aortic PWV and a significant negative association with the level of kidney function. Conclusions The large size of this unique cohort, and the targeted enrollment of chronic kidney disease participants provides an ideal situation to study the role of reduced kidney function as a determinant of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness may be a significant component of the enhanced cardiovascular risk associated with kidney failure. PMID:20019670

  17. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Zangeneh Kamali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods: We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (±3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (±1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (±15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (±24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  18. Deregulated Renal Calcium and Phosphate Transport during Experimental Kidney Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilco P Pulskens

    Full Text Available Impaired mineral homeostasis and inflammation are hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD, yet the underlying mechanisms of electrolyte regulation during CKD are still unclear. Here, we applied two different murine models, partial nephrectomy and adenine-enriched dietary intervention, to induce kidney failure and to investigate the subsequent impact on systemic and local renal factors involved in Ca(2+ and Pi regulation. Our results demonstrated that both experimental models induce features of CKD, as reflected by uremia, and elevated renal neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL expression. In our model kidney failure was associated with polyuria, hypercalcemia and elevated urinary Ca(2+ excretion. In accordance, CKD augmented systemic PTH and affected the FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D axis by elevating circulatory FGF23 levels and reducing renal αklotho expression. Interestingly, renal FGF23 expression was also induced by inflammatory stimuli directly. Renal expression of Cyp27b1, but not Cyp24a1, and blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 were significantly elevated in both models. Furthermore, kidney failure was characterized by enhanced renal expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 5 (TRPV5, calbindin-D28k, and sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2b (NaPi2b, whereas the renal expression of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2a (NaPi2a and type 3 (PIT2 were reduced. Together, our data indicates two different models of experimental kidney failure comparably associate with disturbed FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D signalling and a deregulated electrolyte homeostasis. Moreover, this study identifies local tubular, possibly inflammation- or PTH- and/or FGF23-associated, adaptive mechanisms, impacting on Ca(2+/Pi homeostasis, hence enabling new opportunities to target electrolyte disturbances that emerge as a consequence of CKD development.

  19. Deregulated Renal Calcium and Phosphate Transport during Experimental Kidney Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulskens, Wilco P; Verkaik, Melissa; Sheedfar, Fareeba; van Loon, Ellen P; van de Sluis, Bart; Vervloet, Mark G; Hoenderop, Joost G; Bindels, René J

    2015-01-01

    Impaired mineral homeostasis and inflammation are hallmarks of chronic kidney disease (CKD), yet the underlying mechanisms of electrolyte regulation during CKD are still unclear. Here, we applied two different murine models, partial nephrectomy and adenine-enriched dietary intervention, to induce kidney failure and to investigate the subsequent impact on systemic and local renal factors involved in Ca(2+) and Pi regulation. Our results demonstrated that both experimental models induce features of CKD, as reflected by uremia, and elevated renal neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) expression. In our model kidney failure was associated with polyuria, hypercalcemia and elevated urinary Ca(2+) excretion. In accordance, CKD augmented systemic PTH and affected the FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D axis by elevating circulatory FGF23 levels and reducing renal αklotho expression. Interestingly, renal FGF23 expression was also induced by inflammatory stimuli directly. Renal expression of Cyp27b1, but not Cyp24a1, and blood levels of 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 were significantly elevated in both models. Furthermore, kidney failure was characterized by enhanced renal expression of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 5 (TRPV5), calbindin-D28k, and sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2b (NaPi2b), whereas the renal expression of sodium-dependent Pi transporter type 2a (NaPi2a) and type 3 (PIT2) were reduced. Together, our data indicates two different models of experimental kidney failure comparably associate with disturbed FGF23-αklotho-vitamin-D signalling and a deregulated electrolyte homeostasis. Moreover, this study identifies local tubular, possibly inflammation- or PTH- and/or FGF23-associated, adaptive mechanisms, impacting on Ca(2+)/Pi homeostasis, hence enabling new opportunities to target electrolyte disturbances that emerge as a consequence of CKD development.

  20. Screening for chronic kidney disease can be of help to prevent atherosclerotic end organ damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozyilmaz, Akin; de Jong, Paul E.; Gansevoort, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerotic damage to the kidney is one of the most prevalent causes of chronic kidney disease and ultimately kidney failure. It frequently coincides with atherosclerotic damage to the heart, the brain and the lower extremities. In fact, the severity of the damage in the various end organs runs

  1. Frailty in elderly people with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portilla Franco, Maria Eugenia; Tornero Molina, Fernando; Gil Gregorio, Pedro

    In recent years, the concept of frailty as a "state of pre-disability" has been widely accepted by those involved in the care of the elderly. Its importance lies not only in its high prevalence - more than 25% in people over 85 years of age - but it is also considered an independent risk factor of disability, institutionalisation and mortality amongst the elderly. The study of renal function is relevant in patients with major comorbidities. Studies have shown a significant association between chronic kidney disease and the development of adverse clinical outcomes such as heart disease, heart failure, end-stage renal disease, increased susceptibility to infections and greater functional impairment. Frailty can be reversed, which is why a study of frailty in patients with chronic kidney disease is of particular interest. This article aims to describe the association between ageing, frailty and chronic kidney disease in light of the most recent and relevant scientific publications.

  2. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  3. Salt-Induced Changes in Cardiac Phosphoproteome in a Rat Model of Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Zhengxiu Su; Hongguo Zhu; Menghuan Zhang; Liangliang Wang; Hanchang He; Shaoling Jiang; Fan Fan Hou; Aiqing Li

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl...

  4. Probiotics and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppe, Laetitia; Mafra, Denise; Fouque, Denis

    2015-11-01

    Probiotics are the focus of a thorough investigation as a natural biotreatment due to their various health-promoting effects and inherent ability to fight specific diseases including chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, intestinal microbiota has recently emerged as an important player in the progression and complications of CKD. Because many of the multifactorial physiological functions of probiotics are highly strain specific, preselection of appropriate probiotic strains based on their expression of functional biomarkers is critical. The interest in developing new research initiatives on probiotics in CKD have increased over the last decade with the goal of fully exploring their therapeutic potentials. The efficacy of probiotics to decrease uremic toxin production and to improve renal function has been investigated in in vitro models and in various animal and human CKD studies. However to date, the quality of intervention trials investigating this novel CKD therapy is still lacking. This review outlines potential mechanisms of action and efficacy of probiotics as a new CKD management tool, with a particular emphasis on uremic toxin production and inflammation.

  5. Anemia in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Koshy, Susan M.; Geary, Denis F.

    2007-01-01

    Anemia is a common feature of chronic kidney disease, but the management of anemia in children is complex. Erythropoietin and supplemental iron are used to maintain hemoglobin levels. The National Kidney Foundation-Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) clinical practice guidelines for the management of anemia specifically in children were recently published. Pediatric nephrologists are encouraged to use current clinical practice guidelines and best evidence in conjunction wit...

  6. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    by glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  7. Genetic loci influencing kidney function and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Lord, Graham M.; van der Harst, Pim; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Sehmi, Joban S.; Gale, Daniel P.; Wass, Mark N.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Beckmann, Jacqui; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Bochud, Murielle; Brown, Morris J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Connell, John M. C.; Cook, H. Terence; Cotlarciuc, Ioana; Smith, George Davey; de Silva, Ranil; Deng, Guohong; Devuyst, Olivier; Dikkeschei, Lambert D.; Dimkovic, Nada; Dockrell, Mark; Dominiczak, Anna; Ebrahim, Shah; Eggermann, Thomas; Farrall, Martin; Ferrucci, Luigi; Floege, Jurgen; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Han, Xijin; Hedblad, Bo; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Hepkema, Bouke G.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria; Hypponen, Elina; Johnson, Toby; de Jong, Paul E.; Kleefstra, Nanne; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lapsley, Marta; Li, Yun; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian'an; Luttropp, Karin; Marechal, Celine; Melander, Olle; Munroe, Patricia B.; Nordfors, Louise; Parsa, Afshin; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda W.; Perucha, Esperanza; Pouta, Anneli; Prokopenko, Inga; Roderick, Paul J.; Ruokonen, Aimo; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sanna, Serena; Schalling, Martin; Schlessinger, David; Schlieper, Georg; Seelen, Marc A. J.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sjogren, Marketa; Smit, Johannes H.; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Stenvinkel, Peter; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Swaminathan, Ramasamyiyer; Tanaka, Toshiko; Ubink-Veltmaat, Lielith J.; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallace, Chris; Waterworth, Dawn; Zerres, Klaus; Waeber, Gerard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Maxwell, Patrick H.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Mooser, Vincent; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Lightstone, Liz; Scott, James; Navis, Gerjan; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.

    2010-01-01

    Using genome-wide association, we identify common variants at 2p12-p13, 6q26, 17q23 and 19q13 associated with serum creatinine, a marker of kidney function (P = 10(-10) to 10(-15)). Of these, rs10206899 (near NAT8, 2p12-p13) and rs4805834 (near SLC7A9, 19q13) were also associated with chronic kidney

  8. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  9. Healthy Hair Starts With a Healthy Body: Hair Stylists as Lay Health Advisors to Prevent Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Mary E; Linda Smith-Wheelock, MBA, MSW; Sarah L. Krein, PhD, RN

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease affects one in nine Americans. Diabetes and hypertension account for nearly three quarters of all kidney failure cases. Disproportionate rates of chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension have been observed among African Americans. More than 70% of all kidney failure cases caused by diabetes and hypertension could have been prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyles and medications. Context Approximately 14% of the population living in Michigan is ...

  10. 降浊益肾汤治疗慢性肾衰的临床观察%Clinical observation of Jiangzhuo Decoction for tonifying kidney for chronic renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洪涛; 李树平

    2013-01-01

    衰竭期)。根据中医有“肾常虚”的说法,是说肾脏易虚而宜补。肾藏精,人体精气总是处于不断消耗的状态而较难补充,故治肾从来都以补肾、固肾、滋肾、益肾等治法为主,而很少采用泻肾的治法。现代医学所述的肾脏病范畴,仍存在大量的虚证,尤其是肾虚症,纵有实证亦属本虚表实,我们认为,肾脏病是慢性疾病,虽然有各种实邪存在,但脾肾亏虚贯穿疾病始终,唯有调补脾肾,才能使脏腑经络功能旺盛,从而更好地祛除实邪,健脾则运化有力,益气则行血,血液不易瘀滞,温肾阳则水气易化,滋肾阴则肝阳得潜,故调补脾肾贯穿治疗肾脏病的始终。临床用药,不使用大寒大热之品,而使用性味较为平和的药物,健脾益气多选用黄芪、白术、土茯苓、泽泻等药物,配伍当归补血,佐以砂仁温中行气化湿,补肾多用生熟地杜仲、肉桂、狗脊、龟板、清热以土大黄、生藕片、莲子肉、、泄浊用墨块。取得了很好的效果,延缓了患者最终发展到尿毒症的时间。并为患者减少了经济上的负担。根据多年临床研究、观察,我们运用中医的办法,即中医的传统疗法,辨证施治,根据“肾为先天之本,脾为后天之本”原理,调整人体的机能,健脾补肾,通腑泄浊,以达到阴阳平衡;使患者的病情改善,延缓血液透析时间,提高生活质量。总结经验后自拟降浊益肾汤(黄芪、白术、土茯苓、泽泻、当归、砂仁、生熟地杜仲、肉桂、狗脊、龟板、土大黄、生藕片、莲子肉、墨块等,辩证加减)。%  Chronic renal failure is a kind of primary or secondary to chronic kidney diseases caused by progressive renal damage caused a series of symptoms or metabolic disorders clinical syndrome. Chronic renal failure is occurred in the basis of chronic kidney disease variety

  11. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babawale T Bello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents′ socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8 ± 12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD.

  12. Knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of first-degree relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease toward kidney donation in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Babawale T; Raji, Yemi R

    2016-01-01

    In most parts of Sub-Saharan Africa, kidney transplant programs are dependent on the willingness of relatives of patients with kidney failure to donate kidneys. This study assessed the attitudes of relatives of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) toward kidney donation. This was a cross-sectional survey of relatives of patients with CKD attending the nephrology service of our hospital. The respondents' socio-demographic characteristics and knowledge and beliefs about kidney transplantation, as well as their willingness to donate a kidney, were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. There were 161 respondents who returned completed questionnaires; the mean age of the respondents was 34.8±12.6 years and 52.2% of them were female. About 85.1% of the respondents were aware that kidney transplantation was a treatment option for end-stage renal failure, while 70% of them believed that kidney transplantation resulted in an improvement in the quality of life of these patients. However, 25.5% of the respondents believed that kidney donors were at risk of developing kidney failure in the future. Overall, 77.6% of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney, especially if the affected individual was their offspring. The majority of the respondents were willing to donate a kidney to a relative with CKD.

  13. Data mining a kidney failure data set using Rough Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. K Govinda Rajulu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kidney failure remains one of the dreaded diseases worldwide. The factors of kidney problem/failure remain to be determined. The paper gives the basic idea of rough set theory. The procedure to carry out the operation of rough set theory with lower and upper approximation sets briefly explained. Some applications of rough set theory in the field of medicine w.r.t kidney failures are initiated and some future problems pointed.

  14. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah R

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ravish Shah, Anil K AgarwalDivision of Nephrology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.Keywords: anemia, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, elderly population

  15. Effects of Sucroferric Oxyhydroxide Compared to Lanthanum Carbonate and Sevelamer Carbonate on Phosphate Homeostasis and Vascular Calcifications in a Rat Model of Chronic Kidney Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Olivier; Maillard, Marc; Malluche, Hartmut H; Stehle, Jean-Christophe; Funk, Felix; Burnier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum phosphorus, calcium, and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) levels are associated with cardiovascular disease in chronic renal disease. This study evaluated the effects of sucroferric oxyhydroxide (PA21), a new iron-based phosphate binder, versus lanthanum carbonate (La) and sevelamer carbonate (Se), on serum FGF23, phosphorus, calcium, and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) concentrations, and the development of vascular calcification in adenine-induced chronic renal failure (CRF) rats. After induction of CRF, renal function was significantly impaired in all groups: uremic rats developed severe hyperphosphatemia, and serum iPTH increased significantly. All uremic rats (except controls) then received phosphate binders for 4 weeks. Hyperphosphatemia and increased serum iPTH were controlled to a similar extent in all phosphate binder-treatment groups. Only sucroferric oxyhydroxide was associated with significantly decreased FGF23. Vascular calcifications of the thoracic aorta were decreased by all three phosphate binders. Calcifications were better prevented at the superior part of the thoracic and abdominal aorta in the PA21 treated rats. In adenine-induced CRF rats, sucroferric oxyhydroxide was as effective as La and Se in controlling hyperphosphatemia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and vascular calcifications. The role of FGF23 in calcification remains to be confirmed.

  16. Disturbed skin barrier in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background There are limited data on skin lesions in children with end-stage renal failure. The aim of the study was an evaluation of the skin barrier in children with different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The prevalence of xerosis, its severity, as well as its link selected demographic factors, were examined. Methods The study included 103 children: 72 with CKD stages 3–5 (38 on conservative treatment and 34 on dialysis) and 31 patients with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enur...

  17. Zhang Qi's Experience in Treating Chronic Renal Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-zhan; XU Da-ji; MA Yu-peng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chronic renal failure is a result of the parenchymatous injury of kidney and progressive exacerbation due to many reasons.It is a svstematic clinical syndrome caused by the disturbance in excreting metabolites,adjusting water-electrolyte and acid-base balance as well as production and inactivation of active substances of endocrine.Prof Zhang Qi has rich clinical experience in treating renal failure.A report follows.

  18. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Kisic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure.

  19. Role of kidney Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis and management of anuric kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zand, Ladan; King, Bernard F; Qian, Qi

    2014-08-01

    Kidney perfusion can be acutely compromised by many factors including reduced systemic blood pressure and elevated intra-abdominal pressure. We present a case of near complete absence of kidney perfusion in a 57-year-old man with heart failure and new onset ascites. The renal perfusion defect was directly detected by Doppler ultrasonography. Immediate decompression with large-volume paracentesis restored the kidney perfusion and kidney function. This case illustrates that renal ultrasonography with Doppler flow analysis in appropriate settings can serve as an important adjunct in the diagnosis and treatment of acute oligoanuric kidney failure. Timely reversal of the perfusion defect can rescue kidney function.

  20. Effects of Renal Failure Formula and Calcium Dobesilate on the Chronic Kidney Disease%肾衰方联合羟苯磺酸钙对慢性肾脏病疗效的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李志明; 何学红; 赵钢

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effects of Renal Failure Formula and calcium dobesilate on the chronic kidney disease. Methods: Choose 120 patients with chronic renal insufficiacy and eG-FR lower than 60mL/ ( min · 1.73m ), and put them int6 three groups including 31 patients taking calcium dobesilate, 59 patients taking Renal Failure Formula and calcium dohesilate and 30 patients taking Renal Failure Formula. The patients took 500mg of calcium dobesilate three times a day, 50mL of Renal Failure Formula three times a day. Then observe the levels of serum creatinine ( Scr ), urea nitrogen ( BUN ) and creatinine clearance rate ( Ccr ) before treatment and after two weeks of treatment. Results: (1) In Renal Failure Formula and calcium dobesilate group, BUN level ( P<0.01 )and Scr level decreased ( P<0.001 ), and Ccr went up obviously ( P<0.001 )(2)In calcium dobesilate group in the third and fourth stages, BUN level and Scr level decreased, and Ccr went up ( P<0.05 ) . (3) In Renal Failure Formula group in the third and fourth stages, BUN level and Scr level decreased, and Ccr went up ( P<0.05 ) . (4) Compared with calcium dobesilate group and Renal Failure Formula group, the curative effects in Renal Failure Formula and calcium dohesilate group were better than that in calcium dobesilate group( P<0.01 ). Conclusions: CDThe curative effect in Renal Failure Formula and calcium dobesilate group was better than that in Renal Failure Formula group and calcium dobesilate group.(2)Renal Failure Formula or calcium dobesilate could not obviously improve the patients in the fifth stage of chronic kidney disease. (3)Separate use of calcium dobesilate group or renal failure has no obvious improvement in patients with renal chronic kidney disease in stage V .%目的:观察肾衰方联合羟苯磺酸钙对各期慢性肾脏疾病(CKD)的影响.方法:肾小球滤过率(eGFR)低于每分钟60mL/1.73m2且未行透析治疗的慢性肾功能不全患者120例,分为羟苯磺酸钙组(31

  1. Sympathetic hyperactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, N.

    2007-01-01

    Sympathetic hyperactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often characterized by the presence of sympathetic hyperactivity. This contributes to the pathogenesis of renal hypertension. It is also associated with cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality indep

  2. 温肾健脾汤辅助临床治疗慢性肾功能衰竭的应用效果分析%Effect of warming kidney and invigorating spleen Decoction in treating chronic renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王绪臻; 王晓华; 邹方鹏

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析温肾健脾汤辅助临床治疗慢性肾功能衰竭的应用效果。方法将符合纳入标准的84例患者,随机分为治疗组和对照组各432例。治疗组与对照组均进行常规治疗,治疗组在常规治疗的基础上,服用温肾健脾汤治疗(主要药物:黄精15g,琥珀12g,何首乌15g,仙灵脾15g,煅牡蛎12g,白芍12g,土茯苓12g等)。结果两组临床疗效比较治疗组取得总有效率为85.72%;对照组取得总有效率为61.91%,二者比较有显著性差异(P<0.01)。两组治疗前后肾功能及生活质量得到明显改善,且应用安全。结论温肾健脾汤辅助临床治疗慢性肾功能衰竭可取得显著的康复效果。%Objective to analyze the clinical effect of warming kidney and spleen Decoction in treating chronic renal failure.Methods 84 patients were randomLy divided into treatment group and control group, 432 cases in treatment group and control group. Treatment group and the control group were given the conventional treatment, treatment group on the basis of routine treatment, taking warming the kidney and strengthening the spleen Decoction in the treatment of drugs (mainly:Polygonatum 15g, amber 12g, Radix Polygoni Multiflori 15g, Epimedium 15g, calcined oyster 12g, peony root 12g, glabrous greenbrier rhizome 12g, etc.).Results the total effective rate was 85.72% in the treatment group and two in the control group (P < 0.01), and the total effective rate was 61.91% in the control group (two). The renal function and quality of life of the two groups were significantly improved, and the application was safe.Conclusionthe clinical effect of warming kidney and invigorating spleen Decoction on treating chronic renal failure can be obtained.

  3. 慢性肾脏疾病增加慢性心力衰竭患者死亡率%Chronic kidney disease is associated with increased mortality in patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程中伟; 朱孔博; 方理刚; 张抒扬; 严晓伟; 朱文玲; 方全

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the influence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) on mortality in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) . Methods Ischemic (at least 40 days after myocardial infarction) or non-ischemic cardiomyopathy patients (with left ventricular ejection fraction≤45% and age≥ 21 years) admitted to Pelting Union Medical College Hospital from January 1,2007 to December 31,2009 were retrospectively studied. The patients were classified into two groups according to eGFR: CKD group (eGFR <60 ml·miiT-l. 73 m-2) and control group (eGFR3≥60 ml·min-1·1. 73 m-2). Results A total of 242 patients were screened. Of those 41 patients were excluded because of disaccording with the inclusion criteria,201 patients were followed up (all-cause mortality),and 14 patients (7% ) were lost to follow-up. A total of 36 patients died from any cause during (20 ±9) months of follow up,including 21 patients (30% ) in CKD group and 15 patients (13% ) in control group (P =0.003). Conclusions CKD is associated with increased mortality in CHF patients. In CHF patients combined with CKD,the treatment for CKD is as important as the treatment for CHF.%目的 探讨慢性肾脏疾病(CKD)对慢性心力衰竭(CHF)患者死亡率的影响.方法 对2007年1月1日至2009年12月31日在北京协和医院心内科住院,年龄≥21岁,临床诊断为心力衰竭,且左心室射血分数(LVEF)≤45%的缺血性(心肌梗死后至少40d以上)或非缺血性心肌病患者进行回顾性研究,根据肾小球滤过率(eGFR)情况分为两组,一组为eGFR <60 ml·min-1 ·1.73 m-2(CKD组),另一组为eGFR≥60 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2(对照组),并进行电话随访.结果 共筛选242例患者,除外41例不符合入选标准者,对201例进行随访,14例(7%)失访,经过2 ~41个月[平均(20±9)个月]的随访,共36例(19%)发生全因死亡,包括CKD组21例(30%)和对照组15例(13%)(P=0.003).结论 CKD增加CHF患者死亡率.合并CKD的CHF患者,积极处理CHF的同时应高度重视CKD处理.

  4. K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension and Antihypertensive Agents in Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Rocco, Michael V.; Anderson, Sharon; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Bailie, George R.; Bakris, George L.; Callahan, Mary Beth; Greene, Jane H.; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Lash, James P.; McCullough, Peter A.; Miller III, Edgar R.; Nally, Joseph V.; Pirsch, John D.; Portman, Ronald J.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Sica, Domenic; Wesson, Donald E.; Agodoa, Lawrence; Bolton, Kline; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Hostetter, Tom; Lau, Joseph; Uhlig, Katrin; Chew, Priscilla; Kausz, Annamaria; Kupelnick, Bruce; Raman, Gowri; Sarnak, Mark; Wang, Chenchen; Astor, Brad C.; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Adeera; Levin, Nathan; Bailie, George; Becker, Bryan; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Carrera, Fernando; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Crooks, Peter W.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greenwood, Roger; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Haley, William E.; Hogg, Ronald; Hull, Alan R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lameire, Norbert; Locatelli, Francesco; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Obrador, Gregorio; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Ronco, Claudio; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Schoolwerth, Anton C.; Star, Robert; Steffes, Michael; Steinman, Theodore; Wauters, John-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Pereira, Brian J.G.; Willis, Kerry; Gucciardo, Anthony; Fingerhut, Donna; Klette, Margaret; Schachne, Elicia

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CHRONIC KIDNEY disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure (Fig 1), with poor outcomes and high cost. The prevalence of earlier stages of CKD is approximately 100 times greater than the prevalence

  5. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  6. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need....... In addition, combination treatment seemed safe and effective also in patients with impaired kidney function. These initial findings formed the basis for the design of a large morbidity and mortality trial investigating aliskiren as add-on to standard treatment. The study has just concluded, but was terminated...... early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin inhibition in chronic...

  7. Renal denervation in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, Peter J.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that ablation of renal sympathetic nerves reduces blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and preserved renal function. Hering et al. have now investigated the efficacy and safety of this procedure in patients with moderate to severe chronic kidney dise

  8. Screening of Elderly for Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lezaic, Visnja; Bajcetic, Sanja; Perunicic-Pekovic, Gordana; Bukvic, Danica; Dimkovic, Nada; Djukanovic, Ljubica

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims: The frequency of chronic kidney disease (CKD) markers was assessed in two groups of patients over 60 years - one without and the other with hypertension. Methods: The cross-sectional study involved 585 asymptomatic elderly patients (227 males), 93 without and 492 with hypertensi

  9. Vascular cognitive impairments in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of development of cognitive impairments (CIs, the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and renal failure-induced factors in patients with Stages I–IV chronic kidney disease (CKD and to assess an association of CIs with the signs of vascular wall remodeling in them. Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients aged 53±10 years with CKD were examined. Among them, there were 20 patients with Stages I–II CKD: a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of і60 ml/min/1.73 m2, signs of renal lesion; 20 with Stages III CKD: a GFR of <60–30 ml/min/1.73 m2, and 11 with Stages VI CKD: a GFR of <30–15 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results and discussion. CIs were more common in the patients with Stages III–IV than in those with Stages I–II, as shown by the scores of the mini-mental state examination (p<0.001, the frontal assessment battery (p=0.001, and the regulatory function test (p<0.001. These tests showed that the magnitude of CIs increased with the higher stage of CKD. Stages III–IV CKD is an independent predictor of CIs in persons with predialysis-stage kidney lesion. CIs were found to be related to hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, abdominal obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and patient age. The signs of atherosclerotic lesion of the common carotid arteries and the indicators of arterial stiffness were also associated with the incidence and magnitude of CIs in CKD. The detection of CIs in patients with early CKD allows one to timely initiate adequate therapy aimed particularly at improving cerebral circulation, eliminating the impact of risk factors, and slowing down the vascular remodeling. The management tactics for patients with CKD must involve the identification and correction of cardiovascular risk factors, and duplex scanning of the wall of the common carotid arteries may be used as a noninvasive method to assess the risk of the development and progression of CIs in predialysis CKD. 

  10. Low expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in chronic kidney disease in young dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Akira; Miyazaki, Akiko; Ichii, Osamu; Kohyama, Moeko; Sawa, Mariko; Yamato, Osamu

    2016-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) often results in end-stage renal failure in young dogs; however, the pathogenesis of this disease is not established. This study investigated renal expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 proteins in three dogs with chronic kidney disease by immunohistochemistry. Histopathology showed asynchronous differentiation of renal tissues, including immature glomeruli. COX-1 signals were not detected in diseased or normal kidneys. COX-2 signals were low or undetectable in diseased kidneys, while normal kidneys showed clear positive signals in the macula densa (MD). Quantitative scores of COX-2 in diseased kidneys were significantly lower than those in normal kidneys. These findings demonstrate low renal COX-2 expression in CKD in young dogs, but whether this is correlated with disease pathogenesis remains unclear.

  11. Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rich foods such as potatoes, tomatoes, oranges, and bananas. However, be careful not to eat too much ... Eat Right to Feel Right on Hemodialysis Fact Sheets Kidney Failure: What to Expect Vascular Access for ...

  12. Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2014-01-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant huma...

  13. Metformin in patients with chronic kidney disease: strengths and weaknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Ana; Almeida, Marta; Santos, Josefina; Carvalho, André

    2013-01-01

    A wide array of benefits has been attributed to metformin. These include attenuation of abnormal glucose metabolism (diabetes treatment and prevention), weight neutrality or weight loss, improvement in the pathophysiologic components of metabolic syndrome (insulin resistance, subclinical inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction), lipid-lowering properties, cardiovascular protection, and antineoplastic potential. Metformin itself is not a nephrotoxic drug. Initially appointed as the safest hypoglycemic agent in chronic kidney disease, its use has been limited in these patients because of the perceived risk of lactic acidosis. A fear perpetuated by numerous case reports in which it is implicated. Current guidelines stipulate that it must be used with caution in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs) of less than 60 mL/minute and not at all in eGFRs of less than 30 mL/minute. Identified risk factors for metformin-associated lactic acidosis include acute kidney injury, hypoxemia, sepsis, alcohol abuse, liver failure, myocardial infarction, and shock. Treatment may include supportive care and dialysis techniques. On the other hand, it is likely that the use of metformin would be beneficial in many with chronic kidney disease according to the advantages associated with attenuation of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular protection. The reality of severe metformin-induced lactic acidosis in the absence of chronic renal impairment raises the question of limitation of its use in these patients.

  14. Intestinal microbiota-kidney cross talk in acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Sanjeev; Martina-Lingua, Maria N; Bandapalle, Samatha; Pluznick, Jennifer; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A; Peterson, Daniel A; Rabb, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of acute kidney injury (AKI) involves multiple and overlapping immunological, biochemical, and hemodynamic mechanisms that modulate the effects of both the initial insult and the subsequent repair. Limited but recent experimental data have revealed that the intestinal microbiota significantly affects outcomes in AKI. Additional evidence shows significant changes in the intestinal microbiota in chronic kidney disease patients and in experimental AKI. In this minireview, we discuss the current status of the effect of intestinal microbiota on kidney diseases, the immunomodulatory effects of intestinal microbiota, and the potential mechanisms by which microbiota can modify kidney diseases and vice versa. We also propose future studies to clarify the role of intestinal microbiota in kidney diseases and to explore how the modification of gut microbiota may be a potential therapeutic tool.

  15. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  16. Chronic heart failure and micronutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, K K; Clark, A L; Cleland, J G

    2001-06-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with weight loss, and cachexia is a well-recognized complication. Patients have an increased risk of osteoporosis and lose muscle bulk early in the course of the disease. Basal metabolic rate is increased in HF, but general malnutrition may play a part in the development of cachexia, particularly in an elderly population. There is evidence for a possible role for micronutrient deficiency in HF. Selective deficiency of selenium, calcium and thiamine can directly lead to the HF syndrome. Other nutrients, particularly vitamins C and E and beta-carotene, are antioxidants and may have a protective effect on the vasculature. Vitamins B6, B12 and folate all tend to reduce levels of homocysteine, which is associated with increased oxidative stress. Carnitine, co-enzyme Q10 and creatine supplementation have resulted in improved exercise capacity in patients with HF in some studies. In this article, we review the relation between micronutrients and HF. Chronic HF is characterized by high mortality and morbidity, and research effort has centered on pharmacological management, with the successful introduction of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta-adrenergic antagonists into routine practice. There is sufficient evidence to support a large-scale trial of dietary micronutrient supplementation in HF.

  17. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  18. INDUCTION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE IN A LONG-TERM PERITONEAL EXPOSURE MODEL IN THE RAT: EFFECTS ON FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL PERITONEAL ALTERATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vrtovsnik; A. Coester; D. Lopes-Barreto; D.R. de Waart; A. van der Wal; D.G. Struijk; R. Krediet; M. Zweers

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-term peritoneal exposure model has been developed in Wistar rats. Chronic daily exposure to 3.86% glucose based, lactate buffered, conventional dialysis solutions is possible for up to 20 weeks and induces morphological abnormalities similar to those in long-term peritoneal dialys

  19. Chronic kidney Disease and the Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, Marcello; Riellae, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing. George Bernard Shaw The proportion of older people in the general population is steadily increasing worldwide, with the most rapid growth in low-and middle-income countries [1]. This demographic change is to be celebrated, because it is the consequence of socioeconomic development and better life expectancy. However, population aging also has important implications for society - in diverse areas including health systems, labor markets, public policy, social programs, and family dynamics [2]. A successful response to the aging population will require capitalizing on the opportunities that this transition offers, as well as effectively addressing its challenges. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important public health problem that is characterized by poor health outcomes and very high health care costs. CKD is a major risk multiplier in patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart disease and stroke - all of which are key causes of death and disability in older people [3]. Since the prevalence of CKD is higher in older people, the health impact of population aging will depend in part on how the kidney community responds. March 13, 2014 will mark the celebration of the 9th World Kidney Day (WKD), an annual event jointly sponsored by the International Society of Nephrology and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations. Since its inception in 2006, WKD has become the most successful effort to raise awareness among policymakers and the general public about the importance of kidney disease. The topic for WKD 2014 is "CKD in older people". This article reviews the key links between kidney function, age, health and illness - and discusses the implications of the aging population for the care of people with CKD.

  20. ISCHEMIA in chronic kidney disease: improving the representation of patients with chronic kidney disease in cardiovascular trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Christina M; Shineski, Matthew; Chertow, Glenn M; Bangalore, Sripal

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high cardiovascular risk associated with chronic kidney disease, a recent systematic review confirmed that patients with kidney disease remain underrepresented in cardiovascular trials. Two ongoing trials are assessing the risk:benefit of aggressive evaluation and intervention for ischemic heart disease in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

  1. Cardiovascular complications of chronic renal failure - an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, G C; Sutradhar, S R; Barua, U K; Datta, N C; Debnath, C R; Hoque, M M; Hossain, A S; Haider, M S; Das, M

    2012-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is frequently associated with CKD, which is important because individuals with CKD are more likely to die from CVD than to develop kidney failure. CVD in CKD is treatable and potentially preventable and CKD appears to be a risk factor for CVD. In order of incidence and frequency systemic hypertension, left ventricular failure, congestive cardiac failure, ischemic heart disease, anaemic heart failure, rhythm disturbances, pericarditis with or without effusion, cardiac tamponade, uraemic cardiomyopathy are various cardiovascular complications encountered in patients with chronic renal failure. A patient may present with one or more complications of cardiovascular system. The survival rate and prognosis to a great extent depends on proper management of these complications. Use of regular dialysis and renal transplant has changed the death pattern in developed countries but it is still a major problem in developing country. The aim of this article is early detection of CKD and proper management of it thereby preventing the major cardiovascular complications.

  2. Sympathetic nervous system and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boero, R; Pignataro, A; Ferro, M; Quarello, F

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work was to review evidence on the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in chronic renal failure (CRF). Three main points are discussed: 1) SNS and pathogenesis of arterial hypertension; 2) SNS and cardiovascular risk; 3) implication of SNS in arterial hypotension during hemodialysis. Several lines of evidence indicate the presence of a sympathetic hyperactivity in CRF, and its relationship with arterial hypertension. It is suggested that diseased kidneys send afferent nervous signals to central integrative sympathetic nuclei, thus contributing to the development and maintenance of arterial hypertension. The elimination of these impulses with nephrectomy could explain the concomitant reduction of blood pressure. Several experiments confirmed this hypothesis. Regarding SNS and cardiovascular risk, some data suggest that reduced heart rate variability identifies an increased risk for both all causes and sudden death, independently from other recognized risk factors. Symptomatic hypotension is a common problem during hemodialysis treatment, occurring in approximately 20-30% of all hemodialysis sessions and is accompanied by acute withdrawal of sympathetic activity, vasodilation and relative bradicardia. This reflex is thought to be evoked by vigorous contraction of a progressively empty left ventricle, activating cardiac mechanoceptors. This inhibits cardiovascular centers through vagal afferents, and overrides the stimulation by baroreceptor deactivation. Alternative explanations include cerebral ischemia and increased production of nitric oxide, which inhibit central sympathetic activity. It is hoped that therapies aimed at modulating sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CRF will ameliorate their prognosis and quality of life.

  3. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  4. Sexual function in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Priya; Schmidt, Rebecca J

    2007-04-01

    Endocrine abnormalities are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and lead to sexual dysfunction, anemia, hyperparathyroidism, and altered mineral metabolism. Common clinical problems include disturbances in menstruation in women, erectile dysfunction in men, and decreased libido and infertility in both sexes. Organic factors tend to be prominent and are related to uremia and other comorbid illnesses. Psychological factors and depression may exacerbate the primary problem. Alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis are seen early in CKD and tend to worsen after patients start dialysis. Hypogonadism plays a dominant role in male sexual function, whereas changes in hypothalamic-pituitary function predominate in female sexual dysfunction. In patients on dialysis, treatment strategies include optimizing dose of dialysis, correction of anemia with erythropoietin, and correction of hyperparathyroidism. Successful kidney transplantation may restore normal sexual function, especially in younger patients.

  5. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  6. Short Stature in Chronic Kidney Disease Treated with Growth Hormone and an Aromatase Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R. Mendley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe an alternative strategy for management of severe growth failure in a 14-year-old child who presented with advanced chronic kidney disease close to puberty. The patient was initially treated with growth hormone for a year until kidney transplantation, followed immediately by a year-long course of an aromatase inhibitor, anastrozole, to prevent epiphyseal fusion and prolong the period of linear growth. Outcome was excellent, with successful transplant and anticipated complete correction of height deficit. This strategy may be appropriate for children with chronic kidney disease and short stature who are in puberty.

  7. Proteomic Biomarkers Panel: New Insights in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Mihai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease, despite being a “silent epidemic” disease, represents one of the main causes of mortality in general population, along with cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of poor prognosis for these patients. The specific objective of our study was to characterize the relationship between the inflammatory status, the bone disorders markers, and kidney failure in chronic kidney disease patient stages 2–4, in order to design a novel biomarker panel that improves early disease diagnosis and therapeutic response, thus being further integrated into clinical applications. A panel of proteomic biomarkers, assessed by xMAP array, which includes mediators of inflammation (IL-6, TNF-α and mineral and bone disorder biomarkers (OPG, OPN, OCN, FGF-23, and Fetuin-A, was found to be more relevant than a single biomarker to detect early CKD stages. The association between inflammatory cytokines and bone disorders markers, IL-6, TNF-α, OPN, OPG, and FGF-23, reflects the severity of vascular changes in CKD and predicts disease progression. Proteomic xMAP analyses shed light on a new approach to clinical evaluation for CKD staging and prognosis.

  8. Vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kristin M; Adams, Michael A; Holden, Rachel M

    2013-11-07

    The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  9. Male Sexual Dysfunction and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edey, Matthew M.

    2017-01-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly in end-stage renal disease. Historically, this cause of considerable morbidity has been under-reported and under-recognized. The ideal approach to diagnosis and management remains unclear due to a paucity of good quality data, but an understanding of the pathophysiology is necessary in order to address the burden of this important complication of CKD. This paper will review the endocrine dysfunction that occurs in renal disease, particularly the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis, discuss the causes of erectile dysfunction, infertility, and altered body image and libido in these patients and suggest appropriate treatment interventions. PMID:28382300

  10. Blood vitamin levels in dogs with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, A; Tran, J L; Krammer-Lukas, S; Höller, U; Thalhammer, J G; Zentek, J; Willmann, M

    2012-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) may affect excretion and metabolism of vitamins but data for dogs are limited. In this study, blood vitamin levels were investigated in 19 dogs with chronic renal failure. High performance liquid chromatography was used to quantify retinol, retinyl esters, tocopherol, thiamine, riboflavin, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, ascorbic acid and 25-hydroxycholecalciferol concentrations, whereas cobalamin, folate, biotin and pantothenic acid were measured by microbiological methods. Levels of retinol, retinyl palmitate, ascorbic acid, and vitamins B1, B2 and B6 were increased compared to healthy dogs. Dogs with CKD showed decreased concentrations of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol and folate. Alpha-tocopherol, biotin, pantothenate and cobalamin levels were not significantly different between controls and dogs with CKD. Whether lower vitamin D and folate concentrations in dogs with CKD justify supplementation has to be evaluated in future studies.

  11. Congestive kidney failure in cardiac surgery: the relationship between central venous pressure and acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambardella, Ivancarmine; Gaudino, Mario; Ronco, Claudio; Lau, Christopher; Ivascu, Natalia; Girardi, Leonard N

    2016-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) in cardiac surgery has traditionally been linked to reduced arterial perfusion. There is ongoing evidence that central venous pressure (CVP) has a pivotal role in precipitating acute renal dysfunction in cardiac medical and surgical settings. We can regard this AKI driven by systemic venous hypertension as 'kidney congestive failure'. In the cardiac surgery population as a whole, when the CVP value reaches the threshold of 14 mmHg in postoperative period, the risk of AKI increases 2-fold with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.99, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.16-3.40. In cardiac surgery subsets where venous hypertension is a hallmark feature, the incidence of AKI is higher (tricuspid disease 30%, carcinoid valve disease 22%). Even in the non-chronically congested coronary artery bypass population, CVP measured 6 h postoperatively showed significant association to renal failure: risk-adjusted OR for AKI was 5.5 (95% CI 1.93-15.5; P = 0.001) with every 5 mmHg rise in CVP for patients with CVP <9 mmHg; for CVP increments of 5 mmHg above the threshold of 9 mmHg, the risk-adjusted OR for AKI was 1.3 (95% CI 1.01-1.65; P = 0.045). This and other clinical evidence are discussed along with the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, involving the supremacy of volume receptors in regulating the autonomic output in hypervolaemia, and the regional effect of venous congestion on the nephron. The effect of CVP on renal function was found to be modulated by ventricular function class, aetiology and acuity of venous congestion. Evidence suggests that acute increases of CVP should be actively treated to avoid a deterioration of the renal function, particularly in patients with poor ventricular fraction. Besides, the practice of treating right heart failure with fluid loading should be avoided in favour of other ways to optimize haemodynamics in this setting, because of the detrimental effects on the kidney function.

  12. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-05-06

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD.

  13. Exploration of Applying the Theory of Asending and Descending in the Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure from the Perspective of Spleen and Kidney%运用升降理论从脾肾论治慢性肾功能衰竭探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘禹; 童安荣

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical efficacy of chronic renal failure with the guidance of the asending and descending theory from the relationship of spleen as the acquired foundation and kidney as the innate foundation. Methods: A detailed investigation of the etiology and pathogenesis of chronic renal failure was conducted by using Chinese medicine theory, and treatment measures were proposed. Results: It was advocated that disharmony of asending and descending was the main mechanism of chronic renal failure, and it was also stressed that the spleen and kidney deficiency was the main cause of disharmony of asending and descending of chronic renal failure. In the treatment, the important principle for the treatment of chronic renal failure was to regulate the spleen and stomach, regulate the liver,and harmonize the heart and kidney. Conclusion:The satisfactory curative efficacy of treating chronic renal failure can be achieved with the guidance of the asending and descending theory from the perspective of the spleen and kidney.%目的:探讨运用中医升降理论为指导,从脾肾先天后天关系着手论治慢性肾功能衰竭的临床疗效.方法:运用中医理论详查慢性肾功能衰竭的病因病机,并提出治疗措施.结果:主张升降失常是慢性肾功能衰竭的主要机理,强调脾肾亏虚是导致慢性肾功能衰竭升降失常的主要原因.在治疗中主张调脾胃、疏肝、交通心肾是治疗慢性肾功能衰竭的重要原则.结论:以升降理论为指导从脾肾论治慢性肾功能衰竭取得满意效果.

  14. Histórico familiar de crianças com insuficiência renal crônica: coleta de dados Family history of chilren with chronic kidney failure: data colection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érica Simpionato

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Na sistematização do cuidado, o histórico de enfermagem é a primeira etapa do processo. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar a experiência de coleta de dados para planejamento do cuidado em famílias de crianças com Insuficiência Renal Crônica em diálise peritoneal. O referencial teórico utilizado foi Enfermagem Familiar. A coleta de dados ocorreu através de entrevista em profundidade, análise de documentos, diário de campo, genograma e ecomapa. Participaram da pesquisa quatro famílias. Os autores discutem a entrevista em profundidade, suas limitações e vantagens, a construção do genograma e ecomapa e as implicações éticas, legais e sociais. Concluem com considerações gerais sobre a aplicação destes instrumentos para o cuidado à família de criança com insuficiência renal crônica em diálise peritoneal.En la sistematización del cuidado, el histórico de enfermería constituye la primera etapa del proceso. La finalidad de este artículo es presentar la experiencia de recopilación de datos para el planeo del cuidado en familias de niños con Insuficiencia Renal Crónica en diálisis peritoneal. La Enfermería Familiar fue utilizada como referencial teórico. Para recopilar los datos, se utilizó entrevista con profundidad, análisis de documentos, diario de campo, genograma y ecomapa. Cuatro familias participaron de la investigación. Los autores discuten la entrevista con profundidad, sus limitaciones y ventajas, la construcción del genograma y ecomapa y las implicaciones éticas, legales y sociales. Terminan con consideraciones generales sobre la aplicación de estos instrumentos para el cuidado a las familias de niños con insuficiencia renal crónica en diálisis peritoneal.The systematization process of care has as its first step the nursing history. This study aims to present the experience of data collection for care planning involving families of children with Chronic Kidney Failure on peritoneal dialysis

  15. Sex-linked differences in the course of chronic kidney disease and congestive heart failure: a study in 5/6 nephrectomized Ren-2 transgenic hypertensive rats with volume overload induced using aorto-caval fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Červenka, Luděk; Škaroupková, Petra; Kompanowska-Jezierska, Elzbieta; Sadowski, Janusz

    2016-10-01

    The role of hypertension and the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) in sex-related differences in the course of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and congestive heart failure (CHF) remain unclear, especially when the two diseases are combined. In male and female Ren-2 transgenic rats (TGR), a model of hypertension with activation of endogenous RAS, CKD was induced by 5/6 renal mass reduction (5/6 NX) and CHF was elicited by volume overload achieved by creation of an aorto-caval fistula (ACF). The primary aim of the study was to examine long-term CKD- and CHF-related mortality, especially in animals with CKD and CHF combined, with particular interest in the potential sex-related differences. The follow-up period was 23 weeks after the first intervention (5/6 NX). We found, first, that TGR did not exhibit sexual dimorphism in the course of 5/6 NX-induced CKD. Second, in contrast, TGR exhibited important sex-related differences in the course of ACF-induced CHF-related mortality: intact female TGR showed higher survival rate than male TGR. This situation is reversed in the course of combined 5/6 NX-induced CKD and ACF-induced CHF-related mortality: intact female TGR exhibited poorer survival than male TGR. Third, the survival rate in animals with combined 5/6 NX-induced CKD and ACF-induced CHF was significantly worsened as compared with rat groups that were exposed to 'single organ disease'. Collectively, our present results clearly show that CKD aggravates long-term mortality of animals with CHF. In addition, TGR exhibit remarkable sexual dimorphism with respect to CKD- and CHF-related mortality, especially in animals with combined CKD and CHF.

  16. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mir-davood Omrani; Mohammad Hassan Khadem Ansari

    2006-01-01

    HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF) becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α|) and interleukin (IL) 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unre...

  17. Obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall ME

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Hall,1,2 Jussara M do Carmo,2 Alexandre A da Silva,2 Luis A Juncos,1,2 Zhen Wang,2 John E Hall2 1Department of Medicine, 2Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mississippi Center for Obesity Research, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USA Abstract: Obesity is a major risk factor for essential hypertension, diabetes, and other comorbid conditions that contribute to development of chronic kidney disease. Obesity raises blood pressure by increasing renal tubular sodium reabsorption, impairing pressure natriuresis, and causing volume expansion via activation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and by physical compression of the kidneys, especially when there is increased visceral adiposity. Other factors such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and lipotoxicity may also contribute to obesity-mediated hypertension and renal dysfunction. Initially, obesity causes renal vasodilation and glomerular hyperfiltration, which act as compensatory mechanisms to maintain sodium balance despite increased tubular reabsorption. However, these compensations, along with increased arterial pressure and metabolic abnormalities, may ultimately lead to glomerular injury and initiate a slowly developing vicious cycle that exacerbates hypertension and worsens renal injury. Body weight reduction, via caloric restriction and increased physical activity, is an important first step for management of obesity, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. However, this strategy may not be effective in producing long-term weight loss or in preventing cardiorenal and metabolic consequences in many obese patients. The majority of obese patients require medical therapy for obesity-associated hypertension, metabolic disorders, and renal disease, and morbidly obese patients may require surgical interventions to produce sustained weight loss. Keywords: visceral adiposity, type II diabetes, sodium reabsorption

  18. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  19. [Clinicopathological study of chronic kidney diseases (CKD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2012-02-01

    up-to-date information and techniques in clinical nephrology. From this hospital, I published a paper in Kidney International entitled, "Mesangiolytic glomerulopathy in severe congestive heart failure", based on the autopsy cases collected at the Pathology Department. This paper became a milestone in starting to study the role of chronic hypoxia in CKD. In 1999, I was elected as a professor of the Department of Clinical Laboratories, Faculty of Medicine, University of Fukui. In Fukui, I could extend my hypoxia study to cellular levels and diabetic mouse experiments in collaboration with Dr. Kimura, Dr. Li, Dr. Takahashi and many other doctors and technicians. When overviewing my research history, I realize that I was fortunate to be involved at the starting point of every laboratory with energetic mood and that I was supported and helped by many people.

  20. Acute Ischemic Stroke and Acute on Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Ahsan Aftab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemic stroke is due to either local thrombus formation or emboli that occlude a cerebral artery, together with chronic kidney disease represent major mortality and morbidity. Here wer present a case of 53 years old Malay man, admitted to a hospital in Malaysia complaining of sudden onset of weakness on right sided upper and lower limb associated with slurred speech. Patient was also suffering from uncontrolled hypertension, hyperlipidemia, chronic kidney disease stage 4, and diabetes mellitus(un controlled. He was diagnosed with acute ischemic stroke with cranial nerve 7 palsy (with right hemiparesis, acute on chronic kidney disease precipitated by dehydration and ACE inhibitor, and hyperkalemia. Patients with ischemic disease and chronic kidney disaese require constant monitering and carefull selected pharmacotherapy. Patient was placed under observation and was prescribed multiple pharamacotherpay to stabalise detoriating condition. Keywords: ischemic disease; chronic kidney disease; uncontrolled hypertension. | PubMed

  1. Malignancy and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramon

    2003-01-01

    Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Certain malignant diseases, such as lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus, show an enhanced prevalence compared with the general population. In particular, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) shows an excess incidence in ESRD patients. A multitude of factors, directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens, may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Patients undergoing renal replacement therapy (RRT) are prone to develop acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may subsequently lead to the development of RCC. In pre-dialysis patients with coexistent renal disease, as in dialysis and transplant patients, the presence of ACKD may predispose to RCC. Previous use of cytotoxic drugs (eg, cyclophosphamide) or a history of analgesic abuse, are additional risk factors for malignancy. Malignancy following renal transplantation is an important medical problem during the follow-up. The most common malignancies are lymphoproliferative disorders (early after transplantation) and skin carcinomas (late after transplantation). Another important confounder for risk of malignancy after renal transplantation is the type of immunosuppression. The type of malignancy is different in various countries and dependent on genetic and environmental factors. Finally, previous cancer treatment in a uremic patient on the transplant waiting list is of great importance in relation to waiting time and post-malignancy screening.

  2. [Sympathetic nerve activity in chronic renal failure - what are the therapeutic options?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausberg, M; Tokmak, F

    2013-11-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure are characterized by a tonic elevation of sympathetic tone. This factor largely contributes to their increased cardiovascular risk. The increased sympathetic drive is caused by activiation of renal afferent fibers in the diseased kidneys. Therapeutic options for hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure with respect to their sympathetic overactivity are inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-system and central sympatholytic drugs. The role of catheter-based renal denervation in these patients is currently under investigation.

  3. Chronic kidney disease: considerations for nutrition interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, Alison L

    2014-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is highly prevalent and has major health consequences for patients. Caring for patients with CKD requires knowledge of the food supply, renal pathophysiology, and nutrition-related medications used to work synergistically with diet to control the signs and symptoms of the disease. The nutrition care process and International Dietetic and Nutrition Terminology allow for systematic, holistic, quality care of patients with this complex, progressive disease. Nutrition interventions must be designed with the individual patients needs in mind while prioritizing factors with the largest negative impact on health outcomes and mortality risk. New areas of nutrition treatment are emerging that involve a greater focus on micronutrient needs, the microbiome, and vegetarian-style diets. These interventions may improve outcomes by decreasing inflammation, improving energy and protein delivery, and lowering phosphorus, electrolytes, and fluid retention.

  4. Chronic kidney disease and bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Junichiro James; Matsuo, Koji; Iwasaki, Yoshiko; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease-related mineral and bone disease (CKD-MBD) is a syndrome defined as a systemic mineral metabolic disorder associated with CKD, and the term renal osteodystrophy indicates a pathomorphological concept of bone lesions associated with CKD-MBD. Cortical bone thinning, abnormalities in bone turnover and primary/secondary mineralization, elevated levels of circulating sclerostin, increased apoptosis in osteoblasts and osteocytes, disturbance of the coupling phenomenon, iatrogenic factors, accumulated micro-crackles, crystal/collagen disorientation, and chemical modification of collagen crosslinks are all possible candidates found in CKD that could promote osteopenia and/or bone fragility. Some of above factors are the consequences of abnormal systemic mineral metabolism but for others it seem unlikely. We have used the term uremic osteoporosis to describe the uremia-induced bone fragility which is not derived from abnormal systemic mineral metabolism. Interestingly, the disease aspect of uremic osteoporosis appears to be similar to that of senile osteoporosis.

  5. Thiazide diuretics in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Sinha, Arjun D

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is prevalent in 3%-4% of the adult population in the United States, and the vast majority of these people are hypertensive. Compared with those with essential hypertension, hypertension in CKD remains poorly controlled despite the use of multiple antihypertensive drugs. Hypervolemia is thought to be a major cause of hypertension, and diuretics are useful to improve blood pressure control in CKD. Non-osmotic storage of sodium in the skin and muscle may be a novel mechanism by which sodium may modulate hypertension; further work is need to study this novel phenomenon with diuretics. Among people with stage 4 CKD, loop diuretics are recommended over thiazides. Thiazide diuretics are deemed ineffective in people with stage 4 CKD. Review of the literature suggests that thiazides may be useful even among people with advanced CKD. They cause a negative sodium balance, increasing sodium excretion by 10%-15% and weight loss by 1-2 kg in observational studies. Observational data show improvement in seated clinic blood pressure of about 10-15 mm Hg systolic and 5-10 mm Hg diastolic, whereas randomized trials show about 15 mm Hg improvement in mean arterial pressure. Volume depletion, hyponatremia, hypokalemia, hypercalcemia, and acute kidney injury are adverse effects that should be closely monitored. Our review suggests that adequately powered randomized trials are needed before the use of thiazide diuretics can be firmly recommended in those with advanced CKD.

  6. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  7. Pseudomelanosis duodeni associated with chronic renal failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcia Henriques de Magalh(a)es Costa; Maria da Gloria Fernandes Pegado; Cleber Vargas; Maria Elizabeth C Castro; Kalil Madi; Tiago Nunes; Cyrla Zaltman

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomelanosis duodeni (PD) is a rare dark speckled appearance of the duodenum associated with gastrointestinal bleeding,hypertension,chronic heart failure,chronic renal failure and consumption of different drugs.We report four cases of PD associated with chronic renal failure admitted to the gastroenterology outpatient unit due to epigastric pain,nausea,melena and progressive reduction of hemoglobin index.Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed erosions in the esophagus and stomach,with no active bleeding at the moment.In addition,the duodenal mucosa presented marked signs of melanosis; later confirmed by histopathological study.Even though PD is usually regarded as a benign condition,its pathogenesis and clinical significance is yet to be defined.

  8. Kidney Failure and Liver Allocation: Current Practices and Potential Improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Varun; Lai, Jennifer C

    2015-09-01

    In February 2002, the United Network for Organ Sharing implemented a system for prioritizing candidates for liver transplantation that was based on the risk of 90-day mortality as determined by the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. As the MELD score is driven in part by serum creatinine as a marker of kidney function, the prevalence of kidney dysfunction and failure in patients with end-stage liver disease at the time of listing and at transplantation has steadily risen. In this review, we discuss current practices in liver transplantation in patients with kidney dysfunction focusing briefly on the decision to perform simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. We then discuss pitfalls to the current practices of liver transplantation in patients with kidney dysfunction. We conclude by discussing potential improvements to current practices including the use of the MELD-Na score, alternatives to creatinine and creatinine-based equation for estimating kidney function, and the use of intraoperative kidney replacement therapy during liver transplantation.

  9. Thrombospondin-1 deficiency causes a shift from fibroproliferative to inflammatory kidney disease and delays onset of renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeisberg, Michael; Tampe, Björn; LeBleu, Valerie; Tampe, Desiree; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Kalluri, Raghu

    2014-10-01

    Thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) is a multifunctional matricellular protein known to promote progression of chronic kidney disease. To gain insight into the underlying mechanisms through which TSP1 accelerates chronic kidney disease, we compared disease progression in Col4a3 knockout (KO) mice, which develop spontaneous kidney failure, with that of Col4a3;Tsp1 double-knockout (DKO) mice. Decline of excretory renal function was significantly delayed in the absence of TSP1. Although Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice did progress toward end-stage renal failure, their kidneys exhibited distinct histopathological lesions, compared with creatinine level-matched Col4a3 KO mice. Although kidneys of both Col4a3 KO and Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO mice exhibited a widened tubulointerstitium, predominant lesions in Col4a3 KO kidneys were collagen deposition and fibroblast accumulation, whereas in Col4a3;Tsp1 DKO kidney inflammation was predominant, with less collagen deposition. Altered disease progression correlated with impaired activation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vivo and in vitro in the absence of TSP1. In summary, our findings suggest that TSP1 contributes to progression of chronic kidney disease by catalyzing activation of latent TGF-β1, resulting in promotion of a fibroproliferative response over an inflammatory response. Furthermore, the findings suggest that fibroproliferative and inflammatory lesions are independent entities, both of which contribute to decline of renal function.

  10. The Kidney-Vascular-Bone Axis in the Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Michael E; Hruska, Keith A

    2016-03-01

    The last 25 years have been characterized by dramatic improvements in short-term patient and allograft survival after kidney transplantation. Long-term patient and allograft survival remains limited by cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft injury, among other factors. Cardiovascular disease remains a significant contributor to mortality in native chronic kidney disease as well as cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease more than doubles that of the general population. The chronic kidney disease (CKD)-mineral bone disorder (MBD) is a syndrome recently coined to embody the biochemical, skeletal, and cardiovascular pathophysiology that results from disrupting the complex systems biology between the kidney, skeleton, and cardiovascular system in native and transplant kidney disease. The CKD-MBD is a unique kidney disease-specific syndrome containing novel cardiovascular risk factors, with an impact reaching far beyond traditional notions of renal osteodystrophy and hyperparathyroidism. This overview reviews current knowledge of the pathophysiology of the CKD-MBD, including emerging concepts surrounding the importance of circulating pathogenic factors released from the injured kidney that directly cause cardiovascular disease in native and transplant chronic kidney disease, with potential application to mechanisms of chronic allograft injury and vasculopathy.

  11. [Chronic renal failure secondary to uterine prolapse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Canora, J; Venegas, J L

    2005-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure secondary to bilateral severe hydroureteronephrosis is a rare sequela of uterine prolapse. We report a case of neglected complete uterine prolapse in a 72-year-old patient resulting in bilateral hydroureter, hydronephrosis, and chronic renal failure. In an attempt to diminish the ureteral obstruction a vaginal pessary was used to reduce the uterine prolapse. Finally, surgical repair of prolapse by means of a vaginal hysterectomy was performed. In conclusion, all patients presenting with complete uterine prolapse should be screened to exclude urinary tract obstruction. If present, obstructive uropathy should be relieved by the reduction or repair of the prolapse before irreversible renal damage occurs.

  12. [Circulatory failure in chronic glomerulo- and pyelonephritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulakov, G P; Melikian, A M; Seĭsembekov, T Z

    1982-01-01

    The frequency and degree of circulatory insufficiency depending on the stage of the disease are analyzed in 404 patients with chronic glomerulonephritis and 145 patients with chronic pyelonephritis aged 15 to 74 years. When the renal function is still preserved different degrees of circulatory insufficiency are diagnosed in 29.4% of patients. Circulatory insufficiency complicates more often chronic glomerulonephritis than pyelonephritis and is more common in the aged. Latent cardiac insufficiency is more common. In the period of chronic renal insufficiency cardiac decompensation is seen in 78.1% of cases, its frequency is practically the same in glomerulonephritis and pyelonephritis. The mechanisms of development of cardiac insufficiency and the principles of treatment depending on the functional state of the kidneys are discussed.

  13. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Nasri

    2013-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). App...

  14. Homoarginine and progression of chronic kidney disease: results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Drechsler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54-5.19 using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. RESULTS: Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min, 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60-90 ml/min, 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30-60 ml/min and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min, respectively (p = 0.002. The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16-2.27, p = 0.005. This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11-2.20, p = 0.01, and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98-1.98, p = 0.06. CONCLUSIONS: Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  15. Advanced glycation endproducts in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Andries J.; Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schleicher, E; Somoza,; Shieberle, P

    2008-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been proposed as factors involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). Cross-linking by AGEs results in vascular and myocardial stiffening, which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of CHE Additionally, stimulation of receptors b

  16. New pharmacological strategies in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wal, RMA; Voors, AA; Plokker, HWM; van Gilst, WH; van Veldhuisen, DJ

    2004-01-01

    Diuretics, ACE inhibitors and betablockers form the cornerstone of pharmacological treatment of chronic heart failure (CHF), while angiotensin receptor blockers are gaining ground. However, despite optimal treatment CHF remains a syndrome with poor prognosis. For this reason, a large number of new a

  17. Hormones and arterial stiffness in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Ozkan; Kircelli, Fatih; Voroneanu, Luminita; Covic, Adrian; Ok, Ercan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the major cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Arterial stiffness is an important contributor to the occurrence and progression of cardiovascular disease. Various risk factors, including altered hormone levels, have been suggested to be associated with arterial stiffness. Based on the background that chronic kidney disease predisposes individuals to a wide range of hormonal changes, we herein review the available data on the association between arterial stiffness and hormones in patients with chronic kidney disease and summarize the data for the general population.

  18. Parathyroid hormone secretion in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q; Ladefoged, S D

    1996-01-01

    The aim of study was to introduce and evaluate a method for quantifying the parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion during hemodialysis in secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal failure. We developed a method suitable for inducing sequential hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia during....../ionized calcium curves were constructed, and a mean calcium set-point of 1.16 mmol/liter was estimated compared to the normal mean of about 1.13 mmol/liter. In conclusion, we demonstrate that it is important to use a standardized method to evaluate parathyroid hormone dynamics in chronic renal failure. By the use...... of a standardized method we show that the calcium set-point is normal or slightly elevated, indicating normal parathyroid reactivity to calcium in chronic renal failure....

  19. High serum enalaprilat in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, T; Heisterberg, J; Kamper, A L

    2001-01-01

    renal failure. METHODS: Fifty nine out-patients with plasma creatinine >150 micromol/L and chronic antihypertensive treatment with enalapril were investigated, in a cross-sectional design. RESULTS: Median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 23(range 6-60) ml/minute/1.73 m2. The daily dose of enalapril......-68) ml/minute and correlated linearly with GFR (r=0.86, p=0.003). Intra-subject day-to-day variation in trough concentrations was 19.7%. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic renal failure given small or moderately high doses of enalapril may thus have markedly elevated levels of serum enalaprilat. Whether......BACKGROUND: Most angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and their metabolites are excreted renally and doses should hence be reduced in renal insufficiency. We studied whether the dosage of enalapril in daily clinical practice is associated with drug accumulation of enalaprilat in chronic...

  20. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Paul D

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD). CKD-MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength; or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD-MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1-3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion-excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD-MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD-MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1-3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD-MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and safety of specific

  1. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul D Miller

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following:abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism;abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength;or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  2. Efeitos da correção da acidose metabólica com bicarbonato de sódio sobre o catabolismo protéico na insuficiência renal crônica The effects of the correction of metabolic acidosis with sodium bicarbonate on protein catabolism in chronic kidney failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise MAFRA

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available A desnutrição protéico-energética constitui problema comum aos pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica, influenciando diretamente na sua morbi-mortalidade. A acidose metabólica tem papel no catabolismo protéico, ativando a via proteolítica proteasoma-ubiquitina, dependente de adenosina trifosfato, e conjuntamente com glicocorticóides induz uma maior atividade na desidrogenase que degrada os aminoácidos de cadeia ramificada. Esta revisão teve como objetivo descrever o mecanismo pelo qual a acidose metabólica nos pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica promove o catabolismo protéico, favorecendo assim a desnutrição, bem como avaliar os efeitos do uso de bicarbonato de sódio na correção da acidose e conseqüentemente redução do catabolismo protéico. Pesquisas mostram melhora da acidose pelo uso de bicarbonato de sódio e conseqüente redução do catabolismo protéico na insuficiência renal crônica, podendo ser esta uma conduta promissora na atenuação da desnutrição nestes pacientes.Protein-Energy Malnutrition is common among patients with chronic kidney failure, thus increasing morbidity and mortality. Several studies have shown that metabolic acidosis is a major cause of muscle protein breakdown, and recently it was attributed to ATP-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. Acidosis, plus glucocorticoids, also respond to increasing branched-chain amino acids oxidation. In this review, the impact of metabolic acidosis on protein and amino acid metabolism is examined in order to understand its effect on lean body mass and the nutritional status of patients with chronic kidney failure. The study also observes whether or not sodium bicarbonate supplementation is beneficial to chronic kidney failure patients. In summary, there is a preliminary evidence suggesting that the correction of acidosis using sodium bicarbonate reduces protein degradation in chronic kidney failure patients, thus emerging as a

  3. Chronic Kidney Disease: Highlights for the General Pediatrician

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Quigley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease in the pediatric population has been increasing. Early detection and treatment can slow down the progression of kidney disease and help prevent the development of end stage renal disease. In addition, as the kidney function declines, there are many pathophysiologic interactions with other organ systems that need to be monitored and treated. In particular, because of impaired vitamin D metabolism, calcium and phosphorus homeostasis is dysregulated and results in secondary bone disease. Anemia is common due to a number of factors including impaired erythropoietin production. Growth is often impacted by chronic kidney disease but can be improved by proper treatment. Complications of chronic kidney disease can be minimized by proper monitoring and treatment of these parameters. The general pediatrician plays a critical role in this process.

  4. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-21

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  5. Thiazide Diuretics in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Arjun D; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2015-03-01

    Widely prevalent in the general population, chronic kidney disease (CKD) is frequently complicated with hypertension. Control of hypertension in this high-risk population is a major modifiable cardiovascular and renal risk factor but often requires multiple medications. Although thiazides are an attractive agent, guidelines have previously recommended against thiazide use in stage 4 CKD. We review the updated guidelines on thiazide use in advanced CKD, the antihypertensive mechanism of thiazides, and the clinical studies of thiazides in CKD. Older uncontrolled studies have shown that metolazone reduces blood pressure in CKD, but more recently small randomized controlled trials of hydrochlorothiazide in CKD have shown significant improvement in mean arterial pressure of 15 mmHg. Two recent uncontrolled studies of chlorthalidone including one that used ambulatory blood pressure monitoring found significant improvements in blood pressure. These findings all suggest that thiazides may be efficacious even in advanced CKD; however, electrolyte abnormalities were common in the studies reviewed so close monitoring is necessary during use. Adequately powered randomized trials are now needed before the routine use of thiazide diuretics in advanced CKD can be recommended.

  6. Building the chronic kidney disease management team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    The need to be efficient and the demands for performance-based service are changing how nephrologists deliver care. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs in patients with complex medical and social problems. CKD management requires that multidisciplinary professionals provide patient education, disease management, and psychosocial support. To remain cost-efficient, many physicians are training and supervising midlevel practitioners in the delivery of specialized health care. Specialized care that meets present CKD patient needs is best delivered in a CKD clinic. Three models of CKD clinic are identified: (1) anemia management CKD clinic, (2) the basic CKD clinic, and (3) the comprehensive CKD clinic. Each clinic model is based on critical elements of staffing, billable services, and patient-focused health care. Billable services are anemia-management services, physician services that may be provided by midlevel practitioners, and medical nutrition therapy. In some cases, social worker services may be billable. Building a patient-focused clinic that offers CKD management requires planning, familiarity with federal regulations and statutes, and skillful practitioners. Making services cost-efficient and outcome oriented requires careful physician leadership, talented midlevel practitioners, and billing professionals who understand the goals of the CKD clinic. As Medicare payment reforms evolve, a well-organized CKD program can be well poised to meet the requirements of payers and congressional mandates for performance-based purchasing.

  7. Gut microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigarran Guldris, Secundino; González Parra, Emilio; Cases Amenós, Aleix

    The intestinal microflora maintains a symbiotic relationship with the host under normal conditions, but its imbalance has recently been associated with several diseases. In chronic kidney disease (CKD), dysbiotic intestinal microflora has been reported with an increase in pathogenic flora compared to symbiotic flora. An enhanced permeability of the intestinal barrier, allowing the passage of endotoxins and other bacterial products to the blood, has also been shown in CKD. By fermenting undigested products that reach the colon, the intestinal microflora produce indoles, phenols and amines, among others, that are absorbed by the host, accumulate in CKD and have harmful effects on the body. These gut-derived uraemic toxins and the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD have been associated with increased inflammation and oxidative stress and have been involved in various CKD-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, anaemia, mineral metabolism disorders or the progression of CKD. The use of prebiotics, probiotics or synbiotics, among other approaches, could improve the dysbiosis and/or the increased permeability of the intestinal barrier in CKD. This article describes the situation of the intestinal microflora in CKD, the alteration of the intestinal barrier and its clinical consequences, the harmful effects of intestinal flora-derived uraemic toxins, and possible therapeutic options to improve this dysbiosis and reduce CKD-related complications.

  8. Chronic kidney disease alters intestinal microbial flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D; Wong, Jakk; Pahl, Madeleine; Piceno, Yvette M; Yuan, Jun; DeSantis, Todd Z; Ni, Zhenmin; Nguyen, Tien-Hung; Andersen, Gary L

    2013-02-01

    The population of microbes (microbiome) in the intestine is a symbiotic ecosystem conferring trophic and protective functions. Since the biochemical environment shapes the structure and function of the microbiome, we tested whether uremia and/or dietary and pharmacologic interventions in chronic kidney disease alters the microbiome. To identify different microbial populations, microbial DNA was isolated from the stools of 24 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and 12 healthy persons, and analyzed by phylogenetic microarray. There were marked differences in the abundance of 190 bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the ESRD and control groups. OTUs from Brachybacterium, Catenibacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Halomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae, Nesterenkonia, Polyangiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, and Thiothrix families were markedly increased in patients with ESRD. To isolate the effect of uremia from inter-individual variations, comorbid conditions, and dietary and medicinal interventions, rats were studied 8 weeks post 5/6 nephrectomy or sham operation. This showed a significant difference in the abundance of 175 bacterial OTUs between the uremic and control animals, most notably as decreases in the Lactobacillaceae and Prevotellaceae families. Thus, uremia profoundly alters the composition of the gut microbiome. The biological impact of this phenomenon is unknown and awaits further investigation.

  9. Neurological complications in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Arnold

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD are frequently afflicted with neurological complications. These complications can potentially affect both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Common neurological complications in CKD include stroke, cognitive dysfunction, encephalopathy, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies. These conditions have significant impact not only on patient morbidity but also on mortality risk through a variety of mechanisms. Understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of these conditions can provide insights into effective management strategies for neurological complications. This review describes clinical management of neurological complications in CKD with reference to the contributing physiological and pathological derangements. Stroke, cognitive dysfunction and dementia share several pathological mechanisms that may contribute to vascular impairment and neurodegeneration. Cognitive dysfunction and dementia may be differentiated from encephalopathy which has similar contributing factors but presents in an acute and rapidly progressive manner and may be accompanied by tremor and asterixis. Recent evidence suggests that dietary potassium restriction may be a useful preventative measure for peripheral neuropathy. Management of painful neuropathic symptoms can be achieved by pharmacological means with careful dosing and side effect considerations for reduced renal function. Patients with autonomic neuropathy may respond to sildenafil for impotence. Neurological complications often become clinically apparent at end-stage disease, however early detection and management of these conditions in mild CKD may reduce their impact at later stages.

  10. Tobacco and the pediatric chronic kidney disease population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoloja, Abiodun; Tyc, Vida L

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco use and exposure are preventable causes of morbidity and mortality. Whereas the impact of this public health issue is well described in adults with kidney disease, its role in the pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) population is largely unknown. This review discusses the prevalence of tobacco use and exposure in children with CKD, updates the reader on how tobacco affects the kidney, and presents intervention strategies relevant to this patient population.

  11. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  12. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  13. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  14. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  15. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of vasopre

  16. The management of neonatal acute and chronic renal failure: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulthard, Malcolm G

    2016-11-01

    Most babies with chronic renal failure are identified antenatally, and over half that are treated with peritoneal dialysis receive kidney transplants before school age. Most infants that develop acute renal failure have hypotension following cardiac surgery, or multiple organ failure. Sometimes the falls in glomerular filtration and urine output are physiological and reversible, and sometimes due to kidney injury, but (illogically) it is now common to define them all as having 'acute kidney injury'. Contrary to widespread opinion, careful interpretation of the plasma creatinine concentrations can provide sensitive evidence of early acute renal failure. Conservative management frequently leads to under-nutrition or fluid overload. Acute peritoneal dialysis is often technically fraught in very small patients, and haemotherapies have been limited by vascular access and anticoagulation requirements, the need to blood-prime circuits, and serious limitations in regulating fluid removal. Newer devices, including the Nidus, have been specifically designed to reduce these difficulties.

  17. Isometric exercise and chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efthimia Zerva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The resistance exercise is an important part of all rehabilitation programs in patients with chronic heart failure. Among several kinds of resistance exercises, the one mainly applied is isotonic exercise, whereas, in the contrary, isometric is not heavily used although it affects the daily lives of patients who, trying to look after themselves (moving, walking, lifting objects, twitch in an isometric way their peripheral muscles due to reduced cardiovascular endurance. Purpose: The purpose of the present review was to present the data available so far for isometric exercise in cardiovascular patients and to examine the importance of applying this kind of exercise in rehabilitation programs in the context of, firstly, evaluation, and secondly therapeutic intervention. Material - Methods: The methodology followed included searching inquiries and reviews from international databases (Pubmed, Medline, Scopus on the effects of isometric exercise in patients with chronic heart failure. The progress and development of the studies are of particular importance to this work and, to this end, the literature refers to the entire range of time in the last three decades, from 1985 to 2012 according the key words noted. Results: In rehabilitation programs for patients with chronic heart failure, resistance exercise if applied in an isotonic way helps improve hemodynamic and functional parameters. In contrast, resistance exercise applied in an isometric way requires further investigation because most findings are related to hemodynamic disturbances. The data which is encouraging for isometric exercise programs are few and, therefore, it cannot be directly recommended as a proper way to exercise. Conclusions: Isometric exercise has an important place in the evaluation of patients with chronic heart failure, and limits should be "placed" in its application as a therapeutic tool to prevent complications.

  18. Circulating adipocytokines and chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine T Mills

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2 or presence of albuminuria. Quantile regression and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between adipokines and CKD adjusting for multiple confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to controls, adjusted median leptin (38.2 vs. 17.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001 and adjusted mean resistin (16.2 vs 9.0 ng/mL, p<0.0001 were significantly higher in CKD cases. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was 2.3 (1.1, 4.9 for leptin and 12.7 (6.5, 24.6 for resistin. Median adiponectin was not significantly different in cases and controls, but the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was significant (1.9; 95% CI, 1.1, 3.6. In addition, higher leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were independently associated with lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that adipocytokines are independently and significantly associated with the risk and severity of CKD. Longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate the prospective relationship of adipocytokines to the development and progression of CKD.

  19. Chronic kidney disease in an adult with propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, H J; Bagnasco, S; Hamosh, A; Sperati, C J

    2014-01-01

    We report an adult male with classic propionic acidemia (PA) who developed chronic kidney disease in the third decade of his life. This diagnosis was recognized by an increasing serum creatinine and confirmed by reduced glomerular filtration on a (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA) scan. Histopathology of the kidney showed moderate glomerulo- and tubulointerstitial fibrosis with very segmental mesangial IgA deposits. This is the second reported case of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia possibly indicating that chronic kidney disease may be a late-stage complication of propionic acidemia. Additionally, this is the first description of the histopathology of kidney disease in an individual with propionic acidemia. As more cases emerge, the clinical course and spectrum of renal pathology in this disorder will be better defined.

  20. CCN1 expression in interleukin-6 deficient mouse kidney in experimental model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonda, Tomasz Andrzej; Taranta, Andrzej; Kaminski, Karol Adam; Dziemidowicz, Magdalena; Litvinovich, Sergey; Kozuch, Marcin; Bialuk, Izabela; Chyczewski, Lech; Winnicka, Maria Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Chronic heart failure often leads to worsening of the renal function. Mediators of this process include inflammatory and neuroendocrine factors. CCN1 (Cyr 61), a member of growth factor-inducible immediate early genes, which modulates inflammation and fibrogenesis, is excreted with urine in the early phase of acute renal injury and may be involved in the pathogenesis of the cardiorenal syndrome. The aim of the study was to evaluate CCN1 protein abundance and localization in the kidney of IL-6-deficient C57BL/6J (IL-6 KO) mice and respective wild-type (WT) animals in basal conditions and in animals with chronic heart failure twelve weeks after myocardial infarction. Age- and sex-matched mice from both strains subjected to sham operation served as controls. One group of WT animals subjected to myocardial infarction was treated with antagonist of AT1 receptor telmisartan over 12 weeks. Abundance and localization of CCN1 protein in kidney were assessed with Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. In all groups the strongest immunohistochemical reaction for CCN1 was observed in distal convoluted tubules and in smaller arteries, however, the total expression of CCN1 protein was lower in IL-6 KO mice in comparison to WT animals. The main difference in CCN1 distribution between the examined genotypes was lack of reaction in internal renal medulla and very weak reaction in proximal convoluted tubules in IL-6 KO mice. Experimental heart failure only slightly attenuated the expression of CCN1 protein in the kidney of WT mice and had no effect in IL-6 KO mice. Although, blockade of AT1 receptor did not alter CCN1 protein expression in kidneys of WT mice after myocardial infarction, it significantly changed its CCN1 distribution in the renal tubular system.

  1. Acute-on-chronic Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Choudhury, Ashok

    2016-12-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct entity that differs from acute liver failure and decompensated cirrhosis in timing, presence of treatable acute precipitant, and course of disease, with a potential for self-recovery. The core concept is acute deterioration of existing liver function in a patient of chronic liver disease with or without cirrhosis in response to an acute insult. The insult should be a hepatic one and presentation in the form of liver failure (jaundice, encephalopathy, coagulopathy, ascites) with or without extrahepatic organ failure in a defined time frame. ACLF is characterized by a state of deregulated inflammation. Initial cytokine burst presenting as SIRS, progression to CARS and associated immunoparalysis leads to sepsis and multi-organ failure. Early identification of the acute insult and mitigation of the same, use of nucleoside analogue in HBV-ACLF, steroid in severe alcoholic hepatitis, steroid in severe autoimmune hepatitis and/or bridging therapy lead to recovery, with a 90-day transplant-free survival rate of up to 50 %. First-week presentation is crucial concerning SIRS/sepsis, development, multiorgan failure and consideration of transplant. A protocol-based multi-disciplinary approach including critical care hepatology, early liver transplant before multi-organ involvement, or priority for organ allocation may improve the outcome. Presentation with extrahepatic organ involvement or inclusion of sepsis as an acute insult in definition restricts the therapy, i.e., liver transplant or bridging therapy, and needs serious consideration. Augmentation of regeneration, cell-based therapy, immunotherapy, and gut microbiota modulation are the emerging areas and need further research.

  2. Social representations of illness among people with chronic kidney disease

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    Caroline Gonçalves Pustiglione Campos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the social representations of illness among people with chronic kidney disease undergoing haemodialysis. METHOD: Descriptive, qualitative research, anchored on the social representations theory. This study was conducted in the municipality of Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil, with 23 adults with chronic kidney disease. Data were collection between February and November 2012 by means of a semi-structured interview, and analyzed using Content Analysis. RESULTS: The interviews led to the categories "the meaning of kidney disease": awareness of finitude, and "survival": the visible with chronic kidney disease. The representation of illness unveiled a difference and interruption in life projects, and haemodialysis meant loss of freedom, imprisonment and stigma. CONCLUSION: Family ties and the individuals´ social role are determining representations for healthcare.

  3. Screening techniques for detecting chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, PE; Gansevoort, RT

    2005-01-01

    Purpose of review As patients with impaired kidney function are at increased risk not only for progressive renal function loss, but also for cardiovascular disease, it is of importance to have accurate techniques to screen patients for the presence of an impaired kidney function. Recent findings Glo

  4. Better recovery of kidney function in patients with de novo chronic kidney disease after partial nephrectomy compared with those with pre-existing chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshio; Kondo, Tsunenori; Iizuka, Junpei; Omae, Kenji; Kobayashi, Hirohito; Hashimoto, Yasunobu; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2014-06-01

    We compared kidney functional recovery between patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease, those with de novo chronic kidney disease and those with normal kidney function, after partial nephrectomy. A total of 311 patients who underwent partial nephrectomy at Tokyo Women's Medical University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan, between January 2004 and July 2011 with sufficient kidney functional data participated in the study. Patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease (group1: 78 patients) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) before partial nephrectomy. Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease (group 2: 49) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) before surgery and who developed estimated glomerular filtration rate under 60 mL/min/m(2) 3 months after partial nephrectomy. Normal patients (group 3: 184) were defined as those with estimated glomerular filtration rate over 60 mL/min/m(2) both before and after partial nephrectomy. Group 1 was associated with older age and higher comorbidity, including hypertension and diabetes mellitus, compared with other groups. R.E.N.A.L. score was not significantly different between the groups. Although the percent change of estimated glomerular filtration rate between the preoperative period and 3 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was significantly decreased compared with that in other groups (group 1: -6.8%, group 2: -18%, group 3: -7.3%), the renal functional recovery between 3 and 12 months after partial nephrectomy in group 2 was better than that in other groups (group 1: -0.5%, group 2: 5.6%, group 3: -0.4%). Patients with de novo chronic kidney disease had better kidney functional recovery than the other two groups, which might suggest that they were surgically assaulted and developed chronic kidney disease in the early postoperative period, and were essentially different from those with pre-existing chronic kidney

  5. A patient with heart failure and worsening kidney function.

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    Sarnak, Mark J

    2014-10-07

    There is high prevalence of CKD, defined by reduced GFR, in patients with heart failure. Reduced kidney function is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) involves a bidirectional relationship between the heart and kidneys whereby dysfunction in either may exacerbate the function of the other, but this syndrome has been difficult to precisely define because it has many complex physiologic, biochemical, and hormonal abnormalities. The pathophysiology of CRS is not completely understood, but potential mechanisms include reduced kidney perfusion due to decreased forward flow, increased right ventricular and venous pressure, and neurohormonal adaptations. Treatment options include inotropic medications; diuretics; ultrafiltration; and medications, such as β-blockers, inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and more novel treatments that focus on unique aspects of the pathophysiology. Recent observational studies suggest that treatments that result in a decrease in venous pressure and lead to hemoconcentration may be associated with improved outcomes. Patients with CRS that is not responsive to medical interventions should be considered for ventricular assist devices, heart transplantation, or combined heart and kidney transplantation.

  6. Coronary artery disease in patients with chronic kidney disease: a brief literature review

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    Mostafa Dastani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular is the major cause of death in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. The cardiovascular mortality rate of patients with renal impairment is evaluated to be higher than general population. Coronary artery disease seems to be an important type of cardiovascular complication among patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease before the renal replacement therapy. Due to the strong association between chronic kidney disease and the incidence of coronary artery disease, accurate screening, diagnosis, and management of cardiovascular complications would be essential in patients at different stages of renal dysfunction. Despite the need for the comprehensive knowledge about different aspects of coronary artery disease in patients with renal failure, there is not sufficient evidence regarding the pathophysiology, ideal diagnosis, and treatment strategies for coronary heart disease in population with chronic kidney disease. In this study, we briefly reviewed the existing literatures about the possible screening, diagnosis, and the treatment approaches of risk of coronary heart disease in patients with kidney dysfunction.

  7. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). Approximately 90% of systemic erythropoietin in adults is produced by peritubular interstitial fibroblasts in the renal cortex and outer medulla of the kidney (3-5). A feedback mechanism involving oxygen delivery to the tissues seems to regulate erythropoietin production. Hypoxia-inducible factor regulates transcription of the erythropoietin gene in the kidney, which determines erythropoietin synthesis (3-5). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and mediates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow (4-6). Kidney fibrosis is the last common pathway in chronic renal failure irrespective of the initial etiology (5,6). Constant inflammatory cell infiltration and pericyte-myofibroblast transition lead to renal fibrosis and insufficiency which result in decreased production of erythropoietin (4-7). Thus far, therapeutic efforts to treat patients with chronic renal failure by administering erythropoietin have been made only to correct anemia and putative hypoxic tissue damage. The introduction of recombinant human erythropoietin has marked a significant advance in the management of anemia associated with chronic renal failure (6-9). With an increasing number of patients with chronic renal failure receiving erythropoietin treatment, emerging evidence suggests that erythropoietin not only has an erythropoietic function, but also has renoprotective potential. In fact, in recent years, the additional non

  8. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    George, Sunil K.; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D.; AbouShwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; James J. Yoo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (...

  9. Vegetarian Diet in Chronic Kidney Disease—A Friend or Foe

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    Anna Gluba-Brzózka

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Healthy diet is highly important, especially in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Proper nutrition provides the energy to perform everyday activities, prevents infection, builds muscle, and helps to prevent kidney disease from getting worse. However, what does a proper diet mean for a CKD patient? Nutrition requirements differ depending on the level of kidney function and the presence of co-morbid conditions, including hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The diet of CKD patients should help to slow the rate of progression of kidney failure, reduce uremic toxicity, decrease proteinuria, maintain good nutritional status, and lower the risk of kidney disease-related secondary complications (cardiovascular disease, bone disease, and hypertension. It has been suggested that plant proteins may exert beneficial effects on blood pressure, proteinuria, and glomerular filtration rate, as well as results in milder renal tissue damage when compared to animal proteins. The National Kidney Foundation recommends vegetarianism, or part-time vegetarian diet as being beneficial to CKD patients. Their recommendations are supported by the results of studies demonstrating that a plant-based diet may hamper the development or progression of some complications of chronic kidney disease, such as heart disease, protein loss in urine, and the progression of kidney damage. However, there are sparse reports suggesting that a vegan diet is not appropriate for CKD patients and those undergoing dialysis due to the difficulty in consuming enough protein and in maintaining proper potassium and phosphorus levels. Therefore, this review will focus on the problem as to whether vegetarian diet and its modifications are suitable for chronic kidney disease patients.

  10. Chronic heart failure part 2: treatment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brake, Rebecca; Jones, Ian David

    2017-01-11

    Chronic heart failure is a common and complex clinical syndrome that results from impaired cardiac relaxation or contraction. There have been considerable advances in the management of chronic heart failure; however, the mortality rate remains high. Patients with chronic heart failure may experience multiple debilitating symptoms, such as fatigue, pain, and peripheral oedema. However, breathlessness may be considered the most debilitating symptom. The management of chronic heart failure aims to improve the patient's quality of life by reducing symptoms and supporting the patient to manage their condition. Treatment of patients with chronic heart failure may involve a combination of pharmacological therapy, device implantation and cardiac rehabilitation. This is the second of two articles on chronic heart failure. Part 1 discussed the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure, its causes, assessment, signs and symptoms. Part 2 outlines the treatment and management of patients with the condition, including pharmacological strategies, device implantation, lifestyle modification, cardiac rehabilitation and palliative care.

  11. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

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    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  12. Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro

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    van Bladel Esther R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease. Methods Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP. Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined. Results We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8 vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2, P = 0.032, ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1 vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5, P = 0.002 and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8 vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9, P = 0.004. Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups. Conclusion In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.

  13. Pregnancy across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladunewich, Michelle A; Melamad, Nir; Bramham, Kate

    2016-05-01

    Management of the pregnant woman with chronic kidney disease is difficult for both nephrologists and obstetricians. Prepregnancy counselling with respect to risk stratification, optimization of maternal health prior to pregnancy, as well as management of the many potential pregnancy-associated complications in this complex patient population remains challenging due to the paucity of large, well-designed clinical studies. Furthermore, the heterogeneity of disease and the relative infrequency of pregnancy, particularly in more advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, leaves many clinicians feeling ill prepared to manage these pregnancies. As such, counselling is imprecise and management varies substantially across centers. All pregnancies in women with chronic kidney disease can benefit from a collaborative multidisciplinary approach with a team that consists of nephrologists experienced in the management of kidney disease in pregnancy, maternal-fetal medicine specialists, high-risk pregnancy nursing staff, dieticians, and pharmacists. Further access to skilled neonatologists and neonatal intensive care unit support is essential given the risks for preterm delivery in this patient population. The goal of this paper is to highlight some of the data that currently exist in the literature, provide management strategies for the practicing nephrologist at all stages of chronic kidney disease, and explore some of the knowledge gaps where future multinational collaborative research efforts should concentrate to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with kidney disease across the globe.

  14. Cardiovascular risk in Chinese patients with chronic kidney diseases: where do we stand?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fan-fan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Kidney failure requiring renal replacement therapy is the most visible outcome of CKD. In China, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of end stage renal diseases (ESRD), with poor outcomes and high cost. The registered number of individuals with ESRD treated by dialysis was 41 755 in 1999 and is expected to surpass 140 000 by 2009.1 It is important to note that, as many developing countries, the registered number of dialysis patients accounts only for less than 10% of total ESRD population in China.

  15. Chronic Renal Failure, Cachexia, and Ghrelin

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    A. Laviano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein energy wasting is frequently observed in patients with advanced chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease. Anorexia and reduced food intake are critical contributing factors and negatively impact on patients' survival. Ghrelin is a prophagic peptide produced by the stomach and acting at the hypothalamic level to increase the activity of orexigenic neurons. In patients with chronic renal disease, plasma levels are increased as a likely effect of reduced renal clearance. Nevertheless, patients' food intake is significantly reduced, suggesting inflammation-mediated resistance of hypothalamic nuclei to peripheral signals. A number of forms of evidence show that ghrelin resistance could be overcome by the administration of exogenous ghrelin. Therefore, ghrelin has been proposed as a potential strategy to improve food intake in chronic renal failure patients with protein energy wasting. Preliminary data are encouraging although larger prospective clinical trials are needed to confirm the results and to identify those patients who are likely to benefit most from the administration of exogenous ghrelin.

  16. Acute kidney injury in acute liver failure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joanna K; Love, Eleanor; Craig, Darren G; Hayes, Peter C; Simpson, Kenneth J

    2013-11-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare and often devastating condition consequent on massive liver cell necrosis that frequently affects young, previously healthy individuals resulting in altered cognitive function, coagulopathy and peripheral vasodilation. These patients frequently develop concurrent acute kidney injury (AKI). This abrupt and sustained decline in renal function, through a number of pathogenic mechanisms such as renal hypoperfusion, direct drug-induced nephrotoxicity or sepsis/systemic inflammatory response contributes to increased morbidity and is strongly associated with a worse prognosis. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology AKI in the context of acute liver failure may be beneficial in a number of areas; the development of new and sensitive biomarkers of renal dysfunction, refining prognosis and organ allocation, and ultimately leading to the development of novel treatment strategies, these issues are discussed in more detail in this expert review.

  17. Clinical Evaluation of Renal Protective Effects in the Rescue Party for Chronic Renal Kidney Failure of Three%救肾方对慢性肾功能衰竭3期的肾保护作用的临床评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国胜; 侯小静; 朱广领

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨肾功能衰竭3期采用救肾方治疗对肾保护作用的评价。方法本次选取50例慢性肾功能衰竭3期患者,均为我院2013年1月~2014年1月收治,采用救肾方治疗,回顾对肾保护作用的影响。结果本次研究选取的慢性肾功能衰竭3期的患者,显效7例,占14%;有效31例,占62%;无效12例,占24%,总有效率经统计为76%。相较治疗前,治疗后SCr指标、Ccr指标均改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。无不良事件发生。结论临床针对慢性肾功能衰竭3期患者,采用救肾方治疗,可提高临床效果,改善肾功能指标,对保障预后,加强肾保护有非常重要的作用。%Objective Explore the use of renal failure three rescue treatment of renal protective effect on renal evaluation.Methods The selected 50 cases of chronic renal failure in three patients in our hospital from May 2013 to May 2014 were treated using rescue kidney treatment reviewed on renal protective effect.ResultsThis study selected three chronic renal failure patients,effective in 7 cases,accounting for 14%,effective 31 cases,accounting for 62%,12 cases,accounting for 24%,the total efficiency of 76% by the statistics. Compared before and after treatment SCr indicators,Ccr indicators were significantly improved,and the difference was statisticaly significant(P< 0.05). No significant adverse events.Conclusion Clinical for chronic renal failure three patients,the use of rescue kidney treatment,can significantly improve the clinical results in improving renal function,the protection of the prognosis,strengthen kidney protection has a very important role.

  18. Alterações morfológicas e funcionais dos rins de cães com insuficiência renal crônica Morphologic and functional alterations of the kidneys of dogs with chronic renal failure

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    M.H. Bueno de Camargo

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Alterações morfológicas de 11 casos de cães com insuficiência renal foram caracterizadas e classificadas de acordo com os padrões estabelecidos pela Organização Mundial de Saúde para seres humanos. Glomerulonefrite esclerosante difusa foi diagnosticada em 82,0% dos animais e nefrite intersticial crônica nos 18,0% restantes. Os tipos e freqüência das lesões identificadas foram similares às encontradas na literatura para a insuficiência renal crônica.Morphologic alterations of 11 cases of dogs with renal failure were characterized and classified according to the patterns established by the World Health Organization for human beings. Diffuse sclerosing glomerulonephritis was diagnosed in 82.0% of the animals and chronic interstitial nephritis in the remaining 18.0%. The types and frequencies of lesions were similar to the those noticed in the literature for chronic renal failure.

  19. Treatment of chronic periodontitis decreases serum prohepcidin levels in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Eduardo Machado Vilela

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of periodontal treatment on serum levels of prohepcidin (the prohormone of hepcidin and systemic inflammation markers, as well as correlations among these markers, in patients with chronic periodontitis and chronic kidney disease who were not undergoing dialysis. METHODS: We included 56 chronic periodontitis patients, 36 with chronic kidney disease and 20 without systemic diseases and with normal renal function (control group. Chronic kidney disease was defined as suggested by the clinical practice guidelines in the National Kidney Foundation. Chronic periodontitis was defined through clinical attachment level and by probing pocket depth, according to the American Association of Periodontology. The inflammatory markers ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and prohepcidin were evaluated before and 3 months after periodontal treatment. RESULTS: The efficacy of periodontal treatment was confirmed by the improvement in clinical parameters of chronic periodontitis in the control and chronic kidney disease groups. Periodontal treatment resulted in significant reductions in ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and serum prohepcidin levels in both groups. Moreover, in multivariate linear regression, the reduction in prohepcidin after periodontal treatment was significantly and independently associated with interleukin-6 levels in the control group. CONCLUSIONS: By inducing a decline in the systemic inflammatory response and a decrease in serum prohepcidin, successful periodontal treatment may represent an important means of ameliorating the inflammatory burden seen in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  20. Gastrointestinal Angiodysplasia in Chronic Renal Failure

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    Kaaroud H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI hemorrhage is a frequent and sometimes life-threatening complication of end-stage renal failure. Angiodysplasia (AD, vascular malformation, is the most common cause of recurrent lower-intestinal hemorrhage in patients with renal failure. We report four chronic hemodialysis patients with AD. All patients presented with severe anemia requiring transfusion. GI hemorrhage ceased spontaneously in three cases and after treatment with argon plasma coagulation in another. Diagnosis of AD is usually challenging, since its cause is still unknown, and its clinical presentation is variable. Lesions are multiple in 40-75% of cases, often located in the stomach and duodenum but can affect the colon and the jejunum. Diagnosis is improved by endoscopy which has a much higher sensitivity compared to angiography. Capsular endoscopy may reveal the hemorrhage site in the small intestine when regular endoscopy fails, and therapeutic intervention usually include argon plasma coagulation.

  1. Fatigue in chronic kidney disease: Definition, assessment and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalai, Dora; Bohra, Miqdad

    2016-01-01

    Chronic fatigue--an overwhelming subjective feeling of mental or physical exhaustion--impacts patients' everyday functioning and quality of life, delays recovery after hemodialysis, and increases mortality. There are a number of factors that may perpetuate clinically significant fatigue among individuals with chronic kidney disease, including sleep disorders, depression, sedentary lifestyle, anemia, and chronic inflammation. Some of these factors (i.e., anemia and inflammation) are in the forefront of clinical attention, whereas the other contributing factors often remain unrecognized. This article provides a pragmatic overview of the definition, assessment, maintaining factors, and management of fatigue in chronic kidney disease. Given that chronic fatigue is a major determinant of patients' quality of life, nurses can bring about a fundamental improvement in patients' well-being if they recognize the most common fatigue-perpetuating factors and facilitate fatigue management interventions.

  2. Development and validation of a questionnaire to assess fear of kidney failure following living donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigue, James R; Fleishman, Aaron; Vishnevsky, Tanya; Whiting, James; Vella, John P; Garrison, Krista; Moore, Deonna; Kayler, Liise; Baliga, Prabhakar; Chavin, Kenneth D; Karp, Seth; Mandelbrot, Didier A

    2014-06-01

    Living kidney donors (LKDs) may feel more anxious about kidney failure now that they have only one kidney and the security of a second kidney is gone. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to develop and empirically validate a self-report scale for assessing fear of kidney failure in former LKDs. Participants were 364 former LKDs within the past 10 years at five US transplant centers and 219 healthy nondonor controls recruited through Mechanical Turk who completed several questionnaires. Analyses revealed a unidimensional factor structure, excellent internal consistency (α = 0.88), and good convergent validity for the Fear of Kidney Failure questionnaire. Only 13% of former donors reported moderate to high fear of kidney failure. Nonwhite race (OR = 2.9, P = 0.01), genetic relationship with the recipient (OR = 2.46, P = 0.04), and low satisfaction with the donation experience (OR = 0.49, P = 0.002) were significant predictors of higher fear of kidney failure. We conclude that while mild anxiety about kidney failure is common, high anxiety about future renal failure among former LKDs is uncommon. The Fear of Kidney Failure questionnaire is reliable, valid, and easy to use in the clinical setting.

  3. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection.

  4. Chronic kidney disease aggravates arteriovenous fistula damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Stephan; Kokozidou, Maria; Heiss, Christian; Kranz, Jennifer; Kessler, Tina; Paulus, Niklas; Krüger, Thilo; Jacobs, Michael J; Lente, Christina; Koeppel, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) and impaired dilatation are important contributors to arteriovenous fistula (AVF) failure. It is unclear whether chronic kidney disease (CKD) itself causes adverse remodeling in arterialized veins. Here we determined if CKD specifically triggers adverse effects on vascular remodeling and assessed whether these changes affect the function of AVFs. For this purpose, we used rats on a normal diet or on an adenine-rich diet to induce CKD and created a fistula between the right femoral artery and vein. Fistula maturation was followed noninvasively by high-resolution ultrasound (US), and groups of rats were killed on 42 and 84 days after surgery for histological and immunohistochemical analyses of the AVFs and contralateral femoral vessels. In vivo US and ex vivo morphometric analyses confirmed a significant increase in NIH in the AVFs of both groups with CKD compared to those receiving a normal diet. Furthermore, we found using histological evaluation of the fistula veins in the rats with CKD that the media shrank and their calcification increased significantly. Afferent artery dilatation was significantly impaired in CKD and the downstream fistula vein had delayed dilation after surgery. These changes were accompanied by significantly increased peak systolic velocity at the site of the anastomosis, implying stenosis. Thus, CKD triggers adverse effects on vascular remodeling in AVFs, all of which contribute to anatomical and/or functional stenosis.

  5. Single Drug Treatment for Chronic Kidney Disease – A Case Study

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    D. M. Padavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Punarnava matured whole plant of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Fam Nyctaginaceae, trailing herb found throughout India and collected after rainy season, herb is diffusely branched with stout root stock and many long slender, prostrate or ascending branches. The name says “pun-nava” means new again; Punarnava can rejuvenates the dying cells and helps to revive the dying organs of the body. Kidneys are the organs that have numerous biological roles. They maintain the homeostatic balance of body fluids by removing waste out of body. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD or Chronic Renal Failure (CRF refers to an irreversible deterioration in renal function, which develops over a period of years. The conventional approach of management includes dialysis and renal transplantation, which are involving the high costs and complexity so very few patients are able to obtain adequate treatment for kidney disorders because of financial limitation. Therefore, exploration of a safe and alternative therapy is needed, which proves to be helpful in reducing the requirement of dialysis and in postponing the renal transplantation. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. In present study a case was taken of chronic kidney disease with chronic nephritis. He was Punarnava swaras daily with orally. This treatment approach has significantly improved condition of patient eliminating dialysis requirement.

  6. Ocular findings in the chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Dahal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The aim of the study was to evaluate the ocular signs in chronic renal failure (CRF in diabetes and hypertensive patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS Two hundred and thirty eight cases were enrolled in the study from the nephrology unit of College Of Medical Science, Bharatpur, Nepal and examined in the department of Ophthalmology. The study duration was carried out over 2 years from January 2011 to December 2012. RESULT The number of cases in each grade of CRF were mild 80 (26.67%, moderate 84 (28%, severe 75 (25%, end stage renal disease 61 (20.33%. In all the groups the commonest cause of CRF were Hypertension (HTN 123 out of 300(41% and diabetes 98(32.67%. The commonest ocular symptoms in CRF was blurring of vision 68%. CONCLUSION Many important ocular findings like vitreous haemorrage, retinal detachment, neovascular glaucoma and cataract are the presentation in chronic renal failure, which can cause marked vision loss. Hence proper awareness should be provided to the people in time to prevent these ocular complications.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12949 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 18-26

  7. Chronic Kidney Disease—Effect of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Palaneeswari Meenakshi Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing health problem with increasing incidence. The annual mortality of end-stage renal disease patients is about 9%, which is 10–20 fold higher than the general population, approximately 50% of these deaths are due to cardiovascular (CV disease. CV risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are strongly associated with poor outcome. Many other nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, anemia, and malnutrition are also present. In this review we will focus on the role of oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease.

  8. Pathophysiology of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Way, Fabrice; Lessard, Myriam; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène

    2012-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) alters the metabolism of several minerals, thereby inducing bone lesions and vessel-wall calcifications that can cause functional impairments and excess mortality. The histological bone abnormalities seen in CKD, known as renal osteodystrophy, consist of alterations in the bone turnover rate, which may be increased (osteitis fibrosa [OF]) or severely decreased (adynamic bone disease [AD]); abnormal mineralization (osteomalacia [OM]), and bone loss. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is related to early phosphate accumulation (responsible for FGF23 overproduction by bone tissue), decreased calcitriol production by the kidneys, and hypocalcemia. Secondary hyperparathyroidism is associated with OF. Other factors that affect bone include acidosis, chronic inflammation, nutritional deficiencies, and iatrogenic complications.

  9. Effect of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists on proteinuria and progression of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Currie, Gemma; Taylor, Alison H M; Fujita, Toshiro

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension and proteinuria are critically involved in the progression of chronic kidney disease. Despite treatment with renin angiotensin system inhibition, kidney function declines in many patients. Aldosterone excess is a risk factor for progression of kidney disease. Hyperkalaemi...

  10. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you ... and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Kidney Disease Education Program 2

  11. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α| and interleukin (IL 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unresponsive to hepatitis B vaccination seem to be unable to enhance IL-10 synthesis for control of monokine overproduction. Moreover, human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes, which play a major role in the antigen presentation to immunocompetent cells, have also been shown to modulate this immune response. Unfortunately, seroconversion to anti-HBS has been reported to occur in only 40 to 50% of the vaccine, a significantly lower rate than that observed in healthy adults. Various methods including adjutants such as zinc, gamma interferon, thymopentine, GM-CSF and Levamisol for improving immune responses have been advised. Experience with Pres1/s2, third-generation vaccines is limited and they have not been proven more effective than intradermally (ID administered second-generation S antigen vaccines. Both intramuscular (IM and intradermal (ID vaccinations against hepatitis B have variable efficiency in hemodialysis and non-responders should be retreated by ID route.

  12. Pregnancy management and outcome in women with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bili, E; Tsolakidis, D; Stangou, S; Tarlatzis, B.

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of pregnancies occur in the presence of chronic kidney diseases (CKD), mainly including chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), diabetic nephropathy (DN), and lupus nephritis (LN). The most important factor affecting fetal and maternal prognosis is the degree of renal function at conception. In the majority of patients with mild renal function impairment, and well-controlled blood pressure, pregnancy is usually successful and does not alter the natural course of maternal renal d...

  13. New oral anticoagulants in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar Vega, Lara; de Francisco, A L M; Bada da Silva, Jairo; Galván Espinoza, Luis; Fernández Fresnedo, Gema

    2016-12-08

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) develop bleeding and thrombotic tendencies, so the indication of anticoagulation at the onset of atrial fibrillation (AF) is complex. AF is the most common chronic cardiac arrhythmia, and thromboembolism and ischemic stroke in particular are major complications. In recent years, new oral anticoagulant drugs have been developed, and they have shown superiority over the classical AVK in preventing stroke, systemic embolism and bleeding risk, constituting an effective alternative to those resources.

  14. Cost-effectiveness of lanthanum carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease before and during dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, S.; Tolley, K.; Keith, M.S.; Postma, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Hyperphosphatemia is a common and harmful condition in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We determined the cost-effectiveness of the noncalcium-based phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate (LC) as second-line treatment of hyperphosphatemia after therapy failure with calcium-based

  15. Cost-effectiveness of lanthanum carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia in chronic kidney disease before and during dialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegter, Stefan; Tolley, Keith; Keith, Michael S; Postma, Maarten J

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hyperphosphatemia is a common and harmful condition in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We determined the cost-effectiveness of the noncalcium-based phosphate binder lanthanum carbonate (LC) as second-line treatment of hyperphosphatemia after therapy failure with calcium-based

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骄

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia in the general population.AF and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) share several common risk factors.We investigated the association between chronic kidney disease and risk of atrial fibrillation

  17. The epidermal growth factor receptor pathway in chronic kidney diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Laura R.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Goor, van Harry; Meijer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has a critical role in renal development, tissue repair and electrolyte handling. Numerous studies have reported an association between dysregulation of this pathway and the initiation and progression of various chronic kidney diseases such as diab

  18. Research on stage of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2for the stage assessment in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) .Methods From June 2009 to December 2011,2258 patients were recruited and divided

  19. Novel biomarkers for progression of chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bi-cheng; L(U) Lin-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD) Although there are different initiators of CKD, it is generally recognized that the secondary pathological pathway is quite common to all CKD. CKD may inevitably progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) due to a vicious cycle of nephron destruction by progressive glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  20. Acetaminophen, aspirin and progression of advanced chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, Marie; Fored, Carl Michael; Bellocco, Rino; Fitzmaurice, Garrett; Fryzek, Jon P.; McLaughlin, Joseph K.; Nyren, Olof; Elinder, Carl-Gustaf

    2009-01-01

    Background. Although many studies have investigated the possible association between analgesic use (acetaminophen and aspirin) and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), the effect of analgesics on the progression of established CKD of any cause has not yet been investigated. Methods. In t

  1. Revascularization options in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrith, Guha; Elayda, MacArthur A; Wilson, James M

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease and are undergoing hemodialysis. Chronic kidney disease is a recognized risk factor for premature atherosclerosis. Unfortunately, most major randomized clinical trials that form the basis for evidence-based use of revascularization procedures exclude patients who have renal insufficiency. Retrospective, observational studies suggest that patients with end-stage renal disease and severe coronary occlusive disease have a lower risk of death if they undergo coronary revascularization rather than medical therapy alone. Due to a lack of prospective studies, however, the relative merits of percutaneous versus surgical revascularization are merely a matter of opinion. Several small, retrospective studies have shown that coronary artery bypass grafting is associated with higher procedural death but better long-term survival than is percutaneous coronary intervention. This difference appears to result from poor long-term results of percutaneous coronary intervention in patients who have chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease.Because randomized trials comparing percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery bypass grafting have included patients undergoing balloon angioplasty and placement of bare-metal stents, their conclusions are suspect in the era of drug-eluting stents. In this review, we discuss different revascularization options for patients with chronic kidney disease, the outcomes of revascularization procedures, and the risk factors for adverse outcomes.

  2. Sympathetic hyperactivity - A hidden enemy in chronic kidney disease patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankestijn, Peter J.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is often characterized by the presence of sympathetic hyperactivity. The aim of this brief review is to summarize available knowledge on the pathogenesis of sympathetic hyperactivity and to discuss its clinical relevance, the consequences of this knowledge for the choice of tr

  3. Metabolic remodeling in chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing WANG; Tao GUO

    2013-01-01

    Although the management of chronic heart failure (CHF) has made enormous progress over the past decades,CHF is still a tremendous medical and societal burden.Metabolic remodeling might play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of CHF.The characteristics and mechanisms of metabolic remodeling remained unclear,and the main hypothesis might include the changes in the availability of metabolic substrate and the decline of metabolic capability.In the early phases of the disease,metabolism shifts toward carbohydrate utilization from fatty acids (FAs) oxidation.Along with the progress of the disease,the increasing level of the hyperadrenergic state and insulin resistance cause the changes that shift back to a greater FA uptake and oxidation.In addition,a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence suggests that the improvement in the metabolic capability is likely to be more significant than the selection of the substrate.

  4. Home monitoring of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O. L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Being a common syndrome chronic heart failure (CHF results in high mortality among cardiosurgical patients and requires very high expenditures for the treatment. All over the world the number of patients with CHF syndrome is about 22 millions. Heart failure is difficult to treat because of high level of hospitalization due to decompensation. Care aimed at constant home observation of patients could have been more efficient and not only symptomatic and as a response to complications induced. There are methods controlling CHF patients at home. These methods vary from increase of self-care and telephone support to telemonitoring and remote monitoring of implantable devices. Self-care includes such components as maintenance of drug intake, keeping to a diet, physical exercises and active control over edemas. Telephone calls are also a source of monitoring and treatment of heart failure at home. Meta-analysis of programs for structured phone support showed that telephone support could reduce the level of readmission of HF patients approximately by 25%. Telemonitoring implies transmission of such physiological data as blood pressure, body weight, electrocardiographic signals or oxygen saturation using phone lines, broadband and satellite or wireless networks. Having cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices that are placed in HF patients, it is possible to use their opportunities for the further evaluation of the patient. Some regularly controlled parameters can show the clinical state of the patient and predict the following heart failure. For example, atrial fibrillation, decrease of cardiac rhythm variability and decrease of the level of the patient`s activity (according to integrated accelerometer can predict clinical decompensation. Also, implantable hemodynamic monitors for immediate pressure measuring in the left atrium, sensor system of pressure measuring in the right atrium are

  5. Applications of acoustic radiation force impulse quantification in chronic kidney disease: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang [Dept. of Ultrasound, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-08-15

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an emerging technique with great promise in the field of elastography. Previous studies have validated ARFI quantification as a method of estimating fibrosis in chronic liver disease. Similarly, fibrosis is the principal process underlying the progression of chronic kidney disease, which is the major cause of renal failure. However, the quantification of tissue stiffness using ARFI imaging is more complex in the kidney than in the liver. Moreover, not all previous studies are comparable because they employed different procedures. Therefore, subsequent studies are warranted, both in animal models and in clinical patients, in order to better understand the histopathological mechanisms associated with renal elasticity and to further improve this imaging method by developing a standardized guidelines for its implementation.

  6. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  7. Effect of renal function on prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Adrián Ignacio; Cappola, Thomas P; Fang, James; Hetzel, Scott J; Kadlec, Andrew; Astor, Brad; Sweitzer, Nancy K

    2015-01-01

    Renal dysfunction (RD) is associated with increased mortality in heart failure (HF). The aim of this study was to identify whether worsened or improved renal function during mid-term follow-up is associated with worsened outcomes in patients with chronic HF. A total of 892 participants from a multicenter cohort study of chronic HF were followed over 3.1 ± 1.9 years of enrollment. Worsened and improved renal functions were tested with multivariate models as independent predictors of HF hospitalization and mortality. Although 12% of subjects experienced a ≥25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), 17% experienced a ≥25% increase in eGFR, and there was stability of kidney function observed in the cohort as a whole. The quartile with the worst RD at any point in time had increased risk of HF hospitalization and mortality. Worsened eGFR was associated with HF outcomes in the unadjusted (hazard ratio = 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.04 to 2.81, p = 0.035), but not the adjusted analysis. Improvement in eGFR was not associated with outcome (p = 0.453). In chronic HF, the severity of RD predicts risk of poor outcome better than changes in renal function during mid-term follow-up. This suggests that in patients with appropriately treated chronic HF, worsening renal function in itself does not yield useful prognostic information and may not reflect poor outcome.

  8. Quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Lada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemodialysis and transplantation are performed not only to replace renal function, but also to improve patients' quality of life. The aim of our investigation was to compare the quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF before and after the introduction of active therapy. Material and methods. We tested 76 patients (pts: 20 pts on conservative therapy (CT, 21 pts on chronic hemodialysis and 35 pts with renal transplantation. A questionnaire (combining two questionnaires was used to investigate the physical, emotional and social aspects of health. Results. In regard to physical health of transplantation patients (TP it was established that work capacity and activities were less damaged, whereas physical activity was highest in pts on CT. Social activity was limited in a higher percentage in TP (40% than in hemodialysis patients (HD (19%, while family relationships were most damaged in pts on HD (28.57%. Discomforts were most common in pts on HD. The highest percentage of pts estimated their health status as good or average, but their health status improved after transplantation in 82.86% that is in 57.14% after HD. It was similar with the quality of life: 28.57% of kidney transplant patients rated their quality of life as very good, and 54.28% rated it as good; 38.09% of HD patients rated their quality of life as very good, whereas only 5% of CT patients rated it as very good, and 20% as good. .

  9. Oral disorders in patients with chronic renal failure. Narrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hernández

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure (CRF is one of the best known renal diseases. It is characterized by a deterioration in the overall renal function and is associated with other conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, uropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. Patients with CRF show alterations of the masticatory system that are specific to the disease and other type of disorders as a result of treatment. Oral health in dialysis and transplant patients tends to be poor, which makes them more likely to develop pathological conditions in the oral cavity, potentially increasing morbidity, mortality and affecting the quality of life of patients. Among the lesions we can find dysgeusia, periodontitis, candidiasis, gingival bleeding, petechiae, and joint alterations. Gingivitis and xerostomia associated to long-term use medications can cause oral lesions. Children with CRF show two oral conditions of interest: high incidence of dental anomalies and low caries activity. In patients receiving a kidney transplant, previous dental treatment is critical because the immune status of the patient will be affected not only by the toxemia, but by the immunosuppressive drugs used to prevent transplant rejection. Therefore, the dentist plays an important role in training parents and/or guardians, doctors and paramedics on the treatment of oral lesions in these patients

  10. Nutritional assessment in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditi; Mantan, Mukta; Sethi, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Growth failure is a major problem in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the onset of the condition in infancy is more likely to have an adverse impact on growth than its development in later childhood. This study was aimed to assess nutritional intake and anthropometry of children presenting with CKD in a developing country. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (1-18 years) with CKD visiting the outpatient services were enrolled. The age of onset, cause of CKD, and anthropometry were recorded. Dietary intakes from three 24 h dietary recall (2 mid-week and 1 weekend day) were recorded. A blood sample was taken from all subjects for biochemical parameters. A total of 45 children (forty males and five females) with CKD underwent nutritional assessment. The median age at assessment was 108 months (13-167). Twenty-seven (60%) subjects had CKD stage 1, 2, or 3 while the remaining 40% had CKD stage 4 or 5. Of the 45 children, 27 (60%) had moderate to severe malnutrition at assessment. The mean weight and height (standard deviation scores) were -2.77 ± 2.07 and -2.30 ± 1.38, respectively. The prevalence of growth retardation was much higher in late stages of CKD; the difference was statistically significant (P iron (mean 48.9% deficit); deficient in calcium (mean -22.2%) and had excess phosphates (mean 18.3%). There was a progressive decrease in intake of nutrients in advanced stages of CKD. There was a high prevalence of malnutrition (60%) in children with CKD, especially in higher stages of CKD. An appropriate dietary assessment and nutritional counseling should be planned for all patients with CKD to prevent complications associated with malnutrition and anemia.

  11. Salt-induced changes in cardiac phosphoproteome in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxiu Su

    Full Text Available Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl, or high-salt (4% NaCl diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54% phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46% phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49% phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51% phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed.

  12. Salt-induced changes in cardiac phosphoproteome in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhengxiu; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Wang, Liangliang; He, Hanchang; Jiang, Shaoling; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2014-01-01

    Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model) or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl), or high-salt (4% NaCl) diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54%) phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46%) phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49%) phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51%) phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed.

  13. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Shah R; Agarwal AK

    2013-01-01

    Ravish Shah, Anil K AgarwalDivision of Nephrology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAbstract: Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not...

  14. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda-Díaz, Alejandra Guillermina; Pazarín-Villaseñor, Leonardo; Yanowsky-Escatell, Francisco Gerardo; Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disea...

  15. Noninvasive diagnosis of chronic kidney diseases using urinary proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwy, Justyna; Zürbig, Petra; Argiles, Angel

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of its invasive nature and risks, kidney biopsy is currently required for precise diagnosis of many chronic kidney diseases (CKDs). Here, we explored the hypothesis that analysis of the urinary proteome can discriminate different types of CKD irrespective of the underlying...... mechanism of disease. METHODS: We used data from the proteome analyses of 1180 urine samples from patients with different types of CKD, generated by capillary electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry. A set of 706 samples served as the discovery cohort, and 474 samples were used for independent...

  16. the Pathogenesis of acute on Chronic Hepatitis B liver Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a characteristic clinical liver syndrome, which should be differentiated from acute liver failure, acute decompensated liver cirrhosis and chronic liver failure. The pathogenesis of ACLF is not fully understood yet. Viral factors and immune injury have been reported to be the two major pathogenesis. This paper reviewed the researches on the pathogenesis of acute on chronic hepatitis B liver failure in recent years, to provide theoretical basis for prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. This would beneift for the prognosis and raise the survival rate of patients.

  17. 9. The Contribution of Animal Experiments to Kidney Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Haemodialysis is life-saving and curative in acute renal failure. By reversing the build-up of metabolic products normally excreted by a functioning kidney, dialysis enables the temporarily affected kidneys to heal and resume normal function. In chronic renal failure however, the burden of regular dialysis is necessary unless a healthy kidney from a donor can be grafted. Chronic Renal Failure Chronic renal failure (CRF) due to glomerulonephritis, pyelonephritis or polycystic kidney disease is...

  18. Predicting cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease in Spain. The rationale and design of NEFRONA: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Roig Jordi; Sarró Felipe; Vidal Teresa; Valdivielso Jose; Coll Blai; Borràs Mercè; Martínez Montserrat; Junyent Mireia; Craver Lourdes; Fernández Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular risk assessment in this population is hampered by the failure of traditional risk factors to fully account for the elevated CVD risk (reverse epidemiology effect) and the presence of emerging risk factors specifically related to kidney failure. Therefore, diagnostic tools capable of improving cardiovascular risk assessment beyond tradit...

  19. Healthy Hair Starts With a Healthy Body: Hair Stylists as Lay Health Advisors to Prevent Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Madigan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney disease affects one in nine Americans. Diabetes and hypertension account for nearly three quarters of all kidney failure cases. Disproportionate rates of chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension have been observed among African Americans. More than 70% of all kidney failure cases caused by diabetes and hypertension could have been prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyles and medications.Context Approximately 14% of the population living in Michigan is African American. Despite this small proportion, 47% of patients on dialysis and 45% of those on the kidney transplant waiting list are African American. Risk of end-stage kidney failure is 4 times greater among African Americans than among whites.Methods The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan developed the Healthy Hair Starts with a Healthy Body (Healthy Hair campaign to educate African American men and women about their disease risks and to motivate prevention behaviors. The campaign trains African American hair stylists to promote healthy behaviors with their clients through a “health chat” and by providing diabetes and hypertension risk assessment information and incentives.Consequences Since 1999, Healthy Hair has trained nearly 700 stylists and reached more than 14,000 clients in eight Michigan cities. Information collected through a client “Chat Form” suggests a number of positive behavioral results.Interpretation With nearly 60% of clients indicating that they have taken steps to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease or to seek a physician’s advice, the Healthy Hair program appears to be effective in the short term in prompting attention to healthy behaviors and increasing risk awareness.

  20. Erythropoietin therapy in patients with chronic renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Pinevich, A J; Petersen, J.

    1992-01-01

    Symptomatic anemia is a common complication of chronic renal failure. Treatment is now possible with the availability of recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa). Previous experimental studies have suggested that correcting the anemia of chronic renal failure may be harmful in that renal failure may be accelerated. Although experience with this drug has been primarily restricted to its use in patients with end-stage renal disease, several recent trials have been reported in patients wi...

  1. Gastrointestinal function in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelli, A M

    1995-12-01

    Feeding problems, anorexia and vomiting are common in infants and children with chronic renal failure (CRF), and play a major role in the growth failure often found in this condition. However, the gastroenterological and nutritional aspects of CRF in children have received little attention, hence therapeutic interventions are usually empirical and often ineffective. Gastritis, duodenitis and peptic ulcer are often found in adults with CRF on regular haemodialysis and following renal transplantation. Despite persistent hypergastrinaemia, gastric acid secretion is decreased rather than increased in most of these patients, and active peptic disease appears to be promoted by the removal of the acid output inhibition (neutralisation of gastric acid by ammonia) that follows active treatment. Helicobacter pylori, on the other hand, does not seem to play a significant role in the pathogenesis of peptic disease in CRF. Gastro-oesophageal reflux has been found in about 70% of infants and children with CRF suffering from vomiting and feeding problems, and thus appears to be a major problem in these patients. In a number of symptomatic patients with CRF, gastric dysrhythmias and delayed gastric emptying have also been found; hence there appears to be a complex disorder of gastrointestinal motility in CRF. Serum levels of several polypeptide hormones involved in the modulation of gastrointestinal motility [e.g. gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK), neurotensin] and the regulation of hunger and satiety (e.g. glucagon, CCK) are significantly raised as a consequence of renal insufficiency, and can be reverted to normal by renal transplantation. Furthermore, several other humoral abnormalities (e.g. hypercalcaemia, hypokalaemia, acidosis, etc.) are not uncommon in CRF. By directly affecting the smooth muscle of the gut or stimulating particular areas within the central nervous system, all these humoral alterations may well play a major role in the gastrointestinal dysmotility, anorexia

  2. Epidemic of Chronic Kidney Disease in India -What Can Be Done?

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    Prabahar Murugesan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The exact prevalence of chronic kidney disease in India is not clear in the absence of regular national registry data and provided only by small observational series or rely on reports from personal experience, but the quality of data is quiet uneven. There are only three population based studies in India commenting on the magnitude of chronic kidney disease. In a prevention program started at community level in Chennai, the reported prevalence is 0.86% in the project population and 1.39% in the control region. The second study is based on Delhi involving 4972 urban patients. The prevalence of chronic renal failure (defined as serum creatinine more than 1.8 mg/dL to be 0.79 % or 7852 per million/population. The third study perhaps the only longitudinal study to identify the incidence of end stage renal disease is based on 572,029 subjects residing in city of Bhopal suggests that the average crude and age adjusted incidence rates of end stage renal disease were 151 and 232 per million population respectively. The resources and skill for taking care of this large case load, both in terms of personal and health care infrastructure do not exist currently and would need to be created. To tackle the problem of limited access to renal replacement therapy, an important method would be to try and reduce the incidence of end stage renal disease and the need of renal replacement therapy by preventive measures. It is clear that treatment of chronic kidney disease and its advanced stage end stage renal disease is expensive and beyond the reach of average Indian. Thus it is crucial that prevention of chronic kidney disease has to be the goal of medical fraternity, government of India and the general public. This article suggests a series of primary, secondary and tertiary preventive measures for prevention of chronic kidney disease. Clearly there are already many effective and attractive interventions for the treatment and prevention of chronic kidney disease

  3. Modeling Red Blood Cell and Iron Dynamics in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Abstract Chronic kidney disease causes a slow loss of kidney function over time and can even- tually lead to End Stage Renal Disease, where a patient must...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Chronic kidney disease causes a slow...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 1 Introduction It is estimated that 31 million Americans have chronic kidney disease ( CKD

  4. Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells Reduce Acute and Chronic Kidney Damage in Mice.

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    Marina Burgos-Silva

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic kidney injuries (AKI and CKI constitute syndromes responsible for a large part of renal failures, and are today still associated with high mortality rates. Given the lack of more effective therapies, there has been intense focus on the use stem cells for organ protective and regenerative effects. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have shown great potential in the treatment of various diseases of immune character, although there is still debate on its mechanism of action. Thus, for a greater understanding of the role of MSCs, we evaluated the effect of adipose tissue-derived stem cells (AdSCs in an experimental model of nephrotoxicity induced by folic acid (FA in FVB mice. AdSC-treated animals displayed kidney functional improvement 24h after therapy, represented by reduced serum urea after FA. These data correlated with cell cycle regulation and immune response modulation via reduced chemokine expression and reduced neutrophil infiltrate. Long-term analyses, 4 weeks after FA, indicated that AdSC treatment reduced kidney fibrosis and chronic inflammation. These were demonstrated by reduced interstitial collagen deposition and tissue chemokine and cytokine expression. Thus, we concluded that AdSC treatment played a protective role in the framework of nephrotoxic injury via modulation of inflammation and cell cycle regulation, resulting in reduced kidney damage and functional improvement, inhibiting organ fibrosis and providing long-term immune regulation.

  5. Relation of Aortic Valve and Coronary Artery Calcium in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease to the Stage and Etiology of the Renal Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piers, Lieuwe H.; Touw, Hugo R. W.; Gansevoort, Ron; Franssen, Casper F. M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Zijlstra, Felix; Tio, Rene A.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure have increased cardiac calcium loads. Previous studies have investigated the prevalence and quantitative extent of aortic valve calcium (AVC) and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the impact of

  6. Hyperparathyroidism with hypercalcaemia in chronic kidney disease: primary or tertiary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunn, Mitchell R; Muñoz Mendoza, Jair; Pasche, Lezlee J; Norton, Jeffrey A; Ayco, Alexander L; Chertow, Glenn M

    2010-08-01

    Objective . This study aims to highlight the challenges in the diagnosis of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods . In this report, we describe a middle-aged Filipino gentleman with underlying CKD who presented with intractable nausea, vomiting, severe and medically refractory hypercalcaemia and parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations in excess of 2400 pg/mL. The underlying pathophysiology as well as the aetiologies and current relevant literature are discussed. We also suggest an appropriate diagnostic approach to identify and promptly treat patients with CKD, HPT and hypercalcaemia. Results . Evaluation confirmed the presence of a large parathyroid adenoma; HPT and hypercalcaemia resolved rapidly following resection. Conclusion . This case report is remarkable for its severe hypercalcaemia requiring haemodialysis, large adenoma size, acute-on-chronic kidney injury and markedly elevated PTH concentration in association with primary HPT in CKD.

  7. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

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    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  8. Recent developments in epigenetics of acute and chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Marpadga A; Natarajan, Rama

    2015-08-01

    The growing epidemic of obesity and diabetes, the aging population as well as prevalence of drug abuse has led to significant increases in the rates of the closely associated acute and chronic kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, evidence shows that parental behavior and diet can affect the phenotype of subsequent generations via epigenetic transmission mechanisms. These data suggest a strong influence of the environment on disease susceptibility and that, apart from genetic susceptibility, epigenetic mechanisms need to be evaluated to gain critical new information about kidney diseases. Epigenetics is the study of processes that control gene expression and phenotype without alterations in the underlying DNA sequence. Epigenetic modifications, including cytosine DNA methylation and covalent post-translational modifications of histones in chromatin, are part of the epigenome, the interface between the stable genome and the variable environment. This dynamic epigenetic layer responds to external environmental cues to influence the expression of genes associated with disease states. The field of epigenetics has seen remarkable growth in the past few years with significant advances in basic biology, contributions to human disease, as well as epigenomics technologies. Further understanding of how the renal cell epigenome is altered by metabolic and other stimuli can yield novel new insights into the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. In this review, we have discussed the current knowledge on the role of epigenetic mechanisms (primarily DNAme and histone modifications) in acute and chronic kidney diseases, and their translational potential to identify much needed new therapies.

  9. Alterations of intestinal barrier and microbiota in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatino, Alice; Regolisti, Giuseppe; Brusasco, Irene; Cabassi, Aderville; Morabito, Santo; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the close relationship between the kidney and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract--frequently referred to as the kidney--gut axis--in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this regard, two important pathophysiological concepts have evolved: (i) production and accumulation of toxic end-products derived from increased bacterial fermentation of protein and other nitrogen-containing substances in the GI tract, (ii) translocation of endotoxins and live bacteria from gut lumen into the bloodstream, due to damage of the intestinal epithelial barrier and quantitative/qualitative alterations of the intestinal microbiota associated with the uraemic milieu. In both cases, these gut-centred alterations may have relevant systemic consequences in CKD patients, since they are able to trigger chronic inflammation, increase cardiovascular risk and worsen uraemic toxicity. The present review is thus focused on the kidney-gut axis in CKD, with special attention to the alterations of the intestinal barrier and the local microbiota (i.e. the collection of microorganisms living in a symbiotic coexistence with their host in the intestinal lumen) and their relationships to inflammation and uraemic toxicity in CKD. Moreover, we will summarize the most important clinical data suggesting the potential for nutritional modulation of gut-related inflammation and intestinal production of noxious by-products contributing to uraemic toxicity in CKD patients.

  10. [Infusion-associated kidney and liver failure in undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Wiefel, D E; Steinmann, B; Holm-Hadulla, M; Wille, L; Schärer, K; Gitzelmann, R

    1983-06-24

    Appendectomy was performed in a 14 1/2-year-old boy with undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance because of chronic recurrent abdominal pain. During and after operation fructose containing solutions were infused. The patient received a total of 250 g fructose intravenously over 30 hours. Hours after onset of infusion he became soporous, hypoglycaemic and acidotic and was anuric after one day. Although the diagnosis was suspected by the end of the first postoperative day and fructose had been cancelled and haemodialysis been started, the boy died after a further 3 days with signs of acute kidney and liver failure. The diagnosis of hereditary fructose intolerance was biochemically established in post mortem liver tissue. This case recalls the fact that fructose, sorbitol or invert sugars should not be added to infusion solutions as they may be toxic for healthy persons and imply a lethal risk for patients with undiagnosed hereditary fructose intolerance, even well beyond the baby and infant period.

  11. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

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    Niamh E Goulding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure.Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated four days prior to receiving cisplatin (5mg/kg i.p. and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys.Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3-4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalised following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation.

  12. Increased interleukin-13 levels in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yuki; Inoue, Teruo; Nitto, Takeaki; Morooka, Toshifumi; Node, Koichi

    2009-01-24

    A great number of basic and clinical studies have demonstrated that inflammatory cytokines play an important role in development and progress of heart failure. However, there is limited information about allergic cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13). The inflammatory responses mediated by allergic cytokines can cause significant morbidity and mortality when they become chronic. Therefore, we elucidated the role of IL-13 in the pathophysiology of chronic heart failure. We measured plasma IL-13 levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 110 patients with chronic heart failure and 20 control subjects. Plasma IL-13 levels were increased in heart failure patients, compared with the controls, in association with NYHA functional class. In addition, IL-13 levels were correlated positively with plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein, and negatively with left ventricular ejection fraction. Plasma IL-13 levels may be useful for evaluating disease severity in chronic heart failure.

  13. Dietary sodium in chronic kidney disease: a comprehensive approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Julie A; Cavanaugh, Kerri L

    2010-01-01

    Despite existing guidelines, dietary sodium intake among people worldwide often exceeds recommended limits. Research evidence is growing in both animal and human studies showing indirect and direct adverse consequences of high dietary sodium on the kidney. In patients with kidney disease, dietary sodium may have important effects on proteinuria, efficacy of antiproteinuric pharmacologic therapy, hypertension control, maintaining an optimal volume status, and immunosuppressant therapy. Dietary sodium intake is an important consideration in patients with all stages of chronic kidney disease, including those receiving dialysis therapy or those who have received a kidney transplant. We review in detail the dietary sodium recommendations suggested by various organizations for patients with kidney disease. Potential barriers to successfully translating current sodium intake guidelines into practice include poor knowledge about the sodium content of food among both patients and providers, complex labeling information, patient preferences related to taste, and limited support for modifications in public policy. Finally, we offer existing and potential solutions that may assist providers in educating and empowering patients to effectively manage their dietary sodium intake.

  14. Characterization of Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Niovis Sosa Barberena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cienfuegos has a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which is a health problem of great social and economic impact. Objective: to characterize patients with chronic kidney disease receiving hemodialysis. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted in 80 patients treated at the Specialized Outpatient Center of Cienfuegos in 2013. General variables such as age, sex, and place of origin were analyzed, in addition to the causes of the disease, length of time on hemodialysis, type of vascular access, and prevalence of hepatitis C. Absolute frequencies, percentages, and rates were calculated. Results: the 45 to 54 age group was the most affected by the condition. Males accounted for 63.7%. Cienfuegos municipality showed the highest prevalence with 27.6 per 100 000 inhabitants. The most common cause of chronic kidney disease was nephroangiosclerosis (33.3%. Seventy three percent of patients started hemodialysis as an emergency therapy. The time on hemodialysis was less than one year and one to two years in more than half of patients. An arteriovenous fistula was used in 81.3% of cases. Hepatitis C showed a high prevalence. Conclusion: renal disease is more common in men of working age in Cienfuegos municipality. The major causes of this disease are associated with hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

  15. The Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

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    Vladu Mihaela

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic disease which can evolve towards devastating micro and macro-vascular complications. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD and premature death. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognosis in patients with DM and CKD, depending on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and albuminuria, according to the classification of Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease (KDIGO from 2013 Materials and Methods: The study was epidemiological, transversal, non interventional type, with 600 subjects unselected patients divided into three subgroups: 200 patients with T1DM, 200 patients with T2DM and 200 age matched subjects without DM. The recorded data have been analyzed using the Statistic Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, the 17.00 software (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, United States of America. Results:. We found a statistically significant difference among the three study groups (p < 0.0001 regarding the prognosis of CKD. Conclusions: DM represents an important risk factor for the appearance of CKD but also a negative prognosis factor for the patients with CKD.

  16. A perspective on sympathetic renal denervation in chronic congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madanieh, Raef; El-Hunjul, Mohammed; Alkhawam, Hassan; Kosmas, Constantine E; Madanieh, Abed; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Medical therapy has indisputably been the mainstay of management for chronic congestive heart failure. However, a significant percentage of patients continue to experience worsening heart failure (HF) symptoms despite treatment with multiple therapeutic agents. Recently, catheter-based interventional strategies that interrupt the renal sympathetic nervous system have shown promising results in providing better symptom control in patients with HF. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of HF for better understanding of the interplay between the cardiovascular system and the kidney. Subsequently, we will briefly discuss pivotal renal denervation (RDN) therapy trials in patients with resistant hypertension and then present the available evidence on the role of RDN in HF therapy.

  17. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

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    Vendrely Benoit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by the Diabetology and Nephrology departments of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux. Results The patients were mainly men (44/75, aged 62 ± 13 yrs, with long-standing diabetes (duration:17 ± 9 yrs, 55/75 type 2, and CKD: initial GFR: 56.5 (8.5-209 mL/min/1.73 m2, AER: 196 (20-2358 mg/24 H. Their mean kidney lenght (108 ± 13 mm, 67-147 was correlated to the GFR (r = 0.23, p Conclusions Large kidneys still predict progression in advanced CKD complicating diabetes. In these patients, ultrasound imaging not only excludes obstructive renal disease, but also provides information on the progression of the renal disease.

  18. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease : a KDIGO Controversies Conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; de Jong, Paul E.; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to chr

  19. Renal resistive index and mortality in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Clarisse; Thomas, George; Schold, Jesse D; Arrigain, Susana; Gornik, Heather L; Nally, Joseph V; Navaneethan, Sankar D

    2015-08-01

    Renal resistive index (RRI) measured by Doppler ultrasonography is associated with cardiovascular events and mortality in hypertensive, diabetic, and elderly patients. We studied the factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70) and its associations with mortality in chronic kidney disease patients without renal artery stenosis. We included 1962 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate of 15 to 59 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) who also had RRI measured (January 1, 2005, to October 2011) from an existing chronic kidney disease registry. Participants with renal artery stenosis (60%-99% or renal artery occlusion) were excluded. Multivariable logistic regression model was used to study factors associated with high RRI (≥0.70), and its association with mortality was studied using Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazards model. Hypertension was prevalent in >90% of the patients. In the multivariable logistic regression, older age, female sex, diabetes mellitus, coronary artery disease, peripheral vascular disease, higher systolic blood pressure, and the use of β blockers were associated with higher odds of having RRI≥0.70. During a median follow-up of 2.2 years, 428 patients died. After adjusting for covariates, RRI≥0.70 was associated with increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.65; Pchronic kidney disease. Noncardiovascular/non-malignancy-related deaths were higher in those with RRI≥0.70. RRI≥0.70 is associated with higher mortality in hypertensive chronic kidney disease patients without clinically significant renal artery stenosis after accounting for other significant risk factors. Its evaluation may allow early identification of those who are at risk thereby potentially preventing or delaying adverse outcomes.

  20. 整体护理干预对慢性肾功能衰竭血液透析患者生活质量及临床疗效的影响%Effects of Holistic Nursing Intervention on the Clinical Efficacy and Quality of Life in Patients with Hematodialysis for Chronic Kidney Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈勇琴; 罗丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of holistic nursing intervention on the renal function re -lated index levels and quality of life in patients with hematodialysis for chronic kidney failure .Methods:A to-tal of 60 patients with hematodialysis for chronic kidney failure were selected and randomly divided into obser -vation group and control group , with 30 patients in each group.The control group used usual care , while the observation group used holistic care , and the renal function related index levels and qualities of life before and after the nursing cares were compared .The quality of life was evaluated by short -form health survey (SF-36), and the renal function related indexes included serum creatinine (SCr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Results:Before the nursing care, the two groups had insignificantly different in SF -36 scores, Scr and BUN levels (P>0.05); while after the nursing care, both groups had significantly improved SF -36 scores, Scr and BUN levels compared before the nursing cares (P<0.05).Conclusion: Holistic nursing intervention can ef-fectively improve the index levels related with the renal function and elevate the quality of life in patients with hematodialysis for chronic kidney failure, and the result is worthy of clinical application .%目的:探讨整体护理干预对慢性肾功能衰竭血液透析患者生活质量及肾功能相关指标水平的影响。方法:选择慢性肾功能衰竭血液透析患者60例,随机分为观察组和对照组各30例,对照组实施常规护理,观察组给予整体护理,比较护理前后患者生活质量及肾功能相关指标水平,生活质量采用简明健康调查表(SF-36)评定,肾功能相关指标包括血清肌酐(SCr)和血尿素氮(BUN)。结果:护理前,两组患者 SF-36各维度评分、Scr 及 BUN 水平比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);护理后,两组 SF-36各维度评分、Scr 及 BUN 水平较本组护理

  1. Clinical Study on the Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure of Kidney Yang Deficiency by Yishen Liquid Iontophoresis%益肾液离子导入治疗慢性肾功能衰竭肾阳虚证临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    栗文杰

    2013-01-01

    目的:探讨益肾液离子导入治疗慢性肾功能衰竭肾阳虚证的临床疗效.方法:将60例慢性肾功能衰竭肾阳虚证患者按随机数字表法分为治疗组和对照组各30例.两组均根据病情需要采用西医常规治疗,治疗组在西医常规治疗的基础上予益肾液离子导入治疗,每日1次,每次30 min,7次1个疗程,3d后开始下1个疗程,共3个疗程.两组疗程均为1个月.结果:治疗组有效率为86.67%,对照组有效率为76.67%,两组有效率相比有显著性差异(P<0.05),表明益肾液离子导入治疗肾阳虚型慢性肾功能衰竭有良好疗效.畏寒肢冷症状的疗效治疗组与对照组比较有非常显著性差异(P<0.01);倦怠乏力、腰膝酸痛症状的疗效治疗组与对照组比较有显著性差异(P<0.05),治疗组在改善上述症状方面疗效优于对照组;在改善食少纳呆、恶心、呕吐方面两组疗效相近(P>0.05).结论:益肾液离子导入治疗慢性肾功能衰竭肾阳虚证疗效显著.%Objective:To explore the clinical study on the treatment of chronic renal failure of kidney yang deficiency by Yishen Liquid iontophoresis. Methods:60 patients with chronic renal failure of kidney yang deficiency sydrome were divided into treatment group and control group with 30 cases in each group, according to the table of random number method. Both groups were treated with conventional western medicine, while the treatment group was additionally given Yishen Liquid iontophoresis based on the conventional western medicine . The treatment was given once a day,30 min every time, seven times as a course of treatment. After 3 days, the next course began a-gain with a total number of three courses and courses of the two groups were one month. The effective rate in the treatment group was 86. 67% ,while the rate of the control group was 76. 67%. Comparision of the effective rate in both groups snowed the difference was significant( P 0. 05). Conclusion

  2. Sickle Cell Trait Tied to Higher Kidney Failure Risk for Blacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164005.html Sickle Cell Trait Tied to Higher Kidney Failure Risk for ... HealthDay News) -- Black people with a trait for sickle cell anemia appear to have double the risk of ...

  3. [Intensity of lipid peroxidation in the kidneys in nephrotoxic acute renal failure (experimental study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, V S; Zhiznevskaia, N G; Koltygina, T I; Gapanovich, V M; Makarenko, E V

    2000-01-01

    Mercury chloride was injected cubcutaneously in rats to induce nephrotoxic acute renal failure (ARF). Renal dysfunction in ARF occurs under intensification of lipid peroxidation in the kidneys. Pretreatment with antioxidant ionol diminishes lipid peroxidation intensity in the kidneys in ARF and restricts the severity of renal dysfunction.

  4. A STUDY ON ETIOLOGY AND PROFILE OF PLEURAL EFFUSION IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

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    Prem Kumar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic Kidney disease is characterized by decreased glomerular filteration rate. Most pleural effusions occurring in CKD are attributed to renal failure & heart failure and are left alone, but there are other causes responsible for many effusions such as parapneumonic effusion, atelectasis, tuberculosis and other infections and malignancies due to immunosuppression, hence presence of pleural effusion in CKD deserves further evaluation. Our study is conducted to find the etiology and profile of patients with chronic Kidney disease developing pleural effusion. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Study was conducted among 35 patients with CKD and pleural effusion who attended Government hospital for chest and communicable diseases affiliated to Andhra Medical College, from M arch 2013 to September 2014. The clinical course of pleural effusions and their biochemical characteristics were studied together with radiographs and other relevant investigations. Study design - hospital based prospective study. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS: Of the 35 patients, 57% developed unilateral effusi on, 43% bilateral effusion. Among unilateral effusions - minimal effusions were 25%, moderate were 60%, massive were 15%. Patients with transudative effusion were 31%, exudative were 69%. Causes of effusion were as follows: Cardiac failure 31%, Tuberculosis 28%, Malignancy 9%, uremic effusion 14%, parapneumonic 11%, connective tissue disorders 2%. CONCLUSIONS: Apart from cardiac failure, tuberculosis is a major cause of pleural effusion in CKD patients, especially if the effusion is unilateral, exudative in nature, blood tinged, and lymphocyte predominant. ATT produced improvement in clinical and radiological status in these patients. KEYWORDS: CKD (C hronic K idney D isease, P leural effusion, C ardiac failure, T uberculosis.

  5. Patchy cerebral white matter edema in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anlar, B.; Erzen, C.; Saatci, U.

    1989-07-01

    Bilateral patchy cerebral white matter edema was observed in two children with chronic renal failure. Uremia in one case and hypertension or hyponatremia in the other appeared to be the cause of the neurological and radiological findings. (orig.).

  6. Effect of HIF-1 on anemia of the chronic renal failure rats induced by 5/6 nephrectomy kidney%5/6肾切除慢性肾衰竭大鼠残肾组织中HIF-1表达对贫血的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙秀丽; 冯国徵; 侯国存; 雷震坤; 尚小梅

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of HIF-1 expression in the remnant kidney on anemia in the chronic kidney failure model rats caused by 5/6 nephrectomy. Methods SD male rats with 5/6 nephrectomy were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, model group and EPO group. In EPO group, the recombinant human erythropoietin( rhEPO) 40 IU/kg was injected subcutane-ously twice a week at 3 week after operation till the rats were killed. The experimental animals were sacrificed at 90 d after surgery. The samples of blood and residual kidney tissue were collected to detect the contents of Scr and Hb and observe the pathological chan-ges by HE and Masson staining, respectively. Protein expression level of HIF-1 was detected by Western blot and immunofluorescence as-say. Results ①In model group, most glomeruloes in the remnant kidney showed segmental glomerulosclerosis, renal interstitial fibro-sis and gland atrophy. Compared with sham group, the glomerulosclerosis index was significantly increased in model group(P0. 05).③Compared with sham group, the Hb content increased significantly in model group(P0.05)。②手术组与假手术组相比,Scr明显升高(P0.05)。③与假手术组比较,模型组Hb明显升高(P<0.05);与模型组比较,EPO组Hb变化不明显(P<0.05)。④与假手术组比较,模型组HIF-1表达明显增加(P<0.05);与模型组相比,EPO组HIF-1表达明显减少(P<0.05)。结论在慢性肾衰竭大鼠中,HIF-1的表达增加可改善肾性贫血。

  7. Vitamin D deficiency aggravates chronic kidney disease progression after ischemic acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína Garcia Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Despite a significant improvement in the management of chronic kidney disease (CKD, its incidence and prevalence has been increasing over the years. Progressive renal fibrosis is present in CKD and involves the participation of several cytokines, including Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1. Besides cardiovascular diseases and infections, several studies show that Vitamin D status has been considered as a non-traditional risk factor for the progression of CKD. Given the importance of vitamin D in the maintenance of essential physiological functions, we studied the events involved in the chronic kidney disease progression in rats submitted to ischemia/reperfusion injury under vitamin D deficiency (VDD.Rats were randomized into four groups: Control; VDD; ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI; and VDD+IRI. At the 62 day after sham or IRI surgery, we measured inulin clearance, biochemical variables and hemodynamic parameters. In kidney tissue, we performed immunoblotting to quantify expression of Klotho, TGF-β, and vitamin D receptor (VDR; gene expression to evaluate renin, angiotensinogen, and angiotensin-converting enzyme; and immunohistochemical staining for ED1 (macrophages, type IV collagen, fibronectin, vimentin, and α-smooth mucle actin. Histomorphometric studies were performed to evaluate fractional interstitial area.IRI animals presented renal hypertrophy, increased levels of mean blood pressure and plasma PTH. Furthermore, expansion of the interstitial area, increased infiltration of ED1 cells, increased expression of collagen IV, fibronectin, vimentin and α-actin, and reduced expression of Klotho protein were observed. VDD deficiency contributed to increased levels of plasma PTH as well as for important chronic tubulointerstitial changes (fibrosis, inflammatory infiltration, tubular dilation and atrophy, increased expression of TGF-β1 and decreased expression of VDR and Klotho protein observed in VDD+IRI animals.Through inflammatory

  8. Erythrocyte survival in chronic renal failure. Role of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    OpenAIRE

    Akmal, M; Telfer, N; Ansari, A N; Massry, S G

    1985-01-01

    The human erythrocyte (RBC) is a target organ for parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the hormone increases RBC osmotic fragility and induces their hemolysis. The present study was undertaken to examine whether elevated blood levels of PTH affect RBC survival, and therefore whether PTH, being an extracorpuscular factor, is responsible for the shortened RBC survival in chronic renal failure. 51Cr-labeled RBC survival was elevated in six normal dogs, in six animals with chronic renal failure and seco...

  9. Central Mechanisms of Abnormal Sympathoexcitation in Chronic Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been recognized that the sympathetic nervous system is abnormally activated in chronic heart failure, and leads to further worsening chronic heart failure. In the treatment of chronic heart failure many clinical studies have already suggested that the inhibition of the abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity by beta blockers is beneficial. It has been classically considered that abnormal sympathetic hyperactivity in chronic heart failure is caused by the enhancement of excitatory inputs including changes in peripheral baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes and chemical mediators that control sympathetic outflow. Recently, the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity mediated by brain renin angiotensin system-oxidative stress axis and/or proinflammatory cytokines have been focused. Central renin angiotensin system, proinflammatory cytokines, and the interaction between them have been determined as the target of the sympathoinhibitory treatment in experimental animal models with chronic heart failure. In conclusion, we must recognize that chronic heart failure is a syndrome with an abnormal sympathoexcitation, which is caused by the abnormalities in the central regulation of sympathetic nerve activity.

  10. Angiotensin II, sympathetic nerve activity and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutang; Seto, Sai-Wang; Golledge, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been reported to be increased in both humans and animals with chronic heart failure. One of the mechanisms believed to be responsible for this phenomenon is increased systemic and cerebral angiotensin II signaling. Plasma angiotensin II is increased in humans and animals with chronic heart failure. The increase in angiotensin II signaling enhances sympathetic nerve activity through actions on both central and peripheral sites during chronic heart failure. Angiotensin II signaling is enhanced in different brain sites such as the paraventricular nucleus, the rostral ventrolateral medulla and the area postrema. Blocking angiotensin II type 1 receptors decreases sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex when therapy is administered to the paraventricular nucleus. Injection of an angiotensin receptor blocker into the area postrema activates the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In peripheral regions, angiotensin II elevates both norepinephrine release and synthesis and inhibits norepinephrine uptake at nerve endings, which may contribute to the increase in sympathetic nerve activity seen in chronic heart failure. Increased circulating angiotensin II during chronic heart failure may enhance the sympathoexcitatory chemoreflex and inhibit the sympathoinhibitory baroreflex. In addition, increased circulating angiotensin II can directly act on the central nervous system via the subfornical organ and the area postrema to increase sympathetic outflow. Inhibition of angiotensin II formation and its type 1 receptor has been shown to have beneficial effects in chronic heart failure patients.

  11. Investigating Awareness in Chronic Renal Failure Among Family Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül ATAMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The conditions underlying chronic renal failure have become epidemics in the world. The aim of this study was to reveal the degree of awareness of chronic renal failure among family physicians. MATERIAL and METHODS: Using data collected with a structured questionnaire and considering physicians’ socio-demographic features and their education on nephrology, we evaluated physicians’ awareness of the definition, frequency and clinical features of chronic renal failure. The questionnaire was filled in by volunteering family medicine specialists (FMS, family medicine assistants (FMA and family physicians (FP during a family medicine meeting. RESULTS: Out of 310 physicians, 25.2% (n=78 were FMS, 27.7% (n=86 FMA and 47.1% (n=146 FP. %35,2 of physicians (n=109 (FMS: % 62,8 (n=49, FMA: %52.3 (n=45, FP: %10.3 (n=15, p0.05. However, less than 15% of the physicians reported that they felt competent enough to follow patients with chronic renal failure. The rate of the physicians who felt the need to refer these patients to health institutions was high. However, the Fps did not like the patient care style of internal medicine specialists and thought that patients faced financial problems to access the nephrologist. CONCLUSION: Appropriate care and management of referrals are life-saving for patients with chronic renal failure. New strategies should be developed to increase awareness concerning chronic renal failure and the management of this condition.

  12. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression.

  13. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response by stimulating the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12. In healthy humans, serum leptin concentration is related to the size of adipose tissue mass in the body. The majority of obese subjects have inappropriately high levels of circulating plasma leptin concentrations, indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin concentration is an independent risk factor for mortality in these patients.

  14. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response......, indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin...... by stimulating the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-12. In healthy humans, serum leptin concentration is related to the size of adipose tissue mass in the body. The majority of obese subjects have inappropriately high levels of circulating plasma leptin concentrations...

  15. Anemia in chronic heart failure : etiology and treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure, and is related to increased morbidity and mortality. The etiology of anemia in heart failure is complex and still not fully resolved. The review will describe current advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of an

  16. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item (SF-36 and functional status by the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Clinical, laboratory and sociodemographic variables were investigated. RESULTS: Quality of life decreased in all stages of kidney disease. A reduction in physical functioning, physical role functioning and in the physical component summary was observed progressively in the different stages of kidney disease. Individuals with higher educational level who were professionally active displayed higher physical component summary values, whereas men and those with a higher income presented better mental component summary values. Older patients performed worse on the physical component summary and better on the mental component summary. Hemoglobin levels correlated with higher physical component summary values and the Karnofsky scale. Three or more comorbidities had an impact on the physical dimension. CONCLUSION: Quality of life is decreased in renal patients in the early stages of disease. No association was detected between the stages of the disease and the quality of life. It was possible to establish sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory risk factors for a worse quality of life in this population.

  17. Angiotensin II vaccine promising for patients with chronic heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yang-xin; YAO You-jie; NIE Ru-qiong; ZHOU Shu-xian; WANG Jing-feng

    2009-01-01

    @@ Chronic heart failure (CHF), as the end-stage presentation of all kinds of heart diseases, is a major public health problem as well as a pressing public policy issue. There are more than 5 million patients diagnosed with CHF in USA alone and approximately 550 000 new cases appear per year. About 0.4%-2% of the European population is affected by symptomatic heart failure. Hence heart failure is the leading cause of hospitalization especially in older people around the world.

  18. Losartan reduces ensuing chronic kidney disease and mortality after acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shun-Yang; Chou, Yu-Hsiang; Liao, Fang-Ling; Lin, Chi-Chun; Chang, Fan-Chi; Liu, Chia-Hao; Huang, Tao-Min; Lai, Chun-Fu; Lin, Yu-Feng; Wu, Vin-Cent; Chu, Tzong-Shinn; Wu, Ming-Shiou; Lin, Shuei-Liong

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is an important risk factor for incident chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical studies disclose that ensuing CKD progresses after functional recovery from AKI, but the underlying mechanisms remain illusive. Using a murine model representing AKI-CKD continuum, we show angiotensin II type 1a (AT1a) receptor signaling as one of the underlying mechanisms. Male adult CD-1 mice presented severe AKI with 20% mortality within 2 weeks after right nephrectomy and left renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Despite functional recovery, focal tubular atrophy, interstitial cell infiltration and fibrosis, upregulation of genes encoding angiotensinogen and AT1a receptor were shown in kidneys 4 weeks after AKI. Thereafter mice manifested increase of blood pressure, albuminuria and azotemia progressively. Drinking water with or without losartan or hydralazine was administered to mice from 4 weeks after AKI. Increase of mortality, blood pressure, albuminuria, azotemia and kidney fibrosis was noted in mice with vehicle administration during the 5-month experimental period. On the contrary, these parameters in mice with losartan administration were reduced to the levels shown in control group. Hydralazine did not provide similar beneficial effect though blood pressure was controlled. These findings demonstrate that losartan can reduce ensuing CKD and mortality after functional recovery from AKI. PMID:27677327

  19. Vitamin B-12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Haye H.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T.; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A.; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B-12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause m

  20. Iron deficiency in chronic heart failure : An international pooled analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klip, IJsbrand T.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Voors, Adriaan A.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Enjuanes, Cristina; Banasiak, Waldemar; Lok, Dirk J.; Rosentryt, Piotr; Torrens, Ainhoa; Polonski, Lech; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van der Meer, Peter; Jankowska, Ewa A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is an emerging problem in patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and can be a potential therapeutic target. However, not much is known about the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of ID in patients with chronic HF. Methods In an international pooled cohort compri

  1. Smoking and risk of kidney failure in the Singapore Chinese health study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizhen Jin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relationship between smoking and risk of kidney failure, especially in people of Chinese origin, is not clear. We analyzed data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study to investigate whether smoking increases the risk of kidney failure. METHODS: The Singapore Chinese Health Study is a population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese adults enrolled between 1993 and 1998. Information on smoking status was collected at baseline. Incidence of kidney failure was identified via record linkage with the nationwide Singapore Renal Registry until 2008. Kidney failure was defined by one of the following: 1 serum creatinine level of more than or equal to 500 µmol/l (5.7 mg/dl, 2 estimated glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 ml/min/1.73 m(2, 3 undergoing hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, 4 undergone kidney transplantation. Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed for the outcome of kidney failure after adjusting for age, education, dialect, herbal medications, body mass index, sex, physician-diagnosed hypertension and diabetes mellitus. RESULTS: The mean age of subjects was 55.6 years at baseline, and 44% were men. Overall 30.6% were ever smokers (current or former at baseline. A total of 674 incident cases of kidney failure occurred during a median follow-up of 13.3 years. Among men, smokers had a significant increase in the adjusted risk of kidney failure [hazard ratio (HR: 1.29; 95% CI: 1.02-1.64] compared to never smokers. There was a strong dose-dependent association between number of years of smoking and kidney failure, (p for trend = 0.011. The risk decreased with prolonged cessation (quitting ≥10 years since baseline. The number of women smokers was too few for conclusive relationship. LIMITATION: Information on baseline kidney function was not available. CONCLUSIONS: Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of kidney failure among Chinese men. The risk appears to be dose- and duration

  2. Kidney failure in the elderly due to hypothyroidism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Cristina Pichinin Ledo Silva

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Hypothyroidism is more prevalent in the elderly and its symptoms can be confused with other changes due to aging. Doctors caring for the elderly need to be attentive to this diagnostic possibility. This case report case is notable not only because it presents a rare complication of hypothyroidism (kidney failure, but also because patients with chronic kidney failure of any etiology may suffer increased renal dysfunction as a result. CASE REPORT: This was a 66-year-old male outpatient with a history of generalized edema over the preceding eight years, with periods of worsening, that was intractable to treatment with diuretics. Physical examination revealed bradycardia (heart rate: 52 bpm, pallor, dry and infiltrated skin, macroglossia, edema in the lower limbs and a palpable thyroid with hard consistency. Laboratory tests showed: creatinine 3.9 mg/dl; urea 95 mg/dl; potassium 6.0 mEq/l; thyroid-stimulating hormone > 100 mUI/ml; triiodothyronine 0.01 ng/dl; free thyroxin 0.01 ng/dl; antithyroglobulin 31 IU/ml (normal values: < 40 IU/ml; antithyroperoxidase 85 IU/ml (normal values: < 15 IU/ml; creatinine clearance 30 ml/min/1.73 m²; and proteinuria 122 mg/24 h. After five months of treatment with thyroxin (100 mcg/day, the patient returned without any symptoms and presented the following test results: urea 48 mg/dl; creatinine 1.4 mg/dl; creatinine clearance 67 ml/min/1.73 m²; potassium 4.2 mEq/l; thyroid-stimulating hormone: 20.85 mUI/ml; free thyroxin: 0.71 ng/dl. Hypothyroidism alone can cause renal impairment or worsen renal function in preexisting illnesses. Its treatment can stabilize the clinical condition, or possibly improve it.

  3. Effect of atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide in rats with adenine-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C; Liu, C; Zhou, Q; Xie, Y C; Qiu, X M; Feng, X

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the therapeutic effects of Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats. Fifty male Sprague Dawley rats were selected and randomly divided in to 5 groups (n=10 rats per group): The normal control group, the chronic renal failure pathological control group, the dexamethasone treatment group and two Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide treatment groups, treated with two different concentrations of the polysaccharide, the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and the Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group. All the rats, except those in the normal control group were fed adenine-enriched diets, containing 10 g adenine per kg food for 3 weeks. After being fed with adenine, the dexamethasone treatment group, Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide high group and Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide low group rats were administered the drug orally for 2 weeks. On day 35, the kidney coefficient of the rats and the serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, total protein and hemalbumin were determined. Subsequent to experimentation on a model of chronic renal failure in rats, the preparation was proven to be able to reduce serum levels of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and hemalbumin levels (Prenal function. Atracylodes rhizome polysaccharide had reversed the majority of the indices of chronic renal failure in rats.

  4. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine.

  5. Metformin in Chronic Kidney Disease: Time for a Rethink

    OpenAIRE

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological evidence suggests that this fear is disproportionate. Lactic acidosis is a rare complication to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with an incidence of 6/100,000 patient-years. The risk is not increa...

  6. Nutritional management and growth in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Lesley; Jones, Helen

    2013-04-01

    Despite continuing improvements in our understanding of the causes of poor growth in chronic kidney disease, many unanswered questions remain: why do some patients maintain a good appetite whereas others have profound anorexia at a similar level of renal function? Why do some, but not all, patients respond to increased nutritional intake? Is feed delivery by gastrostomy superior to oral and nasogastric routes? Do children who are no longer in the 'infancy' stage of growth benefit from enteral feeding? Do patients with protein energy wasting benefit from increased nutritional input? How do we prevent obesity, which is becoming so prevalent in the developed world? This review will address these issues.

  7. Aging and the Kidneys: Anatomy, Physiology and Consequences for Defining Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassock, Richard J; Rule, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The varied functions of the kidneys are influenced by the complex process of aging. The glomerular filtration rate (GFR) steadily declines with normal aging, and the progress of this process can be influenced by superimposed diseases. Microscopically, nephron numbers decrease as global glomerulosclerosis becomes more evident. The precise mechanisms underlying nephron loss with aging are not well understood, but derangements in podocyte biology appear to be involved. Classifications of chronic kidney disease (CKD) incorporate GFR values and attendant risk of adverse events. Arbitrary and fixed thresholds of GFR for defining CKD have led to an overdiagnosis of CKD in the elderly. An age-sensitive definition of CKD could offer a solution to this problem and more meaningfully capture the prognostic implications of CKD.

  8. Kidney disease in heart failure: the importance of novel biomarkers for type 1 cardio-renal syndrome detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzuoli, Alberto; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio; Nuti, Ranuccio

    2015-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in heart failure (HF) has been recognized as an independent risk factor for adverse outcome, although the most important clinical trials tend to exclude patients with moderate and severe renal insufficiency. Despite this common association, the precise pathophysiological connection and liaison between heart and kidney is partially understood. Moreover, is it not enough considering how much cardio-renal syndrome type 1 is attributable to previous CKD, and how much to new-onset acute kidney injury (AKI). Neither development of AKI, its progression and time nor duration is related to an adverse outcome. An AKI definition is not universally recognized, and many confounding terms have been used in literature: "worsening renal function", "renal impairment", "renal dysfunction", etc., are all names that contribute to misunderstanding, and do not facilitate an universal classification. Therefore, AKI development should be the consequence of the basal clinical characteristics of patients, different primitive kidney disease and hemodynamic status. AKI could also be the mirror of several underlying associated diseases poorly controlled. Finally, it is not clear which is the optimal laboratory tool for identifying patients with an increased risk of AKI. In the current report, we review the different kidney diseases' impact in HF, and we analyze the modalities for AKI recognition during HF focusing our attention about some new biomarkers with potential application in the current setting.

  9. Keishibukuryogan Reduces Renal Injury in the Early Stage of Renal Failure in the Remnant Kidney Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takako Nakagawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of keishibukuryogan on the early stage of progressive renal failure were examined in rats subjected to 5/6 nephrectomy. Keishibukuryogan, one of the traditional herbal formulations, was given orally at a dose of 1% (w/w and 3% (w/w in chow. Administration of keishibukuryogan was started at 1 week after 5/6 nephrectomy and was continued for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiment, Azan staining did not reveal any severe histological changes in the kidneys of the nephrectomized rats. On the other hand, significant increases in mRNA expressions of transforming growth factor-β1 and fibronectin related to tissue fibrosis, as examined by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction, were observed in nephrectomized rats, and they were significantly suppressed by 3% keishibukuryogan treatment. Against gene expressions related to macrophage infiltration, 3% keishibukuryogan treatment significantly suppressed osteopontin mRNA levels, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 mRNA levels showed a tendency to decrease, but without statistical significance. It was also observed that 3% keishibukuryogan attenuated serum urea nitrogen and urinary protein excretion levels. From these results, it was suggested that keishibukuryogan exerts beneficial effects that result in slowing the progression of chronic renal failure.

  10. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies.

  11. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure

    OpenAIRE

    Campos,E.F.; Tedesco-Silva, H.; P.G. Machado; Franco., M; J.O. Medina-Pestana; Gerbase-Delima, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. the median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did no...

  12. Vascular and Valvular Calcifications in Chronic Kidney Disease: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In chronic kidney disease (CKD and end-stage renal disease patients cardiovascular disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality, with incidence of cardiac related mortality increasing as renal function declines. Even after controlling for traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as smoking, age, gender, dyslipidaemia, and arterial hypertension, patients with CKD have a higher incidence of major cardiovascular events. CKD is characterised by the presence of many other non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors, such as chronic inflammation and accelerated atherosclerosis, oxidative stress, and especially, secondary hyperparathyroidism. This review will summarise the current evidence on vascular calcifications and valvular heart disease in CKD patients, from pathophysiology to therapeutic strategies.

  13. Uric acid metabolism of kidney and intestine in a rat model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Michito; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Kumagai, Takanori; Hosoyamada, Makoto; Uchida, Shunya

    2016-12-01

    Uric acid (UA) is a potential risk factor of the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recently, we reported that intestinal UA excretion might be enhanced via upregulation of the ATP-binding cassette transporter G2 (Abcg2) in a 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) rat model. In the present study, we examined the mRNA and protein expressions of UA transporters, URAT1, GLUT9/URATv1, ABCG2 and NPT4 in the kidney and ileum in the same rat model. Additionally, we investigated the Abcg2 mRNA expression of ileum in hyperuricemic rat model by orally administering oxonic acid. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to three groups consisting of Nx group, oxonic acid-treated (Ox) group and sham-operated control group, and sacrificed at 8 weeks. Creatinine and UA were measured and the mRNA expressions of UA transporters in the kidney and intestine were evaluated by a real time PCR. UA transporters in the kidney sections were also examined by immunohistochemistry. Serum creatinine elevated in the Nx group whereas serum UA increased in the Ox group. Both the mRNA expression and the immunohistochemistry of the UA transporters were decreased in the Nx group, suggesting a marginal role in UA elevation in decreased kidney function. In contrast, the mRNA expression of Abcg2 in the ileum significantly increased in the Ox group. These results suggest that the upregulation of Abcg2 mRNA in the ileum triggered by an elevation of serum UA may play a compensatory role in increasing intestinal UA excretion.

  14. [CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND PREGNANCY--A CASE REPORT].

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    Amaliev, G M; Uchikova, E; Malinova, M

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic renal failure is a complex therapeutic problem requiring a multidisciplinary approach. It is associated with a higher risk of many perinatal complications. The most common abnormalities are related to: progression of renal failure, development of preeclampsia development of nephrotic syndrome, anemic syndrome, IUGR and fetal death. The prognosis depends on the values of serum creatinine prior to pregnancy, the degree of deterioration of renal function, development of additional obstetric complications and the specific etiological reasons that have led to the occurrence of renal failure. Determining the optimum time for authorization birth depends on the condition of the mother, the condition of the fetus and the rate of progression of renal failure, and the deadline the pregnancy should be terminated is 35 weeks. We present a case of a patient with chronic renal failure, with favorable perinatal outcome.

  15. Management of gouty arthritis in patients with chronic kidney disease.

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    Abdellatif, Abdul A; Elkhalili, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a comorbid condition that affects, based on recent estimates, between 47% and 54% of patients with gouty arthritis. However, data from randomized controlled trials in patients with gouty arthritis and CKD are limited, and current gouty arthritis treatment guidelines do not address the challenges associated with managing this patient population. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colchicine are recommended first-line treatments for acute gouty arthritis attacks. However, in patients with CKD, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended because their use can exacerbate or cause acute kidney injury. Also, colchicine toxicity is increased in patients with CKD, and dosage reduction is required based on level of kidney function. Allopurinol, febuxostat, and pegloticase are all effective treatments for controlling elevated uric acid levels after the treatment of an acute attack. However, in patients with CKD, required allopurinol dosage reductions may limit efficacy; pegloticase requires further investigation in this population, and febuxostat has not been studied in patients with creatinine clearancegouty arthritis including urate-lowering therapy in patients with CKD. Challenges specific to primary care providers are addressed, including guidance to help them decide when to collaborate with, or refer patients to, rheumatology and nephrology specialists based on the severity of gout and CKD.

  16. Kidney EPO expression during chronic hypoxia in aged mice.

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    Benderro, Girriso F; LaManna, Joseph C

    2013-01-01

    In order to maintain normal cellular function, mammalian tissue oxygen concentrations must be tightly regulated within a narrow physiological range. The hormone erythropoietin (EPO) is essential for maintenance of tissue oxygen supply by stimulating red blood cell production and promoting their survival. In this study we compared the effects of 290 Torr atmospheric pressure on the kidney EPO protein levels in young (4-month-old) and aged (24-month-old) C57BL/6 mice. The mice were sacrificed after being anesthetized, and kidney samples were collected and processed by Western blot analysis. Relatively low basal expression of EPO during normoxia in young mice showed significant upregulation in hypoxia and stayed upregulated throughout the hypoxic period (threefold compared to normoxic control), showing a slight decline toward the third week. Whereas, a relatively higher normoxic basal EPO protein level in aged mice did not show significant increase until seventh day of hypoxia, but showed significant upregulation in prolonged hypoxia. Hence, we confirmed that there is a progressively increased accumulation of EPO during chronic hypoxia in young and aged mouse kidney, and the EPO upregulation during hypoxia showed a similarity with the pattern of increase in hematocrit, which we have reported previously.

  17. Insulin Resistance in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Min-Tser Liao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome and its components are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD development. Insulin resistance (IR plays a central role in the metabolic syndrome and is associated with increased risk for CKD in nondiabetic patients. IR is common in patients with mild-to-moderate stage CKD, even when the glomerular filtration rate is within the normal range. IR, along with oxidative stress and inflammation, also promotes kidney disease. In patients with end stage renal disease, IR is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and is linked to protein energy wasting and malnutrition. Systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, elevated serum adipokines and fetuin-A, metabolic acidosis, vitamin D deficiency, depressed serum erythropoietin, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and suppressors of cytokine signaling all cause IR by suppressing insulin receptor-PI3K-Akt pathways in CKD. In addition to adequate renal replacement therapy and correction of uremia-associated factors, thiazolidinedione, ghrelin, protein restriction, and keto-acid supplementation are therapeutic options. Weight control, reduced daily prednisolone dosage, and the use of cyclosporin decrease the risk of developing new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation. Improved understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying IR in CKD may lead to more effective therapeutic strategies to reduce uremia-associated morbidity and mortality.

  18. Effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer Hemin on Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慎微; 石黎明; 刘晓城

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The role of HO 1 inducer, hemin, in chronic renal failure (CRF) rats and its possible mechanism of action was studied. 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy was performed to establish chronic renal failure model. Rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: sham-operated group, CRF group,ferrous gluconate group and hemin group. At the 10th week after operation, serum creatinine,BUN, RBC, HGB and HCT were measured. Renal pathologic changes were observed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression and distribution of HO-1. RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay was used to determine the expression of ET-1 in the kidney and plasma. The results showed that as compared with CRF group, serum creatinine and BUN in hemin group were reduced significantly and nephrogenic anemia was improved markedly. Glomerular mesangial proliferation and interstitial lesion were also ameliorated significantly. Hemin not only increased the expression of HO-1 but also reduced the expression of ET-1 in the kidney. The level of ET-1 protein in the plasma was also reduced after hemin treatment. Most of these indexes were not obviously changed in ferrous gluconate group. It was suggested that through inducing the expression of HO-1 and reducing the level of ET-1 in the kidney and plasma, hemin plays an important protective role in 5/6 subtotal nephrectomized rats.

  19. Effective control of hypertension in adults with chronic kidney disease

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    L Adhikary

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Adequate control of hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease patients is difficult to achieve. This study was designed to analyze the adequacy of Hypertension control in adults with CKD using different classes of antihypertensive drugs. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was done that included 85 patients with CKD admitted to our Medicine Department over a period of two years (2006-2008 A.D.. Presence of CKD was defined as glomerular filtration rate 30ug/mg. Adequate blood pressure control was defined as systolic blood pressure less than or equals to 130 and diastolic blood pressure less than or equals to 80 mm Hg. Data and Statistical analysis was done using SPSS Version 12 for Windows. RESULTS: Of all the CKD patients, 51.4% required three Anti-Hypertensive drugs combination for the effective control of Hypertension, while only 21% of CKD patients with hypertension was controlled on two drugs. CONCLUSION: Adequate control of blood pressure in CKD patient was shown to be most effective on combination of three antihypertensive drugs. A poor control was seen on patients taking less than three antihypertensive drugs. Keywords: antihypertensive drug; chronic kidney disease; glomerular filtration rate; hypertension.

  20. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  1. Chinese cohort study of chronic kidney disease: design and methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Bixia; Zhang Luxia; Wang Haiyan; Zhao Minghui

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disorder associated with multiple adverse clinical consequences,especially cardiovascular risk and end-stage renal disease.A recent national survey demonstrated that CKD has become a leading health problem in China.There is an urgent need to implement an in-depth investigation of the CKD burden and also to explore underlying mechanisms of CKD progression and it association with adverse consequences.Methods The Chinese Cohort Study of Chronic Kidney Disease (C-STRIDE) is the first national CKD cohort in China.It will enroll approximately 3 000 pre-dialysis CKD patients aged between 18 and 74 years and follow-up for at least 5 years.Questionnaires,anthropometric measures,laboratory tests,and biomaterials will be collected at baseline and annually.The principal clinical outcomes of the C-STRIDE consist of renal disease events,cardiovascular events,and death.Based on the longitudinal clinical data and biomaterials,the risk factors with CKD progression and other outcomes will be analyzed,and candidate markers and predicted models will be established.Conclusion The C-STRIDE would provide important evidence for underlying mechanisms of CKD progression,valuable information for clinical guidelines,and healthcare policies in China.

  2. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Sierra, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN). Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day), including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2), with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs) with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase). The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health. PMID:27525285

  3. Common pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic kidney disease: therapeutic perspectives.

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    López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos; Rodríguez-Peña, Ana B; López-Hernández, Francisco J

    2010-10-01

    It is estimated that over 10% of the adult population in developed countries have some degree of chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD is a progressive and irreversible deterioration of the renal excretory function that results in implementation of renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplant, which may also lead to death. CKD poses a growing problem to society as the incidence of the disease increases at an annual rate of 8%, and consumes up to 2% of the global health expenditure. CKD is caused by a variety of factors including diabetes, hypertension, infection, reduced blood supply to the kidneys, obstruction of the urinary tract and genetic alterations. The nephropathies associated with some of these conditions have been modeled in animals, this being crucial to understanding their pathophysiological mechanism and assessing prospective treatments at the preclinical level. This article reviews and updates the pathophysiological knowledge acquired primarily from experimental models and human studies of CKD. It also highlights the common mechanism(s) underlying the most relevant chronic nephropathies which lead to the appearance of a progressive, common renal phenotype regardless of aetiology. Based on this knowledge, a therapeutic horizon for the treatment of CKD is described. Present therapy primarily based upon renin-angiotensin inhibition, future diagnostics and therapeutic perspectives based upon anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and hemodynamic approaches, new drugs targeting specific signaling pathways, and advances in gene and cell therapies, are all elaborated.

  4. Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis: An Uncommon Cause of Chronic Renal Failure

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    A Azarfar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis (CHF is a rare disease that affects both the liver and kidneys.  Congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF is an autosomal recessive inherited malformation defined pathologically by a variable degree of periportal fibrosis and irregularly shaped proliferating bile ducts. Affected individuals also have impaired renal function, usually caused, in children and teenagers, by an autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD. Impaired renal function associated with CHF in adults is caused by an autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Case presentation: We report the case of a 8-year-old Iranian girlwas admitted to our hospital for evaluation ofrenal failure. In patient hepatomegaly was noted incidentally on a routine physical examination and then kidney biopsy showed global sclerosis and   A liver biopsy revealed proliferation of collagen fibres surrounding the portal area, a finding that was compatible with congenital hepatic fibrosisand our patient was scheduled for kidney and  liver transplantation. Conclusion: The relationship of ARPKD to CHF is the subject of substantial controversy. Some clinicians suggest that the two conditions represent one disorder with a range of clinical/pathological presentations Key word: Congenital Hepatic Fibrosis Polycystic Kidney Disease, CRF.

  5. [CKD-MBD (Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder). Effect of vitamin D on kidney and cardiovascular system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Hideki

    2010-07-01

    Recently, many investigators have reported that treatment with vitamin D improves outcomes of patients with chronic kidney disease. Though the detailed mechanisms have remained unclear, it has been speculated that such a treatment may prevent progression of chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. It has been reported that Vitamin D may attenuate renal injury and ameliorate renal function and proteinuria. In addition, several studies have shown that vitamin D may prevent progression of atherosclerosis, vascular calcification and left ventricular hypertrophy. The emerging experimental and clinical evidence has suggested that vitamin D may protect kidney and cardiovascular system.

  6. Etiology and Outcome of Chronic Kidney Disease in Iranian Children

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    Neamatollah Ataei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the significant geographical and ethnical differences in pattern of incidence, etiology and outcome of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the present study aimed to assess the etiology and outcome of CKD in Iranian children. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study etiology and outcome of 372 children aged 3 months to 18 years with CKD was studied during the period 1991 –2014. Children (186 boys, 186 girls with Stage 3 to 5 CKDs, defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2body surface area, were identified. Results Etiology was congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in 125 (33.60%, cystic/ hereditary/ congenital diseases in 91 (24.46%, glomerulopathy in 73(19.62%, and cause unknown in 71 (19.09% patients. Forty-eight (13.22% were on conservative treatment, 174(47.93% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD with chronic hemodialysis, 24 (6.61% were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sixty-eight (18.74% underwent on renal transplant which was successful in 52 (14.33% patients but was associated with abnormal renal function in 16(4.41% children. Finally, 49 (13.50% patients died. Conclusion A large number of children developed CKD secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Planning for screening, early detection and instituting timely treatment of preventable causes could lead to a lower incidence of CKD in this group of children.

  7. Multiple New Loci Associated with Kidney Function and Chronic Kidney Disease: The CKDGen consortium

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    Köttgen, Anna; Pattaro, Cristian; Böger, Carsten A.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Olden, Matthias; Glazer, Nicole L.; Parsa, Afshin; Gao, Xiaoyi; Yang, Qiong; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Li, Man; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Isaacs, Aaron; Ketkar, Shamika; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Johnson, Andrew D.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Paré, Guillaume; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Zeller, Tanja; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Tönjes, Anke; Hayward, Caroline; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Launer, Lenore; Harris, Tamara B.; Rapmersaud, Evadnie; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Struchalin, Maksim; Cavalieri, Margherita; Singleton, Andrew; Giallauria, Francesco; Metter, Jeffery; de Boer, Ian; Haritunians, Talin; Lumley, Thomas; Siscovick, David; Psaty, Bruce M.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Oostra, Ben A.; Feitosa, Mary; Province, Michael; Levy, Daniel; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Schillert, Arne; Ziegler, Andreas; Wild, Philipp S.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Wilde, Sandra; Muenzel, Thomas F.; Leak, Tennille S; Illig, Thomas; Klopp, Norman; Meisinger, Christa; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Koenig, Wolfgang; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Minelli, Cosetta; Hu, Frank B.; Johansson, Åsa; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Schreiber, Stefan; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; Imboden, Medea; Nitsch, Dorothea; Brandstätter, Anita; Kollerits, Barbara; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Mägi, Reedik; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Boban, Mladen; Campbell, Susan; Endlich, Karlhans; Völzke, Henry; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Polasek, Ozren; Vitart, Veronique; Badola, Sunita; Parker, Alexander N.; Ridker, Paul M.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Franke, Andre; Rochat, Thierry; Paulweber, Bernhard; Prokopenko, Inga; Wang, Wei; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Shlipak, Michael G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Hastie, Nick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Kao, W. H.; Heid, Iris M.; Fox, Caroline S.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem, and recent genetic studies have identified common CKD susceptibility variants. The CKDGen consortium performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 67,093 Caucasian individuals from 20 population-based studies to identify new susceptibility loci for reduced renal function, estimated by serum creatinine (eGFRcrea), cystatin C (eGFRcys), and CKD (eGFRcrea <60 ml/min/1.73m2; n = 5,807 CKD cases). Follow-up of the 23 genome-wide significant loci (p<5×10−8) in 22,982 replication samples identified 13 novel loci for renal function and CKD (in or near LASS2, GCKR, ALMS1, TFDP2, DAB2, SLC34A1, VEGFA, PRKAG2, PIP5K1B, ATXN2, DACH1, UBE2Q2, and SLC7A9) and 7 creatinine production and secretion loci (CPS1, SLC22A2, TMEM60, WDR37, SLC6A13, WDR72, BCAS3). These results further our understanding of biologic mechanisms of kidney function by identifying loci potentially influencing nephrogenesis, podocyte function, angiogenesis, solute transport, and metabolic functions of the kidney. PMID:20383146

  8. Pro-A-type natriuretic peptide and pro-adrenomedullin predict progression of chronic kidney disease: the MMKD Study.

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    Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Kollerits, Barbara; Struck, Joachim; Ritz, Eberhard; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Kronenberg, Florian

    2009-02-01

    A-type natriuretic peptide (ANP) and adrenomedullin (ADM) are potent hypotensive, diuretic, and natriuretic peptides involved in maintaining cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. We conducted a prospective 7-year study of 177 nondiabetic patients with primary chronic kidney disease to see if ANP and ADM plasma concentrations predict the progression of their disease, using novel sandwich immunoassays covering the midregional epitopes of the stable prohormones (MRproANP and MR-proADM). Progression of chronic kidney disease was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or terminal renal failure, which occurred in 65 patients. Analysis of the receiver operating characteristic curve for the prediction of renal endpoints showed similar areas under the curve for the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (0.838), MR-proANP (0.810), and MRproADM (0.876), respectively, as did the Kaplan-Meier curve analyses of the patients stratified according to the median of the respective markers. In separate multiple Cox-proportional hazard regression analyses, increased plasma concentrations of both peptides were each strongly predictive of the progression of chronic kidney disease after adjustments for age, gender, GFR, proteinuria and amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. Our study suggests that MR-proANP and MR-proADM are useful new markers of progression of primary nondiabetic chronic kidney disease.

  9. Chronic kidney disease screening methods and its implication for Malaysia: an in depth review.

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    Almualm, Yasmin; Zaman Huri, Hasniza

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease has become a public health problem, imposing heath, social and human cost on societies worldwide. Chronic Kidney Disease remains asymptomatic till late stage when intervention cannot stop the progression of the disease. Therefore, there is an urgent need to detect the disease early. Despite the high prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia, screening is still lacking behind. This review discusses the strengths and limitations of current screening methods for Chronic Kidney Disease from a Malaysian point of view. Diabetic Kidney Disease was chosen as focal point as Diabetes is the leading cause of Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease in Malaysia includes a urine test for albuminuria and a blood test for serum creatinine. Recent literature indicates that albuminuria is not always present in Diabetic Kidney Disease patients and serum creatinine is only raised after substantial kidney damage has occurred.  Recently, cystatin C was proposed as a potential marker for kidney disease but this has not been studied thoroughly in Malaysia.  Glomerular Filtration Rate is the best method for measuring kidney function and is widely estimated using the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation. Another equation, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration Creatinine equation was introduced in 2009. The new equation retained the precision and accuracy of the Modification of Diet for Renal Disease equation at GFR 60ml/min/1.73m2. In Asian countries, adding an ethnic coefficient to the equation enhanced its performance. In Malaysia, a multi-ethnic Asian population, the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation should be validated and the Glomerular Filtration Rate should be reported whenever serum creatinine is ordered. Reporting estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate will help diagnose patients who would have been otherwise missed if only albuminuria and serum creatinine are measured.

  10. Market failure, policy failure and other distortions in chronic disease markets

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    Segal Leonie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of chronic disease represents a significant burden on most health systems. This paper explores the market failures and policy failures that exist in the management of chronic diseases. Discussion There are many sources of market failure in health care that undermine the efficiency of chronic disease management. These include incomplete information as well as information asymmetry between providers and consumers, the effect of externalities on consumer behaviour, and the divergence between social and private time preference rates. This has seen government and policy interventions to address both market failures and distributional issues resulting from the inability of private markets to reach an efficient and equitable distribution of resources. However, these have introduced a series of policy failures such as distorted re-imbursement arrangements across modalities and delivery settings. Summary The paper concludes that market failure resulting from a preference of individuals for 'immediate gratification' in the form of health care and disease management, rather than preventative services, where the benefits are delayed, has a major impact on achieving an efficient allocation of resources in markets for the management of chronic diseases. This distortion is compounded by government health policy that tends to favour medical and pharmaceutical interventions further contributing to distortions in the allocation of resources and inefficiencies in the management of chronic disease.

  11. Acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease: an integrated clinical syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Kimmel, Paul L

    2012-09-01

    The previous conventional wisdom that survivors of acute kidney injury (AKI) tend to do well and fully recover renal function appears to be flawed. AKI can cause end-stage renal disease (ESRD) directly, and increase the risk of developing incident chronic kidney disease (CKD) and worsening of underlying CKD. In addition, severity, duration, and frequency of AKI appear to be important predictors of poor patient outcomes. CKD is an important risk factor for the development and ascertainment of AKI. Experimental data support the clinical observations and the bidirectional nature of the relationships between AKI and CKD. Reductions in renal mass and nephron number, vascular insufficiency, cell cycle disruption, and maladaptive repair mechanisms appear to be important modulators of progression in patients with and without coexistent CKD. Distinction between AKI and CKD may be artificial. Consideration should be given to the integrated clinical syndrome of diminished GFR, with acute and chronic stages, where spectrum of disease state and outcome is determined by host factors, including the balance of adaptive and maladaptive repair mechanisms over time. Physicians must provide long-term follow-up to patients with first episodes of AKI, even if they presented with normal renal function.

  12. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ana Cristina Simões e Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD. Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence.

  13. Disorders of body fluids, sodium and potassium in chronic renal failure.

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    Mitch, W E; Wilcox, C S

    1982-03-01

    A stable volume and composition of extracellular fluid are essential for normal functioning of the body. Since the kidney is primarily responsible for regulating extracellular fluid, loss of kidney function should have catastrophic consequences. Fortunately, even with loss of more than 90 percent of renal function, a remarkable capacity to regulate body fluid volumes and sodium and potassium persists. Nevertheless, this capacity is limited to chronic renal disease and this has important consequences for clinical management of these patients. How can sodium and potassium homeostasis be assessed? Methods for evaluating the steady-state regulation of sodium include measurement of body fluids and their distribution in different compartments and measurement of exchangeable and intracellular sodium. Short-term regulation of body sodium can be assessed from measurement of sodium balance during changes in dietary salt. Potassium is predominantly contained within cells and thus the assessment of its regulation requires special emphasis on measurement of steady-state body stores and potassium distribution across cell membranes. However, the methods used to make all of these measurements require assumptions that may not hold in the altered state of uremia. This raises problems in interpretation requiring critical analysis before conclusions can be made regarding sodium and potassium homeostasis in patients with chronic renal failure. This review focuses on abnormalities of body fluids, sodium and potassium in patients with creatinine clearances of less than 20 ml/min due to chronic renal failure and the impact of conservative therapy, dialysis and renal transplantation on these patients.

  14. Change of liver echogenicity in chronic renal failure: Correlation with serologic test and pathologic findings

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    Eun, Hyo Won; Cho, Kyoung Sik; Kim, Jeong Kon [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Hoon [Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-09-15

    To correlate serologic test and pathologic findings with change of hepatic parenchymal echogenicity on ultrasound (US) in patients with chronic renal failure. From January 1995 to April 2000, among eight hundred eighty four patients with kidney transplantation due to chronic renal failure, sixty seven patients who underwent US-guided liver biopsy were selected. Change of liver echogenicity on US was analyzed, and this change was compared with serologic test and pathologic findings. Among sixty seven patients, pathologic findings of thirty four patients with the normal liver echogenicity on US revealed normal in 15 patients (44%), viral hepatitis in 18 (53%), and liver cirrhosis in one patient (3%). Meanwhile, twenty seven patients with chronic liver disease on US were pathologically confirmed as normal in 13 patients (48%), viral hepatitis in 11 (40%), liver cirrhosis in four patients (11%); six patients with cirrhotic change on US, liver cirrhosis in four patients (67%) and viral hepatitis on two patients (33%). Serologic test of thirty four patients with the normal liver echogenicity on US showed positive HBs Ag in 17 patients (50%), positive anti-HCV Ab in 11 (32%), positive in both HBs Ag and anti-HCV Ab in one (3%), and normal result in five patients (15%). In patients with chronic renal failure, it is nor enough to determine the presence of liver disease only based on change of echogenicity on US. A careful correlation with serologic test and, if needed, pathologic confirmation are recommended for the accurate preoperative evaluation of the liver.

  15. Acute-on-chronic and Decompensated Chronic Liver Failure: Definitions, Epidemiology, and Prognostication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jody C

    2016-07-01

    Chronic liver disease is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and represents a major burden for the health care community. Cirrhosis is a progressive disease resulting in end-stage liver failure, which in the absence of liver transplantation is fatal. Acute-on-chronic liver failure carries high short-term mortality but is potentially reversible. Viral hepatitis, alcohol, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease remain the principal causes of liver disease. Though treatments exist for hepatitis B and C, they remain unavailable to many with these diseases. This article reviews the epidemiology of advanced liver disease and the concept of acute-on-chronic liver failure.

  16. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with renal transplantation with renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable.

  17. Management of adynamic bone disease in chronic kidney disease: A brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi K. Sista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO work group released recommendations in 2006 to define the bone-related pathology associated with chronic kidney disease as renal osteodystrophy. In 2009, KDIGO released revised clinical practice guidelines which redefined systemic disorders of bone and mineral metabolism due to chronic kidney disease as chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorders. Conditions under this overarching term include osteitis fibrosa cystica, osteomalacia, and adynamic bone disease. We aim to provide a brief review of the histopathology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and diagnostic features of adynamic bone disease, focusing on current trends in the management of this complex bone disorder.

  18. Deteriorated function of cutaneous microcirculation in chronic congestive heart failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie-Louise Edvinsson; Erik Uddman; Sven E Andersson

    2011-01-01

    Background Chronic congestive heart failure is a complex condition that leads to dysfunction in the peripheral microcirculation. We have previously shown that vascular reactivity is reduced with increasing age.In this study,we examined a group of very old patients with severe chronic heart failure to test the hypothesis that vascular function is further compromised by a combination of heart failure and aging.Methods Cutaneous forearm blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flownretry and compared among three groups:Group 1 (n=20,men±SE:85.54 years),heart failure patients with New York Heart Association class Ⅳ(NYHA IV) and with a NT-proBNP level =10,mean±SE:67.6 ± 3.0 years),healthy controls with no clinical signs of heart failure.The vasodilator response to the iontophoretic administration of acetylcholine (ACh),acting via an endothelial mechanism,and sodium nitroprusside (SNP),acting via a smooth muscle cell mechanism,were studied. Results All patients with heart failure had significantly reduced vascular reactivity independent of the mode of stimulation (ACh,SNP or heat) when compared to healthy controls.However,the responses did not differ between the two groups of heart failure patients.Conclusions Cutaneous vascular reactivity is reduced in heart failure patients and does not correlate with the severity of the condition or age of patients.

  19. The study of aortic stiffness in different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布海霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is any difference in aortic stiffness among different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Six hundred and twenty-six patients with chronic kidney disease were included in the present analysis.They were classified into four groups:normotension(n=391)with systolic blood pressure(SBP)<140 mmHg and diastolic

  20. Future options for the management of chronic kidney disease in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Chidi; Kankam, Charity

    2012-02-01

    The lack of health care infrastructure and prevalence of infectious disease in Nigeria exacerbate the growing problem of diagnosing and treating chronic kidney disease. Nigeria should place more emphasis on chronic kidney disease education, screening, and prevention; propagation of acceptance of peritoneal dialysis over hemodialysis; subsidization of renal replacement costs; and advancement of the national renal transplantation program.

  1. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy.......Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  2. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N;

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  3. Impact of chronic kidney disease on serum tumor markers concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Hong-li; DONG Zhen-nan; WEN Xin-yu; GAO Jing; WANG Bo; TIAN Ya-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum tumor markers have always been of clinical importance in the diagnosis,monitoring disease progression and therapy efficacy for patients with malignant diseases.However,elevated serum tumor markers are found in some benign conditions,especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD).The elevation of them in CKD might cause confusion and misuse of these tumor markers.We conducted this retrospective study to investigate which of the five widely used tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),alpha-fetoprotein (AFP),cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (Cyfra21-1),squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) are affected markedly by CKD,in order to use them more effectively.Methods Serum tumor marker concentrations,biochemical,hematological parameters,and urinalysis were measured in CKD patients and healthy controls.The positive rate and median tumor markers' level in CKD patients and controls,and those in CKD patients stratified by CKD grade were compared using nonparametric rank tests.Correlation analysis of serum tumor markers and other parameters in CKD patients were performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient.Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the important variables that caused elevated serum concentrations of these markers in CKD patients.Results The overall positive rates and serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA in CKD group were significantly higher than those in control group.Positive rate and serum concentrations of those tumor markers increased as kidney function decreased.Both univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis showed that the elevations of those tumor markers were not only associated with kidney function,but also with nutritional status.Conclusions Serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA are significantly influenced by kidney function,as well as nutritional status.Therefore,in clinical work,the indices of kidney function and nutritional

  4. Potential Use of Autologous Renal Cells from Diseased Kidneys for the Treatment of Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sunil K; Abolbashari, Mehran; Jackson, John D; Aboushwareb, Tamer; Atala, Anthony; Yoo, James J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when certain conditions cause the kidneys to gradually lose function. For patients with CKD, renal transplantation is the only treatment option that restores kidney function. In this study, we evaluated primary renal cells obtained from diseased kidneys to determine whether their normal phenotypic and functional characteristics are retained, and could be used for cell therapy. Primary renal cells isolated from both normal kidneys (NK) and diseased kidneys (CKD) showed similar phenotypic characteristics and growth kinetics. The expression levels of renal tubular cell markers, Aquaporin-1 and E-Cadherin, and podocyte-specific markers, WT-1 and Nephrin, were similar in both NK and CKD kidney derived cells. Using fluorescence- activated cell sorting (FACS), specific renal cell populations were identified and included proximal tubular cells (83.1% from NK and 80.3% from CKD kidneys); distal tubular cells (11.03% from NK and 10.9% from CKD kidneys); and podocytes (1.91% from NK and 1.78% from CKD kidneys). Ultra-structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed microvilli on the apical surface of cultured cells from NK and CKD samples. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis showed a similar organization of tight junctions, desmosomes, and other intracellular structures. The Na+ uptake characteristics of NK and CKD derived renal cells were also similar (24.4 mmol/L and 25 mmol/L, respectively) and no significant differences were observed in the protein uptake and transport characteristics of these two cell isolates. These results show that primary renal cells derived from diseased kidneys such as CKD have similar structural and functional characteristics to their counterparts from a normal healthy kidney (NK) when grown in vitro. This study suggests that cells derived from diseased kidney may be used as an autologous cell source for renal cell therapy, particularly in patients with CKD or end

  5. Extra-aortic implantable counterpulsation pump in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitnovetski, Sergei; Almeida, Aubrey A; Barr, Althea; Peters, William S; Milsom, F Paget; Ho, Betty; Smith, Julian A

    2008-06-01

    Extra-aortic counterpulsation for the management of chronic heart failure is a novel approach. We report the use of an extra-aortic implantable counterpulsation pump in the management of a 73-year-old patient with severe heart failure refractory to medical therapy. The implantable counterpulsation pump prolonged his life and greatly improved its quality. The patient lived almost 7 months after the implantation of the device and died of septic complications secondary to gas line infection.

  6. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mungli Prakash; Nagaraj M Phani; Kavya R; Supriya M

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary pepti...

  7. ESPEN guidelines on chronic intestinal failure in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Arends, Jann; Bozzetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    : The GLs were developed by the Home Artificial Nutrition & Chronic Intestinal Failure Special Interest Group of ESPEN. The GRADE system was used for assigning strength of evidence. Recommendations were discussed, submitted to Delphi rounds, and accepted in an online survey of ESPEN members. RESULTS......: The following topics were addressed: management of HPN; parenteral nutrition formulation; intestinal rehabilitation, medical therapies, and non-transplant surgery, for short bowel syndrome, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and radiation enteritis; intestinal transplantation; prevention/treatment of CVC...

  8. Growth Impairment and Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Deniz Kara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Malnutrition is closely linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD in adult patients with poor outcome. But data on pediatric patients is inadequate. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of growth failure and malnutrition in pediatric CKD patients and explore the relationship of these parameters to each other and to other clinical parameters. Methods:This study included 42 patients and 29 healthy children matched for age and gender. Patients were classified firstly in age group and secondly in therapy modalities. Nutritional evaluations were performed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines, and we performed adjustments using values from children with the same chronological age as reference. Findings:In pubertal group, the mean height SDS was lower than in pre-pubertal period while it was higher than in early childhood (P=0.4 and P=0.03 respectively. In all groups, 45% of patients had malnutrition: 20 patients on predialysis, 22 patients with end stage renal disease (14 on hemodialysis, and 8 on peritoneal dialysis. The mean weight SDS was lower in end stage renal disease groups (P<0.001. The height SDS was lower in end stage renal disease groups (P<0.001. Conclusion:Growth failure and malnutrition remain a significant clinical problem as age and therapy modalities are dependent in children with CKD.

  9.  Association between hepatitis B virus and chronic kidney disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Donato, Francesca M; Messa, Piergiorgio

     Background. Hepatitis B virus infection and chronic kidney disease are prevalent and remain a major public health problem worldwide. It remains unclear how infection with hepatitis B virus impacts on the development and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  10. Dendrin ablation prolongs life span by delaying kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weins, Astrid; Wong, Jenny S; Basgen, John M; Gupta, Ritu; Daehn, Ilse; Casagrande, Lisette; Lessman, David; Schwartzman, Monica; Meliambro, Kristin; Patrakka, Jaakko; Shaw, Andrey; Tryggvason, Karl; He, John Cijiang; Nicholas, Susanne B; Mundel, Peter; Campbell, Kirk N

    2015-08-01

    Podocyte loss is central to the progression of proteinuric kidney diseases leading to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD), requiring renal replacement therapy, such as dialysis. Despite modern tools and techniques, the 5-year mortality of some patients requiring dialysis remains at about 70% to 80%. Thus, there is a great unmet need for podocyte-specific treatments aimed at preventing podocyte loss and the ensuing development of ESKD. Here, we show that ablation of the podocyte death-promoting protein dendrin delays the onset of ESKD, thereby expanding the life span of mice lacking the adapter protein CD2AP. Ablation of dendrin delays onset and severity of proteinuria and podocyte loss. In addition, dendrin ablation ameliorates mesangial volume expansion and up-regulation of mesangial fibronectin expression, which is mediated by a podocyte-secreted factor. In conclusion, onset of ESKD and death can be markedly delayed by blocking the function of dendrin.

  11. Increased Expression of p-Akt correlates with Chronic Allograft Nephropathy in a Rat Kidney Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li-Na; Wang, Ning; Dong, Yang; Zhang, Yiqin; Zou, Hequn; Li, Qingqin; Shi, Yangling; Chen, Ling; Zhou, Wenying; Han, Conghui; Wang, Yuxin

    2015-04-01

    Chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN) is the most common cause of chronic graft dysfunction leading to graft failure, our study investigates the expression and significance of p-Akt in the pathogenesis of CAN in rats. Kidneys of Fisher (F344) rats were orthotopically transplanted into Lewis (LEW) rats. The animals were evaluated at 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 weeks post-transplantation for renal function and histopathology. Phosphorate Akt (p-Akt) protein expression was determined by Western blot and immunohistological assays. Our data show that 24-h urinary protein excretion in CAN rats increased significantly at week 16 as compared with F344/LEW controls. Allografts got severe interstitial infiltration of mononuclear cells at week 4 and week 8, but it was degraded as the time went on after week 16. Allografts markedly presented with severe interstitial fibrosis (IF) and tubular atrophy at 16 and 24 weeks. p-Akt expression was upregulated in rat kidneys with CAN, and the increase became more significant over time after transplantation. p-Akt expression correlated significantly with 24-h urinary protein excretion, serum creatinine levels, tubulointerstitial mononuclear cells infiltration, smooth muscle cells (SMCs) migration in vascular wall, and IF. It was concluded that p-Akt overexpression might be the key event that involved mononuclear cells infiltration and vascular SMCs migration at early stage, and IF and allograft nephroangiosclerosis at the late stage of CAN pathogenesis in rats.

  12. Feline chronic kidney disease is associated with upregulation of transglutaminase 2: a collagen cross-linking enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lara, A C; Elliott, J; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Haylor, J L

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cats. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a calcium-dependent enzyme proposed to mediate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the kidney by cross-linking collagen fibrils. Postmortem kidney tissue was obtained from primary renal azotemic (n = 10) and nonazotemic (n = 5) cats (14 domestic short hair, 1 Burmese; aged 9-23.7 years). Extracellular matrix protein deposition was determined by Masson's trichrome staining and collagen immunofluorescence. Total kidney transglutaminase (TG) enzyme activity and TG2 protein were measured in tissue homogenates by putrescine incorporation and Western blotting. Extracellular TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein were determined in situ by immunofluorescence, quantified by multiphase image analysis. Results were compared using the unpaired Student's t-test with Welch's correction. Elevated plasma creatinine, urea, and phosphate concentrations were associated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis but not glomerular fibrosis. Kidney homogenates from azotemic cats showed a 3-fold higher total TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein compared with kidneys from nonazotemic cats. Immunofluorescent studies performed in situ confirmed a 3-fold higher extracellular TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein in cats with azotemia. Tubulointerstitial TG2 showed a positive linear correlation with both renal function and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In conclusion, for cats with azotemia, both filtration failure and tubulointerstitial fibrosis were associated with the upregulation of TG2, a collagen cross-linking enzyme and the major isoform of transglutaminase in the kidney. TG2 may provide a new therapeutic target for drugs designed to slow the progression of feline chronic kidney disease.

  13. Simultaneous pancreas–kidney transplant for type I diabetes with renal failure: Anaesthetic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic grafts have been successfully used in patients with diabetes and are combined with kidney transplantation in patients with renal failure. The propagation of awareness in organ donation in India has increased the donor pool of transplantable organs in the last few years making multi visceral transplants feasible in our country. We present the anaesthetic management of a 32-year-old male with diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal failure who was successfully managed with a combined pancreas and kidney transplantation.

  14. Clinical Study on Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure with Shenshuailing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠建伟; 郭亚玲; 梁延平; 孙世宁; 杨建华; 杨素云

    2001-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of Shenshuailing Kou Fu Ye (SKFY肾衰灵口服液, the Oral Liquid for Renal Failure) and Shenshuailing Guan Chang Ye (SGCY肾衰灵灌肠液, the Enema for Renal Failure) were evaluated in treatment of chronic renal failure, with coateg aldehyde oxystarch as the controls. The changes in the clinical symptoms, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine clearance rate were observed. The total effective rate in the former was 90.46%, and the latter 60.43%.

  15. Symptoms and their correlates in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2007-10-01

    While there is a significant body of literature documenting the impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) experienced by patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recent work has helped to elucidate the mediators of impaired well-being in this patient group. Physical and emotional symptoms have been shown to be common, frequently severe, and directly linked with impaired HRQOL. The following review explores the process of symptom assessment in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), presents an overview of the composite burden and importance of symptoms in patients with ESRD, highlights particularly common and distressing symptoms for which existing treatment strategies may be applicable, and discusses future directions for efforts to address and alleviate symptoms in the growing population of patients who suffer from CKD.

  16. Factors Associated with Chronic Kidney Disease Self-Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tiffany; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Browne, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affected 26 million U.S. adults. Many end-stage CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis experience self-management challenges. However, factors associated with CKD self-management are under-identified. This article describes a mixed-methods study to identify factors associated with self-management in end-stage CKD patients undergoing hemodialysis. A total of 107 patients age 50 and older were interviewed. Overall, participants had low mean scores for exercise (2.46), communication with physicians (2.50), and cognitive symptom management (0.89) and were adherent for greater than 11 days in a 2-week period with fluid (11.86) and diet (11.65) regimens. There were statistically significant age group differences in the self-management behavior of fluid adherence (p social work interventions aimed at increasing self-management behaviors in end-stage CKD patients.

  17. Metformin therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, J K; Roberts, D M; Furlong, T J; Kumar, S S; Greenfield, J R; Kirkpatrick, C M; Graham, G G; Williams, K M; Day, R O

    2012-10-01

    Metformin therapy is limited in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to the potential risk of lactic acidosis. This open-label observational study investigated metformin and lactate concentrations in patients with CKD (n = 22; creatinine clearances 15-40 ml/min) and in two dialysed patients. Patients were prescribed a range of metformin doses (250-2000 mg daily) and metformin concentrations were compared with data from healthy subjects (scaled to 1500 mg twice daily). A subset of patients (n = 7) was controlled on low doses of metformin (250 or 500 mg daily). No correlation between metformin and lactate concentrations was observed. Three patients had high lactate concentrations (>2.7 mmol/l) and two had high metformin concentrations (3-5 mg/l), but none had any symptoms of lactic acidosis. Reducing metformin dosage and monitoring metformin concentrations will allow the safe use of metformin in CKD, provided that renal function is stable.

  18. [DIABETIC NEPHROPATHY AS A CAUSE OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Ivan; Prkačin, Ingrid

    2014-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the leading cause of end-stage chronic kidney disease in most developed countries. Hyperglycemia, hypertension and genetic predisposition are the main risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy. Elevated serum lipids, smoking habits, and the amount and origin of dietary protein also seem to play a role as risk factors. Clinical picture includes a progressive increase in albuminuria, decline in glomerular filtration, hypertension, and a high risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Screening for albuminuria should be performed yearly, starting 5 years after diagnosis in type 1 diabetes or earlier in the presence of adolescence or poor metabolic control. In patients with type 2 diabetes, screening should be performed at diagnosis and yearly thereafter. Patients with albuminuria should undergo evaluation regarding the presence of associated comorbidities, especially retinopathy and macrovascular disease. Achieving the best metabolic control (HbA1c diabetes.

  19. Uric Acid in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Clinical Appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galassi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A consistent body of evidence supports an independent association between uric acid (UA level and the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD in humans. It has been observed in experimental data that UA is capable of inducing renal damage through several pathways, including activation of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone system (RAAS, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Treatment with urate lowering agents and RAAS inhibitors prevented renal insult mediated by UA in animal models. Both of the xanthine oxidase inhibitors available in clinical practice, allopurinol and febuxostat, were efficient in controlling gout flares. However, data from randomised controlled trials are still inconsistent in relation to their benefit for slowing CKD progression. This review discusses the metabolism of urates in humans as well as the experimental and clinical evidence linking UA to CKD. Current evidence about the effect of allopurinol and febuxostat on CKD progression is also considered.

  20. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  1. Hepcidin: an important iron metabolism regulator in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Azevedo Antunes

    Full Text Available Abstract Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production. The elevation of hepcidin has been associated with infection, inflammation, atherosclerosis, insulin resistance and oxidative stress. Some strategies were tested to reduce the effects of hepcidin in patients with CKD, however more studies are necessary to assess the impact of its modulation in the management of anemia in this population.

  2. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Schupp

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients’ burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker’s potential to predict clinical outcomes.

  3. Valvular and perivalvular involvement in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neelavathi Senkottaiyan; Saad Hafidh; Farrin A. Manian; Martin A. Alpert

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve alcification (AVC) are the most common valvular and perivalvular bnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both MAC and AVC occur at a younger age in CKD patients than in the general population. AVC progresses to aortic stenosis and mild aortic stenosis progresses to severe aortic stenosis at a more rapid rate in patients with CKD than in the general population. The use of calcium-free phosphate binders in such patients may reduce the calcium burden in valvular and perivalvular tructures and retard the rate of progression of aortic stenosis. Despite high rates of morbidity and mortality, the prognosis associated with valve surgery in patients with CKD is better than without valve surgery. Infective endocarditis remains an important complication of CKD, particularly in those treated with hemodialysis.

  4. ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Kobalava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. CKD is characterized by accelerated aging of vessels in which the age-related arterial stiffness increase is exacerbated by a number of uremia-related processes. Increased arterial stiffness is associated with structural and functional disorders, as well as with the increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Increased arterial stiffness is diagnosed at an early stage of CKD. Modern understanding of the mechanisms of increased risk of cardiovascular complications in CKD, the factors contributing to the loss of elasticity of the arteries, arterial stiffness increase consequences are analyzed. Data illustrating the twoway interaction between CKD and arterial stiffness and mechanisms of accelerated progression of arterial stiffness in CKD are presented.

  5. De novo noncutaneous malignancies after kidney transplantation are associated with an increased risk of graft failure: results from a time-dependent analysis on 672 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, Tiziana; Musetti, Claudio; Quaglia, Marco; Magnani, Corrado; Stratta, Piero; Bagnardi, Vincenzo; Cantaluppi, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between cancer occurrence and risk of graft failure in kidney transplant recipients. From November 1998 to November 2013, 672 adult patients received their first kidney transplant from a deceased donor and had a minimum follow-up of 6 months. During a median follow-up of 4.7 years (3523 patient-years), 47 patients developed a nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and 40 a noncutaneous malignancy (NCM). A total of 59 graft failures were observed. The failure rate was 6 per 100 patient-year (pt-yr) after NCM versus 1.5 per 100 pt-yr in patients without NCM. In a time-dependent multivariable model, the occurrence of NCM appeared to be associated with failure (HR = 3.27; 95% CI = 1.44-7.44). The effect of NCM on the cause-specific graft failure was different (P = 0.002) when considering events due to chronic rejection (HR = 0.55) versus other causes (HR = 15.59). The reduction of the immunosuppression after NCM was not associated with a greater risk of graft failure. In conclusion, our data suggest that post-transplant NCM may be a strong risk factor for graft failure, particularly for causes other than chronic rejection.

  6. Fractal analysis of the retinal vasculature and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sng, Chelvin C A; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Liu, Erica; Lim, Su Chi; Hamzah, Haslina; Lee, Jeannette; Tai, E Shyong; Wong, Tien Y

    2010-07-01

    BACKGROUND. Fractal analysis provides a global index of the geometric complexity and optimality of vascular networks. In this study, we investigated the relationship between fractal measurements of the retinal vasculature and chronic kidney disease (CKD). METHODS. This was a population-based case-control study which included participants from the Singapore Prospective Study Program. We identified 261 participants with CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate of fractal dimension (D(f)) was quantified from digitized fundus photographs using a computer-based programme. RESULTS. The mean D(f) was 1.43 +/- 0.048 in the participants with CKD and 1.44 +/- 0.042 in controls (P = 0.013). Suboptimal D(f) in the lowest (first) and highest (fifth) quintiles were associated with an increased prevalence of CKD after adjusting for age, systolic blood pressure, diabetes and other risk factors [odds ratio (OR) 2.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15, 3.83 and OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.06, 3.17; compared to the fourth quintile, respectively). This association was present even in participants without diabetes or hypertension. CONCLUSIONS. Our study found that an abnormal retinal vascular network is associated with an increased risk of CKD, supporting the hypothesis that deviations from optimal microvascular architecture may be related to kidney damage.

  7. Amygdalin inhibits renal fibrosis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junqi; Wu, Weizheng; Sheng, Mingxiong; Yang, Shunliang; Tan, Jianming

    2013-05-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is a common outcome of chronic renal diseases. Amygdalin is one of a number of nitrilosides, the natural cyanide‑containing substances abundant in the seeds of plants of the prunasin family that are used to treat cancer and relieve pain. However, whether amygdalin inhibits the progression of renal fibrosis or not remains unknown. The present study aimed to assess the therapeutic potential of amygdalin by investigating its effect and potential mechanism on the activation of renal interstitial fibroblast cells and renal fibrosis in rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO). Treatment of the cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts with amygdalin inhibited their proliferation and the production of transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1. In the rat model of obstructive nephropathy, following ureteral obstruction, the administration of amygdalin immediately eliminated the extracellular matrix accumulation and alleviated the renal injury on the 21st day. Collectively, amygdalin attenuated kidney fibroblast (KFB) activation and rat renal interstitial fibrosis. These results indicate that amygdalin is a potent antifibrotic agent that may have therapeutic potential for patients with fibrotic kidney diseases.

  8. Discriminants of prevalent fractures in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolas, Thomas L; Cremers, Serge; Zhang, Amy; Thomas, Valeri; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Chauncey, Ryan; Nikkel, Lucas; Yin, Michael T; Liu, Xiaowei S; Boutroy, Stephanie; Staron, Ronald B; Leonard, Mary B; McMahon, Donald J; Dworakowski, Elzbieta; Shane, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have higher rates of fracture than the general population. Increased bone remodeling, leading to microarchitectural deterioration and increased fragility, may accompany declining kidney function, but there are no reliable methods to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. In this cross-sectional study of 82 patients with predialysis CKD, high-resolution imaging revealed that the 23 patients with current fractures had significantly lower areal density at the femoral neck; total, cortical, and trabecular volumetric bone density; cortical area and thickness; and trabecular thickness. Compared with levels in the lowest tertile, higher levels of osteocalcin, procollagen type-1 N-terminal propeptide, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b were associated with higher odds of fracture, even after adjustment for femoral neck T-score. Discrimination of fracture prevalence was best with a femoral neck T-score of -2.0 or less and a value in the upper two tertiles for osteocalcin, procollagen type-1 N-terminal propeptide, or tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b; these values corresponded to the upper half of the normal premenopausal reference range. In summary, these cross-sectional data suggest that measurement of bone turnover markers may increase the diagnostic accuracy of densitometry to identify patients with CKD at high risk for fracture.

  9. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

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    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  10. Emerging risk factors and markers of chronic kidney disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Florian

    2009-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common condition with an increasing prevalence. A number of comorbidities are associated with CKD and prognosis is poor, with many patients experiencing disease progression. Recognizing the factors associated with CKD progression enables high-risk patients to be identified and given more intensive treatment if necessary. The identification of new predictive markers might improve our understanding of the pathogenesis and progression of CKD. This Review discusses a number of emerging factors and markers for which epidemiological evidence from prospective studies indicates an association with progression of CKD. The following factors and markers are discussed: asymmetric dimethylarginine, factors involved in calcium-phosphate metabolism, adrenomedullin, A-type natriuretic peptide, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, liver-type fatty acid binding protein, kidney injury molecule 1, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, apolipoprotein A-IV, adiponectin and some recently identified genetic polymorphisms. Additional epidemiological and experimental data are required before these markers can be broadly used for the prediction of CKD progression and before the risk factors can be considered as potential drug targets in clinical interventional trials.

  11. Early life obesity and chronic kidney disease in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increased considerably with a parallel rise in the prevalence of obesity. It is now recognized that early life nutrition has life-long effects on the susceptibility of an individual to develop obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and CKD. The kidney can be programmed by a number of intrauterine and neonatal insults. Low birth weight (LBW) is one of the most identifiable markers of a suboptimal prenatal environment, and the important intrarenal factors sensitive to programming events include decreased nephron number and altered control of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). LBW complicated by accelerated catch-up growth is associated with an increased risk of obesity, hypertension and CKD in later life. High birth weight and exposure to maternal diabetes or obesity can enhance the risk for developing CKD in later life. Rapid postnatal growth per se may also contribute to the subsequent development of obesity and CKD regardless of birth weight and prenatal nutrition. Although the mechanisms of renal risks due to early life nutritional programming remain largely unknown, experimental and clinical studies suggest the burdening role of early life obesity in longstanding cardiovascular and renal diseases.

  12. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  13. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Mario Eandi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Anemia is a frequent complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD due to the inability of the kidneys to release sufficient erythropoietin to regulate the production of red blood cells. Administration of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs is highly effective in correcting anemia of CKD. The ESAs currently approved in Italy are epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, epoetin theta, darbepoetin alfa, CERA and biosimilars epoetin alfa and epoetin zeta. All the ESAs are effective in correcting renal anemia and increasing hemoglobin levels, but the choice of which to use should also take into account their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, their administration route, and economic issues. However, regarding the optimal use of ESAs an issue that remains controversial is the most appropriate dose conversion between epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa. In fact clinical experience demonstrates that the dose relationship between epoetin alfa and darbepoetin alfa is non proportional across the dosing spectrum. In this review is presented an update on the latest available evidence in the treatment of anemia in CKD patients, with particular reference to the definition of the correct conversion ratio EPO:DARB.

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle.

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    Yusra Habib Khan

    Full Text Available Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy.A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equation.Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5% were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1% and 135 (43.4% patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6% were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9% euvolemic and 11 (17.2% were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5% patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users.The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  16. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

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    Dariusz Włodarek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29–79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7ml/min/1.73m [sup]2[/sup] . Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. [b]results[/b]. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake – too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. [b]conclusions[/b]. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

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    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  18. The Potential Role of Catheter-Based Renal Sympathetic Denervation in Chronic and End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, Yusuke; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-07-01

    Sympathetic activation is a hallmark of chronic and end-stage renal disease and adversely affects cardiovascular prognosis. Hypertension is present in the vast majority of these patients and plays a key role in the progressive deterioration of renal function and the high rate of cardiovascular events in this patient cohort. Augmentation of renin release, tubular sodium reabsorption, and renal vascular resistance are direct consequences of efferent renal sympathetic nerve stimulation and the major components of neural regulation of renal function. Renal afferent nerve activity directly influences sympathetic outflow to the kidneys and other highly innervated organs involved in blood pressure control via hypothalamic integration. Renal denervation of the kidney has been shown to reduce blood pressure in many experimental models of hypertension. Targeting the renal nerves directly may therefore be specifically useful in patients with chronic and end-stage renal disease. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of catheter-based renal denervation in patients with impaired kidney function and also reflect on the potential impact on other cardiovascular conditions commonly associated with chronic kidney disease such as heart failure and arrhythmias.

  19. A STUDY ON HEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE IN PATIENTS OF CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO SERUM IRON PROFILE

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    Kallol

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. Chronic renal failure is defined by the National Kidney Foundation as either damage or a glomerular filtration rate less than 60ml/minute/1.73m2 of body surface area for more than 3 months. The primary cause of anemia in patients with chronic renal failure is insufficient production of erythropoietin by the diseased kidneys. As there is paucity of data regarding the haematological changes in chronic renal failure in this region, the present study was aimed to achieve the following objectives. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: 1. To assess the various hematological changes in chronic renal failure. 2. To assess the correlation between hematological and biochemical parameters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study was conducted in the department of Medicine, in a tertiary care hospital, Assam for one year. STUDY DESIGN: Hospital based, single centred observational study. All patients with features of chronic renal failure, who were admitted in medicine wards, were taken randomly for the study. RESULTS: The series included 100 cases of which the highest number 37% were in the age group of 51-60 years. Male preponderance was observed with males being 65% and females 35%. Generalized weakness and swelling were the commonest symptoms observed in 76% and 74% cases and pallor, hypertension, pedal edema, ascites and acidotic breathing on examination were found in 85%, 70%, 57%, 17% and 17% cases respectively. 72% patients had serum creatinine between 5.1 to 10 mg/dl. A negative co-relationship was observed between serum creatinine and hemoglogin. All cases had anemia of which 52% had hemoglobin between 7 to 10 gm/dl, 61% had normocytic normochronic anemia and 20% had absolute iron deficiency. Diabetes was the commonest etiology in 42%, followed by hypertension 35%, undiagnosed 12%, chronic glomerulonephritis 7%, polycystic kidney and obstructive nephropathy in 2% each respectively

  20. Heart Failure Update: Chronic Disease Management Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountain, Lorna B

    2016-03-01

    With high mortality and readmission rates among patients with heart failure (HF), multiple disease management models have been and continue to be tested, with mixed results. Early postdischarge care improves outcomes for patients. Telemonitoring also can assist in reducing mortality and HF-related hospitalizations. Office-based team care improves patient outcomes, with important components including rapid access to physicians, partnerships with clinical pharmacists, education, monitoring, and support. Pay-for-performance measures developed for HF, primarily use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta blockers, also improve patient outcomes, but the influence of adherence to other measures has been minimal. Evaluating comorbid conditions, including diabetes and hypertension, and making drug adjustments for patients with HF to include blood pressure control and use of metformin, when possible, can reduce mortality and morbidity.

  1. Retinopathy and Chronic Kidney Disease in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Juan E.; Alexander, Judith; Ying, Gui-Shuang; Maguire, Maureen; Daniel, Ebenezer; Whittock-Martin, Revell; Parker, Candace; McWilliams, Kathleen; Lo, Joan C.; Go, Alan; Townsend, Raymond; Gadegbeku, Crystal A.; Lash, James P.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Rahman, Mahboob; Feldman, Harold; Kusek, John W.; Xie, Dawei; Jaar, Bernard G.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Retinal vascular and anatomic abnormalities caused by diabetes, hypertension, and other conditions can be observed directly in the ocular fundus and may reflect severity of chronic renal insufficiency. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between retinopathy and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods In this observational, cross-sectional study, 2605 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study, a multi-center study of CKD, were offered participation. Non-mydriatic fundus photographs of the disc and macula in both eyes were obtained in 1936 of these subjects. Photographs were reviewed in a masked fashion at a central photograph reading center using standard protocols. Presence and severity of retinopathy (diabetic, hypertensive or other) and vessel diameter caliber were assessed by trained graders and a retinal specialist using protocols developed for large epidemiologic studies. Kidney function measurements and information on traditional and non-traditional risk factors for decreased kidney function were obtained from the CRIC study. Results Greater severity of retinopathy was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors. Presence of vascular abnormalities usually associated with hypertension was also associated with lower eGFR. We found no strong direct relationship between eGFR and average arteriolar or venular calibers. Conclusions Our findings show a strong association between severity of retinopathy and its features and level of kidney function after adjustment for traditional and non-traditional risk factors for CKD, suggesting that retinovascular pathology reflects renal disease. PMID:22965589

  2. Bone marrow dysfunction in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Voors, Adriaan A.; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Schuringa, Jan J.; Klinkenberg, Theo; van der Harst, Pim; Vellenga, Edo; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether chronic heart failure (CHF) is associated with a general dysfunction of the haematopoietic compartment. Bone marrow was obtained during coronary artery bypass graft surgery from 20 patients with CHF (age 67 +/- 6 years, 75% NYHA class >= III, LVEF 32 +/- 6%), and 20 age- and g

  3. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  4. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

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    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes are considered.

  5. High prevalence of microalbuminuria in chronic heart failure patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van De Wal, RMA; Asselbergs, FW; Plokker, HWT; Smilde, TDJ; Lok, D; Van Veldhuisen, DJ; Van Gilst, WH; Voors, AA

    2005-01-01

    Background: Microalbuminuria is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the relation between microalbuminuria and chronic heart failure has not been well described yet. In this cross-sectional study, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of microalbuminuria an

  6. Nebivolol in chronic heart failure : current evidence and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipsic, Erik; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2010-01-01

    Areas covered in the review: We describe the role of the sympathetic nervous system, beta-blockers and specifically nebivolol in chronic heart failure. What the reader will gain: Nebivolol is a third-generation beta-blocker, with high beta(1)/beta(2) selectivity. Moreover, it has important vasodilat

  7. Hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. Concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caboral, Meriam F; Evangelista, Lorraine S; Whetsell, Martha V

    2012-01-01

    This topic review employed Walker and Avant's method of concept analysis to explore the construct of hope in elderly adults with chronic heart failure. The articles analyzed revealed that hope, as the belief of the occurrence of a positive result without any guarantee that it will be produced, is necessary for the survival and wellbeing of the elderly adults enduring this disease.

  8. ESPEN guidelines on chronic intestinal failure in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pironi, L; Arends, J.; Bozzetti, F.; Cuerda, C.; Gillanders, L.; Jeppesen, P.B.; Joly, F.; Kelly, D.; Lal, S.; Staun, M.; Szczepanek, K.; Gossum, A. van; Wanten, G.J.A.; Schneider, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Chronic Intestinal Failure (CIF) is the long-lasting reduction of gut function, below the minimum necessary for the absorption of macronutrients and/or water and electrolytes, such that intravenous supplementation is required to maintain health and/or growth. CIF is the rarest org

  9. [Telemedicine for patients with chronic intestinal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Sjoukje; Feibig, Doreen; Wanten, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Telemedicine is a valuable extension of the ways in which patients with chronic diseases can be contacted. Patients can easily contact their caregivers within the safe environment of the digital waiting room. Telemedicine especially offers an advantage for those forms of care where the visual aspect is important. Care should be taken with respect to its implementation into the disease management process with careful synchronisation between all involved parties, e.g. patient, caregiver, and organisation. The effectiveness of telemedicine and the savings that can be achieved should be properly established in order to justify the funding of a telemedicine project. Rather than focusing on the possible drawbacks of telemedicine, e.g. safety concerns and the user-friendliness of the system, we should highlight the possibilities that information technology offers.

  10. Dietary Energy Density, Renal Function, and Progression of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is evidence of the association between dietary energy density and chronic diseases. However, no report exists regarding the relation between DED and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Objective. To examine the association between dietary energy density (DED), renal function, and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design. Cross-sectional. Setting. Three nephrology clinics. Subjects. Two hundred twenty-one subjects with diagnosed CKD. Main Outcome Measure. Dietary intake ...

  11. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  12. Cardioprotective Effects of ω-3 PUFAs in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Su Mi Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence rate of chronic kidney disease (CKD is increasing worldwide, and cardiovascular disease (CVD is a main cause of death in patients with CKD. The high incidence of CVD in CKD patients is related to chronic inflammation, dyslipidemia, malnutrition, atherosclerosis, and vascular calcification. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs have been shown to reduce the risk of CVD. In this paper, we review the beneficial effects of ω-3 PUFAs on CVD and the possible cardioprotective mechanisms of ω-3 PUFAs in CKD patients by determining the effect of ω-3 PUFAs in the general population. ω-3 PUFAs have several cardioprotective benefits, such as reducing inflammation, decreasing oxidative stress, inhibiting platelet activity, exerting antiarrhythmic effects, and improving triglyceride levels, in the general population and patients with CKD. Modifications of erythrocyte membrane fatty acid content, including an increased ω-3 index and decreased oleic acid, after ω-3 PUFAs supplementation are important changes related to CVD risk reduction in the general population and patients with CKD. Further basic and clinical studies are essential to confirm the effects of ω-3 PUFAs on vitamin D activation, vascular calcification prevention, cardiovascular events, and mortality in CKD patients.

  13. Hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease: pathophysiology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadtstein, Charlotte; Schaefer, Franz

    2008-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is very common in children with all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD). While fluid overload and activation of the renin-angiotensin system have long been recognized as crucial pathophysiological pathways, sympathetic hyperactivation, endothelial dysfunction and chronic hyperparathyroidism have more recently been identified as important factors contributing to CKD-associated hypertension. Moreover, several drugs commonly administered in CKD, such as erythropoietin, glucocorticoids and cyclosporine A, independently raise blood pressure in a dose-dependent fashion. Because of the deleterious consequences of hypertension on the progression of renal disease and cardiovascular outcomes, an active screening approach should be adapted in patients with all stages of CKD. Before one starts antihypertensive treatment, non-pharmacological options should be explored. In hemodialysis patients a low salt diet, low dialysate sodium and stricter dialysis towards dry weight can often achieve adequate blood pressure control. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are first-line therapy for patients with proteinuria, due to their additional anti-proteinuric properties. Diuretics are a useful alternative for non-proteinuric patients or as an add-on to renin-angiotensin system blockade. Multiple drug therapy is often needed to maintain blood pressure below the 90th percentile target, but adequate blood pressure control is essential for better renal and cardiovascular long-term outcomes.

  14. The role of the kidney in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metra, Marco; Cotter, Gad; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Cas, Livio Dei; Voors, Adriaan A.

    2012-01-01

    Renal dysfunction is common in patients with heart failure and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Cardiac and renal dysfunction may worsen each other through multiple mechanisms such as fluid overload and increased venous pressure, hypo-perfusion, neurohormonal and inflammatory activat

  15. Baseline donor chronic renal injury confers the same transplant survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmoliaptsis, V; Salji, M; Bardsley, V; Chen, Y; Thiru, S; Griffiths, M H; Copley, H C; Saeb-Parsy, K; Bradley, J A; Torpey, N; Pettigrew, G J

    2015-03-01

    Histological assessment of baseline chronic kidney injury may discriminate kidneys that are suitable for transplantation, but has not been validated for appraisal of donation after circulatory death (DCD) kidneys. 'Time-zero' biopsies for 371 consecutive, solitary, deceased-donor kidneys transplanted at our center between 2006 and 2010 (65.5% DCD, 34.5% donation after brain death [DBD]) were reviewed and baseline chronic degenerative injury scored using Remuzzi's classification. High scores correlated with donor age and extended criteria donors (42% of donors), but the spectrum of scores was similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Transplant outcomes for kidneys scoring from 0 to 4 were comparable (1 and 3 year graft survival 95% and 92%), but were much poorer for kidneys scoring ≥5, with 1 year graft survival only 73%, and 12.5% suffering primary nonfunction. Critically, high Remuzzi scores conferred the same survival disadvantage for DCD and DBD kidneys. On multi-variable regression analysis, time-zero biopsy score was the only independent predictor for graft survival, whereas one-year graft estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) correlated with donor age and biopsy score. In conclusion, the relationship between severity of chronic kidney injury and transplant outcome is similar for DCD and DBD kidneys. Kidneys with Remuzzi scores of ≤4 can be implanted singly with acceptable results.

  16. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  17. Dilated ureters, renal dysplasia, and chronic renal failure in an African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Gwen; Langan, Jennifer N; Adkesson, Michael J; Terio, Karen A; Mylniczenko, Natalie D; Meehan, Tom; Schmitt, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    An ultrasonographic reproductive health examination of a 26-yr-old female African elephant (Loxodonta africana) revealed bilateral ureteral wall thickening and dilatation. On ultrasonographic examination, the bladder and both ureters were normal near the trigone; however, the cranial-most aspect of each ureter was dilated and thickened for a length of 30-50 cm. The same month, elevated blood creatinine (3.0 mg/dl), and urine protein-creatinine ratio (4.0) were observed. Chronic renal failure was diagnosed based on these abnormalities, and the persistent ureteral dilatation was seen on subsequent ultrasound examinations. Complete blood cell counts, serum chemistries, and urinalyses remained relatively unchanged until 24 mo after diagnosis, at which time azotemia, hypophosphatemia, and hypercalcemia (including elevated ionized calcium) developed. Hydronephrosis of both kidneys and prominent sacculation of the left ureter were noted on ultrasonographic examination. Lethargy, ventral edema, and oral mucosal ulceration acutely developed 30 mo after diagnosis. Although blood urea nitrogen remained elevated, creatinine, total calcium, and ionized calcium returned to within reference ranges at that time. Due to rapid clinical decline and grave prognosis, humane euthanasia was elected. Bilateral ureteral dilatation, dysplasia of the right kidney, and chronic nephritis of the left kidney were identified postmortem.

  18. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: terminology, mechanisms and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Shiv K; Choudhury, Ashok

    2016-03-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a distinct clinical entity and differs from acute liver failure and decompensated cirrhosis in timing, presence of acute precipitant, course of disease and potential for unaided recovery. The definition involves outlining the acute and chronic insults to include a homogenous patient group with liver failure and an expected outcome in a specific timeframe. The pathophysiology of ACLF relates to persistent inflammation, immune dysregulation with initial wide-spread immune activation, a state of systematic inflammatory response syndrome and subsequent sepsis due to immune paresis. The disease severity and outcome can be predicted by both hepatic and extrahepatic organ failure(s). Clinical recovery is expected with the use of nucleoside analogues for hepatitis B, and steroids for severe alcoholic hepatitis and, possibly, severe autoimmune hepatitis. Artificial liver support systems help remove toxins and metabolites and serve as a bridge therapy before liver transplantation. Hepatic regeneration during ongoing liver failure, although challenging, is possible through the use of growth factors. Liver transplantation remains the definitive treatment with a good outcome. Pre-emptive antiviral agents for hepatitis B before chemotherapy to prevent viral reactivation and caution in using potentially hepatotoxic drugs can prevent the development of ACLF.

  19. Liver enzymes serum levels in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis: a comprehensive review

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    Luís Henrique Bezerra Cavalcanti Sette

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the literature regarding the serum levels of the enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transferase in patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis with and without viral hepatitis. Original articles published up to January 2013 on adult patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis were selected. These articles contained the words “transaminases” “aspartate aminotransferase” “alanine aminotransferase” “gamma glutamyl transferase,” “liver enzymes”, AND “dialysis” OR “hemodialysis”. A total of 823 articles were retrieved. After applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 49 articles were selected. The patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis had reduced serum levels of aminotransferases due to hemodilution, lower pyridoxine levels, or elevated homocysteine levels. The chronic kidney disease patients on hemodialysis infected with the hepatitis C virus also had lower aminotransferase levels compared with the infected patients without chronic kidney disease. This reduction is in part due to decreased viremia caused by the dialysis method, the production of a hepatocyte growth factor and endogenous interferon-α, and lymphocyte activation, which decreases viral action on hepatocytes. Few studies were retrieved on gamma-glutamyl transferase serum levels; those found reported that there were no differences between the patients with or without chronic kidney disease. The serum aminotransferase levels were lower in the patients with chronic kidney disease on hemodialysis (with or without viral hepatitis than in the patients with normal renal function; this reduction has a multifactorial origin.

  20. Chronic renal failure (CRF in children in Jugoslavia

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    Peco-Antić Amira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the demographic variables of chronic non-terminal (CRF and terminal (TRF renal failure patients (pts younger than 19 years treated in Serbia in June 2001. The prevalence of CRF pts was registered as 4,7 per million total population (pmtp or 14,1 per million child population (pmcp while corresponding values for TRF pts were 4,5 pmtp or 13,5 pmcp. The incidence of TRF pts during the period Jan.2000-Jan.2002 was 4,35 pmcp. Boys dominated only among CRF pts (34:14; 60,4% beeing between the ages of 6 and 19 yrs while at the time of diagnosis of HBI, 33,3 % of boys were yanger than 2 yrs.The causes of CRF were: reflux nephropathy 58,3%, congenital kidney disease 16,7%, familial/hereditary 14,6% glomerulonephritis 6,2% and Willms tu 4,1%. Reflux nephropathy was also the most common underlying disease of TRF accounted for 36,9% of total cases while glomerulonephritis was responsible for 23,9 %. Reflux nephropathy was associated with neural tube defect in 53,3% and with congenital lower urinary tract obstruction in 66,7%. The most of CRF (81,25% and TRF pts (95,6% were from Serbia, the others were from Monte Negro and Republic Srpska. The most of CRF (65% and TRF (80% pts were treated in University Children’s Hospital in Belgrade. Of CRF pts 46% had serum sreatinine 100-200 μmol/l, in 11% of pts it was 400-600 μmol/l and 2% of pts were in pre-terminal CRF. One third of CRF pts had proteinuria 150-500 mg/l, and second third had proteinuria greater of 1000 mg/l. Anemia was present in 54% of CRf pts, and arterial hypertension in 56%. Hemodialysis was dominant treatment modality for TRF pts and only 23,9% had functioning transplant. Conclusion: This is the first national study of demographic characteristics of pediatric CRF in Serbia. Since its prevalence is considerably lower than that in Western and North European countries the true prevalence is some what higher. The increasing incidence of pediatric TRF from 2

  1. Prognostic value of renin and prorenin in heart failure patients with decreased kidney function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szymanski, Mariusz K.; Damman, Kevin; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Hillege, Hans L.; de Boer, Rudolf A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in the progression of heart failure (HF) and concomitant kidney dysfunction. Despite the use of RAAS blockade, sustained activation of RAAS has been suggested to link with adverse outcome. We aimed to investigate the prognos

  2. TREATMENT OF RENAL STONES WITH PERCUTANEOUS NEPHROLITHOTOMY IMPROVES RENAL FUNCTIONS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE PATIENTS

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    Ekrem Akdeniz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective:In this study, we aimed to investigate the impact of percutaneous nephrolitotomy on kidney functions in stage III or higher chronic renal failure patients using glomerular filtration rate and serum creatinine level. Material and Method:Between 2010 and 2014, percutaneous nephrolithotomy was applied to patients who had glomerular filtration rate below 60 mL/min/1.73m2. Pre-operative demographic features, stone burden and localization, urine analysis and microbial test, serum creatinine level, direct urinary system graphy, and spiral non-enhanced computerized tomography were obtained. Intraoperative renal unit counts, anesthesia and surgery time, and X-ray exposure time were calculated. Early and late post-operative complications, hospitalization time, stone-free rate, and glomerular function rate were evaluated, retrospectively. Findings:Pre-operatively, mean creatinine value was 2,42±0.76 mg/dL, mean glomerular filtration rate was 45.3±13mL/min/1.73m2, mean stone burden was 393±40 mm², mean intervention time was 79±34 min and 12 patients were stone free (70.5%. Decrease of hemoglobin 1,6 g/dL and transfusion was done only two patients (11.8% due to excessive bleeding. In early and long term follow-up, mean creatinine values and glomerular filtration rate were 1.98±0.72mg/dL, 2.16±0.78mL/dL and 54.1±14 mL/min/1.73m2and 51.8±15 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. Comparison of pre-operative and post-operative creatinine and glomerular filtration rates revealed significant decrease in creatinine level and increase in glomerular filtration rate. Results:Percutaneous nephrolithotomy which eliminates urinary obstruction is safely used in the treatment of kidney stones with minimal damage on kidney functions. Stage III or higher renal failure patients who have obstructive kidney stones or recurrent urinary tract infections can effectively be treated and this may help patients to prevent progression to end-stage renal failure.

  3. Prevalence, correlative and statistical relationships of renal dysfunction in patients with chronic ischemic heart failure

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    D. A. Lashkul

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic heart failure (CHF is one of the most common complications of cardiovascular disease. According multicenter studies conducted during recent years, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of heart failure and has been on average 64% of patients with chronic heart failure. The tight functional relationship of cardiovascular and urinary system causes a lot of interest to the functional state of kidneys in various cardiovascular diseases. Most risk factors for cardiovascular disease are common risk factors of renal failure. Causes significant differences in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD in patients with chronic heart failure, defined as coronary artery disease and hypertension remain unclear. Need clarification prevalence of CKD among patients with CHF in general and in specific groups of patients. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence, correlation and statistical relationships of renal dysfunction with functional class, age and gender of patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure, were hospitalized. Materials and methods. Analyzed the medical cards 344 patients (286 men and 58 women with ischemic chronic heart failure, mean age 59.2±9.4 years. The etiology of heart failure in 298 (86.6% patients had a combination of coronary artery disease and essential hypertension in 46 (13.4% - CHD. Chronic heart failure 1 functional class (FC was diagnosed in 10 (2.9% patients, 2 FC - in 106 (31%, 3 FC - 207 (60.5% and 4 FC - 19 (5, 6% patients. Diabetes was 62 (18% patients. Myocardial infarction had a history of 245 (71.2% patients. Glomerular filtration rate was calculated using the formula MDRD (Modification of Diet in Renal Disease. Descriptive statistics are presented as mean±standard deviation for continuous variables and as percentages for categorical variables. Depending on the distribution of the analyzed parameters used unpaired Student's t-test or U-Mann-Whitney test. Comparisons among all

  4. Multiple sites of calciphylaxis in a patient with chronic renal failure

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    Ramy Magdy Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Calciphylaxis has seldom been reported in patients with acute renal failure or in pre-dialysis patients. It also has been reported at lower calcium phosphorous products and in patients with adynamic bone disease. We report a pre-hemodialysis (HD patient with acute renal failure and biopsy-proven calciphylaxis involving multiple cutaneous sites with calcification of the perineal area resulting in dry gangrene of the penis that necessitated a partial penectomy. The patient had elevated serum calcium, phosphorous and parathyroid hormone level of 612 pg/mL. The same patient suffered subsequently from a calcium embolus that occluded his left ophthalmic artery and resulted in left eye blindness. Calciphylaxis is a devastating phenomenon and physicians should have a high clinical suspicion for it in HD patients as well as in patients with late stages of chronic kidney disease.

  5. Prophylactic orthosteric inhibition of leukocyte integrin CD11b/CD18 prevents long-term fibrotic kidney failure in cynomolgus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnadi, Abbas; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Neal Smith, Rex; Li, Xiangen; Alonso, José L.; Means, Terry K.; Arnaout, M. Amin

    2017-01-01

    Ischaemic acute kidney injury (AKI), an inflammatory disease process, often progresses to chronic kidney disease (CKD), with no available effective prophylaxis. This is in part due to lack of clinically relevant CKD models in non-human primates. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of the archetypal innate immune receptor CD11b/CD18 prevents progression of AKI to CKD in cynomolgus monkeys. Severe ischaemia-reperfusion injury of the right kidney, with subsequent periods of the left ureter ligation, causes irreversible right kidney failure 3, 6 or 9 months after AKI. Moreover, prophylactic inactivation of CD11b/CD18, using the orthosteric CD11b/CD18 inhibitor mAb107, improves microvascular perfusion and histopathology, reduces intrarenal pro-inflammatory mediators and salvages kidney function long term. These studies reveal an important early role of CD11b+ leukocytes in post-ischaemic kidney fibrosis and failure, and suggest a potential early therapeutic intervention to mitigate progression of ischaemic AKI to CKD in humans. PMID:28071653

  6. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight-Chitosan on the Adenine- Induced Chronic Renal Failure Ratsin vitro andin vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Xuan; HAN Baoqin; SUI Xianxian; HU Rui; LIU Wanshun

    2015-01-01

    Theeffects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigatedin vivoand in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6–7 and 37℃ for 24h to obtain LMWC.In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For theinvivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the controlgroup, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The re-sults after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100mgkg−1d−1.

  7. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

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    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  8. [End stage of chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaboch, J; Opatrná, S; Matoušovic, K; Schück, O

    2012-01-01

    Renal function disorder is inevitably associated with metabolic acidosis. An adult produces approximately 1 mmol of acids/kg of body weight every day (3 mmol/kg in children), derived from metabolization of proteins from food. Development of metabolic acidosis in patients with kidney disease is based on accumulation of acids and insufficient production of bicarbonates; alkaline loss represents a marginal issue here limited to patients with type II renal tubular acidosis only. The prevalence of this disorder increases with declining glomerular filtration (GFR) from 2% in patients with GFR 1.0-1.5 ml/s/1.73 m2 to 39% in patients with GFR inflammation, to progression of tubular interstitial fibrosis that subsequently leads to further GFR reduction. Metabolic acidosis has a number of severe adverse effects on the organism, e.g. deterioration of kidney bone disease through stimulation of bone resorption and inhibition of bone formation, inhibition of vitamin D formation, increased muscle catabolism, reduced albumin production, glucose metabolism disorder, increased insulin resistance, reduced production of thyroid hormones, increased accumulation of β2-microglobulin etc. Non-interventional studies suggest that alkali supplementation may slow down progression of chronic nephropathies. However, this approach, safe and inexpensive, has not been widely implemented in clinical practice yet. With respect to dialyzed patients, abnormal levels of bicarbonates are associated with increased mortality. Both metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, rather regularly seen in a considerable number of patients, have a negative effect on patient survival. Alkali substitution from a dialysis solution is the main pillar of metabolic acidosis management in patients on hemo- as well as peritoneal dialysis. Available technologies allow individualization of the treatment and this should be observed.

  9. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

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    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  10. Smell and taste function in children with chronic kidney disease.

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    Armstrong, Jessica E; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Kainer, Gad

    2010-08-01

    Loss of appetite and poor growth are common in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and changes in smell and/or taste function may be responsible, but the hypothesis has not been proven. This aims of this prospective age- and gender-controlled study were to determine whether: (1) changes in smell and taste function occur in children with CKD; (2) smell or taste dysfunction are associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR); (3) there is an association between smell or taste loss and body mass index (BMI). The study cohort consisted of 72 children of whom 20 were CKD stage 3-5 patients, 12 were CKD stage 2 patients, 20 were clinical controls (CC) and 20 were healthy children (HC). The CKD patients and clinical controls were recruited from Sydney Children's Hospital and The Children's Hospital, Westmead, and healthy controls were recruited from a local school. Scores for each group from taste and smell chemosensory function tests were compared, and their relationship with renal function and BMI investigated. The CKD stage 3-5 group had a significantly lower taste identification score (85.6%, P children in the CKD stage 3-5 group exhibiting taste loss. Decreased taste function was associated with decreased eGFR (r = 0.43, P 0.9). Odour identification scores were not different; however, there was a positive relationship with BMI (r = 0.427, P = 0.006). We conclude that a loss of taste can occur in children with CKD and that when it occurs, it worsens as eGFR declines and is found early in kidney disease.

  11. Prognostic significance of urinary NGAL in chronic kidney disease

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    Patel ML

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Munna Lal Patel,1 Rekha Sachan,2 Ravi Misra,3 Ritul Kamal,4 Radhey Shyam,5 Pushpalata Sachan6 1Department of Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 3Department of Internal Medicine, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 4Epidemiology Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR, Lucknow, India; 5Department of Geriatric Intensive Care Unit, King George Medical University, Lucknow, India; 6Department of Physiology, Career Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem. Recently urinary NGAL (uNGAL has been proven to be a useful (potentially ideal biomarker for early detection of CKD. The aim of the present study was to examine the correlation of uNGAL with severity of renal impairment in CKD and to evaluate its prognostic value in these subjects. Methods: This was a prospective study carried out over a period of 24 months in subjects with CKD due to primary chronic glomerulonephritis. New cases of CKD stage II, III, IV aged between 18 and 65 years were enrolled as per KDIGO (Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines 2012. A total of 90 subjects completed the study up to the end-point. The primary follow-up end-point was 18 months, or decreased glomerular filtration rate of less than 15 mL/min. Secondary follow-up end-point was the number of subjects who expired during this period. Results: Multiple regression model of estimated glomerular filtration rate showed significant associations with log uNGAL (β=0.38, P<0.001, Ca×PO4 (β=0.60, P<0.001, hemoglobin (β=0.37, P<0.001, urine protein (β=0.34, P<0.001, serum albumin (β=0.48, P<0.001, and systolic blood pressure (β=0.76, P<0.001. Receiver operator curve for uNGAL considering the progression of CKD showed area under the curve

  12. [Efficacy and safety of lanthanum carbonate in chronic kidney disease patients with hyperphosphataemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laville, Maurice

    2011-06-01

    Hyperphosphataemia is a frequent complication in patients with chronic kidney disease and is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity. Lanthanum carbonate is a calcium-free phosphate binder indicated in patients with chronic kidney disease. Its digestive absorption is minimal (carbonate have been assessed in randomized trials. The most common side effects reported were gastrointestinal and occurred with a similar incidence than with placebo and other phosphate binders. Hypercalcemia was less frequent than with calcium carbonate. This review highlights pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and clinical (efficacy and safety) properties of lanthanum carbonate and discusses its place in the management of hyperphosphataemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  13. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease.

  14. SERUM YKL-40 LEVELS IN CHRONIC HEART FAILURE.

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    Maria Kazakova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes are involved in the pathogenesis and development of chronic heart disease. The promising novel inflammatory biomarker YKL-40 is related to the degree of inflammation and pathological tissue remodeling. The aim of this study was to determine serum YKL-40 levels in patients with chronic heart failure and to evaluate the potential relationship with ultrasonography findings. Forty-three individuals were enrolled in the study – 24 patients (10 females and 14 males with chronic heart failure, aged 70±11 (mean ± standard deviation and 16 healthy people as age-matched controls (above 50 years. The serum YKL-40 levels were assessed by ELISA. Sonographic measurements such as two-dimensional, Power wave, Continuous Wave, Colour mode and M-Mode were performed using a diagnostic ultrasound system (PHILIPS Ultrasound, Washington, US with a L11-3 probe of 3-11 MHz. The six minute walk test was used to assess functional capability of patients. Our study revealed significantly higher serum YKL-40 levels in patients compared to the control group (P=0.010. No relation was found between the glycoprotein and the results from the ultrasonographic and functional examination. We suppose that increased serum YKL-40 levels in patients with chronic heart failure might reflect the inflammatory route in the development of the disease.

  15. Health status, renal function, and quality of life after multiorgan failure and acute kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy

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    Faulhaber-Walter R

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert Faulhaber-Walter,1,2 Sebastian Scholz,1,3 Herrmann Haller,1 Jan T Kielstein,1,* Carsten Hafer1,4,* 1Department of Renal and Hypertensive Disease, Medical School Hannover, Hannover, Germany; 2Facharztzentrum Aarberg, Waldshut-Tiengen, Germany; 3Sanitaetsversorgungszentrum Wunstorf, Wunstorf, Germany; 4HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt, Erfurt, Germany *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI in need of renal replacement therapy (RRT may have a protracted and often incomplete rehabilitation. Their long-term outcome has rarely been investigated. Study design: Survivors of the HANnover Dialysis OUTcome (HANDOUT study were evaluated after 5 years for survival, health status, renal function, and quality of life (QoL. The HANDOUT study had examinded mortality and renal recovery of patients with AKI receiving either standard extendend or intensified dialysis after multi organ failure. Results: One hundred fifty-six former HANDOUT participants were analyzed. In-hospital mortality was 56.4%. Five-year survival after AKI/RRT was 40.1% (86.5% if discharged from hospital. Main causes of death were cardiovascular complications and sepsis. A total of 19 survivors presented to the outpatient department of our clinic and had good renal recovery (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 72.5±30 mL/min/1.73 m2; mean proteinuria 89±84 mg/d. One person required maintenance dialysis. Seventy-nine percent of the patients had a pathological kidney sonomorphology. The Charlson comorbidity score was 2.2±1.4 and adjusted for age 3.3±2.1 years. Numbers of comorbid conditions averaged 2.38±1.72 per patient (heart failure [52%] > chronic kidney disease/myocardial infarction [each 29%]. Median 36-item short form health survey (SF-36™ index was 0.657 (0.69 physical health/0.66 mental health. Quality-adjusted life-years after 5 years were 3.365. Conclusion: Mortality after severe AKI is higher than

  16. Post-transplant anti-HLA class II antibodies as risk factor for late kidney allograft failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, E F; Tedesco-Silva, H; Machado, P G; Franco, M; Medina-Pestana, J O; Gerbase-DeLima, M

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively analyze the relationship between the post-transplant anti-HLA class I and/or class II panel reactive antibodies and graft failure due to chronic allograft nephropathy (CAN). We studied 512 first kidney recipients transplanted at a single center, with a graft functioning for at least 3 years. A single blood sample was collected from each patient for antibody evaluation. The median posttransplant time after blood collection was 4.4 years and did not differ between patients with (n = 91) or without anti-HLA antibodies (n = 421). Female gender, pregnancies and blood transfusions were associated with the presence of anti-HLA class I antibodies. Graft function deterioration was associated with anti-HLA class II antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed independent association for creatinine levels (RR = 7.5), acute rejection (RR = 2.6), recipient male gender (RR = 3.6) and anti-HLA class II antibodies (RR = 2.9) and CAN-associated graft loss. In conclusion, the presence of anti-HLA class II antibodies conferred a risk for graft loss before a decline in renal function and increased the risk of graft failure in patients who already had a decline in graft function. Thus, anti-HLA class II antibody monitoring is a useful tool for the management of long-term kidney recipients.

  17. Glycated albumin in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cai-Mei; Ma, Wen-Ya; Wu, Chia-Chao; Lu, Kuo-Cheng

    2012-10-09

    Chronic hyperglycemia results in a non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, and produces Amadori products, such as glycated albumin (GA), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fructosamine. In current clinical practice, long-term glycemic control is assessed by quarterly measurements of HbA1c. Since the degree of hemoglobin glycosylation depends not only on the level of glycemic control, but also on the lifespan of red blood cells, patients with hemoglobin disorders or anemia of any cause may have erroneous HbA1c levels, and consequently receive insufficient treatment. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from various types of anemia, and consequently, they are frequently treated with iron and/or erythropoietin therapy or frequent blood transfusion. Thus, serum GA is a potentially useful glycemic index in diabetic patients with CKD, since it is not influenced by anemia and associated treatments. GA may also reflect the status of blood glucose more rapidly (2-3 weeks) than HbA1c (2-3 months), and is beneficial in those with wide variations in blood glucose or at higher risk for hypoglycemia. If clinical investigations support its utility, it may be applicable as a screening tool for all patients with diabetes during routine health examinations. Serum GA levels are also associated with AGE-related fluorescence and the number of glycation sites, and it may influence the structural and functional changes inalbumin. Since end-stage renal disease is an extreme microvascular complication of diabetic nephropathy, CKD patients with diabetes should be carefully managed to prevent disease progression. In this review, the clinical aspects of GA were discussed, including a comparison of GA with other glycated proteins, the utility and limitations of GA as a glycemic index, its influence on the therapeutic effects of hypoglycemic agents, its correlations with vascular complications, and its potential role in pathogenesis, specifically in diabetic patients with CKD.

  18. NLRP3 inflammasome activation in dialyzed chronic kidney disease patients.

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    Simona Granata

    Full Text Available To assess whether NLR pyrin domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3 inflammasome, a multiprotein complex that mediates the activation of caspase-1 (CASP-1 and pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-18 and IL-1β, could be involved in the chronic inflammatory state observed in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment (CKD-HD, we employed several biomolecular techniques including RT-PCR, western blot, FACS analysis, confocal microscopy and microarray. Interestingly, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 15 CKD-HD patients showed higher mRNA levels of NLRP3, CASP-1, ASC, IL-1β, IL-18 and P2X7 receptor compared to 15 healthy subjects. Western blotting analysis confirmed the above results. In particular, active forms of CASP-1, IL1-β and IL-18 resulted significantly up-regulated in CKD-HD versus controls. Additionally, elevated mitochondrial ROS level, colocalization of NLRP3/ASC/mitochondria in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from CKD-HD patients and down-regulation of CASP-1, IL1-β and IL-18 protein levels in immune-cells of CKD-HD patients stimulated with LPS/ATP in presence of mitoTEMPO, inhibitor of mitochondrial ROS production, suggested a possible role of this organelle in the aforementioned CKD-associated inflammasome activation. Then, microarray analysis confirmed, in an independent microarray study cohort, that NLRP3 and CASP-1, along with other inflammasome-related genes, were up-regulated in 17 CKD-HD patients and they were able to clearly discriminate these patients from 5 healthy subjects. All together these data showed, for the first time, that NLRP3 inflammasome was activated in uremic patients undergoing dialysis treatment and they suggested that this unphysiological condition could be possibly induced by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  19. Elevated body mass index as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease: current perspectives

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    Garl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyn S Garland Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative as the presence of reduced kidney function or kidney damage for a period of 3 months or greater. Obesity is considered a risk factor for CKD development, but its precise role in contributing to CKD and end stage kidney disease is not fully elucidated. In this narrative review, the objectives are to describe the pathogenesis of CKD in obesity, including the impact of altered adipokine secretion in obesity and CKD, and to provide an overview of the clinical studies assessing the risk of obesity and CKD development. Keywords: obesity, chronic renal disease, adipokine

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Chronic Kidney Disease-Associated Pruritus: a Literature Review.

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    Panahi, Yunes; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin; Farnood, Farahnoosh; Noshad, Hamid; Lotfi, Mahsa; Gharekhani, Afshin

    2016-12-01

    Uremic pruritus remains one of the most tormenting, frequent and potentially disabling problem in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, an area of substantial etiological interest with relation to uremic pruritus is the essential fatty acids deficiency. So we performed a literature review to elucidate the efficacy of omega-3 fatty acids on uremic pruritus. This review evaluated all of the studies published in English language, focusing on the clinical effects of omega-3 fatty acids on uremic pruritus. The literature review was conducted in December 2015 and carried out by searching Scopus, Medline, Cochrane central register of controlled trials, and Cochrane database of systematic reviews. The search terms were "kidney injury", "kidney failure", "chronic kidney disease", "end-stage renal disease", "dialysis", "hemodialysis", "peritoneal dialysis", "pruritus", "itch", "skin problems", "fish oil", "omega 3", "n-3 fatty acids", "polyunsaturated fatty acids", "docosahexaenoic acid", and "eicosapentaenoic acid". Four small studies investigating potential benefits of omega-3 fatty acids on symptoms of uremic pruritus were found. Among them, three small randomized controlled trials have shown a significant improvement in pruritus symptoms (evaluated by a standard questionnaire) in CKD patients who took omega-3 supplement compared to omega-6, omega-9, and placebo supplementation. Despite numerous limitations of the studies, it is worth noting that even minor reduction in itching symptoms may be clinically significant for CKD patients. Therefore, and considering multiple health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids in advanced CKD and negligible risk profile, omega-3 intake can wisely be applied to CKD patients with uremic pruritus.

  1. Pandigital and subcutaneous chronic tophaceous gout with acute renal failure

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    J Shashibhushan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout (Podagra is a disorder of purine metabolism characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints and connective tissue and risk of deposition in kidney interstitium. Although acute gouty arthritis is familiar for most physicians, chronic gouty arthritis, which affects small joints of the hands can be difficult to distinguish from other common interphalangeal arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis, and erosive osteoarthritis because of very similar presentations. Here we describe a 60-year-old male diabetic patient with pandigital, extensive subcutaneous tophaceous gout presented with uremic encephalopathy and joint deformities. He had been treated mistakenly as RA for 10 years.

  2. Estimation of toxic metals in scalp hair samples of chronic kidney patients.

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    Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Jalbani, Nusrat; Kazi, Naveed; Arain, Muhammad Balal; Jamali, Muhammad Khan; Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kandhro, Ghulam Abbas; Sarfraz, Raja Adil; Shah, Abdul Qadir; Ansari, Rehana

    2009-01-01

    The determination of toxic metals (TMs) in the biological samples of human beings is an important clinical screening procedure. The aim of this work is to determine total content of TMs, aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), and lead (Pb) in scalp hair samples of chronic kidney male patients (CKPs) on maintenance hemodialysis, during the period of 2005-2007. The study included 115 CKPs (all smokers) and 150 controls or referents [82 (nonsmokers) and 68 (smokers)]. Both controls and patients (males) were of the same age group (ranged 25-55 years), socioeconomic status, localities, and dietary habits. The scalp hair samples were analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer, prior to microwave-induced acid digestion. The accuracy of the total Al, Cd, Ni, and Pb measurements was tested by simultaneously analyzing certified reference material (human hair NCS ZC81002). No significant differences were observed between the analytical results and the certified values (paired t test at p > 0.05). The levels of TMs in scalp hair samples of patients were found to be higher as compared to control nonsmoker and smokers. Moreover, the study shows that levels of Al, Cd, Ni, and Pb in scalp hair samples may be useful to evaluate the impact of cigarette smoking in kidney failure patients.

  3. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

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    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  4. More than skin deep? Potential nicotinamide treatment applications in chronic kidney transplant recipients.

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    Bostom, Andrew G; Merhi, Basma; Walker, Joanna; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2016-12-24

    Non-melanoma cutaneous carcinomas, or skin cancers, predominantly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), are the most common malignancies occurring in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). Squamous cell carcinoma risk is dramatically elevated in KTRs, occurring at rates of up 45-250 times those reported in general populations. New non-melanoma skin cancers in KTRs with a prior non-melanoma skin cancer also develop at 3-times the rate reported in non-KTRs with the same clinical history. The unique aggressiveness of SCCs in KTRs increases patient morbidity, due to the high rate of new lesions requiring treatment, frequently surgical excision. Oral nicotinamide shows promise in the chemoprevention of the especially aggressive non-melanoma skin cancers which occur in KTRs. This benefit might be conferred via its inhibition of sirtuin enzymatic pathways. Nicotinamide's concurrent hypophosphatemic effect may also partially ameliorate the disturbed calcium-phosphorus homeostasis in these patients-a putative risk factor for mortality, and graft failure. Conceivably, a phase 3 trial of nicotinamide for the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancers in KTRs, lasting at least 12-mo, could also incorporate imaging and laboratory measures which assess nicotinamide's impact on subclinical cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease risk, and progression.

  5. More than skin deep? Potential nicotinamide treatment applications in chronic kidney transplant recipients

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    Bostom, Andrew G; Merhi, Basma; Walker, Joanna; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Non-melanoma cutaneous carcinomas, or skin cancers, predominantly squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), are the most common malignancies occurring in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). Squamous cell carcinoma risk is dramatically elevated in KTRs, occurring at rates of up 45-250 times those reported in general populations. New non-melanoma skin cancers in KTRs with a prior non-melanoma skin cancer also develop at 3-times the rate reported in non-KTRs with the same clinical history. The unique aggressiveness of SCCs in KTRs increases patient morbidity, due to the high rate of new lesions requiring treatment, frequently surgical excision. Oral nicotinamide shows promise in the chemoprevention of the especially aggressive non-melanoma skin cancers which occur in KTRs. This benefit might be conferred via its inhibition of sirtuin enzymatic pathways. Nicotinamide’s concurrent hypophosphatemic effect may also partially ameliorate the disturbed calcium-phosphorus homeostasis in these patients-a putative risk factor for mortality, and graft failure. Conceivably, a phase 3 trial of nicotinamide for the prevention of non-melanoma skin cancers in KTRs, lasting at least 12-mo, could also incorporate imaging and laboratory measures which assess nicotinamide’s impact on subclinical cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease risk, and progression. PMID:28058215

  6. Sodium Excretion and the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Mills, Katherine T.; Chen, Jing; Yang, Wei; Appel, Lawrence J.; Kusek, John W.; Alper, Arnold; Delafontaine, Patrice; Keane, Martin G.; Mohler, Emile; Ojo, Akinlolu; Rahman, Mahboob; Ricardo, Ana C.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Townsend, Raymond; He, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with the general population. Prior studies have produced contradictory results on the association of dietary sodium intake with risk of CVD, and this relationship has not been investigated in patients with CKD. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the association between urinary sodium excretion and clinical CVD events among patients with CKD. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective cohort study of patients with CKD from 7 locations in the United States enrolled in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study and followed up from May 2003 to March 2013. EXPOSURES The cumulative mean of urinary sodium excretion from three 24-hour urinary measurements and calibrated to sex-specific mean 24-hour urinary creatinine excretion. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES A composite of CVD events defined as congestive heart failure, stroke, ormyocardial infarction. Events were reported every 6 months and confirmed by medical record adjudication. RESULTS Among 3757 participants (mean age, 58 years; 45% women), 804 composite CVD events (575 heart failure, 305 myocardial infarction, and 148 stroke) occurred during a median 6.8 years of follow-up. From lowest (infarction, and 6.4% vs 2.7% for stroke at median follow-up. Hazard ratios of the highest quartile compared with the lowest quartile were 1.36 (95% CI, 1.09–1.70; P = .007) for composite CVD events, 1.34 (95% CI, 1.03–1.74; P = .03) for heart failure, and 1.81 (95% CI, 1.08–3.02; P = .02) for stroke after multivariable adjustment. Restricted cubic spline analyses of the association between sodium excretion and composite CVD provided no evidence of a nonlinear association (P = .11) and indicated a significant linear association (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among patients with CKD, higher urinary sodium excretion was associated with increased risk of CVD. PMID:27218629

  7. Acute renal failure potentiates methylmalonate-induced oxidative stress in brain and kidney of rats.

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    Schuck, P F; Alves, L; Pettenuzzo, L F; Felisberto, F; Rodrigues, L B; Freitas, B W; Petronilho, F; Dal-Pizzol, F; Streck, E L; Ferreira, G C

    2013-03-01

    Tissue methylmalonic acid (MMA) accumulation is the biochemical hallmark of methylmalonic acidemia. The disease is clinically characterized by progressive neurological deterioration and kidney failure, whose pathophysiology is still unclear. In the present work we investigated the effects of acute MMA administration on various parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and kidney of young rats, as well as the influence of acute renal failure on MMA-elicited effects on these parameters. Acute renal failure was induced by gentamicin, an aminoglycoside antibiotic whose utilization over prolonged periods causes nephrotoxicity. The administration of gentamicin alone increased carbonyl content and inhibited superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in cerebral cortex, as well as increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and sulfhydryl levels and diminished glutathione peroxidase activity in kidney. On the other hand, MMA administration increased TBA-RS levels in cerebral cortex and decreased SOD activity in kidney. Furthermore, the simultaneous administration of MMA and gentamicin to the rats provoked an augment in TBA-RS levels and superoxide generation in cerebral cortex and in TBA-RS, carbonyl and sulfhydryl levels in kidney, while diminished SOD activity in both studied tissues. Finally, nitrate/nitrite content, reduced glutathione levels, 2',7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein oxidation and catalase activity were not affected by this animal treatment in either tissue. In conclusion, our present data are in line with the hypothesis that MMA acts as a toxin in brain and kidney of rats and suggest that renal injury potentiates the toxicity of MMA on oxidative stress parameters in brain and peripheral tissues.

  8. Vaccine administration in children with chronic kidney disease.

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    Esposito, Susanna; Mastrolia, Maria Vincenza; Prada, Elisabetta; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Principi, Nicola

    2014-11-20

    Pediatric patients with severe chronic kidney disease (CKD) on conservative treatment, on dialysis, and those with renal transplantation are at a higher risk for infectious diseases as the result of impaired immune responses against infectious agents. Infections in these patients can have drastic consequences for disease morbidity and mortality. Immunization is a crucial preventive strategy for disease management in this pediatric population. However, vaccination coverage among children with CKD remains low due to safety concerns and doubts about vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. In this study, we reviewed why children with CKD are at higher risk of infections, the importance of vaccinations among these children, barriers to vaccinations, and recommend the best vaccination schedules. Overall, vaccines have acceptable immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety profiles in children with CKD. However, in some cases, the protective antibody levels induced by vaccines and the benefits and risks of booster vaccine doses must be individually managed. Furthermore, close contacts and household members of these children should complete age-appropriate vaccination schedules to increase the child's indirect protection.

  9. Metformin in chronic kidney disease: time for a rethink.

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    Heaf, James

    2014-06-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological evidence suggests that this fear is disproportionate. Lactic acidosis is a rare complication to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), with an incidence of 6/100,000 patient-years. The risk is not increased in metformin-treated patients. Metformin possesses a number of clinical effects independent of glucose reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk of LA. It is suggested that introduction of metformin therapy to more advanced stages of CKD may bring therapeutic benefits that outweigh the possible risks.

  10. Plant phosphates, phytate and pathological calcifications in chronic kidney disease.

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    Buades Fuster, Juan Manuel; Sanchís Cortés, Pilar; Perelló Bestard, Joan; Grases Freixedas, Félix

    Phytate, or myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis dihydrogen phosphate (InsP6), is a naturally occurring phosphorus compound that is present in many foods, mainly legumes, whole grains and nuts. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have cardiovascular disease mortality up to 30times higher than the general population. Vascular calcifications (VCs) directly contribute to overall morbidity and mortality, especially in CKD. In part, this high mortality is due to elevated levels of phosphorus in the blood. Therefore, control of dietary phosphorus is essential. Dietary phosphorus can be classified according to its structure in organic phosphorus (plant and animal) and inorganic (preservatives and additives). Plant-phosphorus (legumes and nuts), mainly associated with InsP6, is less absorbable by the human gastrointestinal tract as the bioavailability of phosphorous from plant-derived foods is very low. Recent data indicate that restriction of foods containing plant phosphates may compromise the adequate supply of nutrients that have a beneficial effect in preventing cardiovascular events, such as InsP6 or fibre found in legumes and nuts. Experimental studies in animals and observational studies in humans suggest that InsP6 can prevent lithiasis and VCs and protect from osteoporosis. In conclusion, we need prospective studies to elucidate the potential benefits and risks of phytate (InsP6) through the diet and as an intravenous drug in patients on haemodialysis.

  11. Cardiovascular calcifications in chronic kidney disease: Potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bover, Jordi; Ureña-Torres, Pablo; Górriz, José Luis; Lloret, María Jesús; da Silva, Iara; Ruiz-García, César; Chang, Pamela; Rodríguez, Mariano; Ballarín, José

    Cardiovascular (CV) calcification is a highly prevalent condition at all stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is directly associated with increased CV and global morbidity and mortality. In the first part of this review, we have shown that CV calcifications represent an important part of the CKD-MBD complex and are a superior predictor of clinical outcomes in our patients. However, it is also necessary to demonstrate that CV calcification is a modifiable risk factor including the possibility of decreasing (or at least not aggravating) its progression with iatrogenic manoeuvres. Although, strictly speaking, only circumstantial evidence is available, it is known that certain drugs may modify the progression of CV calcifications, even though a direct causal link with improved survival has not been demonstrated. For example, non-calcium-based phosphate binders demonstrated the ability to attenuate the progression of CV calcification compared with the liberal use of calcium-based phosphate binders in several randomised clinical trials. Moreover, although only in experimental conditions, selective activators of the vitamin D receptor seem to have a wider therapeutic margin against CV calcification. Finally, calcimimetics seem to attenuate the progression of CV calcification in dialysis patients. While new therapeutic strategies are being developed (i.e. vitamin K, SNF472, etc.), we suggest that the evaluation of CV calcifications could be a diagnostic tool used by nephrologists to personalise their therapeutic decisions.

  12. Tubular atrophy in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease progression.

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    Schelling, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    The longstanding focus in chronic kidney disease (CKD) research has been on the glomerulus, which is sensible because this is where glomerular filtration occurs, and a large proportion of progressive CKD is associated with significant glomerular pathology. However, it has been known for decades that tubular atrophy is also a hallmark of CKD and that it is superior to glomerular pathology as a predictor of glomerular filtration rate decline in CKD. Nevertheless, there are vastly fewer studies that investigate the causes of tubular atrophy, and fewer still that identify potential therapeutic targets. The purpose of this review is to discuss plausible mechanisms of tubular atrophy, including tubular epithelial cell apoptosis, cell senescence, peritubular capillary rarefaction and downstream tubule ischemia, oxidative stress, atubular glomeruli, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interstitial inflammation, lipotoxicity and Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 inactivation. Once a a better understanding of tubular atrophy (and interstitial fibrosis) pathophysiology has been obtained, it might then be possible to consider tandem glomerular and tubular therapeutic strategies, in a manner similar to cancer chemotherapy regimens, which employ multiple drugs to simultaneously target different mechanistic pathways.

  13. Restless Legs Syndrome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

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    Novak, Marta; Winkelman, John W; Unruh, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Symptoms of restless legs syndrome (RLS) are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) on dialysis; symptoms of RLS are estimated to affect up to 25% of patients on dialysis when the international RLS diagnostic criteria are applied. RLS is a neurologic disorder with a circadian rhythmicity characterized by an overwhelming urge to move the legs during rest, which can be relieved temporarily by movement. RLS has been associated with an increase in sleep disturbance, higher cardiovascular morbidity, decreased quality of life, and an increased risk of death in patients with CKD. Although the exact pathophysiology of RLS is unknown, it is thought to involve an imbalance in iron metabolism and dopamine neurotransmission in the brain. The symptoms of moderate to severe RLS can be treated with several pharmacologic agents; however, data specific to patients on dialysis with RLS are lacking. The purpose of this article is to examine the relationship between, and complications of, RLS and CKD both in dialysis and nondialysis patients, and discuss the treatment options for patients on dialysis with RLS.

  14. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

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    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future.

  15. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

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    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD.

  16. Chronic Kidney Disease Impairs Bone Defect Healing in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiqing; Kang, Ning; Seriwatanachai, Dutmanee; Dong, Yuliang; Zhou, Liyan; Lin, Yunfeng; Ye, Ling; Liang, Xing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-03-09

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been regarded as a risk for bone health. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CKD on bone defect repair in rats. Uremia was induced by subtotal renal ablation, and serum levels of BUN and PTH were significantly elevated four weeks after the second renal surgery. Calvarial defects of 5-mm diameter were created and implanted with or without deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM). Micro-CT and histological analyses consistently revealed a decreased newly regenerated bone volume for CKD rats after 4 and 8 weeks. In addition, 1.4-mm-diameter cortical bone defects were established in the distal end of femora and filled with gelatin sponge. CKD rats exhibited significantly lower values of regenerated bone and bone mineral density (BMD) within the cortical gap after 2 and 4 weeks. Moreover, histomorphometric analysis showed an increase in both osteoblast number (N.Ob/B.Pm) and osteoclast number (N.Oc/B.Pm) in CKD groups due to hyperparathyroidism. Notably, collagen maturation was delayed in CKD rats as verified by Masson's Trichrome staining. These data indicate that declined renal function negatively affects bone regeneration in both calvarial and femoral defects.

  17. The increasing financial impact of chronic kidney disease in australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Patrick S; Kingsley, Michael I; Morton, R Hugh; Scanlan, Aaron T; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare current and projected expenditure associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), renal replacement therapy (RRT), and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia. Data published by Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and World Bank were used to compare CKD-, RRT-, and CVD-related expenditure and prevalence rates. Prevalence and expenditure predictions were made using a linear regression model. Direct statistical comparisons of rates of annual increase utilised indicator variables in combined regressions. Statistical significance was set at P Dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation prior to analysis. Between 2012 and 2020, prevalence, per-patient expenditure, and total disease expenditure associated with CKD and RRT are estimated to increase significantly more rapidly than CVD. RRT prevalence is estimated to increase by 29%, compared to 7% in CVD. Average annual RRT per-patient expenditure is estimated to increase by 16%, compared to 8% in CVD. Total CKD- and RRT-related expenditure had been estimated to increase by 37%, compared to 14% in CVD. Per-patient, CKD produces a considerably greater financial impact on Australia's healthcare system, compared to CVD. Research focusing on novel preventative/therapeutic interventions is warranted.

  18. The Increasing Financial Impact of Chronic Kidney Disease in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick S. Tucker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to determine and compare current and projected expenditure associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD, renal replacement therapy (RRT, and cardiovascular disease (CVD in Australia. Data published by Australia and New Zealand Dialysis and Transplant Registry, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and World Bank were used to compare CKD-, RRT-, and CVD-related expenditure and prevalence rates. Prevalence and expenditure predictions were made using a linear regression model. Direct statistical comparisons of rates of annual increase utilised indicator variables in combined regressions. Statistical significance was set at P<0.05. Dollar amounts were adjusted for inflation prior to analysis. Between 2012 and 2020, prevalence, per-patient expenditure, and total disease expenditure associated with CKD and RRT are estimated to increase significantly more rapidly than CVD. RRT prevalence is estimated to increase by 29%, compared to 7% in CVD. Average annual RRT per-patient expenditure is estimated to increase by 16%, compared to 8% in CVD. Total CKD- and RRT-related expenditure had been estimated to increase by 37%, compared to 14% in CVD. Per-patient, CKD produces a considerably greater financial impact on Australia’s healthcare system, compared to CVD. Research focusing on novel preventative/therapeutic interventions is warranted.

  19. Depressed cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A dysfunctional autonomic nervous system (ANS has also been recognized as an important mechanism contributing to the poor outcome in CKD patients, with several studies reporting a reduction in heart rate variability (HRV. Objective: Evaluate the sympathovagal balance in patients with chronic kidney disease on conservative treatment. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, patients with CKD stages 3, 4 and 5 not yet on dialysis (CKD group and age-matched healthy subjects (CON group underwent continuous heart rate recording during two twenty-minute periods in the supine position (pre-inclined, followed by passive postural inclination at 70° (inclined period. Power spectral analysis of the heart rate variability was used to assess the normalized low frequency (LFnu, indicative of sympathetic activity, and the normalized high frequency (HFnu, indicative of parasympathetic activity. The LFnu/HFnu ratio represented sympathovagal balance. Results: After tilting, CKD patients had lower sympathetic activity, higher parasympathetic activity, and lower sympathovagal balance than patients in the CON group. Compared to patients in stage 3, patients in stage 5 had a lower LFnu/HFnu ratio, suggesting a more pronounced impairment of sympathovagal balance as the disease progresses. Conclusion: CKD patients not yet on dialysis have reduced HRV, indicating cardiac autonomic dysfunction early in the course of CKD.

  20. Ghrelin and leptin pathophysiology in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunta, Sujana S; Mak, Robert H

    2013-04-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone with additional effects on the regulation of inflammation and the cardiovascular system. It may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cachexia/protein-energy wasting (PEW), inflammation and cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease (CKD). There are three circulating gene products of ghrelin, namely, acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin, each with individual distinct functions. Perturbations of these circulating ghrelin proteins impact the overall milieu of CKD. Leptin is an anorexigenic hormone which is secreted from the adipocytes and interacts with ghrelin and other appetite-regulating hormones. Leptin also plays a role in regulating inflammation and the cardiovascular system. Indeed, ghrelin and leptin may play yin-and-yang roles in CKD pathophysiology. Clinical trials involving the use of the mimetics or antagonists of these hormones are limited to short-term phase I/II studies. Further understanding of their interactions in CKD pathophysiology is needed for potential large-scale clinical trials, which may impact the quality of life and survival of patients with CKD.

  1. Linking zinc and leptin in chronic kidney disease: future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Julie Calixto; Aranha, Luciana Nicolau; Moraes, Cristiane; Brito, Luciana Catunda; Mafra, Denise

    2012-04-01

    Anorexia is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with the development of malnutrition and an increased risk of mortality. Several compounds are linked to anorexia in these patients; however, the mechanisms are unknown. Zinc (Zn) deficiency is associated with decreased food intake and has been observed in CKD patients. In addition, leptin is an anorexigenic peptide, and patients with CKD present generally high levels of this hormone. Studies have suggested an association between Zn and leptin status in human and rats; however, the results are inconsistent. Some claimed that Zn supplementation does not change leptin release or that there is no significant relationship between Zn and leptin. Others have reported that Zn might be a mediator of leptin production. CKD patients have hyperleptinemia and hypozincemia, but the relationship between Zn deficiency and leptin levels in CKD patients has been poorly understood until now. The aim of this review is to integrate knowledge on leptin and Zn actions to provide a cohesive clinical perspective regarding their interactions in CKD patients.

  2. Branched chain amino acid profile in early chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients is a predictor of prognosis during the first period of dialysis. Serum albumin is the most commonly used nutritional marker. Another index is plasma amino acid profile. Of these, the plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA, especially valine and leucine, correlate well with nutritional status. Plasma BCAAs were evaluated along with albumin and C-reactive protein in 15 patients of early stages of CKD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A significant decrease in plasma valine, leucine and albumin levels was observed in CKD patients when compared with the controls (P <0.05. No significant difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels was observed between the two groups. Malnutrition seen in our CKD patients in the form of hypoalbuminemia and decreased concentrations of BCAA points to the need to evaluate the nutritional status in the early stages itself. Simple measures in the form of amino acid supplementation should be instituted early to decrease the morbidity and mortality before start of dialysis in these patients.

  3. Causes of chronic kidney disease in Egyptian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Safouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few published reports on the causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD in Egyptian children. We reviewed the records of 1018 (males 56.7%, age ranged from 1 to 19 years Egyptian patients suffering from CKD and followed-up at the pediatric nephrology units (outpatient clinics and dialysis units of 11 universities over a period of two years. The mean of the estimated glomerular filtration rate was 12.5 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Children with CKD stage I and stage II comprised 4.4% of the studied group, while those with stage III, IV and V comprised 19.7%, 18.3% and 57.6%, respectively. The most common single cause of CKD was obstructive uropathy (21.7%, followed by primary glomerulonephritis (15.3%, reflux/urinary tract infection (14.6%, aplasia/hypoplasia (9.8% and familial/metabolic diseases (6.8%; unknown causes accounted for 20.6% of the cases. Of the 587 patients who had reached end-stage renal disease, 93.5% was treated with hemodialysis and only 6.5% were treated with peritoneal dialysis.

  4. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD.

  5. Effects of chronic kidney disease on blood cells membrane properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaderjakova, Z; Lajdova, I; Horvathova, M; Morvova, M; Sikurova, L

    2012-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is progressive loss of renal function associated among others with increased intracellular calcium concentration. The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of CKD on cell membrane properties such as human red blood cell Ca(2+) ATPase activity, lymphocyte plasma membrane P2X(7) receptor expression and function. This could help us in elucidating the origin of increased calcium concentration in blood cells. We found out Ca(2+) ATPase activity is decreased in early stage CKD patients resulting in altered calcium removal from cytoplasm. By means of flow cytometry we assessed that P2X(7) receptor expression on lymphocyte membrane is 1.5 fold increased for CKD patients. Moreover, we detected an increased uptake of ethidium bromide through this receptor in CKD at basal conditions. It means CKD lymphocyte membranes contain more receptors which are more permeable thus allowing increased calcium influx from extracellular milieu. Finally, we can state alterations in blood cell membranes are closely linked to CKD and may be responsible for intracellular calcium accumulation.

  6. HEARING ASSESSMENT IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS UNDERGOING HEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The auditory sensitivity of 63 patient of chronic renal failure on hemodialysis was assessed in order to know the effect of dialysis on hearing threshold. All selected patient were non diabetic with normal tympanic membrane and with no history of ototoxic drug and any hereditary hearing problems. Pure tone audiometry was done before and after dialys is and all cases were followed for 3 month. A high incidence of high frequency sensorineural hearing loss was obtained which could not be attributed to age , noise exposure and ottotoxicity. An association between high frequency sensorineural hearing loss a nd hemodialysis is thus suggested KEYWORDS: Hemodialysis ; Pure tone audiometry ; High frequency sensorineural hearing loss ; Duration of disease ; Chronic renal failure

  7. Medication safety and chronic kidney disease in older adults prescribed metformin: a cross-sectional analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Deborah L.; Abrass, Itamar B; Young, Bessie A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Medication safety in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a growing concern. This is particularly relevant in older adults due to underlying CKD. Metformin use is contraindicated in patients with abnormal kidney function; however, many patients are potentially prescribed metformin inappropriately. We evaluated the prevalence of CKD among older adults prescribed metformin for type 2 diabetes mellitus using available equations to estimate kidney function and examined demogra...

  8. Oral Manifestations of Chronic Renal Failure Complicating a Systemic Genetic Disease: Diagnostic Dilemma. Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, Leila; Renoux, Marion; Radoï, Loredana

    2015-11-01

    Chronic renal failure can give rise to a wide spectrum of oral manifestations, owing mainly to secondary hyperparathyroidism complicating this disease. However, any systemic disease responsible for kidney failure can produce oral manifestations, which can be misdiagnosed. This report describes the case of a 40-year-old male patient referred for oral assessment before kidney and liver transplantation. He had primary hyperoxaluria complicated by end-stage renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Panoramic radiography indicated not only external root resorption, but also maxillary and mandibular radiolucencies consistent with brown tumors. Unexpectedly, histologic study of the bone biopsy specimen led to the diagnosis of jaws oxalosis. Primary hyperoxaluria is a systemic genetic disease. The affected genes are involved in glyoxylate metabolism and their deficiency results in overproduction of oxalates. Inability of the kidney to excrete oxalates leads to deposition of these crystals in almost all tissues (oxalosis) and to multiple-organ failure. Several oral findings have been described in patients with oxalosis, such as periodontal disease and root resorptions, but radiolucencies in the jaws have rarely been described. This case report is of particular interest because of the unusual location of oxalate crystal deposition in the jaws, which could be misdiagnosed in a patient with renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  9. A pharmacokinetic study of roxatidine acetate in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lameire, N; Rosenkranz, B; Maass, L; Brockmeier, D

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of roxatidine acetate 150 mg were studied in 31 patients with varying degrees of chronic renal failure. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to their creatinine clearance (Clcr): controls (Clcr 94.5 +/- 13.9 ml/min; n = 6); mild chronic renal failure (Clcr 47 +/- 6 ml/min; n = 4); moderate chronic renal failure (Clcr 27.3 +/- 3.1 ml/min; n = 4); severe chronic renal failure (Clcr 12.8 +/- 1.4 ml/min; n = 5) and uraemia (Clcr 6.6 +/- 0.6 ml/min; n = 12). Serum and urine samples were analysed with capillary gas chromatography to measure the salt of the desacetyl metabolite of roxatidine acetate (roxatidine). The terminal half-life was 6.02 +/- 0.31 hours in controls and 7.35 +/- 0.57, 9.3 +/- 0.83, 14.6 +/- 3.7 and 18.10 +/- 2.77 hours, respectively, in the 4 other groups, with progressively decreasing creatinine clearance. Maximum serum concentration and time to maximum serum concentration rose from 816 +/- 75 ng/ml and 2.08 +/- 0.22 hours, respectively, in controls to 1364.7 +/- 156 ng/ml and 4.05 +/- 0.47 hours, respectively, in uraemic patients. Relative total clearance progressively decreased with decreasing glomerular filtration rate (GFR) [from 353.6 +/- 26 ml/min in controls to 90.31 +/- 12.2 ml/min in patients with uraemia]. Renal clearance decreased from a control of 243.9 +/- 56 ml/min to 12.32 +/- 0.18 ml/min in uraemic patients. A linear correlation between creatinine clearance and both relative total clearance and renal drug clearance was noted.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Neurological Complications in Child with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital uremic encephalopathy, progressive dialysis encephalopathy, Wernicke encefalopathy, headache, seizures because of dialysis, disequilibrium syndrome, cerebral hemorrhage and uremic neuropathy are the neurologic complications seen in child with chronic renal failure. Here it is aimed to discuss these complications with literature, and to emphasize the importance of evaluation of patients with these aspects. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 406-412

  11. Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Renal Failure on Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; Hassan, Mona Mamdouh; Bazaraa, Hafez Mahmoud; Ahmed, Hany Fathy; Mahmoud Badr, Ahmed Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: Growth retardation is still an important manifestation of children with chronic renal failure (CRF). The aim of this study is to evaluate the growth in relation to nutritional status in Egyptian children with CRF on hemodialysis.Subjects and Methods: The study included 30 Egyptian children above the age of six years on regular haemodialysis at the Haemodialysis Unit of the Centre of Pediatric Nephrology and Transplantation of Cairo University. Anthropometry, biochemical pa...

  12. [Diagnosis and management of chronic renal failure in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalen, Isabelle; Le Meur, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of chronic renal failure in the elderly is rising due to the ageing of the general population. Its management, and notably nephroprotective therapies, must be adapted to the elderly person who is often frail and with multiple pathologies. The decision to start extra-renal purification does not depend on the patient's chronological age but on their physiological age and requires dialogue between the patient and their family, the geriatrician and the nephrologist.

  13. Limbal and corneal calcification in patients with chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen-Broekema, N; van Bijsterveld, O P

    1993-09-01

    In patients with chronic renal failure on regular dialysis treatment, limboconjunctival degenerations and calcifications are commonly observed. In this study three groups of patients were followed over a period of 6 years. The first group consisted of 47 patients with renal failure, the second group of 17 patients with renal failure and hyperparathyroidism not controlled by drugs, and the third group seven patients with primary hyperparathyroidism without renal failure. The aim of this study was to determine the progression of the limboconjunctival changes over time. The hypothesis that an increase in serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations, as a result of tertiary hyperparathyroidism, could possibly add a corneal component to the limbal calcification was also tested. All patients with renal failure (in as much as the degenerative limbal features were not obscured by deposits of lime salts), had a type II white limbus girdle of Vogt. This limbal degeneration was observed in only 45% of controls. In all 47 patients with renal failure conjunctival calcification was observed; 26 of them also had limbal calcification. After 6 years 41 patients had developed limbal calcification. This progression was statistically significant. In 15 out of 17 patients with tertiary hyperparathyroidism a band-shaped keratopathy developed in addition to the limboconjunctival calcification.

  14. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  15. Association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利求

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients.Methods A prospective study was conducted on 1380 consecutive patients

  16. Pharmacological intervention of hypertension in proteinuric chronic kidney disease: how and what?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fan-fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant interactive disease in patients with diabetes,hypertension, and cardiovascular disease with major morbidity consequences and high costs to the healthcare system.

  17. A study on the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study skeletal muscle atrophy and the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Mean muscle cross sectional area,mRNA and protein expression of

  18. Abnormalities of the breast in chronic renal failure and renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Kyu Ho; Park, Seog Hee [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Manifestations of breast abnormalities in these patients included breast calcifications, duct dilatation, fibrocystic change, rapidly enlarged multiple fibroadenomas, edema, invasive ductal cancer, extensive fibrosis, spontaneous hemorrhage, and Mondor's disease. These interesting cases we experienced are reported. Prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol are required concurrently for normal development of mammary epithelium. Hormonal profile of chronic renal failure is different to normal person due to decreased renal clearance. The incidence of breast cancer is also increased in CRF. Metastatic soft tissue calcification is well described finding in chronic renal failure related to an increase in serum calcium phosphate product and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Kidney failure alone may increases prolactin level. The possibility of deranged hypothalamic-pituitary control mechanisms do not excluded. Impaired prolactin response to TRH stimulation has also been observed. Methyldopa and tricyclic antidepressants specifically were associated with hyperprolactinemia. Cyclosporin administration may elevate serum prolactin levels with simultaneous down regulation of prolactin receptors. Some populations of lymphocytes and fibroblasts exhibit cyclosporin receptors. Cyclosporin could potentially promote fibroadenomas by direct action, and seems to alter LH secretion.

  19. Suppression of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Ameliorates Chronic Kidney Disease-Induced Cardiac Fibrosis and Diastolic Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugyei-Twum, Antoinette; Abadeh, Armin; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Mitchell, Melissa; Kabir, Golam; Connelly, Kim A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is a common finding in patients with chronic kidney disease. Here, we investigate the cardio-renal effects of theracurmin, a novel formulation of the polyphenolic compound curcumin, in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Briefly, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to undergo sham or subtotal nephrectomy (SNx) surgery. At 3 weeks post surgery, SNx animals were further randomized to received theracurmin via once daily oral gavage or vehicle for 5 consecutive weeks. At 8 weeks post surgery, cardiac function was assessed via echocardiography and pressure volume loop analysis, followed by LV and renal tissue collection for analysis. SNx animals developed key hallmarks of renal injury including hypertension, proteinuria, elevated blood urea nitrogen, and glomerulosclerosis. Renal injury in SNx animals was also associated with significant diastolic dysfunction, macrophage infiltration, and cardiac NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Treatment of SNx animals with theracurmin improved structural and functional manifestations of cardiac injury associated with renal failure and also attenuated cardiac NLRP3 inflammasome activation and mature IL-1β release. Taken together, our findings suggest a significant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in renal injury-induced cardiac dysfunction and presents inflammasome attenuation as a unique strategy to prevent adverse cardiac remodeling in the setting of chronic kidney disease. PMID:28000751

  20. Coping with chronic renal failure in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Esther; Lai, Claudia; Zhang, Zhi-Xue

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the coping behaviours of Chinese patients with chronic renal failure. The study, based on Lazarus and Folkman (Stress, Appraisal and Coping, Springer, New York, 1984) model of coping, was conducted to identify the process by which 11 chronic renal failure patients cope with their disease. The identified themes are coping with fluctuating feelings and concerns, motivation to cope, interdependent relationships between patients and their family members and modes of coping strategies. The significance of the results indicates that coping is the consequence not only of situational demands but also of life goals. Meaning in life is an important motivator in the coping process. Besides problem-focused coping and emotion-focused coping, another important element is relationship-focused coping. The interdependent influences of families on patients and patients on families are also important factors. The role of family and cultural factors is discussed as it affects how patients with chronic renal failure cope with their illness.

  1. Renal histology in polycystic kidney disease with incipient and advanced renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeier, M; Fehrenbach, P; Geberth, S; Möhring, K; Waldherr, R; Ritz, E

    1992-11-01

    Renal specimens were obtained at surgery or postmortem from patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Patients had either serum creatinine (SCr) below 350 mumol/liter (N = 12) or terminal renal failure (N = 50). Specimens were examined by two independent observers using a carefully validated score system. Mean glomerular diameters were similar in ADPKD patients with early renal failure (176 +/- 38 microns) and in victims of traffic accidents (177 +/- 23 microns), while they were significantly greater in diabetics with comparable renal function (205 +/- 16 microns). Glomerular diameters in ADPKD patients with terminal renal failure (191 +/- 45 microns) and with early renal failure were not significantly different. On average, 29% of glomeruli (17 to 62) were globally sclerosed in early renal failure, and 49% (19 to 93) in terminal renal failure. The proportion of glomeruli with segmental sclerosis was less than 4% in both groups. Marked vascular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, and tubular atrophy were present in early renal failure, and even more so in terminal renal failure. Interstitial infiltrates were scarce and consisted mainly of CD4 positive lymphocytes and CD68 positive macrophages. Immunestaining with monoclonal renin antibodies showed an increased juxtaglomerular index and expression of renin by arterioles adjacent to cysts, as well as by cyst wall epithelia. The data show more severe vascular and interstitial, but not glomerular, changes in ADPKD with advanced as compared to early renal failure.

  2. Bone mineral disorder in chronic kidney disease: Klotho and FGF23; cardiovascular implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanova Villanueva, Laura; Sánchez González, Carmen; Sánchez Tomero, José Antonio; Aguilera, Abelardo; Ortega Junco, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular factors are one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease. Bone mineral metabolism disorders and inflammation are pathological conditions that involve increased cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease. The cardiovascular risk involvement of bone mineral metabolism classical biochemical parameters such as phosphorus, calcium, vitamin D and PTH is well known. The newest markers, FGF23 and klotho, could also be implicated in cardiovascular disease.

  3. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in these ......Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity...

  4. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  5. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on chronic kidney disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hilana Paula Carillo Artese; Celso Oliveira de Sousa; Ronir Raggio Luiz; Carmelo Sansone; Maria Cynésia Medeiros Barros Torres

    2010-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a debilitating systemic condition. Our working hypothesis is that CKD predialysis patients with periodontitis would respond poorly to periodontal treatment owing to immunologic compromise. Twenty-one predialysis patients (group 1) and 19 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (group 2) with chronic periodontitis were subjected to non-surgical periodontal treatment with no antibiotics. Clinical periodontal and systemic parameters were evaluated ...

  6. Injury - kidney and ureter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney damage; Toxic injury of the kidney; Kidney injury; Traumatic injury of the kidney; Fractured kidney; Inflammatory injury of the kidney; Bruised kidney; Ureteral injury; Pre-renal failure - injury, ...

  7. Uric acid as a risk factor for progression of non-diabetic chronic kidney disease? The Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Gisela; Kollerits, Barbara; Neyer, Ulrich; Ritz, Eberhard; Kronenberg, Florian

    2008-04-01

    The kidney is one of the organs most prominently affected by aging. This can be seen by a loss of renal mass which is caused by a decrease in the number of nephrons resulting in hyperfiltration, hypertrophy and elevations in glomerular pressure. The factors influencing aging of the kidney are not fully elucidated. Epidemiological, experimental and interventional studies resulted in inconsistent results and have not firmly established whether uric acid levels affect progression of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD). Therefore, we analyzed whether uric acid levels predict the progression of CKD in the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study comprising at baseline 227 Caucasian patients aged 18-65 years with primary non-diabetic CKD of various degrees of renal impairment. Of them, 177 completed a prospective follow-up of 7 years. Primary endpoint was progression of CKD defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or terminal renal failure. Patients who reached a progression endpoint (n =6 5) were significantly older, had higher baseline serum creatinine and protein excretion rates as well as lower Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR). Uric acid levels were only higher in patients with progression of disease when patients with uric acid-lowering drugs were excluded from the analysis. Cox regression analysis revealed that increasing uric acid levels predict disease progression only when the analysis was not adjusted for baseline kidney function parameters. As soon as we adjusted the analysis for GFR and proteinuria this association completely vanished. In summary, our prospective 7 year follow-up study in patients with non-diabetic primary CKD did not support uric acid as an independent predictor for CKD progression.

  8. Could metformin be used in patients with diabetes and advanced chronic kidney disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Tahseen A; Srirathan, Danushan; Abraham, Georgi; Oei, Elizabeth L; Fan, Stanley L; McCafferty, Kieran; Yaqoob, M Magdi

    2017-02-01

    Diabetes is an important cause of end stage renal failure worldwide. As renal impairment progresses, managing hyperglycaemia can prove increasingly challenging, as many medications are contra-indicated in moderate to severe renal impairment. Whilst evidence for tight glycaemic control reducing progression to renal failure in patients with established renal disease is limited, poor glycaemic control is not desirable, and is likely to lead to progressive complications. Metformin is a first-line therapy in patients with Type 2 diabetes, as it appears to be effective in reducing diabetes related end points and mortality in overweight patients. Cessation of metformin in patients with progressive renal disease may not only lead to deterioration in glucose control, but also to loss of protection from cardiovascular disease in a cohort of patients at particularly high risk. We advocate the need for further study to determine the role of metformin in patients with severe renal disease (chronic kidney disease stage 4-5), as well as patients on dialysis, or pre-/peri-renal transplantation. We explore possible roles of metformin in these circumstances, and suggest potential key areas for further study.

  9. The effect of activated charcoal on adenine-induced chronic renal failure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H; Alza'abi, Mohamed; Ramkumar, Aishwarya; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa I; Beegam, Sumaya; Nemmar, Abderrahim; Brand, Susanne; Schupp, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    Activated charcoal (AC) is a sorbent that has been shown to remove urinary toxins like urea and indoxyl sulfate. Here, the influence of AC on kidney function of rats with experimental chronic renal failure (CRF) is investigated. CRF was induced in rats by feeding adenine (0.75%) for four weeks. As an intervention, AC was added to the feed at concentrations of 10%, 15% or 20%. Adenine treatment impaired kidney function: it lowered creatinine clearance and increased plasma concentrations of creatinine, urea, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and vanin-1. Furthermore, it raised plasma concentrations of the uremic toxins indoxyl sulfate, phosphate and uric acid. Renal morphology was severely damaged and histopathological markers of inflammation and fibrosis were especially increased. In renal homogenates, antioxidant indices, including superoxide dismutase and catalase activity, total antioxidant capacity and reduced glutathione were adversely affected. Most of these changes were significantly ameliorated by dietary administration of AC at a concentration of 20%, while effects induced by lower doses of dietary AC on adenine nephrotoxicity were not statistically significant. The results suggest that charcoal is a useful sorbent agent in dietary adenine-induced CRF in rats and that its usability as a nephroprotective agent in human kidney disease should be studied.

  10. Managing anemia in patients with chronic heart failure: what do we know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Sandhu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ankur Sandhu1, Sandeep Soman1, Michael Hudson2, Anatole Besarab11Divisions of Nephrology, 2Cardiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USAAbstract: Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF with an incidence ranging from 4% to 55% depending on the studied population. Several studies have highlighted that the prevalence of anemia increases with worsening heart failure as reflected by New York Heart Association classification. Additionally, several epidemiological studies have highlighted its role as a prognostic marker, linking it to worse outcomes including; malnutrition, increased hospitalizations, refractory heart failure and death. The pathophysiology of anemia is multifactorial and related to various factors including; hemodilution, iron losses from anti-platelet drugs, activation of the inflammatory cascade, urinary losses of erythropoietin and associated renal insufficiency. There are a host of epidemiological studies examining HF outcomes and anemia, but only a few randomized trials addressing this issue. The purpose of this article is to review the literature that examines the interrelationship of anemia and congestive HF, analyzing its etiology, impact on outcomes and also the role of associated kidney disease as well as cardiorenal syndrome both as a marker of morbidity and mortality.Keywords: anemia, cardio-renal syndrome, heart failure

  11. Resetting the transcription factor network reverses terminal chronic hepatic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Taichiro; Bell, Aaron; Brooks, Jenna M; Setoyama, Kentaro; Melis, Marta; Han, Bing; Fukumitsu, Ken; Handa, Kan; Tian, Jianmin; Kaestner, Klaus H; Vodovotz, Yoram; Locker, Joseph; Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Fox, Ira J

    2015-04-01

    The cause of organ failure is enigmatic for many degenerative diseases, including end-stage liver disease. Here, using a CCl4-induced rat model of irreversible and fatal hepatic failure, which also exhibits terminal changes in the extracellular matrix, we demonstrated that chronic injury stably reprograms the critical balance of transcription factors and that diseased and dedifferentiated cells can be returned to normal function by re-expression of critical transcription factors, a process similar to the type of reprogramming that induces somatic cells to become pluripotent or to change their cell lineage. Forced re-expression of the transcription factor HNF4α induced expression of the other hepatocyte-expressed transcription factors; restored functionality in terminally diseased hepatocytes isolated from CCl4-treated rats; and rapidly reversed fatal liver failure in CCl4-treated animals by restoring diseased hepatocytes rather than replacing them with new hepatocytes or stem cells. Together, the results of our study indicate that disruption of the transcription factor network and cellular dedifferentiation likely mediate terminal liver failure and suggest reinstatement of this network has therapeutic potential for correcting organ failure without cell replacement.

  12. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-02

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  13. Effect of stem cells seeded onto biomaterial on the progression of experimental chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Heloisa C; Fernandes, Ida M M; Kawasaki-Oyama, Rosa S; Baptista, Maria Alice S F; Plepis, Ana Maria G; Martins, Virginia A; Coimbra, Terezila M; Goloni-Bertollo, Eny M; Braile, Domingo M; Abbud-Filho, Mario

    2011-06-01

    Different routes for the administration of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) have been proposed to treat the progression of chronic renal failure (CRF). We investigated whether (1) the use of bovine pericardium (BP) as a scaffold for cell therapy would retard the progression of CRF and (2) the efficacy of cell therapy differently impacts distinct degrees of CRF. We used 2/3 and 5/6 models of renal mass reduction to simulate different stages of chronicity. Treatments consisted of BP seeded with either mesenchymal or mononuclear cells implanted in the parenchyma of remnant kidney. Renal function and proteinuria were measured at days 45 and 90 after cell implantation. BMDC treatment reduced glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and lymphocytic infiltration. Immunohistochemistry showed decreased macrophage accumulation, proliferative activity and the expression of fibronectin and α-smooth muscle-actin. Our results demonstrate: (1) biomaterial combined with BMDC did retard the progression of experimental CRF; (2) cellular therapy stabilized serum creatinine (sCr), improved creatinine clearance and 1/sCr slope when administered during the less severe stages of CRF; (3) treatment with combined therapy decreased glomerulosclerosis, fibrosis and the expression of fibrogenic molecules; and (4) biomaterials seeded with BMDC can be an alternative route of cellular therapy.

  14. Medical nutrition therapy in chronic kidney disease; from dialysis to transplant: A case report

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    Gabriela Leal-Escobar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease has direct implications in nutritional status, causing anorexia and muscular catabolism. These situations are frequent in kidney renal replacement therapy in which nutritional disorders and inflammatory mechanisms associated with therapy often lead to the development of protein-energy wasting. Nutrition therapy has shown an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent and treat metabolic alterations, reducing surgical and nutritional complication risks in kidney transplantation patients. The current case reports nutritional intervention on a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient who was subsequently prescribed to automatic peritoneal dialysis and, finally, kidney transplant from a living donor.

  15. Cinacalcet in Pediatric and Adolescent Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Alharthi, Abdulla A.; Kamal, Naglaa M.; Abukhatwah, Mohamed W.; Sherief, Laila M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cinacalcet, a calcimimetic drug, has been shown to be efficacious in adult chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients; however, it was not fully studied in pediatric CKD patients. We aimed at assessing the effect of cinacalcet on intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) secretion in children with CKD-4/5 with iPTH consistently ≥ 300 pg/mL refractory to conventional treatment. This is a prospective cohort analysis of 28 children with uncontrolled hyper-parathyroidism secondary to stage 4 and 5 CKD admitted to a tertiary center during the period from April 2012 to April 2014. Twenty-eight patients with CKD-4/5 were assessed prospectively regarding bone biochemistry, renal ultrasonography, serum iPTH level, and medications. Patients were classified into 3 groups: group 1, 6 patients with CKD-4 on supplemental and supportive therapy; group 2, 6 patients with CKD-5 on hemodialysis and; group 3, 16 patients with CKD-5 on automated peritoneal dialysis. Patients were between the ages of 9 months and 18 years on commencing cinacalcet at doses of 0.5 to 1.5 mg/kg. All patients showed at least a 60% reduction in iPTH (60%–97%). Highly significant reduction in iPTH and serum alkaline phosphatase levels was detected post-cinacalcet. The serum calcium (Ca), phosphate (P), and Ca × P product were unaffected. Treatment was well tolerated with no hypophosphatemia, hypocalcemia, or other adverse effects almost in all patients. Cinacalcet use was proven safe for all pediatric and adolescent patients with CKD-4/5 during the study period, and at the same time most of the patients reached the suggested iPTH target values PMID:25590845

  16. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  17. Smads as therapeutic targets for chronic kidney disease

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    Hui Yao Lan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Renal fibrosis is a hallmark of chronic kidney disease (CKD. It is generally thought that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1 is a key mediator of fibrosis and mediates renal scarring positively by Smad2 and Smad3, but negatively by Smad7. Our recent studies found that in CKD, TGF-β1 is not a sole molecule to activate Smads. Many mediators such as angiotensin II and advanced glycation end products can also activate Smads via both TGF-β-dependent and independent mechanisms. In addition, Smads can interact with other signaling pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB pathways, to regulate renal inflammation and fibrosis. In CKD, Smad2 and Smad3 are highly activated, while Smad7 is reduced or lost. In the context of fibrosis, Smad3 is pathogenic and mediates renal fibrosis by upregulating miR-21 and miR-192, but down-regulating miR-29 and miR-200 families. By contrast, Smad2 and Smad7 are protective. Overexpression of Smad7 inhibits both Smad3-mediated renal fibrosis and NF-κB-driven renal inflammation. Interestingly, Smad4 has diverse roles in renal fibrosis and inflammation. The complexity and distinct roles of individual Smads in CKD suggest that treatment of CKD should aim to correct the imbalance of Smad signaling or target the Smad3-dependent genes related to fibrosis, rather than to block the general effect of TGF-β1. Thus, treatment of CKD by overexpression of Smad7 or targeting Smad3-dependent miRNAs such as downregulation of miR-21 or overexpression of miR-29 may represent novel therapeutic strategies for CKD.

  18. Genetic studies in chronic kidney disease: interpretation and clinical applicability.

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    Witasp, Anna; Nordfors, Louise; Carrero, Juan Jesus; Luttropp, Karin; Lindholm, Bengt; Schalling, Martin; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The tools of modern molecular biology are evolving rapidly, resulting in vastly more efficient approaches to illuminating human genetic variations and their effects on common multifactorial disorders such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Indeed, candidate gene association studies and genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have generated novel genetic variants in previously unrecognized biological pathways, highlighting disease mechanisms with a potential role in CKD etiology, morbidity and mortality. Nephrologists now need to find ways to make use of these advancements and meet the increasingly stringent requirements for valid study design, data handling and interpretation of genetic studies. Adding to our prior article in this journal, which introduced the basics of genotype-phenotype association studies in CKD, this second article focuses on how to ascertain robust and reproducible findings by applying adequate methodological and statistical approaches to genotype-phenotype studies in CKD populations. Moreover, this review will briefly discuss genotype-based risk prediction, pharmacotherapy, drug target identification and individualized treatment solutions, specifically highlighting potentially important findings in CKD patients. This increased knowledge will hopefully facilitate the exciting transition from conventional clinical medicine to gene-based medicine. However, before this can be accomplished, unsolved issues regarding the complex human genetic architecture as well technical and clinically oriented obstacles will have to be overcome. Additionally, new policies and standardized risk evaluations for genetic testing in the clinical setting will have to be established to guarantee that CKD patients are provided with high-quality genotype-guided counseling that will help to improve their poor outcomes.

  19. Arterial stiffness & Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J.; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies.

  20. The social cost of chronic kidney disease in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Giuseppe; Bellelli, S; Amato, M; Bianchi, S; Conti, P; Cupisti, A; Panichi, V; Rosati, A; Pizzarelli, F

    2016-10-03

    This study aims to estimate the mean annual social cost per patient with chronic kidney disease (CKD) by stages 4 and 5 pre-dialyses and cost components in Italy. The multicenter cross-sectional study included all adult outpatients in charge of the 14 main Nephrology Centers of Tuscany Region during 7 weeks from 2012 to 2013. Direct medical costs have been estimated using tariffs for laboratory tests, diagnostic exams, visits, hospitalization and prices for drugs. Non-medical costs included expenses of low-protein special foods, travel, and formal and informal care. Patients' and caregivers' losses of productivity have been estimated as indirect costs using the human capital approach. Costs have been expressed in Euros (2016). Totals of 279 patients in stage 4 and 205 patients in stage 5 have been enrolled. The estimated mean annual social cost of a patient with CKD were €7422 (±€6255) for stage 4 and €8971 (±€6503) for stage 5 (p < 0.05). Direct medical costs were higher in stage 5 as compared to stage 4; direct non-medical costs and indirect costs accounted, respectively, for 41 and 5 % of the total social cost of CKD stage 4 and for 33 and 9 % of CKD stage 5. In Italy, the overall annual social cost of CKD was €1,809,552,398 representing 0.11 % of the Gross Domestic Product. Direct non-medical costs and indirect costs were weighted on the social cost of CKD almost as much as the direct medical cost. Patients, their families and the productivity system sustain the burden of the disease almost as much as the healthcare system.

  1. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  2. Liver and kidney lesions and associated enzyme changes induced in rabbits by chronic cyanide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolie, N P; Osagie, A U

    1999-07-01

    The effect of prolonged chronic cyanide exposure on liver and kidney integrity, as well as some associated enzyme and metabolite changes, were investigated in New Zealand white rabbits (initial mean weight 1.52 kg) using a combination of colorimetric, spectrophotometric, enzymatic, gravimetric and histological procedures. Two groups of rabbits were fed for 40 weeks on either pure growers' mash or growers' mash containing 702 ppm inorganic cyanide. Results obtained indicate that the cyanide-fed rabbits had significantly decreased liver activities of alkaline phosphatase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase and sorbitol dehydrogenase relative to controls (Pactivities of these enzymes in the cyanide-treated group. Kidney alkaline phosphatase activity was significantly decreased (Pactivities of lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, liver and kidney rhodanese activities were significantly raised in the cyanide-fed group. There were marked degenerative changes in the liver and kidney sections from the cyanide-treated rabbits. These results suggest that chronic cyanide exposure may be deleterious to liver and kidney functions.

  3. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A. van; Papazova, D.A.; Oosterhuis, N.R.; Gremmels, H.; Giles, R.H.; Fledderus, J.O.; Joles, J.A.; Verhaar, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  4. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, Arianne; Papazova, Diana A.; Oosterhuis, Nynke R.; Gremmels, Hendrik; Giles, Rachel H.; Fledderus, Joost O.; Joles, Jaap A.; Verhaar, Marianne C.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  5. [Acute kidney failure due to kidney cortex necrosis. 2 clinical cases of surviving patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida, E

    1991-07-01

    A 22 year old female developed preeclampsia with fetal death in utero. After cesarean section she developed uterine inertia and acute hemorrhagic anemia complicated by sepsis, disseminated intravascular coagulation and total anuria for 4 weeks. She was treated with hemodialysis. The second patient, a 49 year old man developed sepsis and intravascular coagulation after a dog bite. Acute renal failure with a 3 week total anuria followed. He was initially treated with peritoneo dialysis. Renal biopsy showed evidence of renal cortical necrosis in both patients.

  6. Arginine dimethylation products in pediatric patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Akram E. El-Sadek

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Disturbed serum levels of arginine and its dimethyl derivatives may underlie development and/or progression of CKD. Elevated serum SDMA level is strongly correlated with impaired kidney functions and could be considered as a predictor for kidney functions deterioration and CKD progression.

  7. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI.

  8. A stepwise approach for effective management of chronic pain in autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casteleijn, Niek F.; Visser, Folkert W.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Gevers, Tom J. G.; Groen, Gerbrand J.; Hogan, Marie C.; Gansevoort, Ron T.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain, defined as pain existing for >4-6 weeks, affects >60% of patients with autosomal-dominant polycystic disease (ADPKD). It can have various causes, indirectly or directly related to the increase in kidney and liver volume in these patients. Chronic pain in ADPKD patients is often severe,

  9. Cystatin-C is associated with partial recovery of kidney function and progression to chronic kidney disease in living kidney donors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Seon-Ok; Kim, Sae-Gyul; Song, Jun-Gol; Hwang, Gyu Sam

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Donor nephrectomy in living-donor kidney transplantation may result in hyperfiltration injury in remnant kidney; however, its clinical implication in partial recovery of kidney function (PRKF) in remnant kidney and chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the effect of PRKF on CKD development in the residual kidney and the utility of cystatin-C (Cys-C) in evaluating renal function in living-donor kidney transplantation donors. The electronic medical records and laboratory results of 1648 kidney transplant (KT) donors and 13,834 healthy nondonors between January 2006 and November 2014 were reviewed. The predictors of PRKF and CKD diagnosed by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria were evaluated by multivariate analysis. CKD risk was compared between KT donors and healthy nondonors using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis following propensity score matching (PSM). The incidence of PRKF for KT donors was 49.3% (813). CKD incidence was 24.8% (408) in KT donors and 2.0% (277) in healthy nondonors. The predictors of PRKF were, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 17.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 9.16–32.77), age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00–1.04; P PSM, the risk of progression to CKD was higher in KT donors than in healthy nondonors (HR, 58.4; 95% CI, 34.2–99.8; P < 0.001). Donor nephrectomy is associated with PRKF and progression to CKD. Cys-C is a useful early marker for detecting PRKF and CKD. PMID:28151912

  10. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

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    Ng C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (CrCl for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and CrCl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine and the normal side (voided urine were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. RESULTS: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential CrCl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl was defined as the percentage of CrCl of the obstructed kidney as of the total CrCl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00 x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  11. Direct acute tubular damage contributes to Shigatoxin-mediated kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porubsky, Stefan; Federico, Giuseppina; Müthing, Johannes; Jennemann, Richard; Gretz, Norbert; Büttner, Stefan; Obermüller, Nicholas; Jung, Oliver; Hauser, Ingeborg A; Gröne, Elisabeth; Geiger, Helmut; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Betz, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    The pathogenesis and therapy of Shigatoxin 2 (Stx2)-mediated kidney failure remain controversial. Our aim was to test whether, during an infection with Stx2-producing E. coli (STEC), Stx2 exerts direct effects on renal tubular epithelium and thereby possibly contributes to acute renal failure. Mice represent a suitable model because they, like humans, express the Stx2-receptor Gb3 in the tubular epithelium but, in contrast to humans, not in glomerular endothelia, and are thus free of glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). In wild-type mice, Stx2 caused acute tubular dysfunction with consequent electrolyte disturbance, which was most likely the cause of death. Tubule-specific depletion of Gb3 protected the mice from acute renal failure. In vitro, Stx2 induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in human tubular epithelial cells, thus implicating a direct effect of Stx2 on the tubular epithelium. To correlate these results to human disease, kidney biopsies and outcome were analysed in patients with Stx2-associated kidney failure (n = 11, aged 22-44 years). The majority of kidney biopsies showed different stages of an ongoing TMA; however, no glomerular complement activation could be demonstrated. All biopsies, including those without TMA, showed severe acute tubular damage. Due to these findings, patients were treated with supportive therapy without complement-inhibiting antibodies (eculizumab) or immunoadsorption. Despite the severity of the initial disease [creatinine 6.34 (1.31-17.60) mg/dl, lactate dehydrogenase 1944 (753-2792) U/l, platelets 33 (19-124)/nl and haemoglobin 6.2 (5.2-7.8) g/dl; median (range)], all patients were discharged after 33 (range 19-43) days with no neurological symptoms and no dialysis requirement [creatinine 1.39 (range 0.84-2.86) mg/dl]. The creatinine decreased further to 0.90 (range 0.66-1.27) mg/dl after 24 months. Based on these data, one may surmise that acute tubular damage represents a separate

  12. Abnormalities of skeletal muscle in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkin, D P; Jones, D A; Round, J M; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1988-02-01

    We have examined muscle strength, mitochondrial enzyme activity, histochemistry and fibre size in the quadriceps muscle of 9 patients with severe chronic heart failure. A needle biopsy of the quadriceps muscle was taken with patients at rest. Maximum oxygen uptake was measured during treadmill exercise. Mean maximal oxygen consumption was 11.7 ml.kg-1.min-1. Isometric maximum voluntary contraction was reduced to 55% of the predicted value for weight. Eight biopsies were abnormal. Findings included increased acid phosphatase, increased interstitial cellularity, excess intracellular lipid accumulation, atrophy of both type I and II fibres and variation in size with hypertrophy and atrophy of fibers. Muscle fibre capillary density and the activity of mitochondrial enzymes were normal. Changes in skeletal muscle strength may play a role in the limitation of exercise capacity seen in patients with congestive heart failure.

  13. Hepatic encephalopathy in acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Guan-Huei

    2015-10-01

    The presence of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) within 4 weeks is part of the criteria for defining acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF). The pathophysiology of HE is complex, and hyperammonemia and cerebral hemodynamic dysfunction appear to be central in the pathogenesis of encephalopathy. Recent data also suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a significant role in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia. Multiple prospective and retrospective studies have shown that hepatic encephalopathy in ACLF patients is associated with higher mortality, especially in those with grade III-IV encephalopathy, similar to that of acute liver failure (ALF). Although significant cerebral edema detected by CT in ACLF patients appeared to be less common, specialized MRI imaging was able to detect cerebral edema even in low grade HE. Ammonia-focused therapy constitutes the basis of current therapy, as in the treatment of ALF. Emerging treatment strategies focusing on modulating the gut-liver-circulation-brain axis are discussed.

  14. Quality of life in patients with chronic congestive heart failure

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    Anca D. Farcaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Quality of life (QOL is severely decreased in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Our study aims to identify the factors affecting the evaluation of QOL. Material and Methods: Clinical, demographic, social and economic data was collected from patients with CHF in NYHA class III and IV as part of a complex workup. The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to evaluate QOL. Results: QOL decreases as the NYHA class increases. Women evaluate their QOL as more severely affected than men. Age, social and economic factors modulate the perception of QOL. Conclusion: Combining demographic, social and economic data and evaluation of QOL can provide valuable and useful information for the medical management of patients with CHF.

  15. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

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    Mungli Prakash

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary peptide levels in CRF patients and Urinary % peptides were significantly decreased in CRF patients as compared to healthy controls. Urinary % peptides correlated negatively with proteinuria. Conclusion: we have found decrease in urinary peptides and % urinary peptides in CRF patients and possibly measurement of % urinary peptides may possibly serve as better indicator in early detection of impairment in renal function.

  16. Metabolic acidosis and malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome in chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Mehrotra, Rajnish; Fouque, Denis; Kopple, Joel D

    2004-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, a common condition in patients with renal failure, may be linked to protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) and inflammation, together also known as malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome (MICS). Methods of serum bicarbonate measurement may misrepresent the true bicarbonate level, since the total serum carbon dioxide measurement usually overestimates the serum bicarbonate concentration. Moreover, the air transportation of blood samples to distant laboratories may lead to erroneous readings. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or end-stage renal disease (ESRD), a significant number of endocrine, musculoskeletal, and metabolic abnormalities are believed to result from acidemia. Metabolic acidosis may be related to PEM and MICS due to an increased protein catabolism, decreased protein synthesis, endocrine abnormalities including insulin resistance, decreased serum leptin level, and inflammation among individuals with renal failure. Evidence suggests that the catabolic effects of metabolic acidosis may result from an increased activity of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome and branched-chain keto acid dehydrogenase. In contrast to the metabolic studies, many epidemiologic studies in maintenance dialysis patients have indicated a paradoxically inverse association between mildly decreased serum bicarbonate and improved markers of protein-energy nutritional state. Hence metabolic acidosis may be considered as yet another element of the reverse epidemiology in ESRD patients. Interventional studies have yielded inconsistent results in CKD and ESRD patients, although in peritoneal dialysis patients, mitigating acidemia appears to more consistently improve nutritional status and reduce hospitalizations. Large-scale, prospective randomized interventional studies are needed to ascertain the potential benefits of correcting acidemia in malnourished and/or inflamed CKD and maintenance hemodialysis patients. Until then, all

  17. [Quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure under high-efficiency hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romão, Maria Aparecida Fadil; Romão Junior, João Egidio; Belasco, Angélica Gonçalves Silva; Barbosa, Dulce Aparecida

    2006-12-01

    This study aimed at assessing the quality of life (QL) of patients with chronic kidney failure under high efficiency hemodialysis. The Medical Outcomes Study 36 Item Short Form Health Survey (SF36) was applied, and the results were correlated with social-demographic profile, clinical and laboratorial data, Karnofsky's Scale and Depression Cognitive Index (DCI). The sample consisted of 50 patients with an average age of 37 and mean treatment duration of 50.6 months. LQ changes were evidenced by correlations of SF36 scores with social-demographic aspects, clinical data, Karnofsky's Scale, and DCI. It was concluded that the individual use of SF36 may aid the assessment of therapeutic conduct.

  18. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Azzouz, Haifa; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hédi Ben; Béji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD) for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin) that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadroparin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calciphylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  19. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Ben Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcu-taneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadro-parin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calci-phylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  20. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase single nucleotide polymorphism and left ventricular function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Chand

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with accelerated cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS Glu298Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotype has been associated with a worse phenotype amongst patients with established heart failure and in patients with progression of their renal disease. The association of a cardiac functional difference in non-dialysis CKD patients with no known previous heart failure, and eNOS gene variant is investigated.140 non-dialysis CKD patients, who had cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging and tissue doppler echocardiography as part of two clinical trials, were genotyped for eNOS Glu298Asp SNP retrospectively.The median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 50 mls/min and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 74% with no overt diastolic dysfunction in this cohort. There were significant differences in LVEF across eNOS genotypes with GG genotype being associated with a worse LVEF compared to other genotypes (LVEF: GG 71%, TG 76%, TT 73%, p = 0.006. After multivariate analysis, (adjusting for age, eGFR, baseline mean arterial pressure, contemporary CMR heart rate, total cholesterol, high sensitive C-reactive protein, body mass index and gender GG genotype was associated with a worse LVEF, and increased LV end-diastolic and systolic index (p = 0.004, 0.049 and 0.009 respectively.eNOS Glu298Asp rs1799983 polymorphism in CKD patients is associated with relevant sub-clinical cardiac remodelling as detected by CMR. This gene variant may therefore represent an important genetic biomarker, and possibly highlight pathways for intervention, in these patients who are at particular risk of worsening cardiac disease as their renal dysfunction progresses.