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Sample records for chronic kidney failure

  1. Ivabradine, heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Di Lullo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of congestive heart failure are actually increasing worldwide, especially in Western countries. In Europe and the United States, congestive heart failure represents a disabling clinical disease, accountable for increased hospitalization and health care costs. European guidelines have underlined the importance of pharmacological treatment to improve both patients’ outcomes and quality of life. The latest clinical trials to evaluate ivabradine’s efficacy have underlined its usefulness as a stand-alone medication and in combination with conventional congestive heart failure therapy, including in chronic kidney disease patients.

  2. Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Information > Health Communication Programs > National Kidney Disease Education Program > Learn About Kidney Disease > Living With Kidney Disease > Kidney Failure | Share External Link Disclaimer Living With Kidney Disease ...

  3. CT of the kidney in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transverse size of the kidneys was measured by CT, and CT findings of the kidneys were studied in 94 patients with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis (HD), 58 patients with chronic renal failure not under hemodialysis (CRF) and 100 controls. The transverse size of the kidneys decreased according to the deterioration of renal function. The ratio of the maximal renal transverse size to the minimal vertebral size, which the author proposed as a new criterion for renal atrophy, was 1.8 in controls, 1.2 in CRF and 0.8 in HD. A kidney smaller than the vertebral body indicated chronic renal failure. Characteristic CT features in CRF were mild renal atrophy and cystic changes (41.4 %). In HD, renal atrophy was more advanced, the occurrence of cystic changes was more frequent (64.9 %), and there were frequent renal (68.1 %) and aortic calcifications. Furthermore acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACD) was observed (27.7 %) only in HD. In this study no renal neoplasm was found in ACD. However, several complications in HD, one perirenal hematoma and six hydronephroses, were observed. (author)

  4. CT of the kidney in chronic renal failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Kanji

    1988-10-01

    The transverse size of the kidneys was measured by CT, and CT findings of the kidneys were studied in 94 patients with chronic renal failure under hemodialysis (HD), 58 patients with chronic renal failure not under hemodialysis (CRF) and 100 controls. The transverse size of the kidneys decreased according to the deterioration of renal function. The ratio of the maximal renal transverse size to the minimal vertebral size, which the author proposed as a new criterion for renal atrophy, was 1.8 in controls, 1.2 in CRF and 0.8 in HD. A kidney smaller than the vertebral body indicated chronic renal failure. Characteristic CT features in CRF were mild renal atrophy and cystic changes (41.4 %). In HD, renal atrophy was more advanced, the occurrence of cystic changes was more frequent (64.9 %), and there were frequent renal (68.1 %) and aortic calcifications. Furthermore acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACD) was observed (27.7 %) only in HD. In this study no renal neoplasm was found in ACD. However, several complications in HD, one perirenal hematoma and six hydronephroses, were observed.

  5. Acute renal failure: outcomes and risk of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, C A; Schoolwerth, A C

    2007-09-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative (ADQI) are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury that might confer a different prognosis. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease and more information regarding recovery from ARF is available. Controversy exists regarding the optimal management of ARF. Recent publications emphasize the importance of timing and dose of renal replacement therapy rather than the modality of treatment (intermittent hemodialysis vs continuous therapies). These issues are explored in this review. PMID:17912228

  6. Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poskurica Mileta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60% among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF, and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF. Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°. In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable.

  7. [Congestive heart failure in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poskurica, Mileta; Petrović, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disorders are the most frequent cause of death (46-60%) among patients with advanced chronic renal failure (CRF), and on dialysis treatment. Uremic cardiomyopathy is the basic pathophysiologic substrate, whereas ischemic heart disease (IHD) and anemia are the most important contributing factors. Associated with well-know risk factors and specific disorders for terminal kidney failure and dialysis, the aforementioned factors instigate congestive heart failure (CHF). Suspected CHF is based on the anamnesis, clinical examination and ECG, while it is confirmed and defined more precisely on the basis of echocardiography and radiology examination. Biohumoral data (BNP, NT-proBNP) are not sufficiently reliable because of specific volemic fluctuation and reduced natural clearance. Therapy approach is similar to the one for the general population: ACEI, ARBs, β-blockers, inotropic drugs and diuretics. Hypervolemia and most of the related symptoms can be kept under control effectively by the isolated or ultrafiltation, in conjunction with dialysis, during the standard bicarbonate hemodialysis or hemodiafiltration. In the same respect peritoneal dialysis is efficient for the control of hypervolemia symptoms, mainly during the first years of its application and in case of the lower NYHA class (II°/III°). In general, heart support therapy, surgical interventions of the myocardium and valve replacement are rarely used in patients on dialysis, whereas revascularization procedures are beneficial for associated IHD. In selected cases the application of cardiac resynchronization and/or implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator are advisable. PMID:25731010

  8. Effects of Sodium Citrate on Salt Sensitivity and Kidney Injury in Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sejoong; Yang, Jin Young; Jung, Eun Sook; Lee, Jeonghwan; Heo, Nam Ju; Lee, Jae Wook; Na, Ki Young; Han, Jin Suk

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis, which is observed in salt-sensitive hypertension, is also associated with kidney injury. Alkali therapy in chronic renal failure (CRF) may ameliorate the progression of kidney disease; however, few studies have examined the effects of alkali therapy on salt sensitivity and kidney injury in CRF. We randomly administered standard diet (SD), sodium chloride with 20% casein diet (NACL), or sodium citrate with 20% casein diet (NACT) to Sprague-Dawley rats after a CRF or a sham ...

  9. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain proper fluid ... marrow and strengthen the bones. The term kidney (renal) failure describes a situation in which the kidneys have ...

  10. EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS MARKERS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURES OF SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemidi Ilaiah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress defines an imbalance between the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. The existence of oxidative stress and higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD in association with uraemia is proven from studies on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD patients. Non traditional risk factors like oxidative stress are being given special emphasis to explain high incidence and identification of new therapeutic interventions. Excess Reactive oxygen Species levels have been implicated to damage DNA, lipids, proteins etc., It may also affect the cells of host, particularly at the inflammation site contributing to proteinuria observed in Chronic Kidney Disease patients. The uremic status, oxidant and antioxidant levels were assessed in the present study. This prospective observational study was conducted for nine months. Patients meeting the study criteria were included. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA, glutathione-S-transferase (GST, Protein thiols, Total proteins, Serum urea, creatinine, albumin and Haemoglobin levels were estimated using suitable methods. Study recruited 108 Chronic Kidney Disease patients, divided into three groups namely, patients without haemodialysis (54, patients with haemodialysis (54 and control population (50. Serum urea, creatinine, MDA and GST levels were found to be significantly increased (P<0.0001, and total proteins, albumin, proteinthiols, and Haemoglobin levels were found to be significantly decreased in Chronic Renal Failure patients compared to normal controls (P<0.0001. Our study confirms the presence of oxidative stress in Chronic Kidney Disease patient population. Our study also emphasises the need for anti-oxidant therapy in CKD patients.

  11. Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure by Supplementing the Kidney and Invigorating Blood Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张勉之; 张大宁; 张文柱; 刘树松; 张敏英

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of treatment of chronic renal failure by supplementing the kidney and invigorating blood flow. Method: The eligible patients were assigned to a treatment group (N =120)treated with the above principle and a control group (N = 128) treated with western drugs, and the effectiveness was evaluated when the study was completed in one year. Results: The total effective rate of 92.5% was achieved in the treatment group, better than that in the control group (49.2%); the difference was significant (P<0.01), especially in patients of stage Ⅰ and Ⅱ. Conclusion: The treatment of chronic renal failure by supplementing the kidney and invigorating blood flow proved to be very effective.

  12. Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... York Golf Classic The 11th Annual New York Golf Classic Each August, supporters in our Northeast Region hit the links in support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health screenings ...

  13. The epidemiology and outcome of acute renal failure and the impact on chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Clay A; Schoolwerth, Anton C

    2006-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) is a common condition, especially among the critically ill, and confers a high mortality. Recent publications have highlighted changes in the epidemiology and improvement in mortality that was long thought to be static despite improvements in clinical care. The incidence of ARF is increasing. Efforts, such as the Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative, are being undertaken to establish a consensus definition of ARF, and to distinguish between varying degrees of acute kidney injury. Data are emerging to allow comparison of the epidemiology of ARF across institutions internationally. There is ongoing recognition of the important interaction between ARF and chronic kidney disease. Two brief case reports are offered to help frame the context and clinical impact of this disorder, followed by a review of some of the recent literature that addresses these points. PMID:17150044

  14. Association of Chronic Kidney Disease With Chronotropic Incompetence in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, David A; Katz, Daniel H; Beussink-Nelson, Lauren; Sanchez, Cynthia L; Strzelczyk, Theresa A; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2015-10-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI) is common in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and may be a key reason underlying exercise intolerance in these patients. However, the determinants of CI in HFpEF are unknown. We prospectively studied 157 patients with consecutive HFpEF who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and defined CI according to specific thresholds of the percent heart rate reserve (%HRR). CI was diagnosed as present if %HRR respiratory exchange ratio ≤1.05) on cardiopulmonary exercise testing were excluded. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with CI. Of the 157 participants, 108 (69%) achieved a respiratory exchange ratio >1.05 and were included in the final analysis. Of these 108 participants, 70% were women, 62% were taking β blockers, and 38% had chronic kidney disease. Most patients with HFpEF met criteria for CI (81 of 108; 75%). Lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), higher B-type natriuretic peptide, and higher pulmonary artery systolic pressure were each associated with CI. A 1-SD decrease in GFR was independently associated with CI after multivariable adjustment (adjusted odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 1.1 to 4.4, p = 0.02). The association between reduced GFR and CI persisted when considering a variety of measures of chronotropic response. In conclusion, reduced GFR is the major clinical correlate of CI in patients with HFpEF, and further study of the relation between chronic kidney disease and CI may provide insight into the pathophysiology of CI in HFpEF. PMID:26260398

  15. Prognostic impact of atrial fibrillation on clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nileshkumar; J; Patel; Aashay; Patel; Kanishk; Agnihotri; Dhaval; Pau; Samir; Patel; Badal; Thakkar; Nikhil; Nalluri; Deepak; Asti; Ritesh; Kanotra; Sabeeda; Kadavath; Shilpkumar; Arora; Nilay; Patel; Achint; Patel; Azfar; Sheikh; Neil; Patel; Apurva; O; Badheka; Abhishek; Deshmukh; Hakan; Paydak; Juan; Viles-Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation(AF) is the most common type of sustained arrhythmia,which is now on course to reach epidemic proportions in the elderly population. AF is a commonly encountered comorbidity in patients with cardiac and major non-cardiac diseases. Morbidity and mortality associated with AF makes it a major healthcare burden. The objective of our article is to determine the prognostic impact of AF on acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease. Multiple studies have been conducted to determine if AF has an independent role in the overall mortality of such patients. Our review suggests that AF has an independent adverse prognostic impact on the clinical outcomes of acute coronary syndromes,heart failure and chronic kidney disease.

  16. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part I. Ultrasonic measurement of renal size and analysis of renal ultrasonotomograms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonograms of 546 kidneys were obtained in 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Dialysed kidneys could be detected in 529 of the 546 kidneys (96.9%) by ultrasonic examination. The ultrasonic diagnoses on dialysed kidneys were contracted kidney in 313 kidneys (59.2%) and acquired cystic disease of the kidney in 107 kidneys (20.2%). Ultrasonic measurement of the size of kidney (length and thickness) revealed that the kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure were much smaller than normal ones. But the kidneys in patients undergoing dialysis for more than 8 years gradually increased in size with incidence of acquired renal cysts. The kidneys in patients with diabetic nephropathy were greater in length and thickness than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. Sonographic features of dialysed kidneys were unclear renal imaging, unidentified central echoes, cortico-medulla + border and increased parenchymal echogenicity. Irregularity of the renal contour had a tendency to increase in number with incidence of cysts in long-term dialysis patients. The ultrasonograms of the kidneys with diabetic nephropathy showed fewer changes than normal ones. No major complication of the kidney was detected in the present study. However, two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. We believe that regular screening of the kidneys by ultrasonic examination is mandatory in patients on chronic dialysis for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232408

  17. [Ultrasonographic study on kidneys in patients with chronic renal failure. Part II. Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, S; Fujii, H; Kaneko, S; Yachiku, S; Anzai, T; Inada, F; Kobayashi, T; Furuta, K; Ishida, H

    1990-08-01

    Ultrasonic examination of the kidney was performed on 280 patients undergoing chronic dialysis. Acquired cystic disease of the kidney (ACDK) was detected in 107 of 529 kidneys (20.2%). This paper presents an analysis of ultrasonotomograms of ACDK. Ultrasonic measurement of the size of ACDK was 72.5 +/- 15.2 mm in length and 41.7 +/- 9.8 mm in thickness. The size of ACDK was significantly greater than that of contracted kidneys by ultrasonographic diagnosis. With regard to sex distinction the length and thickness of ACDK were significantly greater in males than in females. As for laboratory data, patients with ACDK showed significantly higher values of red blood cell count, hematocrit and serum creatinine concentration compared with contracted kidneys. Prolongation of the dialysis peirod increased the incidence of ACDK. The size of ACDK showed a tendency to increase with duration of dialysis. However, no correlation was noted statistically between the incidence of ACDK and duration of dialysis and between the size of ACDK and duration of dialysis. There was a significantly lower incidence of ACDK in patients with diabetic nephropathy than those with chronic glomerulonephritis. A sonographic feature of ACDK is irregularity of the renal contour because of cystic transformation. Renal imaging, identification of the corticomedullary border, identification of the central echoes and increased parenchymal echogenicity were similar to other dialyzed kidneys. The main complications of ACDK are hemorrhage and tumor formation. We observed two retroperitoneal hematomas and one renal cell carcinoma developed within two years after this examination. The incidence of complications of ACDK was 5.1 per cent. We believe that patients with ACDK should be watched carefully by regular ultrasonic examination for early diagnosis and treatment of these complications. PMID:2232409

  18. EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS MARKERS IN CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURES OF SOUTH INDIAN POPULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Kemidi Ilaiah; V Chandrashekar; K.B.Prusty; H.N.Viswas; J.Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress defines an imbalance between the formation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants. The existence of oxidative stress and higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in association with uraemia is proven from studies on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) patients. Non traditional risk factors like oxidative stress are being given special emphasis to explain high incidence and identification of new therapeutic interventions. Excess Reactive oxygen Species levels have been ...

  19. Understanding by older patients of dialysis and conservative management for chronic kidney failure

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin-Crine, S; Okamoto, I; Leydon, G M; Murtagh, F. E.; Farrington, K; Caskey, F.; Rayner, H.; Roderick, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: older adults with chronic kidney disease stage 5 may be offered a choice between dialysis and conservative management. Few studies have explored patients’ reasons for choosing conservative management and none have compared the views of those who have chosen different treatments across renal units. Study design: qualitative study with semistructured interviews. Settings & participants: patients 75 years or older recruited from 9 renal units. Units were chosen to reflect var...

  20. Chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Chronic kidney disease is the slow loss of kidney function over time. The main job of the kidneys is to remove wastes and excess water from the body. Causes ... over months or years. You may not notice any symptoms for some time. The loss of function may be so slow that you ...

  1. Maxillary brown tumor associated with chronic kidney failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stênio Medeiros Queiroz

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The brown tumor is a bone lesion that may affect the entire skeleton, including the maxillary bones. These tumors are characterized as focal giant cell lesions that may be associated with primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT. Brown tumors are invasive in some cases and an association with chronic renal failure (CRF has been reported. With the aim to facilitate the differential diagnosis of bone lesions that may affect dialysis patients, this paper describes a case of brown tumor in a 36- year old patient with CRF, secondary HPT carrier, who had a lesion on the right maxilla for approximately five months.

  2. [Renal failure and cystic kidney diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correas, J-M; Joly, D; Chauveau, D; Richard, S; Hélénon, O

    2011-04-01

    Cystic kidney diseases often are discovered at the time of initial work-up of renal failure through ultrasound or family history, or incidentally at the time of an imaging test. Hereditary diseases include autosomal dominant or recessive polycystic kidney disease (PKD), tuberous sclerosis (TS) and medullary cystic kidney disease (MCKD). Autosomal dominant PKD is characterized by large renal cysts developing in young adults. Renal failure is progressive and becomes severe around 50-60 years of age. Atypical cysts (hemorrhagic or hyperdense) are frequent on CT and MRI examinations. Imaging plays a valuable role in the management of acute complications such as cyst hemorrhage or infection. Autosomal recessive PKD is often detected in neonates, infants or young adults. It is characterized by renal enlargement due to the presence of small cysts and liver disease (fibrosis and biliary ductal dilatation). Late manifestation or slow progression of autosomal recessive PKD may be more difficult to distinguish from autosomal dominant PKD. These cystic kidney diseases should not be confused with non-hereditary incidental multiple renal cysts. In tuberous sclerosis, renal cysts are associated with angiomyolipomas and sometimes pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. Renal failure is inconstant. Other hereditary cystic kidney diseases, including MCKD and nephronophtisis, are usually associated with renal failure. Non-hereditary cystic kidney diseases include multicystic renal dysplasia (due to complete pelvi-ureteric atresia or hydronephrosis), acquired multicystic kidney disease (chronic renal failure, chronic hemodialysis) and varied cystic kidney diseases (multicystic renal disease, glomerulocystic kidney disease, microcystic kidney disease). PMID:21549887

  3. An assessment of chronic kidney diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Neves, José; Rosário Martins, M.; Vilhena, João; Neves, João; Gomes, Sabino; Abelha, António; Machado, José Manuel; Vicente, Henrique

    2015-01-01

    Kidney renal failure means that one’s kidney have unexpectedlystoppedfunctioning,i.e.,oncechronicdiseaseis exposed, the presence or degree of kidney dysfunction and its progression must be assessed, and the underlying syndrome has to be diagnosed. Although the patient’s history and physical examination may denote good practice, some key information has to be obtained from valuation of the glomerular filtration rate, and the analysis of serum biomarkers. Indeed, chronic kidney sickness depicts...

  4. Myeloperoxidase in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhana Rao, A; Anand, Usha; Anand, C. V.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous lines of evidence implicate a role of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is a well accepted fact that patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at an increased risk for CVD. MPO is a pro-oxidant enzyme which could be involved in the increased susceptibility of these patients to CVD. Hence, the levels of plasma MPO was determined in healthy controls as well as in patients with CKD [stratified with the level of their kidney failure as CKD...

  5. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwit Rahmawati; Heru Muryawan; Farah Prabowo

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were in...

  6. Familial mixed nephrocalcinosis as a cause of chronic kidney failure: two case reports

    OpenAIRE

    de Arruda, Pedro Francisco Ferraz; Gatti, Márcio; de Arruda, José Germano Ferraz; Fácio, Fernando Nestor; Spessoto, Luis Cesar Fava; de Arruda, Laísa Ferraz; de Godoy, José Maria Pereira; de Godoy, Moacir Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nephrocalcinosis consists of the deposition of calcium salts in the renal parenchyma and is considered the mixed form when it involves the renal cortex and medulla. The main etiological agents of this condition are primary hyperparathyroidism, renal tubular acidosis, medullary sponge kidney, hyperoxaluria and taking certain drugs. These factors can lead to hypercalcemia and/or hypercalciuria, which can give rise to nephrocalcinosis. Case presentations Patient 1 was a 48-year-old ...

  7. Synchronous Urolithiasis in Orthotopic and Left to Right Crossed Ectopic Kidneys, without Fusion, presenting as Acute on Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. DOGRA, MS, MCh

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available Presented here is a case of20 year old male with multiple calculi in orthotopic as well as in left toright crossed ectopic kidney without fusion, causing obstructive uropathy, leading to progressiverenal failure and uraemia, thus posing a challenge in management. After pre-operative preparationwith repeated haemodialysis, a complete clearance of stones from both kidneys was accomplishedat one operation. The post-operative course was uneventful with considerable improvement andstablization in renal functional status.

  8. Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation on Screening for Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) . This recommendation ...

  9. Effects of perindopril on expression of kidney aquaporin-2 and urine aquaporin-2 excretion in chronic heart failure rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳邵

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the expression of kidneyaquaporin-2(AQP2) and urine AQP2 excretion in chronic heart failure(CHF) rats and investigate effects of perindopril on the expression and excretion of AQP2.Methods

  10. PERFORMANCE OF DATA MINING TECHNIQUES TO PREDICT IN HEALTHCARE CASE STUDY: CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basma Boukenze

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the promises of predictive analytics in big data, and the use of machine learning algorithms, predicting future is no longer a difficult task, especially for health sector, that has witnessed a great evolution following the development of new computer technologies that gave birth to multiple fields of research. Many efforts are done to cope with medical data explosion on one hand, and to obtain useful knowledge from it, predict diseases and anticipate the cure on the other hand. This prompted researchers to apply all the technical innovations like big data analytics, predictive analytics, machine learning and learning algorithms in order to extract useful knowledge and help in making decisions. In this paper, we will present an overview on the evolution of big data in healthcare system, and we will apply three learning algorithms on a set of medical data. The objective of this research work is to predict kidney disease by using multiple machine learning algorithms that are Support Vector Machine (SVM, Decision Tree (C4.5, and Bayesian Network (BN, and chose the most efficient one.

  11. Tissue Doppler-derived E/e' ratio as a parameter for assessing diastolic heart failure and as a predictor of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Keun; Kim, Biro; Lee, Jun Young; Kim, Jae Seok; Han, Byoung-Geun; Choi, Seung Ok; Yang, Jae Won

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Diastolic dysfunction occurs frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with heart failure (HF) or mortality. We investigated whether the ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity (E/e' ratio), estimated using tissue Doppler imaging, has prognostic value for cardiovascular morbidity and all-cause mortality in patients with CKD. Methods For 186 patients with CKD of stages III to V, we obtained echo...

  12. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabol...

  13. Association of dialysis adequacy with nutritional and inflammatory status in patients with chronic kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayati, Roya; Lesanpezeshki, Mahboub; Seifi, Sepideh

    2015-11-01

    The number of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure has increased in the past years worldwide. Several parameters have been introduced for the quantitative assessment of dialysis adequacy. The National Cooperative Dialysis Study results indicated that Kt/V and time-averaged concentration of urea (TAC) are predictors of mortality in patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Also, the protein catabolic ratio (PCR), which is an indicator of nutritional status, can predict patients' mortality. Our aim was to assess the impact of parameters that show dialysis adequacy on indices of nutrition or inflammation. A total of 46 patients were included in the study; eight patients were excluded during the course of the study and 38 patients were enrolled in the final analysis. All patients were receiving HD for at least for three months. HD was administered three times per week and the study lasted for two months. Kt/V, TAC and PCR were assessed at the beginning of the study based on patients' urea and blood urea nitrogen in the first week of our study; these calculations were repeated at the end of the first and second months using the mean of the mentioned values in the month. Both adequacy indices significantly and positively correlated with changes in PCR (P <0.001). However, no significant correlation was detectable between Kt/V and TAC with either body mass index and albumin or C-reactive protein. Based on the Kt/V values, patients with adequate dialysis had slower decrease in the PCR (P <0.001). Our results indicate that adequacy of dialysis is correlated with patients' nutritional status. No correlation was observed between dialysis adequacy and inflammatory status. PMID:26586053

  14. Association of dialysis adequacy with nutritional and inflammatory status in patients with chronic kidney failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Hemayati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with dialysis-dependent renal failure has increased in the past years worldwide. Several parameters have been introduced for the quantitative assessment of dialysis adequacy. The National Cooperative Dialysis Study results indicated that Kt/V and time-averaged concentration of urea (TAC are predictors of mortality in patients who receive maintenance hemodialysis (HD. Also, the protein catabolic ratio (PCR, which is an indicator of nutritional status, can predict patients′ mortality. Our aim was to assess the impact of parameters that show dialysis adequacy on indices of nutrition or inflammation. A total of 46 patients were included in the study; eight patients were excluded during the course of the study and 38 patients were enrolled in the final analysis. All patients were receiving HD for at least for three months. HD was administered three times per week and the study lasted for two months. Kt/V, TAC and PCR were assessed at the beginning of the study based on patients′ urea and blood urea nitrogen in the first week of our study; these calculations were repeated at the end of the first and second months using the mean of the mentioned values in the month. Both adequacy indices significantly and positively correlated with changes in PCR (P <0.001. However, no significant correlation was detectable between Kt/V and TAC with either body mass index and albumin or C-reactive protein. Based on the Kt/V values, patients with adequate dialysis had slower decrease in the PCR (P <0.001. Our results indicate that adequacy of dialysis is correlated with patients′ nutritional status. No correlation was observed between dialysis adequacy and inflammatory status.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Español Chronic Kidney Disease and Medicines: What You Need to Know Page ... What you need to know Because you have chronic kidney disease, you should take steps to protect your kidneys. ...

  16. Hyperphosphatemia of Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hruska, Keith A.; Mathew, Suresh; Lund, Richard; Qiu, Ping; Pratt, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Observational studies have determined hyperphosphatemia to be a cardiovascular risk factor in chronic kidney disease. Mechanistic studies have elucidated that hyperphosphatemia is a direct stimulus to vascular calcification, which is one cause of morbid cardiovascular events contributing to the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease. This review describes the pathobiology of hyperphosphatemia that develops as a consequence of positive phosphate balance in chronic kidney disease and the me...

  17. Safety and tolerability of the novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist BAY 94-8862 in patients with chronic heart failure and mild or moderate chronic kidney disease: a randomized, double-blind trial

    OpenAIRE

    Pitt, Bertram; Kober, Lars; Ponikowski, Piotr; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Krum, Henry; Nowack, Christina; Kolkhof, Peter; Kim, So-Young; Zannad, Faiez

    2013-01-01

    Aims Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF), but their use is limited by hyperkalaemia and/or worsening renal function (WRF). BAY 94-8862 is a highly selective and strongly potent non-steroidal MRA. We investigated its safety and tolerability in patients with HFrEF associated with mild or moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD). Methods and results This randomized, controlled, phase II ...

  18. About Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... York Golf Classic The 11th Annual New York Golf Classic Each August, supporters in our Northeast Region hit the links in support of AKF. Kidney Action Day Kidney Action Day Learn about our signature outreach event. Free health screenings ...

  20. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many foods contain extra iron (liver, beef, pork, chicken, lima and kidney beans, iron-fortified cereals). Talk to your provider or dietitian about which foods with iron you can eat because of your kidney disease.

  1. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Webinars Tips & Stories Links & Resources Learn About Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Glossary Ask Our Expert Toll-Free Helpline: ... Questions What You Can Do Download all the chronic kidney disease information presented here. Preview Our CKD Booklets Stage ...

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 and kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Amelia; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Gámez-Méndez, Ana Maria; Escalante, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent prostaglandins are necessary for normal kidney function. These prostaglandins are associated with inflammation, maintenance of sodium and water homeostasis, control of renin release, renal vasodilation, vasoconstriction attenuation, and prenatal renal development. COX-2 expression is regulated by the renin-angiotensin system, glucocorticoids or mineralcorticoids, and aldosterone, supporting a role for COX-2 in kidney function. Indeed, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels as well as enzyme activity are increased, along with PGE2, during kidney failure. In addition, changes in COX-2 expression are associated with increased blood pressure, urinary volume, sodium and protein and decreased urinary osmolarity. Intrarenal mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang II) production, increased sodium delivery, glomerular hypertension, and renal tubular inflammation have been suggested to be responsible for the increase in COX-2 expression. Although, specific COX-2 pharmacological inhibition has been related to the prevention of kidney damage, clinical studies have reported that COX-2 inhibition may cause side effects such as edema or a modest elevation in blood pressure and could possibly interfere with antihypertensive drugs and increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Thus, administration of COX-2 inhibitors requires caution, especially in the presence of underlying cardiovascular disease. PMID:22119250

  3. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Chronic Tubulointerstitial Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic tubulointerstitial diseases are a common final pathway toward chronic renal failure regardless the primary damage (glomerular, vascular or directly the tubulointerstitium). Chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (CTN) is characterized by interstitial scarring, fibrosis and tubule atrophy, resulting in progressive chronic kidney disease. Most frequent causes of CTN are drugs, heavy metals, obstructive uropathy, nephrolithiasis, reflux disease, immunologic diseases, neoplasia, ischemia, metabolic diseases, genetics and miscellaneous. At ultrasound (US), kidneys' morphological aspect is similar in all forms of chronic interstitial nephropathy and only chronic pyelonephritis with or without reflux shows distinguishing characteristics. In interstitial nephropathy, kidneys' profiles are finely irregular and corticomedullary differentiation is altered because of a diffused hyperechogenicity. The only indirect sign of chronic interstitial damage can be derived from the value of intrarenal resistive indexes that hardly overcome 0.75. US is mandatory in clinical chronic pyelonephritis work-up because it provides information on kidney's diameter and on growth nomogram in children. Renal profiles can be more or less altered depending on the number of cortical scars and the presence of pseudonodular areas of segmental compensatory hypertrophy. In the early stages, US diagnosis of renal tuberculosis is difficult because parenchymal lesions are non-specific. US sensitivity in the diagnosis of hydronephrosis is very high, close to 100% and, finally, US is the first choice imaging technique in the diagnosis of urinary lithiasis. PMID:27169608

  4. Renal failure (chronic)

    OpenAIRE

    Clase, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Chronic renal failure is characterised by a gradual and sustained decline in renal clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Continued progression of renal failure will lead to renal function too low to sustain healthy life. In developed countries, such people will be offered renal replacement therapy in the form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Requirement for dialysis or transplantation is termed end-stage renal disease (ESRD).Diabetes, glomerulonephritis, hypertension, pyelone...

  5. Challenging immunosuppression treatment in lung transplant recipients with kidney failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högerle, Benjamin A; Kohli, Neeraj; Habibi-Parker, Kirsty; Lyster, Haifa; Reed, Anna; Carby, Martin; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Weymann, Alexander; Simon, André R; Sabashnikov, Anton; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Soresi, Simona

    2016-03-01

    Kidney failure after lung transplantation is a risk factor for chronic kidney disease. Calcineurin inhibitors are immunosuppressants which play a major role in terms of postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. We report our preliminary experience with the anti-interleukin-2 monoclonal antibody Basiliximab utilized as a "calcineurin inhibitor-free window" in the setting of early postoperative kidney failure after lung transplantation. Between 2012 and 2015 nine lung transplant patients who developed kidney failure for more than 14 days were included. Basiliximab was administrated in three doses (Day 0, 4, and 20) whilst Tacrolimus was discontinued or reduced to maintain a serum level between 2 and 4 ng/mL. Baseline glomerular filtration rate pre transplant was normal for all patients. Seven patients completely recovered from kidney failure (67%, mean eGFR pre and post Basiliximab: 42.3 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and 69 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) and were switched back on Tacrolimus. Only one of these patients still needs ongoing renal replacement therapy. Two patients showed no recovery from kidney failure and did not survive. Basiliximab might be a safe and feasible therapeutical option in patients which are affected by calcineurin inhibitor-related kidney failure in the early post lung transplant period. Further studies are necessary to confirm our preliminary results. PMID:26892232

  6. Diet - chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this special diet to limit the buildup of waste products in the body. Limiting fluids between dialysis ... up when the kidneys no longer function well. Dangerous heart rhythms may result, which can lead to ...

  7. ADVANCE: Study to Evaluate Cinacalcet Plus Low Dose Vitamin D on Vascular Calcification in Subjects With Chronic Kidney Disease Receiving Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-14

    Chronic Kidney Disease; End Stage Renal Disease; Coronary Artery Calcification; Vascular Calcification; Calcification; Cardiovascular Disease; Chronic Renal Failure; Hyperparathyroidism; Kidney Disease; Nephrology; Secondary Hyperparathyroidism

  8. Complications of Diabetes: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD and Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    iyabet Dunyagoz Hospitals G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, almost half of the patients who are on chronic kidney replacement therapy have diabetes. The enormous worldwide rise in these cases pose potential economic burden for every country and therefore monitoring kidney function should be a practice provided in outpatient settings. Poorly controlled diabetes will not only result in chronic renal failure, but also patients with chronic renal disease will have some metabolic abnormalities that will increase both morbidity and mortality of the patients. While hypertension may associate with most of the diabetic cases, those people with diabetes who have no rise in blood pressure will eventually develop hypertension at later stage of the chronic kidney disease.

  9. Renal imaging in children with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwit Rahmawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney failure is a cause of death in children. Diagnosing chronic kidney disease is often made by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings and ultrasonography or other imaging tests. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is needed for education and management of the disease. Objective To describe renal imaging findings and mortality in children with chronic kidney disease. Methods This was a cross-sectional study on children with kidney diseases who were inpatients at Dr. Kariadi Hospital from January 2008 to June 2011. Data were taken from medical records. Chronic kidney disease was confirmed by clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and radiologic imaging. Renal ultrasound findings were determined by the radiologist responsible at that time. Results were presented as frequency distributions. Results Of 37 chronic kidney disease cases, 27 were males and 10 were females. Subjects’ most common complaints were dyspnea (7 out of 37 and edema (30 out of 37. Renal ultrasound imaging of subjects with chronic kidney disease yielded the following findings: reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (30 out of 37, bilateral echogenic kidneys (21 out of 37, reduced renal cortex thickness (4 out of 37 and small-sized kidneys (4 out of 37. Eight of the 37 children died. These 8 subjects had the following radiologic imaging findings: both kidneys appeared small in size (4 out of 8, reduced ‘renal cortex’ thickness (4 out of 8, echogenic kidneys (6 out of 8, and reduced cortico-medullary differentiation (8 out of 8. Conclusion Renal ultrasound imaging of pediatric subjects with chronic kidney disease revealed findings of reduced cortico-medullary differentiation, bilateral echogenic kidneys, reduced renal cortex thickness, and small kidneys bilaterally. [Paediatr Indones. 2013;53:193-9.].

  10. Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Page Content On this ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is anemia? Anemia is a condition in which the body ...

  11. Arteriosclerotic changes in the myocardium, lung, and kidney in dogs with chronic congestive heart failure and myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Bo Torkel; Jönsson, Lennart; Olsen, Lisbeth Høier;

    2006-01-01

    -matched, sex-matched, and weight-matched control dogs underwent extensive pathological and histopathological examination. Morphometry and scoring of tissue sections were used to measure arterial narrowing and fibrosis in the myocardium, kidney, and lung; and intimal thickness and plaque formation in the aorta...

  12. Clinical Significance of HLA-DQ Antibodies in the Development of Chronic Antibody-Mediated Rejection and Allograft Failure in Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeyoung; Min, Ji Won; Kim, Ji-Il; Moon, In-Sung; Park, Ki-Hyun; Yang, Chul Woo; Chung, Byung Ha; Oh, Eun-Jee

    2016-03-01

    With the development of the single antigen beads assay, the role of donor specific alloantibody (DSA) against human leukocyte antigens in kidney transplantation (KT) has been highlighted. This study aimed to investigate the clinical significance of DQ-DSA detected at renal allograft biopsy. We evaluated 263 KT recipients who underwent allograft biopsy and DSA detection at the same time. Among them, 155 patients who were nonsensitized before transplantation were selected to investigate the role of de-novo DQ-DSA. Both the total and nonsensitized subgroup was categorized into 4 groups each according to DSA results as: DQ only, DQ + non-DQ, non-DQ, and no DSA. In the total patient group, post-KT DSA was positive in 79 (30.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was most prevalent (64.6%). In the nonsensitized subgroup, de-novo DSAs were detected in 45 (29.0%) patients and DQ-DSA was also most prevalent (73.3%). The DQ only group showed a significantly longer post-KT duration compared to the other groups (P < 0.05). The overall incidence of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) was 17.9%. B-DSA, DR-DSA, and DQ-DSA were associated with AMR (P < 0.05), but in the analysis for chronic AMR, only DQ-DSA showed significance in both the total and the nonsensitized subgroup (P < 0.05). On comparison of Banff scores among groups, those representing humoral immunity were significantly dominant in all DSA positive groups compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05), and higher scores of markers representing chronic tissue injury were more frequently detected in the groups with DQ-DSA. The worst postbiopsy survival was seen in the DQ + non-DQ group of the total patient group, and patients with de-novo DQ-DSA showed poorer graft survival in the nonsensitized subgroup compared to the no DSA group (P < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, de-novo DQ-DSA was the only significant risk factor associated with late allograft failure (P < 0.05). Our study is the first to demonstrate

  13. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  14. [Management of antirheumatic drugs in kidney failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganelli, Rocco; Manganelli, Serena; Iannaccone, Salvatore; De Simone, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The nephrologist deals with the management of patients with rheumatic disease, both diagnostically and therapeutically. He must determine whether the renal pathology is related to the rheumatologic disease, mostly through the use of the renal biopsy. In the second case, he must know the nephrotoxic potential of the drugs prescribed and adjust their use to the degree of renal impairment. This task is made difficult by the absence of controlled clinical trials regarding their use on patients with renal insufficiency or on chronic dialysis. For this reason, the prescription will have to take into account the pharmacokinetics of the drugs. Kidney failure can affect the metabolism of antirheumatic drugs determining their accumulation, which can lead to increased toxicity, either renal or systemic. On the other hand, dialysis can cause excessive drug removal, leading to sub-therapeutic pharmacological effects and to the need for additional doses. In this brief review, we will consider the nephrotoxic effects of some important drugs used in rheumatology and examined individually, with specific reference to rheumatoid arthritis: methotrexate, leflunamide, hydroxychloroquine, cyclosporine, biological DMARDs. In the past, therapeutic success in rheumatic diseases associated with kidney impairment was severely limited by the well- known nephrotoxicity of drugs such as gold salts, D-penicillamine, NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors. Although generally effective, they are contraindicated in case of kidney failure. Biologic therapies have recently opened new therapeutic perspectives. Nevertheless, it is worth stressing how our knowledge of their action is still incomplete and this may result in exposure to immune-mediated renal disease. PMID:26845207

  15. Association of periodontitis and chronic kidney disease in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. U. Nabi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of our study is to study the etiopathogenesis of periodontitis in chronic kidney disease and to identify a correlation between periodontitis and chronic kidney disease, with the help of periodontal exaamination, ultrasonographic and hematobiochemical analysis. Materials and Methods: 46 dogs with renal failure were studied and classified as presenting a slight (56.52%, moderate (36.95% and severe (47.8% degree of periodontal disease. Results: Marked gingival recession involving whole maxillary dental arcade, Oral mucosa ulcers and tissue necrosis and mobility of mandibular incisors was observed in dogs with chronic kidney disease. Dogs with normal renal function were observed to have minimal gingival recession of the mandibular teeth only. Conclusion: In view of the causative association between periodontal infection, generalized inflammation and important systemic diseases like chronic kidney disease, we hypothesize that targeted prophylaxis and careful treatment of oral diseases can prevent the progression of renal failure

  16. Cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Wright; Alastair Hutchison

    2009-01-01

    Julian Wright, Alastair HutchisonManchester Institute of Nephrology and Transplantation, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UKAbstract: Patients with chronic kidney disease have a high burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease do not progress to end stage renal failure, but do have a significantly higher incidence of all cardiovascular co-morbidities. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors only partially account for this ...

  17. Adiponectin and chronic kidney disease; a review on recent findings

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Maryam; Nasri Parto; Nasri Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin is a multifunctional cytokine that has a role in regulating inflammation. In patients without chronic renal failure (CRF) and type 2 diabetics, decreased adiponectin levels are associated with insulin resistance. Lower serum plasma adiponectin values are link to larger tumor size and metastasis in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney too. However, in patients with established chronic kidney disease (CKD), adiponectin levels are elevated and positively predict progression of disease....

  18. NAFLD and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Marcuccilli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common cause of chronic liver disease in developed countries and it is now considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Evidence linking NAFLD to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD is emerging as a popular area of scientific interest. The rise in simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation as well as the significant cost associated with the presence of chronic kidney disease in the NAFLD population make this entity a worthwhile target for screening and therapeutic intervention. While several cross-sectional and case control studies have been published to substantiate these theories, very little data exists on the underlying cause of NAFLD and CKD. In this review, we will discuss the most recent publications on the diagnosis of NAFLD as well new evidence regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD and CKD as an inflammatory disorder. These mechanisms include the role of obesity, the renin-angiotensin system, and dysregulation of fructose metabolism and lipogenesis in the development of both disorders. Further investigation of these pathways may lead to novel therapies that aim to target the NAFLD and CKD. However, more prospective studies that include information on both renal and liver histology will be necessary in order to understand the relationship between these diseases.

  19. Does treating obesity stabilize chronic kidney disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atray Naveen K

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is a growing health issue in the Western world. Obesity, as part of the metabolic syndrome adds to the morbidity and mortality. The incidence of diabetes and hypertension, two primary etiological factors for chronic renal failure, is significantly higher with obesity. We report a case with morbid obesity whose renal function was stabilized with aggressive management of his obesity. Case report A 43-year old morbidly obese Caucasian male was referred for evaluation of his chronic renal failure. He had been hypertensive with well controlled blood pressure with a body mass index of 46 and a baseline serum creatinine of 4.3 mg/dl (estimated glomerular filtration rate of 16 ml/min. He had failed all conservative attempts at weight reduction and hence was referred for a gastric by-pass surgery. Following the bariatric surgery he had approximately 90 lbs. weight loss over 8-months and his serum creatinine stabilized to 4.0 mg/dl. Conclusion Obesity appears to be an independent risk factor for renal failure. Targeting obesity is beneficial not only for better control of hypertension and diabetes, but also possibly helps stabilization of chronic kidney failure.

  20. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Amy L. Weaver; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  1. Is Progressive Chronic Kidney Disease a Slow Acute Kidney Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Larry D; Polzin, David J; Elliott, Jonathan; Nabity, Mary B; Segev, Gilad; Grauer, Gregory F; Brown, Scott; Langston, Cathy; van Dongen, Astrid M

    2016-11-01

    International Renal Interest Society chronic kidney disease Stage 1 and acute kidney injury Grade I categorizations of kidney disease are often confused or ignored because patients are nonazotemic and generally asymptomatic. Recent evidence suggests these seemingly disparate conditions may be mechanistically linked and interrelated. Active kidney injury biomarkers have the potential to establish a new understanding for traditional views of chronic kidney disease, including its early identification and possible mediators of its progression, which, if validated, would establish a new and sophisticated paradigm for the understanding and approach to the diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of urinary disease in dogs and cats. PMID:27593574

  2. RENAL REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN ACUTE KIDNEY FAILURE - AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treesa P. Varghese

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is the loss of renal function, either acute or chronic, that results in azotemia and syndrome of uremia. Acute renal failure, is also known as acute kidney injury (AKI, is defined as an abrupt (within 48 hours reduction in kidney function. The initial management of acute kidney failure involves treating the underlying cause, stopping nephrotoxic drugs and ensuring that the patient is euvolaemic with an adequate mean arterial blood pressure. However, no specific treatments have been shown to reverse the course AKF so Renal Replacement Therapy (RRT is the cornerstone of further management. RRT therapy can be administrated either intermittently or continuously. Multiple modalities of RRT are currently available. The purpose of this review is to familiarize different modalities of RRT for blood purification.

  3. Kidney Failure and Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... narrows due to plaque buildup (stenosis) and blood flow is restricted to even one kidney, high blood pressure (hypertension) ... can be detected by physical examination or special tests: A physician’s ... through narrowed renal arteries. An Abdominal Ultrasound examination ...

  4. Controversies in Chronic Kidney Disease Staging

    OpenAIRE

    Polkinghorne, Kevan R

    2011-01-01

    In 2002, a new chronic kidney disease staging system was developed by the US National Kidney Foundation. The classification system represented a new conceptual framework for the diagnosis of chronic kidney disease (moving to a schema based on disease severity defined by the glomerular filtration rate). While the introduction of the staging system stimulated significant clinical and research interest in kidney disease, there has been vigorous debate on its merits. This mini-review aims to summ...

  5. CARDIORENAL INTERACTION IN DECOMPENSATED CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    OpenAIRE

    Zh. D. Kobalava; S. V. Villevalde; M. A. Efremovtseva

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the prevalence of cardiorenal interactions, predictors of development, variants of clinical course, and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with acute decompensation of chronic heart failure (ADCHF).Material and methods. Patients (n=278) with clinical manifestations of ADCHF were included into the study. All patients underwent clinical, laboratory and instrumental investigation. Renal function was assessed using the CKD-EPI formula to calculate glomerular fil...

  6. K/DOQI clinical practice guidelines for chronic kidney disease: Evaluation, classification, and stratification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Coresh, Josef; Bolton, Kline; Culleton, Bruce; Harvey, Kathy Schiro; Ikizler, T. Alp; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Kausz, Annamaria; Kimmel, Paul L.; Kusek, John; Levin, Adeera; Minaker, Kenneth L.; Nelson, Robert; Rennke, Helmut; Steffes, Michael; Witten, Beth; Hogg, Ronald J.; Furth, Susan; Lemley, Kevin V.; Portman, Ronald J.; Schwartz, George; Lau, Joseph; Balk, Ethan; Perrone, Ronald D.; Karim, Tauqeer; Rayan, Lara; Al-Massry, Inas; Chew, Priscilla; Astor, Brad C.; De Vine, Deirdre; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Nathan; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Keane, William; Kliger, Alan; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Willis, Kerry; Bailie, George; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Couser, William; de Zeeuw, Dick; Garber, Alan; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Hannah, Ramon G.; Acosta, Jaime Herrera; Hogg, Ronald; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lewis, Caya; Lowrie, Edmund; Matas, Arthur; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Nally, Joseph V.; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Smith, David; Star, Robert; Steinman, Theodore; Valderrabano, Fernando; Walls, John; Wauters, Jean-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine

    2002-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic kidney disease as a public health problem. Chronic kidney disease is a worldwide public health problem. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure, with poor outcomes and high cost. There is an even higher prevalence of earlier stages of

  7. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease: A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, A.S.; Eckardt, K.U.; Tsukamoto, Y.; Levin, A.; Coresh, J.; Rossert, J.; Hostetter, T.H.; Lameire, N.; Eknoyan, G.; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  8. Definition and classification of chronic kidney disease : A position statement from Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, AS; Eckardt, KU; Tsukamoto, Y; Levin, A; Coresh, J; Rossert, J; de Zeeuw, D; Hostetter, TH; Lameire, N; Eknoyan, G

    2005-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and premature death. A simple definition and classification of kidney disease is necessary for international development and implementation of clinical practice g

  9. Metformin in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James

    2014-01-01

    Metformin has traditionally been regarded as contraindicated in chronic kidney disease (CKD), though guidelines in recent years have been relaxed to permit therapy if the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is > 30 mL/min. The main problem is the perceived risk of lactic acidosis (LA). Epidemiological...... reduction, including weight loss, which are beneficial to patients. The risk of death and cardiovascular disease is reduced by about a third in non-CKD patients. Since metformin intoxication undoubtedly causes LA, and metformin is renally excreted, inappropriate dosage of metformin will increase the risk of...

  10. [Perioperative acute kidney injury and failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhor, Vibol; Journois, Didier

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative period is very likely to lead to acute renal failure because of anesthesia (general or perimedullary) and/or surgery which can cause acute kidney injury. Characterization of acute renal failure is based on serum creatinine level which is imprecise during and following surgery. Studies are based on various definitions of acute renal failure with different thresholds which skewed their comparisons. The RIFLE classification (risk, injury, failure, loss, end stage kidney disease) allows clinicians to distinguish in a similar manner between different stages of acute kidney injury rather than using a unique definition of acute renal failure. Acute renal failure during the perioperative period can mainly be explained by iatrogenic, hemodynamic or surgical causes and can result in an increased morbi-mortality. Prevention of this complication requires hemodynamic optimization (venous return, cardiac output, vascular resistance), discontinuation of nephrotoxic drugs but also knowledge of the different steps of the surgery to avoid further degradation of renal perfusion. Diuretics do not prevent acute renal failure and may even push it forward especially during the perioperative period when venous retourn is already reduced. Edema or weight gain following surgery are not correlated with the vascular compartment volume, much less with renal perfusion. Treatment of perioperative acute renal failure is similar to other acute renal failure. Renal replacement therapy must be mastered to prevent any additional risk of hemodynamic instability or hydro-electrolytic imbalance. PMID:24656890

  11. Neurocognitive Outcomes in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Current Findings and Contemporary Endeavors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Arlene C.; Butler, Robert; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Wentz, Alicia; Shinnar, Shlomo; Lande, Marc B.; Mendley, Susan R.; Warady, Bradley A.; Furth, Susan L.; Hooper, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Given the rise in chronic kidney disease (CKD) in both children and adults, CKD has recently been targeted as a public health priority. Childhood onset kidney disease is generally a noncurable and progressive condition that leads to kidney failure by early adulthood. Fortunately, improved identification of kidney problems allows for early…

  12. Chronic Kidney Disease and Endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Rebić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The endothelial cell layer is responsible for molecular traffic between the blood and surrounding tissue, and endothelial integrity plays a pivotal role in many aspects of vascular function. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the main cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and its incidence and severity increase in direct proportion with kidney function decline. Non-traditional risk factors for CVDs, including endothelial dysfunction (ED, are highly prevalent in this population and play an important role in cardiovascular (CV events. ED is the first step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events. Several risk markers have been associated with ED. Reduced bioavailability of nitric oxide plays a central role, linking kidney disease to ED, atherosclerosis, and CV events. Inflammation, loss of residual renal function, and insulin resistance are closely related to ED in CKD. ED may be followed by structural damage and remodelling that can precipitate both bleeding and thrombotic events. The endothelium plays a main role in vascular tone and metabolic pathways. ED is the first, yet potentially reversible step in the development of atherosclerosis and its severity has prognostic value for CV events.

  13. Kidney Failure: What to Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Events Upcoming and past meetings Follow Us Social media, RSS feeds, and more Follow Us Health Information > ... be hard. A mental health counselor or renal social worker can help people ... failure and depression should not keep their depression to themselves or ...

  14. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A; Zugck, Christian; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P <0.00001). The severity of periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  15. Periodontitis in Chronic Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Hanna; Herrmann, Kristina; Franke, Jennifer; Karimi, Alamara; Täger, Tobias; Cebola, Rita; Katus, Hugo A.; Zugck, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The purpose of our study was to investigate whether a correlation between periodontitis and chronic heart failure exists, as well as the nature of the underlying cause. We enrolled 71 patients (mean age, 54 ± 13 yr; 56 men) who had stable chronic heart failure; all underwent complete cardiologic and dental evaluations. The periodontal screening index was used to quantify the degree of periodontal disease. We compared the findings to those in the general population with use of data from the 4th German Dental Health Survey. Gingivitis, moderate periodontitis, and severe periodontitis were present in 17 (24%), 17 (24%), and 37 (52%) patients, respectively. Severe periodontitis was more prevalent among chronic heart failure patients than in the general population. In contrast, moderate periodontitis was more prevalent in the general population (P periodontal disease was not associated with the cause of chronic heart failure or the severity of heart failure symptoms. Six-minute walking distance was the only independent predictor of severe periodontitis. Periodontal disease is highly prevalent in chronic heart failure patients regardless of the cause of heart failure. Prospective trials are warranted to clarify the causal relationship between both diseases. PMID:27547136

  16. Chronic kidney disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherucci, Francesca; Roperto, Rosa Maria; Materassi, Marco; Romagnani, Paola

    2016-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Although relatively uncommon in children, it can be a devastating illness with many long-term consequences. CKD presents unique features in childhood and may be considered, at least in part, as a stand-alone nosologic entity. Moreover, some typical features of paediatric CKD, such as the disease aetiology or cardiovascular complications, will not only influence the child's health, but also have long-term impact on the life of the adult that they will become. In this review we will focus on the unique issues of paediatric CKD, in terms of aetiology, clinical features and treatment. In addition, we will discuss factors related to CKD that start during childhood and require appropriate treatments in order to optimize health outcomes and transition to nephrologist management in adult life. PMID:27478602

  17. Ancient literature research of tonifying the kidney and purging the turbidity method in treating chronic renal failure%补肾泄浊法治疗慢性肾衰竭的古代文献研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张蕾; 刘旭生

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to comb ancient literature about filling kidney and turbidity relief treatment on chronic renal failure. Method; using ehinese Medical Tantras as literature retrieval tool, analyzing ancient literature by content analytical method. Result; Filling kidney and turbidity relief is the basic treatment method of chronic renal failure. Prescription in ancient has big quantity , rich dosage form and various use methods. Conclusion; modern application of ancient formulas of filling kidney and turbidity relief still needs to be further exploration and research.%目的:对补肾泄浊法治疗慢性肾衰竭相关古籍文献进行梳理.方法:采用《中华医典》第四版为文献检索工具,应用内容分析法对检索到的条文进行归纳总结.结果:补肾泄浊法是慢性肾衰竭的基本治疗大法.补肾泄浊古代方药拟方较多,剂型丰富,使用方法多样.结论:古代补肾泄浊方药的现代应用仍有待进一步探索和研究.

  18. Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the cost of treatment for kidney failure. U.S. citizens who have kidney failure are eligible for Medicare. ... Budget & Legislative Information Strategic Plans & Reports Advisory & Coordinating Committees Research Areas Jobs at NIDDK FAQs Visit Us ...

  19. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmadzadeh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods:We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (�3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (�1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (�15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (�24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  20. Chronic Kidney Disease in Southwestern Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrnaz Zangeneh Kamali

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the etiology of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD among children attending the pediatric nephrology service at Abuzar children's hospital in Ahvaz city, the referral center in Southwest of Iran.Methods: We reviewed the records of 139 children, diagnosed to have CKD over a 10-year period. CKD was defined a glomerular filtration rate (GFR below 60 ml/1.73 m2/min persisting for more than 3 months.Findings: Among 139 children 81 (58% were males. The mean age at diagnosis of CKD in the patients was 4.2 (±3.6 years. Mean level of serum creatinine at presentation was 1.9 (±1.4 mg/dl. The mean GFR at presentation was 33.5 (±15.4 ml/1.73m2/min while 22% of the patients were already at end stage renal failure indicating that these children were referred too late. Congenital urologic malformation was the commonest cause of CKD present in 70 (50.4% children [reflux nephropathy (23.1%, hypo/dysplastic kidney (15.8%, obstructive uropathy (10.8%, and prune belly syndrome (0.7%]. Other causes included hereditary nephropathies (17.2%, chronic glomerulo-nephritis (6.5%, multisystemic diseases (4.3%, miscellaneous and unknown (each one 10.8%. The mean duration of follow-up was 26 (±24.67 months. Peritoneal or hemodialysis was performed in 10 patients. Six patients underwent (4 live-related and 2 non-related renal transplantation. The rest have died or received standard conservative management for CKD.Conclusion: The commonest causes of CKD were reflux nephropathy, hypo/dysplastic kidney, hereditary nephropathy and obstructive uropathy. Patients presented late, had severe CKD and were malnourished and stunted.

  1. Influence of Diet Balanced with Essential Amino Acids / Keto Acid Analogs and High-Nutrient Blend on the Progression of Renal Failure in Patients in the Pre-Dialysis Stage of Chronic Kidney Disease Caused by Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    I I Aleksandrova; Mikhailov, A. A.; Lyudmila Y. Milovanova; Yury S. Milovanov

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a low protein diet (LPD) balanced with essential amino acids (EAA) / keto acid analogs (KAA) and protein “SUPRO-XT 219D” in the composition of the high-energy nutrient blend (HENB) for slow down of renal failure in patients in the pre-dialysis stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD) induced by systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD).Material and Methods: In this study, 46 patients (35 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 15 with various forms of sy...

  2. Imaging in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) diagnosis and staging are based on estimated or calculated glomerular filtration rate (GFR), urinalysis and kidney structure at renal imaging techniques. Ultrasound (US) has a key role in evaluating both morphological changes (by means of B-Mode) and patterns of vascularization (by means of color-Doppler and contrast-enhanced US), thus contributing to CKD diagnosis and to the follow-up of its progression. In CKD, conventional US allows measuring longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness and evaluating renal echogenicity and urinary tract status. Maximum renal length is usually considered a morphological marker of CKD, as it decreases contemporarily to GFR, and should be systematically recorded in US reports. More recently, it has been found to be a significant correlation of both renal longitudinal diameter and cortical thickness with renal function. Conventional US should be integrated by color Doppler, which shows parenchymal perfusion and patency of veins and arteries, and by spectral Doppler, which is crucial for the diagnosis of renal artery stenosis and provides important information about intrarenal microcirculation. Different values of renal resistive indexes (RIs) have been associated with different primary diseases, as they reflect vascular compliance. Since RIs significantly correlate with renal function, they have been proposed to be independent risk factors for CKD progression, besides proteinuria, low GFR and arterial hypertension. Despite several new applications, US and color Doppler contribute to a definite diagnosis in <50% of cases of CKD, because of the lack of specific US patterns, especially in cases of advanced CKD. However, US is useful to evaluate CKD progression and to screen patients at risk for CKD. The indications and the recommended frequency of color Doppler US could differ in each case and the follow-up should be tailored. PMID:27170301

  3. Kidneys in chronic liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marek Hartleb; Krzysztof Gutkowski

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI),defined as an abrupt increase in the serum creatinine level by at least 0.3 mg/dL,occurs in about 20% of patients hospitalized for decompensating liver cirrhosis.Patients with cirrhosis are susceptible to developing AKI because of the progressive vasodilatory state,reduced effective blood volume and stimulation of vasoconstrictor hormones.The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis are pre-renal azotemia,hepatorenal syndrome and acute tubular necrosis.Differential diagnosis is based on analysis of circumstances of AKI development,natriuresis,urine osmolality,response to withdrawal of diuretics and volume repletion,and rarely on renal biopsy.Chronic glomeruIonephritis and obstructive uropathy are rare causes of azotemia in cirrhotic patients.AKI is one of the last events in the natural history of chronic liver disease,therefore,such patients should have an expedited referral for liver transplantation.Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) is initiated by progressive portal hypertension,and may be prematurely triggered by bacterial infections,nonbacterial systemic inflammatory reactions,excessive diuresis,gastrointestinal hemorrhage,diarrhea or nephrotoxic agents.Each type of renal disease has a specific treatment approach ranging from repletion of the vascular system to renal replacement therapy.The treatment of choice in type 1 hepatorenal syndrome is a combination of vasoconstrictor with albumin infusion,which is effective in about 50% of patients.The second-line treatment of HRS involves a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt,renal vasoprotection or systems of artificial liver support.

  4. Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sairam, Krish; Scoffone, Cesare M; Alken, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    glomerular filtration rate, including chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II-greater than 60, stage III-30 to 59 and stages IV/V-less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m(2). Patient characteristics, operative characteristics, outcomes and morbidity were assessed. RESULTS: Estimated glomerular filtration rate data were...... available on 5,644 patients, including 4,436 with chronic kidney disease stages 0/I/II, 994 with stage III and 214 with stages IV/V. A clinically significant minority of patients with nephrolithiasis presented with severe chronic kidney disease. A greater number of patients with stages IV/V previously...... underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy, ureteroscopy or nephrostomy and had positive urine cultures than less severely affected patients, consistent with the higher incidence of staghorn stones in these patients. Patients with chronic kidney disease stages IV/V had statistically significantly worse...

  5. Nutrition in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cereals Bran cereals Egg whites Egg yolks Sorbet Ice cream Source: Phosphorous: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney ... for Scientists Current Funding Opportunities Funded Grants & Grant History Funding Process Research Programs & Contacts Research Training & Career ...

  6. A Review of Pediatric Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspar, C D W; Bholah, R; Bunchman, T E

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is complex in both adults and children, but the disease is far from the same between these populations. Here we review the marked differences in etiology, comorbidities, impact of disease on growth and quality of life, issues unique to adolescents and transitions to adult care, and special considerations of congenital kidney and urinary tract anomalies for transplantation. PMID:26766175

  7. Exploring metabolic dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slee Adrian D

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impaired kidney function and chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to kidney failure and end-stage renal disease (ESRD is a serious medical condition associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and in particular cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. CKD is associated with multiple physiological and metabolic disturbances, including hypertension, dyslipidemia and the anorexia-cachexia syndrome which are linked to poor outcomes. Specific hormonal, inflammatory, and nutritional-metabolic factors may play key roles in CKD development and pathogenesis. These include raised proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and −6, tumor necrosis factor, altered hepatic acute phase proteins, including reduced albumin, increased C-reactive protein, and perturbations in normal anabolic hormone responses with reduced growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-1 axis activity. Others include hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin aldosterone system (RAAS, with angiotensin II and aldosterone implicated in hypertension and the promotion of insulin resistance, and subsequent pharmacological blockade shown to improve blood pressure, metabolic control and offer reno-protective effects. Abnormal adipocytokine levels including leptin and adiponectin may further promote the insulin resistant, and proinflammatory state in CKD. Ghrelin may be also implicated and controversial studies suggest activities may be reduced in human CKD, and may provide a rationale for administration of acyl-ghrelin. Poor vitamin D status has also been associated with patient outcome and CVD risk and may indicate a role for supplementation. Glucocorticoid activities traditionally known for their involvement in the pathogenesis of a number of disease states are increased and may be implicated in CKD-associated hypertension, insulin resistance, diabetes risk and cachexia, both directly and indirectly through effects on other systems including activation of the mineralcorticoid

  8. Healthy Hair Starts With a Healthy Body: Hair Stylists as Lay Health Advisors to Prevent Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Madigan, Mary E; Linda Smith-Wheelock, MBA, MSW; Sarah L. Krein, PhD, RN

    2007-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease affects one in nine Americans. Diabetes and hypertension account for nearly three quarters of all kidney failure cases. Disproportionate rates of chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension have been observed among African Americans. More than 70% of all kidney failure cases caused by diabetes and hypertension could have been prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyles and medications. Context Approximately 14% of the population living in Michigan is ...

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Kidney Transplant Rejection via Large-Scale Proteogenomic Analysis of Tissue Biopsies

    OpenAIRE

    Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Hewel, Johannes A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Mondala, Tony S.; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steve R.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Yates, John R.; Salomon, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    The most common cause of kidney transplant failure is the poorly characterized histopathologic entity interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). There are no known unifying mechanisms, no effective therapy, and no proven preventive strategies. Possible mechanisms include chronic immune rejection, inflammation, drug toxicity, and chronic kidney injury from secondary factors. To gain further mechanistic insight, we conducted a large-scale proteogenomic study of kidney transplant biopsies...

  10. Nourishing Kidney, Invigorating Spleen and Clearing away Turbidity Therapy for Chronic Renal Failure%益肾健脾清利化浊法治疗慢性肾功能不全

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶景华; 张彤; 盖云; 蔡艳

    2011-01-01

    The dysfunction of spleen and kidney is the fundamental pathogenesis of chronic renal failure (CRF) and its pathology manifests mixture of asthenia and sthenia, and deficiency in the root and excess in the branch.The deficiency in the root is asthenia of spleen and kidney and the excess in the branch is the retention of dampness, turbid and stasis.So nourishing kidney and invigorating spleen are the key of treatment based on syndrome differentiation of CRF, and clearing away turbidity is the emphasis for dispelling pathogenic factor.%脾肾功能失常是慢性肾功能不全的根本病机,病变过程为虚实夹杂、本虚标实.本虚为脾肾虚衰,标实为湿、浊、瘀毒留滞,因此,益肾健脾为慢性肾衰辨证论治的关键,而清利化浊为消除慢性肾功能不全增恶因素的重点.

  11. Insomnia and chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Don; Anstead, Michael I; Ho, Julia; Phillips, Barbara A

    2009-09-01

    Insomnia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic disease including chronic heart failure (CHF) and is a significant contributing factor to fatigue and poor quality of life. The pathophysiology of CHF often leads to fatigue, due to nocturnal symptoms causing sleep disruption, including cough, orthopnea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and nocturia. Inadequate cardiac function may lead to hypoxemia or poor perfusion of the cerebrum, skeletal muscle, or visceral body organs, which result in organ dysfunction or failure and may contribute to fatigue. Sleep disturbances negatively affect all dimensions of quality of life and is related to increased risk of comorbidities, including depression. This article reviews insomnia in CHF, cardiac medication side-effects related to sleep disturbances, and treatment options. PMID:18758945

  12. Aggressive blood pressure control for chronic kidney disease unmasks moyamoya!

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, T. Keefe; Halabi, Carmen M.; Siefken, Philp; Karmarkar, Swati; Leonard, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive crises in children or adolescents are rare, but chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major risk factor for occurrence. Vesicoureteral reflux nephropathy is a common cause of pediatric renal failure and is associated with hypertension. Aggressive blood pressure (BP) control has been shown to delay progression of CKD and treatment is targeted for the 50th percentile for height when compared with a target below the 90th percentile for the general pediatric hypertensive patient. We pres...

  13. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  14. Data mining a kidney failure data set using Rough Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. K Govinda Rajulu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Kidney failure remains one of the dreaded diseases worldwide. The factors of kidney problem/failure remain to be determined. The paper gives the basic idea of rough set theory. The procedure to carry out the operation of rough set theory with lower and upper approximation sets briefly explained. Some applications of rough set theory in the field of medicine w.r.t kidney failures are initiated and some future problems pointed.

  15. Zhang Qi's Experience in Treating Chronic Renal Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-zhan; XU Da-ji; MA Yu-peng

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chronic renal failure is a result of the parenchymatous injury of kidney and progressive exacerbation due to many reasons.It is a svstematic clinical syndrome caused by the disturbance in excreting metabolites,adjusting water-electrolyte and acid-base balance as well as production and inactivation of active substances of endocrine.Prof Zhang Qi has rich clinical experience in treating renal failure.A report follows.

  16. The alteration in peripheral neutrophils of patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yevgenyevna Muravlyova Larissa; Molotov-Luchankiy Vilen Borisovich; Yemelyevna Bakirova Ryszhan; Akylbekovna Turmukhambetova Anar; Anatolyevich Klyuyev Dmitriy; Andreevna Demidchik Ludmila; Alexandrovna Kolesnikova Yevgeniya

    2015-01-01

    Recent findings have demonstrated the impaired functions of neutrophils of patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of our research was to study oxidative modified proteins, as well as the histone spectrum in neutrophils drawn from patients with chronic kidney disease, and to estimate the ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps. In this work, we have assumed that metabolic alteration in neutrophils may develop at early stages of chronic kidney disease...

  17. Pregnancy in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellanki, Kavitha

    2013-05-01

    Despite vast improvements in fetal outcomes, pregnancy in women with CKD is fraught with hazards; worsening of renal function and complications like preeclampsia and premature delivery are common. To date, there is no accurate formula to calculate glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Also, whether the current CKD classification is better than the older classification at predicting outcomes in pregnant women with CKD is unknown. Women with an estimated GFR ≥1.4 mg/dL are at increased risk of progressive worsening of renal function regardless of the cause of the underlying kidney disease. Preeclampsia is difficult to diagnose in pregnant women with underlying CKD, and serum markers such as soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1) and placental growth factor (PIGF) may lead the way for definitive diagnosis. New-onset lupus or lupus flare is an indication for kidney biopsy during pregnancy; cyclosporine is safe and is the most effective agent that can be used during pregnancy. Women with adult polycystic kidney disease are at increased risk of hypertension and preeclampsia during pregnancy, as well as hepatic cysts later in life, the latter occurring with multiple pregnancies. Strict blood pressure control is important in pregnant women with diabetic nephropathy. A multidisciplinary team that includes nephrologists and obstetricians who deal with high-risk pregnancies should be involved in the care of pregnant women with CKD for successful pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23928386

  18. Sexuality and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and erection difficulties. Therapy also can help a person work through the effects of chronic illness on sexual functioning. A sex therapist can be a psychiatrist, psychologist, physician, or social ...

  19. Microcirculation in Acute and Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafrani, Lara; Ince, Can

    2015-12-01

    The renal microvasculature is emerging as a key player in acute and chronic kidney diseases. Renal microvascular disease involves alterations in endothelial barrier permeability, exaggerated inflammation, impairment of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation involving the nitric oxide system, increased oxidative stress, and loss of angiogenic factors. Moreover, evidence suggests that there is a microvascular component to the pathogenesis of renal scarring. New technology is being developed to explore renal microcirculation in vivo in experimental models and humans. This technology will provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of kidney diseases and will help guide specific therapeutic strategies aimed at restoring the renal microcirculation. This article reviews the cellular and molecular mechanisms of renal microvascular dysfunction in acute and chronic kidney diseases and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications of these findings. Recent developments in the monitoring of renal microcirculation are described with respect to their advantages and limitations, and future directions are outlined. PMID:26231789

  20. Direct renin inhibition in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Frederik; Rossing, Peter; Parving, Hans-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    that renin inhibition could hold potential for improved treatment in patients with chronic kidney disease, with diabetic nephropathy as an obvious group of patients to investigate, as the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is enhanced in these patients and as there is an unmet need...... inhibition in chronic kidney disease by reporting of the studies published so far as well as perspective on the future possibilites....... was terminated early as a beneficial effect was unlikely and there was an increased frequency of side effects. Also in non-diabetic kidney disease a few intervention studies have been carried out, but there is no ongoing hard outcome study. In this review we provide the current evidence for renin...

  1. Circulating Adipocytokines and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Mills, Katherine T.; L Lee Hamm; A Brent Alper; Chad Miller; Alhakam Hudaihed; Saravanan Balamuthusamy; Chung-Shiuan Chen; Yanxi Liu; Joseph Tarsia; Nader Rifai; Myra Kleinpeter; Jiang He; Jing Chen

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD), but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)

  2. The Western Diet and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Divya; Vellanki, Kavitha; Kramer, Holly

    2015-03-01

    Characteristics of the Western diet that fueled the obesity epidemic may also impact kidney disease incidence and progression. Enlarging portion sizes over the past half century has been accompanied by increased intake of protein, sodium, and processed foods while consumption of fruits and vegetables has declined. Overall dietary patterns play a strong role for chronic disease risk including chronic kidney disease. While dietary patterns high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in red meats, such as the Mediterranean diet, decrease the risk of chronic diseases, the Western diet, characterized by high intake of red meat, animal fat, sweets, and desserts and low intake of fresh fruits and vegetables and low-fat dairy products, increases risk of chronic diseases. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms whereby several key characteristics of the typical Western diet may impact kidney disease incidence and progression. We also discuss a public health policy initiative to improve dietary choices. Reducing protein intake to the recommended daily allowance of 0.8 g/kg/day and increasing intake of fruit and vegetables and fiber may mitigate kidney disease progression and reduce risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. PMID:25754321

  3. Treatment and Prevention of Common Complications of Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Salahuddin Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem with an increasing incidence and prevalence. Outcomes of CKD include not only complications of decreased kidney function and cardiovascular disease but also kidney failure causing increased morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, CKD is often undetected and undertreated because of its insidious onset, variable progression, and length of time to overt kidney failure. Diabetes is now the leading cause of CKD requiring renal replacement therapy in many parts of the world, and its prevalence is increasing disproportionately in the developing countries. This review article outlines the current recommendations from various clinical guidelines and research studies for treatment, prevention and delaying the progression of both CKD and its common complications such as hypertension, anemia, renal osteodystrophy, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance, and hyperlipidemia. Recommendations for nutrition in CKD and measures adopted for early diabetic kidney disease to prevent further progression have also been reviewed. There is strong evidence that early detection and management of CKD can prevent or reduce disease progression, decrease complications and improve outcomes. Evidence supports that achieving optimal glucose control, blood pressure, reduction in albuminuria with a multifactorial intervention slows the progression of CKD. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor antagonists are most effective because of their unique ability to decrease proteinuria, a factor important for the progression of CKD.

  4. Screening for chronic kidney disease : Where does Europe go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Paul E.; van der Velde, Marije; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Zoccali, Carmine

    2008-01-01

    This review discusses various screening approaches for chronic kidney disease that are used in Europe. The criterion for defining chronic kidney disease in the various programs differs but is frequently limited to estimated glomerular filtration rate, thus offering only data on chronic kidney diseas

  5. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our online catalog. Alternate Language URL Españ​ol Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Basics Page Content Chronic Kidney Disease: The ... and My Lifestyle CKD: Tracking My Test Results Chronic Kidney Disease: The Basics You've been told that you ...

  6. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    OpenAIRE

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham; Gleadle, Jonathan M.; De Pasquale, Carmine G; Selvanayagam, Joseph B

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  7. K/DOQI Clinical Practice Guidelines on Hypertension and Antihypertensive Agents in Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; Rocco, Michael V.; Anderson, Sharon; Andreoli, Sharon P.; Bailie, George R.; Bakris, George L.; Callahan, Mary Beth; Greene, Jane H.; Johnson, Cynda Ann; Lash, James P.; McCullough, Peter A.; Miller III, Edgar R.; Nally, Joseph V.; Pirsch, John D.; Portman, Ronald J.; Sevick, Mary Ann; Sica, Domenic; Wesson, Donald E.; Agodoa, Lawrence; Bolton, Kline; Cutler, Jeffrey A.; Hostetter, Tom; Lau, Joseph; Uhlig, Katrin; Chew, Priscilla; Kausz, Annamaria; Kupelnick, Bruce; Raman, Gowri; Sarnak, Mark; Wang, Chenchen; Astor, Brad C.; Eknoyan, Garabed; Levin, Adeera; Levin, Nathan; Bailie, George; Becker, Bryan; Becker, Gavin; Burrowes, Jerrilynn; Carrera, Fernando; Churchill, David; Collins, Allan; Crooks, Peter W.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Golper, Thomas; Gotch, Frank; Gotto, Antonio; Greenwood, Roger; Greer, Joel W.; Grimm Jr., Richard; Haley, William E.; Hogg, Ronald; Hull, Alan R.; Hunsicker, Lawrence; Klag, Michael; Klahr, Saulo; Lameire, Norbert; Locatelli, Francesco; McCulloch, Sally; Michael, Maureen; Newmann, John M.; Nissenson, Allen; Norris, Keith; Obrador, Gregorio; Owen Jr., William; Patel, Thakor G.; Payne, Glenda; Ronco, Claudio; Rivera-Mizzoni, Rosa A.; Schoolwerth, Anton C.; Star, Robert; Steffes, Michael; Steinman, Theodore; Wauters, John-Pierre; Wenger, Nanette; Briggs, Josephine; Burrows-Hudson, Sally; Latos, Derrick; Mapes, Donna; Oberley, Edith; Pereira, Brian J.G.; Willis, Kerry; Gucciardo, Anthony; Fingerhut, Donna; Klette, Margaret; Schachne, Elicia

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: CHRONIC KIDNEY disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health issue. In the United States, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of kidney failure (Fig 1), with poor outcomes and high cost. The prevalence of earlier stages of CKD is approximately 100 times greater than the prevalence

  8. Haemostasis in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Jens; Menke, Julia; Sollinger, Daniel; Schinzel, Helmut; Thürmel, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The coagulation system has gained much interest again as new anticoagulatory substances have been introduced into clinical practice. Especially patients with renal failure are likely candidates for such a therapy as they often experience significant comorbidity including cardiovascular diseases that require anticoagulation. Patients with renal failure on new anticoagulants have experienced excessive bleeding which can be related to a changed pharmacokinetic profile of the compounds. However, the coagulation system itself, even without any interference with coagulation modifying drugs, is already profoundly changed during renal failure. Coagulation disorders with either episodes of severe bleeding or thrombosis represent an important cause for the morbidity and mortality of such patients. The underlying reasons for these coagulation disorders involve the changed interaction of different components of the coagulation system such as the coagulation cascade, the platelets and the vessel wall in the metabolic conditions of renal failure. Recent work provides evidence that new factors such as microparticles (MPs) can influence the coagulation system in patients with renal insufficiency through their potent procoagulatory effects. Interestingly, MPs may also contain microRNAs thus inhibiting the function of platelets, resulting in bleeding episodes. This review comprises the findings on the complex pathophysiology of coagulation disorders including new factors such as MPs and microRNAs in patients with renal insufficiency. PMID:24132242

  9. Vascular cognitive impairments in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rogova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the specific features of development of cognitive impairments (CIs, the role of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and renal failure-induced factors in patients with Stages I–IV chronic kidney disease (CKD and to assess an association of CIs with the signs of vascular wall remodeling in them. Patients and methods. Fifty-one patients aged 53±10 years with CKD were examined. Among them, there were 20 patients with Stages I–II CKD: a glomerular filtration rate (GFR of і60 ml/min/1.73 m2, signs of renal lesion; 20 with Stages III CKD: a GFR of <60–30 ml/min/1.73 m2, and 11 with Stages VI CKD: a GFR of <30–15 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results and discussion. CIs were more common in the patients with Stages III–IV than in those with Stages I–II, as shown by the scores of the mini-mental state examination (p<0.001, the frontal assessment battery (p=0.001, and the regulatory function test (p<0.001. These tests showed that the magnitude of CIs increased with the higher stage of CKD. Stages III–IV CKD is an independent predictor of CIs in persons with predialysis-stage kidney lesion. CIs were found to be related to hyperhomocysteinemia, anemia, abdominal obesity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and patient age. The signs of atherosclerotic lesion of the common carotid arteries and the indicators of arterial stiffness were also associated with the incidence and magnitude of CIs in CKD. The detection of CIs in patients with early CKD allows one to timely initiate adequate therapy aimed particularly at improving cerebral circulation, eliminating the impact of risk factors, and slowing down the vascular remodeling. The management tactics for patients with CKD must involve the identification and correction of cardiovascular risk factors, and duplex scanning of the wall of the common carotid arteries may be used as a noninvasive method to assess the risk of the development and progression of CIs in predialysis CKD. 

  10. Slowing progression of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drawz, Paul E; Rosenberg, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Early identification of chronic kidney disease (CKD) provides an opportunity to implement therapies to improve kidney function and slow progression. The goal of this article is to review established and developing clinical therapies directed at slowing progression. The importance of controlling blood pressure will be discussed along with the target blood pressure that should be achieved in CKD patients. Therapy directed at inhibiting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system remains the mainstay of treatment with single-agent inhibition of this system being as good as dual blockade with fewer adverse effects. Other therapies that may be used include correction of metabolic acidosis, dietary protein restriction, and new models for delivering care to patients with CKD. Emerging therapies targeting endothelin, uric acid, kidney fibrosis, and oxidant stress hold promise for the future. PMID:25019022

  11. Cystatin C or Creatinine for Detection of Stage 3 Chronic Kidney Disease in Anorexia Nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Delanaye, Pierre; Cavalier, Etienne; RADERMECKER, Régis; Paquot, Nicolas; Depas, Gisèle; Chapelle, Jean-Paul; Scheen, André; Krzesinski, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Background: Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) are at a high risk of renal failure. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is often missed in these patients because the serum creatinine is a poor marker of kidney function. We studied the utility of cystatin C to detect renal failure in this population. Method: Twenty-seven AN patients were studied. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were measured with the chromium-51- ethylenediaminetetraacetate ((51)Cr-EDTA) method. We compared the ability of creatini...

  12. The alteration in peripheral neutrophils of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgenyevna Muravlyova Larissa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent findings have demonstrated the impaired functions of neutrophils of patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of our research was to study oxidative modified proteins, as well as the histone spectrum in neutrophils drawn from patients with chronic kidney disease, and to estimate the ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps. In this work, we have assumed that metabolic alteration in neutrophils may develop at early stages of chronic kidney disease. Materials and methods: Neutrophils obtained from patients with various stages of chronic kidney disease and degrees of chronic renal failure were used. As control, blood samples obtained from 32 healthy individuals was employed. In the examined neutrophils, advanced oxidation protein products, protein reactive carbonyl derivatives, as well as nucleosomal histones were detected. The ability of neutrophils to form spontaneous neutrophil extracellular traps was estimated. Our results have demonstrated an increase of nucleosomal histones in neutrophils of all patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, our work fixes the rate of growth of intracellular advanced oxidation protein products and the decreasing of protein reactive carbonyl derivatives in neutrophils from patients with chronic kidney disease. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of the neutrophils with altered oxidative status and the decomposition of the histone spectrum in the circulation of patients with chronic kidney disease.

  13. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turke...

  14. Chronic Kidney Disease and Its Complications

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Robert; Kanso, Abbas; Sedor, John R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disease impacting more than twenty million individuals in the United States. Progression of CKD is associated with a number of serious complications, including increased incidence of cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, anemia and metabolic bone disease. CKD patients should be assessed for the presence of these complications and receive optimal treatment to reduce their morbidity and mortality. A multidisciplinary approach is required to accomplish...

  15. Nuclear medicine in acute and chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostic value of renal scintiscans in patients with acute or chronic renal failure has not been emphasized other than for the estimation of renal size. 131I OIH, 67gallium, /sup 99m/TcDTPA, glucoheptonate and DMSA all may be valuable in a variety of specific settings. Acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, acute interstitial nephritis, cortical necrosis, renal artery embolism, or acute pyelonephritis may be recognized. Data useful in the diagnosis and management of the patient with obstructive or reflux nephropathy may be obtained. Radionuclide studies in patients with chronic renal failure may help make apparent such causes as renal artery stenosis, chronic pyelonephritis or lymphomatous kidney infiltration. Future correlation of scanning results with renal pathology promises to further expand nuclear medicine's utility in the noninvasive diagnosis of renal disease

  16. Efeitos negativos da insuficiência renal crônica sobre a função pulmonar e a capacidade funcional Negative effects of chronic kidney failure on lung function and functional capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana L. Cury

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a função pulmonar e a capacidade funcional em pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica (IRC em hemodiálise e em pacientes após transplante renal. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 72 indivíduos, sendo 32 pacientes com IRC em hemodiálise (GD há mais de 6 meses, 10 pacientes transplantados renais (GT há, pelo menos, 6 meses e 30 sujeitos saudáveis para grupo controle (GC. Todos os grupos foram avaliados utilizando espirometria, pressões inspiratória (PImax e expiratória (PEmax máximas e teste da caminhada em seis minutos (TC6min. Para análise estatística, foi utilizado o programa SPSS 12.0, com nível mínimo de significância αOBJECTIVE: To evaluate lung function and functional capacity in patients with chronic kidney failure (CKF undergoing dialysis and in patients after kidney transplant. METHODS: Seventy-two participants were evaluated: 32 patients with CKF on dialysis (DG for at least six months, ten patients who had kidney transplants (TG at least six months earlier, and 30 healthy subjects as a control group (CG. All groups were evaluated using spirometry, with maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP, and using the six-minute walking test (6MWT. The SPSS 12.0 software was used for statistical analysis, with a minimum significance level of α<0.05. RESULTS: There was a decreased lung function in the DG for FVC, FEV1, MVV, VC, MIP and MEP, and decreased FEV1 and MVV in the TG compared to the CG (one-way ANOVA/Fisher's post-hoc; p<0.01. There was also an association (chi-square between decreased MIP and belonging to the DG (α=0.5, p<0.001, between lower performance in the 6MWT for the DG and TG (p<0.01 compared to the CG (one-way ANOVA/Fisher's post-hoc, and between MIP and MEP (Pearson's coefficient; r=0.752; p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with CKF undergoing dialysis showed impaired functional capacity and lung function that were not completely reverted in the kidney transplant

  17. Experiences of kidney failure: a qualitative meta-synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaroff, Kara L Schick

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a qualitative meta-synthesis on the experiences of kidney failure in the nursing literature. Database searches were not limited by date; however, only 13 peer-reviewed articles, theses, and dissertations met inclusion criteria. Meta-synthesis of the texts suggests individuals with kidney failure have experiences of paradoxical nature, including occurrences of restricted freedom that bring about distant connection, dependent autonomy, abnormal normalcy, and uncertain hope. When nurses are attuned to the seemingly contradictory nature of experiences of individuals living with kidney failure, they may be better able to develop strategies that will increase quality of life for these patients. PMID:22480049

  18. Growth Hormone Therapy in Children with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Cayir, Atilla; Kosan, Celalettin

    2014-01-01

    Growth is impaired in a chronic renal failure. Anemia, acidosis, reduced intake of calories and protein, decreased synthesis of vitamin D and increased parathyroid hormone levels, hyperphosphatemia, renal osteodystrophy and changes in growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor and the gonadotropin-gonadal axis are implicated in this study. Growth is adversely affected by immunosuppressives and corticosteroids after kidney transplantation. Treating metabolic disorders using the recombinant huma...

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm2). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging of kidneys in patients with chronic kidney disease: initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xueqin; Fang, Wenqiang; Ling, Huawei; Chai, Weimin; Chen, Kemin [Ruijin Hospital Shanghai, Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the assessment of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Seventy-two healthy volunteers and 43 patients underwent coronal echo-planar DW MR imaging of the kidneys with a single breath-hold time of 16 s. The patients were grouped according to five stages as indicated by the K/DOQI CKD (kidney disease outcome quality initiative). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of the kidneys was calculated with high b values (b = 500 s/mm{sup 2}). The ADC values were compared between patients and healthy volunteers, and among different stages. For statistical analysis, Student's t tests, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation tests, and Spearman's correlation tests were used. No difference between the cortex and medulla could be observed on DW images of all volunteers. Patients with CKD had significantly lower renal ADC (t = -4.383, P = 0.000) than volunteers. The ADC values of kidneys were significantly lower than normal at most stages of CKD, except CKD1. There was a negative correlation between the ADCs and serum creatinine (sCr) level (P = 0.000) amongst the patients. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging is feasible in the assessment of renal function, especially in the detection of early stage renal failure of CKD. (orig.)

  1. Update on the Current Status of Kidney Transplantation for Chronic Kidney Disease in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Lillian R

    2016-11-01

    Kidney transplantation is a novel treatment option for cats suffering from chronic renal failure or acute irreversible renal injury. Improvement in quality of life as well as survival times of cats that have undergone transplantation has helped the technique to gain acceptance as a viable treatment option for this fatal disease. This article reviews information regarding the optimal time for intervention, congenital and acquired conditions that have been successfully treated with transplantation, recipient and donor screening, immunosuppressive therapy, recent advances in anesthetic and surgical management, postoperative monitoring and long-term management, and troubleshooting perioperative and long-term complications. PMID:27593577

  2. Effects of acute and chronic hypohydration on kidney health and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehally, John; Khosravi, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the homeostasis of body fluid tonicity and effective circulating volume. Renal homeostatic mechanisms are frequently challenged in acutely ill people. Fluid depletion causing hypovolemia may result in renal hypoperfusion that, if left untreated, may lead to acute kidney failure. Some populations, notably older people and neonates, are less tolerant of extremes in fluid loading and deprivation, similar to those with established chronic kidney disease. Risk of kidney injury during fluid depletion is increased by medications including diuretics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, and renin-angiotensin system blockers. There is no consistent evidence indicating that lower-than-average fluid intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Increasing consumption of sugar-containing beverages is, however, a major concern for kidney health as a precursor of obesity and diabetes. There is no evidence that high dietary protein intake can cause chronic kidney disease, nor accelerate progression of established kidney disease. Idiosyncratic, adverse renal responses have been described with creatine supplements. There are only a few clinical conditions for which high fluid intake should be considered. These include recurrent kidney stones or urinary tract infections and, possibly, polycystic kidney disease. PMID:26290296

  3. CPAP in chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic Heart Failure (CHF represents worldwide a clinical condition with increasing prevalence, high social, economical and epidemiological impact. Even if new pharmacological and non-pharmacological approachs have been recently used, mortality remains high in general population and quality of life is poor in these patients. DISCUSSION The association between CHF and sleep disorders is frequent but still undervalued: sleep apnoeas in CHF produce negative effects on cardiovascular system and an aggravation of prognosis. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure is commonly used to treat sleep apnoeas in patients without cardiac involvement and it is also used in first line treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema thanks to its hemodynamic and ventilatory effects. The addition of nightly CPAP to standard aggressive medical therapy in patients with CHF and sleep apnoeas reduces the number of apnoeas, reduces the blood pressure, and the respiratory and cardiac rate, reduces the activation of sympathetic nervous system, the left ventricular volume and the hospitalization rate; besides CPAP increases the left ventricular ejection fraction, amd the oxygenation, it improves quality of life, tolerance to exercise and seems to reduce mortality in patients with a higher apnoeas suppression. CONCLUSIONS These implications suggest to investigate sleep apnoeas in patients with CHF in order to consider a possible treatment with CPAP. Further studies need to be developed to confirm the use of CPAP in patients with CHF without sleep disorders.

  4. Diagnosis based on nuclear medicine in intensive care as demonstrated by acute and chronic failures of blood flow (brain, lungs, heart, kidneys)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The value of nuclear medicine procedures which are noninvasive and impose little burden on the patient is assessed with respect of intensive care. Firstly, additional data are available to evaluate physiological functions. Secondly, these functions can be monitored under therapy. Thirdly, screening of the contralateral organ or of other organs can be provided. Cerebral procedures yield values of regional cerebral blood flow (ml/100 g/min) in addition to the morphological findings of CT. Cardiovascular procedures are supplementary in describing the regional as well as the global cardiac function. Using myocardium imaging with thallium-201 the extent of infarction can be estimated. In the crucial diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, radionuclide studies provide the necessary information. Renal procedures evaluate single kidney function yielding clearance values (ml/min). Furthermore, radionuclide flow studies are useful to detect early complications of transplanted kidneys. Diagnostic procedures with radionuclides if all instruments were care could be even more efficient if all instruments were available in the intensive care unit or could be transported there instead of transferring the patients to the nuclear medicine department. (orig.)

  5. INDUCTION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY FAILURE IN A LONG-TERM PERITONEAL EXPOSURE MODEL IN THE RAT: EFFECTS ON FUNCTIONAL AND STRUCTURAL PERITONEAL ALTERATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Vrtovsnik; A. Coester; D. Lopes-Barreto; D.R. de Waart; A. van der Wal; D.G. Struijk; R. Krediet; M. Zweers

    2010-01-01

    Background: A long-term peritoneal exposure model has been developed in Wistar rats. Chronic daily exposure to 3.86% glucose based, lactate buffered, conventional dialysis solutions is possible for up to 20 weeks and induces morphological abnormalities similar to those in long-term peritoneal dialys

  6. Chronic Disease and Childhood Development: Kidney Disease and Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Susan D.; Simmons, Roberta G.

    As part of a larger study of transplantation and chronic disease and the family, 124 children (10-18 years old) who were chronically ill with kidney disease (n=72) or were a year or more post-transplant (n=52) were included in a study focusing on the effects of chronic kidney disease and transplantation on children's psychosocial development. Ss…

  7. Myocardial Ischemia Assessment in Chronic Kidney Disease: Challenges and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Fei Cen Parnham

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the chronic kidney disease population and often presents with atypical symptoms. Current diagnostic investigations of myocardial ischemia in chronic kidney disease lack sensitivity and specificity or may have adverse effects. We present a case vignette and explore the challenges of diagnostic myocardial stress investigation in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  8. Vitamin K Status in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel M. Holden

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to summarize the research to date on vitamin K status in chronic kidney disease (CKD. This review includes a summary of the data available on vitamin K status in patients across the spectrum of CKD as well as the link between vitamin K deficiency in CKD and bone dynamics, including mineralization and demineralization, as well as ectopic mineralization. It also describes two current clinical trials that are underway evaluating vitamin K treatment in CKD patients. These data may inform future clinical practice in this population.

  9. Arterial Stiffness and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, Anne-Sophie; Briet, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health concern due to the high prevalence of associated cardiovascular (CV) disease. CV mortality is 10-30 times higher in end-stage renal disease patients than in the age-adjusted general population. The last 20 years have been marked by a huge effort in the characterization of the vascular remodeling process associated with CKD and its consequences on the renal, CV and general prognosis. By comparison with patients with normal renal function, w...

  10. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  11. Chronic kidney disease: Statins in chronic kidney disease: time to move on?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Richard; Wanner, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Statins reduce the risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease in healthy individuals and those with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, clinical trials have suggested a minimal effect of statins on CKD progression. The PLANET trials compared the renal effects of rosuvastatin and atorvastatin, but the findings leave many questions unanswered. PMID:25802077

  12. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Left Ventricular Function in Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sourabh Chand; Colin D Chue; Edwards, Nicola C.; James Hodson; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Alexander Hamilton; Gough, Stephen C L; Lorraine Harper; Steeds, Rick P.; Townend, Jonathan N.; Ferro, Charles J.; Richard Borrows

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with accelerated cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) Glu298Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype has been associated with a worse phenotype amongst patients with established heart failure and in patients with progression of their renal disease. The association of a cardiac functional difference in non-dialysis CKD patients with no known previous heart failure, and eNOS gene variant is investi...

  13. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  14. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  15. Treatment Methods for Kidney Failure: Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... back on the waiting list for another kidney. Side Effects of Immunosuppressants Immunosuppressants can weaken your immune system, ... patients, over long periods of time, this diminished immunity can increase the risk of developing cancer. Some ...

  16. Sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maung, Stephanie C; El Sara, Ammar; Chapman, Cherylle; Cohen, Danielle; Cukor, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders have a profound and well-documented impact on overall health and quality of life in the general population. In patients with chronic disease, sleep disorders are more prevalent, with an additional morbidity and mortality burden. The complex and dynamic relationship between sleep disorders and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain relatively little investigated. This article presents an overview of sleep disorders in patients with CKD, with emphasis on relevant pathophysiologic underpinnings and clinical presentations. Evidence-based interventions will be discussed, in the context of individual sleep disorders, namely sleep apnea, insomnia, restless leg syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness. Limitations of the current knowledge as well as future research directions will be highlighted, with a final discussion of different conceptual frameworks of the relationship between sleep disorders and CKD. PMID:27152260

  17. Hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Sule; Erdem, Yunus; Batuman, Vecihi; Erturk, Sehsuvar

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, both hypertension and chronic kidney disease are major public health problems, due to their epidemic proportions and their association with high cardiovascular mortality. In 2003, the first Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Turkey (the PatenT) study was conducted in a nationally representative population (n=4910) by the Turkish Society of Hypertension and Renal Diseases, and showed that overall age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of hypertension in Turkey was 31.8%. The PatenT study also reported that overall awareness (40.7%), treatment (31.1%), and control rates (8.1%) of hypertension were strikingly low. Only 20.7% of the patients who were aware of their hypertension and receiving treatment had their blood pressure controlled to diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, obesity, and metabolic syndrome were reported as 32.7%, 12.7%, 76.3%, 20.1%, and 31.3%, respectively. The prevalence and awareness of hypertension in CREDIT population was 32.7% and 48.6%, respectively. According to the data obtained from national surveys, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease in Turkey is alarmingly high. To improve prevention, early diagnosis, and treatment of these major public health problems, appropriate health strategies should be implemented by the government, together with medical societies, non-governmental organizations, industry, health-care providers, and academia. PMID:25019009

  18. ELEVATION OF SERUM POTASSIUM AND ITS OUTCOME IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Punam Yadav; Dinkar Malik; Sandeep Kumar; Vijai Malik

    2014-01-01

    Potassium is the principal metallic ion inside the cells. During physical activity potassium ion leaves muscle cells and this leads to fatigue. When aldosteron instructs the kidney to retain sodium ion, they generally excrete more potassium ion. The kidneys are the principal organ of excretion for potassium, not only potassium is filtered by the kidneys in the glomeruli but it is also secreted by the tubules. Chronic renal failure does not cause severe or progressive hyperkala...

  19. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mir-davood Omrani; Mohammad Hassan Khadem Ansari

    2006-01-01

    HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF) becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α|) and interleukin (IL) 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unre...

  20. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page Content On this page: Why ... Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Controlling blood glucose, also called blood sugar, ...

  1. Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disease Organizations​​ . (PDF, 345 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Nutrition for Early Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults Page ... choices? Points to Remember Clinical Trials Why is nutrition important for someone with early chronic kidney disease ( ...

  2. Current Evidence on Treatment of Patients With Chronic Systolic Heart Failure and Renal Insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Kevin; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Felker, G. Michael; Lassus, Johan; Zannad, Faiez; Krum, Henry; McMurray, John J. V.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly prevalent in patients with chronic systolic heart failure. Therefore, evidence-based therapies are more and more being used in patients with some degree of renal dysfunction. However, most pivotal randomized clinical trials specifically excluded patients

  3. [Hyperhydration and dialysis in acute kidney failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saner, Fuat H; Bienholz, Anja; Tyczynski, Bartosz; Kribben, Andreas; Feldkamp, Thorsten

    2015-05-01

    Despite the advances in critical care medicine, the hospital mortality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring dialysis remains high. Depending on the underlying disease the in-house mortality is reported to be up to 80%. Several observational studies demonstrated an association between mortality and fluid overload. A primary mechanism of interest is that fluid overload causes tissue edema and subsequent reduction of perfusion, oxygenation and nutrient delivery. This results in further renal damage. In addition, fluid overload-related dilution within the extracellular space causes artificially low serum creatinine, which masks AKI diagnosis. As a consequence, renal protective management strategies are deferred, which further aggravates kidney injury. This aggravation of renal damage subsequently increases the mortality. This review discusses the role of fluid overload for outcomes in critically ill patients as described in the current literature and assesses criteria for the initiation of renal replacement therapy in this critically ill population. PMID:25970415

  4. Achieving Salt Restriction in Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. McMahon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is consistent evidence linking excessive dietary sodium intake to risk factors for cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD progression in CKD patients; however, additional research is needed. In research trials and clinical practice, implementing and monitoring sodium intake present significant challenges. Epidemiological studies have shown that sodium intake remains high, and intervention studies have reported varied success with participant adherence to a sodium-restricted diet. Examining barriers to sodium restriction, as well as factors that predict adherence to a low sodium diet, can aid researchers and clinicians in implementing a sodium-restricted diet. In this paper, we critically review methods for measuring sodium intake with a specific focus on CKD patients, appraise dietary adherence, and factors that have optimized sodium restriction in key research trials and discuss barriers to sodium restriction and factors that must be considered when recommending a sodium-restricted diet.

  5. Recipient Criteria Predictive of Graft Failure in Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molmenti, Ernesto P; Alex, Asha; Rosen, Lisa; Alexander, Mohini; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Yang, Jingyan; Siskind, Eric; Alex, Leesha; Sameyah, Emil; Bhaskaran, Madhu; Ali, Nicole; Basu, Amit; Sachdeva, Mala; Agorastos, Stergiani; Rajendran, Prejith; Krishnan, Prathik; Ramadas, Poornima; Amodu, Leo; Cagliani, Joaquin; Rehman, Sameer; Kressel, Adam; Sethna, Christine B; Sotiropoulos, Georgios C; Radtke, Arnold; Sgourakis, George; Schwarz, Richard; Fishbane, Steven; Bellucci, Alessandro; Coppa, Gene; Rilo, Horacio; Molmenti, Christine L

    2016-03-01

    Several classifications systems have been developed to predict outcomes of kidney transplantation based on donor variables. This study aims to identify kidney transplant recipient variables that would predict graft outcome irrespective of donor characteristics. All U.S. kidney transplant recipients between October 25,1999 and January 1, 2007 were reviewed. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to model time until graft failure. Death-censored and nondeath-censored graft survival models were generated for recipients of live and deceased donor organs. Recipient age, gender, body mass index (BMI), presence of cardiac risk factors, peripheral vascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, cerebrovascular disease, history of malignancy, hepatitis B core antibody, hepatitis C infection, dialysis status, panel-reactive antibodies (PRA), geographic region, educational level, and prior kidney transplant were evaluated in all kidney transplant recipients. Among the 88,284 adult transplant recipients the following groups had increased risk of graft failure: younger and older recipients, increasing PRA (hazard ratio [HR],1.03-1.06], increasing BMI (HR, 1.04-1.62), previous kidney transplant (HR, 1.17-1.26), dialysis at the time of transplantation (HR, 1.39-1.51), hepatitis C infection (HR, 1.41-1.63), and educational level (HR, 1.05-1.42). Predictive criteria based on recipient characteristics could guide organ allocation, risk stratification, and patient expectations in planning kidney transplantation. PMID:26900309

  6. Thyroid Disorders and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Mohamedali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hormones play a very important role regulating metabolism, development, protein synthesis, and influencing other hormone functions. The two main hormones produced by the thyroid are triiodothyronine (T3 and thyroxine (T4. These hormones can also have significant impact on kidney disease so it is important to consider the physiological association of thyroid dysfunction in relation to chronic kidney disease (CKD. CKD has been known to affect the pituitary-thyroid axis and the peripheral metabolism of thyroid hormones. Low T3 levels are the most common laboratory finding followed by subclinical hypothyroidism in CKD patients. Hyperthyroidism is usually not associated with CKD but has been known to accelerate it. One of the most important links between thyroid disorders and CKD is uremia. Patients who are appropriately treated for thyroid disease have a less chance of developing renal dysfunction. Clinicians need to be very careful in treating patients with low T3 levels who also have an elevation in TSH, as this can lead to a negative nitrogen balance. Thus, clinicians should be well educated on the role of thyroid hormones in relation to CKD so that proper treatment can be delivered to the patient.

  7. Socioeconomic disparities in chronic kidney disease : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vart, Priya; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Joosten, Michel M.; Bultmann, Ute; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Evidence on the strength of the association between low SES and chronic kidney disease (CKD; measured by low estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR], high albuminuria, low eGFR/high albuminuria, and renal failure) is scattered and sometimes conflicting. Therefore, a systematic review an

  8. Acute-on-chronic liver failure: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamora Nava LE

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Luis Eduardo Zamora Nava,1 Jonathan Aguirre Valadez,2 Norberto C Chávez-Tapia,3 Aldo Torre21Department of Endoscopy, 2Department of Gastroenterology, National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition Salvador Zubirán, 3Obesity and Digestive Diseases Unit, Medica Sur Clinic and Foundation, Mexico City, MexicoAbstract: There is no universally accepted definition of acute-on-chronic liver failure; however, it is recognized as an entity characterized by decompensation from an underlying chronic liver disease associated with organ failure that conveys high short-term mortality, with alcoholism and infection being the most frequent precipitating events. The pathophysiology involves inflammatory processes associated with a trigger factor in susceptible individuals (related to altered immunity in the cirrhotic population. This review addresses the different definitions developed by leading research groups, epidemiological and pathophysiological aspects, and the latest treatments for this entity.Keywords: acute-on-chronic liver failure, cirrhosis, organ failure, acute kidney injury, infection

  9. Management of hyperglycemia in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires Neto, Patrícia; Gomes, Henrique Vieira; Campos, Mário

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes currently accounts for approximately 45% of cases of end-stage renal failure in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Several observational studies have identified a positive correlation between measures of glycemic control and cardiovascular and microvascular benefits. Several randomized prospective studies have been conducted to quantify the impact of strict glycemic control on morbidity and mortality. These studies have consistently demonstrated an association between strict glycemic control and a reduction in microvascular events, but these results contrast with the lack of consistent results regarding macrovascular events. Treating diabetes has always been challenging. This challenge is increased in chronic kidney disease, due to changes in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin and most oral antidiabetic agents. The available pharmacotherapeutic arsenal for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus currently involves approximately 6 different pharmacological classes of oral antidiabetic agents and different modalities of insulin therapy. PMID:23807643

  10. Renal Cell Protection of Erythropoietin beyond Correcting The Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Nasri

    2013-01-01

    Currently many patients with chronic renal failure have profited from the use of erythropoietin to correct anemia (1,2). In chronic kidney disease, anemia is believed to be a surrogate index for tissue hypoxia that continues preexisting renal tissue injury (1-3). Erythropoietin is an essential glycoprotein that accelerates red blood cell maturation from erythroid progenitors and facilitates erythropoiesis. It is a 30.4 kD glycoprotein and class I cytokine containing 165 amino acids (3,4). App...

  11. Chronic Heart Failure: Contemporary Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Ramani, Gautam V.; Uber, Patricia A.; Mehra, Mandeep R.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) remains the only cardiovascular disease with an increasing hospitalization burden and an ongoing drain on health care expenditures. The prevalence of CHF increases with advancing life span, with diastolic heart failure predominating in the elderly population. Primary prevention of coronary artery disease and risk factor management via aggressive blood pressure control are central in preventing new occurrences of left ventricular dysfunction. Optimal therapy for CHF...

  12. Homoarginine and progression of chronic kidney disease: results from the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Drechsler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homoarginine is an amino acid derivative mainly synthesized in the kidney. It is suggested to increase nitric oxide availability, enhance endothelial function and to protect against cardiovascular diseases. We aimed to investigate the relation between homoarginine, kidney function and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. METHODS: We measured plasma homoarginine concentrations in baseline samples of the Mild to Moderate Kidney Disease (MMKD Study, a prospective cohort study of 227 patients with CKD in Europe. Homoarginine concentrations were available in 182 of the baseline samples and in 139 of the prospectively-followed patients. We correlated homoarginine concentrations to parameters of kidney function. The association between homoarginine and progression of CKD was assessed during a follow-up of up to seven years (median 4.45 years, interquartile range 2.54-5.19 using Cox regression analysis. Progression of CKD was defined as doubling of baseline serum creatinine and/or end-stage renal disease. RESULTS: Study participants were at baseline on average 47±13 years old and 65% were male. Mean±standard deviation of homoarginine concentrations were 2.5±1.1 µmol/L and concentrations were incrementally lower at lower levels of GFR with mean concentrations of 2.90±1.02 µmol/L (GFR>90 ml/min, 2.64±1.06 µmol/L (GFR 60-90 ml/min, 2.52±1.24 µmol/L (GFR 30-60 ml/min and 2.05±0.78 µmol/L (GFR<30 ml/min, respectively (p = 0.002. The age- and sex-adjusted risk to reach the renal endpoint was significantly higher by 62% with each decrease by one standard deviation (1.1 µmol/L of homoarginine (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.16-2.27, p = 0.005. This association was independent of proteinuria (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.11-2.20, p = 0.01, and was slightly attenuated when adjusting for GFR (HR 1.40 (95% CI 0.98-1.98, p = 0.06. CONCLUSIONS: Homoarginine concentrations are directly correlated with kidney function and are significantly

  13. Chronic kidney disease and the skeleton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul D Miller

    2014-01-01

    Fractures across the stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) could be due to osteoporosis, some form of renal osteodystrophy defined by specific quantitative histomorphometry or chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD). CKD–MBD is a systemic disease that links disorders of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD to either one or all of the following:abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, parathyroid hormone or vitamin D metabolism;abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth or strength;or vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Osteoporosis, as defined by the National Institutes of Health, may coexist with renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD. Differentiation among these disorders is required to manage correctly the correct disorder to reduce the risk of fractures. While the World Health Organization (WHO) bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis can be used in patients with stages 1–3 CKD, the disorders of bone turnover become so aberrant by stages 4 and 5 CKD that neither the WHO criteria nor the occurrence of a fragility fracture can be used for the diagnosis of osteoporosis. The diagnosis of osteoporosis in stages 4 and 5 CKD is one of the exclusion—excluding either renal osteodystrophy or CKD–MBD as the cause of low BMD or fragility fractures. Differentiations among the disorders of renal osteodystrophy, CKD–MBD or osteoporosis are dependent on the measurement of specific biochemical markers, including serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and/or quantitative bone histomorphometry. Management of fractures in stages 1–3 CKD does not differ in persons with or without CKD with osteoporosis assuming that there is no evidence for CKD–MBD, clinically suspected by elevated PTH, hyperphosphatemia or fibroblast growth factor 23 due to CKD. Treatment of fractures in persons with osteoporosis and stages 4 and 5 CKD is not evidence-based, with the exception of post-hoc analysis suggesting efficacy and

  14. SICK EUTHYROID SYNDROME IN CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sick euthyroid syndrome is an undermined entity seen in many chronic illness. CKD is one of the forerunners in terms of magnitude in the list of chronic illnesses. Also there is evidence of abnormal thyroid metabolism at several levels in uremia. Hence the need to evaluate thyroid function in CKD patients exists, as revealed by recent studies. AIMS: To study thyroid function test in patients of chronic renal failure. Also, to study the correlation between thyroid function test and severity of renal failure, defined by creatinine clearance. MATERIALS & METHODS : In a cross sectional observational case control study, 50 patients of chronic renal failure either on conservative management or on maintenance haemodialysis and 50 normal healthy subjects as control were enrolled. Creatinine clearance was calculated by Cockcroft – Gault Equation. Thyroid function tests were done by C.L.I.A (Chemiluminescence Immunoassay. RESULTS : Of the 50 patients (M:F – 58:42%, with a mean age 40.58 ± 12.65 years, 28 (56% were on conservative management, 22 (44% were on hemodialysis for a minimum period of three months. All patients were clinically euthyroid. Thyroid function tests were normal (all parameters within normal range in 13 (26% patien ts. However 37 (74% out of 50 patients of CKD had deranged thyroid function test (sick euthyroid syndrome. Mean Total T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 71.52 ± 27.88ng/dl and 95.34 ± 16.31ng/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T3 in patients of CKD and controls were 2.19 ± 0.70pg/ml and 3.23 ± 0.79pg/ml respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Total T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 6.03 ± 1.60μg/dl and 6.88 ± 1.06μg/dl respectively (p < 0.005. Mean Free T4 in patients of CKD and controls were 1. 18 ± 0.55ng/ml and 1.29 ± 0.24ng/dl respectively (no statistically significant difference. Mean TSH in patients of CKD and controls were 2.90 ± 1.39 vs. 2.81 ± 0.99μIU/ml respectively (no

  15. Values of multi-parameter renal ultrasound in the differential diagnosis of acute and chronic kidney failure%多项肾脏超声参数评分法在急慢性肾功能衰竭鉴别中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘金祥; 丁勇; 吴晓峰; 单薇; 曹翠云; 任迎

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the values of scoring kidney size,medulla echo,blood perfusion and other ultrasound parameters in the differential diagnosis of acute and chronic kidney failure.Methods Forty-three cases of acute renal failure,forty-five cases of chronic renal failure,forty-three cases of kidney disease with normal renal function and forty cases of healthy controls were enrolled in this study.Size of kidney,form (lotus-root sign),blood flow (firework sign)and other indicators were observed and scored.Then,the scores of the parameters were used to draw ROC curve for seeking an optimal diagnostic cutoff.Results The renal cortex echo enhancement and medulla echo reduction,forming a lotus root sign,were characteristic changes of acute renal failure for distinguishing acute kidney failure from the chronic.Although blood perfusion in kidney was negatively correlated with creatinine in kidney failure,the reduction of blood flow showing as firework sign was mostly acute renal failure in class Ⅰ and Ⅱ,while chronic renal failure was mostly in class Ⅲ and Ⅳ.The size of kidney increased in acute renal failure but decreased in chronic renal failure.However,the normal size of kidney was meaningless for the differential diagnosis.For patients with renal failure but without diabetics,total score ≥ 10 can be used to diagnose acute kidney failure with a sensitivity of 83.7% and specificity of 95.6%.Conclusion Multi-parameter analysis of renal ultrasound plays an important role in the diagnosis of acute renal failure,especially for the patients with normal size of the kidney.%目的:采用肾脏大小、髓质回声、血流灌注等多种超声参数的评分来探讨其在急性肾功能衰竭中诊断及与慢性肾功能衰竭鉴别诊断的价值。方法171例患者分成4组,即急性肾功能衰竭组、慢性肾功能衰竭组、肾功能正常的肾病组和正常对照组,观察4组患者的肾脏大小、形态(藕片征)、血流(烟花征)等

  16. Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Chronic Kidney Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML); Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL); Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML); Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL); Hodgkin Disease; Multiple Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS); Aplastic Anemia; AL Amyloidosis; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Myelofibrosis; Myeloproliferative Disease; Sickle Cell Anemia; Autoimmune Diseases; Thalassemia

  17. Advanced glycation endproducts in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Andries J.; Hartog, Jasper W. L.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Schleicher, E; Somoza,; Shieberle, P

    2008-01-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) have been proposed as factors involved in the development and progression of chronic heart failure (CHF). Cross-linking by AGEs results in vascular and myocardial stiffening, which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of CHE Additionally, stimulation of receptors b

  18. Body mass index in chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Heidi M; Schou, Morten; Goetze, Jens P; Faber, Jens; Frystyk, Jan; Flyvbjerg, Allan; Kistorp, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) is associated with a poor outcome in chronic heart failure (CHF). An inverse association between BMI and adiponectin and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether novel markers of...

  19. Prevalence of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Stojceva-Taneva

    2016-01-01

    CONCLUSION: Our study showed that chronic kidney disease is frequent in the Republic of Macedonia and is associated with older age and diabetes. Diabetes had a significantly stronger association with CKD at younger age.

  20. Parathyroid hormone secretion in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q; Ladefoged, S D;

    1996-01-01

    The aim of study was to introduce and evaluate a method for quantifying the parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion during hemodialysis in secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal failure. We developed a method suitable for inducing sequential hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia during...... failure. By the use of a standardized method we show that the calcium set-point is normal or slightly elevated, indicating normal parathyroid reactivity to calcium in chronic renal failure......., blood PTH/ionized calcium curves were constructed, and a mean calcium set-point of 1.16 mmol/liter was estimated compared to the normal mean of about 1.13 mmol/liter. In conclusion, we demonstrate that it is important to use a standardized method to evaluate parathyroid hormone dynamics in chronic renal...

  1. High serum enalaprilat in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elung-Jensen, T; Heisterberg, J; Kamper, A L;

    2001-01-01

    renal failure. METHODS: Fifty nine out-patients with plasma creatinine >150 micromol/L and chronic antihypertensive treatment with enalapril were investigated, in a cross-sectional design. RESULTS: Median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was 23(range 6-60) ml/minute/1.73 m2. The daily dose of enalapril......-68) ml/minute and correlated linearly with GFR (r=0.86, p=0.003). Intra-subject day-to-day variation in trough concentrations was 19.7%. CONCLUSION: Patients with chronic renal failure given small or moderately high doses of enalapril may thus have markedly elevated levels of serum enalaprilat. Whether......BACKGROUND: Most angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and their metabolites are excreted renally and doses should hence be reduced in renal insufficiency. We studied whether the dosage of enalapril in daily clinical practice is associated with drug accumulation of enalaprilat in chronic...

  2. Chronic renal failure in Al-Anbar of Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami M Awad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no precise study of the epidemiology and prevalence of chronic renal failure in Al-Anbar, Iraq. Therefore, we studied 230 hemodialysis (HD patients at the HD unit of Al-Ramadi teaching hospital during the period from April 1, 2008 to April 1, 2009. There were 124 (53% male patients with a mean age of 48 ± 18.5 years, and 146 (63% patients were older than 40 years. The estimated prevalence of chronic renal failure was 141 patients per million population. Diabetes mellitus (33% and hypertension (22.6% were the most common causes of chronic renal failure, followed in order by obstructive uropathy in 17.3%, undetermined causes in 14%, pyelonephritis in 4.7%, glomerulonephritis in 4.3%, and polycystic kidney disease in 3.9%. This study suggests that large number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD have diabetes and hypertension. However, those patients with undetermined cause still form a significant portion of etiology of ESRD, and this reflects late referral combined with diagnostic limitations.

  3. A study on the relationship between of life quality and family support in patients with chronic kidney failure%慢性肾功能衰竭病人生存质量与家庭支持的相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋芬; 杨海娟; 黄爱玲

    2009-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between of life quality and family support in patients with chronic kidney failure. Methods 170 cases of chronic kidney failure pationts were evaluated by using the MOS SF-36 questionnaire and the social (family) support review questionnaire (SSRS) . Results The total score of QOL were positivly correlated with total score of the SSRS and three dimensioalities : impersonal support,subjet support , usage of the support (rT =0.227, rI =0. 109, rS =0.226, rU =0. 194;P<0.05 or P<0.01) . The total score of SSRS of patients who had been the single or conjugal bereavement were lower than of the married (F =21. 202, P < 0. 01 ), and uneducated were lower than those who had been educated more (F =2. 786, P < 0. 01 ) . Conclusion The life quality of chronic kidney failure patients can be improved throgh reinforeement of the family support.%目的 探讨慢性肾功能衰竭病人生存质量与家庭支持的相关性.方法 采用MOSSF36、SSRS量表对170例慢性肾功能衰竭病人进行调查.结果 生存质量与家庭支持的关系总分及各因子评分呈正相关,差异有显著性(RT=0.227、RI=0.109、RS=0.226、RU=0.194,P<0.05).患者文化程度越高获得的家庭支持总分也越高(F=2.786,<0.01).结论 加强慢性肾功能衰竭病人的家庭支持,可提高其生存质量.

  4. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Carolina Cruz; Carolina Andrade; Milton Urrutia; Sergio Draibe; Luiz Antônio Nogueira-Martins; Ricardo de Castro Cintra Sesso

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outco...

  5. Impaired vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzner, Fabian; Scholze, Alexandra; Wittstock, Antje;

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics.......Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) show increased cardiovascular morbidity. We hypothesized that vascular properties which can be routinely evaluated noninvasively are related to different stages of CKD and their clinical and biochemical characteristics....

  6. Stroke and bleeding in atrial fibrillation with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions.......Both atrial fibrillation and chronic kidney disease increase the risk of stroke and systemic thromboembolism. However, these risks, and the effects of antithrombotic treatment, have not been thoroughly investigated in patients with both conditions....

  7. Reduction of cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease by mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Murray

    2015-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and morbidity in people with chronic kidney disease, but there are few evidence-based treatments for reducing cardiovascular events in these patients. The failure of novel drug candidates to delay progression to end-stage renal disease and limit or abrogate cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has led to increased interest in a mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist-based treatment model to reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Aldosterone concentrations and MR signalling are associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular injury and the incidence of sudden death, and MR blockade decreases the risk of cardiovascular events and sudden death in patients with reduced glomerular filtration rate. Since evidence from clinical trials shows that treatment with MR antagonists confers a morbidity and mortality advantage for patients with cardiovascular disorders, similar benefits might also accrue in patients with chronic kidney disease. Large prospective trials are urgently needed to answer this question. In this Review, I argue that despite differences in the pathophysiology and clinical features of cardiovascular disease in patients with and without chronic kidney disease, MR antagonists could provide cardiovascular benefit in patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:26429402

  8. Targeted Screening and Treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease: Lessons Learned from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program

    OpenAIRE

    Vassalotti, Joseph A.; Leslie Gracz-Weinstein; Monica R. Gannon; Wendy Weinstock Brown

    2006-01-01

    The National Kidney Foundation's (NKF) Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP) is a public service program that addresses the gaps in chronic kidney disease (CKD) awareness and care. This free, voluntary, community-based program is designed to screen people at risk of CKD and promote CKD awareness among primary healthcare providers and the public. The primary objective of KEEP is to identify individuals at risk of CKD at a time when appropriate intervention has the potential to markedly slow a...

  9. Potential Deleterious Effects of Vasopressin in Chronic Kidney Disease and Particularly Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.; Boertien, W. E.; Zietse, R.; Gansevoort, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The antidiuretic hormone vasopressin is crucial for regulating free water clearance in normal physiology. However, it has also been hypothesized that vasopressin has deleterious effects on the kidney. Vasopressin is elevated in animals and patients with chronic kidney disease. Suppression of vasopre

  10. Acute kidney transplant failure following transurethral bladder polyp fulguration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Bradley H.; Marroquin, Carlos E.; Tuttle-Newhall, Janet E.; Kuo, Paul C.; Preminger, Glenn M.; Butterly, David W.

    2005-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction and anastomotic leak represent the most common urologic complications of kidney transplantation. Delay in diagnosis or treatment can lead to allograft loss. Obstruction of the ureter occurs in 2% of kidney transplant recipients. Although the majority of cases are immediate technical complications of the operation, subsequent manipulation of the genitourinary system can result in iatrogenic ureteral injury. We report the case of a long-term kidney transplant recipient who developed obstructive uropathy and acute renal failure requiring dialysis after undergoing cystoscopy and bladder polyp fulguration. The etiology was inadvertent thermal injury of the ureteroneocystostomy incurred during the procedure. After attempted percutaneous management, definitive open repair resulted in a return of allograft function to baseline. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:15779509

  11. Circulating adipocytokines and chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine T Mills

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adipokines have been associated with atherosclerotic heart disease, which shares many common risk factors with chronic kidney disease (CKD, but their relationship with CKD has not been well characterized. METHODS: We investigated the association of plasma leptin, resistin and adiponectin with CKD in 201 patients with CKD and 201 controls without. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m(2 or presence of albuminuria. Quantile regression and logistic regression models were used to examine the association between adipokines and CKD adjusting for multiple confounding factors. RESULTS: Compared to controls, adjusted median leptin (38.2 vs. 17.2 ng/mL, p<0.0001 and adjusted mean resistin (16.2 vs 9.0 ng/mL, p<0.0001 were significantly higher in CKD cases. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was 2.3 (1.1, 4.9 for leptin and 12.7 (6.5, 24.6 for resistin. Median adiponectin was not significantly different in cases and controls, but the odds ratio comparing the highest tertile to the lower two tertiles was significant (1.9; 95% CI, 1.1, 3.6. In addition, higher leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were independently associated with lower eGFR and higher urinary albumin levels. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that adipocytokines are independently and significantly associated with the risk and severity of CKD. Longitudinal studies are warranted to evaluate the prospective relationship of adipocytokines to the development and progression of CKD.

  12. Safety and tolerability of the novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist BAY 94-8862 in patients with chronic heart failure and mild or moderate chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pitt, Bertram; Kober, Lars; Ponikowski, Piotr;

    2013-01-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) improve outcomes in patients with heart failure and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF), but their use is limited by hyperkalaemia and/or worsening renal function (WRF). BAY 94-8862 is a highly selective and strongly potent non...

  13. An ignored cause of chronic kidney disease in children: type 2 cardiorenal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Engin Melek; Sercan Aynaci; Bahriye Atmis; Sevcan Erdem; Nazan Ozbarlas; Aysun Karabay Bayazit

    2016-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is a disorder of the heart and kidneys in which acute or chronic dysfunction in one organ may induce acute or chronic dysfunction in the other organ. It is well known that the main cause of mortality among patients with end-stage renal disease is due to cardiovascular events and a common complication in patients in acute heart failure is a decrease in renal function. However, when there are no signs and/or symptoms of chronic cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular causes ...

  14. Acute Kidney Injury Enhances Outcome Prediction Ability of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Score in Critically Ill Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Chih-Hsiang; Fan, Pei-Chun; Chang, Ming-Yang; Tian, Ya-Chung; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yung-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and serious complication in intensive care unit (ICU) patients and also often part of a multiple organ failure syndrome. The sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score is an excellent tool for assessing the extent of organ dysfunction in critically ill patients. This study aimed to evaluate the outcome prediction ability of SOFA and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III score in ICU patients with AKI. Methods A tot...

  15. Malnutrition in patients with chronic renal failure

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Abdul Rashid Tony

    2000-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition is common in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) and may contribute to a poor clinical outcome. However, the role of nutrition in this regard has not been clearly defined. Malnutrition in patients with CRF may have many causes, including disturbances in protein and energy metabolism, hormonal derangements, as well as low food intake because of anorexia, caused by uremic toxicity, various superimposed illnesses and psychosocial problems. Alth...

  16. Prospective memory and chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Habota, Tina; Cameron, Jan; McLennan, Skye N; Ski, Chantal F; Thompson, David R; Peter G Rendell

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) experience a number of debilitating symptoms, which impact on activities of daily living and result in poor quality of life. Prospective memory, which is defined as memory to carry out future intentions, has not been investigated in this group. However, emerging evidence suggests CHF patients have difficulties with cognitive processes related to prospective memory. Self-care, which partly relies on prospective memory, is essential in sympto...

  17. Central Blood Pressure and Chronic Kidney Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie L. Cohen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension, diabetes, and proteinuria are well-recognized risk factors for progressive kidney function loss. However, despite excellent antihypertensive and antidiabetic drug therapies, which also often lower urinary protein excretion, there remains a significant reservoir of patients with chronic kidney disease who are at high risk for progression to end-stage kidney disease. This has led to the search for less traditional cardiovascular risk factors that will help stratify patients at risk for more rapid kidney disease progression. Among these are noninvasive estimates of vascular structure and function. Arterial stiffness, manifested by the pulse wave velocity in the aorta, has been established in a number of studies as a significant risk factor for kidney disease progression and cardiovascular endpoints. Much less well studied in chronic kidney disease are measures of central arterial pressures. In this paper we cover the physiology behind the generation of the central pulse wave contour and the studies available using these approaches and conclude with some speculations on the rationale for why measurements of central pressure may be informative for the study of chronic kidney disease progression.

  18. Platelets of patients with chronic kidney disease demonstrate deficient platelet reactivity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Bladel Esther R

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients with chronic kidney disease studies focusing on platelet function and properties often are non-conclusive whereas only few studies use functional platelet tests. In this study we evaluated a recently developed functional flow cytometry based assay for the analysis of platelet function in chronic kidney disease. Methods Platelet reactivity was measured using flow cytometric analysis. Platelets in whole blood were triggered with different concentrations of agonists (TRAP, ADP, CRP. Platelet activation was quantified with staining for P-selectin, measuring the mean fluorescence intensity. Area under the curve and the concentration of half-maximal response were determined. Results We studied 23 patients with chronic kidney disease (9 patients with cardiorenal failure and 14 patients with end stage renal disease and 19 healthy controls. Expression of P-selectin on the platelet surface measured as mean fluorescence intensity was significantly less in chronic kidney disease patients compared to controls after maximal stimulation with TRAP (9.7 (7.9-10.8 vs. 11.4 (9.2-12.2, P = 0.032, ADP (1.6 (1.2-2.1 vs. 2.6 (1.9-3.5, P = 0.002 and CRP (9.2 (8.5-10.8 vs. 11.5 (9.5-12.9, P = 0.004. Also the area under the curve was significantly different. There was no significant difference in half-maximal response between both groups. Conclusion In this study we found that patients with chronic kidney disease show reduced platelet reactivity in response of ADP, TRAP and CRP compared to controls. These results contribute to our understanding of the aberrant platelet function observed in patients with chronic kidney disease and emphasize the significance of using functional whole blood platelet activation assays.

  19. Early diagnosis saves lives: focus on patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ecder, Tevfik

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a global public health problem. Patients with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of developing end-stage kidney disease and its complications. Early identification and management of patients with chronic kidney disease is important in order to decrease the morbidity and mortality. Early detection of chronic kidney disease is possible with screening programs targeting high-risk patients, such as patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, elderly patient...

  20. Cardiovascular risk in Chinese patients with chronic kidney diseases: where do we stand?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fan-fan

    2005-01-01

    @@ Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Kidney failure requiring renal replacement therapy is the most visible outcome of CKD. In China, there is a rising incidence and prevalence of end stage renal diseases (ESRD), with poor outcomes and high cost. The registered number of individuals with ESRD treated by dialysis was 41 755 in 1999 and is expected to surpass 140 000 by 2009.1 It is important to note that, as many developing countries, the registered number of dialysis patients accounts only for less than 10% of total ESRD population in China.

  1. Effects of chronic kidney disease and uremia on hepatic drug metabolism and transport

    OpenAIRE

    Yeung, Catherine K.; Shen, Danny D.; Thummel, Kenneth E; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of non-renally cleared drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease is often unpredictable. Some of this variability may be due to alterations in the expression and activity of extra-renal drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters, primarily localized in the liver and intestine. Studies conducted in rodent models of renal failure have shown decreased mRNA and protein expression of many members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) gene family and the ATP-Binding Cassette ...

  2. The origin of interstitial myofibroblasts in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Grgic, Ivica; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Humphreys, Benjamin D.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic kidney diseases (CKD), independent of their primary cause, lead to progressive, irreversible loss of functional renal parenchyma. Renal pathology in CKD is characterized by tubulointerstitial fibrosis with excessive matrix deposition produced by myofibroblasts. Because blocking the formation of these scar-forming cells represents a logical therapeutic target for patients with progressive fibrotic kidney disease, the origin of renal myofibroblasts is a subject of intense investigation....

  3. The Use of Targeted Biomarkers for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Devarajan, Prasad

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of sensitive and specific biomarkers for the early prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression. The recent application of innovative technologies such as functional genomics, proteomics, and biofluid profiling has uncovered a number of new candidates that are emerging as predictive biomarkers of CKD. The most promising among these include urinary proteins such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), and liver-type f...

  4. Chronic kidney disease and bone fracture: a growing concern

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Leonard, Mary B.; Shane, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Susceptibility to fracture is increased across the spectrum of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Moreover, fracture in patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) results in significant excess mortality. The incidence and prevalence of CKD and ESKD are predicted to increase markedly over the coming decades in conjunction with the aging of the population. Given the high prevalence of both osteoporosis and CKD in older adults, it is of the utmost public health relevance to be able to assess fract...

  5. Discriminants of Prevalent Fractures in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nickolas, Thomas L.; Cremers, Serge; Zhang, Amy; Thomas, Valeri; Stein, Emily; Cohen, Adi; Chauncey, Ryan; Nikkel, Lucas; Yin, Michael T.; Liu, Xiaowei S.; Boutroy, Stephanie; Staron, Ronald B.; Leonard, Mary B.; McMahon, Donald J.; Dworakowski, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have higher rates of fracture than the general population. Increased bone remodeling, leading to microarchitectural deterioration and increased fragility, may accompany declining kidney function, but there are no reliable methods to identify patients at increased risk for fracture. In this cross-sectional study of 82 patients with predialysis CKD, high-resolution imaging revealed that the 23 patients with current fractures had significantly lower are...

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Cystic Renal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Cysts are frequently found in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and they have a different prognostic significance depending on the clinical context. Simple solitary parenchymal cysts and peripelvic cysts are very common and they have no clinical significance. At US, simple cyst appears as a round anechoic pouch with regular and thin profiles. On the other hand, hereditary polycystic disease is a frequent cause of CKD in children and adults. Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) and autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) are the best known cystic hereditary diseases. ADPKD and ARPKD show a diffused cystic degeneration with cysts of different diameters derived from tubular epithelium. Medullary cystic disease may be associated with tubular defects, acidosis and lithiasis and can lead to CKD. Acquired cystic kidney disease, finally, is secondary to progressive structural end-stage kidney remodelling and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. PMID:27169740

  7. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection. PMID:27142134

  8. Chronic Kidney Disease—Effect of Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subha Palaneeswari Meenakshi Sundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a growing health problem with increasing incidence. The annual mortality of end-stage renal disease patients is about 9%, which is 10–20 fold higher than the general population, approximately 50% of these deaths are due to cardiovascular (CV disease. CV risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are strongly associated with poor outcome. Many other nontraditional risk factors such as inflammation, infection, oxidative stress, anemia, and malnutrition are also present. In this review we will focus on the role of oxidative stress in chronic kidney disease.

  9. Gastrointestinal Angiodysplasia in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaaroud H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal (GI hemorrhage is a frequent and sometimes life-threatening complication of end-stage renal failure. Angiodysplasia (AD, vascular malformation, is the most common cause of recurrent lower-intestinal hemorrhage in patients with renal failure. We report four chronic hemodialysis patients with AD. All patients presented with severe anemia requiring transfusion. GI hemorrhage ceased spontaneously in three cases and after treatment with argon plasma coagulation in another. Diagnosis of AD is usually challenging, since its cause is still unknown, and its clinical presentation is variable. Lesions are multiple in 40-75% of cases, often located in the stomach and duodenum but can affect the colon and the jejunum. Diagnosis is improved by endoscopy which has a much higher sensitivity compared to angiography. Capsular endoscopy may reveal the hemorrhage site in the small intestine when regular endoscopy fails, and therapeutic intervention usually include argon plasma coagulation.

  10. Single Drug Treatment for Chronic Kidney Disease – A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Padavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Punarnava matured whole plant of Boerhaavia diffusa Linn. (Fam Nyctaginaceae, trailing herb found throughout India and collected after rainy season, herb is diffusely branched with stout root stock and many long slender, prostrate or ascending branches. The name says “pun-nava” means new again; Punarnava can rejuvenates the dying cells and helps to revive the dying organs of the body. Kidneys are the organs that have numerous biological roles. They maintain the homeostatic balance of body fluids by removing waste out of body. Chronic Kidney disease (CKD or Chronic Renal Failure (CRF refers to an irreversible deterioration in renal function, which develops over a period of years. The conventional approach of management includes dialysis and renal transplantation, which are involving the high costs and complexity so very few patients are able to obtain adequate treatment for kidney disorders because of financial limitation. Therefore, exploration of a safe and alternative therapy is needed, which proves to be helpful in reducing the requirement of dialysis and in postponing the renal transplantation. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. In present study a case was taken of chronic kidney disease with chronic nephritis. He was Punarnava swaras daily with orally. This treatment approach has significantly improved condition of patient eliminating dialysis requirement.

  11. Treatment disparities in acute coronary syndromes, heart failure, and kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Peter A; Maynard, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    It has been consistently observed that patients with renal dysfunction have more premature, severe, complicated, and fatal cardiovascular disease than age- and sex-matched individuals with normal renal function. There have been 4 major explanations for this finding: (1) positive confounding by third variables associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including diabetes mellitus and hypertension; (2) therapeutic nihilism or lesser use of beneficial therapies in CKD; (3) greater toxicities of therapies, such as bleeding from anticoagulants or contrast-induced kidney injury; (4) biological factors which result directly from CKD that work to promote and accelerate cardiovascular disease. In this paper, we focus on the issue of treatment disparities or therapeutic nihilism and its contribution to poor outcomes in the setting of acute coronary syndromes and acutely decompensated heart failure. This issue is important because if we can overcome barriers to the utilization of beneficial treatments, then clinical outcomes should improve over time. PMID:21625092

  12. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Vendrely Benoit; Beauvieux Marie-Christine; Barthe Nicole; Raffaitin Christelle; Montaudon Michel; Laurent François; Lasseur Catherine; Garcia Magalie; Rigalleau Vincent; Chauveau Philippe; Combe Christian; Gin Henri

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance) below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by ...

  13. How to Read a Food Label: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How to Read a Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) National Kidney Disease Education Program If you ... and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Kidney Disease Education Program 2

  14. Functional genomics in renal transplantation and chronic kidney disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the past decade, the development of genomic technology has revolutionized modern biological research. Functional genomic analyses enable biologists to study genetic events on a genome wide scale. Examples of applications are gene discovery, biomarker determination, disease classification, and drug target identification. Global expression profiles performed with microarrays enable a better understanding of molecular signature of human disease, including acute and chronic kidney disease. About 10 % of the population in western industrialized nations suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Treatment of end stage renal disease, the final stage of CKD is performed by either hemo- or peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation. The preferred treatment is renal transplantation, because of the higher quality of life. But the pathophysiology of the disease on a molecular level is not well enough understood and early biomarkers for acute and chronic kidney disease are missing. In my studies I focused on genomics of allograft biopsies, prevention of delayed graft function after renal transplantation, anemia after renal transplantation, biocompatibility of hemodialysis membranes and peritoneal dialysis fluids and cardiovascular diseases and bone disorders in CKD patients. Gene expression profiles, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction networks were used to elucidate the underlying pathophysiological mechanism of the disease or phenomena, identifying early biomarkers or predictors of disease state and potentially drug targets. In summery my PhD thesis represents the application of functional genomic analyses in chronic kidney disease and renal transplantation. The results provide a deeper view into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of kidney disease. Nevertheless, future multicenter collaborative studies, meta-analyses of existing data, incorporation of functional genomics into large-scale prospective clinical trials are needed and will give biomedical

  15. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    OpenAIRE

    Manfredi Tesauro; Maria Paola Canale; Giuseppe Rodia; Nicola Di Daniele; Davide Lauro; Angelo Scuteri; Carmine Cardillo

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS) leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease ...

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骄

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia in the general population.AF and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) share several common risk factors.We investigated the association between chronic kidney disease and risk of atrial fibrillation

  17. Progress of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in chronic renal failure patients with vertebral bone change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone changes caused by kidney diseases affect the quality of life in the patients with chronic renal failure. How to improve evaluation of the bone change, and consequently start early intervention and treatment is an important topic. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has been successfully used in the evaluations of central nervous system, breast and prostate, etc. Evaluation of bone changes with MRS is under studied. This article reviewed the MRS in evaluation of vertebral body bone changes in patients with chronic renal failure. (authors)

  18. Research on stage of chronic kidney disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 45 ml·min-1·1.73 m-2for the stage assessment in the elderly patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) .Methods From June 2009 to December 2011,2258 patients were recruited and divided

  19. Novel biomarkers for progression of chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bi-cheng; L(U) Lin-li

    2010-01-01

    @@ CHARACTERISTICS OF THE PROGRESSION OF CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD) Although there are different initiators of CKD, it is generally recognized that the secondary pathological pathway is quite common to all CKD. CKD may inevitably progress to end stage renal disease (ESRD) due to a vicious cycle of nephron destruction by progressive glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis.

  20. Sarcopenia and Physical Inactivity in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Keiji; Ookawara, Susumu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    Sarcopenia and physical inactivity synergistically progress in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and are strong predictors of mortality in this population. Exercise training and essential amino acids and vitamin D supplements may contribute to improving sarcopenia and physical inactivity in CKD patients. PMID:27570755

  1. HBV Vaccination in Chronic Renal Failure Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir-davood Omrani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available HBV infection in chronic renal failure (CRF becomes chronic in 30 to 60% compared with less than 10% in nonuremic patients. Immunological dysfunction in patients on hemodialysis may be related to imbalanced cytokine systems, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-|α| and interleukin (IL 6,1 by retention of renal metabolite in uremia and chronic inflammation and have a poor immunological reaction to T-cell-dependent antigens, like hepatitis B vaccination. Immunocompromised patients who are unresponsive to hepatitis B vaccination seem to be unable to enhance IL-10 synthesis for control of monokine overproduction. Moreover, human leukocyte antigen (HLA genes, which play a major role in the antigen presentation to immunocompetent cells, have also been shown to modulate this immune response. Unfortunately, seroconversion to anti-HBS has been reported to occur in only 40 to 50% of the vaccine, a significantly lower rate than that observed in healthy adults. Various methods including adjutants such as zinc, gamma interferon, thymopentine, GM-CSF and Levamisol for improving immune responses have been advised. Experience with Pres1/s2, third-generation vaccines is limited and they have not been proven more effective than intradermally (ID administered second-generation S antigen vaccines. Both intramuscular (IM and intradermal (ID vaccinations against hepatitis B have variable efficiency in hemodialysis and non-responders should be retreated by ID route.

  2. Role of Bone Biopsy in Stages 3 to 4 Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sprague, Stuart M.

    2008-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism develops relatively early in chronic kidney disease as a consequence of impaired phosphate, calcium, and vitamin D homeostasis. The disease state in chronic kidney disease, which includes the histologic features of bone disease, defined as renal osteodystrophy, and the hormonal and biochemical disturbances, have recently been redefined as a disease syndrome and is referred to as “chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder.” As chronic kidney disease progres...

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Kidney Transplant Rejection via Large-Scale Proteogenomic Analysis of Tissue Biopsies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakorchevsky, Aleksey; Hewel, Johannes A.; Kurian, Sunil M.; Mondala, Tony S.; Campbell, Daniel; Head, Steve R.; Marsh, Christopher L.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    The most common cause of kidney transplant failure is the poorly characterized histopathologic entity interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (IFTA). There are no known unifying mechanisms, no effective therapy, and no proven preventive strategies. Possible mechanisms include chronic immune rejection, inflammation, drug toxicity, and chronic kidney injury from secondary factors. To gain further mechanistic insight, we conducted a large-scale proteogenomic study of kidney transplant biopsies with IFTA of varying severity. We acquired proteomic data using tandem mass spectrometry with subsequent quantification, analysis of differential protein expression, validation, and functional annotations to known molecular networks. We performed genome-wide expression profiling in parallel. More than 1400 proteins with unique expression profiles traced the progression from normal transplant biopsies to biopsies with mild to moderate and severe disease. Multiple sets of proteins were mapped to different functional pathways, many increasing with histologic severity, including immune responses, inflammatory cell activation, and apoptosis consistent with the chronic rejection hypothesis. Two examples include the extensive population of the alternative rather than the classical complement pathway, previously not appreciated for IFTA, and a comprehensive control network for the actin cytoskeleton and cell signaling of the acute-phase response. In summary, this proteomic effort using kidney tissue contributes mechanistic insight into several biologic processes associated with IFTA. PMID:20093355

  4. An Update on Coronary Artery Disease and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Afsar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the improvements in diagnostic tools and medical applications, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, especially coronary artery disease (CAD, remain the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. The main factors for the heightened risk in this population, beside advanced age and a high proportion of diabetes and hypertension, are malnutrition, chronic inflammation, accelerated atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, coronary artery calcification, left ventricular structural and functional abnormalities, and bone mineral disorders. Chronic kidney disease is now recognized as an independent risk factor for CAD. In community-based studies, decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR and proteinuria were both found to be independently associated with CAD. This paper will discuss classical and recent epidemiologic, pathophysiologic, and clinical aspects of CAD in CKD patients.

  5. Risk following hospitalization in stable chronic systolic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Putte; Swedberg, Karl; Borer, Jeffrey S; Böhm, Michael; Kober, Lars; Komajda, Michel; Lloyd, Suzanne M; Metra, Marco; Tavazzi, Luigi; Ford, Ian

    2013-01-01

    We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF).......We explored the impact of being hospitalized due to worsening heart failure (WHF) or a myocardial infarction (MI) on subsequent mortality in a large contemporary data set of patients with stable chronic systolic heart failure (HF)....

  6. Home monitoring of chronic heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bockeria O. L.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Being a common syndrome chronic heart failure (CHF results in high mortality among cardiosurgical patients and requires very high expenditures for the treatment. All over the world the number of patients with CHF syndrome is about 22 millions. Heart failure is difficult to treat because of high level of hospitalization due to decompensation. Care aimed at constant home observation of patients could have been more efficient and not only symptomatic and as a response to complications induced. There are methods controlling CHF patients at home. These methods vary from increase of self-care and telephone support to telemonitoring and remote monitoring of implantable devices. Self-care includes such components as maintenance of drug intake, keeping to a diet, physical exercises and active control over edemas. Telephone calls are also a source of monitoring and treatment of heart failure at home. Meta-analysis of programs for structured phone support showed that telephone support could reduce the level of readmission of HF patients approximately by 25%. Telemonitoring implies transmission of such physiological data as blood pressure, body weight, electrocardiographic signals or oxygen saturation using phone lines, broadband and satellite or wireless networks. Having cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices that are placed in HF patients, it is possible to use their opportunities for the further evaluation of the patient. Some regularly controlled parameters can show the clinical state of the patient and predict the following heart failure. For example, atrial fibrillation, decrease of cardiac rhythm variability and decrease of the level of the patient`s activity (according to integrated accelerometer can predict clinical decompensation. Also, implantable hemodynamic monitors for immediate pressure measuring in the left atrium, sensor system of pressure measuring in the right atrium are

  7. [Ultrasound and color Doppler applications in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) encompasses all clinical features and complications during the progression of various kidney conditions towards end-stage renal disease. These conditions include immune and inflammatory diseases such as primary and HCV-related glomerulonephritis; infectious diseases such as pyelonephritis with or without reflux and tuberculosis; vascular diseases such as chronic ischemic nephropathy; hereditary and congenital diseases such as polycystic disease and congenital cystic dysplasia; metabolic diseases including diabetes and hyperuricemia; and systemic diseases (collagen disease, vasculitis, myeloma). During the progression of CKD, ultrasound imaging can differentiate the nature of the renal damage in only 50-70% of cases. Infact, the end-stage kidney appears shrunken, reduced in volume (Ø acquired cystic degeneration (small and multiple cysts involving the cortex and medulla) or nephrocalcinosis, but there are rare exceptions, such as polycystic kidney disease, diabetic nephropathy, and secondary inflammatory nephropathies. The main difficulties in the differential diagnosis are encountered in multifactorial CKD, which is commonly presented to the nephrologist at stage 4-5, when the kidney is shrunken, unstructured and amorphous. As in acute renal injury and despite the lack of sensitivity, ultrasonography is essential for assessing the progression of the renal damage and related complications, and for evaluating all conditions that increase the risk of CKD, such as lithiasis, recurrent urinary tract infections, vesicoureteral reflux, polycystic kidney disease and obstructive nephropathy. The timing and frequency of ultrasound scans in CKD patients should be evaluated case by case. In this review we will consider the morphofunctional features of the kidney in all nephropathies that may lead to progressive CKD. PMID:23229668

  8. Role of leptin in reverse epidemiology in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Tepel, Martin

    2007-01-01

    , indicating leptin resistance. In healthy subjects increased leptin concentration constitutes a biomarker for increased cardiovascular risk. On the other hand, a recent prospective long-term study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy showed that reduced serum leptin......Leptin is mainly produced by adipocytes and metabolized in the kidney. Leptin is taken up into the central nervous system by a saturable transport system, and controls appetite in rodents and in healthy subjects. Leptin acts on peripheral tissue and increases the inflammatory response by...

  9. Biodegradable Magnesium (Mg) Implantation Does Not Impose Related Metabolic Disorders in Rats with Chronic Renal Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiali; Xu, Jiankun; Liu, Waiching; Li, Yangde; Qin, Ling

    2016-05-01

    Mg and its alloys have been considered as one of the most promising biodegradable medical devices, but it was still unclear whether hypermagnesemia involved health risks would occur in persons with kidney disease due to their deteriorated kidney function for Mg ions excretion from their body. In this study, we established a chronic renal failure (CRF) model in rats induced by adenine administration prior to Mg implantation, aiming to predict if CRF patients are suitable for the use of Mg implants. The results showed that Mg levels in serum, urine, feces and internal organs had no significant changes after Mg implantation for both normal and CRF rats. Biochemical indices detection and histopathological analysis in kidney, liver and heart tissue confirmed that Mg implants did not induce any extra damage in animals even with renal failure. Our study indicates that Mg based orthopaedic medical device may be considered for use in CRF patients without biosafety concerns.

  10. Oral disorders in patients with chronic renal failure. Narrative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hernández

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure (CRF is one of the best known renal diseases. It is characterized by a deterioration in the overall renal function and is associated with other conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, uropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. Patients with CRF show alterations of the masticatory system that are specific to the disease and other type of disorders as a result of treatment. Oral health in dialysis and transplant patients tends to be poor, which makes them more likely to develop pathological conditions in the oral cavity, potentially increasing morbidity, mortality and affecting the quality of life of patients. Among the lesions we can find dysgeusia, periodontitis, candidiasis, gingival bleeding, petechiae, and joint alterations. Gingivitis and xerostomia associated to long-term use medications can cause oral lesions. Children with CRF show two oral conditions of interest: high incidence of dental anomalies and low caries activity. In patients receiving a kidney transplant, previous dental treatment is critical because the immune status of the patient will be affected not only by the toxemia, but by the immunosuppressive drugs used to prevent organ rejection. Therefore, the dentist plays an important role in training parents and/or guardians, doctors and paramedics on the treatment of oral lesions in these patients.

  11. Quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Lada

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemodialysis and transplantation are performed not only to replace renal function, but also to improve patients' quality of life. The aim of our investigation was to compare the quality of life in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF before and after the introduction of active therapy. Material and methods. We tested 76 patients (pts: 20 pts on conservative therapy (CT, 21 pts on chronic hemodialysis and 35 pts with renal transplantation. A questionnaire (combining two questionnaires was used to investigate the physical, emotional and social aspects of health. Results. In regard to physical health of transplantation patients (TP it was established that work capacity and activities were less damaged, whereas physical activity was highest in pts on CT. Social activity was limited in a higher percentage in TP (40% than in hemodialysis patients (HD (19%, while family relationships were most damaged in pts on HD (28.57%. Discomforts were most common in pts on HD. The highest percentage of pts estimated their health status as good or average, but their health status improved after transplantation in 82.86% that is in 57.14% after HD. It was similar with the quality of life: 28.57% of kidney transplant patients rated their quality of life as very good, and 54.28% rated it as good; 38.09% of HD patients rated their quality of life as very good, whereas only 5% of CT patients rated it as very good, and 20% as good. .

  12. Cardiovascular Disease in Chronic Kidney Disease: Data from the Kidney Early Evaluation Program (KEEP)

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Peter A.; Steigerwalt, Susan; Tolia, Kirit; Chen, Shu-Cheng; Li, Suying; Norris, Keith C.; Whaley-Connell, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) are leading joint risk factors for both cardiovascular disease (CVD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). In the nationwide KEEP (Kidney Early Evaluation Program) an estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or a urine albumin:creatinine ratio ≥30 mg/g (3.4 mg/mmol) defines CKD. Overall in KEEP, the rates of identified CKD and self-reported CVD are 25.7% and 22.1%, respectively. The presence of CKD has been associated with youn...

  13. Healthy Hair Starts With a Healthy Body: Hair Stylists as Lay Health Advisors to Prevent Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Madigan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chronic kidney disease affects one in nine Americans. Diabetes and hypertension account for nearly three quarters of all kidney failure cases. Disproportionate rates of chronic kidney disease, diabetes, and hypertension have been observed among African Americans. More than 70% of all kidney failure cases caused by diabetes and hypertension could have been prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyles and medications.Context Approximately 14% of the population living in Michigan is African American. Despite this small proportion, 47% of patients on dialysis and 45% of those on the kidney transplant waiting list are African American. Risk of end-stage kidney failure is 4 times greater among African Americans than among whites.Methods The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan developed the Healthy Hair Starts with a Healthy Body (Healthy Hair campaign to educate African American men and women about their disease risks and to motivate prevention behaviors. The campaign trains African American hair stylists to promote healthy behaviors with their clients through a “health chat” and by providing diabetes and hypertension risk assessment information and incentives.Consequences Since 1999, Healthy Hair has trained nearly 700 stylists and reached more than 14,000 clients in eight Michigan cities. Information collected through a client “Chat Form” suggests a number of positive behavioral results.Interpretation With nearly 60% of clients indicating that they have taken steps to prevent diabetes, hypertension, and chronic kidney disease or to seek a physician’s advice, the Healthy Hair program appears to be effective in the short term in prompting attention to healthy behaviors and increasing risk awareness.

  14. Salt-induced changes in cardiac phosphoproteome in a rat model of chronic renal failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxiu Su

    Full Text Available Heart damage is widely present in patients with chronic kidney disease. Salt diet is the most important environmental factor affecting development of chronic renal failure and cardiovascular diseases. The proteins involved in chronic kidney disease -induced heart damage, especially their posttranslational modifications, remain largely unknown to date. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (chronic renal failure model or sham operation were treated for 2 weeks with a normal-(0.4% NaCl, or high-salt (4% NaCl diet. We employed TiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for phosphoproteomic profiling of left ventricular free walls in these animals. A total of 1724 unique phosphopeptides representing 2551 non-redundant phosphorylation sites corresponding to 763 phosphoproteins were identified. During normal salt feeding, 89 (54% phosphopeptides upregulated and 76 (46% phosphopeptides downregulated in chronic renal failure rats relative to sham rats. In chronic renal failure rats, high salt intake induced upregulation of 84 (49% phosphopeptides and downregulation of 88 (51% phosphopeptides. Database searches revealed that most of the identified phospholproteins were important signaling molecules such as protein kinases, receptors and phosphatases. These phospholproteins were involved in energy metabolism, cell communication, cell differentiation, cell death and other biological processes. The Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes analysis revealed functional links among 15 significantly regulated phosphoproteins in chronic renal failure rats compared to sham group, and 23 altered phosphoproteins induced by high salt intake. The altered phosphorylation levels of two proteins involved in heart damage, lamin A and phospholamban were validated. Expression of the downstream genes of these two proteins, desmin and SERCA2a, were also analyzed.

  15. Predicting cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease in Spain. The rationale and design of NEFRONA: a prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Roig Jordi; Sarró Felipe; Vidal Teresa; Valdivielso Jose; Coll Blai; Borràs Mercè; Martínez Montserrat; Junyent Mireia; Craver Lourdes; Fernández Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular risk assessment in this population is hampered by the failure of traditional risk factors to fully account for the elevated CVD risk (reverse epidemiology effect) and the presence of emerging risk factors specifically related to kidney failure. Therefore, diagnostic tools capable of improving cardiovascular risk assessment beyond tradit...

  16. the Pathogenesis of acute on Chronic Hepatitis B liver Failure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-chun Chi; Quan-jiang Dong; Chang-xin Geng

    2014-01-01

    Acute-on-chronic liver failure is a characteristic clinical liver syndrome, which should be differentiated from acute liver failure, acute decompensated liver cirrhosis and chronic liver failure. The pathogenesis of ACLF is not fully understood yet. Viral factors and immune injury have been reported to be the two major pathogenesis. This paper reviewed the researches on the pathogenesis of acute on chronic hepatitis B liver failure in recent years, to provide theoretical basis for prompt and accurate diagnosis and treatment of this syndrome. This would beneift for the prognosis and raise the survival rate of patients.

  17. Metabolic Syndrome, Chronic Kidney, and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Adipokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfredi Tesauro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease, whose incidence is alarmingly growing. It is associated with metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular complications. These complications are clustered in the metabolic syndrome (MetS leading to high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Obesity predisposes to diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephrosclerosis, and focal and segmental glomerular sclerosis and represents an independent risk factor for the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Albuminuria is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. Microalbuminuria has been described as early manifestation of MetS-associated kidney damage and diabetic nephropathy. Obesity and MetS affect renal physiology and metabolism through mechanisms which include altered levels of adipokines such as leptin and adiponectin, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Secretory products of adipose tissue also deeply and negatively influence endothelial function. A better understanding of these interactions will help in designing more effective treatments aimed to protect both renal and cardiovascular systems.

  18. Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy In Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkman, Danielle L.; Edwards, David G.; Lennon-Edwards, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity levels are low in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Evidence indicates that a sedentary lifestyle contributes to increased morbidity and mortality risk; thus, increasing physical activity is an undeniable aspect of a healthy lifestyle. Despite the myriad of health benefits associated with exercise, as well as clinical guidelines in its favor, exercise is still not prescribed as part of routine care in the CKD patient population. This article briefly discusses the b...

  19. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Anoop Shankar; Shirmila Syamala; Jie Xiao; Paul Muntner

    2012-01-01

    Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representativ...

  20. Disparities in Periodontitis Prevalence among Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H.

    2011-01-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerula...

  1. The central nervous system in childhood chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, Debbie S; Duquette, Peter J; Icard, Phil F; Hooper, Stephen R

    2007-10-01

    Neurodevelopmental deficits in pediatric and adult survivors of childhood onset chronic kidney disease (CKD) have been documented for many years. This paper reviews the available literature on central nervous system involvement incurred in childhood CKD. The studies reviewed include recent work in neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and neuropsychology, along with commentary on school functioning and long-term outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for monitoring the neurodevelopmental status and pursuing appropriate early interventions for children with CKD. PMID:17072652

  2. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Cannata, J.B. (Jorge); Rodríguez, Minerva; Gómez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease–mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone format...

  3. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial depletion and dysfunction in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Puya G.; Moradi, Hamid; Yang, Jia-Ying; Wang, Ping H.; Vaziri, Nasratola D

    2013-01-01

    Advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with impaired exercise capacity, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and oxidative stress. Mitochondria are the primary source for energy production and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial state 3 respiration, mitochondrial complex I enzyme activity, and tissue porin/actin ratio were determined in the gastrocnemius muscle of male SD rats 14 weeks after 5/6 nephrectomy (CKD) or sham-operation (control). The CKD group exhibited...

  4. Impaired renal function in relatives of chronic kidney disease patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pradip Kumar Dutta; Md Shafiul Haider; Abul Kashem

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is now a public health burden. If simple screening tests like the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and presence of albuminuria are done in asymptomatic persons, CKD can be diagnosed earlier that will help in halting the disease and not let it progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Aim: This study was conducted to see the proportion of renal function abnormality in the relatives of CKD patients. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional compa...

  5. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revisio...

  6. The risk of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Olechnowicz-Tietz, Sylwia; Gluba, Anna; Paradowska, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a serious health problem; the number of people with impaired renal function is rapidly rising, especially in industrialized countries. A major complication of CKD is cardiovascular disease. Accelerated atherosclerosis has been observed in early stages of renal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the degree of renal insufficiency and both the prevalence and intensity of coronary artery disease (asses...

  7. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

    2014-01-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctl...

  8. Coronary artery calcification in chronic kidney disease: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Stompór, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Arterial calcification is a well-recognized complication of advanced atherosclerosis. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by significantly more pronounced, disseminated and fast-progressing calcification of the vascular system, including the coronary arteries. New computed tomography-based imaging techniques allow for the noninvasive assessment and monitoring of calcification in different vascular sites. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) develops early in the course of CKD and is ...

  9. A Structural Approach to Skeletal Fragility in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, Mary B.

    2009-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy is a multifactorial disorder of bone metabolism in chronic kidney disease (CKD). As CKD progresses, ensuing abnormalities in mineral metabolism result in distortions in trabecular microarchitecture, thinning of the cortical shell, and increased cortical porosity. Recent studies have demonstrated significantly increased hip fracture rates in CKD stages 3 and 4, in dialysis patients, and in transplant recipients. The majority of studies of bone loss in CKD relied on dual en...

  10. Anticoagulation in chronic kidney disease patients—the practical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Stephen; Szeki, Iren; Nash, Michael J; Thachil, Jecko

    2014-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness about the risks of arterial and venous thromboembolism (TE) in hospital patients and general public which has led to consideration of thrombosis prevention measures in earnest. Early recognition of the symptoms of TE disease has led to timely administration of antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, translating to better outcome in many of these patients. In this respect, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) represent a special group. They indeed represent...

  11. Arterial stiffness and chronic kidney disease: causes and consequences

    OpenAIRE

    J.D. Kobalava; Yu.V. Kotovskaya; S.V. Villevalde; A.E.Soloveva; I.M. Amirbegishvili

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. CKD is characterized by accelerated aging of vessels in which the age-related arterial stiffness increase is exacerbated by a number of uremia-related processes. Increased arterial stiffness is associated with structural and functional disorders, as well as with the increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Increased arterial stiffness is diagnosed at an early stage of CKD. Modern understanding of ...

  12. Chronic kidney disease: identification and management in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Fraser, Simon; Blakeman, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Simon DS Fraser,1 Tom Blakeman2 1Academic Unit of Primary Care and Population Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton General Hospital, University of Southampton, Southampton, 2National Institute for Health Research Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research Greater Manchester, Centre for Primary Care, Institute of Population Health, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important and common noncommunicable condition globally...

  13. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menno Pruijm

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI, detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies performed in patients suffering from essential hypertension or chronic kidney disease (CKD. In line with animal studies, acute changes in cortical and medullary oxygenation have been observed after the administration of medication (furosemide, blockers of the renin-angiotensin system or alterations in sodium intake in these patient groups, underlining the important role of renal sodium handling in kidney oxygenation. In contrast, no BOLD-MRI studies have convincingly demonstrated that renal oxygenation is chronically reduced in essential hypertension or in CKD or chronically altered after long-term medication intake. More studies are required to clarify this discrepancy and to further unravel the role of renal oxygenation in the development and progression of essential hypertension and CKD in humans.

  14. The Prognosis of Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladu Mihaela

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic disease which can evolve towards devastating micro and macro-vascular complications. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a worldwide public health problem, with adverse outcomes of kidney failure, cardiovascular disease (CVD and premature death. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prognosis in patients with DM and CKD, depending on estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and albuminuria, according to the classification of Clinical Practice Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Chronic Kidney Disease (KDIGO from 2013 Materials and Methods: The study was epidemiological, transversal, non interventional type, with 600 subjects unselected patients divided into three subgroups: 200 patients with T1DM, 200 patients with T2DM and 200 age matched subjects without DM. The recorded data have been analyzed using the Statistic Package for Social Sciences (SPSS, the 17.00 software (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, United States of America. Results:. We found a statistically significant difference among the three study groups (p < 0.0001 regarding the prognosis of CKD. Conclusions: DM represents an important risk factor for the appearance of CKD but also a negative prognosis factor for the patients with CKD.

  15. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Cristina Simões e Silva; Flávia Cordeiro Valério; Mariana Affonso Vasconcelos; Débora Marques de Miranda; Eduardo Araújo Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD). Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, ...

  16. The definition, classification, and prognosis of chronic kidney disease : a KDIGO Controversies Conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levey, Andrew S.; de Jong, Paul E.; Coresh, Josef; El Nahas, Meguid; Astor, Brad C.; Matsushita, Kunihiro; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Kasiske, Bertram L.; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe

    2011-01-01

    The definition and classification for chronic kidney disease was proposed by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (NKF-KDOQI) in 2002 and endorsed by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) in 2004. This framework promoted increased attention to chr

  17. Net Clinical Benefit of Antithrombotic Therapy in Patients With Atrial Fibrillation and Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Anders Nissen; Lip, Gregory Y H; Kamper, Anne-Lise;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The balance between stroke reduction and increased bleeding associated with antithrombotic therapy among patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) is controversial. OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the risk associated with CKD in individual CHA₂DS₂-VASc...... (Congestive heart failure; Hypertension; Age ≥75 years; Diabetes mellitus; previous Stroke, transient ischemic attack, or thromboembolism; Vascular disease; Age 65 to 74 years; Sex category) strata and the net clinical benefit of warfarin in patients with AF and CKD in a nationwide cohort. METHODS: By...

  18. Long-term risk of chronic kidney disease in unilateral multicystic dysplastic kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, Omer; Chandar, Jayanthi; Rodriguez, Maria M; Abitbol, Carolyn L; Seeherunvong, Wacharee; Freundlich, Michael; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2011-04-01

    The clinical spectrum of renal dysplasia includes the non-functioning multicystic dysplastic kidney (MCDK). We report our experience of the outcome of unilateral MCDK and its contralateral kidney in 101 children with the diagnosis of MCDK from 1985 to 2009. Data collected included urine protein/creatinine ratio, estimated GFR (eGFR), blood pressure, surgical intervention, renal length and abnormalities of the contralateral kidney, and the involution rate. There was a predominance of left-sided MCDK. Diagnosis was made prenatally in 86.7%. Contralateral abnormalities included vesicoureteral reflux (16.8%), UPJ obstruction (4.1%), and megaureter (2.4%). Complete involution of MCDK occurred within 5 years in 60%. Compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral kidney to >97% occurred in 74.1%. Nephrectomy was performed in 19.8%. There was an increased risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage ≥ 2, and hypertension in those with contralateral abnormalities (prenal injury. Therefore, systematic follow-up of all patients is recommended. PMID:21240528

  19. Large kidneys predict poor renal outcome in subjects with diabetes and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vendrely Benoit

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Renal hypertrophy occurs early in diabetic nephropathy, its later value is unknown. Do large kidneys still predict poor outcome in patients with diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD? Methods Seventy-five patients with diabetes and CKD according to a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR, by 51Cr-EDTA clearance below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or an Albumin Excretion Rate above 30 mg/24 H, had an ultrasound imaging of the kidneys and were cooperatively followed during five years by the Diabetology and Nephrology departments of the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux. Results The patients were mainly men (44/75, aged 62 ± 13 yrs, with long-standing diabetes (duration:17 ± 9 yrs, 55/75 type 2, and CKD: initial GFR: 56.5 (8.5-209 mL/min/1.73 m2, AER: 196 (20-2358 mg/24 H. Their mean kidney lenght (108 ± 13 mm, 67-147 was correlated to the GFR (r = 0.23, p Conclusions Large kidneys still predict progression in advanced CKD complicating diabetes. In these patients, ultrasound imaging not only excludes obstructive renal disease, but also provides information on the progression of the renal disease.

  20. Retardation of kidney failure -- applying principles to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, D C H; Rangan, G K

    2005-01-01

    Over the next decade, the number of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) treated by dialysis may double, and even developed nations will have difficulty in coping with this alarming increase. This review will outline the proven and unproven strategies that have the potential to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recently, a number of randomised clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of several strategies to slow the progression of CKD. Proven strategies include adequate blood pressure control (with angiotensin blockade), and for diabetic nephropathy good glycaemic control. Other potentially beneficial strategies include smoking cessation, lipid control and aldosterone blockade. The early institution of these strategies has the potential to regress established CKD as well as improve the long-term cardiovascular outcomes of these patients. Proof of the efficacy in humans of promising experimental approaches, such as the administration of growth factors (e.g., recombinant bone morphogenetic protein-7), anti-fibrotic agents (e.g., pirfenidone) and novel anti-proteinuric drugs (e.g., pentosan polysulphate), is awaited. Finally, the primary prevention of CKD, at least in part, by the eradication of type 2 diabetes and obesity (through improvement of lifestyle factors), and adequate treatment of hypertension, have the potential to eliminate up to half of the most common causes of CKD (or ESRD) in developed countries. PMID:15726215

  1. Influence of chronic kidney disease on the outcome of patients with chronic total occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qing-Bin; Chen, Li-Ming; Min LI; Cui, Yu-Qi; Zhao, Chuan-Yan; Cui, Lian-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) predicted a poor prognosis in patients with coronary artery disease. There is a paucity of data on outcomes after revascularization in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) and CKD. This study aims to investigate the impact of CKD on the revascularization of CTO. Methods: This study enrolled 1,092 CTO patients received treatments in our hospital between February 2009 and January 2014. Major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and al...

  2. Sudden cardiac death and chronic kidney disease: From pathophysiology to treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, L; Rivera, R; Barbera, V; Bellasi, A; Cozzolino, M; Russo, D; De Pascalis, A; Banerjee, D; Floccari, F; Ronco, C

    2016-08-15

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients demonstrate higher rates of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity; and increased incidence of sudden cardiac death (SCD) with declining kidney failure. Coronary artery disease (CAD) associated risk factors are the major determinants of SCD in the general population. However, current evidence suggests that in CKD patients, traditional cardiovascular risk factors may play a lesser role. Complex relationships between CKD-specific risk factors, structural heart disease, and ventricular arrhythmias (VA) contribute to the high risk of SCD. In dialysis patients, the occurrence of VA and SCD could be exacerbated by electrolyte shifts, divalent ion abnormalities, sympathetic overactivity, inflammation and iron toxicity. As outcomes in CKD patients after cardiac arrest are poor, primary and secondary prevention of SCD and cardiac arrest could reduce cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. PMID:27174593

  3. Relationship between chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashar K

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Khaled Nashar,1 Brent M Egan2 1Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Care Coordination Institute and Greenville Health System, Greenville, SC, USA Abstract: Both metabolic syndrome (MetS and chronic kidney disease (CKD are increasing in incidence and lead to significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The relationship between these two entities is complex. Individual components of the MetS are known risk factors for incident kidney disease, but it is not clear how the clustering of these components is linked to the development and progression of kidney disease. Cross-sectional studies show an association of the MetS and prevalent CKD; however, one cannot draw conclusions as to which came first – the MetS or the kidney disease. Observational studies suggest a relationship between MetS and incident CKD, but they also demonstrate the development of MetS in patients with established CKD. These observations suggest a bidirectional relationship. A better understanding of the relationship between components of the MetS and whether and how these components contribute to progression of CKD and incident cardiovascular disease could inform more effective prevention strategies. Keywords: obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension, oxdative stress, inflammation, adipokines 

  4. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. PMID:27169551

  5. Quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Cruz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the dimensions of quality of life in the stages of chronic kidney disease and the influence of sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory data. INTRODUCTION: The information available on the quality of life of patients on conservative treatment and the relationship between the quality of life and glomerular filtration rate is limited. METHODS: 155 patients in stages 1-5 of chronic kidney disease and 36 in hemodialysis were studied. Quality of life was rated by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item (SF-36 and functional status by the Karnofsky Performance Scale. Clinical, laboratory and sociodemographic variables were investigated. RESULTS: Quality of life decreased in all stages of kidney disease. A reduction in physical functioning, physical role functioning and in the physical component summary was observed progressively in the different stages of kidney disease. Individuals with higher educational level who were professionally active displayed higher physical component summary values, whereas men and those with a higher income presented better mental component summary values. Older patients performed worse on the physical component summary and better on the mental component summary. Hemoglobin levels correlated with higher physical component summary values and the Karnofsky scale. Three or more comorbidities had an impact on the physical dimension. CONCLUSION: Quality of life is decreased in renal patients in the early stages of disease. No association was detected between the stages of the disease and the quality of life. It was possible to establish sociodemographic, clinical and laboratory risk factors for a worse quality of life in this population.

  6. Effects of chronic kidney disease and uremia on hepatic drug metabolism and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Catherine K; Shen, Danny D; Thummel, Kenneth E; Himmelfarb, Jonathan

    2014-03-01

    The pharmacokinetics of non-renally cleared drugs in patients with chronic kidney disease is often unpredictable. Some of this variability may be due to alterations in the expression and activity of extra renal drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, primarily localized in the liver and intestine. Studies conducted in rodent models of renal failure have shown decreased mRNA and protein expression of many members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP) gene family and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) gene families of drug transporters. Uremic toxins interfere with transcriptional activation, cause downregulation of gene expression mediated by proinflammatory cytokines, and directly inhibit the activity of the cytochrome P450s and drug transporters. While much has been learned about the effects of kidney disease on non-renal drug disposition, important questions remain regarding the mechanisms of these effects, as well as the interplay between drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in the uremic milieu. In this review, we have highlighted the existing gaps in our knowledge and understanding of the impact of chronic kidney disease on non-renal drug clearance, and identified areas of opportunity for future research. PMID:24132209

  7. [Geriatric patients with chronic kidney insufficiency: which antalgia?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, M; Hemett, O M; Descombes, E; Blondel, N; Hayoz, D

    2014-04-01

    Pain is a leading cause of office visits. In the geriatric population, it is known that the prevalence of renal failure increases exponentially with age, modifing the elimination of drugs and of their metabolites. What analgesia should be offered to these patients? The holy grail would be a medication without renal elimination, without toxic metabolites and without nephrotoxicity. Based on the literature we try to propose a specific approach to analgesia in older patients with kidney insufficiency, in order to help practitioners to better prescribe for this group of patients. PMID:24791426

  8. [The role of zinc in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Tatsuo

    2016-07-01

    Renal anemia is one of the most important complication as a cause of cardiovascular event in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The status of renal anemia has been ameliorated by using recombinant human erythropoietin (EPO), however, the EPO resistant anemia is sometimes seen in high stage CKD patients. Heavy metal deficiency including zinc deficiency is one of the cause of EPO resistant anemia. Recently, it is reported that zinc deficiency is seen in patients with CKD. In this article, we describe zinc deficiency in patients with CKD. The ability that zinc supplementation improves their anemia in CKD patients is also described. PMID:27455803

  9. Chronic kidney disease-induced HMGB1 elevation worsens sepsis and sepsis-induced acute kidney injury

    OpenAIRE

    Leelahavanichkul, Asada; Huang, Yuning; Hu, Xuzhen; Zhou, Hua; Tsuji, Takayuki; Chen, Richard; Jeffrey B Kopp; Schnermann, Jürgen; Yuen, Peter S.T.; Star, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    We previously showed that kidney dysfunction/interstitial fibrosis by folate predisposes mice to sepsis mortality (normal/sepsis: 15%; folate/sepsis: 90%); agents that increased survival in normal septic mice were ineffective in the two-stage model. We used a recently characterized 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx) mouse model of progressive chronic kidney disease (CKD) to study how CKD impacts sepsis and acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by cecal ligation-puncture (CLP). CKD intensified sepsis severity (...

  10. Intestinal adaptations in chronic kidney disease and the influence of gastric bypass surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Marguerite

    2014-09-01

    Studies have shown that compensatory adaptations in gastrointestinal oxalate transport can impact the amount of oxalate excreted by the kidney. Hyperoxaluria is a major risk factor in the formation of kidney stones, and oxalate is derived from both the diet and the liver metabolism of glyoxylate. Although the intestine generally absorbs oxalate from dietary sources and can contribute as much as 50% of urinary oxalate, enteric oxalate elimination plays a significant role when renal function is compromised. While the mechanistic basis for these changes in the direction of intestinal oxalate movements in chronic renal failure involves an upregulation of angiotensin II receptors in the large intestine, enteric secretion/excretion of oxalate can also occur by mechanisms that are independent of angiotensin II. Most notably, the commensal bacterium Oxalobacter sp. interacts with the host enterocyte and promotes the movement of oxalate from the blood into the lumen, resulting in the beneficial effect of significantly lowering urinary oxalate excretion. Changes in the passive permeability of the intestine, such as in steatorrhoea and following gastric bypass, also promote oxalate absorption and hyperoxaluria. In summary, this report highlights the two-way physiological signalling between the gut and the kidney, which may help to alleviate the consequences of certain kidney diseases. PMID:24951497

  11. Chronic Renal Failure in a Patient Due to Gluteal Compartment Syndrome After a Nephrectomy Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan ULUTAŞ, , ,

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gluteal compartment syndrome is a rare reason of rhabdomyolysis resulting from atraumatic origin, and leading to renal failure. Beside to other atraumatic causes like drug abuse, alcohol intoxication, and antihyperlipidemic medications prolonged operation duration in a fixed position is an important cause of this syndrome. Male sex, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are risk factors for gluteal compartment syndrome associated kidney failure. We report a 56 year old obese patient with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, and hypertension who undergo a nephrectomy operation resulting with gluteal compartment syndrome, and chronic kidney disease. We also highlight the importance of preventive cares and early recognition of gluteal compartment syndrome to avoid further morbidity.

  12. Investigating Awareness in Chronic Renal Failure Among Family Physicians

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    Birgül ATAMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The conditions underlying chronic renal failure have become epidemics in the world. The aim of this study was to reveal the degree of awareness of chronic renal failure among family physicians. MATERIAL and METHODS: Using data collected with a structured questionnaire and considering physicians’ socio-demographic features and their education on nephrology, we evaluated physicians’ awareness of the definition, frequency and clinical features of chronic renal failure. The questionnaire was filled in by volunteering family medicine specialists (FMS, family medicine assistants (FMA and family physicians (FP during a family medicine meeting. RESULTS: Out of 310 physicians, 25.2% (n=78 were FMS, 27.7% (n=86 FMA and 47.1% (n=146 FP. %35,2 of physicians (n=109 (FMS: % 62,8 (n=49, FMA: %52.3 (n=45, FP: %10.3 (n=15, p0.05. However, less than 15% of the physicians reported that they felt competent enough to follow patients with chronic renal failure. The rate of the physicians who felt the need to refer these patients to health institutions was high. However, the Fps did not like the patient care style of internal medicine specialists and thought that patients faced financial problems to access the nephrologist. CONCLUSION: Appropriate care and management of referrals are life-saving for patients with chronic renal failure. New strategies should be developed to increase awareness concerning chronic renal failure and the management of this condition.

  13. Predictive factors of graft dysfunction and long-term kidney allograft failure

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is considered the treatment of choice for many patients with endstage chronic kidney disease; however, despite advancements in short-term allograft survival, long-term survival has not paralleled this improvement. Due to the inevitable ischemic damage and associated reperfusion injury, delayed graft function (DGF) is a common complication after kidney transplantation, which may negatively affect graft survival. Because serum creatinine (SCr) and other traditional marker...

  14. Kidney Disease and the Nexus of Chronic Kidney Disease and Acute Kidney Injury: The Role of Novel Biomarkers as Early and Accurate Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerramilli, Murthy; Farace, Giosi; Quinn, John; Yerramilli, Maha

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) are interconnected and the presence of one is a risk for the other. CKD is an important predictor of AKI after exposure to nephrotoxic drugs or major surgery, whereas persistent or repetitive injury could result in the progression of CKD. This brings new perspectives to the diagnosis and monitoring of kidney diseases highlighting the need for a panel of kidney-specific biomarkers that reflect functional as well as structural damage and recovery, predict potential risk and provide prognosis. This article discusses the kidney-specific biomarkers, symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), clusterin, cystatin B, and inosine. PMID:27485279

  15. Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 and 2 predict outcomes in advanced chronic kidney disease: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Neirynck, Nathalie; Glorieux, Griet; Schepers, Eva; Verbeke, Francis; Vanholder, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Background : Soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 (sTNFR1) and 2 (sTNFR2) have been associated to progression of renal failure, end stage renal disease and mortality in early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD), mostly in the context of diabetic nephropathy. The predictive value of these markers in advanced stages of CKD irrespective of the specific causes of kidney disease has not yet been defined. In this study, the relationship between sTNFR1 and sTNFR2 and the risk for adverse car...

  16. Anemia in chronic heart failure : etiology and treatment options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Voors, Adriaan A.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose of review Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure, and is related to increased morbidity and mortality. The etiology of anemia in heart failure is complex and still not fully resolved. The review will describe current advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of an

  17. [Consensus document on treatment of type 2 diabetes in patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, Ricardo; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Artola, Sara; Górriz, José L; Menéndez, Edelmiro

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are highly prevalent chronic diseases that represent a significant public health problem and require multidisciplinary management. T2DM is the main cause of CKD in our setting and it is also a major comorbidity of non-diabetic nephropathy. Patients with diabetes and renal failure represent a special risk group as they have higher morbidity and mortality and are at a higher risk of hypoglycaemia than diabetic individuals with normal renal function. Treatment of T2DM in patients with CKD is controversial because of the scarcity of evidence available. This consensus document aims to facilitate the appropriate selection and dosage of anti-diabetic drugs as well as establishing glycaemic control safety targets in patients with CKD. PMID:24611186

  18. Vitamin B-12 and folate deficiency in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Haye H.; Comin-Colet, Josep; Klip, Ijsbrand T.; Enjuanes, Cristina; Grote Beverborg, Niels; Voors, Adriaan A.; Banasiak, Waldemar; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Bruguera, Jordi; Ponikowski, Piotr; Jankowska, Ewa A.; van der Meer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, clinical correlates and the effects on outcome of vitamin B-12 and folic acid levels in patients with chronic heart failure (HF). Methods We studied an international pooled cohort comprising 610 patients with chronic HF. The main outcome measure was all-cause m

  19. Extracorporal hemodialysis with acute or decompensated chronical hepatic failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wasem, Jürgen; Caspary, Wolfgang; Siebert, Uwe; Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Grabein, Kristin; Hessel, Franz

    2006-01-01

    Background: Conventional diagnostic procedures and therapy of acute liver failure (ALF) and acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) focus on to identify triggering events of the acute deterioration of the liver function and to avoid them. Further objectives are to prevent the development respectively the progression of secondary organ dysfunctions or organ failure. Most of the times the endocrinological function of the liver can to a wide extent be compensated, but the removal of toxins can onl...

  20. Associations between thyroid dysfunction and chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dănciulescu Miulescu Rucsandra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. The interactions between kidney and thyroid functions are well established: thyroid hormones are necessary for the maintenance of electrolyte and water homeostasis and kidney is involved in the regulation of thyroid hormones metabolism. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease (CKD. Material and Method. 23 patients with diabetes mellitus and CKD in pre-dialysis phase were recruited for this study. All subjects were investigated with thyroid ultrasound and laboratory tests to determine thyroid function, including: serum triiodothyronine (T3, free thyroxine (free T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH and antithyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO. Results were compared with the same measurements in 21 patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Results. The prevalence of goiter (52.17% vs. 19.04%, p<0.05, subclinical hypothyroidism (23.80% vs. 9.52%, p<0.05, hypothyroidism (8.69% vs. 4.76 %, p<0.05 and low T3 syndrome (23.80% vs. 0.00% p<0.05 were significant high in diabetic patients with CKD compared with patients with diabetes mellitus but without CKD. Conclusions. We observed high prevalence of thyroid morphology abnormalities and thyroid function disorders in diabetic patients with CKD. Low T3 syndrome and subclinical hypothyroidism are the most frequently thyroid function disorders in CKD patients.

  1. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy with Early Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Guillermina Miranda-Díaz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM and the secondary kidney damage produces diabetic nephropathy (DN. Early nephropathy is defined as the presence of microalbuminuria (30–300 mg/day, including normal glomerular filtration rate (GFR or a mildly decreased GFR (60–89 mL/min/1.73 m2, with or without overt nephropathy. The earliest change caused by DN is hyperfiltration with proteinuria. The acceptable excretion rate of albumin in urine is 300 mg/day. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is characterized by abnormalities in renal function that persist for >3 months with health implications. Alterations in the redox state in DN are caused by the persistent state of hyperglycemia and the increase in advanced glycation end products (AGEs with ability to affect the renin-angiotensin system and the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β, producing chronic inflammation and glomerular and tubular hypertrophy and favoring the appearance of oxidative stress. In DN imbalance between prooxidant/antioxidant processes exists with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS. The overproduction of ROS diminishes expression of the antioxidant enzymes (manganese superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. The early detection of CKD secondary to DN and the timely identification of patients would permit decreasing its impact on health.

  2. Chinese cohort study of chronic kidney disease: design and methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Bixia; Zhang Luxia; Wang Haiyan; Zhao Minghui

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common disorder associated with multiple adverse clinical consequences,especially cardiovascular risk and end-stage renal disease.A recent national survey demonstrated that CKD has become a leading health problem in China.There is an urgent need to implement an in-depth investigation of the CKD burden and also to explore underlying mechanisms of CKD progression and it association with adverse consequences.Methods The Chinese Cohort Study of Chronic Kidney Disease (C-STRIDE) is the first national CKD cohort in China.It will enroll approximately 3 000 pre-dialysis CKD patients aged between 18 and 74 years and follow-up for at least 5 years.Questionnaires,anthropometric measures,laboratory tests,and biomaterials will be collected at baseline and annually.The principal clinical outcomes of the C-STRIDE consist of renal disease events,cardiovascular events,and death.Based on the longitudinal clinical data and biomaterials,the risk factors with CKD progression and other outcomes will be analyzed,and candidate markers and predicted models will be established.Conclusion The C-STRIDE would provide important evidence for underlying mechanisms of CKD progression,valuable information for clinical guidelines,and healthcare policies in China.

  3. Cognitive Changes in Chronic Kidney Disease and After Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sandwijk, Marit S; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; Majoie, Charles B L M; Caan, Matthan W A; De Sonneville, Leo M J; Van Gool, Willem A; Bemelman, Frederike J

    2016-04-01

    Cognitive impairment is very common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is strongly associated with increased mortality. This review article will discuss the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment in CKD, as well as the effect of dialysis and transplantation on cognitive function. In CKD, uremic toxins, hyperparathyroidism and Klotho deficiency lead to chronic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction and vascular calcifications. This results in an increased burden of cerebrovascular disease in CKD patients, who consistently have more white matter hyperintensities, microbleeds, microinfarctions and cerebral atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging scans. Hemodialysis, although beneficial in terms of uremic toxin clearance, also contributes to cognitive decline by causing rapid fluid and osmotic shifts. Decreasing the dialysate temperature and increasing total dialysis time limits these shifts and helps maintain cognitive function in hemodialysis patients. For many patients, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment modality, because it reverses the underlying mechanisms causing cognitive impairment in CKD. These positive effects have to be balanced against the possible neurotoxicity of infections and immunosuppressive medications, especially glucocorticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors. A limited number of studies have addressed the overall effect of transplantation on cognitive function. These have mostly found an improvement after transplantation, but have a limited applicability to daily practice because they have only included relatively young patients. PMID:26479287

  4. Etiology and Outcome of Chronic Kidney Disease in Iranian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamatollah Ataei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Considering the significant geographical and ethnical differences in pattern of incidence, etiology and outcome of chronic kidney disease (CKD, the present study aimed to assess the etiology and outcome of CKD in Iranian children. Materials and Methods In a cross-sectional study etiology and outcome of 372 children aged 3 months to 18 years with CKD was studied during the period 1991 –2014. Children (186 boys, 186 girls with Stage 3 to 5 CKDs, defined as a glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min per 1.73 m2body surface area, were identified. Results Etiology was congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract in 125 (33.60%, cystic/ hereditary/ congenital diseases in 91 (24.46%, glomerulopathy in 73(19.62%, and cause unknown in 71 (19.09% patients. Forty-eight (13.22% were on conservative treatment, 174(47.93% had end-stage renal disease (ESRD with chronic hemodialysis, 24 (6.61% were on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Sixty-eight (18.74% underwent on renal transplant which was successful in 52 (14.33% patients but was associated with abnormal renal function in 16(4.41% children. Finally, 49 (13.50% patients died. Conclusion A large number of children developed CKD secondary to congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract. Planning for screening, early detection and instituting timely treatment of preventable causes could lead to a lower incidence of CKD in this group of children.

  5. Coping Effectively: A Guide to Living Well with Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Social Security office for a copy of the handbook explaining Medicare coverage for dialysis and transplant services. ■ ... with a transplant. For people on dialysis, eating foods that are not part of your kidney-friendly ...

  6. What I Need to Know about Living with Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Training & Career Development Grant programs for students, postdocs, and faculty Research at NIDDK Labs, faculty, and ... diabetes, digestive and liver diseases, kidney diseases, weight control and nutrition, urologic diseases, endocrine and metabolic diseases, ...

  7. Mechanisms of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids to improve cardiac remodeling in chronic renal failure disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Ju; Zhang, Huanji; Chen, Jie; Zuo, Zhiyi; Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Hui

    2013-02-15

    Both clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated that cardiac remodeling in patients with chronic renal failure (CRF) is very common. It is a key feature during the course of heart failure and an important risk factor for subsequent cardiac mortality. Traditional drugs or therapies rarely have effects on cardiac regression of CRF and cardiovascular events are still the first cause of death. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are the products of arachidonic acids metabolized by cytochrome P450 epoxygenases. It has been found that EETs have important biological effects including anti-hypertension and anti-inflammation. Recent data suggest that EETs are involved in regulating cardiomyocyte injury, renal dysfunction, chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related risk factors and signaling pathways, all of which play key roles in cardiac remodeling induced by CRF. This review analyzes the literature to identify the possible mechanisms for EETs to improve cardiac remodeling induced by CRF and indicates the therapeutic potential of EETs in it. PMID:23313758

  8. [CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE AND PREGNANCY--A CASE REPORT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaliev, G M; Uchikova, E; Malinova, M

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in women with chronic renal failure is a complex therapeutic problem requiring a multidisciplinary approach. It is associated with a higher risk of many perinatal complications. The most common abnormalities are related to: progression of renal failure, development of preeclampsia development of nephrotic syndrome, anemic syndrome, IUGR and fetal death. The prognosis depends on the values of serum creatinine prior to pregnancy, the degree of deterioration of renal function, development of additional obstetric complications and the specific etiological reasons that have led to the occurrence of renal failure. Determining the optimum time for authorization birth depends on the condition of the mother, the condition of the fetus and the rate of progression of renal failure, and the deadline the pregnancy should be terminated is 35 weeks. We present a case of a patient with chronic renal failure, with favorable perinatal outcome. PMID:26137779

  9. Interactions between Cytokines, Congenital Anomalies of Kidney and Urinary Tract and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Simões e Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal hydronephrosis is the most common anomaly detected on antenatal ultrasound, affecting 1–5% of pregnancies. Postnatal investigation has the major aim in detecting infants with severe urinary tract obstruction and clinically significant urinary tract anomalies among the heterogeneous universe of patients. Congenital uropathies are frequent causes of pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD. Imaging techniques clearly contribute to this purpose; however, sometimes, these exams are invasive, very expensive, and not sufficient to precisely define the best approach as well as the prognosis. Recently, biomarkers have become a focus of clinical research as potentially useful diagnostic tools in pediatric urological diseases. In this regard, recent studies suggest a role for cytokines and chemokines in the pathophysiology of CAKUT and for the progression to CKD. Some authors proposed that the evaluation of these inflammatory mediators might help the management of postnatal uropathies and the detection of patients with high risk to developed chronic kidney disease. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to revise general aspects of cytokines and the link between cytokines, CAKUT, and CKD by including experimental and clinical evidence.

  10. Effect of Heme Oxygenase-1 Inducer Hemin on Chronic Renal Failure Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慎微; 石黎明; 刘晓城

    2004-01-01

    Summary: The role of HO 1 inducer, hemin, in chronic renal failure (CRF) rats and its possible mechanism of action was studied. 5/6 subtotal nephrectomy was performed to establish chronic renal failure model. Rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: sham-operated group, CRF group,ferrous gluconate group and hemin group. At the 10th week after operation, serum creatinine,BUN, RBC, HGB and HCT were measured. Renal pathologic changes were observed. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression and distribution of HO-1. RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay was used to determine the expression of ET-1 in the kidney and plasma. The results showed that as compared with CRF group, serum creatinine and BUN in hemin group were reduced significantly and nephrogenic anemia was improved markedly. Glomerular mesangial proliferation and interstitial lesion were also ameliorated significantly. Hemin not only increased the expression of HO-1 but also reduced the expression of ET-1 in the kidney. The level of ET-1 protein in the plasma was also reduced after hemin treatment. Most of these indexes were not obviously changed in ferrous gluconate group. It was suggested that through inducing the expression of HO-1 and reducing the level of ET-1 in the kidney and plasma, hemin plays an important protective role in 5/6 subtotal nephrectomized rats.

  11. The study of aortic stiffness in different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    布海霞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether there is any difference in aortic stiffness among different hypertension subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Six hundred and twenty-six patients with chronic kidney disease were included in the present analysis.They were classified into four groups:normotension(n=391)with systolic blood pressure(SBP)<140 mmHg and diastolic

  12. Low serum leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholze, Alexandra; Rattensperger, Dirk; Zidek, Walter;

    2007-01-01

    Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy.......Leptin, secreted from adipose tissue, regulates food intake, energy expenditure, and immune function. It is unknown whether leptin predicts mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis therapy....

  13. The renal arterial resistive index and stage of chronic kidney disease in patients with renal allograft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Stine O; Thiesson, Helle C; Poulsen, Lene N;

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft.......The study investigated the optimal threshold value of renal arterial resistive index as assessed by Doppler ultrasonography determining chronic kidney disease stage 4 or higher in patients with renal allograft....

  14. Clinical Implication of the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone Blockers in Chronic Kidney Disease Undergoing Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) blockers have been widely used in chronic kidney disease patients undergoing hemodialysis; however, whether RAAS blockers have beneficial effects for cardiovascular disease in those patients has not been fully defined. This review focuses on the effects of RAAS blockers in chronic kidney disease undergoing hemodialysis for cardiovascular disease.

  15. Impact of chronic kidney disease on serum tumor markers concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Hong-li; DONG Zhen-nan; WEN Xin-yu; GAO Jing; WANG Bo; TIAN Ya-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Serum tumor markers have always been of clinical importance in the diagnosis,monitoring disease progression and therapy efficacy for patients with malignant diseases.However,elevated serum tumor markers are found in some benign conditions,especially in chronic kidney disease (CKD).The elevation of them in CKD might cause confusion and misuse of these tumor markers.We conducted this retrospective study to investigate which of the five widely used tumor markers including carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA),alpha-fetoprotein (AFP),cytokeratin 19 fragment antigen 21-1 (Cyfra21-1),squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) are affected markedly by CKD,in order to use them more effectively.Methods Serum tumor marker concentrations,biochemical,hematological parameters,and urinalysis were measured in CKD patients and healthy controls.The positive rate and median tumor markers' level in CKD patients and controls,and those in CKD patients stratified by CKD grade were compared using nonparametric rank tests.Correlation analysis of serum tumor markers and other parameters in CKD patients were performed using the Spearman correlation coefficient.Multivariate Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the important variables that caused elevated serum concentrations of these markers in CKD patients.Results The overall positive rates and serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA in CKD group were significantly higher than those in control group.Positive rate and serum concentrations of those tumor markers increased as kidney function decreased.Both univariate analysis and multivariate regression analysis showed that the elevations of those tumor markers were not only associated with kidney function,but also with nutritional status.Conclusions Serum concentrations of Cyfra21-1,SCC,CEA are significantly influenced by kidney function,as well as nutritional status.Therefore,in clinical work,the indices of kidney function and nutritional

  16. Development of MRI techniques for the assessment of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Charlotte E.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) are more susceptible to develop cardiovascular disease in comparison to the healthy population. This thesis aims to develop and apply MRI techniques to assess the human heart and kidney in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to inform on structure, function, perfusion and blood flow, without the need for ionizing radiation. In order to assess blood flow using MRI, ga...

  17. A comparison of ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging shows kidney length predicts chronic kidney disease in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Bhutani, Harpreet; Smith, Vikram; Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Mittal, Ankush; Grantham, Jared J.; Torres, Vicente E.; Mrug, Michal; Bae, Kyongtae T.; Wu, Zhiyuan; Ge, Yinghui; Landslittel, Doug; Gibbs, Patrice; O’Neill, W. Charles; Arlene B Chapman; ,

    2015-01-01

    ADPKD is marked by gradual renal cyst and kidney enlargement and ultimately renal failure. Magnetic resonance-based, height-adjusted total kidney volume (htTKV) over 600 ml/m predicts the development of CKD Stage 3 within 8 years in the Consortium for Radiologic Imaging in Polycystic Kidney Disease cohort. Here we compared simultaneous ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging to determine if ultrasound and kidney length (KL) predict future CKD Stage 3 over longer periods of follow-up. A tota...

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease, Obesity, and Hypertension: The Role of Leptin and Adiponectin

    OpenAIRE

    Tesauro, M.; A. Mascali; Franzese, O.; Cipriani, S.; C. Cardillo; Di Daniele, N.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem and characterized by a progressive loss in renal function over a period of months or years as defined by structural or functional abnormalities of the kidney. Several elements contribute to determine a progression of the kidney injury, inducing a worsening of renal damage and accelerating the decline of renal function: obesity and hypertension are two known factors of kidney progression. Remarkable improvements have been recently achieve...

  19. Market failure, policy failure and other distortions in chronic disease markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segal Leonie

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing prevalence of chronic disease represents a significant burden on most health systems. This paper explores the market failures and policy failures that exist in the management of chronic diseases. Discussion There are many sources of market failure in health care that undermine the efficiency of chronic disease management. These include incomplete information as well as information asymmetry between providers and consumers, the effect of externalities on consumer behaviour, and the divergence between social and private time preference rates. This has seen government and policy interventions to address both market failures and distributional issues resulting from the inability of private markets to reach an efficient and equitable distribution of resources. However, these have introduced a series of policy failures such as distorted re-imbursement arrangements across modalities and delivery settings. Summary The paper concludes that market failure resulting from a preference of individuals for 'immediate gratification' in the form of health care and disease management, rather than preventative services, where the benefits are delayed, has a major impact on achieving an efficient allocation of resources in markets for the management of chronic diseases. This distortion is compounded by government health policy that tends to favour medical and pharmaceutical interventions further contributing to distortions in the allocation of resources and inefficiencies in the management of chronic disease.

  20. [Osteoporosis treatment for patients with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Yoshio

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis is defined as a condition of impairment in bone strength and predisposes individuals to an increased risk of fractures. The risk of fragility fracture is shown to be high in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Osteoporosis treatment for patients with CKD G1-3 should not differ from treatment for patients without CKD, as long as there are no accompanying hyperparathyroidism and hyperphosphatemia that indicate the co-existence of CKD -mineral and bone disorder. However, there are few published data on osteoporosis treatment for patients with CKD G4, 5. So, considerations for current pharmacologic therapy (such as bisphosphonate, denosumab, teriparatide, and raloxifene) should be a thoughtful and open discussion with these patients. PMID:26529937

  1. Diets for patients with chronic kidney disease, should we reconsider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitch, William E; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Here we revisit how dietary factors could affect the treatment of patients with complications of chronic kidney disease (CKD), bringing to the attention of the reader the most recent developments in the field. We will briefly discuss five CKD-induced complications that are substantially improved by dietary manipulation: 1) metabolic acidosis and the progression of CKD; 2) improving the diet to take advantage of the benefits of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) on slowing the progression of CKD; 3) the diet and mineral bone disorders in CKD; 4) the safety of nutritional methods utilizing dietary protein restriction; and 5) evidence that new strategies can treat the loss of lean body mass that is commonly present in patients with CKD. PMID:27401192

  2. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  3. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

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    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  4. Valvular and perivalvular involvement in patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neelavathi Senkottaiyan; Saad Hafidh; Farrin A. Manian; Martin A. Alpert

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Mitral annular calcification (MAC) and aortic valve alcification (AVC) are the most common valvular and perivalvular bnormalities in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both MAC and AVC occur at a younger age in CKD patients than in the general population. AVC progresses to aortic stenosis and mild aortic stenosis progresses to severe aortic stenosis at a more rapid rate in patients with CKD than in the general population. The use of calcium-free phosphate binders in such patients may reduce the calcium burden in valvular and perivalvular tructures and retard the rate of progression of aortic stenosis. Despite high rates of morbidity and mortality, the prognosis associated with valve surgery in patients with CKD is better than without valve surgery. Infective endocarditis remains an important complication of CKD, particularly in those treated with hemodialysis.

  5. ARTERIAL STIFFNESS AND CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

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    J. D. Kobalava

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. CKD is characterized by accelerated aging of vessels in which the age-related arterial stiffness increase is exacerbated by a number of uremia-related processes. Increased arterial stiffness is associated with structural and functional disorders, as well as with the increase in cardiovascular mortality in patients with CKD. Increased arterial stiffness is diagnosed at an early stage of CKD. Modern understanding of the mechanisms of increased risk of cardiovascular complications in CKD, the factors contributing to the loss of elasticity of the arteries, arterial stiffness increase consequences are analyzed. Data illustrating the twoway interaction between CKD and arterial stiffness and mechanisms of accelerated progression of arterial stiffness in CKD are presented.

  6. Vegetarianism: advantages and drawbacks in patients with chronic kidney diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Philippe; Combe, Christian; Fouque, Denis; Aparicio, Michel

    2013-11-01

    Vegetarian diet is a very old practice that is liable to confer some health benefits. Recent studies have demonstrated that modification of the dietary pattern with a reduction of animal protein intake and increased consumption of plant-based foods could influence cardiovascular risk profile and mortality rate. Moreover, phosphate bioavailability from plant proteins is reduced. These statements could lead to some benefits for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. This review summarizes the characteristics and benefits of vegetarian diets in the general population and the potential beneficial effects of such a diet on phosphate balance, insulin sensitivity, and the control of metabolic acidosis in CKD patients. Potential drawbacks exist when a vegetarian diet is associated with protein intake that is too restrictive and/or insufficient energy intake, justifying an early and regular nutritional follow-up jointly assumed by a nephrologist and a renal dietitian. PMID:24070587

  7. Chronic active thrombotic microangiopathy in native and transplanted kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping L; Prichard, Jeffery W; Lin, Fan; Shultz, Michael F; Malek, Sayeed K; Shaw, John H; Hartle, James E

    2006-01-01

    We report 2 complicated cases of thrombotic microangiopathy with chronic features and active components. The first case was a 36-yr-old woman with positive anti-DNA antibody and possible lupus cerebritis, who developed thrombotic microangiopathy secondary to a series of syndromes, including preeclampsia and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome. Renal biopsy revealed no evidence of lupus nephritis and her renal function returned to normal 1 week after the biopsy. The second case was a 46-yr-old man who developed thrombotic microangiopathy of unknown etiology, which led to end-stage renal disease within 6 mo. The patient received a living related-donor transplant, but thrombotic microangiopathy recurred in the donor kidney only 40 days after the renal transplantation. PMID:16951274

  8. Early life obesity and chronic kidney disease in later life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Hyung Eun; Yoo, Kee Hwan

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) has increased considerably with a parallel rise in the prevalence of obesity. It is now recognized that early life nutrition has life-long effects on the susceptibility of an individual to develop obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and CKD. The kidney can be programmed by a number of intrauterine and neonatal insults. Low birth weight (LBW) is one of the most identifiable markers of a suboptimal prenatal environment, and the important intrarenal factors sensitive to programming events include decreased nephron number and altered control of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). LBW complicated by accelerated catch-up growth is associated with an increased risk of obesity, hypertension and CKD in later life. High birth weight and exposure to maternal diabetes or obesity can enhance the risk for developing CKD in later life. Rapid postnatal growth per se may also contribute to the subsequent development of obesity and CKD regardless of birth weight and prenatal nutrition. Although the mechanisms of renal risks due to early life nutritional programming remain largely unknown, experimental and clinical studies suggest the burdening role of early life obesity in longstanding cardiovascular and renal diseases. PMID:25145270

  9. Protein-Energy Wasting and Mortality in Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Ezio Gianetta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-energy wasting (PEW is common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and is associated with an increased death risk from cardiovascular diseases. However, while even minor renal dysfunction is an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular prognosis, PEW becomes clinically manifest at an advanced stage, early before or during the dialytic stage. Mechanisms causing loss of muscle protein and fat are complex and not always associated with anorexia, but are linked to several abnormalities that stimulate protein degradation and/or decrease protein synthesis. In addition, data from experimental CKD indicate that uremia specifically blunts the regenerative potential in skeletal muscle, by acting on muscle stem cells. In this discussion recent findings regarding the mechanisms responsible for malnutrition and the increase in cardiovascular risk in CKD patients are discussed. During the course of CKD, the loss of kidney excretory and metabolic functions proceed together with the activation of pathways of endothelial damage, inflammation, acidosis, alterations in insulin signaling and anorexia which are likely to orchestrate net protein catabolism and the PEW syndrome.

  10. HDL abnormalities in nephrotic syndrome and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2016-01-01

    Normal HDL activity confers cardiovascular and overall protection by mediating reverse cholesterol transport and through its potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antithrombotic functions. Serum lipid profile, as well as various aspects of HDL metabolism, structure, and function can be profoundly altered in patients with nephrotic range proteinuria or chronic kidney disease (CKD). These abnormalities can, in turn, contribute to the progression of cardiovascular complications and various other comorbidities, such as foam cell formation, atherosclerosis, and/or glomerulosclerosis, in affected patients. The presence and severity of proteinuria and renal insufficiency, as well as dietary and drug regimens, pre-existing genetic disorders of lipid metabolism, and renal replacement therapies (including haemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis, and renal transplantation) determine the natural history of lipid disorders in patients with kidney disease. Despite the adverse effects associated with dysregulated reverse cholesterol transport and advances in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms, safe and effective therapeutic interventions are currently lacking. This Review provides an overview of HDL metabolism under normal conditions, and discusses the features, mechanisms, and consequences of HDL abnormalities in patients with nephrotic syndrome or advanced CKD. PMID:26568191

  11. Ramadan fasting and chronic kidney disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi

    2014-07-01

    Ramadan fasting represents one of the five pillars of the Islam creed according to the Sunnah and the second practice of faith for the Shiaa. Even though patients are exempted from observing this religious duty, they may be eager to share this particular moment of the year with their family and peers. However, there are no guidelines or standardized protocols that can help physicians to properly address the issue of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) fasting in Ramadan and to correctly advise them. Moreover, in a more interconnected and globalized society, in which more and more Muslim patients live in the Western countries, this topic is of high interest also for the general practitioner. For this purpose, we carried out a systematic review, including also articles written in Arabic, Turkish, and Persian languages. Our main findings are that: recipients of kidney allograft can safely fast during Ramadan;evidences for safety in patients with nephrolithiasis and CKD are instead mixed and controversial. On the other hand,most studies have been carried out during Ramadan falling in cold seasons, and there is scarce information about Ramadan fasting in hot seasons. For these reasons, the findings may be not generalizable and therefore cautions should be taken and applied; the physicians should carefully monitor their patients during the fasting period with an adequate follow-up, in order to avoid any injurious effect. PMID:25364369

  12. New Targets for End-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease Therapy

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    Prakoura Niki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe forms of chronic kidney disease can lead to a critical, end-stage condition, requiring renal replacement therapy, which may involve a form of dialysis or renal transplantation. Identification and characterization of novel markers and/or targets of therapy that could be applied in these critically ill patients remains the focus of the current research in the field of critical care medicine and has been the objective of our studies for some years past. To this end, we used models of renal vascular disease, Ang II, L-NAME or mice overexpressing renin, treated with AT1 antagonists at different stages of progression, to create cohorts of animals during progression, reversal or escape from therapy. Transcriptomic analysis and comparisons were performed and genes were selected according to the following criteria: a not previously described in the kidney, b highly upregulated during progression and returning to the normal levels during reversal, and c producing proteins that are either circulating or membrane receptors.

  13. Systemic Redox Imbalance in Chronic Kidney Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulianiti, Konstantina P; Kaltsatou, Antonia; Mitrou, Georgia I; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Maridaki, Maria; Stefanidis, Ioannis; Sakkas, Giorgos K; Karatzaferi, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience imbalance between oxygen reactive species (ROS) production and antioxidant defenses leading to cell and tissue damage. However, it remains unclear at which stage of renal insufficiency the redox imbalance becomes more profound. The aim of this systematic review was to provide an update on recent advances in our understanding of how the redox status changes in the progression of renal disease from predialysis stages 1 to 4 to end stage 5 and whether the various treatments and dialysis modalities influence the redox balance. A systematic review was conducted searching PubMed and Scopus by using the Cochrane and PRISMA guidelines. In total, thirty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Even from an early stage, imbalance in redox status is evident and as the kidney function worsens it becomes more profound. Hemodialysis therapy per se seems to negatively influence the redox status by the elevation of lipid peroxidation markers, protein carbonylation, and impairing erythrocyte antioxidant defense. However, other dialysis modalities do not so far appear to confer advantages. Supplementation with antioxidants might assist and should be considered as an early intervention to halt premature atherogenesis development at an early stage of CKD. PMID:27563376

  14. Assessment of diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients

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    Dariusz Włodarek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Nutrition is important in the therapy of predialysis patients. The aim of the presented single-centre descriptive study was to assess the diet in chronic kidney disease female predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention, in comparison with recommendations, as well as the analysis of the energy, protein and phosphate intake in correlation with chosen laboratory measurements. [b]materials and methods.[/b] The research was carried out in 31 female predialysis patients with CKD of different etiology, aged 29–79 years (GFR: 19.4±9.7ml/min/1.73m [sup]2[/sup] . Main outcome measures were self-reported data from three-day dietary recall. Nutrients content and energy value of diet were compared with guidelines for chronic kidney disease patients or, in case of nutrients when they are not settled, with the recommendations for healthy women. [b]results[/b]. All patients had a lower energy intake than the recommended level. At the same time, 35.8% of patients were characterised by improper protein intake – too low or too high. The majority of patients had low intake of most of vitamins and minerals. The total, animal and plant protein were positively correlated with the energy value of diet and with amount of most of the nutrients. Values of GFR were positively correlated with animal protein intake, while phosphate and creatinine in blood were negatively correlated with total and animal protein intake. [b]conclusions[/b]. The study highlights that diet of CKD predialysis patients with no previous dietary intervention is not properly balanced.

  15. Chronic Kidney Disease, Fluid Overload and Diuretics: A Complicated Triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yusra Habib; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Amer Hayat; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite promising role of diuretics to manage fluid overload among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients, their use is associated with adverse renal outcomes. Current study aimed to determine the extent of renal deterioration with diuretic therapy. Methods A total 312 non-dialysis dependent CKD (NDD-CKD) patients were prospectively followed-up for one year. Fluid overload was assessed via bioimpedance spectroscopy. Estimated GFR (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine values by using Chronic Kidney Disease- Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) equation. Results Out of 312 patients, 64 (20.5%) were hypovolemic while euvolemia and hypervolemia were observed in 113 (36.1%) and 135 (43.4%) patients. Overall 144 patients were using diuretics among which 98 (72.6%) were hypervolemic, 35 (30.9%) euvolemic and 11 (17.2%) were hypovolemic. The mean decline in estimated GFR of entire cohort was -2.5 ± 1.4 ml/min/1.73m2 at the end of follow up. The use of diuretics was significantly associated with decline in eGFR. A total of 36 (11.5%) patients initiated renal replacement therapy (RRT) and need of RRT was more profound among diuretic users. Conclusions The use of diuretics was associated with adverse renal outcomes indicated by decline in eGFR and increasing risk of RRT initiation in our cohort of NDD-CKD patients. Therefore, it is cautiously suggested to carefully prescribe diuretics by keeping in view benefit versus harm for each patient. PMID:27442587

  16. Prevalence of anemia in predialysis chronic kidney disease patients

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    FAM Shaheen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence of anemia in a large cohort that comprises patients in different stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, we conducted a multi-center cross-sectional study of a cohort of CKD patients who have not started dialysis. The study patients were recruited from the nephrology clinics in 11 different medical centers distributed all over the regions of the KSA. For the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR, we used the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI equation. There were 250 study patients who fulfilled the criteria for the study. The patients were stratified according to their GFR as follows: stage 1: 19 patients, stage 2: 35 patients, stage 3: 67 patients, stage 4: 68 patients, and stage 5: 61 patients. The composite of proteinuria and abnormal imaging in stages 1 and 2 was satisfied in 100% of the cases. The prevalence of anemia was elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 12 g/dL (the level at which the evaluation of anemia in CKD should be initiated in the different stages of CKD, that is, 42%, 33%, 48%, 71%, and 82% in the stages from 1 to 5, respectively. The prevalence was also elevated for the hemoglobin levels below 11 g/dL (the minimum hemoglobin level at which therapy should be initiated with erythropoietin, that is, 21%, 17%, 31%, 49%, and 72%, respectively for stages from 1 to 5. In conclusion, we found a large prevalence of anemia among the CKD population in Saudi Arabia, and the burden of patients who require treatment with erythropoietin is considerably large. However, the response to therapy will not require large doses according to the availability of long-acting erythropoiesis stimulating agents, which will render the therapy more convenient and less expensive.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease and Chronic Inflammation in End Stage Kidney Disease

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    Sofia Zyga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD is one of the most severe diseases worldwide. In patients affected by CKD, a progressive destruction of the nephrons is observed not only in structuralbut also in functional level. Atherosclerosis is a progressive disease of large and medium-sized arteries. It is characterized by the deposition of lipids and fibrous elements and is a common complication of the uremic syndrome because of the coexistence of a wide range of risk factors. High blood pressure, anaemia, insulin resistance, inflammation, high oxidative stress are some of the most common factors that cause cardiovascular disease and atherogenesis in patients suffering from End Stage Kidney Disease (ESRD. At the same time, the inflammatory process constitutes a common element in the apparition and development of CKD. A wide range of possible causes can justify the development of inflammation under uremic conditions. Such causes are oxidative stress, oxidation, coexistentpathological conditions as well as factors that are due to renal clearance techniques. Patients in ESRD and coronary disease usually show increased acute phase products. Pre-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and TNF-a, and acute phase reactants, such as CRP and fibrinogen, are closely related. The treatment of chronic inflammation in CKD is of high importance for the development ofthe disease as well as for the treatment of cardiovascular morbidity.Conclusions: The treatment factors focus on the use of renin-angiotensic system inhibitors, acetylsalicylic acid, statins and anti-oxidant treatment in order to prevent the action of inflammatorycytokines that have the ability to activate the mechanisms of inflammation.

  18. Prevention programs for chronic kidney disease in low-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perico, Norberto; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important determinant of the poor health outcome for major noncommunicable diseases that are the leading cause of death worldwide. Early recognition with screening programs of CKD and co-morbid conditions, like hypertension, diabetes, or toxic environments, can potentially slow progression to renal failure, improve quality of life and reduce healthcare cost. Effective multimodal tools are available to prevent CKD by managing its risk factors, and to slow or even halt disease progression to end-stage renal failure (ESRF). They can be adapted even to poor-resource settings of low- and middle-income countries for individual at high risk of CKD. CKD is also linked to acute kidney injury (AKI), that in poorest part of Africa, Asia and Latin America is preventable, treatable and often reversible, if managed adequately and in timely manner as proposed by the program "AKI 0by25" launched by the international Society of Nephrology in 2013. In addition to saving lives, prevention programs will create major heath gains, eventually reducing the current health inequity that arises from unaffordable or unobtainable renal replacement therapies in many part of the developing world if ESRF is not prevented. PMID:26983956

  19. Growth Impairment and Nutritional Status in Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Orhan Deniz Kara

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Malnutrition is closely linked to chronic kidney disease (CKD in adult patients with poor outcome. But data on pediatric patients is inadequate. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of growth failure and malnutrition in pediatric CKD patients and explore the relationship of these parameters to each other and to other clinical parameters. Methods:This study included 42 patients and 29 healthy children matched for age and gender. Patients were classified firstly in age group and secondly in therapy modalities. Nutritional evaluations were performed according to the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines, and we performed adjustments using values from children with the same chronological age as reference. Findings:In pubertal group, the mean height SDS was lower than in pre-pubertal period while it was higher than in early childhood (P=0.4 and P=0.03 respectively. In all groups, 45% of patients had malnutrition: 20 patients on predialysis, 22 patients with end stage renal disease (14 on hemodialysis, and 8 on peritoneal dialysis. The mean weight SDS was lower in end stage renal disease groups (P<0.001. The height SDS was lower in end stage renal disease groups (P<0.001. Conclusion:Growth failure and malnutrition remain a significant clinical problem as age and therapy modalities are dependent in children with CKD.

  20. Severe metabolic alkalosis and recurrent acute on chronic kidney injury in a patient with Crohn's disease

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    Schmid Axel

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diarrhea is common in patients with Crohn's disease and may be accompanied by acid base disorders, most commonly metabolic acidosis due to intestinal loss of bicarbonate. Case Presentation Here, we present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis in a young patient suffering from M. Crohn. The patient had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and suffered from chronic kidney disease. He was now referred to our clinic for recurrent acute kidney injury, the nature of which was pre-renal due to profound volume depletion. Renal failure was associated with marked hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis which only responded to high volume repletion and high dose blockade of gastric hypersecretion. Intestinal failure with stomal fluid losses of up to 5.7 litres per day required port implantation to commence parenteral nutrition. Fluid and electrolyte replacement rapidly improved renal function and acid base homeostasis. Conclusions This case highlights the important role of gastrointestinal function to maintain acid base status in patients with Crohn's disease.

  1. Feline chronic kidney disease is associated with upregulation of transglutaminase 2: a collagen cross-linking enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lara, A C; Elliott, J; Syme, H M; Brown, C A; Haylor, J L

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in cats. Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a calcium-dependent enzyme proposed to mediate tubulointerstitial fibrosis in the kidney by cross-linking collagen fibrils. Postmortem kidney tissue was obtained from primary renal azotemic (n = 10) and nonazotemic (n = 5) cats (14 domestic short hair, 1 Burmese; aged 9-23.7 years). Extracellular matrix protein deposition was determined by Masson's trichrome staining and collagen immunofluorescence. Total kidney transglutaminase (TG) enzyme activity and TG2 protein were measured in tissue homogenates by putrescine incorporation and Western blotting. Extracellular TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein were determined in situ by immunofluorescence, quantified by multiphase image analysis. Results were compared using the unpaired Student's t-test with Welch's correction. Elevated plasma creatinine, urea, and phosphate concentrations were associated with tubulointerstitial fibrosis but not glomerular fibrosis. Kidney homogenates from azotemic cats showed a 3-fold higher total TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein compared with kidneys from nonazotemic cats. Immunofluorescent studies performed in situ confirmed a 3-fold higher extracellular TG enzyme activity and TG2 protein in cats with azotemia. Tubulointerstitial TG2 showed a positive linear correlation with both renal function and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. In conclusion, for cats with azotemia, both filtration failure and tubulointerstitial fibrosis were associated with the upregulation of TG2, a collagen cross-linking enzyme and the major isoform of transglutaminase in the kidney. TG2 may provide a new therapeutic target for drugs designed to slow the progression of feline chronic kidney disease. PMID:25047228

  2. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Mungli Prakash; Phani, Nagaraj M; Kavya R; Supriya M

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary pepti...

  3. Oral disorders in patients with chronic renal failure. Narrative review.

    OpenAIRE

    Carolina Hernández

    2016-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is one of the best known renal diseases. It is characterized by a deterioration in the overall renal function and is associated with other conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, uropathy, chronic glomerulonephritis and autoimmune diseases. Patients with CRF show alterations of the masticatory system that are specific to the disease and other type of disorders as a result of treatment. Oral health in dialysis and transplant patients tends to be poor, wh...

  4. Deprivation and dialysis: pathways to kidney failure in Australian Aborigines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Rates of end-stage renal disease among Australian Aboriginal people have been increasing over the past 2 decades, particularly in the northern and more remote areas of Australia, and especially in disadvantaged communities. Proteinuria predicts the rate of loss of kidney function; it is common in young adults and virtually universal in those over 50 years of age. Cumulative independent risk factors include low birth weight, recurrent skin infections, adult obesity, diabetes or its precursors, smoking, excessive alcohol intake, and a family history of renal disease. A plausible theory is that intrauterine malnutrition permanently reduces total nephron numbers, which are then overworked in adulthood by the metabolic stresses of obesity (from excess alcohol and poor diet), by higher blood pressures, and by infections, while starved of blood supply because of smoking. Although kidney disease is often only detected when already well established, active medical intervention offers great rewards. Control of blood pressure (preferentially using angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin-II receptor blockers (AIIRBs) in combination) can often stop or even reverse kidney damage, even if ongoing diabetes control is poor. Adequately funded kidney health programs with active Aboriginal health worker involvement are enormously cost-effective: tight blood pressure control at least halves the rate of disease progression, and every year of dialysis deferred for 1 patient could fund the appointment of 2 health workers. Addressing the underlying social causes for this epidemic is critical. PMID:15719338

  5. The Role of the Gut Microbiome on Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio-Maia, B; Simões-Silva, L; Pestana, M; Araujo, R; Soares-Silva, I J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is estimated to affect nearly 500 million people worldwide and cardiovascular (CV) disease is a major cause of death in this population. However, therapeutic interventions targeting traditional CV risks are not effective at lowering the incidence of CV events or at delaying the progression of the disease in CKD patients. In recent years, disturbances of normal gut microbiome were recognized in the pathogenesis of diverse chronic diseases. Gut dysbiosis is being unraveled in CKD and pointed as a nontraditional risk factor for CV risk and CKD progression. The most often reported changes in gut microbiome in CKD are related to the lower levels of Bifidobacteriaceae and Lactobacillaceae and to higher levels of Enterobacteriaceae. Although metagenomics brought us an amplified vision on the microbial world that inhabits the human host, it still lacks the sensitivity to characterize the microbiome up to species level, not revealing alterations that occur within specific genus. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art concerning gut dysbiosis in CKD and its role in pathophysiological mechanisms in CKD, particularly in relation with CV risk. Also, the strategies towards prevention and treatment of gut dysbiosis in CKD progression will be discussed. PMID:27565581

  6. Plasma Uromodulin Correlates With Kidney Function and Identifies Early Stages in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steubl, Dominik; Block, Matthias; Herbst, Victor; Nockher, Wolfgang Andreas; Schlumberger, Wolfgang; Satanovskij, Robin; Angermann, Susanne; Hasenau, Anna-Lena; Stecher, Lynne; Heemann, Uwe; Renders, Lutz; Scherberich, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Uromodulin, released from tubular cells of the ascending limb into the blood, may be associated with kidney function. This work studies the relevance of plasma uromodulin as a biomarker for kidney function in an observational cohort of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and subjects without CKD (CKD stage 0). It should be further evaluated if uromodulin allows the identification of early CKD stages.Plasma uromodulin, serum creatinine, cystatin C, blood-urea-nitrogen (BUN) concentrations, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR CKD-EPIcrea-cystatin) were assessed in 426 individuals of whom 71 were CKD stage 0 and 355 had CKD. Besides descriptive statistics, univariate correlations between uromodulin and biomarkers/eGFR were calculated using Pearson-correlation coefficient. Multiple linear regression modeling was applied to establish the association between uromodulin and eGFR adjusted for demographic parameters and pharmacologic treatment. Receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis adjusted for demographic parameters was performed to test if uromodulin allows differentiation of subjects with CKD stage 0 and CKD stage I.Mean uromodulin plasma levels were 85.7 ± 60.5 ng/mL for all CKD stages combined. Uromodulin was correlated with all biomarkers/eGFR in univariate analysis (eGFR: r = 0.80, creatinine: r = -0.76, BUN: r = -0.72, and cystatin C: r = -0.79). Multiple linear regression modeling showed significant association between uromodulin and eGFR (coefficient estimate β = 0.696, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.603-0.719, P < 0.001). In ROC analysis uromodulin was the only parameter that significantly improved a model containing demographic parameters to differentiate between CKD 0° and I° (area under the curve [AUC] 0.831, 95% CI 0.746-0.915, P = 0.008) compared to creatinine, cystatin C, BUN, and eGFR (AUC for creatinine: 0.722, P = 0.056, cystatin C: 0.668, P = 0.418, BUN: 0.653, P = 0.811, and e

  7. Failure to visualize acutely injured kidneys with technetium-99m DMSA does not preclude recoverable function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 35-yr-old patient developed severe acute tubular necrosis requiring hemodialysis. A [99mTc]dimercaptosuccinic acid scan of the kidneys showed no renal uptake at 4 or 24 hr, but the patient subsequently recovered normal renal function as judged by a normal serum creatinine. Based on this case report and a review of the literature, one cannot assume irreversible loss of function in patients with acute renal failure, based on the absence of radiopharmaceutical uptake by the kidneys

  8. Clinical Study on Treatment of Chronic Renal Failure with Shenshuailing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠建伟; 郭亚玲; 梁延平; 孙世宁; 杨建华; 杨素云

    2001-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of Shenshuailing Kou Fu Ye (SKFY肾衰灵口服液, the Oral Liquid for Renal Failure) and Shenshuailing Guan Chang Ye (SGCY肾衰灵灌肠液, the Enema for Renal Failure) were evaluated in treatment of chronic renal failure, with coateg aldehyde oxystarch as the controls. The changes in the clinical symptoms, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen and creatinine clearance rate were observed. The total effective rate in the former was 90.46%, and the latter 60.43%.

  9. Remote patient monitoring in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Mishkin, Aaron; Aronow, Wilbert S; Kalra, Ankur; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) poses a significant economic burden on our health-care resources with very high readmission rates. Remote monitoring has a substantial potential to improve the management and outcome of patients with HF. Readmission for decompensated HF is often preceded by a stage of subclinical hemodynamic decompensation, where therapeutic interventions would prevent subsequent clinical decompensation and hospitalization. Various methods of remote patient monitoring include structured telephone support, advanced telemonitoring technologies, remote monitoring of patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers and defibrillators, and implantable hemodynamic monitors. Current data examining the efficacy of remote monitoring technologies in improving outcomes have shown inconsistent results. Various medicolegal and financial issues need to be addressed before widespread implementation of this exciting technology can take place. PMID:23018667

  10. Improving compliance with iron infusion therapy in the treatment of chronic anemia in haemodialysis patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nuti, Amith

    2015-01-01

    This quality improvement project was conducted at the haemodialysis unit in the paediatric nephrology department at Noah's Ark Children's Hospital, Cardiff. Stakeholders involved were the medical and nursing staff at the haemodialysis unit, responsible for the care of children with chronic kidney disease CKD. Anaemia is prevalent among children with CKD. Iron infusion is administered to such children with chronic anaemia. Children on haemodialysis attending the Children's Kidney Center receiv...

  11. [Telemedicine for patients with chronic intestinal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauta, Sjoukje; Feibig, Doreen; Wanten, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Telemedicine is a valuable extension of the ways in which patients with chronic diseases can be contacted. Patients can easily contact their caregivers within the safe environment of the digital waiting room. Telemedicine especially offers an advantage for those forms of care where the visual aspect is important. Care should be taken with respect to its implementation into the disease management process with careful synchronisation between all involved parties, e.g. patient, caregiver, and organisation. The effectiveness of telemedicine and the savings that can be achieved should be properly established in order to justify the funding of a telemedicine project. Rather than focusing on the possible drawbacks of telemedicine, e.g. safety concerns and the user-friendliness of the system, we should highlight the possibilities that information technology offers. PMID:25515390

  12. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houda Mbarki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual′s health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years. All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF, active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of <60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . However, the small sample size does not allow us to draw any firm conclusions on fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended.

  13. Effects of fasting during Ramadan on renal function of patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarki, Houda; Tazi, Nada; Najdi, Adil; Tachfouti, Nabil; Arrayhani, Mohamed; Sqalli, Tarik

    2015-03-01

    Fasting during Ramadan is prohibited when an individual's health is endangered. Little work has been published in this direction in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to evaluate the impact of fasting during Ramadan on the renal function of patients with CKD, adjusting for the initial degree of renal impairment. We prospectively studied 60 patients with CKD (35 females; mean age 45.6 ± 15.8 years). All study patients were older than 15 years, being followed-up at the nephrology clinic for more than six months, having a stable CKD during the preceding six months and who had fasted during Ramadan the previous year. Patients who had a medical contra-indication for fasting were excluded from the study [severe or resistant arterial hypertension, insulin-requiring diabetes, acute renal failure (ARF), active renal disease, repetitive urolithiasis or terminal chronic renal failure]. Statistical analysis was performed in collaboration with the epidemiology lab at the Fez Medical School using the SPSS software version 17. Three of the study patients developed ARF in the first week and four of them at the end of the month of the study period. The risk of developing ARF was significantly higher for patients with baseline creatinine clearance of fasting during Ramadan in stable CKD patients. Studies on larger numbers of patients are recommended. PMID:25758882

  14. Optimal medication dosing in patients with diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Lori

    2014-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in Canada. As rates of diabetes rise, so does the prevalence of CKD. Diabetes and CKD are chronic diseases that require multiple medications for their management. Many of the anticipated effects of these medications are altered by the physiologic changes that occur in CKD. Failure to individualize drug dosing in this population may lead to toxicity or decreased therapeutic response, leading to treatment failure. At times this can be challenging for a multitude of reasons, including the limitations of available calculations for estimating renal function, inconsistent dosing recommendations and the lack of dosing recommendations for some medications. Clinicians caring for these patients need to consider an approach of individualized drug therapy that will ensure optimal outcomes. The better understanding that clinicians have of these challenges, the more effective they will be at using the available information as a guide together with their own professional judgement to make appropriate dosing changes. This article discusses the following: 1) physiologic changes that occur in CKD and its impact on drug dosing; 2) advantages and disadvantages of various calculations used for estimating renal function; 3) pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes of some commonly used medications in diabetes, and finally, 4) an approach to individualized drug dosing for this patient population. PMID:25284697

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, K K; Kjaergaard, J; Akkan, D;

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an important differential diagnosis in patients with heart failure (HF). The primary aims were to determine the prevalence of COPD and to test the accuracy of self-reported COPD in patients admitted with HF. Secondary aims were to study a...

  16. Hemostatic biomarkers in dogs with chronic congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Falk, Torkel; Tidholm, Anna;

    2007-01-01

    Background: Chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) in humans is associated with abnormal hemostasis, and abnormalities in hemostatic biomarkers carry a poor prognosis. Alterations in hemostatic pathways can be involved in the pathogenesis of CHF in dogs, and microthrombosis in the myocardium could...

  17. The case for statin therapy in chronic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Harst, Pim; Boehm, Michael; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.

    2008-01-01

    Both primary and secondary prevention studies have provided a wealth of evidence that statin therapy effectively reduces cardiovascular events. However, this general statement on the efficacy and safety of statin treatment has not been validated in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Recently

  18. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes) are considered.

  19. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEART FAILURE: FOCUS ON METOPROLOL SUCCINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of metoprolol succinate in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF are covered. Results of MERIT-HF study are taken as the main evidences. Patterns of the metoprolol succinate use in the treatment of different categories of patients with CHF (women, the elderly , severe CHF forms, CHF with concomitant hypertension or diabetes are considered.

  20. Children and Adolescents with Chronic Kidney Disease: A Population at Risk for More Than Just Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michelle M

    2016-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of children and adolescents with chronic health conditions is a multifactorial concept that combines a child's perception and adaptation to physical, social, emotional, and school environments regardless of particular medical diagnosis. Children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience non-kidney specific co-morbidities, including depression, body image alterations, and sleep disturbance, that impair their daily lives. This article reviews the pediatric nephrology literature to highlight the evidence identifying these riskr to HRQOL and suggesting ways in which nurses in both nephrology and primary care are poised to identify and modify these risk factors. PMID:27025152

  1. Simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant for type I diabetes with renal failure: Anaesthetic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lakshmi; Surendran, Sudhindran; Kesavan, Rajesh; Menon, Ramachandran Narayana

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic grafts have been successfully used in patients with diabetes and are combined with kidney transplantation in patients with renal failure. The propagation of awareness in organ donation in India has increased the donor pool of transplantable organs in the last few years making multi visceral transplants feasible in our country. We present the anaesthetic management of a 32-year-old male with diabetes mellitus and end-stage renal failure who was successfully managed with a combined pancreas and kidney transplantation. PMID:27013753

  2. Urinary Citrate: A view in Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANTHOSH KUMAR.N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim & Objective: To evaluate the 24 hour urinary citrate levels in chronic renal failure and healthy controls and to define the role of urinary citrates in the chronic renal failures. Materials and Methods: The 24 hours urinary citrates, Blood urea, Serum creatinine, Na+, K+were evaluated in 25 chronic renal failure patients and25 healthy subjects taken as controls. In both groups participants were on their usual diet. In addition, none of the participant was taking any drugs that could interfere with the citrate excretion. Results: The mean 24 hour urinary citrate excretion in patients and healthy controls was 296.3 ± 8.543mg and 323.9 ± 4.304mg respectively. Using previously defined values of normal urinary citrates as more than 320 mg.The difference in 24 hour urinary citrateexcretion in all patients and healthy control was statistically significant (

    failures and healthy controls. Uniformly low citrate excretion in patients indicates that low citrate levels may be a feature seen in predisposing factor for renal failure

  3. Biophysical approach to chronic kidney disease management in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Foletti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD and its clinical progression are a critical issue in an aging population. Therefore, strategies aimed at preventing and managing the decline of renal function are warranted. Recent evidence has provided encouraging results for the improvement of renal function achieved through an integrated biophysical approach, but prospective studies on the clinical efficacy of this strategy are still lacking. This was an open-label prospective pilot study to investigate the effect of electromagnetic information transfer through the aqueous system on kidney function of older patients affected by stage 1 or 2 CKD. Patients received biophysical therapy every 3 months over a 1-year period. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR values were calculated using the CKD–Epidemiology Collaboration formula, and were recorded at baseline and at the end of treatment. Overall, 58 patients (mean age 74.8 ± 3.7 years were included in the study. At baseline, mean eGFR was 64.6 ± 15.5 mL/min, and it significantly increased to 69.9 ± 15.8 mL/min after 1 year (+5.2 ± 10 mL/min, p<0.0002. The same trend was observed among men (+5.7 ± 10.2 mL/min, p<0.0064 and women (+4.7 ± 9.9 mL/min, p<0.014. When results were analyzed by sex, no difference was found between the 2 groups. Although further and larger prospective studies are needed, our findings suggest that an integrated biophysical approach may be feasible in the management of older patients with early-stage CKD, to reduce and prevent the decline of renal function due to aging or comorbidities.

  4. Patient education for phosphorus management in chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar-Zadeh K

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Kamyar Kalantar-ZadehHarold Simmons Center for Kidney Disease Research and Epidemiology, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, University of California Irvine’s School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USAObjectives: This review explores the challenges and solutions in educating patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD to lower serum phosphorus while avoiding protein insufficiency and hypercalcemia.Methods: A literature search including terms “hyperphosphatemia,” “patient education,” “food fatigue,” “hypercalcemia,” and “phosphorus–protein ratio” was undertaken using PubMed.Results: Hyperphosphatemia is a strong predictor of mortality in advanced CKD and is remediated via diet, phosphorus binders, and dialysis. Dietary counseling should encourage the consumption of foods with the least amount of inorganic or absorbable phosphorus, low phosphorus-to-protein ratios, and adequate protein content, and discourage excessive calcium intake in high-risk patients. Emerging educational initiatives include food labeling using a “traffic light” scheme, motivational interviewing techniques, and the Phosphate Education Program – whereby patients no longer have to memorize the phosphorus content of each individual food component, but only a “phosphorus unit” value for a limited number of food groups. Phosphorus binders are associated with a clear survival advantage in CKD patients, overcome the limitations associated with dietary phosphorus restriction, and permit a more flexible approach to achieving normalization of phosphorus levels.Conclusion: Patient education on phosphorus and calcium management can improve concordance and adherence and empower patients to collaborate actively for optimal control of mineral metabolism.Keywords: hyperphosphatemia, renal diet, phosphorus binders, educational programs, food fatigue, concordance

  5. [Analysis of hemodialysis and graft representations in patients with chronic renal failure: an anthropological approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desseix, Aurélie; Merville, Pierre; Couzi, Lionel

    2010-04-01

    Hemodialysis and kidney transplant are two treatments for renal failure, which lead to numerous changes in the patients' way of life. We have questioned ourselves on the different ways they could deal with those changes by studying the representations and the ritualisation that surrounds the sick. From 2005 to 2007, qualitative interviews, based on the method of life stories, were conducted with 35 patients with chronic renal failure in three Aquitaine's centres. The results show three main groups of representation both in pre-transplant and in post-transplant. Specific behaviours are tied to each group of representation that are beneficial or deleterious with respect to treatment or the patient's social life. We will show that, on the one hand, the patients who see the hemodialysis treatment as a traditional rite of passage cope with the situation more easily and on the other hand, we will stress that this representation is closely linked to how the patients will later accept the kidney transplant. So, we have been able to link the representations of hemodialysis patients and transplant experience. Then these results have a practical consequence for the caregivers who can use the tools of anthropology (the interview guide, analysis grid) through a program of therapeutic education, to precociously take care of patients who are likely to come up against issues after their kidney transplant. PMID:20299298

  6. Renal function and peak exercise oxygen consumption in chronic heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction

    OpenAIRE

    D. Scrutinio; Agostoni, P; Gesualdo, L.; U. Corra; Mezzani, A; Piepoli, M; Di Lenarda, A.; Iorio, A.; Passino, C; Magri, D.; Masarone, D; Battaia, E; Girola, D; Re, F.; Cattadori, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease is associated with sympathetic activation and muscle abnormalities, which may contribute to decreased exercise capacity. We investigated the correlation of renal function with peak exercise oxygen consumption (V˙O2) in heart failure (HF) patients. Methods and Results: We recruited 2,938 systolic HF patients who underwent clinical, laboratory, echocardiographic and cardiopulmonary exercise testing. The patients were stratified according to estimated glomerula...

  7. Chronic renal failure (CRF in children in Jugoslavia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the demographic variables of chronic non-terminal (CRF and terminal (TRF renal failure patients (pts younger than 19 years treated in Serbia in June 2001. The prevalence of CRF pts was registered as 4,7 per million total population (pmtp or 14,1 per million child population (pmcp while corresponding values for TRF pts were 4,5 pmtp or 13,5 pmcp. The incidence of TRF pts during the period Jan.2000-Jan.2002 was 4,35 pmcp. Boys dominated only among CRF pts (34:14; 60,4% beeing between the ages of 6 and 19 yrs while at the time of diagnosis of HBI, 33,3 % of boys were yanger than 2 yrs.The causes of CRF were: reflux nephropathy 58,3%, congenital kidney disease 16,7%, familial/hereditary 14,6% glomerulonephritis 6,2% and Willms tu 4,1%. Reflux nephropathy was also the most common underlying disease of TRF accounted for 36,9% of total cases while glomerulonephritis was responsible for 23,9 %. Reflux nephropathy was associated with neural tube defect in 53,3% and with congenital lower urinary tract obstruction in 66,7%. The most of CRF (81,25% and TRF pts (95,6% were from Serbia, the others were from Monte Negro and Republic Srpska. The most of CRF (65% and TRF (80% pts were treated in University Children’s Hospital in Belgrade. Of CRF pts 46% had serum sreatinine 100-200 μmol/l, in 11% of pts it was 400-600 μmol/l and 2% of pts were in pre-terminal CRF. One third of CRF pts had proteinuria 150-500 mg/l, and second third had proteinuria greater of 1000 mg/l. Anemia was present in 54% of CRf pts, and arterial hypertension in 56%. Hemodialysis was dominant treatment modality for TRF pts and only 23,9% had functioning transplant. Conclusion: This is the first national study of demographic characteristics of pediatric CRF in Serbia. Since its prevalence is considerably lower than that in Western and North European countries the true prevalence is some what higher. The increasing incidence of pediatric TRF from 2

  8. Potassium: Tips for People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... melon l Lemons and limes l Mangoes l Papayas l Pears l Peaches l Plums l Pineapple ... KIDNEY (1-866-454-3639). The National Kidney Disease Education Program (NKDEP) encourages people to get tested ...

  9. Children with Chronic Kidney Disease: Tips for Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sign up for our FREE magazine, Kidney Living Organ Donation & Transplantation Be an Organ Donor Living Donation Donor ... Giving Primary menu Home Prevention Kidney Disease Patients Organ Donation & Transplantation Professionals Events Advocacy Donate Search Search Header ...

  10. Chronic Kidney Disease: What Does It Mean for Me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cause serious health problems. Is smoking cigarettes bad for my kidneys? Cigarette smoking can make kidney ... Training & Career Development Research at NIDDK Research Resources Technology Advancement & Transfer Meetings & Events Health Information Health Topics ...

  11. Effects of Low-Molecular-Weight-Chitosan on the Adenine- Induced Chronic Renal Failure Ratsin vitro andin vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHI Xuan; HAN Baoqin; SUI Xianxian; HU Rui; LIU Wanshun

    2015-01-01

    Theeffects of low-molecular-weight-chitosan (LMWC) on chronic renal failure (CRF) rats induced by adenine were investigatedin vivoand in vitro. Chitosan were hydrolyzed using chitosanase at pH 6–7 and 37℃ for 24h to obtain LMWC.In vitro, the effect of LMWC on the proliferation of renal tubular epithelial cells (RTEC) showed that it had no cytotoxic effect and could promote cell growth. For theinvivo experiment, chronic renal failure rats induced by adenine were randomly divided into control group, Niaoduqing group, and high-, medium- and low-dose LMWC groups. For each group, we detected serum creatinine (SCR), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), glutathione oxidase (GSH-Px) activities of renal tissue, and obtained the ratio of kidney weight/body weight, pathological changes of kidney. The levels of serum SCR, BUN were higher in the adenine-induced rats than those in the controlgroup, indicating that the rat chronic renal failure model worked successfully. The re-sults after treatment showed that LMWC could reduce the SCR and BUN levels and enhance the activities/levels of T-SOD and GSH-PX in kidney compared to control group. Histopathological examination revealed that adenine-induced renal alterations were restored by LMWC at three tested dosages, especially at the low dosage of 100mgkg−1d−1.

  12. Elevated body mass index as a risk factor for chronic kidney disease: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garl

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyn S Garland Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada Abstract: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined by the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative as the presence of reduced kidney function or kidney damage for a period of 3 months or greater. Obesity is considered a risk factor for CKD development, but its precise role in contributing to CKD and end stage kidney disease is not fully elucidated. In this narrative review, the objectives are to describe the pathogenesis of CKD in obesity, including the impact of altered adipokine secretion in obesity and CKD, and to provide an overview of the clinical studies assessing the risk of obesity and CKD development. Keywords: obesity, chronic renal disease, adipokine

  13. Acute Renal Failure - A Serious Complication in Patients After Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Bogdanovic, Lj; Radunovic, M; Prostran, M; Naumovic, R; Simic-Ogrizovic, S; Radojevic-Skodric, S

    2016-01-01

    Free radical-mediated injury releases proinflammatory cytokines and activates innate immunity. It has been suggested that the early innate response and the ischemic tissue damage play roles in the development of adaptive responses, which may lead to acute kidney rejection. Various durations of hypothermic kidney storage before transplantation add to ischemic tissue damage. The final stage of ischemic injury occurs during reperfusion that develops hours or days after the initial insult. Repair and regeneration processes occur together with cellular apoptosis, autophagy and necrosis and a favorable outcome is expected if regeneration prevails. Along the entire transplantation time course, there is a great demand for novel immune and nonimmune injury biomarkers. The use of these markers can be of great help in the monitoring of kidney injury in potential kidney donors, where acute kidney damage can be overlooked, in predicting acute transplant dysfunction during the early post-transplant periods, or in predicting chronic changes in long term followup. Numerous investigations have demonstrated that biomarkers that have the highest predictive value in acute kidney injury include NGAL, Cystatin C, KIM-1, IL-18, and L-FABP. Most investigations show that the ideal biomarker to fulfill all the needs in renal transplant has not been identified yet. Although, in many animal models, new biomarkers are emerging for predicting acute and chronic allograft damage, in human allograft analysis they are still not routinely accepted and renal biopsy still remains the gold standard. PMID:27498898

  14. Disparities in periodontitis prevalence among chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, E; Swede, H

    2011-06-01

    Because of adverse effects of uremia in the innate and adaptive immune systems, we hypothesized that chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients would have higher prevalence of moderate periodontitis compared with individuals without CKD. We examined this hypothesis using the NHANES III dataset, including 12,081 adults stratified by Race-Ethnicity. We followed the American Academy of Periodontology/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition for moderate periodontitis. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated based on calibrated serum creatinine levels according to the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study formula. Analyses incorporated NHANES sampling weights. Overall, 14.6% of individuals with CKD were classified as having moderate periodontitis, compared with 8.7% in the non-CKD group (p = 0.001). A significant dose-response association (p = 0.001) was observed between prevalence of moderate periodontitis and CKD stages among non-Hispanic Blacks and Mexican-Americans, but not so for non-Hispanic Whites. Prevalence of periodontitis among participants with CKD was substantially higher among non-Hispanic Blacks (38.9%) and Mexican-Americans (37.3%) compared with non-Hispanic Whites (12.9%). Multivariate logistic regression models showed that Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic Blacks with CKD were approximately 30% to 60% more likely to have moderate periodontitis compared with those without CKD, after adjustment for diabetes status and other potential confounders. PMID:21422478

  15. [Obesity in children and its relationship with chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurita-Cruz, Jessie Nallely; Villasís-Keever, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, obesity and chronic kidney disease (CKD) have increased worldwide, in parallel. This article focuses on the current issues of obesity on renal damage, with special emphasis on what happens at pediatric ages. While obesity has been linked closely with type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension, reduced insulin sensitivity is a direct mechanism for renal damage. The pathophysiologic mechanisms on renal damage include glomerular hyperfiltration and hypertrophy, hypercellularity and broadening of the mesangial regions, while the lack of sensitivity to insulin increases the effects of angiotensin II, exacerbates proteinuria and induces the production of inflammatory cytokines. Many epidemiological studies have documented the relationship of increased BMI with the development of ERC, but most of these studies have been conducted in adults. In children, the information is scarce, but is consistent with findings in adults. In contrast, there are studies which show that interventions aimed to improve weight loss and limit renal damage and proteinuria is reduced, the blood pressure and glomerular filtration rate. Allthe above make us think on the need to improve efforts to reduce the prevalence of obesity from the early stages of life, which could reduce the number of patients with CKD in the future. PMID:27197109

  16. Rare mutations associating with serum creatinine and chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Mikaelsdottir, Evgenia; Palsson, Runolfur; Indridason, Olafur S; Holm, Hilma; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Helgason, Agnar; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Magnusson, Olafur Th; Kong, Augustine; Masson, Gisli; Sulem, Patrick; Olafsson, Isleifur; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stefansson, Kari

    2014-12-20

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. A number of common sequence variants have been found to associate with serum creatinine (SCr), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and/or CKD. We imputed 24 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms and insertions/deletions identified by whole-genome sequencing of 2230 Icelanders into 81 656 chip-typed individuals and 112 630 relatives of genotyped individuals over the age of 18 with SCr measurements. The large set of sequenced individuals allowed accurate imputation of variants to a minor allele frequency (MAF) of 0.1%. We tested the imputed variants for association with SCr. In addition to replicating established loci, we discovered missense and loss-of-function variants associating with SCr in three solute carriers (SLC6A19, SLC25A45 and SLC47A1) and two E3 ubiquitin ligases (RNF186 and RNF128). All the variants are within coding sequences and all but one are rare (MAF Hartnup disease. PMID:25082825

  17. Causes of chronic kidney disease in Egyptian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Safouh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few published reports on the causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD in Egyptian children. We reviewed the records of 1018 (males 56.7%, age ranged from 1 to 19 years Egyptian patients suffering from CKD and followed-up at the pediatric nephrology units (outpatient clinics and dialysis units of 11 universities over a period of two years. The mean of the estimated glomerular filtration rate was 12.5 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Children with CKD stage I and stage II comprised 4.4% of the studied group, while those with stage III, IV and V comprised 19.7%, 18.3% and 57.6%, respectively. The most common single cause of CKD was obstructive uropathy (21.7%, followed by primary glomerulonephritis (15.3%, reflux/urinary tract infection (14.6%, aplasia/hypoplasia (9.8% and familial/metabolic diseases (6.8%; unknown causes accounted for 20.6% of the cases. Of the 587 patients who had reached end-stage renal disease, 93.5% was treated with hemodialysis and only 6.5% were treated with peritoneal dialysis.

  18. Branched chain amino acid profile in early chronic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutritional status in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients is a predictor of prognosis during the first period of dialysis. Serum albumin is the most commonly used nutritional marker. Another index is plasma amino acid profile. Of these, the plasma levels of branched chain amino acids (BCAA, especially valine and leucine, correlate well with nutritional status. Plasma BCAAs were evaluated along with albumin and C-reactive protein in 15 patients of early stages of CKD and 15 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. A significant decrease in plasma valine, leucine and albumin levels was observed in CKD patients when compared with the controls (P <0.05. No significant difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels was observed between the two groups. Malnutrition seen in our CKD patients in the form of hypoalbuminemia and decreased concentrations of BCAA points to the need to evaluate the nutritional status in the early stages itself. Simple measures in the form of amino acid supplementation should be instituted early to decrease the morbidity and mortality before start of dialysis in these patients.

  19. Impaired renal function in relatives of chronic kidney disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Kumar Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is now a public health burden. If simple screening tests like the glomerular filtration rate (GFR and presence of albuminuria are done in asymptomatic persons, CKD can be diagnosed earlier that will help in halting the disease and not let it progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Aim: This study was conducted to see the proportion of renal function abnormality in the relatives of CKD patients. Settings and Design: This was a cross-sectional comparative study conducted at Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH, Chittagong, Bangladesh, a tertiary hospital in the southern part of Bangladesh. Materials and Methods: We screened the relatives of CKD patients, as a risk population, by urine albumin and estimated GFR (eGFR. Results: We observed a significant difference in urine albumin (29% vs 10% in relatives and nonrelatives, respectively and abnormal renal function [albuminuria/creatinine clearance (CCr criteria] (30% vs 11% in relatives and nonrelatives, respectively between relatives and nonrelatives. Relatives of glomerulonephritis-CKD (GN-CKD patients had more albuminuria than others. Risk factors like hypertension (HTN, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT/diabetes mellitus (DM, and family history of DM/HTN/cardiovascular disease (CVD were significant among relatives and might have some link to familial influence on developing CKD. Conclusion: Relatives of CKD patients should be screened as a risk population to evaluate abnormal renal function.

  20. Disorders of Iron Metabolism and Anemia in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bhupesh; Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2016-07-01

    Dysregulated iron homeostasis plays a central role in the development of anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is a major contributor toward resistance to treatment with erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology requires an in-depth understanding of normal iron physiology and regulation. Recent discoveries in the field of iron biology have greatly improved our understanding of the hormonal regulation of iron trafficking in human beings and how its alterations lead to the development of anemia of CKD. In addition, emerging evidence has suggested that iron homeostasis interacts with bone and mineral metabolism on multiple levels, opening up new avenues of investigation into the genesis of disordered iron metabolism in CKD. Building on recent advances in our understanding of normal iron physiology and abnormalities in iron homeostasis in CKD, this review characterizes how anemia related to disordered iron metabolism develops in the setting of CKD. In addition, this review explores our emerging recognition of the connections between iron homeostasis and mineral metabolism and their implications for the management of altered iron status and anemia of CKD. PMID:27475656

  1. Multidisciplinary strategies in the management of early chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ramírez, Héctor R; Cortés-Sanabria, Laura; Rojas-Campos, Enrique; Hernández-Herrera, Aurora; Cueto-Manzano, Alfonso M

    2013-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide epidemic especially in developing countries, with clear deficiencies in identification and treatment. Better care of CKD requires more than only economic resources, utilization of health research in policy-making and health systems changes that produce better outcomes. A multidisciplinary approach may facilitate and improve management of patients from early CKD in the primary health-care setting. This approach is a strategy for improving comprehensive care, initiating and maintaining healthy behaviors, promoting teamwork, eliminating barriers to achieve goals and improving the processes of care. A multidisciplinary intervention may include educational processes guided by health professional, use of self-help groups and the development of a CKD management plan. The complex and fragmented care management of patients with CKD, associated with poor outcome, enhances the importance of implementing a multidisciplinary approach in the management of this disease from the early stages. Multidisciplinary strategies should focus on the needs of patients (to increase their empowerment) and should be adapted to the resources and health systems prevailing in each country; its systematic implementation can help to improve patient care and slow the progression of CKD. PMID:24215785

  2. Febuxostat for hyperuricemia in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Tetsu; Morishita, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Chiharu; Iimura, Osamu; Tsunematsu, Sadao; Watanabe, Yuko; Kusano, Eiji; Nagata, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Febuxostat is a nonpurine xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, which recently received marketing approval. However, information regarding the experience with this agent among advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is limited. In the current study, we investigated the effects of oral febuxostat in patients with advanced CKD with asymptomatic hyperuricemia. We demonstrated, for the first time, that not only the serum levels of uric acid (UA) but also those of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, an oxidative stress marker, were significantly reduced after six months of febuxostat treatment, with no adverse events. These results encouraged us to pursue further investigations regarding the clinical impact of lowering the serum UA levels with febuxostat in advanced CKD patients in terms of concomitantly reducing oxidative stress via the blockade of XO. More detailed studies with a larger number of subjects and assessments of the effects of multiple factors affecting hyperuricemia, such as age, sex, and dietary habits, would shed light on the therapeutic challenges of treating asymptomatic hyperuricemia in patients with various stages of CKD. PMID:25210423

  3. The Importance of Magnesium in Chronic Kidney Disease: New Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat KARAMAN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is one of the 11 most abundant elements in the human body and it is required for the action of over 300 enzymes. It is the most common intracellular, bivalent cation. It is located in quite important structures from DNA/RNA to ATP. It interacts with negatively charged ions to provide an allosteric effect and therefore plays the role of a bridge in connecting different molecules. It is mostly found in dark green vegetables, the chlorophyl complex and unprocessed cereals. The current environmental pollution and the increased consumption of refined products cause serious problems with Mg uptake. Despite considerable advances over the last decades, cardiovascular diseases exact a very high toll as the leading cause of death in Western societies. This is mainly the result of the increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis, related to the aging of the population, the increase in diabetes and obesity, unhealthy diets, sedentary lifestyle, and particularly hyperlipidemia and hypertension. Chronic kidney diseases are quite common in the population at present and are associated with serious mortality and morbidity. Our aim in this review was to investigate the effect of Mg on endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and CKD.

  4. Association of dyslipidemia with renal outcomes in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available Dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD and the relationship between dyslipidemia with renal outcomes in patients with moderate to advanced CKD remains controversial. Hence, our objective is to determine whether dyslipidemia is independently associated with rapid renal progression and progression to renal replacement therapy (RRT in CKD patients. The study analyzed the association between lipid profile, RRT, and rapid renal progression (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] slope <-6 ml/min/1.73 m(2/yr in 3303 patients with stages 3 to 5 CKD. During a median 2.8-year follow-up, 1080 (32.3% participants commenced RRT and 841 (25.5% had rapid renal progression. In the adjusted models, the lowest quintile (hazard ratios [HR], 1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01 to 1.49 and the highest two quintiles of total cholesterol (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.52 and HR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.65 respectively increased risks for RRT (vs. quintile 2. Besides, the highest quintile of total cholesterol was independently associated with rapid renal progression (odds ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.83. Our study demonstrated that certain levels of dyslipidemia were independently associated with RRT and rapid renal progression in CKD stage 3-5. Assessment of lipid profile may help identify high risk groups with adverse renal outcomes.

  5. Sleep disorders in pediatric chronic kidney disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabouli, Stella; Papadimitriou, Eleni; Printza, Nikoleta; Dotis, John; Papachristou, Fotios

    2016-08-01

    The prevalence of sleep disorders during childhood has been estimated to range from 25 to 43 %. The aim of this review is to determine the prevalence of sleep disorders and possible associations with chronic kidney disease (CKD)-related factors and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in children with CKD. An electronic systematic literature search for sleep disorders in children with CKD in Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library Databases identified seven relevant articles for review, all of which reported an increased prevalence of sleep disorders in children with CKD. Five studies included children with CKD undergoing dialysis, and two studies included only non-dialysis patients. In all studies the presence of sleep disturbances was assessed by questionnaires; only one study compared the results of a validated questionnaire with laboratory-based polysomnography. The prevalence of any sleep disorder ranged from 77 to 85 % in dialysis patients, to 32-50 % in transplanted patients and 40-50 % in non-dialysis patients. The most commonly studied disorder was restless legs syndrome, which presented at a prevalence of 10-35 %. Three studies showed significant associations between presence of sleep disorders and HRQOL. We found consistent evidence of an increased prevalence of sleep disturbances in children with CKD, and these seemed to play a critical role in HRQOL. PMID:26482250

  6. Erythropoietin stimulating agents in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hayat, Amir; Haria, Dhiren; Salifu, Moro O

    2008-01-01

    Anemia is a very common clinical problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Erythropoietin is a hormone synthesized in the kidney responsible for red blood cell maturation in the bone marrow. It is deficient in the majority of patients with advanced kidney disease thereby predisposing to anemia. Since the approval of recombinant human erythropoietin (epoetin alfa) by the US FDA in 1989, epoetin alfa and sim...

  7. Erythropoietin stimulating agents in the management of anemia of chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Salifu, Moro O

    2008-01-01

    Amir Hayat, Dhiren Haria, Moro O SalifuDivision of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY, USAAbstract: Anemia is a very common clinical problem in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in these patients. Erythropoietin is a hormone synthesized in the kidney responsible for red blood cell maturation in the bone marrow. It is deficient in the majority of patients with advanced kidney disease ...

  8. Correlation of Ultrasonographic Parameters with Serum Creatinine in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Siddappa, Jagdeesh K.; Saurabh Singla; Mohammed Al Ameen; Rakshith, S.C.; Naveen Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of our study is to correlate renal echogenicity with serum creatinine in order to determine the significance of renal echogenicity when it comes to identifying the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and for the sonographic grading of CKD. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients above 30 years of age who had been diagnosed with CKD according to the guidelines of the National Kidney Foundation were included in the study. Patients on kidney replacement therapy or wi...

  9. [Acute kidney failure and renal replacement therapy after colonoscopy in a 63-year-old woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bös, D

    2015-11-01

    A 63-year-old woman presented with intestinal disorder, alternating between obstipation and diarrhoea. Sodium phosphate/diphosphate (Fleet®) was used in preparation for colonoscopy. Within 24 h the patient developed severe hyperphosphatemia and oliguric acute kidney failure with the need of renal replacement therapy. This case illustrates the rare event of phosphate nephropathy after colonoscopy. PMID:26482077

  10. Is Dialysis Modality a Factor in the Survival of Patients Initiating Dialysis After Kidney Transplant Failure?

    OpenAIRE

    Perl, Jeffrey; Dong, James; Rose, Caren; Jassal, Sarbjit Vanita; Gill, John S.

    2013-01-01

    ♦ Background: Kidney transplant failure (TF) is among the leading causes of dialysis initiation. Whether survival is similar for patients treated with peritoneal dialysis (PD) and with hemodialysis (HD) after TF is unclear and may inform decisions concerning dialysis modality selection.

  11. Features of ambulatory blood pressure in 540 patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the features and influencing factors of ambulatory blood pressure in chronic kidney disease(CKD)patients.Methods A total of 540 CKD patients from May 2010 to May 2012 in our department

  12. A study on the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study skeletal muscle atrophy and the change of autophagy in skeletal muscle of patients with chronic kidney disease.Methods Mean muscle cross sectional area,mRNA and protein expression of

  13. Pharmacological intervention of hypertension in proteinuric chronic kidney disease: how and what?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Fan-fan

    2008-01-01

    @@ Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant interactive disease in patients with diabetes,hypertension, and cardiovascular disease with major morbidity consequences and high costs to the healthcare system.

  14. Association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜利求

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between chronic kidney dysfunction and the complexity of coronary artery disease in elderly patients.Methods A prospective study was conducted on 1380 consecutive patients

  15. N-acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in patients with chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittstock, Antje; Burkert, Magdalena; Zidek, Walter;

    2009-01-01

    Patients with stage 5 chronic kidney disease show increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality that are partly related to impaired arterial vascular reactivity. We investigated whether intravenous administration of the antioxidant acetylcysteine improves arterial vascular reactivity in these...

  16. Excisional wound healing is delayed in a murine model of chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhil K Seth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately 15% of the United States population suffers from chronic kidney disease (CKD, often demonstrating an associated impairment in wound healing. This study outlines the development of a surgical murine model of CKD in order to investigate the mechanisms underlying this impairment. METHODS: CKD was induced in mice by partial cauterization of one kidney cortex and contralateral nephrectomy, modifying a previously published technique. After a minimum of 6-weeks, splinted, dorsal excisional wounds were created to permit assessment of wound healing parameters. Wounds were harvested on postoperative days (POD 0, 3, 7, and 14 for histological, immunofluorescent, and quantitative PCR (qPCR. RESULTS: CKD mice exhibited deranged blood chemistry and hematology profiles, including profound uremia and anemia. Significant decreases in re-epithelialization and granulation tissue deposition rates were found in uremic mice wounds relative to controls. On immunofluorescent analysis, uremic mice demonstrated significant reductions in cellular proliferation (BrdU and angiogenesis (CD31, with a concurrent increase in inflammation (CD45 as compared to controls. CKD mice also displayed differential expression of wound healing-related genes (VEGF, IL-1β, eNOS, iNOS on qPCR. CONCLUSIONS: These findings represent the first reported investigation of cutaneous healing in a CKD animal model. Ongoing studies of this significantly delayed wound healing phenotype include the establishment of renal failure model in diabetic strains to study the combined effects of CKD and diabetes.

  17. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: From Pathophysiology to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lullo, Luca; Gorini, Antonio; Russo, Domenico; Santoboni, Alberto; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases represent the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). According to a well-established classification, cardiovascular involvement in CKD can be set in the context of cardiorenal syndrome type 4. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) represents a key feature to provide an accurate picture of systolic-diastolic left heart involvement in CKD patients. Cardiovascular involvement is present in about 80% of prevalent hemodialysis patients, and it is evident in CKD patients since stage IIIb-IV renal disease (according to the K/DOQI CKD classification). According to the definition of cardiorenal syndrome type 4, kidney disease is detected before the development of heart failure, although timing of the diagnosis is not always possible. The evaluation of LVH is a bit heterogeneous, and few standard imaging methods can provide the accuracy of either CT- or MRI-derived left ventricular mass. Key principles in the treatment of LVH in CKD patients are mainly based on anemia and blood pressure control, together with the management of secondary hyperparathyroidism and sudden cardiac death prevention. This review is mainly focused on the clinical aspects of CKD-related LVH to provide practical guidelines both for cardiologists and nephrologists in the daily clinical approach to CKD patients. PMID:26648942

  18. Pandigital and subcutaneous chronic tophaceous gout with acute renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Shashibhushan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gout (Podagra is a disorder of purine metabolism characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in joints and connective tissue and risk of deposition in kidney interstitium. Although acute gouty arthritis is familiar for most physicians, chronic gouty arthritis, which affects small joints of the hands can be difficult to distinguish from other common interphalangeal arthropathies such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA, psoriatic arthritis, and erosive osteoarthritis because of very similar presentations. Here we describe a 60-year-old male diabetic patient with pandigital, extensive subcutaneous tophaceous gout presented with uremic encephalopathy and joint deformities. He had been treated mistakenly as RA for 10 years.

  19. Does hypokalemia contribute to acute kidney injury in chronic laxative abuse?

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Young; Yoon, Hyaejin; Yi, Joo-Hark; Jung, Woon-Yong; Han, Sang-Woong; Kim, Ho-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged hypokalemia from chronic laxative abuse is recognized as the cause of chronic tubulointerstitial disease, known as “hypokalemic nephropathy,” but it is not clear whether it contributes to acute kidney injury (AKI). A 42-year-old woman with a history of chronic kidney disease as a result of chronic laxative abuse from a purging type of anorexia nervosa (AN-P), developed an anuric AKI requiring hemodialysis and a mild AKI 2 months later. Both episodes of AKI involved severe to moderat...

  20. Frontiers in Research: Chronic Kidney Diseases: The pivotal role of pericytes in kidney fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kida, Yujiro; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2011-01-01

    Kidney pericytes were recently identified as collagen-Iα1 producing cells in healthy kidney, but the developmental, physiological and pathological roles of kidney pericytes remain poorly understood. Pericytes are stromal-derived cells that envelop, and have intimate connections with adjacent capillary endothelial cells (ECs). Recent studies in eye and brain have revealed that pericytes are crucial for angiogenesis, vascular stability and vessel integrity.In response to kidney injury, pericyte...

  1. Association between urinary sodium, creatinine, albumin, and long term survival in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    McQuarrie, Emily P.; Traynor, Jamie P.; Taylor, Alison H.; Freel, E. Marie; Fox, Jonathan G; Jardine, Alan G; Mark, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Dietary sodium intake is associated with hypertension and cardiovascular risk in the general population. In patients with chronic kidney disease, sodium intake has been associated with progressive renal disease, but not independently of proteinuria. We studied the relationship between urinary sodium excretion and urinary sodium:creatinine ratio and mortality or requirement for renal replacement therapy in chronic kidney disease. Adults attending a renal clinic who had at least one 24-hour ur...

  2. Uraemic vascular damage and calcification in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shroff, R

    2009-01-01

    Summary of thesis: Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease. Structural and functional vascular abnormalities and arterial calcification begins early in the course of renal decline and can be found even in children, contributing to their high mortality risk. Through clinical and laboratory studies, this thesis sought to investigate the causes of uraemic vascular damage and calcification in children with chronic kidney dise...

  3. Prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice.

    OpenAIRE

    van Nielen, M; Assendelft, P.; Drenthen, T; Hombergh, P. van den; Dis, I. van; Schellevis, F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To study the attitudes and working methods of general practitioners (GPs) in primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases. Methods: A questionnaire with questions about primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney diseases in general practice was sent to a representative sample of 1100 Dutch GPs. The data were analyzed using frequency tables, chi-square and ANOVA. Results: 330 GPs completed and ret...

  4. The Relationship Between Chronic Inflammation and Glucidic-Lipidic Profile Disorders in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Tarța I.D.; Căldăraru Carmen Denise; Gliga Mirela; Huțanu Adina; Bajko Z; Carașca E; Dogaru G.A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic inflammation has a proven role in atherogenesis, lipid profile parameters being related to cytokine production. In kidney transplant recipients, interleukin 6 (IL-6) is significantly associated with graft-related outcomes and also alterations of cholesterol and triglyceride metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between chronic inflammation and glucidic-lipidic metabolism disorders in a group of patients with kidney transplantation as renal...

  5. Prevalence and Correlates of Insomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shahbaj Ahmad; Manan Gupta; Ravi Gupta; Mohan Dhyani

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor sleep quality, insomnia, and restless legs syndrome (RLS) and sleep apnea are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical correlates of these problems are poorly understood. Aims: This study was to find out the prevalence and correlates of insomnia and subjects with ′high risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)′ in adults with chronic kidney disease. Materials and Methods: One hundred and four adults with CKD were included. Their demographic data, details re...

  6. Assessment of Iron Status in Anemic Children with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ali K Alzahrani1, 2, Abdrahman Alzahrani3, Nihad A Al Nashar4 , Hala A Mohamed4

    2013-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency is the commonest cause of resistance to erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs) in dialyzed children treated from anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Aim of the work: This study was conducted in order to evaluate the significance of different biomarkers in assessment of iron status during management of anemic children with CKD. Patients and method: Twenty five children with diagnosis of anemia of chronic kidney disease were enrolled for the study. They were cl...

  7. Cardiovascular disease relates to intestinal uptake of p-cresol in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Poesen, Ruben; Viaene, Liesbeth; Verbeke, Kristin; Augustijns, Patrick; Bammens, Bert; Claes, Kathleen; Kuypers, Dirk; Evenepoel, Pieter; Meijers, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Background Serum p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) associates with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease. PCS concentrations are determined by intestinal uptake of p-cresol, human metabolism to PCS and renal clearance. Whether intestinal uptake of p-cresol itself is directly associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with renal dysfunction has not been studied to date. Methods We performed a prospective study in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 1 – 5 (NCT004416...

  8. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Grint, Daniel; Lundgren, Jens;

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.......Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined....

  9. The Relationship between Health-Promoting Behaviors and Resilience in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Ching Ma; Hong-Jer Chang; Yueh-Min Liu; Hsiang-Li Hsieh; Lan Lo; Mei-Yu Lin; Kuo-Cheng Lu

    2013-01-01

    This cross-sectional research study explored differences in health-promoting behavior and resilience among three groups of chronic kidney disease patients (high-risk, early chronic kidney disease; early CKD and pre-end stage renal disease; pre-ESRD) treated at the Nephrology outpatient clinic in northern Taiwan. A total of 150 CKD outpatients were interviewed using structured questionnaires including a CKD Health to Promote Lifestyle Scale, and resilience scale. We found that the pre-ESRD gro...

  10. Gout and risk of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis: meta-analysis of observational studies

    OpenAIRE

    Roddy, E.; Mallen, C.; Belcher, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction To determine the prevalence of chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis in people with gout, and the association between gout and prevalent or incident chronic kidney disease and nephrolithiasis. Methods Systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies. Data sources; MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL databases, hand-searched reference lists, citation history and contact with authors. Eligibility criteria: cohort, case–control or cross-sectional studies which examined the...

  11. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  12. HEARING ASSESSMENT IN CHRONIC RENAL FAILURE PATIENTS UNDERGOING HEMODIALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The auditory sensitivity of 63 patient of chronic renal failure on hemodialysis was assessed in order to know the effect of dialysis on hearing threshold. All selected patient were non diabetic with normal tympanic membrane and with no history of ototoxic drug and any hereditary hearing problems. Pure tone audiometry was done before and after dialys is and all cases were followed for 3 month. A high incidence of high frequency sensorineural hearing loss was obtained which could not be attributed to age , noise exposure and ottotoxicity. An association between high frequency sensorineural hearing loss a nd hemodialysis is thus suggested KEYWORDS: Hemodialysis ; Pure tone audiometry ; High frequency sensorineural hearing loss ; Duration of disease ; Chronic renal failure

  13. Experiences of air travel in patients with chronic heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Ingle, Lee; Hobkirk, James; Damy, Thibaud; Nabb, Samantha; Clark, Andrew L.; Cleland, John G F

    2012-01-01

    Aim To conduct a survey in a representative cohort of ambulatory patients with stable, well managed chronic heart failure (CHF) to discover their experiences of air travel. Methods An expert panel including a cardiologist, an exercise scientist, and a psychologist developed a series of survey questions designed to elicit CHF patients' experiences of air travel (Appendix 1). The survey questions, information sheets and consent forms were posted out in a self-addressed envelope to 1293 CHF pati...

  14. Abnormalities of the breast in chronic renal failure and renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bae Young; Kim, Hak Hee; Choi, Kyu Ho; Park, Seog Hee [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-15

    Manifestations of breast abnormalities in these patients included breast calcifications, duct dilatation, fibrocystic change, rapidly enlarged multiple fibroadenomas, edema, invasive ductal cancer, extensive fibrosis, spontaneous hemorrhage, and Mondor's disease. These interesting cases we experienced are reported. Prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol are required concurrently for normal development of mammary epithelium. Hormonal profile of chronic renal failure is different to normal person due to decreased renal clearance. The incidence of breast cancer is also increased in CRF. Metastatic soft tissue calcification is well described finding in chronic renal failure related to an increase in serum calcium phosphate product and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Kidney failure alone may increases prolactin level. The possibility of deranged hypothalamic-pituitary control mechanisms do not excluded. Impaired prolactin response to TRH stimulation has also been observed. Methyldopa and tricyclic antidepressants specifically were associated with hyperprolactinemia. Cyclosporin administration may elevate serum prolactin levels with simultaneous down regulation of prolactin receptors. Some populations of lymphocytes and fibroblasts exhibit cyclosporin receptors. Cyclosporin could potentially promote fibroadenomas by direct action, and seems to alter LH secretion.

  15. Abnormalities of the breast in chronic renal failure and renal transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manifestations of breast abnormalities in these patients included breast calcifications, duct dilatation, fibrocystic change, rapidly enlarged multiple fibroadenomas, edema, invasive ductal cancer, extensive fibrosis, spontaneous hemorrhage, and Mondor's disease. These interesting cases we experienced are reported. Prolactin, growth hormone, and cortisol are required concurrently for normal development of mammary epithelium. Hormonal profile of chronic renal failure is different to normal person due to decreased renal clearance. The incidence of breast cancer is also increased in CRF. Metastatic soft tissue calcification is well described finding in chronic renal failure related to an increase in serum calcium phosphate product and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Kidney failure alone may increases prolactin level. The possibility of deranged hypothalamic-pituitary control mechanisms do not excluded. Impaired prolactin response to TRH stimulation has also been observed. Methyldopa and tricyclic antidepressants specifically were associated with hyperprolactinemia. Cyclosporin administration may elevate serum prolactin levels with simultaneous down regulation of prolactin receptors. Some populations of lymphocytes and fibroblasts exhibit cyclosporin receptors. Cyclosporin could potentially promote fibroadenomas by direct action, and seems to alter LH secretion.

  16. Uterine Prolapse as a Cause of Chronic Renal Failure

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    Savaş SİPAHİ

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Uterine prolapse, common in old and multiparous women, has been reported as a rare cause of obstructive uropathy. In this case, the management of a 75-year-old female patient who presented at the outpatient clinic with a history of anuresis and diagnosed with total uterine prolapse, bilateral hydronephrosis, urinary infection and acute renal failure is presented. The renal failure clinical picture regressed with appropriate treatment. However, the patient refused surgery and chose to have a pessary implemented. Four months after dismissal, she was readmitted to the hospital with recurrent renal failure that required dialysis treatment. The patient did not respond to therapy and was placed on a chronic dialysis program with a diagnosis of end-stage renal disease due to posterenal causes.

  17. Osteoporosis and adynamic bone in chronic kidney disease.

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    Cannata-Andía, Jorge B; Rodriguez García, Minerva; Gómez Alonso, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Among the chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) disorders, osteoporosis and adynamic bone are highly prevalent, and they have been consistently associated with low bone mass, bone fractures, vascular calcifications and greater mortality in general and CKD populations. Despite the fact that osteoporosis and adynamic bone have similar clinical outcomes, they have different pathogeneses and clinical management. In osteoporosis, there is a lack of balance between bone formation and bone resorption, and less new bone is formed to replace bone losses. Osteoporosis is defined by the World Health Organization as "a disease characterized by low bone mineral density and micro architectural deterioration leading to low bone strength and increased risk of fractures." In the general population, there is a good correlation between dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements and bone fractures, but this is not the case with CKD patients. Despite the fact that we have a great number of active antiosteoporotic drugs, the experience in CKD patients is limited. Adynamic bone is suspected based on biochemical parameters, mainly parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone alkaline phosphatase, but it needs to be proven using a bone biopsy, where a low or zero bone formation rate and a reduction or absence of osteoblasts and osteoclasts should be found. The clinical management of adynamic bone has important limitations and currently does not allow taking many active measures. Treatment is mainly based on the prevention of risk factors known to induce PTH oversuppression, such as aluminium and calcium load and very high doses of vitamin D receptor activators. Due to the limitations in the treatment of both conditions, prevention plays a key role in the management of these disorders. PMID:23023723

  18. Salivary Alterations in Rats with Experimental Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Ana Carolina; Bergamaschi, Cassia Toledo; de Souza, Douglas Nesadal; Nogueira, Fernando Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to analyze changes in saliva composition and salivary secretion process of rats with chronic kidney disease induced by 5/6 nephrectomy to set the foundation for salivary studies related to CKD. Methods CKD was induced in Wistar rats via 5/6 nephrectomy. Blood and saliva samples were collected from Control, Sham and CKD groups at 8 and 12 weeks after the surgery. Salivation was stimulated via intraperitoneal injections of pilocarpine (1.0 mg/Kg body weight) or isoproterenol (5.0 mg/Kg body weight). Saliva was collected and immediately stored at -80°C until analysis. The salivary flow rate, total protein, amylase and peroxidase activities, and urea concentrations were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results Increases in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations were observed in the CKD groups. Amylase activity was significantly reduced in response to both stimuli in the CKD groups at 8 weeks and increased in the CKD groups at 12 weeks in response to isoproterenol stimulus. The peroxidase activities of the CKD groups were significantly reduced in response to isoproterenol stimulation and were increased at 12 weeks in response to pilocarpine stimulation. Salivary urea was significantly increased in the CKD groups at 8 weeks in response to the isoproterenol stimuli and at 12 weeks in response to both salivary agonists. Conclusions The pattern of alterations observed in this experimental model is similar to those observed in patients and clearly demonstrates the viability of 5/6 nephrectomy as an experimental model in future studies to understand the alterations in salivary compositions and in salivary glands that are elicited by CKD. PMID:26859883

  19. Refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease (CKD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was conducted to determine the refusal of dialysis amongst patients of chronic kidney disease presenting for the first time for dialysis in uremic condition. Study Design: Cross sectional Study. Place and Duration of the Study: Outpatient department of Nephrology, Mayo Hospital, Lahore from 1 st Jan 2012 to 31 st December 2012. Patients and Methods: Patients of CKD due to any cause presenting with uremia for the first time for dialysis were included in the study. History and physical examination was done and demographic data was collected in pre designed form. Patients were offered for dialysis while explaining to them the advantages of getting and disadvantages of not getting dialysis. Patient's response on the offer was recorded and the reason for the refusal were noted. Results: According to the criteria 150 patients were included in the study. Most of the patients were male 92 (61.3%) and illiterate 78 (52.0%). Major cause of CKD was diabetes mellitus 58 (38.7%) followed by hypertension 38 (25.3%). Mean age of the patients was 42.59 ± 13.72 year and income of themost of the patients 126 (84%) was less than US$100/-month. Most of the patients 126 (77.0%) were asked about the need of dialysis in less than three months, 61 (41.3%) offered for the first time and amongst them 85 (54.0%) were offered dialysis already. Majority of the patients 101 (67.3%) refused dialysis when it was offered to them for the first time. Major reason of the refusal was fear of dialysis procedure in 76 (76%) patients followed by treatment by spiritual 14 (14%) and alternative ways and others 11 (11 %). Middle age persons refused dialysis significantly. (author)

  20. Cochlear function in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Samantha Marlanie Govender

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate cochlear functioning in patients (18 - 45 years old with varying stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD. Using purposive sampling, 50 participants, 10 in each of the 5 stages of CKD, were selected and underwent pure tone audiometric testing and distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs.Results: Significant differences (p<0.05 were found between pure tone audiometry and DPOAEs in detecting early cochlear dysfunction in the high-frequency range in stages 3 (6 000/5 000 Hz; p=0.00, 4 (6 000/5 000 Hz; p<0.03 and 5 (4 000/3 333 Hz; p<0.01, 8 000/6 667 Hz:p<0.05 with DPOAEs being more sensitive in identifying early cochlear dysfunction. Patients in stages 1 and 2 presented with normal puretone thresholds and DPOAEs, suggesting that cochlear functioning in these patients was normal. Early cochlear dysfunction, thereby indicating a subclinical hearing loss, was identified in stages 3, 4 and 5 by DPOAE testing. In addition, blood test results, drug intake and concomitant conditions were recorded and analysed which suggested a relationship between reduced cochlear functioning and increased electrolyte levels, treatment regimens and concomitant conditions.Conclusion: Participants in the later stages of CKD presented with early cochlear dysfunction, presenting with subclinical hearing loss. It was postulated that this subclinical hearing loss resulted from a combination of electrolytic, urea and creatinine imbalances, together with concomitant medical conditions and ototoxic drug intake. It was concluded that audiological monitoring be included in the management of patients with CKD and that DPOAEs be introduced as part of the test battery to monitor cochlear function in patients with varying degrees of CKD.

  1. Arterial stiffness &Sri Lankan chronic kidney disease of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Fiona; Kimmitt, Robert; Herath, Chula; Webb, David J; Melville, Vanessa; Siribaddana, Sisira; Eddleston, Michael; Dhaun, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common and independently associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Arterial stiffness contributes to CVD risk in CKD. In many developing countries a considerable proportion of CKD remains unexplained, termed CKDu. We assessed arterial stiffness in subjects with Sri Lankan CKDu, in matched controls without CKD and in those with defined CKD. Aortic blood pressure (BP), pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed in 130 subjects (50 with CKDu, 45 with CKD and 35 without CKD) using the validated TensioMed™ Arteriograph monitor. Brachial and aortic BP was lower in controls than in CKDu and CKD subjects but no different between CKDu and CKD. Controls had a lower PWV compared to subjects with CKDu and CKD. Despite equivalent BP and renal dysfunction, CKDu subjects had a lower PWV than those with CKD (8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 9.9 ± 2.2 m/s, p < 0.01). Excluding diabetes accentuated the differences in PWV seen between groups (controls vs. CKDu vs. CKD: 6.7 ± 0.9 vs. 8.7 ± 1.5 vs. 10.4 ± 1.5 m/s, p < 0.001 for all). Sri Lankan CKDu is associated with less arterial stiffening than defined causes of CKD. Whether this translates to lower cardiovascular morbidity and mortality long term is unclear and should be the focus of future studies. PMID:27586642

  2. Impaired postprandial lipemic response in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saland, Jeffrey M; Satlin, Lisa M; Zalsos-Johnson, Jeanna; Cremers, Serge; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2016-07-01

    Dyslipidemia in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is usually characterized by hypertriglyceridemia. Here we studied postprandial lipemia in children and young adults to determine whether an increasing degree of CKD results in a proportional increase in triglyceride and chylomicron concentration. Secondary goals were to determine whether subnephrotic proteinuria, apolipoprotein (apo)C-III and insulin resistance modify the CKD effect. Eighteen fasting participants (mean age of 15 years, mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 50 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) underwent a postprandial challenge with a high fat milkshake. Triglycerides, apoB-48, insulin, and other markers were measured before and 2, 4, 6, and 8 hours afterward. Response was assessed by the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and of apoB-48. The primary hypothesis was tested by correlation to estimated GFR. Significantly, for every 10 ml/min/1.73 m(2) lower estimated GFR, the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides was 17% greater while that of apoB-48 was 16% greater. Univariate analyses also showed that the incremental area under the curve of triglycerides and apoB-48 were significantly associated with subnephrotic proteinuria, apoC-III, and insulin resistance. In multivariate analysis, CKD and insulin resistance were independently associated with increased area under the curve and were each linked to increased levels of apoC-III. Thus, postprandial triglyceride and chylomicron plasma excursions are increased in direct proportion to the degree of CKD. Independent effects are associated with subclinical insulin resistance and increased apoC-III is linked to both CKD and insulin resistance. PMID:27162092

  3. Relationship between Plasma Leptin Level and Chronic Kidney Disease

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    Anoop Shankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Leptin is an adipose tissue-derived hormone shown to be related to several metabolic, inflammatory, and hemostatic factors related to chronic kidney disease. Recent animal studies have reported that infusion of recombinant leptin into normal rats for 3 weeks fosters the development of glomerulosclerosis. However, few studies have examined the association between leptin and CKD in humans. Therefore, we examined the association between plasma leptin levels and CKD in a representative sample of US adults. Methods. We examined the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey participants >20 years of age (n=5820, 53.6% women. Plasma leptin levels were categorized into quartiles (≤4.3 Fg/L, 4.4–8.7 Fg/L, 8.8–16.9 Fg/L, >16.9 Fg/L. CKD was defined as a glomerular filtration rate of <60 mL/min/1.73 m2 estimated from serum creatinine. Results. Higher plasma leptin levels were associated with CKD after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, smoking, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI, diabetes, hypertension, and serum cholesterol. Compared to quartile 1 of leptin (referent, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval of CKD associated with quartile 4 was 3.31 (1.41 to 7.78; P-trend = 0.0135. Subgroup analyses examining the relation between leptin and CKD by gender, BMI categories, diabetes, and hypertension status also showed a consistent positive association. Conclusion. Higher plasma leptin levels are associated with CKD in a representative sample of US adults.

  4. Skeletal muscle proton T 2 in chronic heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the interest of proton T 2 measurement of skeletal muscle at rest and with exercise in patients with chronic heart failure, we performed associated measurements of proton T 2 using magnetic resonance imaging, of external work using ergometry, and of intra-cellular pH (pH) using magnetic resonance 31 P-spectroscopy, in skeletal muscle of the leg anterior compartment, in 37 patients with chronic heart failure. Sixteen patients were in New York Heart Association class II (NYHA II, moderate cardiac failure) and 21 in NYHA classes III-IV (severe cardiac failure). Rest T 2 was significantly increased in NYHA III-IV patients (30.9 ± 2.2 versus 32.8 ± 209 ms, p i variations were of -8 ± 4 versus -9 ± 5%, p =3D NS. The ratio of relative T 2 variations to W was significantly increased in NYPH III-IV patients (0.24 ± 0.12 versus 0.60 ± 0.41%/J, p i with exercise were coupled with external work, only in group NYHA II. T 2 variations negatively correlated with those of pHi in both groups (r=3D -0.78, pi variations with exercise which seems to depend on the exercise intensity level. (authors). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Symmetric Dimethylarginine: Improving the Diagnosis and Staging of Chronic Kidney Disease in Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relford, Roberta; Robertson, Jane; Clements, Celeste

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a common condition in cats and dogs, traditionally diagnosed after substantial loss of kidney function when serum creatinine concentrations increase. Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) is a sensitive circulating kidney biomarker whose concentrations increase earlier than creatinine as glomerular filtration rate decreases. Unlike creatinine SDMA is unaffected by lean body mass. The IDEXX SDMA test introduces a clinically relevant and reliable tool for the diagnosis and management of kidney disease. SDMA has been provisionally incorporated into the International Renal Interest Society guidelines for CKD to aid staging and targeted treatment of early and advanced disease. PMID:27499007

  6. Pharmacokinetics of salicylate in rabbits with acute kidney failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of sodium salicylate were studied in rabbits with acute renal failure induced by intravenous administration of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate in a dose of 0.2 mg kg-1. 14C-labelled salicylic acid, 99mTc-complex and 125I-hippuran were used to study the metabolism. The 99mTc and 125I activities were measured with a Tesla gamma counter or beta-gamma spectrometer NE 8312. The 14C activity was measured using beta spectrometer Rack beta 1219. The 99mTc activity was determined immediately after the experiment, the 14C activity was determined after 4 days. The drug concentration was determined by comparing the activities of the sample and the standard activities. (J.J.). 6 figs., 1 tab., 18 refs

  7. Significance, definition, classification and risk factors of chronic kidney disease in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, A M

    2015-03-01

    Renal dysfunction or chronic kidney disease (CKD) is found in 10% of the global population and is classified into five stages according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). No matter where a patient lives, estimation of the GFR is mandatory for decision-making and obtained by the simple measurement of a serum creatinine level. The objective of diagnosing CKD lies in its future prevention, early detection and proper treatment, which will prevent or delay functional deterioration. Primary hypertension (PH) occurs in 25% of South Africa (SA)s black population and is the putative cause of stage 5 CKD in 40 - 60% of these patients. Moreover, in this group, stage 5 CKD occurs at a relatively young age (35 - 45 years) compared with other population groups in whom stage 5 CKD resulting from PH usually occurs between 60 and 70 years of age. In the cohort study, PH has been found in 12 - 16% of black school learners (mean age 17 years) compared with 1.8 - 2% of other ethnic groups (mixed race, Asian, white). End-stage renal failure (ESRF) is the fifth most common cause of death in SA, excluding post-traumatic cases. In addition, undiagnosed or poorly controlled PH is a potent risk factor for other cardiovascular disease (CVD), e.g. congestive cardiac failure, myocardial infarction, stroke. Significant protein is also associated with CVD and protein >1 g/d is a significant risk factor for ESRF. PMID:26294833

  8. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic kidney disease

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    Franczyk-Skóra Beata

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular deaths account for about 40% of all deaths of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, particularly those on dialysis, while sudden cardiac death (SCD might be responsible for as many as 60% of SCD in patients undergoing dialysis. Studies have demonstrated a number of factors occurring in hemodialysis (HD that could lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with CKD undergoing HD are at high risk of ventricular arrhythmia and SCD since changes associated with renal failure and hemodialysis-related disorders overlap. Antiarrhythmic therapy is much more difficult in patients with CKD, but the general principles are similar to those in patients with normal renal function - at first, the cause of arrhythmias should be found and eliminated. Also the choice of therapy is narrowed due to the altered pharmacokinetics of many drugs resulting from renal failure, neurotoxicity of certain drugs and their complex interactions. Cardiac pacing in elderly patients is a common method of treatment. Assessment of patients’ prognosis is important when deciding whether to implant complex devices. There are reports concerning greater risk of surgical complications, which depends also on the extent of the surgical site. The decision concerning implantation of a pacing system in patients with CKD should be made on the basis of individual assessment of the patient.

  9. Prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franczyk-Skóra, Beata; Gluba, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Kozłowski, Dariusz; Małyszko, Jolanta; Rysz, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular deaths account for about 40% of all deaths of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), particularly those on dialysis, while sudden cardiac death (SCD) might be responsible for as many as 60% of SCD in patients undergoing dialysis. Studies have demonstrated a number of factors occurring in hemodialysis (HD) that could lead to cardiac arrhythmias. Patients with CKD undergoing HD are at high risk of ventricular arrhythmia and SCD since changes associated with renal failure and hemodialysis-related disorders overlap. Antiarrhythmic therapy is much more difficult in patients with CKD, but the general principles are similar to those in patients with normal renal function - at first, the cause of arrhythmias should be found and eliminated. Also the choice of therapy is narrowed due to the altered pharmacokinetics of many drugs resulting from renal failure, neurotoxicity of certain drugs and their complex interactions. Cardiac pacing in elderly patients is a common method of treatment. Assessment of patients' prognosis is important when deciding whether to implant complex devices. There are reports concerning greater risk of surgical complications, which depends also on the extent of the surgical site. The decision concerning implantation of a pacing system in patients with CKD should be made on the basis of individual assessment of the patient. PMID:23206758

  10. The impact of chronic heart failure on misinterpretation and misclassification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity

    OpenAIRE

    Vyshnyvetskyy, I.I.; Borovtsova, A. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the impact of comorbid chronic heart failure (CHF) on the severity of symptoms and correctness of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) classification.Materials and methods. Cross-sectional study included 177 patients with COPD and concomitant cardiovascular diseases. All patients were undergone spirometry, chest radiography, echocardiography, validated questionnaires (COPD assessment test (CAT), Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS)). Multiple regression was us...

  11. Tempo até o transplante e sobrevida em pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, 1998-2002 Time to kidney transplantation in chronic renal failure patients in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1998-2002

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    Cynthia Braga da Cunha

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, descreveram-se as características dos 14.419 pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica tratados por hemodiálise no Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, e analisou-se o tempo até a primeira realização do transplante no período de 1998 a 2002. Técnicas de análise de sobrevida como a análise não paramétrica de Kaplan-Meier e a modelagem semiparamétrica com o modelo de riscos proporcionais de Cox foram utilizadas. Além do modelo de sobrevida para transplante, o tempo até o óbito foi estimado para a comparação das estimativas dos dois modelos. Os resultados mostraram que, no período estudado, apenas 6,3% dos pacientes foram transplantados, 32,4% foram indicados e 6,3% inscritos na lista de espera. Observa-se que a probabilidade de transplante dos pacientes indicados, inscritos para o transplante e os que estão em uma faixa etária reduzida é maior. A diabetes mellitus possui um efeito redutor de 35% no risco de realização de transplante. Todas as estimativas apresentaram direções contrárias às obtidas pelo modelo de sobrevida para óbito.This study analyzes the characteristics of 14,419 chronic renal failure patients treated with hemodialysis and time to first kidney transplantation in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 1998 to 2002. Survival analysis methods were used, such as the Kaplan-Meier non-parametric method and the semi-parametric method with the Cox proportional hazards model. Besides the survival model for transplantation, time to death was analyzed to compare the two models' estimates. During the period studied, only 6.3% of patients received transplants, 32.4% were referred for transplantation, and 6.3% were included on the waiting list. Odds of transplantation were greater for those who had been referred, those on the waiting list, and younger patients. Diabetes mellitus reduced the probability of conducting transplantation by 35%. All the estimates showed directions opposite to those

  12. Ex vivo exposure of bone marrow from chronic kidney disease donor rats to pravastatin limits renal damage in recipient rats with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppen, A. van; Papazova, D.A.; Oosterhuis, N.R.; Gremmels, H.; Giles, R.H.; Fledderus, J.O.; Joles, J.A.; Verhaar, M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthy bone marrow cell (BMC) infusion improves renal function and limits renal injury in a model of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in rats. However, BMCs derived from rats with CKD fail to retain beneficial effects, demonstrating limited therapeutic efficacy. Statins have been reported

  13. [Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease and strategies to counteract chronic diseases in Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrilli, Valeria; D'Elia, Roberto; Galeone, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The Prevention of Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is placed in the more general context of prevention of major chronic Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs): cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, chronic lung diseases and tumors that are the main problem for public health worldwide. Any health policy strategy aimed to the prevention of NCDs has to provide knowledge of health and socioeconomic status of the population, to reduce the level of exposure to risk factors and to adapt health services to the request for assistance. To this purpose, population monitoring systems have been implemented in the last years. The NCDs share some risk factors that are related, in large part, to unhealthy individual behaviours: smoking, alcohol abuse, unhealthy diet and physical inactivity. NCDs prevention has to be understood as the set of all actions, sanitary and not, aiming to prevent or delay the onset of diseases or their complications. Preventive measures should, therefore, involve not only the health sector but also all the actors that can help to prevent that disease. As for the Prevention of CKD, the Ministry of Health has established a working table, which handled the Drafting of the "Position paper for the CKD", approved in the State-Regions Conference on august 8th 2014. The document draws a national strategy to combat this disease through primary prevention, early diagnosis and the establishment of diagnostic - therapeutic pathways (DTP). PMID:27545630

  14. Impact of Iodinated Contrast on Renal Function and Hemodynamics in Rats with Chronic Hyperglycemia and Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sheila Marques; Martins, Daniel Malisani; da Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti; Watanabe, Mirian; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Iodinated contrast (IC) is clinically used in diagnostic and interventional procedures, but its use can result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI). Chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hyperglycemia (CH) are important predisposing factors to CI-AKI. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of iodinated contrast on the renal function and hemodynamics in rats with chronic hyperglycemia and chronic kidney disease. A total of 30 rats were divided into six groups; Sham: control of chronic renal disease; Citrate: control of chronic hyperglycemia (CH); Nx5/6: rats with 5/6 nephrectomy; Chronic Hyperglycemia: rats receiving Streptozotocin 65 mg/kg; Nx5/6 + IC: rats Nx5/6 received 6 mL/kg of IC; CH + IC: Chronic hyperglycemia rats receiving 6 mL/kg of IC. Renal function (inulin clearance; urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, NGAL) and hemodynamics (arterial blood pressure; renal blood flow; renal vascular resistance) were evaluated. Iodinated contrast significantly increased urinary NGAL and reduced inulin clearance, while the hemodynamics parameters showed changes in arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, and renal vascular resistance in both CKD and CH groups. The results suggest that the iodinated contrast in risk factors models has important impact on renal function and hemodynamics. NGAL was confirmed to play a role of highlight in diagnosis of CI-AKI. PMID:27034930

  15. One risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alssema (Marjan); R.S. Newson (Rachel); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); H.L. Hillege (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.T. Gansevoort; J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identi

  16. One Risk Assessment Tool for Cardiovascular Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, Marjan; Newson, Rachel S.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nijpels, Giel; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKDD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identification of p

  17. Stage-to-stage progression of chronic kidney disease in renal transplantation with chronic allograft dysfunction

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    Khalkhali H

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Although the short-term results of kidney transplantation have improved greatly during the past decades, the long-term results have not improved according. Graft loss due to chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD is a major concern in renal transplant recipients (RTRs. There is little data about disease progression in this patient population. In this paper, we investigated history of kidney function as the pattern, waiting time and rate of pass from intermediate stages in RTR with CAD."n"nMethods: In a single-center retrospective study, 214 RTRs with CAD investigated at the Urmia University Hospital urmia, Iran from 1997 to 2005. Kidney function at each visit assessed with GFR. We apply NKF and K/DOQI classification of chronic kidney disease (CKD staging system to determine pattern of disease progression per stage in this group of patients. "n"nResults: The pure death-censored graft loss was 26% with mean waiting time 81.7 months. 100% of RTRs passed from stage I to II in mean waiting time 26.3 months. The probability of prognostic factors transition from stage II to III was 88.9% with mean waiting time 25.5 months, transition from III to IV was 55.7% with mean waiting time of 24.9 months and transition for

  18. ST2 and patient prognosis in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Zhang, Yuhui; Ky, Bonnie

    2015-04-01

    Biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases are indispensable tools for diagnosis and prognosis, and the use of several biomarkers is now considered the standard of care. New markers continue to be developed, but few prove to be substantially better than established markers. Suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2) is a marker of cardiomyocyte stress and fibrosis that provides incremental value to natriuretic peptides for risk stratification of patients with a wide spectrum of cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of all available data, the 2013 American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines now recommend measurement of ST2 for additive risk stratification in patients with acute or chronic ambulatory heart failure (HF). This report provides an up-to-date overview of the clinical studies that led to the endorsement of ST2 as a cardiovascular prognostic marker in chronic HF. The presented data suggest that the addition of ST2 to a model that includes established mortality risk factors, including natriuretic peptides, substantially improves the risk stratification for death and HF hospitalization in patients with HF. ST2's prognostic value remains strong even in the subset of patients with renal insufficiency and is superior to other remodeling-fibrosis biomarkers currently being evaluated. In conclusion, these results have been repeatedly validated; thus, ST2 could be rapidly incorporated into clinical practice for risk prediction. Indeed, the body of evidence supporting the use of ST2 in chronic HF stratification continues to grow, with consistent data from cohorts around the world in single-center (Barcelona, Brussels, and San Diego cohorts) and multicenter (Penn Heart Failure Study [PHFS] and Muerte Subita en Insuficiencia Cardiac [MUSIC]) studies and in post hoc studies from clinical trials (Prospective Randomized Amlodipine Survival Evaluation 2 [PRAISE-2], Heart Failure: A Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training [HF

  19. Managing anemia in patients with chronic heart failure: what do we know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Sandhu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Ankur Sandhu1, Sandeep Soman1, Michael Hudson2, Anatole Besarab11Divisions of Nephrology, 2Cardiology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USAAbstract: Anemia is common in patients with chronic heart failure (HF with an incidence ranging from 4% to 55% depending on the studied population. Several studies have highlighted that the prevalence of anemia increases with worsening heart failure as reflected by New York Heart Association classification. Additionally, several epidemiological studies have highlighted its role as a prognostic marker, linking it to worse outcomes including; malnutrition, increased hospitalizations, refractory heart failure and death. The pathophysiology of anemia is multifactorial and related to various factors including; hemodilution, iron losses from anti-platelet drugs, activation of the inflammatory cascade, urinary losses of erythropoietin and associated renal insufficiency. There are a host of epidemiological studies examining HF outcomes and anemia, but only a few randomized trials addressing this issue. The purpose of this article is to review the literature that examines the interrelationship of anemia and congestive HF, analyzing its etiology, impact on outcomes and also the role of associated kidney disease as well as cardiorenal syndrome both as a marker of morbidity and mortality.Keywords: anemia, cardio-renal syndrome, heart failure

  20. Prediction of differential creatinine clearance in chronically obstructed kidneys by non-contrast helical computerized tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: We investigate the use of non-contrast helical computerized tomography (NCHCT in the measurement of differential renal parenchymal volume as a surrogate for differential creatinine clearance (CrCl for unilateral chronically obstructed kidney. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with unilateral chronically obstructed kidneys with normal contralateral kidneys were enrolled. Ultrasonography (USG of the kidneys was first done with the cortical thickness of the site with the most renal substance in the upper pole, mid-kidney, and lower pole of both kidneys were measured, and the mean cortical thickness of each kidney was calculated. NCHCT was subsequently performed for each patient. The CT images were individually reviewed with the area of renal parenchyma measured for each kidney. Then the volume of the slices was summated to give the renal parenchymal volume of both the obstructed and normal kidneys. Finally, a percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN was inserted to the obstructed kidney, and CrCl of both the obstructed kidney (PCN urine and the normal side (voided urine were measured two 2 after the relief of obstruction. RESULTS: From March 1999 to February 2001, thirty patients were enrolled into the study. Ninety percent of them had ureteral calculi. The differential CrCl of the obstructed kidney (%CrCl was defined as the percentage of CrCl of the obstructed kidney as of the total CrCl, measured 2 weeks after relief of obstruction. The differential renal parenchymal volume of the obstructed kidney (%CTvol was the percentage of renal parenchymal volume as of the total parenchymal volume. The differential USG cortical thickness of the obstructed kidney (%USGcort was the percentage of mean cortical thickness as of the total mean cortical thickness. The Pearson's correlation coefficient (r between %CTvol and %CrCl and that between %USGcort and %CrCl were 0.756 and 0.543 respectively. The regression line was %CrCl = (1.00 x %CTvol - 14.27. The %CTvol

  1. Optimal medical therapy in chronic heart failure-an audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Systolic heart failure is a chronic condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Evidence based optimal medical therapy (OMT) has been shown to reduce mortality. Underuse of OMT due to multiple reasons has been a consistent problem. The study objective was to audit the use of OMT in patients with heart Failure. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of study: This audit was carried out in AFIC-NIHD from April 2011- February 2012. Material and Methods: Seventy consecutive stage D heart failure patients were included in the study. The patients were assessed clinically by a cardiologist and all previous documentations, referral letters, prescriptions, and purchase receipts were reviewed. To identify any other medication patients might have been taking (which did not appear on the prescriptions) patients were asked to identify common medicine packs. The patients underwent a detailed clinical evaluation including history, physical examination. Relevant investigations were done. ACCF/AHA (American College of Cardiology Foundation / American Heart Association) and ESC (European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure were taken as standard of care. Results: In our audit we found that a large proportion of patients who were at high risk as per the Seattle Heart Failure Model (SHFM) were not on OMT, only 4.3% of the patients were on beta blockers that have been shown to improve mortality in the large randomized clinical trials, 64.3% were not taking any beta blockers where as 55.7% were not on ACE inhibitors and adding the OMT greatly reduced their mortality risk. Conclusions: We concluded that a large proportion of patients were not on OMT despite not having any contraindication to such therapy. This deprives them of significant survival benefit. (author)

  2. Chronic heart failure in Japan: Implications of the CHART studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Shiba

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Nobuyuki Shiba, Hiroaki ShimokawaDepartment of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Evidence-Based Cardiovascular Medicine, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai City, JapanAbstract: The prognosis of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF still remains poor, despite the recent advances in medical and surgical treatment. Furthermore, CHF is a major public health problem in most industrialized countries where the elderly population is rapidly increasing. Although the prevalence and mortality of CHF used to be relatively low in Japan, the disorder has been markedly increasing due to the rapid aging of the society and the Westernization of lifestyle that facilitates the development of coronary artery disease. The Chronic Heart Failure Analysis and Registry in the Tohoku District (CHART-1 study was one of the largest cohorts in Japan. The study has clarified the characteristics and prognosis of Japanese patients with CHF, demonstrating that their prognosis was similarly poor compared with those in Western countries. However, we still need evidence for the prevention and treatment of CHF based on the large cohort studies or randomized treatment trials in the Japanese population. Since the strategy for CHF management is now changing from treatment to prevention, a larger-size prospective cohort, called the CHART-2 study, has been initiated to evaluate the risk factors of CHF in Japan. This review summarizes the current status of CHF studies in Japan and discusses their future perspectives.Keywords: heart failure, aging, Japanese

  3. Pre-pregnancy counselling for women with chronic kidney disease:a retrospective analysis of nine years’ experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Kate S; Bramham, Kate Macpherson; Vais, Alina; Harding, Kate R; Chowdhury, Paramit; Taylor, Cath; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background Women with chronic kidney disease have an increased risk of maternal and fetal complications in pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy counselling is recommended but the format of the counselling process and the experience of the patient have never been assessed. This study examines the experience of women with chronic kidney disease attending pre-pregnancy counselling and evaluates their pregnancy outcomes. Methods This is a cross-sectional assessment of 179 women with chronic kidney disease at...

  4. A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Utility-Based Quality of Life in Chronic Kidney Disease Treatments

    OpenAIRE

    Wyld, Melanie; Morton, Rachael Lisa; Hayen, Andrew; Howard, Kirsten; Webster, Angela Claire

    2012-01-01

    Editors' Summary Background Ill health can adversely affect an individual's quality of life, particularly if caused by long-term (chronic) conditions, such as chronic kidney disease—in the United States alone, 23 million people have chronic kidney disease, of whom 570,000 are treated with dialysis or kidney transplantation. In order to measure the cost-effectiveness of interventions to manage medical conditions, health economists use an objective measurement known as quality-adjusted life yea...

  5. Hemodialysis versus peritoneal dialysis: a case control study of survival in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maier, Alexandra; Stocks, Franziska; Pommer, Wolfgang;

    2009-01-01

    It is still controversial whether the mode of dialysis or preexisting comorbidities may influence the prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5. Therefore, we performed a prospective case control study to evaluate whether the mode of dialysis may influence outcome. We found 25 cases...... dialysis, predicted death in patients with chronic kidney disease. It is concluded that age and comorbidities but not mode of dialysis are important to predict survival in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5....

  6. KNOW-CKD (KoreaN cohort study for Outcome in patients With Chronic Kidney Disease): design and methods

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Kook-Hwan; Park, Sue Kyung; Park, Hayne Cho; Chin, Ho Jun; Chae, Dong Wan; Choi, Kyu Hun; Han, Seung Hyeok; Yoo, Tae Hyun; Lee, Kyubeck; Kim, Yong-Soo; Chung, Wookyung; Hwang, Young-Hwan; Kim, Soo Wan; Kim, Yeong Hoon; Kang, Sun Woo

    2014-01-01

    Background The progression and complications of chronic kidney disease should differ depending on the cause (C), glomerular filtration rate category (G), and albuminuria (A). The KNOW-CKD (KoreaN Cohort Study for Outcome in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease), which is a prospective cohort study, enrolls subjects with chronic kidney disease stages 1 to 5 (predialysis). Methods/Design Nine nephrology centers in major university hospitals throughout Korea will enroll approximately 2,450 adult...

  7. Mild systemic thermal therapy ameliorates renal dysfunction in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Yoshihiro; Kuwabara, Takashige; Hayata, Manabu; Kakizoe, Yutaka; Izumi, Yuichiro; Iiyama, Junichi; Kitamura, Kenichiro; Mukoyama, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    Thermal therapy has become a nonpharmacological therapy in clinical settings, especially for cardiovascular diseases. However, the practical role of thermal therapy on chronic kidney disease remains elusive. We performed the present study to investigate whether a modified thermal protocol, repeated mild thermal stimulation (MTS), could affect renal damages in chronic kidney disease using a mouse renal ablation model. Mice were subjected to MTS or room temperature (RT) treatment once daily for 4 wk after subtotal nephrectomy (Nx) or sham operation (Sh). We revealed that MTS alleviated renal impairment as indicated by serum creatinine and albuminuria in Nx groups. In addition, the Nx + MTS group showed attenuated tubular histological changes and reduced urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin excretion approximately by half compared with the Nx + RT group. Increased apoptotic signaling, such as TUNEL-positive cell count and cleavage of caspase 3, as well as enhanced oxidative stress were significantly reduced in the Nx + MTS group compared with the Nx + RT group. These changes were accompanied with the restoration of kidney Mn-SOD levels by MTS. Heat shock protein 27, a key molecular chaperone, was phosphorylated by MTS only in Nx kidneys rather than in Sh kidneys. MTS also tended to increase the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt in Nx kidneys, possibly associated with the activation of heat shock protein 27. Taken together, these results suggest that modified MTS can protect against renal injury in a rodent model of chronic kidney disease. PMID:27029428

  8. Prevalence and variation of Chronic Kidney Disease in the Irish health system: initial findings from the National Kidney Disease Surveillance Programme.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is a major non-communicable chronic disease that is associated with adverse clinical and economic outcomes. Passive surveillance systems are likely to improve efforts for prevention of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and inform national service planning. This study was conducted to determine the overall prevalence of CKD in the Irish health system, assess period trends and explore patterns of variation as part of a novel surveillance initiative.

  9. A Meta-Analysis on Prehypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that there is an association between prehypertension and an increased risk of end-stage renal disease. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between prehypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD. This meta-analysis aimed to demonstrate the association between prehypertension and the incidence of CKD and identify the impacts of gender and ethnic differences.MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library (from inception through March 2016 and article reference lists were searched for relevant studies regarding blood pressure and CKD. Blood pressure (BP measurements were classified as follows: optimal BP (less than 120/80 mmHg, prehypertension (120-139/80-89 mmHg and hypertension (over 140/90 mmHg. CKD was defined by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 or proteinuria. Two investigators independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of studies enrolled in this meta-analysis using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS. We performed the meta-analysis using Stata/SE 12.0 (StataCorp LP. The random-effect models were used in the heterogeneous analyses.After retrieving data from 4,537 potentially relevant articles, we identified 7 cohort studies including 261,264 subjects, according to the predefined selection criteria. Five studies were conducted in Mongolians from East Asia, and the other two studies were performed in Indo-Europeans from Austria and Iran. The participants ranged in age from 20 to 89 years, and the proportion of females ranged from 27.2% to 63.8%. The follow-up period ranged from 2 to 11 years. Compared with the optimal BP values, prehypertension showed an increased risk of CKD (pooled RR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.13-1.44; P = 0.000; I2 = 77.9%. In the sex-stratified analysis, we found a similar trend in women (pooled RR = 1.29; 95% CI = 1.01-1.63; P = 0.039; I2 = 76.1% but not in men. This effect was observed only in Mongolians from East Asia (pooled RR = 1.37; 95

  10. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the elderly -- a geriatrician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munikrishnappa, Devaraj

    2007-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming increasingly prevalent among many different populations all over the world, including the US and Europe. Its multitude of complications with devastating outcomes leads to a significantly higher risk for cardio-vascular and all-cause mortality in an individual. However, it is clear now that early detection of CKD might not only delay some of the complications but also prevent them. Therefore, various important public health organizations all over the world have turned their focus and attention to CKD and its risk factors, early detection and early intervention. Nevertheless, the general goals in preventing the increase in CKD and its complications are far from being completely achieved. Why is this so? What is the magnitude and complexity of the problem? How is it affecting the population - are there differences in its affection by age, gender or frail elderly versus the robust? Are we modifying the risk factors appropriately and aggressively? Are there subtle differences in managing the risk factors in those on dialysis versus the non-dialysis CKD patients? Is it important to treat anaemia of CKD aggressively, will it make a difference in the disease progression, its complications or to quality of life? What do these unfortunate individuals commonly succumb to? What do we advise patients who refuse dialysis or those who desire dialysis or transplant? Are there useful non-dialytic treatment recommendations for those who refuse dialysis? What is the role of the physicians caring for the elderly with CKD? When should the primary care givers refer a CKD patient to a nephrologist? The key to eventually controlling incident and prevalent CKD and improve quality of life of affected individuals, lies in not only knowing these and many other vital aspects, but also in applying such knowledge compulsively in day-to-day practice by each and every one us. As CKD is increasingly a disease of the elderly with men being affected more, this

  11. Chronic kidney disease during a 12-year period at tertiary health institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paripović Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric population. Objective. The aim of the study was analysis of aetiology, staging and associated complications of CKD at the time of diagnosis. Methods. Data of 97 patients (56 boys of average age 7.8±5.8 years, referred for the first time to the Institute for Mother and Child Healthcare „Dr Vukan Čupić”, Belgrade in the period 1998- 2009, due to CKD, stage 2-5, were analysed. In each patient illness history was obtained, and physical examination, laboratory, X-ray and other investigations were performed according to the indications. CKD was classified according to the glomerular filtration rate into four grades: 2 - mild (60-90 ml/min/1.73 m2; 3 - moderate (30-60 ml/min/1.73 m2; 4 - advanced (15-30 ml/ min/1.73 m2; and 5 - terminal (<15 ml/min/1.73 m2. Results. The most frequent causes of CKD were congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (43.3%, followed by glomerular diseases (17.5%, hereditary kidney diseases (16.5%, metabolic diseases (7.2% and other causes (15.5%. Mild CKD was found in 29.8%, moderate in 28.9%, advanced in 22.7%, and terminal in 18.6% children. Among patients with CKD stage 4 and 5, 75% of patients presented with acute renal failure, while 25% had earlier detected CKD (stage 1, but were not under regular follow-up. Associated complications included metabolic acidosis (63%, anaemia (60%, hypertension (42.3%, short stature (25.8%, renal osteodystrophy (13.4% and cardiovascular diseases (7.2%. Conclusion. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract are the leading cause of CKD in paediatric population. A significant proportion (41.3% of patients had advanced and terminal CKD. In most patients CKD was diagnosed late and with associated complications.

  12. Comparison of Serum Concentrations of Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Creatinine as Kidney Function Biomarkers in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, J.A.; Obare, E.; Yerramilli, M.; Jewell, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) has been shown to be an accurate and precise biomarker for calculating estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in humans, as well as a more sensitive biomarker than serum creatinine concentration (sCr) for assessing renal dysfunction. Objectives The purpose of this retrospective study was to report on the utility of measuring serum SDMA concentrations in cats for detection of chronic kidney disease (CKD) before diagnosis by conventional measurem...

  13. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Ben Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcu-taneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadro-parin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calci-phylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  14. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase single nucleotide polymorphism and left ventricular function in early chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourabh Chand

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with accelerated cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS Glu298Asp single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotype has been associated with a worse phenotype amongst patients with established heart failure and in patients with progression of their renal disease. The association of a cardiac functional difference in non-dialysis CKD patients with no known previous heart failure, and eNOS gene variant is investigated.140 non-dialysis CKD patients, who had cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR imaging and tissue doppler echocardiography as part of two clinical trials, were genotyped for eNOS Glu298Asp SNP retrospectively.The median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 50 mls/min and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF was 74% with no overt diastolic dysfunction in this cohort. There were significant differences in LVEF across eNOS genotypes with GG genotype being associated with a worse LVEF compared to other genotypes (LVEF: GG 71%, TG 76%, TT 73%, p = 0.006. After multivariate analysis, (adjusting for age, eGFR, baseline mean arterial pressure, contemporary CMR heart rate, total cholesterol, high sensitive C-reactive protein, body mass index and gender GG genotype was associated with a worse LVEF, and increased LV end-diastolic and systolic index (p = 0.004, 0.049 and 0.009 respectively.eNOS Glu298Asp rs1799983 polymorphism in CKD patients is associated with relevant sub-clinical cardiac remodelling as detected by CMR. This gene variant may therefore represent an important genetic biomarker, and possibly highlight pathways for intervention, in these patients who are at particular risk of worsening cardiac disease as their renal dysfunction progresses.

  15. Nutrition for Advanced Chronic Kidney Disease in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... colas, canned iced teas and lemonade, nuts, and peanut butter are high in phosphorus. A renal dietitian can ... yogurt) Beans (baked, kidney, lima, pinto) Nuts and peanut butter Processed meats (hot dogs, canned meat) Cola Canned ...

  16. Impact of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital heart disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on acute and chronic exercise responses

    OpenAIRE

    Brassard, Patrice; Ferland, Annie; Marquis, Karine; Maltais, François; Jobin, Jean; Poirier, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Several chronic diseases are known to negatively affect the ability of an individual to perform exercise. However, the altered exercise capacity observed in these patients is not solely associated with the heart and lungs dysfunction. Exercise has also been shown to play an important role in the management of several pathologies encountered in the fields of cardiology and pneumology. Studies conducted in our institution regarding the influence of diabetes, chronic heart failure, congenital he...

  17. Kidney failure during HIV disease treated with tenofovir, multiple concurrent diseases and drug therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Manfredi; Leonardo Calza; Vincenzo Colangeli; Nicola Dentale; Gabriella Verucchi

    2012-01-01

    A significant case report of a HIV infected patient in his fifties who experienced an excellent virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (which has been modified just to prevent or avoid some adverse events), but developed a severe, sudden acute kidney failure while under a polypharmacy due to some underlying and overwhelming disorders (i.e. arterial hypertension, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, a recent acute heart infarction with remarkable remnants, and fin...

  18. The relationships of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Ping; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Lin, Jen-Jyn; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J.P.; Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension, blood pressure variation, and resistant hypertension have close relations to sleep apnea, which lead to target organ damage, including the kidney. The complex relationships between sleep apnea and blood pressure cause their interactions with chronic kidney disease ambiguous. The aim of the study was to elucidate the separate and joint effects of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease. A cross-sectional study was done to see the associations of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension with chronic kidney disease in 998 subjects underwent overnight polysomnography without device-therapy or surgery for their sleep-disordered breathing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the severity of SA, hypertension stage, resistant hypertension, and their joint effects on CKD. The multivariable relative odds (95% CI) of chronic kidney disease for the aged (age ≥65 years), severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension were 3.96 (2.57–6.09) (P < 0.001), 2.28 (1.13–4.58) (P < 0.05), 3.55 (1.70–7.42) (P < 0.001), and 9.42 (4.22–21.02) (P < 0.001), respectively. In subgroups analysis, the multivariable relative odds ratio of chronic kidney disease was highest in patients with both resistant hypertension and severe sleep apnea [13.42 (4.74–38.03)] (P < 0.001). Severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Patients with both severe sleep apnea and resistant hypertension have the highest risks. PMID:27281098

  19. Biomarkers of chronic kidney disease in the urine of diabetic/hypertensive patients by means of Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Elzo Everton de Sousa; Bispo, Jeyse Aliana Martis; Fernandes, Adriana Barrinha; Silveira, Landulfo

    2016-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) and arterial hypertension (AH) are common diseases that, if untreated, predispose the patient to renal failure. This study aimed to evaluate possible biomarkers in the urine of patients with DM and AH capable to predict the chronic renal disease, by means of Raman spectroscopy. Urines were obtained from patients with DM and AH, and separated into four groups: no symptoms of diseases related to DM and AH (G1), with low clinical complications (G2), with severe clinical complications (G3), and with chronic kidney disease (G4) arised from DM and AH. It has been used a dispersive Raman spectrometer (830nm, 250mW, 20s accumulation). In the spectra of urine it was identified Raman peaks at 680cm-1 (creatinine), 1004cm-1 (urea) and 1128cm-1 (glucose). The results revealed that G2, G3 and G4 presented the creatinine peak with lower intensity than G1 (p kidney disease associated to DM and AH, particularly the renal failure.

  20. [Radiographic manifestations in teeth and jaws in chronic kidney insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Bedani, P L; Romano, C

    1996-10-01

    Forty-five patients affected with chronic renal failure (29 men and 16 women; mean age: 47.8 years), treated with hemodialysis for 4 to 245 months (mean: 66.9 months) were examined with panoramic and skeletal radiographs-the latter of the skull, hands, shoulders and clavicles, pelvis and spine. The control group (45 subjects with no renal diseases) was examined only with panoramic radiography. Dental and skeletal radio-graphs were given an 0-6 score and then compared to assess a possible relationship between skeletal and dental changes at radiography. Twenty-six dialysis patients (57.7%) had radiographic abnormalities in the maxillary bones-i.e., osteoporosis (100% of patients), focal osteosclerosis adjacent to the roots (11.5%), lamina dura reduction or loss (26.9%), calcifications of soft tissues or salivary glands (15.3%) and brown tumors (7.6%). In the teeth of dialysis patients, the dental pulp chamber was narrowed in 11.1% and hypercementosis of the roots was observed in 4.5%. Radiographic abnormalities in the hand, shoulder and pelvis were depicted in 51.1% of dialysis patients-in 86.9% of them with maxillary lesions. In the control group, 15.5% had mandibular bone lesions-i.e., osteopenia, cortex reduction at the mandibular angles and cyst-like lesions -but the evidence of caries and periodontal disease did not differ from that in the dialysis group. The diagnosis and follow-up of dialysis patients are currently made with serum biochemistry, radiography and histology. The purpose of skeletal radiology is to monitor the progression or regression of musculoskeletal abnormalities. Panoramic radiography might be useful in monitoring renal osteodystrophy, especially to assess the response to therapy-i.e., parathyroidectomy, calcium or vitamin-D therapy and renal transplant. PMID:9045243

  1. Relation of aortic valve calcium to chronic kidney disease (from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraty, Marie A; Chai, Boyang; Hsu, Jesse Y; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Gao, Yanlin; Yang, Wei; Keane, Martin G; Budoff, Matthew J; Mohler, Emile R

    2015-05-01

    Although subjects with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at markedly increased risk for cardiovascular mortality, the relation between CKD and aortic valve calcification has not been fully elucidated. Also, few data are available on the relation of aortic valve calcification and earlier stages of CKD. We sought to assess the relation of aortic valve calcium (AVC) with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of bone metabolism in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study. All patients who underwent aortic valve scanning in the CRIC study were included. The relation between AVC and eGFR, traditional and novel cardiovascular risk factors, and markers of calcium metabolism were analyzed using both unadjusted and adjusted regression models. A total of 1,964 CRIC participants underwent computed tomography for AVC quantification. Decreased renal function was independently associated with increased levels of AVC (eGFR 47.11, 44.17, and 39 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, pAVC risk factors. Adjusted regression models identified several traditional and novel risk factors for AVC in patients with CKD. There was a difference in AVC risk factors between black and nonblack patients. In conclusion, our study shows that eGFR is associated in a dose-dependent manner with AVC in patients with CKD, and this association is independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:25791240

  2. Computer-assisted imaging algorithms facilitate histomorphometric quantification of kidney damage in rodent renal failure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Klapczynski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical 5/6 nephrectomy and adenine-induced kidney failure in rats are frequently used models of progressive renal failure. In both models, rats develop significant morphological changes in the kidneys and quantification of these changes can be used to measure the efficacy of prophylactic or therapeutic approaches. In this study, the Aperio Genie Pattern Recognition technology, along with the Positive Pixel Count, Nuclear and Rare Event algorithms were used to quantify histological changes in both rat renal failure models. Methods: Analysis was performed on digitized slides of whole kidney sagittal sections stained with either hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemistry with an anti-nestin antibody to identify glomeruli, regenerating tubular epithelium, and tubulointerstitial myofibroblasts. An anti-polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN antibody was also used to investigate neutrophil tissue infiltration. Results: Image analysis allowed for rapid and accurate quantification of relevant histopathologic changes such as increased cellularity and expansion of glomeruli, renal tubular dilatation, and degeneration, tissue inflammation, and mineral aggregation. The algorithms provided reliable and consistent results in both control and experimental groups and presented a quantifiable degree of damage associated with each model. Conclusion: These algorithms represent useful tools for the uniform and reproducible characterization of common histomorphologic features of renal injury in rats.

  3. Na+-K+ pump in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review summarizes the evidence for the defect in Na+-K+ pump in chronic renal failure, considers the role of various factors in causing this defect, and discusses the clinical implications thereof. Intracellular Na is elevated in erythrocytes, leukocytes, and muscle cells from some patients with chronic renal failure (CRF). Recent evidence suggest that this elevation of cell Na may be, in large part, a consequence of decreased number of Na+-K+ pump units per cell. Maintenance dialysis over a period of weeks ameliorates the defect in intracellular Na+, and this improvement is contemporaneous with an increase in the number of Na+-K+ pump sites per cell. In erythrocytes with normal cell Na+, acute hemodialysis increases the rate of 22Na+ and 42K+ transport. Many factors such as the presence of retained toxic metabolite or circulating inhibitor in the uremic plasma, or biochemical changes produced by acute hemodialysis, may explain this finding. In cells with high cell Na+, the pump-mediated 42K+ transport is normalized at the expense of a raised cell Na+. The decreased muscle membrane potential in uremic subjects has been attributed to a decreased activity of Na+-K+ pump. The authors discuss the role of hormonal abnormalities and circulating inhibitors, which may cause an acute inhibition of the pump and of other factors such as K+ depletion, which may cause more chronic alterations. The implications of alteration of Na+ and K+ pump transport and raised cell Na+ on other non-pump-mediated transport pathways are discussed. Raised cell Na+ may be a marker for the adequacy of maintenance dialysis in patients with end-stage renal failure

  4. Preemptive Renal Transplantation-The Best Treatment Option for Terminal Chronic Renal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arze Aimaretti, L; Arze, S

    2016-03-01

    Renal transplantation is the best therapeutic option for end-stage chronic renal disease. Assuming that it is more advisable if performed early, we aimed to show the clinical, social, and economic advantages in 70% of our patients who were dialyzed only for a short period. For this purpose, we retrospectively collected data over 28 years in 142 kidney transplants performed in patients with sports, and reproduction. Immunosuppression consisted of 3 drugs, including steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine or mycophenolate. The cost in the 1st year, including patient and donor evaluation, surgery, immunosuppression, and follow-up, was $13,300 USD versus $22,320 for hemodialysis. We conclude that preemptive renal transplantation with <6 weeks on dialysis is the best therapeutic option for end-stage renal failure, especially in developing countries such as Bolivia, where until last year, full public support for renal replacement therapy was unavailable. PMID:27110013

  5. A girl with Peters plus syndrome associated with myelomeningocele and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Osamu; Arai, Hiroko; Harada, Ryoko; Hasegawa, Kei; Iitaka, Kikuo

    2010-08-01

    A girl was born with sclerocornea of the right eye, corneal staphyloma of the left eye and lumbar myelomeningocele. The myelomeningocele was repaired soon after birth. The corneal staphyloma was perforated during infancy. She received keratoplasty and achieved light perception. Her right kidney revealed multicystic dysplasia and was non-functioning at birth. She had neurogenic bladder, and her renal function deteriorated gradually. Peters plus syndrome was diagnosed based on anterior ocular segment anomalies, short stature, developmental delay and characteristic face. Anterior ocular segment anomalies are rare findings, but seem to be occasionally associated with spina bifida and renal anomalies. Myelomeningocele and chronic renal failure in patients with Peters plus syndrome have not been reported to our knowledge. PMID:20424881

  6. Quality of life in patients with chronic congestive heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca D. Farcaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Quality of life (QOL is severely decreased in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF. Our study aims to identify the factors affecting the evaluation of QOL. Material and Methods: Clinical, demographic, social and economic data was collected from patients with CHF in NYHA class III and IV as part of a complex workup. The Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ was used to evaluate QOL. Results: QOL decreases as the NYHA class increases. Women evaluate their QOL as more severely affected than men. Age, social and economic factors modulate the perception of QOL. Conclusion: Combining demographic, social and economic data and evaluation of QOL can provide valuable and useful information for the medical management of patients with CHF.

  7. Urinary Peptide Levels in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mungli Prakash

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Peptide levels in urine are found to be decreased in renal failure. In the current study urinary peptide levels were determined in chronic renal failure (CRF patients. Method: 86 CRF patients and 80 healthy controls were selected for the study. Urinary proteins and peptide levels were determined by spectrophotometer based Lowry and Bradford methods. Urinary creatinine levels were determined by clinical chemistry analyzer. Results: There was significant decrease in urinary peptide levels in CRF patients and Urinary % peptides were significantly decreased in CRF patients as compared to healthy controls. Urinary % peptides correlated negatively with proteinuria. Conclusion: we have found decrease in urinary peptides and % urinary peptides in CRF patients and possibly measurement of % urinary peptides may possibly serve as better indicator in early detection of impairment in renal function.

  8. Proinsulin and insulin profile in chronic cardiac failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mowar, S.N.; Chhetri, M.K.; Pal, S.K.; Ghosh, K.K. (Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Calcutta (India))

    Proinsulin and insulin were estimated by radio-immunoassay technique in 73 cases of chronic cardiac failure of different etiology matched against 30 controls. Patients were divided into group A comprised of 49 and group B comprised of 24 patients who were in grade I or II and grade III or IV respectively. Results show significantly lowered level of proinsulin, the insulin level was insignificantly affected in group A. In group B, both the parameters were significantly lowered compared to control but returned to that found in group A, along with the improvement of cardiac status. The significance of such observation is discussed.

  9. Proinsulin and insulin profile in chronic cardiac failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proinsulin and insulin were estimated by radio-immunoassay technique in 73 cases of chronic cardiac failure of different etiology matched against 30 controls. Patients were divided into group A comprised of 49 and group B comprised of 24 patients who were in grade I or II and grade III or IV respectively. Results show significantly lowered level of proinsulin, the insulin level was insignificantly affected in group A. In group B, both the parameters were significantly lowered compared to control but returned to that found in group A, along with the improvement of cardiac status. The significance of such observation is discussed. (author)

  10. Exercise training and the progression of chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eidemak, I; Haaber, A B; Feldt-Rasmussen, B;

    1997-01-01

    The possible beneficial effect of regular exercise training on the progression of chronic renal failure was studied in a prospective randomized controlled study. Thirty patients with a median glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of 25 ml/(min.1.73 m2) (range 10-43) were randomized to physical training...... rate of progression judged by the slope of GFR versus time plot was equal in the two groups. Hence, the beneficial effect of exercise training, earlier observed in rat studies, could not be reproduced in our patients. Physical exercise had no untoward effect on progression of renal disease....

  11. Increased Circulating Cathepsin K in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Guangxian Zhao; Yuzi Li; Lan Cui; Xiang Li; Zhenyi Jin; Xiongyi Han; Ennan Fang; Yihua Gao; Dongmei Zhou; Haiying Jiang; Xueying Jin; Guanghao Piao; Xiangshan Li; Guang Yang; Jiyong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Cysteinyl cathepsin K (CatK) is one of the most potent mammalian collagenases involved in cardiovascular disease. Here, we investigated the clinical predictive value of serum CatK levels in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We examined 134 patients with CHF, measuring their serum CatK, troponin I, high-sensitive C-reactive protein, and pre-operative N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels. The patients were divided into two groups: the 44 patients who showed a left ventricula...

  12. [Chronic heart failure and its consequences on the partner relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztajzel, Juan

    2015-12-01

    There are presently few data on chronic heart failure (CHF) and its consequences on the partner relationship. The aim of our study was to assess how patients with severe CHF and their female partners were affected in their relationship. First, there was a need to address the issue of sexuality with the doctor because of fear of the occurrence of a cardiac event or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock. Second, there was often a significant decrease in libido and erectile dysfunction associated with general depressive symptoms. Finally, the female partners in several couples developed an overprotective behavior leading to resentment and frustration in patients towards them. PMID:26790235

  13. Management of chronic heart failure in the older population

    OpenAIRE

    Azad, Nahid; Lemay, Genevieve

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of hospitalization for those over the age of 65 and represents a significant clinical and economic burden. About half of hospital re-admissions are related to co-morbidities, polypharmacy and disabilities associated with CHF. Moreover, CHF also has an enormous cost in terms of poor prognosis with an average one year mortality of 33%–35%. While more than half of patients with CHF are over 75 years, most clinical trials have included younger pati...

  14. Chronic renal failure and macrogenitalia associated with genitourinary neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Bumin Nuri; Oktem, Faruk; Armağan, Abdullah; Dündar, Nihal Olgaç; Bircan, Sema; Yesildag, Ahmet

    2010-02-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a genetic disorder of the nervous system that primarily affects the development and growth of neural cell tissues. This disorder is characterized by the development of various tumors, including neurofibromas, neuroniomas, malignant and benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and meningiomas. Accompanying skin changes and bone deformities are also common in NF. However, genitourinary involvement in NF is a rare condition, and penile enlargement has been reported only in a few males with plexiform NF. We report a 6-year-old boy with chronic renal failure associated with plexiform neurofibromas of the bladder and prostatic urethra which led to urinary obstruction and macrogenitalia due to genitourinary NF. PMID:19826840

  15. Prognosis and Biomarkers in Acute-on-Chronic Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P

    2016-05-01

    As formal definitions of acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) have now been established, and given an increased recognition of the dynamic nature of this condition, there is a growing clinical need to assess prognosis and response to interventions. Conventional scoring systems such as Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) fail to capture the two key prognostic elements in ACLF-namely, extrahepatic organ failure and measures of systemic inflammation-and as such are limited in their prognostic accuracy. Even the best available scoring systems such as the recently described CLIF (Chronic Liver Failure) Consortium ACLF (CLIF-C ACLF) score, are at best 75% accurate and need to be applicable to all etiologies of liver disease. Thus, in the absence of "gold standard" markers of prognosis that render one scoring system superior to another, there is a need to explore other markers of pathophysiology that may better define outcome. This review addresses the evidence for markers of oxidative stress, including those reflecting the inflammasome; elements of cell death such as cytokeratins M30 and M65; and indicators of immune dysfunction, innate immune failure and gut dysbiosis. Finally, evidence for relevance of markers of organ dysfunction, including hemodynamic response, are explored along with associated mediators such as copeptin, dimethylarginines, and renin. It is anticipated that further critique and validation of emerging and relevant biomarkers will facilitate a composite score which, either alone or in combination with existing scoring systems such as CLIF-C, will enable improved prognostication and targeting of therapy in ACLF. PMID:27172354

  16. Usefulness of imaging techniques and novel biomarkers in the prediction of cardiovascular risk in patients with chronic kidney disease in Spain: The NEFRONA project

    OpenAIRE

    Junyent, Mireia; Martínez Alonso, Montserrat; Borràs, Mercè; Betriu i Bars, M. Àngels; Coll,Blai; Craver Hospital, Lourdes; Marco Mayayo, M. Paz; Sarró, Felipe; Valdivielso Revilla, José Manuel; Fernández i Giráldez, Elvira

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Cardiovascular risk assessment in this population is hampered by the failure of traditional risk factors to fully account for the elevated CVD risk, mainly due to the reverse epidemiology effect, and the presence of risk factors specifically related to uraemia. Hereby, we present the protocol of a prospective study aimed to assess the ...

  17. The clinical meanings of leptin RIA in patients with chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the relationship between chronic renal failure and serum leptin levels in patients with chronic renal failure. Methods: Serum leptin levels (with RIA) were determined in 134 patients (male, 73, female 61) with chronic renal failure and 40 controls. Results: The serum levels of leptin in the chronic renal failure group were significantly higher than those in the controls (t=2.39, P<0.01). There were no significant differences among the leptin levels in patients with different stages of renal failure. Conclusion: There were hyper-leptinemia and leptin resistance in patients with chronic renal failure. The increase of leptin levels is thought to be harmful in patients with chronic renal failure, however, the precise mechanism remains to be studied further. (authors)

  18. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Jayanta; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Barrows, Ian R.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Wolman, Melanie; Patel, Samir S.; Keane, Martin G.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function. Methods: Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, hig...

  19. Association between Inflammation and Cardiac Geometry in Chronic Kidney Disease: Findings from the CRIC Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanta Gupta; Dominic, Elizabeth A.; Fink, Jeffrey C.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Barrows, Ian R.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Joffe, Marshall M.; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Melanie Wolman; Patel, Samir S.; Keane, Martin G.; Feldman, Harold I.; Kusek, John W.; Raj, Dominic S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and myocardial contractile dysfunction are independent predictors of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The association between inflammatory biomarkers and cardiac geometry has not yet been studied in a large cohort of CKD patients with a wide range of kidney function. Methods Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, high-...

  20. Risk factors of cardiovascular disease among children with chronic kidney disease in Gaza strip

    OpenAIRE

    Muhaisen, Rafat M.; Sharif, Fadel A.; Yassin, Maged M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a global public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in patients with mild-to-moderate CKD and end-stage renal disease. There is accumulating evidence that the increase in CVD burden is present in CKD patients prior to dialysis, due both to conventional risk factors and kidney-specific disease. Detection and initiation of treatment for CVD risk factors at early stages of CKD should be ...

  1. Obesity-Related Chronic Kidney Disease—The Role of Lipid Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Mount; Matthew Davies; Suet-Wan Choy; Natasha Cook; David Power

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for chronic kidney disease (CKD). The mechanisms linking obesity and CKD include systemic changes such as high blood pressure and hyperglycemia, and intrarenal effects relating to lipid accumulation. Normal lipid metabolism is integral to renal physiology and disturbances of renal lipid and energy metabolism are increasingly being linked with kidney disease. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) are important regulators of f...

  2. New Pathogenic Concepts and Therapeutic Approaches to Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Sánchez-Lozada, Laura G; Osorio-Alonso, Horacio;

    2016-01-01

    In chronic kidney disease inflammatory processes and stimulation of immune cells result in overproduction of free radicals. In combination with a reduced antioxidant capacity this causes oxidative stress. This review focuses on current pathogenic concepts of oxidative stress for the decline of...... kidney function and development of cardiovascular complications. We discuss the impact of mitochondrial alterations and dysfunction, a pathogenic role for hyperuricemia, and disturbances of vitamin D metabolism and signal transduction. Recent antioxidant therapy options including the use of vitamin D and...

  3. Upper Tract Urothelial Carcinomas in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Relationship with Diagnostic Challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Li-Jen Wang; Shen-Yang Lee; Bin Tean Teh; Cheng-Keng Chuang; Joëlle Nortier

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease and upper tract urothelial carcinomas display a bidirectional relationship. Review of the literature indicates that early diagnosis and correct localization of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients are important but problematic. Urine cytology and cystoscopy have limited sensitivity for the diagnosis of upper tract urothelial carcinomas in dialysis patients. Enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging cou...

  4. Novel drugs and intervention strategies for the treatment of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo Jan; de Zeeuw, Dick

    2013-10-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide health problem. The disease is most often progressive of nature with a high impact on patients and society. It is increasingly recognized that CKD can be detected in the early stages and should be managed as early as possible. Treatment of the cause, but in particular control of the main risk markers, such as high blood pressure, glucose and albuminuria, has been instrumental in delaying the progression to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). However, despite the state of the art therapy, the absolute risk of renal and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in CKD patients remains devastatingly high. Novel drugs are therefore highly desirable to halt effectively the progressive renal (and cardiovascular) function loss. Recently, several novel strategies have been tested targeting traditional risk factors such as blood pressure (combination therapy of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and novel mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) as well as dyslipidaemia (statins) with surprising results. In addition, drug targets specifically related to the kidney, such as vitamin D, uric acid, erythropoietin and phosphate, have been the subject of clinical trials, in some instances with unexpected results. Finally, novel targets including endothelin receptors and inflammatory pathways are increasingly explored as potential avenues to improve renal and cardiovascular protection, albeit that the drugs tested have not been unequivocally successful. In this article we review novel drugs or intervention strategies for the management of CKD, we try to provide explanations for the failure of some promising drugs and hypothesize on the potential success of new strategies. PMID:23802504

  5. Chronic kidney disease, severe arterial and arteriolar sclerosis and kidney neoplasia: on the spectrum of kidney involvement in MELAS syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccoli Giorgina

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MELAS syndrome (MIM ID#540000, an acronym for Mitochondrial Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes, is a genetically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with protean manifestations and occasional kidney involvement. Interest in the latter is rising due to the identification of cases with predominant kidney involvement and to the hypothesis of a link between mitochondrial DNA and kidney neoplasia. Case presentation We report the case of a 41-year-old male with full blown MELAS syndrome, with lactic acidosis and neurological impairment, affected by the "classic" 3243A > G mutation of mitochondrial DNA, with kidney cancer. After unilateral nephrectomy, he rapidly developed severe kidney functional impairment, with nephrotic proteinuria. Analysis of the kidney tissue at a distance from the two tumor lesions, sampled at the time of nephrectomy was performed in the context of normal blood pressure, recent onset of diabetes and before the appearance of proteinuria. The morphological examination revealed a widespread interstitial fibrosis with dense inflammatory infiltrate and tubular atrophy, mostly with thyroidization pattern. Vascular lesions were prominent: large vessels displayed marked intimal fibrosis and arterioles had hyaline deposits typical of hyaline arteriolosclerosis. These severe vascular lesions explained the different glomerular alterations including ischemic and obsolescent glomeruli, as is commonly observed in the so-called "benign" arteriolonephrosclerosis. Some rare glomeruli showed focal segmental glomerulosclerosis; as the patient subsequently developed nephrotic syndrome, these lesions suggest that silent ischemic changes may result in the development of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis secondary to nephron loss. Conclusions Nephron loss may trigger glomerular sclerosis, at least in some cases of MELAS-related nephropathy. Thus the incidence of kidney disease in the "survivors" of MELAS

  6. Decreased chronic cellular and antibody-mediated injury in the kidney following simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Timucin; Heimbach, Julie K; Rosen, Charles B; Nyberg, Scott L; Park, Walter D; Stegall, Mark D

    2016-04-01

    In simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation (SLK), the liver can protect the kidney from hyperacute rejection and may also decrease acute cellular rejection rates. Whether the liver protects against chronic injury is unknown. To answer this we studied renal allograft surveillance biopsies in 68 consecutive SLK recipients (14 with donor-specific alloantibodies at transplantation [DSA+], 54 with low or no DSA, [DSA-]). These were compared with biopsies of a matched cohort of kidney transplant alone (KTA) recipients (28 DSA+, 108 DSA-). Overall 5-year patient and graft survival was not different: 93.8% and 91.2% in SLK, and 91.9% and 77.1% in KTA. In DSA+ recipients, KTA had a significantly higher incidence of acute antibody-mediated rejection (46.4% vs. 7.1%) and chronic transplant glomerulopathy (53.6% vs. 0%). In DSA- recipients at 5 years, KTA had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of T cell-mediated rejection (clinical plus subclinical, 30.6% vs. 7.4%). By 5 years, DSA+ KTA had a 44% decline in mean GFR while DSA+SLK had stable GFR. In DSA- KTA, the incidence of a combined endpoint of renal allograft loss or over a 50% decline in GFR was significantly higher (20.4% vs. 7.4%). Simultaneously transplanted liver allograft was the most predictive factor for a significantly lower incidence of cellular (odds ratio 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.06-0.27) and antibody-mediated injury (odds ratio 0.11, confidence interval 0.03-0.32), as well as graft functional decline (odds ratio 0.22, confidence interval 0.06-0.59). Thus, SLK is associated with reduced chronic cellular and antibody-mediated alloimmune injury in the kidney allograft. PMID:26924059

  7. HEMODIALYSIS THERAPY SUSTAINED LOW EFFICIENCY DAILY DIALISIS FOR CHRONIC KIDNEY DESEASE PATIENT IN INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gede Andry Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Kidney failure is a clinical condition characterized by an irreversible decline in kidney function, to a degree that requires the permanent renal replacement therapy, in the form of dialysis or kidney transplantation. Dialysis consists of two major categories such as dialysis / hemodialysis intermittent and continuous dialysis / continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT. SLEDD is the latest technique of renal replacement therapy that uses conventional hemodialysis equipment, but the therapeutic results like continuous dialysis therapy / CRRT were appropriate used in patien with critical ill.

  8. Differential effects of Smad3 targeting in a murine model of chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellenberger, Terese; Krag, Søren; Danielsen, Carl Christian;

    2013-01-01

    genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) metabolism. This study analyzes the hypothesis that blockade of Smad3 attenuates the development of TGF-β1-driven renal fibrosis. This was examined in vivo in a transgenic model of TGF-β1-induced chronic kidney disease with Smad3 or without Smad3 expression......Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of progressive kidney diseases that are characterized by fibrosis. The main intracellular signaling pathway of TGF-β1 is the Smad system, where Smad2 and Smad3 play a central role in transcriptional regulation of target...... in the kidney....

  9. Recent advances in understanding of chronic kidney disease [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junna Yamaguchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is defined as any condition that causes reduced kidney function over a period of time. Fibrosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial inflammation are the hallmark of pathological features in CKD. Regardless of initial insult, CKD has some common pathways leading CKD to end-stage kidney disease, including hypoxia in the tubulointerstitium and proteinuria. Recent advances in genome editing technologies and stem cell research give great insights to understand the pathogenesis of CKD, including identifications of the origins of renal myofibroblasts and tubular epithelial cells upon injury. Environmental factors such as hypoxia, oxidative stress, and epigenetic factors in relation to CKD are also discussed.

  10. Complex radionuclide evaluation of structural and functional kidneys disorders of children with chronic obstructive pyelonephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Children's chronic obstructive pyelonephritis (COPN) is the most important and difficult among microbes-inflammatory kidney's deceases. Kidney's COPN functional disorders are evaluated generally by clinical and laboratory criteria which not always have high informativity. Scintigraphic kidney's examinations with nephrotropic radiopharmaceuticals (NRP) are more informative. Conclusion. The most informative are 99mTc-EC and 99mTc-DTPA for initial examinations, 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-pyrophosphate for monitoring examinations

  11. [Novel treatments for hepatitis C virus infection in chronic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Fabrizio; Messa, Piergiorgio

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has been accumulated showing a negative impact of chronic hepatitis C virus infection on survival in patients with chronic kidney disease. Moreover, it appears that anti-HCV positive status has been associated with an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease in the adult general population. These reports have emphasized the need for safe and effective therapies for hepatitis C virus infection in the chronic kidney disease population. Treatment of HCV has made considerable progress with the approval of interferon-free, direct-acting antiviral drug-based combination therapies among patients with intact kidneys; but a paucity of information exists regarding chronic kidney disease patients. The first published report on the antiviral treatment of hepatitis C among patients with chronic kidney disease (stage 4-5) and HCV genotype 1 concerns the combination of grazoprevir (NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and elbasvir (NS5A inhibitor); excellent safety and efficacy (sustained viral response, 94.3% 115/122) have been reached. In another study, the 3-D regimen (ombitasvir/ paritaprevir/ ritonavir/ dasabuvir with or without ribavirin) has been administered to CKD (stage 4-5) patients with genotype 1 (n=20); the rate of sustained viral response was excellent (90%, 18/20) and no patients discontinued treatment due to adverse events. Preliminary data on the combined treatment of sofosbuvir (NS5B inhibitor) and simeprevir (NS3/4A inhibitor) has given a viral response of 89% (34/38), but the size of the study group (n=38 patients with end-stage renal disease) was small. Thus, the evidence in the medical literature concerning use of DAAs in CKD population is encouraging even if it has a preliminary nature. Also, several points need to be addressed regarding the use of DAAs in CKD population including their impact on survival, costs, and drug-drug interactions. PMID:27545640

  12. Chronic kidney disease related to renal tuberculosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Bezerra da Silva Junior

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Genitourinary tuberculosis (TB is the third most common form of extrapulmonary TB. A 34-year-old man with severe kidney function loss secondary to renal TB initially presented with urinary symptoms, including dysuria and polacyuria. The diagnosis was based on clinical history and laboratory tests; the urinalysis revealed acid-fast bacilli. The patient's condition stabilized after beginning TB-specific treatment, but the right kidney function loss persisted. Renal TB can lead to irreversible loss of renal function. As such, renal function should be considered in all patients from TB-endemic areas who present with urinary symptoms and whose urine cultures are negative for common pathogens.

  13. Determinants of arterial stiffness in chronic kidney disease stage 3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha J McIntyre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early chronic kidney disease (CKD is associated with increased cardiovascular (CV risk but underlying mechanisms remain uncertain. Arterial stiffness (AS is associated with increased CV risk in advanced CKD, but it is unclear whether AS is relevant to CV disease (CVD in early CKD. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: 1717 patients with previous estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR 59-30 mL/min/1.73 m(2; mean age 73±9y, were recruited from 32 general practices in primary care. OUTCOMES: Increased arterial stiffness. MEASUREMENTS: Medical history was obtained and participants underwent clinical assessment, urine and serum biochemistry testing. Carotid to femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV was determined as a measure of AS, using a Vicorder™ device. RESULTS: Univariate analysis revealed significant correlations between PWV and risk factors for CVD including age (r = 0.456; p<0.001, mean arterial pressure (MAP (r = 0.228; p<0.001, body mass index (r = -0.122; p<0.001, log urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (r = 0.124; p<0.001, Waist to Hip ratio (r = 0.124, p<0.001, eGFR (r = -0.074; p = 0.002, log high sensitivity c-reactive protein (r = 0.066; p = 0.006, HDL (r = -0.062; p = 0.01 and total cholesterol (r = -0.057; p = 0.02. PWV was higher in males (9.6 m/sec vs.10.3 m/sec; p<0.001, diabetics (9.8 m/sec vs. 10.3 m/sec; p<0.001, and those with previous CV events (CVE (9.8 m/s vs. 10.3 m/sec; p<0.001. Multivariable analysis identified age, MAP and diabetes as strongest independent determinants of higher PWV (adjusted R² = 0.29. An interactive term indicated that PWV increased to a greater extent with age in males versus females. Albuminuria was a weaker determinant of PWV and eGFR did not enter the model. LIMITATIONS: Data derived from one study visit, with absence of normal controls. CONCLUSION: In this cohort, age and traditional CV risk factors were

  14. Kidney Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... campuses in Maryland and Arizona Research Resources Protocols, repositories, mouse models, plasmids, and more Technology Advancement & Transfer ... through its clearinghouses and education programs to increase knowledge and understanding about health and disease among patients, ...

  15. Plasma levels of microRNA in chronic kidney disease: patterns in acute and chronic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Craenenbroeck, Amaryllis H; Ledeganck, Kristien J; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Jürgens, Angelika; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Fransen, Erik; Adams, Volker; De Winter, Benedicte Y; Verpooten, Gert A; Vrints, Christiaan J; Couttenye, Marie M; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2015-12-15

    Exercise training is an effective way to improve exercise capacity in chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the underlying mechanisms are only partly understood. In healthy subjects (HS), microRNA (miRNA or miR) are dynamically regulated following exercise and have, therefore, been suggested as regulators of cardiovascular adaptation to exercise. However, these effects were not studied in CKD before. The effect of acute exercise (i.e., an acute exercise bout) was assessed in 32 patients with CKD and 12 age- and sex-matched HS (study 1). miRNA expression in response to chronic exercise (i.e., a 3-mo exercise training program) was evaluated in 40 CKD patients (study 2). In a subgroup of study 2, the acute-exercise induced effect was evaluated at baseline and at follow-up. Plasma levels of a preselected panel miRNA, involved in exercise adaptation processes such as angiogenesis (miR-126, miR-210), inflammation (miR-21, miR-146a), hypoxia/ischemia (miR-21, miR-210), and progenitor cells (miR-150), were quantified by RT-PCR. Additionally, seven miRNA involved in similar biological processes were quantified in the subgroup of study 2. Baseline, studied miRNA were comparable in CKD and HS. Following acute exercise, miR-150 levels increased in both CKD (fold change 2.12 ± 0.39, P = 0.002; and HS: fold change 2.41 ± 0.48 P = 0.018, P for interaction > 0.05). miR-146a acutely decreased in CKD (fold change 0.92 ± 0.13, P = 0.024), whereas it remained unchanged in HS. Levels of miR-21, miR-126, and miR-210 remained unaltered. Chronic exercise did not elicit a significant change in the studied miRNA levels. However, an acute exercise-induced decrease in miR-210 was observed in CKD patients, only after training (fold change 0.76 ± 0.15). The differential expression in circulating miRNA in response to acute and chronic exercise may point toward a physiological role in cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, also in CKD. PMID:26475583

  16. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-09-01

    The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease.We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing.The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients' reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group.The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  17. Chronic kidney disease of unknown aetiology in Sri Lanka: is cadmium a likely cause?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiris-John Roshini J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rising prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD and subsequent end stage renal failure necessitating renal replacement therapy has profound consequences for affected individuals and health care resources. This community based study was conducted to identify potential predictors of microalbuminuria in a randomly selected sample of adults from the North Central Province (NCP of Sri Lanka, where the burden of CKD is pronounced and the underlying cause still unknown. Methods Exposures to possible risk factors were determined in randomly recruited subjects (425 females and 461 males from selected areas of the NCP of Sri Lanka using an interviewer administered questionnaire. Sulphosalicylic acid and the Light Dependent Resister microalbumin gel filtration method was used for initial screening for microalbuminuria and reconfirmed by the Micral strip test. Results Microalbumnuria was detected in 6.1% of the females and 8.5% of the males. Smoking (p Conclusions Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, UTI, and smoking are known risk factors for microalbuminuria. The association between microalbuminuria and consumption of well water suggests an environmental aetiology to CKD in NCP. The causative agent is yet to be identified. Investigations for cadmium as a potential causative agent needs to be initiated.

  18. Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in the Elderly Peritoneal Dialysis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James Goya

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper was to review the literature concerning the treatment of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD) in the elderly peritoneal dialysis (PD) patient. ♦ RESULTS: Chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disorder is a major problem in the elderly PD patient......, with its associated increased fracture risk, vascular calcification, and accelerated mortality fracture risk. Peritoneal dialysis, however, bears a lower risk than hemodialysis (HD). The approach to CKD-MBD prophylaxis and treatment in the elderly PD patient is similar to other CKD patients, with some...... to other dialysis patient groups, physicians should be aware of the special problems of the elderly group....

  19. Risk assessment and novel treatment of chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vuuren, S.H.

    2013-01-01

    The first chapters of this thesis focus on the prenatal development of the kidney, with a particular focus on the development of a CSFK. We aim to unravel the process of compensatory enlargement in a CSFK. In Chapter 2, a prospective longitudinal study of normal human fetuses is described, focussing

  20. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Kidneys' Structural Changes in End-Stage Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Mario; Samoni, Sara; Petrucci, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    Acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are the most important manifestations of end-stage kidneys' structural changes. ACKD is caused by kidney damage or scarring and it is characterized by the presence of small, multiple cortical and medullary cysts filled with a fluid similar to preurine. ACKD prevalence varies according to predialysis and dialysis age and its pathogenesis is unknown, although it is stated that progressive destruction of renal tissue induces hypertrophy/compensatory hyperplasia of residual nephrons and may trigger the degenerative process. ACKD is almost asymptomatic, but it can lead to several complications (bleeding, rupture, infections, RCC). Ultrasound (US) is the first level imaging technique in ACKD, because of its sensitivity and reliability. The most serious complication of ACKD is RCC, which is stimulated by the same growth factors and proto-oncogenes that lead to the genesis of cysts. Two different histological types of RCC have been identified: (1) RCC associated with ACKD and (2) papillary renal clear cell carcinoma. Tumors in end-stage kidneys are mainly small, multifocal and bilateral, with a papillary structure and a low degree of malignancy. At US, RCC appears as a small inhomogeneous nodule (<3 cm), clearly outlined from the renal profile and hypoechoic if compared with sclerotic parenchyma. In some cases, tumor appears as a homogeneous and hyperechoic multifocal mass. The most specific US sign of a small tumor in end-stage kidney is the important arterial vascularization, in contrast with renal parenchymal vascular sclerosis. PMID:27169876

  1. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  2. Cytokine and Chemokine Expression in Kidneys during Chronic Leptospirosis in Reservoir and Susceptible Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Roche, Louise; Geroult, Sophie; Soupé-Gilbert, Marie-Estelle; Monchy, Didier; Huerre, Michel; Goarant, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Humans can be infected after exposure to contaminated urine of reservoir animals, usually rodents, regarded as typical asymptomatic carriers of leptospires. In contrast, accidental hosts may present an acute form of leptospirosis with a range of clinical symptoms including the development of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is considered as a possible AKI-residual sequela but little is known about the renal pathophysiology consequent to leptospirosis infection. Herein, we studied the renal morphological alterations in relation with the regulation of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, comparing two experimental models of chronic leptospirosis, the golden Syrian hamster that survived the infection, becoming carrier of virulent leptospires, and the OF1 mouse, a usual reservoir of the bacteria. Animals were monitored until 28 days after injection with a virulent L. borgpetersenii serogroup Ballum to assess chronic infection. Hamsters developed morphological alterations in the kidneys with tubulointerstitial nephritis and fibrosis. Grading of lesions revealed higher scores in hamsters compared to the slight alterations observed in the mouse kidneys, irrespective of the bacterial load. Interestingly, pro-fibrotic TGF-β was downregulated in mouse kidneys. Moreover, cytokines IL-1β and IL-10, and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3 and IP-10/CXCL-10 were significantly upregulated in hamster kidneys compared to mice. These results suggest a possible maintenance of inflammatory processes in the hamster kidneys with the infiltration of inflammatory cells in response to bacterial carriage, resulting in alterations of renal tissues. In contrast, lower expression levels in mouse kidneys indicated a better regulation of the inflammatory response and possible resolution processes likely related to resistance mechanisms. PMID:27219334

  3. Screening of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in general population on world kidney day on three consecutive years: A single day data

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep Kumar Rai; Pawan Kumar Jindal; Punam Rai; Pramod Kumar Rai; Sachindra Nat Rai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a global public health problem. There is now convincing evidence that CKD can be detected using simple laboratory tests, and that treatment can prevent or delay complications of decreased kidney function, slow the progression of kidney disease and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Currently, screening for CKD is accepted practice only in patients with hypertension or diabetes, but more widespread screening is...

  4. Predictors of advanced chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ryom; Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole;

    2014-01-01

    Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown.......Whilst several antiretroviral drugs have been associated with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD), their contribution to advanced CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) remain unknown....

  5. Is chronic renal failure a risk factor for the development of erosive osteoarthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Disney, A; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C

    1989-03-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis of the hands of unusually early onset and severity was seen in two patients treated for chronic renal failure by long term haemodialysis and renal homograft respectively. The significance of this observation is discussed in the light of previous studies of erosive arthropathy in patients with chronic renal failure. Factors associated with chronic renal failure may predispose to the development of erosive osteoarthritis. PMID:2649026

  6. Is chronic renal failure a risk factor for the development of erosive osteoarthritis?

    OpenAIRE

    Duncan, I J; Hurst, N P; Disney, A; Sebben, R; Milazzo, S C

    1989-01-01

    Erosive osteoarthritis of the hands of unusually early onset and severity was seen in two patients treated for chronic renal failure by long term haemodialysis and renal homograft respectively. The significance of this observation is discussed in the light of previous studies of erosive arthropathy in patients with chronic renal failure. Factors associated with chronic renal failure may predispose to the development of erosive osteoarthritis.

  7. Direct measurement of skeletal muscle fatigue in patients with chronic heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Buller, N. P.; Jones, D.; Poole-Wilson, P A

    1991-01-01

    Skeletal muscle function was measured as force production and fatigue in both the quadriceps (a large locomotive muscle) and adductor pollicis (a small intrinsic hand muscle) in five healthy volunteers, five patients with mild chronic heart failure, and five patients with severe chronic heart failure. The quadriceps of patients with chronic heart failure had a reduced muscle cross sectional area, a reduced maximum isometric force production, and an increased tendency to fatigue. Isometric for...

  8. Apolipoprotein and lipid abnormalities in chronic liver failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spósito A.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Total serum lipids, as well as apolipoproteins A-I (apo A-I and B (apo B, were determined in 74 patients with chronic liver failure without cholestasis and in 82 normal subjects. The VLDL, LDL and HDL lipid fractions were reduced in the liver failure group by 36%, 24% and 46%, respectively (P<0.001. Apolipoproteins A-I and B were also reduced by 26% and 25%, respectively (P<0.001. However, the reduction of HDL cholesterol (HDLc was more pronounced than that of apo A-I and the HDLc:apo A-I ratio was significantly lower in the liver failure group. After separating these patients into groups with plasma albumin lower than 3.0, between 3.0 and 3.5, and higher than 3.5 g/dl, the HDLc:apo A-I ratio was proportional to plasma albumin, but the correlation was not statistically significant. When these patients were separated by the Child classification of liver function, there was a correlation between the HDLc:apo A-I ratio and liver function. The differences in the HDLc:apo A-I ratio between the Child groups B and C, and A and C were statistically significant (P<0.05. We conclude that there is a more pronounced reduction in HDL cholesterol than in apo A-I in liver failure patients. Therefore, the HDLc:apo A-I ratio is a marker of liver function, probably because there is a decreased lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase production by the diseased liver

  9. The Chronic Kidney Disease Model: A General Purpose Model of Disease Progression and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Uptal D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is the focus of recent national policy efforts; however, decision makers must account for multiple therapeutic options, comorbidities and complications. The objective of the Chronic Kidney Disease model is to provide guidance to decision makers. We describe this model and give an example of how it can inform clinical and policy decisions. Methods Monte Carlo simulation of CKD natural history and treatment. Health states include myocardial infarction, stroke with and without disability, congestive heart failure, CKD stages 1-5, bone disease, dialysis, transplant and death. Each cycle is 1 month. Projections account for race, age, gender, diabetes, proteinuria, hypertension, cardiac disease, and CKD stage. Treatment strategies include hypertension control, diabetes control, use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, use of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nephrology specialty care, CKD screening, and a combination of these. The model architecture is flexible permitting updates as new data become available. The primary outcome is quality adjusted life years (QALYs. Secondary outcomes include health state events and CKD progression rate. Results The model was validated for GFR change/year -3.0 ± 1.9 vs. -1.7 ± 3.4 (in the AASK trial, and annual myocardial infarction and mortality rates 3.6 ± 0.9% and 1.6 ± 0.5% vs. 4.4% and 1.6% in the Go study. To illustrate the model's utility we estimated lifetime impact of a hypothetical treatment for primary prevention of vascular disease. As vascular risk declined, QALY improved but risk of dialysis increased. At baseline, 20% and 60% reduction: QALYs = 17.6, 18.2, and 19.0 and dialysis = 7.7%, 8.1%, and 10.4%, respectively. Conclusions The CKD Model is a valid, general purpose model intended as a resource to inform clinical and policy decisions improving CKD care. Its value as a tool is illustrated in our example which projects a relationship between

  10. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  11. T1-mapping for assessment of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury and prediction of chronic kidney disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueper, Katja; Gutberlet, Marcel; Wacker, Frank; Hartung, Dagmar [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Peperhove, Matti; Tewes, Susanne; Barrmeyer, Amelie [Hannover Medical School, Department of Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Rong, Song [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zunyi Medical College, Laboratory of Organ Transplantation, Zunyi (China); Gerstenberg, Jessica; Haller, Herman; Gueler, Faikah [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Mengel, Michael [University of Alberta, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Edmonton (Canada); Meier, Martin [Hannover Medical School, REBIRTH Cluster of Excellence, Hannover (Germany); Hannover Medical School, Institute for Animal Science, Hannover (Germany); Chen, Rongjun [Hannover Medical School, Department of Nephrology, Hannover (Germany); Zhejiang University, The Kidney Disease Center of the First Affiliated Hospital, Hangzhou (China)

    2014-09-15

    To investigate whether T1-mapping allows assessment of acute kidney injury (AKI) and prediction of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in mice. AKI was induced in C57Bl/6N mice by clamping of the right renal pedicle for 35 min (moderate AKI, n = 26) or 45 min (severe AKI, n = 23). Sham animals served as controls (n = 9). Renal histology was assessed in the acute (day 1 + day 7; d1 + d7) and chronic phase (d28) after AKI. Furthermore, longitudinal MRI-examinations (prior to until d28 after surgery) were performed using a 7-Tesla magnet. T1-maps were calculated from a fat-saturated echoplanar inversion recovery sequence, and mean and relative T1-relaxation times were determined. Renal histology showed severe tubular injury at d1 + d7 in both AKI groups, whereas, at d28, only animals with prolonged 45-min ischemia showed persistent signs of AKI. Following both AKI severities T1-values significantly increased and peaked at d7. T1-times in the contralateral kidney without AKI remained stable. At d7 relative T1-values in the outer stripe of the outer medulla were significantly higher after severe than after moderate AKI (138 ± 2 % vs. 121 ± 3 %, p = 0.001). T1-elevation persisted until d28 only after severe AKI. Already at d7 T1 in the outer stripe of the outer medulla correlated with kidney volume loss indicating CKD (r = 0.83). T1-mapping non-invasively detects AKI severity in mice and predicts further outcome. (orig.)

  12. Are we satisfied with the follow-up of hypertensive and chronic kidney disease patients in outpatient clinics?

    OpenAIRE

    Peppa, M.; Vlahakos, D

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension and chronic kidney disease constitute major health problems as they are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Large-scale clinical trials, have emphasized the need of a strict blood pressure and early recognition of kidney disease to reduce the complications. However, the rate of hypertension control seems to be low, the prevalence of hypertension and chronic kidney disease steadily increases, indicating a gap in the management of those patients. This is due either t...

  13. Challenges for nephrology nurses in the management of children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Deborah; Macdonald, Dina; Kolnacki, Ken; Simek, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    An important treatment goal for pediatric nephrology caregivers is the optimization of a child's capacity for normal growth and development. However, the physiologic and metabolic derangements associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) significantly alter these processes, creating important challenges in the care of affected children. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines support early recognition and treatment of CKD-related complications to improve growth and development and, ultimately, quality of life for children with this chronic condition. PMID:15303424

  14. Iron status and chronic kidney disease predict restless legs syndrome in an older hospital population.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quinn, Colin

    2011-03-01

    Iron deficiency is important in the pathogenesis of restless legs syndrome (RLS), and serum ferritin measurement, using a cutoff of 45-50ng\\/ml, is widely recommended as the optimal screening test for iron deficiency in RLS. Serum ferritin often increases with inflammation, and a higher cutoff may be better in those with acute and chronic inflammatory conditions, including those with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

  15. Hepatitis C, Chronic Renal Failure, Control Is Possible!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed-Moayed Alavian

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has come to the top of virus-induced liver diseases in many parts of the world. In Iran, it seems that HCV prevalence in general population is less than one percent, which is much lower than in most of the regional countries(1. However, the infection is emerging in Iran mostly due to problem of intravenous drug abuse and needle-sharing in the country (2, 3. The patients receiving maintenance transfusion such as chronic renal failure (CRF patients and the patients with thalassemia major are the other population who are at the high risk of HCV acquisition although compulsory blood screening has been able to remarkably decrease the HCV incidence in these patients (4. The prevalence of HCV infection among CRF patients on hemodialysis in Tehran, the capital of Iran, was around 13 percent in 2002 (5. There is no valid data regarding HCV incidence rate among CRF patients in country. However, according to the most recent official report of Management of Special Diseases and Transplantation Center (MSDT, the prevalence of HCV infection among patients on hemodialysis in the whole country has decreased from 14.4% in 1999 to 4.5% in 2005. Various reasons might be responsible for this reduction such as blood screening; developing technology of alternative modalities instead of transfusion in Iran like producing domestic Erythropoietin which has been resulted in decreasing transfusion; early transplantation; and training health staffs. On the other hand, the other reason such as mortality ofHCV infected CRF patients should not be neglected. Although there is no data in this regard in Iran, a meta-analysis, demonstrated that HCV infected patients on dialysis have an increased risk of mortality compared to HCV negative cases (6. Therefore, with the lack of data defining incidence rate in Iran, the reduction of HCV prevalence in the country should not overlook the necessity of designing a comprehensive strategy to control HCV

  16. [Chronic kidney diseases do not always pass unnoticed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cyrielle; Pruijma, Menno; Rotman, Samuel; Bonny, Olivier

    2016-02-24

    Kidney diseases are frequent, but most of the time, they develop unnoticed. This paucity of symptoms may lead to delayed diagnosis with important consequences on their outcome. Nevertheless, specific systemic signs such as skin lesions, joint pain or electrolytes disturbances may sometimes alert the clinician and direct the diagnosis to an underlying nephropathy. A high awareness of clinicians is warranted to recognize these red flags and diagnose these diseases early, as illustrated by two clinical cases discussed in this article. PMID:27039602

  17. Renal Tissue Oxygenation in Essential Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Menno Pruijm; Lucie Hofmann; Bruno Vogt; Marie-Eve Muller; Maciej Piskunowicz; Matthias Stuber; Michel Burnier

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies suggest that renal tissue hypoxia plays an important role in the development of renal damage in hypertension and renal diseases, yet human data were scarce due to the lack of noninvasive methods. Over the last decade, blood oxygenation level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI), detecting deoxyhemoglobin in hypoxic renal tissue, has become a powerful tool to assess kidney oxygenation noninvasively in humans. This paper provides an overview of BOLD-MRI studies perform...

  18. Gene polymorphisms of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system components and the progression of chronic kidney diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Kujawa-Szewieczek

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension as well as cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney diseases. Among the most frequently studied RAAS gene polymorphisms are the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion (I/D, angiotensinogen M235T and angiotensin II receptor type 1 A1166C polymorphisms.A significant correlation was found between the I/D polymorphism and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates. However, there was no significant correlation between I/D, M235T, A1166C polymorphism and arterial hypertension. The role of I/D polymorphism in the development and progression of chronic kidney disease is also non-conclusive. However, DD genotype has been identified as relevant for loss of renal function both in patients with IgA nephropathy and in patients of Asian origin with diabetic nephropathy.The relationship between RAAS gene polymorphism and transplanted kidney function has not been confirmed in large prospective and retrospective studies. Conclusion: there is no clear opinion concerning the influence of RAAS genotypes on the prevalence of post-transplant hypertension or erythrocytosis.Although a role of RAAS gene polymorphism in kidney function deterioration could not be ruled out, it is more likely that a variety of genetic and environmental factors influence the progression of chronic kidney diseases.

  19. Do telemonitoring projects of heart failure fit the Chronic Care Model?

    OpenAIRE

    Willemse, Evi; Adriaenssens, Jef; Dilles, Tinne; Remmen, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of extramural and transmural telemonitoring projects on chronic heart failure in Belgium. It describes to what extent these telemonitoring projects coincide with the Chronic Care Model of Wagner.Background: The Chronic Care Model describes essential components for high-quality health care. Telemonitoring can be used to optimise home care for chronic heart failure. It provides a potential prospective to change the current care organisation.Methods: This...

  20. The Impact of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Smoking on Mortality and Kidney Transplantation in End-Stage Kidney Disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2012-09-07

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and tobacco use are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. The prevalence and clinical impact of COPD on mortality and kidney transplantation among patients who begin dialysis therapy is unclear. Methods: We explored the clinical impact of COPD and continued tobacco use on overall mortality and kidney transplantation in a national cohort study of US dialysis patients. National data on all dialysis patients (n = 769,984), incident between May 1995 and December 2004 and followed until October 31, 2006, were analyzed from the United States Renal Data System. Prevalence and period trends were determined while multivariable Cox regression evaluated relative hazard ratios (RR) for death and kidney transplantation. Results: The prevalence of COPD was 7.5% overall and increased from 6.7 to 8.1% from 1995-2004. COPD correlated significantly with older age, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, malnutrition, poor functional status, and tobacco use. Adjusted mortality risks were significantly higher for patients with COPD (RR = 1.20, 95% CI 1.18-1.21), especially among current smokers (RR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.25-1.32), and varied inversely with advancing age. In contrast, the adjusted risks of kidney transplantation were significantly lower for patients with COPD (RR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.41-0.54, for smokers and RR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.50-0.58, for non-smokers) than without COPD [RR = 0.72, 95% CI 0.70-0.75, for smokers and RR = 1.00 for non-smokers (referent category)]. Conclusions: Patients with COPD who begin dialysis therapy in the US experience higher mortality and lower rates of kidney transplantation, outcomes that are far worse among current smokers.

  1. Helicobacter Pylori in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Allahverdi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.Pylori is considered to cause gastritis and peptic ulcer. In dialysis patients this study was done in order to determine the role of H pylori in gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. Methods: Upper digestive tract endoscopy was conducted on 69 patients with ESRD. Gimsa staining and pathology evaluation were performed on Specimen of antrum for H pylori evaluation. Results: sixty five patients (94.2% had pathologic defect in endoscopy and 57 patients (82.6% had gastrointestinal symptoms. Prevalence of H pylori positive was 21.7% (15 patients. H pylori was positive in 21% patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: Chronic renal failure and dialysis had no effect on prevalence of H pylori.

  2. [Respiratory preparation before surgery in patients with chronic respiratory failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, Jean-Marc; Jaber, Samir

    2012-03-01

    Scheduled and/or thoracic, abdominal surgeries increase the risk of respiratory postoperative complications. In patients with chronic respiratory failure, preoperative evaluation should be performed to evaluate respiratory function in aim to optimize perioperative management. Preoperative gas exchange abnormalities (hypoxemia or hypercapnia) are associated with respiratory postoperative complications. Respiratory physiotherapy and prophylactic non-invasive ventilation should be integrated in a global rehabilitation management for cardiothoracic or abdominal surgery procedures, which are at high risk of postoperative respiratory dysfunction. Stopping tobacco consummation should be benefit, but decease risk of postoperative complications is relevant only after a period for 6 to 8 weeks of cessation. Bronchodilatator aerosol therapy (beta-agonists and atropinics) and inhaled corticotherapy allow a rapid preparation for 24 to 48 h. Systematic preoperative antibiotherapy should not be recommended. PMID:22004791

  3. The role of statins in chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyguła-Jurkiewicz, Bożena; Szczurek, Wioletta; Król, Bogumiła; Zembala, Marian

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of statins in reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with documented coronary artery disease is unquestionable. However, in chronic heart failure (CHF), evidence regarding the beneficial effects of statin therapy remains contradictory. Although numerous retrospective studies have demonstrated improved prognosis in CHF patients treated with statins, two randomized trials, GISSI-HF and CORONA, have not confirmed the benefit of rosuvastatin in this group of patients. The benefits of using statins in CHF probably result mostly from their pleiotropic action, including the improvement of endothelial function, the inhibition of neurohormonal activation, and the reduction of proinflammatory activation. On the other hand, it has been recognized that low cholesterol is associated with worse morbidity and mortality in patients with CHF. It appears that it is necessary to conduct further randomized clinical trials using different kinds of statins in different populations of patients with CHF. PMID:26336439

  4. Chronic renal failure among HIV-1-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of exposure to antiretrovirals in chronic renal failure (CRF) is not well understood. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) are estimated using the Cockcroft-Gault (CG) or Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD) equations. METHODS: Baseline was arbitrarily defined as the first...... recorded GFR; patients with two consecutive GFR determine odds ratio (OR) of CRF at baseline. ART exposure (yes/no or cumulative exposure) prior to baseline was included in multivariate models (adjusted for region...... of Europe, age, prior AIDS, CD4 cell count nadir, viral load, hypertension and use of nephrotoxic anti-infective therapy). RESULTS: Using CG, the median GFR at baseline (n = 4474) was 94.4 (interquartile range, 80.5-109.3); 158 patients (3.5%) had CRF. Patients with CRF were older (median, 61.9 versus 43...

  5. PRIMARY CARE PROBLEMS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shtegman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate primary care efficacy in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF.Material and methods. Outpatients (n=139 with CHF and 35 primary care physicians were included into the study. The evaluation of drug therapy and patient awareness of the principles of non-drug CHF treatment were performed. An anonymous survey among doctors in terms of current CHF guidelines knowledge, patient information provided by physicians, and doctors’ burnout status was also carried out.Results. Only 39% and 10% of CHF outpatients received target doses of ACE inhibitors/sartans and beta-blockers, respectively. Majority of CHF outpatients and their doctors need in additional education/training. 56% of primary care physicians demonstrated an emotional burnout.Conclusion. Author considers it essential to distribute short pocket-guidelines on CHF management among primary care physicians, and to reduce the load on primary care physicians with simultaneous strengthening of their performance control.

  6. Telemonitoring in chronic heart failure: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giamouzis, Gregory; Mastrogiannis, Dimos; Koutrakis, Konstantinos; Karayannis, George; Parisis, Charalambos; Rountas, Chris; Adreanides, Elias; Dafoulas, George E; Stafylas, Panagiotis C; Skoularigis, John; Giacomelli, Sara; Olivari, Zoran; Triposkiadis, Filippos

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a growing epidemic with the annual number of hospitalizations constantly increasing over the last decades for HF as a primary or secondary diagnosis. Despite the emergence of novel therapeutic approached that can prolong life and shorten hospital stay, HF patients will be needing rehospitalization and will often have a poor prognosis. Telemonitoring is a novel diagnostic modality that has been suggested to be beneficial for HF patients. Telemonitoring is viewed as a means of recording physiological data, such as body weight, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and electrocardiogram recordings, by portable devices and transmitting these data remotely (via a telephone line, a mobile phone or a computer) to a server where they can be stored, reviewed and analyzed by the research team. In this systematic review of all randomized clinical trials evaluating telemonitoring in chronic HF, we aim to assess whether telemonitoring provides any substantial benefit in this patient population. PMID:22720184

  7. An Epidermolysis Bullosa Patient Complicated with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özkan Ulutaş

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A 32-yr-old man with epidermolysis bullosa presented with clinical and laboratory findings of chronic renal failure. The patient was supposed to be suffering from mesangial IgA glomerulonephritis in view of the repeated persistent macroscopic episodes of hematuria and raised serum IgA levels, especially polimeric IgA. Because continuous vascular access could not be established, the patient died due to uremia and sepsis. Renal complications are associated with life-threatening problems in this inherited mechanobullous disease because it is impossible to obtain a continuous vascular access or a continuous peritoneal access. The possibility of IgA nephropathy should be considered in patients with epidermolysis bullosa. They should be periodically set up screened for IgA levels and hematuria.

  8. Radiological diagnosis of pulmonary edema in chronic renal failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary edema has been revealed in 132 patients (51.6 %) during radiologic examination of 256 patients with chronic renal failure. The performance of anterio-posterior chest radiographs was in most cases necessary and quite sufficient for making diagnostic conclusions. Follow up study of patients with pulmonary edema and analysis of radiologic picture of the alterations permitted physicians to distinguish approximately 3 stages of the process development, which transit from one into another. Stage 1 involves early disorders and prodromes of pulmonary edema; Stage 2 interstitial lung edema; Stage 3 alveolar edema. The circulation enforcement of the upper lobar vessels has been the main feature of stage 1. Radiogramometry provided additional information for the pulmonary edema diagnosis. For instance, cardioradiometric data are useful for pulmonary edema diagnosis and evidence in favour of its close connection with heart disorders

  9. Radiological features of progressive tumoral calcinosis in chronic renal failure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hodnett, P

    2012-02-03

    We present the case of a young adult patient with chronic renal failure who developed painful subcutaneous nodules after failed renal transplant and recommencing dialysis. These nodules were juxta-articular in location and initially located over both shoulders. Radiological evaluation suggested tumoral calcinosis. The patient was placed on a strict dialysis and dietary regimen but was suboptimally compliant with same. The patient developed progressive disease with an increase in size and number of juxta-articular calcified soft-tissue masses. However, 6 months following a second renal transplant clinical and radiological follow up demonstrated marked resolution both in symptomatology and radiographic findings. We present the plain radiographic, CT and MRI findings which demonstrate the typical radiological features of tumoral calcinosis. We correlate these findings with clinical course and histological findings following surgical excision of one of these masses.

  10. [Optimization of energy metabolism in patients with chronic heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, A N

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays particular interest of clinicians is attracted by metabolic therapy of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of complex therapy with addition of Vasonat on the dynamics of remodeling indexes of left ventricle and functional class of CHF on classification of NYHA. It has been shown that application of metabolic modulator Vasonat in addition to conventional therapy of CHF facilitated the clinical improvement and significant decline of functional class. Vasonat use resulted in the meaningful improvement of the contractive function of myocardium and increase of tolerance to the physical exercise. Moreover, high efficiency of Vasonat has been demonstrated in the control of the syndrome of oxidizing stress, by decrease in intensity of free-radical processes and activation of the antioxidant defense system. PMID:21265120

  11. Histological and Biochemical Evaluation of the Kidney following Chronic Consumption of Hibiscus sabdariffa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. U. Ukoha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hibiscus sabdariffa L. has been used traditionally as herbal medicine and has been documented to have a broad range of therapeutic effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chronic administration of aqueous extract of flowers of Hibiscus sabdariffa on the histology of the kidney and some biochemical indices of renal function in male Wistar rats. Twenty (20 Wistar rats were randomly divided into four (4 groups of five rats each. The extract was administered orally in doses 200, 500, and 800 mg/kg body weight for 21 days. The kidney was harvested and processed histologically and blood samples were taken for biochemical assays. The histological results showed dose dependent pathological states and the biochemical analysis revealed a dose dependant variation in renal indices. These results suggest that chronic administration of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa may be toxic to the kidney.

  12. Chronic diarrhea due to duodenal candidiasis in a patient with a history of kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri-Majalan, Nader; Moghaddasi, Sarasadat; Qane, Mohammad Davud; Shefaie, Farzane; Masoumi Dehshiri, Roghayyeh; Amirbaigy, Mohammad Kassem; Baghbanian, Mahmoud

    2014-11-01

    Candida infection in the small intestine is uncommon. We report an unusual case of duodenal candidiasis that presented as chronic diarrhea in a patient who had previously undergone kidney transplantation. A 60-year-old man presented with profuse watery diarrhea that had lasted 6 months 13 years after kidney transplantation. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy results indicated candidiasis within the esophagus and duodenum. Biopsy results revealed active duodenitis with hyphal and yeast forms of Candida overlying the duodenal epithelium in periodic acid Schiff staining. The patient was successfully treated with fluconazole. After 6 months of follow-up, the patient had no complaint of diarrhea. Duodenal candidiasis may be the result of chronic diarrhea in patients with a history of kidney transplantation. PMID:25362226

  13. Management of chronic heart failure in the older population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nahid Azad; Genevieve Lemay

    2014-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the leading cause of hospitalization for those over the age of 65 and represents a significant clinical and economic burden. About half of hospital re-admissions are related to co-morbidities, polypharmacy and disabilities associated with CHF. Moreover, CHF also has an enormous cost in terms of poor prognosis with an average one year mortality of 33%–35%. While more than half of patients with CHF are over 75 years, most clinical trials have included younger patients with a mean age of 61 years. Inadequate data makes treatment decisions challenging for the providers. Older CHF patients are more often female, have less cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors, but higher rates of non-cardiovascular conditions and diastolic dysfunction. The prevalence of CHF with reduced ejection fraction, ischemic heart disease, and its risk factors declines with age, whereas the prevalence of non-cardiac co-morbidities, such as chronic renal failure, dementia, anemia and malignancy increases with age. Diabetes and hypertension are among the strongest risk factors as predictors of CHF particularly among women with coronary heart disease. This review paper will focus on the specific consideration for CHF assessment in the older population. Management strategies will be reviewed, including non-pharmacologic, pharmacologic, quality care indicators, quality improvement in care transition and lastly, end-of-life issues. Palliative care should be an integral part of an interdiscipli-nary team approach for a comprehensive care plan over the whole disease trajectory. In addition, frailty contributes valuable prognostic in-sight incremental to existing risk models and assists clinicians in defining optimal care pathways for their patients.

  14. Safety of ACE inhibitor therapies in patients with chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sidorenkov, Grigory; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: ACE inhibitors are first-line therapy in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The main adverse effects of ACE inhibitors are hypotension, renal function impairment and hyperkalemia. Areas covered: This paper reviews evidence from clinical studies regarding adverse effects of ACE

  15. A Trial of Darbepoetin Alfa in Type 2 Diabetes and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfeffer, Marc A.; Burdmann, Emmanuel A.; Chen, Chao-Yin; Cooper, Mark E.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Feyzi, Jan M.; Ivanovich, Peter; Kewalramani, Reshma; Levey, Andrew S.; Lewis, Eldrin F.; McGill, Janet B.; McMurray, John J. V.; Parfrey, Patrick; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Singh, Ajay K.; Solomon, Scott D.; Toto, Robert

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Anemia is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and renal events among patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Although darbepoetin alfa can effectively increase hemoglobin levels, its effect on clinical outcomes in these patients has not been adequately te

  16. Dietary sodium restriction : a neglected therapeutic opportunity in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humalda, Jelmer K.; Navis, Gerjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Restriction of dietary sodium is recommended at a population level as well as for groups at high cardiovascular risk, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). This review addresses recent evidence for the protective effect of dietary sodium restriction in CKD patients specifically. Recent

  17. Mineralocorticoid receptor blockade—a novel approach to fight hyperkalaemia in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ritz, E.; Pitt, B

    2013-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia continues to be a major hazard of mineralocorticoid receptor blockade in an effort to retard the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In cardiac patients on mineralocorticoid receptor blockade, RLY-5016 which captures K+ in the colon has been effective in reducing the risk of hyperkalaemia. This compound might be useful in CKD as well.

  18. Iron isomaltoside 1000: a new intravenous iron for treating iron deficiency in chronic kidney disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wikström, Björn; Bhandari, Sunil; Barany, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) often suffer from iron deficiency anemia necessitating treatment with intravenous iron. This study was designed to assess the safety of iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) in CKD patients. The secondary objective was to assess its effect on iron deficiency...... anemia....

  19. Hypertensive chronic kidney disease in African Americans: Strategies for improving care

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, David; Agodoa, Lawrence; Norris, Keith C.

    2012-01-01

    African Americans have a disproportionate burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which tends to have an earlier onset and a more rapid progression in this population. Many of the factors responsible for the rapid progression of CKD in African Americans are detectable by screening and are modifiable with prompt therapy.

  20. Mediators of the Association Between Low Socioeconomic Status and Chronic Kidney Disease in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vart, Priya; Gansevoort, Ronald; Crews, Deidra C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Bultmann, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Using data collected from 9,823 participants in the 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we formally investigated potentially modifiable factors linking low socioeconomic status (SES) to chronic kidney disease (CKD) for their presence and magnitude