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Sample records for chronic bacterial infections

  1. Bacterial colonization or infection in chronic sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandak, Nenad; Pajić-Penavić, Ivana; Sekelj, Alen; Tomić-Paradžik, Maja; Cabraja, Ivica; Miklaušić, Božana

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was the determination of bacteria present in maxillary and ethmoid cavities in patients with chronic sinusitis and to correlate these findings with bacteria simultaneously present in their nasopharynx. The purpose of this correlation was to establish the role of bacteria found in chronically inflamed sinuses and to evaluate if the bacteria present colonized or infected sinus mucosa. Nasopharyngeal and sinus swabs of 65 patients that underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery were cultivated and at the same time the presence of leukocytes were determined in each swab. The most frequently found bacteria in nasopharynx were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus spp., Streptococcus viridans and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maxillary or ethmoidal sinus swabs yielded bacterial growth in 47 (72.31%) patients. The most frequently found bacteria in sinuses were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella spp. and Streptococci (pneumoniae, viridans and spp.). The insignificant number of leukocytes was present in each sinus and nasopharyngeal swab. Every published microbiology study of chronic sinusitis proved that sinus mucosa were colonized with bacteria and not infected, yet antibiotic therapy was discussed making no difference between infection and colonization. Chronic sinusitis should be considered a chronic inflammatory condition rather than bacterial infection, so routine antibiotic therapy should be avoided. Empiric antibiotic therapy should be prescribed only in cases when the acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis occurs and the antibiotics prescribed should aim the usual bacteria causing acute sinusitis. In case of therapy failure, antibiotics should be changed having in mind that under certain circumstances any bacteria colonizing sinus mucosa can cause acute exacerbation of chronic sinusitis.

  2. Rhinovirus Infection Induces Degradation of Antimicrobial Peptides and Secondary Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Patrick Mallia; Joseph Footitt; Rosa Sotero; Annette Jepson; Marco Contoli; Maria-Belen Trujillo-Torralbo; Tatiana Kebadze; Julia Aniscenko; Gregory Oleszkiewicz; Katrina Gray; Message, Simon D.; Kazuhiro Ito; Peter J Barnes; Ian M Adcock; Alberto Papi

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections.

  3. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    treatment depends on accurate and fast diagnosis. However, in cases where the bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often turns out to be untreatable and will develop into a chronic state. The important hallmarks of chronic biofilm-based infections are extreme resistance...... to antibiotics and many other conventional antimicrobial agents, and an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. In this thesis, I will assemble the current knowledge on biofilms with an emphasis on chronic infections, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of these infections, before relating this to my...... previous research into the area of biofilms. I will present evidence to support a view that the biofilm lifestyle dominates chronic bacterial infections, where bacterial aggregation is the default mode, and that subsequent biofilm development progresses by adaptation to nutritional and environmental...

  4. The role of bacterial biofilms in chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-05-01

    Acute infections caused by pathogenic bacteria have been studied extensively for well over 100 years. These infections killed millions of people in previous centuries, but they have been combated effectively by the development of modern vaccines, antibiotics and infection control measures. Most research into bacterial pathogenesis has focused on acute infections, but these diseases have now been supplemented by a new category of chronic infections caused by bacteria growing in slime-enclosed aggregates known as biofilms. Biofilm infections, such as pneumonia in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic wounds, chronic otitis media and implant- and catheter-associated infections, affect millions of people in the developed world each year and many deaths occur as a consequence. In general, bacteria have two life forms during growth and proliferation. In one form, the bacteria exist as single, independent cells (planktonic) whereas in the other form, bacteria are organized into sessile aggregates. The latter form is commonly referred to as the biofilm growth phenotype. Acute infections are assumed to involve planktonic bacteria, which are generally treatable with antibiotics, although successful treatment depends on accurate and fast diagnosis. However, in cases where the bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often turns out to be untreatable and will develop into a chronic state. The important hallmarks of chronic biofilm-based infections are extreme resistance to antibiotics and many other conventional antimicrobial agents, and an extreme capacity for evading the host defences. In this thesis, I will assemble the current knowledge on biofilms with an emphasis on chronic infections, guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of these infections, before relating this to my previous research into the area of biofilms. I will present evidence to support a view that the biofilm lifestyle dominates chronic bacterial infections, where bacterial

  5. Chronic filarial infection provides protection against bacterial sepsis by functionally reprogramming macrophages.

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    Fabian Gondorf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helminths immunomodulate their hosts and induce a regulatory, anti-inflammatory milieu that prevents allergies and autoimmune diseases. Helminth immunomodulation may benefit sepsis outcome by preventing exacerbated inflammation and severe pathology, but the influence on bacterial clearance remains unclear. To address this, mice were chronically infected with the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis (L.s. and the outcome of acute systemic inflammation caused by i.p. Escherichia coli injection was determined. L.s. infection significantly improved E. coli-induced hypothermia, bacterial clearance and sepsis survival and correlated with reduced concentrations of associated pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines and a less pronounced pro-inflammatory macrophage gene expression profile. Improved sepsis outcome in L.s.-infected animals was mediated by macrophages, but independent of the alternatively activated macrophage subset. Endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria that are present in most human pathogenic filariae, as well as L.s., signal via TLR2 and modulate macrophage function. Here, gene expression profiles of peritoneal macrophages from L.s.-infected mice revealed a downregulation of genes involved in TLR signaling, and pulsing of macrophages in vitro with L.s. extract reduced LPS-triggered activation. Subsequent transfer improved sepsis outcome in naïve mice in a Wolbachia- and TLR2-dependent manner. In vivo, phagocytosis was increased in macrophages from L.s.-infected wild type, but not TLR2-deficient animals. In association, L.s. infection neither improved bacterial clearance in TLR2-deficient animals nor ameliorated E. coli-induced hypothermia and sepsis survival. These results indicate that chronic L.s. infection has a dual beneficial effect on bacterial sepsis, reducing pro-inflammatory immune responses and improving bacterial control. Thus, helminths and their antigens may not only improve the outcome of autoimmune and allergic diseases

  6. Early diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infection in chronic cholestatic hepatitis B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Zhi Wu; Dan Chen; Lian-San Zhao; Xiao-Hui Yu; Mei Wei; Yan Zhao; Qing Fang; Qian Xu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the early diagnostic methods of bacterial and fungal infection in patients with chronic cholestatic hepatitis B.METHODS: One hundred and one adult in-patients with chronic hepatitis B were studied and divided into 3 groups:direct bilirubin (DBil)/total bilirubin (TBil)≥0.5, without bacterial and fungal infection (group A, n=38); DBil/TBil <0.5, without bacterial and fungal infection (group B, n=23);DBil/TBil≥0.5, with bacterial or fungal infection (group C,n=40). The serum biochemical index and pulse rate were analyzed.RESULTS: Level of TBil, DBil, alkaline phosphatase (ALP)and DBil/ALP in group A increased compared with that in group B. The level of ALP in group C decreased compared with that in group A, whereas the level of TBil, DBil and DBil/ALP increased (ALP: 156±43, 199±68, respectively,P<0.05; TBil: 370±227, 220±206, respectively, P<0.01;DBil: 214±143, 146±136, respectively, P<0.01; DBil/ALP:1.65±1.05, 0.78±0.70, respectively, P<0.001). The level of DBil and infection affected DBil/ALP. Independent of the effect of DBil, infection caused DBil/ALP to rise (P<0.05).The pulse rate in group A decreased compared with that in group B (63.7±6.4, 77.7±11.4, respectively, P<0.001),and the pulse rate in group C increased compared with that in group A (81.2±12.2, 63.7±6.4, respectively, P<0.001).The equation (infection=0.218 pusle rate +1.064 DBil/ALP -16.361), with total accuracy of 85.5%, was obtained from stepwise logistic regression. Pulse rate (≥80/min) and DBil/ALP (≥1.0) were used to screen infection. The sensitivity was 62.5% and 64.7% respectively, and the specificity was 100% and 82.8% respectively.CONCLUSION: Bacterial and fungal infection deteriorate jaundice and increase pulse rate, decrease serum ALP and increase DBil/ALP. Pulse rate, DBil/ALP and the equation (infection=0.218 pusle rate+1.064 DBil/ALP-16.361) are helpful to early diagnosis of bacterial and fungal infection in patients with chronic

  7. Increased interleukin-18 in the gingival tissues evokes chronic periodontitis after bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaka, Kotaro; Shoji, Noriaki; Nishioka, Takashi; Sugawara, Yumiko; Hoshino, Tomoaki; Sugawara, Shunji; Sasano, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that results in the breakdown of the tooth-supporting tissues, and can ultimately lead to resorption of the alveolar bone. Recently, several studies have shown a close relationship between increased interleukin-18 (IL-18) levels and the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis, a major cause of tooth loss. However, it has yet to be shown whether chronic periodontitis results from or causes an increase in IL-18 after bacterial infection. In the present study, we investigated how IL-18 overexpression relates to periodontal disease using IL-18 transgenic (Tg) mice. IL-18Tg and wild-type mice were inoculated intraorally with Porphyromonas (P.) gingivalis, which has been implicated in the etiology of chronic periodontitis. Seventy days after P. gingivalis infection, alveolar bone loss and gingival cytokine levels were assessed using histo-morphological analysis and enzyme-linked immuno-absorbent assay, respectively. Periodontal bone loss was evoked in IL-18Tg mice, but not in wild-type mice. Interestingly, levels of bone-resorptive cytokines, including IL-1α, IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-6, were unchanged in the gingival tissues of IL-18Tg mice infected with P. gingivalis, although levels of interferon γ (a proinflammatory T-helper 1 cytokine) decreased. RT-PCR analysis showed elevated expression of mRNAs for receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (a key stimulator of osteoclast development and activation) and CD40 ligand (a marker of T cell activation) in the gingiva of IL-18Tg mice infected with P. gingivalis. We conclude that increased IL-18 in the gingival tissues evokes chronic periodontitis after bacterial infection, presumably via a T cell-mediated pathway.

  8. Serum sialic acid in malignant tumors, bacterial infections, and chronic liver diseases.

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    Stefenelli, N; Klotz, H; Engel, A; Bauer, P

    1985-01-01

    The total serum sialic acid concentration was determined in 2,264 persons with various malignant tumors, bacterial infections, rheumatic diseases, and chronic liver diseases, and in a control group. The thiobarbiturate method according to Warren was used. The upper limit (95% percentile) in the control group was 2.23 mumol/ml. Higher values were found in the groups with neoplasms (mean: 3.04 mumol/ml), inflammatory diseases (e.g., pneumonia: 3.02 mumol/ml), and active rheumatoid arthritis (3.05 mumol/ml). In the group with malignant diseases, the sialic acid concentration at the time of diagnosis was highest for bronchial carcinoma (3.29 mumol/ml) and lowest for breast cancer (2.58 mumol/ml). In chronic liver diseases the mean sialic acid level was lower than in a heterogeneous group of noninflammatory and nonneoplastic diseases. The estimation of the serum sialic acid concentration could be useful in the detection of tumor burden and metastases, and in the evaluation of the later course and prognosis of malignant neoplasms if bacterial/inflammatory and active rheumatoid processes can be excluded.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Shifts in Bacterial Biogeography and Gland Occupation during the Development of a Chronic Infection

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    Zavros, Yana; Shepherd, Benjamin; Salama, Nina R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gland colonization may be one crucial route for bacteria to maintain chronic gastrointestinal infection. We developed a quantitative gland isolation method to allow robust bacterial population analysis and applied it to the gastric pathobiont Helicobacter pylori. After infections in the murine model system, H. pylori populations multiply both inside and outside glands in a manner that requires the bacteria to be motile and chemotactic. H. pylori is able to achieve gland densities averaging 25 to 40 bacteria/gland after 2 to 4 weeks of infection. After 2 to 4 weeks of infection, a primary infection leads to colonization resistance for a secondary infection. Nonetheless, about ~50% of the glands remained unoccupied, suggesting there are as-yet unappreciated parameters that prevent gastric gland colonization. During chronic infections, H. pylori populations collapsed to nearly exclusive gland localization, to an average of <8 bacteria/gland, and only 10% of glands occupied. We analyzed an H. pylori chemotaxis mutant (Che−) to gain mechanistic insight into gland colonization. Che− strains had a severe inability to spread to new glands and did not protect from a secondary infection but nonetheless achieved a chronic gland colonization state numerically similar to that of the wild type. Overall, our analysis shows that bacteria undergo substantial population dynamics on the route to chronic colonization, that bacterial gland populations are maintained at a low level during chronic infection, and that established gland populations inhibit subsequent colonization. Understanding the parameters that promote chronic colonization will allow the future successful design of beneficial microbial therapeutics that are able to maintain long-term mammalian colonization. PMID:27729513

  10. Ear infection - chronic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle ear infection - chronic; Otitis media - chronic; Chronic otitis media; Chronic ear infection ... up. When this happens, infection can occur. A chronic ear infection develops when fluid or an infection ...

  11. Bacterial Infections

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    ... body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  12. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  13. Polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic foot ulcer biofilm infections determined using bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP.

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    Scot E Dowd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetic extremity ulcers are associated with chronic infections. Such ulcer infections are too often followed by amputation because there is little or no understanding of the ecology of such infections or how to control or eliminate this type of chronic infection. A primary impediment to the healing of chronic wounds is biofilm phenotype infections. Diabetic foot ulcers are the most common, disabling, and costly complications of diabetes. Here we seek to derive a better understanding of the polymicrobial nature of chronic diabetic extremity ulcer infections. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a new bacterial tag encoded FLX amplicon pyrosequencing (bTEFAP approach we have evaluated the bacterial diversity of 40 chronic diabetic foot ulcers from different patients. The most prevalent bacterial genus associated with diabetic chronic wounds was Corynebacterium spp. Findings also show that obligate anaerobes including Bacteroides, Peptoniphilus, Fingoldia, Anaerococcus, and Peptostreptococcus spp. are ubiquitous in diabetic ulcers, comprising a significant portion of the wound biofilm communities. Other major components of the bacterial communities included commonly cultured genera such as Streptococcus, Serratia, Staphylococcus and Enterococcus spp. CONCLUSIONS: In this article, we highlight the patterns of population diversity observed in the samples and introduce preliminary evidence to support the concept of functional equivalent pathogroups (FEP. Here we introduce FEP as consortia of genotypically distinct bacteria that symbiotically produce a pathogenic community. According to this hypothesis, individual members of these communities when they occur alone may not cause disease but when they coaggregate or consort together into a FEP the synergistic effect provides the functional equivalence of well-known pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, giving the biofilm community the factors necessary to maintain chronic biofilm infections

  14. Prostatic inflammation induces fibrosis in a mouse model of chronic bacterial infection.

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    Letitia Wong

    Full Text Available Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show-for the first time-that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process.

  15. Enhancement of Urinary Bladder Carcinogenesis by the Role of Chronic Bacterial Infection-induced Inflammation (Imunnohistochemical and Biochemical studies

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    Gabri MS*, Ashmawy AM**, Ibrahim MA*, Hosny RM

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bacterial infections traditionally have not been considered major causes of cancer. Recently, however, bacteria have been linked to cancer by two mechanisms: induction of chronic inflammation and production of carcinogenic bacterial metabolites. The most specific example of the inflammatory mechanism of carcinogenesis is Escherichia coli infection. E. coli has been epidemiologically linked to urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder by its propensity to cause lifelong inflammation. This inflammation is in turn thought to cause cancer by inducing cell proliferation and production of mutagenic free radicals and N-nitroso compounds.Material and methods: After each 3, 6 and 9 months of daily oral administration of dibutyl amine (DBA plus sodium nitrate (nitrosamine precursors in drinking water, curcuma in grinding diet and bladder injection with E. coli, rats were sacrificed. The excited bladder were dissected, processed and stained with H&E and anti-Ki67 immunohistochemical stains. This was followed by Elisa for caspse-3 and statistical analysis.Results: The current results indicated that E. coli infection in the bladder tissues increases the carcinogenic ability of nitrosamine precursors through caused marked alteration in the form hyperplastic, dysplastic and metaplastic urothelium. Also, there was a statistically significant increase in ki67 immunoreactivity in urothelium. However, a statistically significant decrease in the concentration of caspase-3 in bladder tissue consequently caused the process of carcinogenesis. All these changes were less marked after curcuma treatment when compared with the group that not treated with curcuma. Conclusion: Bacterial infection of the urinary bladder may play a major additive and possible role in bladder carcinogenesis. Rhizome of curcuma may have a protective action during induction of urinary bladder tumors.

  16. [Combination therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khryanin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the possible etiological factors in the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The authors presented a comparative long-term analysis of morbidity from non-viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Russia. Against the background of general decline in STIs incidence, a significant percentage of them is made up by urogenital trichomoniasis. The findings substantiated the advantages of combination therapy (ornidazole and ofloxacin) for bacterial urinary tract infections.

  17. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mak, Tim N; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate...... filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge...... about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria...

  18. Pharmacological inhibition of quorum sensing for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that aim to kill or inhibit bacterial growth. A major concern with this approach is the frequently observed development of resistance to antimicrobial compounds. The discovery of bacterial-communication systems (quorum-sensing...... mechanisms and potential antipathogenic drugs that specifically target quorum-sensing systems in a manner unlikely to pose a selective pressure for the development of resistant mutants....

  19. [Parodontitis immunotropic therapy in patients with chronic viral and bacterial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soboleva, L A; Siakin, R R; Blinnikova, E N; Shul'diakov, A A; Pichugina, L M

    2010-01-01

    80 patients with chronic hepatitis and brucellosis were examined in order to determine the efficacy of cycloferon liniment in parodontitis treatment. It was established that the use of local cycloferon form in comprehensive treatment of parodontitis helped to speed up recovery process and to reduce the frequency of disease relapses. Normalization of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant defense processes indices with reduction of infectious loading of parodontal pockets fluid and normalization of local cytokines' status was noted.

  20. Bacterial sinusitis can be a focus for initial lung colonisation and chronic lung infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Kasper

    2013-01-01

    A major purpose of treating patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is to prevent or delay chronic lung infections with CF-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. In the intermittent stage, bacteria can usually be eradicated from the lungs with antibiotics, but following eradication, the next lung colonisa...... therapy, e.g. saline and antibiotic irrigations....

  1. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

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    WONDIM MELKAM

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids (GCs, synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bacterial infection. This review, therefore, summarizes various bacterial infections for which glucocorticoids are reported to be used as adjuvant therapy, strategies for administration of glucocorticoids, and challenges of using glucocorticoids as adjuvant therapy.

  2. Epigenetics and bacterial infections.

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    Bierne, Hélène; Hamon, Mélanie; Cossart, Pascale

    2012-12-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms regulate expression of the genome to generate various cell types during development or orchestrate cellular responses to external stimuli. Recent studies highlight that bacteria can affect the chromatin structure and transcriptional program of host cells by influencing diverse epigenetic factors (i.e., histone modifications, DNA methylation, chromatin-associated complexes, noncoding RNAs, and RNA splicing factors). In this article, we first review the molecular bases of the epigenetic language and then describe the current state of research regarding how bacteria can alter epigenetic marks and machineries. Bacterial-induced epigenetic deregulations may affect host cell function either to promote host defense or to allow pathogen persistence. Thus, pathogenic bacteria can be considered as potential epimutagens able to reshape the epigenome. Their effects might generate specific, long-lasting imprints on host cells, leading to a memory of infection that influences immunity and might be at the origin of unexplained diseases.

  3. Chronic diarrhea among adults in Kigali, Rwanda: association with bacterial enteropathogens, rectocolonic inflammation, and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Clerinx, J; Bogaerts, J; Taelman, H; Habyarimana, J B; Nyirabareja, A; Ngendahayo, P; Van de Perre, P

    1995-11-01

    One hundred patients with chronic diarrhea were seen in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Centre Hospitalier de Kigali, Rwanda; stool and/or rectal swab culture was performed for these patients, and they underwent rectoscopy and serological testing for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Enteropathogenic bacteria were isolated from 39 (39%) of the patients: Shigella species (22 of 100 patients tested), non-typhi Salmonella (11/100), Aeromonas species (5/60), and Campylobacter species (4/60). Rectocolitis was seen in 70 (70%) of the patients. HIV-1 antibodies were detected in 82 (94%) of 87 patients tested. Cytomegalovirus was not found in rectal biopsy specimens from 29 patients. Entamoeba histolytica was detected in two of 31 rectal smears. Idiopathic ulcerative colitis was diagnosed for two HIV-1-seropositive patients. One or more AIDS-defining diseases were found in 32 (32%) of the patients, and 72 (72%) fulfilled the World Health Organization's clinical case definition criteria for AIDS. Chronic diarrhea, as seen in a hospital setting in a region highly endemic for HIV-1 infection, is strongly associated with HIV-1 infection, with rectocolonic inflammation, and with infection due to enteropathogenic bacteria.

  4. Bacterial Nasal Infections

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    ... vestibule. Nasal furuncles may develop into a spreading infection under the skin (cellulitis) at the tip of the nose. A doctor becomes concerned about infections in this part of the face because veins ...

  5. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

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    Eligio Pizzigallo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”. Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis. The etiopathogenetic role of EBV is demonstrated only in a well-examined subgroup of patients, while in most of the remaining cases this role should be played by other infectious agents - able to remain in a latent or persistent way in the host – or even by not infectious agents (toxic, neuroendocrine, methabolic, etc.. However, the pathogenetic substrate of the different etiologic forms seems to be the same, much probably represented by the oxidative damage due to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines as a response to the triggering event (infectious or not infectious. Anyway, recently the scientists turned their’s attention to the genetic predisposition of the subjects affected by the syndrome, so that in the last years the genetic studies, together with those of molecular biology, received a great impulse

  6. Bacterial Skin Infections

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    ... Japanese Espaniol Find information on medical topics, symptoms, drugs, procedures, news and more, written in everyday language. * This is ... officials say 13 cases of a potentially deadly, drug-resistant fungal infection... More News Tweets by Merck and the Merck Manuals Merck & ...

  7. EBV CHRONIC INFECTIONS

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    Delia Racciatti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The infection from Epstein-Barr virus (EBV or virus of infectious mononucleosis, together with other herpesviruses’ infections, represents a prototype of persistent viral infections characterized by the property of the latency. Although the reactivations of the latent infection are associated with the resumption of the viral replication and eventually with the “shedding”, it is still not clear if this virus can determine chronic infectious diseases, more or less evolutive. These diseases could include some pathological conditions actually defined as “idiopathic”and characterized by the “viral persistence” as the more credible pathogenetic factor. Among the so-called idiopathic syndromes, the “chronic fatigue syndrome” (CFS aroused a great interest around the eighties of the last century when, just for its relationship with EBV, it was called “chronic mononucleosis” or “chronic EBV infection”.

    Today CFS, as defined in 1994 by the CDC of Atlanta (USA, really represents a multifactorial syndrome characterized by a chronic course, where reactivation and remission phases alternate, and by a good prognosis

  8. Chronic hyperosmotic stress inhibits renal Toll-Like Receptors expression in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage) exposed or not to bacterial infection.

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    Schmitz, Mélodie; Baekelandt, Sébastien; Bequet, Sandrine; Kestemont, Patrick

    2017-03-24

    Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) are the first innate receptors in recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns. In fish, upregulation of toll-like receptors during infection has been largely demonstrated while the effects of abiotic stressors on their expression remain poorly investigated. In this study, striped catfish were submitted during 20 days to three salinity profiles (freshwater, low saline water, saline water), followed by injection of a bacterial strain of Edwardsiella ictaluri. The expression of TLRs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 19, 21, and 22 was measured in kidney at different time points in non infected and infected striped catfish. Infection induced overexpression of TLRs 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 21 and 22. With elevated salinity, the expression of all TLRs, except TLR5, was severely decreased, particularly after bacterial infection. The TLRs responsiveness of striped catfish facing bacterial disease and salinity stress and possible consequences on striped catfish immune response's efficiency are discussed.

  9. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: A critical review andpractical guidance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infection is common and accounts for majormorbidity and mortality in cirrhosis. Patients withcirrhosis are immunocompromised and increased susceptibilityto develop spontaneous bacterial infections,hospital-acquired infections, and a variety of infectionsfrom uncommon pathogens. Once infection develops,the excessive response of pro-inflammatory cytokineson a pre-existing hemodynamic dysfunction in cirrhosisfurther predispose the development of serious complicationssuch as shock, acute-on-chronic liver failure, renalfailure, and death. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitisand bacteremia are common in patients with advancedcirrhosis, and are important prognostic landmarks inthe natural history of cirrhosis. Notably, the incidenceof infections from resistant bacteria has increasedsignificantly in healthcare-associated settings. Serumbiomarkers such as procalcitonin may help to improvethe diagnosis of bacterial infection. Preventive measures(e.g. , avoidance, antibiotic prophylaxis, and vaccination),early recognition, and proper management are requiredin order to minimize morbidity and mortality of infectionsin cirrhosis.

  10. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial profile of chronic venous leg ulcers and the importance of the profile to ulcer development. Patients with persisting venous leg ulcers were included and followed for 8 weeks. Every second week, ulcer samples were collected and the bacterial s...

  11. [Urinary tract infections and chronic renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotová, D

    2011-01-01

    The paper briefly summarizes issues related to urinary tract infections in adults: predispositions and risk factors, classification, assessment of pathogenicity of bacterial agents, the role of bacteriuria and leucocyturia, interpretation of findings, treatment principles and an association with chronic renal failure. Urinary tract infections are the second most frequent infectious disease in the population. They most often affect women of childbearing potential and then seniors of both sexes who have multiple risk factors. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus saprophyticus are the most pathogenic towards urinary tract; they are responsible for 85% and 10-15% of cases of acute uncomplicated urinary infections, respectively. Chronic pyelonephritis, a chronic interstitial nephritis, is the fourth most frequent cause of chronic renal failure. Chronic renal failure is a risk factor for the development of urinary infections due to metabolic disorders resulting in secondary immunodeficiencywith a disorder of all components of immunity. In patients with chronic renal failure, urinary tract infections occur most frequently after kidney transplantation when graft pyelonephritis is a life-threatening complication. Therefore, urinary tract infection prevention with co-trimoxazole once daily over at least 6 months is recommended in renal allograft recipients.

  12. Common bacterial urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J E

    1976-09-01

    Unfortunately, there is no general consensus as to how long patients with bacteriuria or urinary tract infections should be monitored and certainly there is no agreement on how long recurrent episodes should be treated beyond ten days to two weeks. The most important points to remember are: 1. Culture the urine both at the time of therapy and during follow-up. The patient should be examined periodically for the presence of bacteruria. If bacteria cannot be eradicated, at least the physician is aware of the organism most likely causing the patient's symptoms. 2. Do not subject the patient with frequent recurrent (chronic) and complicated infections to continual antibacterial therapy, but rather, manage the acute episodes. 3. Use prophylaxis, particularly single bed-time doses for dysuria and frequency symptoms. 4. Screen for bacteriuria during pregnancy. 5. Avoid the use of catheters except where absolutely necessary. 6. Avoid systemic prophylaxis of infection in patients with catheters; rather, use closed-system drainage with antibacteri-irrigation. It is to be hoped within the next few years, studies now underway will allow specific recommendations regarding the management of asymptomatic bacteruria, the duration of therapy for recurrent infections, the prevention and treatment of L-form bacterial infections, and indications for urologic procedures.

  13. Chronic Infection and Venous Thromboembolic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epaulard, Olivier; Foote, Alison; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease often arises as a complication of another pathological condition and/or triggering event. Infectious diseases result from both the direct action of the pathogens themselves and their effect on the immune system. The resulting inflammatory process and the coagulation and fibrinolysis processes share common pathways, explaining why infection is associated with thrombosis. In this brief overview, besides certain chronic infectious diseases, we also consider some acute infections, as the mechanisms are likely to be similar, particularly in the initial infective stage or the more acute episodes of a chronic infection. The infectious agent can be viral, bacterial, fungal, or parasitic. However, the literature on the link between infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is uneven, favoring infections that are found in more developed countries where physicians have access to VTE diagnostic tools. Thus, large epidemiological studies in this field are restricted to a limited number of the common chronic infectious diseases such as tuberculosis, while for other infections, particularly parasitic and fungal infections, the link with VTE is only evoked in a few scattered case reports.

  14. Tobacco use increases susceptibility to bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demuth Donald R

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Active smokers and those exposed to secondhand smoke are at increased risk of bacterial infection. Tobacco smoke exposure increases susceptibility to respiratory tract infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and Legionnaires disease; bacterial vaginosis and sexually transmitted diseases, such as chlamydia and gonorrhoea; Helicobacter pylori infection; periodontitis; meningitis; otitis media; and post-surgical and nosocomial infections. Tobacco smoke compromises the anti-bacterial function of leukocytes, including neutrophils, monocytes, T cells and B cells, providing a mechanistic explanation for increased infection risk. Further epidemiological, clinical and mechanistic research into this important area is warranted.

  15. Chronic Ocular Hypertension after Treated Multifocal Bacterial Keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodoros Athanassios Papadopoulos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To report an unusual case of multifocal bacterial keratitis that despite success-ful treatment caused chronic ocular hypertension. Methods: A 67-year-old woman with unilateral multifocal keratitis and no previous ocular pathology was admitted to our hospital. Corneal scrapings and conjunctival samples were obtained for culture and the patient received intensive therapy with fortified vancomycin and tobramycin eye drops. Results: The cultures demonstrated two strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis, one resistant to ciprofloxacin and both sensitive to vancomycin. Treatment was effective and gradually discontinued after total cessation of the inflammatory activity. During the follow-up period, the patient developed late and persistent ocular hypertension of unknown etiology, in absence of any detectable inflammation or complication, and received permanent antiglaucoma therapy. Conclusion: Differential diagnosis between fungal and bacterial infection is critical in cases of multifocal keratitis. Patients with multifocal bacterial keratitis may need intraocular pressure monitoring, even after complete infection healing.

  16. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia as well...

  17. Mesenteric ossification in CT indicates sclerosing peritonitis in chronic bacterial infection and pancreatitis; Mesenteriale Verknoecherungen als computertomographische Zeichen einer sklerosierenden Peritonitis bei chronischer Bauchfellentzuendung und Pankreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchner, J.; Kirchner, E.M. [Abt. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Klinikum Niederberg Velbert (Germany); Kickuth, R. [Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Katholisches Marienhospital Herne, Universitaetsklinik der Ruhr Univ. Bochum (Germany); Stein, A. [Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Onkologie, Universitaetsklinikum Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Sclerosing peritonitis already has been described as a serious complication of the continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. But different other affections of the pertioneum such as chronic bacterial peritonitis and pancreatitis may result in sclerosing peritonitis, too. The symptom is characterised by thickened small bowel walls and periotoneal membranes as well as peritoneal calcifications which can be shown in computed tomography. We demonstrate two cases of peritoneal ossifications due to peritonitis and pancreatitis. (orig.) [German] Die sklerosierende Peritonitis wurde wiederholt als ernste Komplikation der Bauchfelldialyse beschrieben. Aber auch verschiedene andere Reizzustaende wie chronische bakterielle Peritonitis und Pankreatitis koennen eine sklerosierende Peritonitis nach sich ziehen. Hierbei zeigen sich neben einer Verdickung des Peritoneums und der Waende des Duenndarms auch computertomographisch nachweisbare Kalkeinlagerungen. Wir stellen zwei Patienten mit chronischer Peritonitis nach Sigmaperforation und Pankreatitis mit Verknoecherungen des Peritoneums vor. (orig.)

  18. In Vivo Evaluation of Bacterial Infection Involving Morphologically Different Surgical Meshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsman, Anton F.; van Dam, Gooitzen M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Busscher, Henk J.; Ploeg, Rutger J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of morphology of surgical meshes on the course of bacterial infection under the influence of the host immune system in an in vivo chronic bacterial infection model. Background: The use of prosthetic meshes has increased dramatically the last decades in abdominal wal

  19. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Zaccherini

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections represent a frequent complication of liver cirrhosis carrying a significantly greater risk of morbidity and mortality as compared to that observed in non-cirrhotic patients. Such unfavourable prognosis is related to the systemic complications (liver and renal failure, shock, coagulopathy, multiple organ failure induced by a series of pro-inflammatory and immunological systems which are activated by bacteria and their pathogenetic products.The epidemiology of bacterial infections in cirrhosis has changed in the last years with a marked increase of Gram+ infections and the emergence of multi-resistant bacteria.The severity of liver disease represents the major clinical factor predisposing to bacterial infections, which are asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic at presentation in almost half of the cases. Aim of this review is to summarise the clinical and therapeutic aspects of bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients. The most common sites of infection are the urinary tract, ascites, blood, lungs and soft tissues.Beside antibiotics, it has been proposed the administration of human albumin to prevent the development of renal failure in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and, more recently, the use of hydrocortisone to treat cirrhotic patients with septic shock.

  20. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  1. Immunodiagnostic Techniques for Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    capsulatuni Serum Actinomvcesr israeli Serum Aspergillus fumiqatus Serum Protozoan: Trvnanosoma cruzi Serum Entameaba histolvtica Serum Trichinella sviralis...serological study of human Trypanosoma rhodesiense infections using a microscale enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tropenmed. Parasitol. 26:247-251, 1975

  2. Citrobacter rodentium mouse model of bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepin, Valerie F; Collins, James W; Habibzay, Maryam; Frankel, Gad

    2016-10-01

    Infection of mice with Citrobacter rodentium is a robust model to study bacterial pathogenesis, mucosal immunology, the health benefits of probiotics and the role of the microbiota during infection. C. rodentium was first isolated by Barthold from an outbreak of mouse diarrhea in Yale University in 1972 and was 'rediscovered' by Falkow and Schauer in 1993. Since then the use of the model has proliferated, and it is now the gold standard for studying virulence of the closely related human pathogens enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively). Here we provide a detailed protocol for various applications of the model, including bacterial growth, site-directed mutagenesis, mouse inoculation (from cultured cells and after cohabitation), monitoring of bacterial colonization, tissue extraction and analysis, immune responses, probiotic treatment and microbiota analysis. The main protocol, from mouse infection to clearance and analysis of tissues and host responses, takes ∼5 weeks to complete.

  3. Mucin dynamics in intestinal bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara K Lindén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial gastroenteritis causes morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Murine Citrobacter rodentium infection is a model for gastroenteritis caused by the human pathogens enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterohaemorrhagic E. coli. Mucin glycoproteins are the main component of the first barrier that bacteria encounter in the intestinal tract. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Immunohistochemistry, we investigated intestinal expression of mucins (Alcian blue/PAS, Muc1, Muc2, Muc4, Muc5AC, Muc13 and Muc3/17 in healthy and C. rodentium infected mice. The majority of the C. rodentium infected mice developed systemic infection and colitis in the mid and distal colon by day 12. C. rodentium bound to the major secreted mucin, Muc2, in vitro, and high numbers of bacteria were found in secreted MUC2 in infected animals in vivo, indicating that mucins may limit bacterial access to the epithelial surface. In the small intestine, caecum and proximal colon, the mucin expression was similar in infected and non-infected animals. In the distal colonic epithelium, all secreted and cell surface mucins decreased with the exception of the Muc1 cell surface mucin which increased after infection (p<0.05. Similarly, during human infection Salmonella St Paul, Campylobacter jejuni and Clostridium difficile induced MUC1 in the colon. CONCLUSION: Major changes in both the cell-surface and secreted mucins occur in response to intestinal infection.

  4. Detection of bacterial biofilms in different types of chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xingzhi; Keyoumu, Youlidusi; Long, Li; Zhang, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities that may be homogeneous or heterogeneous. They play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic nasal sinusitis, chronic tonsillitis, cholesteatomas, and device-related infections. Despite this, few studies have been done that examine the presence of bacterial biofilms in tissues from patients with different types of COM or middle ear cholesteatomas. In the current study, we examined the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from humans with chronic ear infections using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We hypothesize that bacterial biofilms present differently in patients with different types of chronic otitis media. Our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media. A prospective study was conducted in which middle ear tissues were obtained from 38 patients who underwent tympanoplasty and/or tympanomastoid surgery due to chronic ear infections. A total of 50 middle and mastoid tissue samples were processed for SEM analysis. In addition, 38 middle ear secretion specimens were obtained for routine bacterial culture analysis. Bacterial biofilms were present in 85 % (11 of 13) of patients with middle ear cholesteatoma, 92 % (12/13) of patients with chronic otitis suppurative media (CSOM), and 16 % of patients (2/12) with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). Fungal biofilms were found in two cases of cholesteatoma. The positive coincidence rate between bacterial biofilms visualized by SEM and bacteria detected by culture was 82 %. Our findings suggest that bacterial biofilms are very common in CSOM and middle ear cholesteatomas. Positive bacterial cultures imply the presence of biofilm formation in CSOM and cholesteatomas. As such, our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media.

  5. Periodontal diseases as bacterial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bascones Martínez

    Full Text Available The periodontal disease is conformed by a group of illnesses affecting the gums and dental support structures. They are caused by certain bacteria found in the bacterial plaque. These bacteria are essential to the onset of illness; however, there are predisposing factors in both the host and the microorganisms that will have an effect on the pathogenesis of the illness. Periodontopathogenic bacterial microbiota is needed, but by itself, it is not enough to cause the illness, requiring the presence of a susceptible host. These diseases have been classified as gingivitis, when limited to the gums, and periodontitis, when they spread to deeper tissues. Classification of periodontal disease has varied over the years.The one used in this work was approved at the International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, held in 1999. This study is an overview of the different periodontal disease syndromes. Later, the systematic use of antibiotic treatment consisting of amoxicillin, amoxicillinclavulanic acid, and metronidazole as first line coadjuvant treatment of these illnesses will be reviewed.

  6. Bacterial foodborne infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Nicole M; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A

    2014-11-01

    Diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence after transplantation within a single-center population of HCT recipients. All HCT recipients who underwent transplantation from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington were followed for 1 year after transplantation. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplantation, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species, or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within 1 year after transplantation. Nonfoodborne infections with these agents and patients with pre-existing bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplantation) were excluded from analyses. A total of 12 of 4069 (.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within 1 year after transplantation. Patients with infections had a median age at transplantation of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR], 35 to 57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9 of 12 [75%]), male gender (8 of 12 [67%]) and had allogeneic transplantation (8 of 12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval, .5 to 1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplantation (IQR, 26 to 58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was C. jejuni/coli (5 of 12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3 of 12 [25%]), although Salmonella (2 of 12 [17%]) and Listeria (2 of 12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella

  7. 77 FR 59929 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis in Patients With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... treatment of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis in patients with chronic obstructive... Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis-- Developing Antimicrobial Drugs for Treatment'' published in... Chronic Bronchitis in Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Developing Antimicrobial...

  8. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance.

  9. PPARγ in Bacterial Infections: A Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is now recognized as an important modulator of leukocyte inflammatory responses and function. Its immunoregulatory function has been studied in a variety of contexts, including bacterial infections of the lungs and central nervous system, sepsis, and conditions such as chronic granulomatous disease. Although it is generally believed that PPARγ activation is beneficial for the host during bacterial infections via its anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, PPARγ agonists have also been shown to dampen the host immune response and in some cases exacerbate infection by promoting leukocyte apoptosis and interfering with leukocyte migration and infiltration. In this review we discuss the role of PPARγ and its activation during bacterial infections, with focus on the potential of PPARγ agonists and perhaps antagonists as novel therapeutic modalities. We conclude that adjustment in the dosage and timing of PPARγ agonist administration, based on the competence of host antimicrobial defenses and the extent of inflammatory response and tissue injury, is critical for achieving the essential balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory effects on the immune system.

  10. Bacterial Genotoxins: Merging the DNA Damage Response into Infection Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Grasso

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial genotoxins are unique among bacterial toxins as their molecular target is DNA. The consequence of intoxication or infection is induction of DNA breaks that, if not properly repaired, results in irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence or death of the target cells. At present, only three bacterial genotoxins have been identified. Two are protein toxins: the cytolethal distending toxin (CDT family produced by a number of Gram-negative bacteria and the typhoid toxin produced by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The third member, colibactin, is a peptide-polyketide genotoxin, produced by strains belonging to the phylogenetic group B2 of Escherichia coli. This review will present the cellular effects of acute and chronic intoxication or infection with the genotoxins-producing bacteria. The carcinogenic properties and the role of these effectors in the context of the host-microbe interaction will be discussed. We will further highlight the open questions that remain to be solved regarding the biology of this unusual family of bacterial toxins.

  11. Treatment of recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by local injection of thiamphenicol into prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.A.; Baert, L.; Maes, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients were treated for recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by an injection of 2 Gm. thiamphenicol glycinate via the perineal route directly into the prostate. Escherichia coli was identified as the pathogen responsible for this infection in 83 per cent of the cases. Using this med

  12. Glucocorticosteroids: as Adjuvant Therapy for Bacterial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs), synthetic analogues of the natural steroid hormones, are well known for their antiinflammatory and immunosuppressive properties in the periphery. They are widely and successfully used in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, chronic inflammation, and transplant rejection. Nowadays, GCs are claimed to have a beneficial role being as adjunct therapy in various infections. Different studies have been conducted to investigate their use as adjuvant therapy for different bact...

  13. Pro-Con Debate: Protracted Bacterial Bronchitis as a Cause of Chronic Cough in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidiwala, Aneela; Krilov, Leonard R; Pirzada, Melodi; Patel, Sameer J

    2015-08-01

    Pro: Children with chronic cough present a diagnostic challenge. Protracted bacterial bronchitis (PBB) is a chronic, persistent bacterial infection of conducting airways defined by the presence of cough for longer than 4 weeks that resolves with antimicrobial therapy and without an alternative diagnosis. The diagnosis is made by the findings of increased bronchial secretions and edema of the lower airways on flexible bronchoscopy and positive cultures on bronchoalveolar lavage. It is speculated that an initial respiratory insult such as viral infection disrupts normal surface morphology and ciliary function, which leads to chronic self-perpetuating inflammation with the formation of bacterial biofilms, leading to PBB. PBB is often misdiagnosed as asthma, leading to inappropriate and excessive use of steroids. The importance of timely diagnosis should be emphasized due to the potential that PBB may be a precursor to chronic suppurative lung disease or bronchiectasis if left untreated; however, every patient should be adequately assessed to exclude other causes of chronic cough. Con: Clinical criteria for the diagnosis of PBB are nonspecific and may not distinguish it from other known causes of chronic cough, including viral infections. Benefits from antibiotic therapy (particularly prolonged therapy) have not been demonstrated. Respiratory conditions are the most common reason for antibiotic prescriptions during ambulatory visits in the United States, and many of these prescriptions are inappropriate and/or unnecessary. The proposed diagnostic criteria and recommendations for the treatment of PBB will lead to unnecessary overuse of antibiotics.

  14. Systematic Search for Primary Immunodeficiency in Adults With Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-23

    Complement Deficiency; Antibody Deficiency; Chronic Sinus Infection; Meningitis, Bacterial; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Otitis Media; Streptococcal Infection; Neisseria Infections; Haemophilus Influenza; Pneumococcal Infections

  15. Gut flora and bacterial translocation in chronic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Almeida; Sumedha Galhenage; Jennifer Yu; Jelica Kurtovic; Stephen M Riordan

    2006-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that derangement of gut flora is of substantial clinical relevance to patients with cirrhosis. Intestinal bacterial overgrowth and increased bacterial translocation of gut flora from the intestinal lumen, in particular, predispose to an increased potential for bacterial infection in this group. Recent studies suggest that, in addition to their role in the pathogenesis of overt infective episodes and the clinical consequences of sepsis, gut flora contributes to the pro-inflammatory state of cirrhosis even in the absence of overt infection.Furthermore, manipulation of gut flora to augment the intestinal content of lactic acid-type bacteria at the expense of other gut flora species with more pathogenic potential may favourably influence liver function in cirrhotic patients. Here we review current concepts of the various inter-relationships between gut flora, bacterial translocation, bacterial infection, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and liver function in this group.

  16. Long-Term Fosfomycin-Tromethamine Oral Therapy for Difficult-To-Treat Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigrau, Carles; Rodríguez-Pardo, Dolors; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Andreu, Antonia; Larrosa, Nieves; Almirante, Benito

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 15 difficult-to-treat (i.e., exhibiting previous failure, patient side effects, or resistance to ciprofloxacin and co-trimoxazole) chronic bacterial prostatitis infections (5 patients with multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae [MDRE]) receiving fosfomycin-tromethamine at a dose of 3 g per 48 to 72 h for 6 weeks. After a median follow-up of 20 months, 7 patients (47%) had a clinical response, and 8 patients (53%) had persistent microbiological eradication; 4/5 patients with MDRE isolates achieved eradication. There were no side effects. Fosfomycin-tromethamine is a possible alternative therapy for chronic bacterial prostatitis. PMID:26666924

  17. Targeted imaging of bacterial infections : advances, hurdles and hopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oosten, Marleen; Hahn, Markus; Crane, Lucia M. A.; Pleijhuis, Rick G.; Francis, Kevin P.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; van Dam, Gooitzen M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections represent an increasing problem in modern health care, in particular due to ageing populations and accumulating bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Diagnosis is rarely straightforward and consequently treatment is often delayed or indefinite. Therefore, novel tools that can be

  18. Biofilms in chronic infections - a matter of opportunity - monospecies biofilms in multispecies infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burmølle, Mette; Thomsen, Trine Rolighed; Fazli, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    to permanent tissue fillers and chronic wounds) both as to distribution (such as where in the wound bed) and organization (monospecies or multispecies microcolonies). We correlate these biofilm observations to observations of commensal biofilms (dental and intestine) and biofilms in natural ecosystems (soil......). The observations of the chronic biofilm infections point toward a trend of low bacterial diversity and sovereign monospecies biofilm aggregates even though the infection in which they reside are multispecies. In contrast to this, commensal and natural biofilm aggregates contain multiple species that are believed...

  19. Chronic hyperosmotic stress interferes with immune homeostasis in striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, S.) and leads to excessive inflammatory response during bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Mélodie; Douxfils, Jessica; Mandiki, Syaghalirwa N M; Morana, Cédric; Baekelandt, Sébastien; Kestemont, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Hyperosmotic stress has often been investigated from osmoregulation perspectives while the effects of such stress on the immune capacity remain largely unexplored. In this study, striped catfish were submitted to three salinity profiles (freshwater, low saline water, saline water) during 20 days, followed by infection with a virulent bacteria, Edwardsiella ictaluri, responsible for the enteric septicaemia of catfish. Osmoregulatory (plasma osmolality, gill Na(+)K(+)ATPase), immune (blood cells, lysozyme activity, complement activity, respiratory burst) parameters and mortality rate were investigated. In addition, abundances of heat shock protein 70 and high mobility group box 1 were explored. With elevated salinity, plasma osmolality severely increased while gill Na(+)K(+)ATPase slightly increased. Salinity alone stimulated the number of granulocytes, lysozyme activity and respiratory burst but depleted the number of thrombocytes. Salinity in combination with infection stimulated the number of monocytes and ACH50. On the contrary, erythrocytes, hematocrit, heat shock protein 70 and high mobility group box 1 did not significantly vary with salinity profiles. Then, salinity induced earlier onset on mortalities after E. ictaluri inoculation whereas cumulative mortality reach 79.2%, 67.0% and 91.7% respectively in freshwater, low saline water and saline water. In conclusion, salinity stimulates several immune functions in striped catfish but prolonged exposure to excessive hyperosmotic condition may lead to excessive inflammatory response and death.

  20. 581 Chronic Urticaria and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Nadia; Lugo-Reyes, Saul; Segura Mendez, Nora Hilda; Mendieta, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic Urticaria (CU) is a group of diseases that share a distinct skin reaction pattern. Triggering of urticaria by infections has been discussed for many years but the exact role and pathogenesis of mast cell activation by infectious processes is unclear. The remission of annoying spontaneous chronic urticaria has been reported after successful treatment of persistent infections. Objective To describe the infections found in chronic urticaria patients in our service, by performing a complete medical history, physical examination, laboratory studies and cultures. Methods Universe: Consecutive patients with chronic urticaria, with a detailed history, physical examination, laboratory studies underwent clinical viral panel, cultures, biopsy for detection of H. Pylori. Results A total of 50 patients, mostly women 82% and 18% men, mean age 41 years. 42% of the total population had salmonella, proteus infection in 20% and 8% brucellosis. Crossed with urinary tract infection 6% of the population. Five patients had positive stool in 3 patients Endolimax nana was isolated and 2 patients reported Giardia lamblia, 5 patients (10%) women had undergone cervicovaginitis 2 of them infected with S. haemolyticus, the rest was cultivated E. faecalis, and T. Gardenella vaginalis, respectively. Was isolated in 2 patients and one patient H.pilory HCV infection. Conclusions Infections may play a causal role of UC in some cases. Were identified in 42% of cases and gastrointestinal infections by most common cause Salmonellosis. As for genitourinary tract infections, intestinal parasites, Helicobacter pylori, were treated appropriately with antibiotic therapy, found a successful resolution of urticaria mainly in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. There is growing evidence that persistent infections in chronic urticaria are important triggers, particularly in the case of infection by Helicobacter pylori, so If an infection is identified, it should be appropriately

  1. Chronic helminth infection does not exacerbate Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc P Hübner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic helminth infections induce a Th2 immune shift and establish an immunoregulatory milieu. As both of these responses can suppress Th1 immunity, which is necessary for control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection, we hypothesized that chronic helminth infections may exacerbate the course of MTB. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-infection studies were conducted in cotton rats as they are the natural host for the filarial nematode Litomosoides sigmodontis and are an excellent model for human MTB. Immunogical responses, histological studies, and quantitative mycobacterial cultures were assessed two months after MTB challenge in cotton rats with and without chronic L. sigmodontis infection. Spleen cell proliferation and interferon gamma production in response to purified protein derivative were similar between co-infected and MTB-only infected animals. In contrast to our hypothesis, MTB loads and occurrence and size of lung granulomas were not increased in co-infected animals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that chronic filaria infections do not exacerbate MTB infection in the cotton rat model. While these results suggest that filaria eradication programs may not facilitate MTB control, they indicate that it may be possible to develop worm-derived therapies for autoimmune diseases that do not substantially increase the risk for infections.

  2. Helicobacter Infection and Chronic Liver Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the recentHelicobacter infection associated with chronic liver disease. The bacteriology, prevalence, pathogenesis and diagnosis were reviewed. Future work should be conducted on the pathogenesis and treatment of this disease.

  3. Multiple bacterial species reside in chronic wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjødsbøl, Kristine; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Karlsmark, Tonny;

    2006-01-01

    species present were identified. More than one bacterial species were detected in all the ulcers. The most common bacteria found were Staphylococcus aureus (found in 93.5% of the ulcers), Enterococcus faecalis (71.7%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (52.2%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (45.7%), Proteus...

  4. Bacterial infections of pulp and periodontal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Moles, Miguel Angel; González, Nabila M

    2004-01-01

    The anatomical and structural characteristics of the pulp make this structure prone to altering as a result of, for instance, periodontal conditions (proximity), iatrogenic alterations, infections and involvement of vascular and nerve structures (it is surrounded by hard tissues that prevent expansion), to name just a few. Pulpitis is a process that courses with pain of varying intensity that allows us to determine the location of the lesion in clinical terms. Its evolution varies and may even progress to pulpar necrosis that in turn, produces neuritis-like pain. Diagnosis is established by means of clinical symptomatology and supported by X-rays, palpation of tissues at painful sites, application of electrical stimuli, heat, etc. Periodontitis is a bacterial infection originating in the apex. The most important form is the so-called acute apical periodontitis that arises as a result of a prior episode of pulpitis. It is characterized by acute pain located in the tooth, accompanied by the feeling of having a long-tooth. The patient refers being unable to chew on that side; there may be painful mobility of the tooth and an outflow of pus that alleviates symptoms. X-rays do not provide a lot of information, but may attest to a widening of the apical space. This pathology may disseminate to surrounding tissues, leading to conditions of considerable severity.

  5. Prevention and Management of Bacterial Infections in Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K. Taneja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cirrhosis of liver are at risk of developing serious bacterial infections due to altered immune defenses. Despite the widespread use of broad spectrum antibiotics, bacterial infection is responsible for up to a quarter of the deaths of patients with liver disease. Cirrhotic patients with gastrointestinal bleed have a considerably higher incidence of bacterial infections particularly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. High index of suspicion is required to identify infections at an early stage in the absence of classical signs and symptoms. Energetic use of antibacterial treatment and supportive care has decreased the morbidity and mortality over the years; however, use of antibiotics has to be judicious, as their indiscriminate use can lead to antibiotic resistance with potentially disastrous consequences. Preventive strategies are still in evolution and involve use of antibiotic prophylaxis in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and spontaneous bacterial infections and selective decontamination of the gut and oropharynx.

  6. Spectrum of bacterial colonization associated with urothelial cells from patients with chronic lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasriya, Rajvinder; Sathiananthamoorthy, Sanchutha; Ismail, Salim; Kelsey, Michael; Wilson, Mike; Rohn, Jennifer L; Malone-Lee, James

    2013-07-01

    Chronic lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), such as urgency and incontinence, are common, especially among the elderly, but their etiology is often obscure. Recent studies of acute urinary tract infections implicated invasion by Escherichia coli into the cytoplasm of urothelial cells, with persistence of long-term bacterial reservoirs, but the role of infection in chronic LUTS is unknown. We conducted a large prospective study with eligible patients with LUTS and controls over a 3-year period, comparing routine urine cultures of planktonic bacteria with cultures of shed urothelial cells concentrated in centrifuged urinary sediments. This comparison revealed large numbers of bacteria undetected by routine cultures. Next, we typed the bacterial species cultured from patient and control sediments under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, and we found that the two groups had complex but significantly distinct profiles of bacteria associated with their shed bladder epithelial cells. Strikingly, E. coli, the organism most responsible for acute urinary tract infections, was not the only or even the main offending pathogen in this more-chronic condition. Antibiotic protection assays with shed patient cells and in vitro infection studies using patient-derived strains in cell culture suggested that LUTS-associated bacteria are within or extremely closely associated with shed epithelial cells, which explains how routine cultures might fail to detect them. These data have strong implications for the need to rethink our common diagnoses and treatments of chronic urinary tract symptoms.

  7. Analysis of antibiotic treatment on elderly patients with chronic renal insufficiency and bacterial infection%老年慢性肾功能不全合并细菌感染的抗生素治疗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈振汉; 滕玲

    2013-01-01

    目的 探索应用抗生素治疗慢性肾功能不全失代偿期合并下呼吸道感染的老年患者的临床效果和对其肾功能的影响.方法 选取某院自2008年5月~2011年10月治疗的60例肾功能不全合并肺部感染的老年患者纳入观察组,同期选取60肾功能正常的老年下呼吸道感染的患者纳入对照组.两组患者应用头孢哌酮进行治疗,观察两组患者的总体治疗效果差异以及观察组患者治疗前后的肾功能血肌酐、尿素氮、尿酸、肌酐清除率水平差异.结果 观察组和对照组患者平均治疗时间分别为(10.15±3.23)d和(7.32±2.18)d,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);两组患者的总体治疗效果差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),但痊愈率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组治疗前后患者的血肌酐、尿素氮、内生肌酐清除率水平与治疗前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 肾功能不全的老年患者一旦发生下呼吸道感染,应用抗生素治疗的难度增大,治疗过程中应密切留意患者的肾功能情况,并合理控制药物用量,一旦出现肾功能衰竭应立即停药,必要时进行血液透析.%OBJECTIVE To explore the clinical effect of antibiotic treatment on elderly patients with chronic renal insufficiency and bacterial infection,and its influence on the renal function.METHODS 60 elderly patients with chronic renal failure (the experimental group) and 60 elderly patients with normal renal function (the control group) were chosen,and all patients suffered from lower respiratory tract infection and were treated by Cefiazidime in our hospital from May 2008 to October 2011.The difference of clinical effect and renal function change before and after treatment were observed.RESULTS The average treatment time of experimental group and control group were (10.15 ± 3.23) d and (7.32 ± 2.18) d with a stastical difference (P < 0.05) ; There was no statistical difference in overall treatment

  8. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, L.; Haagensen, J.A.; Jelsbak, L.

    2008-01-01

    The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lu...

  9. Syndromes with chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Wojdasiewicz, Piotr; Rożek, Marcin; Słowińska, Iwona E; Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Słowiński, Radosław; Poniatowski, Łukasz A; Gasik, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) has been known for over of 40 years. It is an underrecognized entity due to the low number of described cases and poor propagation awareness of the problem. Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis is usually confused with infectious spondylodiscitis or malignant lesions, both primary and metastatic. Failing to consider CNO as one of possible lesions of the spine among an array of differential diagnoses may lead to a prolonged ineffective treatment increasing treatment-related morbidity. In this paper the authors describe these two syndromes, with a possible autoimmune background - chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO syndrome - that include CNO being among the manifestations. The authors present the spinal symptomatology of CNO for both syndromes published so far to help spine clinicians organize the information for better usage in everyday clinical practice.

  10. Syndromes with chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis in the spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Wojdasiewicz, Piotr; Rożek, Marcin; Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Słowiński, Radosław; Poniatowski, Łukasz A.; Gasik, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) has been known for over of 40 years. It is an underrecognized entity due to the low number of described cases and poor propagation awareness of the problem. Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis is usually confused with infectious spondylodiscitis or malignant lesions, both primary and metastatic. Failing to consider CNO as one of possible lesions of the spine among an array of differential diagnoses may lead to a prolonged ineffective treatment increasing treatment-related morbidity. In this paper the authors describe these two syndromes, with a possible autoimmune background – chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO syndrome – that include CNO being among the manifestations. The authors present the spinal symptomatology of CNO for both syndromes published so far to help spine clinicians organize the information for better usage in everyday clinical practice. PMID:27407266

  11. Bacterial infections in Myd88-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Jason S; Rong, Fang; Cooper, Timothy K

    2014-04-01

    Three breeding colonies of Myd88(-/-) mice had a history of significant morbidity and mortality. Although strain-specific poor reproductive performance might explain neonatal death and dystocia, mice were found dead or required euthanasia because of moribundity, distended abdomen, head tilt, and seizures. Histopathology results included bacteremia, placentitis, metritis, peritonitis with abscess formation, and suppurative meningoencephalitis. Intralesional gram-negative coccobacilli were present, often in extremely high number. Cultures of samples of the cardiac blood of a mouse and from water-bottle sipper tubes provided to some affected mice grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In addition, affected tissues from 2 mice and feces from a third tested PCR-positive for P. aeruginosa. Although the mice had received autoclaved reverse-osmosis-purified drinking water, we suspect that the mice were inoculated with P. aeruginosa through contaminated sipper tubes. Because of the deficiency in most of the Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, these Myd88(-/-) mice were unlikely to have developed competitive innate and adaptive immune responses, resulting in bacterial infections. These clinical cases underscore the importance of understanding how genotype, phenotype and environment affect animal health. Sound husbandry and experimental practices are needed to prevent the exposure of immuno-deficient mice to pathogens.

  12. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. PMID:26345407

  13. Management of chronic Giardia infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, Angel A; Hanevik, Kurt; Almirall, Pedro; Cimerman, Sérgio; Alfonso, Maydel

    2014-09-01

    Advances in our understanding of chronic giardiasis (CG) may improve our care of patients in this stage of the disease. This review proposes a new concept of CG and highlights the recent advances in our understanding and management of this condition. According to this review, management requires, initially, an accurate diagnosis, which may exclude several conditions that can mimic CG. Optimal treatment requires a tailored approach which includes the recognition of the known modifiable causes of this health condition, assessment of symptoms and potential complications, their treatment utilizing, if necessary, a multidisciplinary team, and an ongoing monitoring for the effect of therapy - weighing the efficacy of individual drugs - all of these together may lead to a successful treatment of CG.

  14. Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing Loss Middle Ear Infection (Chronic Otitis Media) and Hearing ... learning important speech and language skills. Types of hearing loss Conductive hearing loss is a form of hearing ...

  15. Investigation of septins using infection by bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokowski, S; Mostowy, S

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of the host cytoskeleton during infection by bacterial pathogens has significantly contributed to our understanding of cell biology and host defense. Work has shown that septins are recruited to the phagocytic cup as collarlike structures and enable bacterial entry into host cells. In the cytosol, septins can entrap actin-polymerizing bacteria in cage-like structures for targeting to autophagy, a highly conserved intracellular degradation process. In this chapter, we describe methods to investigate septin assembly and function during infection by bacterial pathogens. Use of these methods can lead to in-depth understanding of septin biology and suggest therapeutic approaches to combat infectious disease.

  16. The role of temperate bacteriophages in bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Emily V; Winstanley, Craig; Fothergill, Joanne L; James, Chloe E

    2016-03-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria. There are an estimated 10(31) phage on the planet, making them the most abundant form of life. We are rapidly approaching the centenary of their identification, and yet still have only a limited understanding of their role in the ecology and evolution of bacterial populations. Temperate prophage carriage is often associated with increased bacterial virulence. The rise in use of technologies, such as genome sequencing and transcriptomics, has highlighted more subtle ways in which prophages contribute to pathogenicity. This review discusses the current knowledge of the multifaceted effects that phage can exert on their hosts and how this may contribute to bacterial adaptation during infection.

  17. Comparative study of bacterial infection prevalence between cirrhotic patients with and without upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delvone Almeida

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infection is a frequent complication in patients with chronic liver disease, mainly during the advanced stages. There is evidence that the main factors that contribute to a predisposition to infection in cirrhotic patients are related to hepatic failure with consequent immunodeficiency. Invasive procedures (diagnostic or therapeutic can predispose to bacterial infections, and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB is considered a potentially important risk factor. A group of cirrhotic patients (child B and C Pugh groups were evaluated retrospectively by chart reviews regarding the prevalence of bacterial infection during hospitalization to determine whether UGB was a risk factor. An infection was considered present if a specific organ system was identified or if fever (>38ºC persisted for more than 24 hours with associated leukocytosis. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis was based on classical criteria. Eighty-nine patients were evaluated. Fourty-six patients presented with UGB, and 43 patients had no UGB (control. There were infections recorded in 25/46 (54% patients with UGB, and 15/43 (35% in those without UGB (p=0.065. The ratio of the number of infections/admitted patients, was significantly larger in the group with UGB (0.78 ± 0.89 vs. 0.39 ± 0.62; p=0.028 since patients had more than one infection. In the UGB group compared to non UGB group, ascites was more frequent (67% vs. 42%; p=0.027; they were more likely to have undergone endoscopic procedures (p<0.001 and the mean ± SD for platelets count was smaller (96,114 ± 57,563 vs. 145,674 ± 104,083; p=0.007. The results show that UGB is an important contribution to bacterial infection among Child B and C cirrhotic patients.

  18. [Chronic hepatitis and occult HCV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowala-Piaskowska, Arleta; Mozer-Lisewska, Iwona; Pham, Tram N Q; Michalak, Tomasz I

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) was discovered in 1989. HCV is a positive single-strand RNA. We all have thought, that HCV can replicate only in liver tissue, but now we know, that HCV can replicate in extrahepatic tissue as well. In about 48-86% of HCV infected patients, chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been noticed and eventually, after tens of years, liver insufficiency, cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The current recommended treatment for CHC is a combination of pegylated-interferon alpha and Ribavirin. Presently it is known, that HCV infection can persist as an occult infection. RNA HCV can be detected in patients after successful treatment for CHC or spontaneous elimination. Persistent HCV replication in hepatocytes or lymphoid cells would likely lead to continuous antigenic stimulation of the immune system. This prolonged replication may contribute to the immune tolerance of HCV, impairment of immune response and even further virus persistence. This occult infection grows more important in transplantation.

  19. Do bacterial vaginosis and chlamydial infection affect serum cytokine level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogavac Mirjana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Serbia is the country with extremely low birth rate and a relatively high percentage of preterm deliveries (8%. With this in mind, discovering new diagnostic methods that could be used for the prediction of preterm delivery is of great importance. In this study we tried to determine whether bacterial vaginosis and chlamydial infection could provoke preterm delivery by activation of systemic cytokine network. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8, IFN-γ, IL-6 and TNF-α in pregnant women with symptoms of preterm delivery and to make correlation between these parameters and the presence of bacterial vaginosis or chlamydial infection. Method. In the serum of 35 pregnant women, which were divided in groups according to the presence or absence of bacterial vaginosis and chlamydial infection, commercial ELISA tests for proinflammatory cytokines were performed. Results. The serum level of IFN-γ was significantly increased in pregnant women having chlamydial infection, as well as the level of IL-1β in women with bacterial vaginosis. The levels of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 were not significantly different between the investigated groups. Conclusion. The preliminary results obtained in this research point out the possibility that not only intrauterine or systemic infections, but also bacterial vaginosis and chlamydial infection can cause a partial activation of systemic cytokine network and contribute to the occurrence of preterm delivery.

  20. Early severe inflammatory responses to uropathogenic E. coli predispose to chronic and recurrent urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Hannan

    Full Text Available Chronic infections are an increasing problem due to the aging population and the increase in antibiotic resistant organisms. Therefore, understanding the host-pathogen interactions that result in chronic infection is of great importance. Here, we investigate the molecular basis of chronic bacterial cystitis. We establish that introduction of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC into the bladders of C3H mice results in two distinct disease outcomes: resolution of acute infection or development of chronic cystitis lasting months. The incidence of chronic cystitis is both host strain and infectious dose-dependent. Further, development of chronic cystitis is preceded by biomarkers of local and systemic acute inflammation at 24 hours post-infection, including severe pyuria and bladder inflammation with mucosal injury, and a distinct serum cytokine signature consisting of elevated IL-5, IL-6, G-CSF, and the IL-8 analog KC. Mice deficient in TLR4 signaling or lymphocytes lack these innate responses and are resistant, to varying degrees, to developing chronic cystitis. Treatment of C3H mice with the glucocorticoid anti-inflammatory drug dexamethasone prior to UPEC infection also suppresses the development of chronic cystitis. Finally, individuals with a history of chronic cystitis, lasting at least 14 days, are significantly more susceptible to redeveloping severe, chronic cystitis upon bacterial challenge. Thus, we have discovered that the development of chronic cystitis in C3H mice by UPEC is facilitated by severe acute inflammatory responses early in infection, which subsequently are predisposing to recurrent cystitis, an insidious problem in women. Overall, these results have significant implications for our understanding of how early host-pathogen interactions at the mucosal surface determines the fate of disease.

  1. Multiple drug resistance and bacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U Khan

    2008-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a great problem in developing countries due to excessive use and misuse of antibi-otics.The emergence of new pathogenic strains with resistance developed against most of the antibiotics which may cause,difficult to treat infection.To understand the current scenario in different mode of infection is most important for the clinicians and medical practitioners.This article summarized some common infections and an-tibiotic resistance pattern found among these pathogens.

  2. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wu; Claus Moser; Heng-Zhuang Wang; Niels Hiby; Zhi-Jun Song

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections. Clinical and laboratory investigations demonstrated a perspicuous correlation between biofilm infection and medical foreign bodies or indwelling devices. Clinical observations and experimental studies indicated clearly that antibiotic treatment alone is in most cases insufficient to eradicate biofilm infections. Therefore, to effectively treat biofilm infections with currently available antibiotics and evaluate the outcomes become important and urgent for clinicians. The review summarizes the latest progress in treatment of clinical biofilm infections and scientific investigations, discusses the diagnosis and treatment of different biofilm infections and introduces the promising laboratory progress, which may contribute to prevention or cure of biofilm infections. We conclude that, an efficient treatment of biofilm infections needs a well-established multidisciplinary collaboration, which includes removal of the infected foreign bodies, selection of biofilm-active, sensitive and well-penetrating antibiotics, systemic or topical antibiotic administration in high dosage and combinations, and administration of anti-quorum sensing or biofilm dispersal agents.

  3. Relationship between Intrauterine Bacterial Infection and Early Embryonic Developmental Arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Fei Yan; Xin-Yan Liu; Yun-Fei Cheng; Zhi-Yi Li; Jie Ou; Wei Wang; Feng-Qin Li

    2016-01-01

    Background:Early embryonic developmental arrest is the most commonly understudied adverse outcome of pregnancy.The relevance of intrauterine infection to spontaneous embryonic death is rarely studied and remains unclear.This study aimed to investigate the relationship between intrauterine bacterial infection and early embryonic developmental arrest.Methods:Embryonic chorion tissue and uterine swabs for bacterial detection were obtained from 33 patients who underwent artificial abortion (control group) and from 45 patients who displayed early embryonic developmental arrest (trial group).Results:Intrauterine bacterial infection was discovered in both groups.The infection rate was 24.44% (11/45) in the early embryonic developmental arrest group and 9.09% (3/33) in the artificial abortion group.Classification analysis revealed that the highest detection rate for Micrococcus luteus in the early embryonic developmental arrest group was 13.33% (6/45),and none was detected in the artificial abortion group.M.luteus infection was significantly different between the groups (P < 0.05 as shown by Fisher's exact test).In addition,no correlation was found between intrauterine bacterial infection and history of early embryonic developmental arrest.Conclusions:M.luteus infection is related to early embryonic developmental arrest and might be one of its causative factors.

  4. TBK1 protects vacuolar integrity during intracellular bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Radtke

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available TANK-binding kinase-1 (TBK1 is an integral component of Type I interferon induction by microbial infection. The importance of TBK1 and Type I interferon in antiviral immunity is well established, but the function of TBK1 in bacterial infection is unclear. Upon infection of murine embryonic fibroblasts with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella, more extensive bacterial proliferation was observed in tbk1(-/- than tbk1(+/+ cells. TBK1 kinase activity was required for restriction of bacterial infection, but interferon regulatory factor-3 or Type I interferon did not contribute to this TBK1-dependent function. In tbk1(-/-cells, Salmonella, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus pyogenes escaped from vacuoles into the cytosol where increased replication occurred, which suggests that TBK1 regulates the integrity of pathogen-containing vacuoles. Knockdown of tbk1 in macrophages and epithelial cells also resulted in increased bacterial localization in the cytosol, indicating that the role of TBK1 in maintaining vacuolar integrity is relevant in different cell types. Taken together, these data demonstrate a requirement for TBK1 in control of bacterial infection distinct from its established role in antiviral immunity.

  5. Biofilms in chronic bacterial prostatitis (NIH-II) and in prostatic calcifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli, Sandra

    2010-08-01

    The prevalence of inflammatory conditions of the prostate gland is increasing. In Italy, there is a high incidence of prostatitis (13.3%), also accompanied by prostatic calcifications. Cat NIH-II chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBPs) are the most frequent. Their aetiology theoretically involves the whole range of bacterial species that are able to form biofilms and infect prostate cells. The aim of our study was to isolate potential biofilm-producing bacteria from CBP patients, to evaluate their ability to produce in vitro biofilms, and to characterize intraprostatic bacteria and prostatic calcifications using scanning electron microscopy. The 150 clinical bacterial strains isolated from chronic prostatitis NIH-II patients were: 50 Enterococcus faecalis; 50 Staphylococcus spp.; 30 Escherichia coli; 20 gram-negative miscellanea. Quantitative assay of biofilm production and adhesion was performed according to the classic Christensen microwell assay. Isolates were classified as nonproducers, weak, moderate or strong producers. The majority of E. coli, gram-negative bacteria, Staphylococci and Enterococci strains were strong or medium producers: 63-30%, 75-15%, 46-36%, and 58-14%, respectively. Prostatic calcifications consisted of bacteria-like forms similar to the species isolated from biological materials and calcifications of patients. Our study proves, for the first time, that bacterial strains able to produce biofilms consistently are present in CBP. Additionally, prostatic calcifications are biofilm-related.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Nina; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Ciofu, Oana

    2012-01-01

    The molecular epidemiology of the chronic airway infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) was investigated by cross-sectional analysis of bacterial isolates from 51 CF centers and by longitudinal analysis of serial isolates which had been collected at the CF...

  7. Update and actual trends on bacterial infections following liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose Luis del Pozo

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in effective antimicrobial prophylactic strategies have led to a decline in the incidence of opportunistic infections in liver transplant recipients.However, morbidity and mortality due to infectious diseases remain as major problems. Bacterial infections occurring early after transplant are mainly related to the technical aspects of the procedure. By contrast,after the first postoperative days and beyond, the nature and variety of infectious complications change.Opportunistic bacterial infections are uncommon after 6 mo in patients receiving stable and reduced maintenance doses of immunosuppression with good graft function and little is documented about these cases in the literature. Transplant recipients may be more susceptible to some pathogens, such as the Nocardia species, Legionella species, Listeria monocytogenes , Mycoplasma species, Salmonella species or Rhodococcus equi. Respiratory infections due to capsulated bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenza, can be lifethreatening if not promptly treated in this population.These late bacterial infections may be very difficult to recognize and treat in this population. In this article,we review what has been described in the literature with regards to late bacterial infections following liver transplantation.

  8. Virus-induced secondary bacterial infection: a concise review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendaus MA

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed A Hendaus,1 Fatima A Jomha,2 Ahmed H Alhammadi3 1Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar; 2School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Khiara, Lebanon; 3Department of Pediatrics, Academic General Pediatrics Division, Weill-Cornell Medical College, Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Abstract: Respiratory diseases are a very common source of morbidity and mortality among children. Health care providers often face a dilemma when encountering a febrile infant or child with respiratory tract infection. The reason expressed by many clinicians is the trouble to confirm whether the fever is caused by a virus or a bacterium. The aim of this review is to update the current evidence on the virus-induced bacterial infection. We present several clinical as well in vitro studies that support the correlation between virus and secondary bacterial infections. In addition, we discuss the pathophysiology and prevention modes of the virus–bacterium coexistence. A search of the PubMed and MEDLINE databases was carried out for published articles covering bacterial infections associated with respiratory viruses. This review should provide clinicians with a comprehensive idea of the range of bacterial and viral coinfections or secondary infections that could present with viral respiratory illness. Keywords: bacteria, infection, risk, virus

  9. STIM1 controls T cell-mediated immune regulation and inflammation in chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Weidinger, Carl; Shaw, Patrick; Vaeth, Martin; Ribierre, Theo; Liu, Menghan; Fergus, Tawania; Kozhaya, Lina; McVoy, Lauren; Unutmaz, Derya; Ernst, Joel D; Feske, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Chronic infections induce a complex immune response that controls pathogen replication, but also causes pathology due to sustained inflammation. Ca2+ influx mediates T cell function and immunity to infection, and patients with inherited mutations in the gene encoding the Ca2+ channel ORAI1 or its activator stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) are immunodeficient and prone to chronic infection by various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Here, we demonstrate that STIM1 is required for T cell-mediated immune regulation during chronic Mtb infection. Compared with WT animals, mice with T cell-specific Stim1 deletion died prematurely during the chronic phase of infection and had increased bacterial burdens and severe pulmonary inflammation, with increased myeloid and lymphoid cell infiltration. Although STIM1-deficient T cells exhibited markedly reduced IFN-γ production during the early phase of Mtb infection, bacterial growth was not immediately exacerbated. During the chronic phase, however, STIM1-deficient T cells displayed enhanced IFN-γ production in response to elevated levels of IL-12 and IL-18. The lack of STIM1 in T cells was associated with impaired activation-induced cell death upon repeated TCR engagement and pulmonary lymphocytosis and hyperinflammation in Mtb-infected mice. Chronically Mtb-infected, STIM1-deficient mice had reduced levels of inducible regulatory T cells (iTregs) due to a T cell-intrinsic requirement for STIM1 in iTreg differentiation and excessive production of IFN-γ and IL-12, which suppress iTreg differentiation and maintenance. Thus, STIM1 controls multiple aspects of T cell-mediated immune regulation to limit injurious inflammation during chronic infection.

  10. Strategies for combating bacterial biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Moser, Claus Ernst; Wang, Heng-Zhuang

    2015-01-01

    Formation of biofilm is a survival strategy for bacteria and fungi to adapt to their living environment, especially in the hostile environment. Under the protection of biofilm, microbial cells in biofilm become tolerant and resistant to antibiotics and the immune responses, which increases...... the difficulties for the clinical treatment of biofilm infections. Clinical and laboratory investigations demonstrated a perspicuous correlation between biofilm infection and medical foreign bodies or indwelling devices. Clinical observations and experimental studies indicated clearly that antibiotic treatment...... alone is in most cases insufficient to eradicate biofilm infections. Therefore, to effectively treat biofilm infections with currently available antibiotics and evaluate the outcomes become important and urgent for clinicians. The review summarizes the latest progress in treatment of clinical biofilm...

  11. Bacterial biofilm in chronic lesions of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring, H C; Bay, L; Nilsson, M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic non-healing or recurrent inflammatory lesions, reminiscent of infection but recalcitrant to antibiotic therapy generally characterize biofilm driven-diseases. Chronic lesions of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) exhibit several aspects, which are compatible with well-known biofilm...... Acid (PNA) - Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) in combination with Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). In addition, corresponding histopathological analysis in hematoxylin and eosin slides were performed. RESULTS: Biofilms were seen in 67% of the samples of chronic lesions and in 75......% of the perilesional samples. The mean diameter of aggregates in lesional skin was significantly greater than in perilesional skin (p=0.01). Biofilms exceeding 50 μm in diameter were found in 42% of lesional samples and only in only 5% of the perilesional samples (p=0.009). The majority of the large biofilms...

  12. Actinomyces and Nocardia infections in chronic granulomatous disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahindokht Bassiri-Jahromi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD is an inherited disorder of the Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced oxidase complex characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections. Disseminated infection by combination of opportunistic agents is being increasingly reported in CGD patients. We presented in the retrospective review of medical records, the etiology, presentation, clinical characteristics the infections detected, predisposing condition and outcome of nocardiosis and actinomycosis involved in a group of pediatric patients diagnosed with CGD. Materials and Methods: The clinical presentation of CGD-related infections was reviewed retrospectively from the medical records of all 12 patients with CGD. We studied respectively 12 patients between 2001 and 2008, and we analyzed two pediatric patients with CGD who acquired Nocardia and Actinomyces infections, and their clinical and microbiological characteristics were described. The material for investigations was collected from scrapings, crusts, pus from subcutaneous abscesses or exudation from sinus tracts, surgical debridement, and biopsy specimens. The microbiological diagnosis was determined by biochemical tests, histology, microscopy, and culture of clinical samples. Results: The medical records of 12 diagnosed CGD patients with suspected nocardiosis or actinomycosis were reviewed. One patient was diagnosed with actinomycosis and one patient with nocardiosis. Patients consisted of seven males and five females with ranging ages of 3 to 18 years. Nocardiosis and actinomycosis isolated in the two patients were confirmed by histology and culture methods. Neutrophil oxidative burst were absent (NBT=0 in both patients. The most common manifestations of CGD due to fungal infections, actinomycosis, and nocardiosis were osteomyelitis (42.8%, pulmonary infections (28.6%, lymphadenopathy (14.3%, and skin involvement (14.3% during their illness. Conclusion: Nocardiosis

  13. Chronic multifocal non-bacterial osteomyelitis in hypophosphatasia mimicking malignancy

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    Warmuth-Metz Monika

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypophosphatasia (HP is characterized by a genetic defect in the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP gene and predominantly an autosomal recessive trait. HP patients suffer from reduced bone mineralization. Biochemically, elevated concentrations of substrates of TNSALP, including pyridoxal-5'-phosphate and inorganic pyrophosphate occur in serum, tissues and urine. The latter has been associated with chronic inflammation and hyperprostaglandinism. Case presentation We report on 2 affected children presenting with multifocal inflammatory bone lesions mimicking malignancy: A 6 years old girl with short stature had been treated with human growth hormone since 6 months. Then she started to complain about a painful swelling of her left cheek. MRI suggested a malignant bone lesion. Bone biopsy, however, revealed chronic inflammation. A bone scan showed a second rib lesion. Since biopsy was sterile, the descriptive diagnosis of chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO was established. The diagnostic tests related to growth failure were repeated and subsequent analyses demonstrated a molecular defect in the TNSALP gene. The second girl (10 years old complained about back pain after she had fallen from her bike. X rays of her spine revealed compressions of 2 thoracic vertebrae. At first these were considered trauma related, however a bone scan did show an additional lesion in the right 4th rib. A biopsy of this rib revealed a sterile lympho- plasmocytoid osteomyelitis suggesting multifocal CNO. Further analyses did show a decreased TNSALP in leukocytes and elevated pyridoxal phosphate in plasma, suggesting a heterozygous carrier status of HP. Conclusion Chronic bone oedema in adult HP and chronic hyper-prostaglandinism in childhood HP do suggest that in some HP patients bone inflammation is present in conjunction with the metabolic defect. Sterile multifocal osteomyelitis could be demonstrated. Non-steroidal anti

  14. Catabolism of host-derived compounds during extracellular bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Jamie A; Wargo, Matthew J

    2014-02-01

    Efficient catabolism of host-derived compounds is essential for bacterial survival and virulence. While these links in intracellular bacteria are well studied, such studies in extracellular bacteria lag behind, mostly for technical reasons. The field has identified important metabolic pathways, but the mechanisms by which they impact infection and in particular, establishing the importance of a compound's catabolism versus alternate metabolic roles has been difficult. In this review we will examine evidence for catabolism during extracellular bacterial infections in animals and known or potential roles in virulence. In the process, we point out key gaps in the field that will require new or newly adapted techniques.

  15. Innate Immune Sensors and Gastrointestinal Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina L. Hold

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal microbiota is a major source of immune stimulation. The interaction between host pattern-recognition receptors and conserved microbial ligands profoundly influences infection dynamics. Identifying and understanding the nature of these interactions is a key step towards obtaining a clearer picture of microbial pathogenesis. These interactions underpin a complex interplay between microbe and host that has far reaching consequences for both. Here, we review the role of pattern recognition receptors in three prototype diseases affecting the stomach, the small intestine, and large intestine, respectively (Helicobacter pylori infection, Salmonella infection, and inflammatory bowel disease. Specifically, we review the nature and impact of pathogen:receptor interactions, their impact upon pathogenesis, and address the relevance of pattern recognition receptors in the development of therapies for gastrointestinal diseases.

  16. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Brian; Schaeffer, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  17. Chronic prostatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, Bradley A.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Le, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, CP/CPPS). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown.

  18. Procalcitonin Identifies Cell Injury, Not Bacterial Infection, in Acute Liver Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody A Rule

    Full Text Available Because acute liver failure (ALF patients share many clinical features with severe sepsis and septic shock, identifying bacterial infection clinically in ALF patients is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT has proven to be a useful marker in detecting bacterial infection. We sought to determine whether PCT discriminated between presence and absence of infection in patients with ALF.Retrospective analysis of data and samples of 115 ALF patients from the United States Acute Liver Failure Study Group randomly selected from 1863 patients were classified for disease severity and ALF etiology. Twenty uninfected chronic liver disease (CLD subjects served as controls.Procalcitonin concentrations in most samples were elevated, with median values for all ALF groups near or above a 2.0 ng/mL cut-off that generally indicates severe sepsis. While PCT concentrations increased somewhat with apparent liver injury severity, there were no differences in PCT levels between the pre-defined severity groups-non-SIRS and SIRS groups with no documented infections and Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock groups with documented infections, (p = 0.169. PCT values from CLD patients differed from all ALF groups (median CLD PCT value 0.104 ng/mL, (p ≤0.001. Subjects with acetaminophen (APAP toxicity, many without evidence of infection, demonstrated median PCT >2.0 ng/mL, regardless of SIRS features, while some culture positive subjects had PCT values <2.0 ng/mL.While PCT appears to be a robust assay for detecting bacterial infection in the general population, there was poor discrimination between ALF patients with or without bacterial infection presumably because of the massive inflammation observed. Severe hepatocyte necrosis with inflammation results in elevated PCT levels, rendering this biomarker unreliable in the ALF setting.

  19. Combinations of bacterial species in endodontic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, LB; Wesselink, P.R.; van Winkelhoff, AJ

    2002-01-01

    Aim This study was undertaken to investigate combinations of bacteria found in root-canal infections of teeth with periapical bone destruction without clinical signs and symptoms. Methodology Endodontic samples from 58 root canals were cultured anaerobically and microorganisms were counted and ident

  20. Sustainable strategies for treatment of bacterial infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to antibiotics and the consequential failures of treatment based on antibiotics makes microbial infections a major threat to human health. This problem combined with rapidly increasing life-style disease problems challenge our healtcare system as well as the pharma industry, and if we do...

  1. Prevalence of bacterial pathogens causing ocular infections in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background / Aims: The eye may be infected from external sources or through intra-ocular invasion of micro-organisms carried by the blood stream. This study was undertaken to isolate and identify the specific bacterial pathogens causing ocular infections and to determine their in-vitro antibacterial susceptibilities to commonly used antibacterial agents. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of all patients with clinically diagnosed bacterial ocular infections such as blepharitis, conjunctivitis, internal and external hordeolum, suppurative scleritis, canaliculitis, keratitis, dacryocystitis, preseptal cellulitis, endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis presenting between January 2005 and December 2005 was performed. Extra-ocular and intra-ocular specimens were collected and were subjected to direct microscopy and culture. Results: A total of 756 patients with bacterial ocular infections were analyzed, of which 462(61% eyes had adnexal bacterial infection, 217(28.7% had corneal infection, 6 (0.8% had scleral involvement and the remaining 71(9.39% eyes had infection of the intra-ocular tissues. The predominant bacterial species isolated was S. aureus (195 of 776; 25% followed by S. pneumoniae (169 of 776; 21.78% and coagulase negative staphylococci (142 of 776; 18.3%. The largest number of gram-positive isolates were susceptible to cefazolin (545 of 624; 87.34%, chloramphenicol (522 of 624; 83.65% and gatifloxacin (511 of 624; 81.89% and gram-negative isolates were to amikacin (127 of 136; 93.38%, gatifloxacin (125 of 136; 91.91% and ofloxacin (119 of 136; 87.5%, while aerobic actinomycetes were to amikacin (100%, gatifloxacin (14 of 16; 87.5%, chloramphenicol (14 of 16; 87.5% and ofloxacin (13 of 16; 81.25%. Conclusions: S. aureus frequently causes infections of eyelids and conjunctiva, S. pneumoniae of lacrimal apparatus and cornea and coagulase negative staphylococci causes intra-ocular infections. Of all routinely used antibacterials

  2. A Survey of Bacterial Infections in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Shirazi

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients are prone to bacterial, viral and fungal infections. Bacterial infec­tion is considered as one of the common and serious complications in bone marrow transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of bacterial infections in bone marrow transplant recipients."nMethods: Fifty-two blood and 25 catheter samples were obtained from 23 patients who were hospitalized in bone marrow trans­plantation unit in Shariati Hospital in Tehran. Bacterial strains were isolated and identified by the standard conven­tional bacteriological methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to the guidelines from NCCLS using 18 different antibiotics."nResults:  The strains of Staphylococci, Streptococcus viridans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli were isolated from 8(66.7%, 1(8.3%, 2 (16.7% and the 1(8.3% cases, respectively."nConclusion: Current study indicated that the bacterial infections particularly those caused by the Gram-positive cocci were still as important problem in bone marrow transplant.

  3. Methylotroph Infections and Chronic Granulomatous Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, E Liana; Petts, Jennifer R; Fasano, Mary Beth; Ford, Bradley; Nauseef, William M; Neves, João Farela; Simões, Maria João; Tierce, Millard L; de la Morena, M Teresa; Greenberg, David E; Zerbe, Christa S; Zelazny, Adrian M; Holland, Steven M

    2016-03-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a defect in production of phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species, which leads to recurrent infections with a characteristic group of pathogens not previously known to include methylotrophs. Methylotrophs are versatile environmental bacteria that can use single-carbon organic compounds as their sole source of energy; they rarely cause disease in immunocompetent persons. We have identified 12 infections with methylotrophs (5 reported here, 7 previously reported) in patients with CGD. Methylotrophs identified were Granulibacter bethesdensis (9 cases), Acidomonas methanolica (2 cases), and Methylobacterium lusitanum (1 case). Two patients in Europe died; the other 10, from North and Central America, recovered after prolonged courses of antimicrobial drug therapy and, for some, surgery. Methylotrophs are emerging as disease-causing organisms in patients with CGD. For all patients, sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was required for correct diagnosis. Geographic origin of the methylotroph strain may affect clinical management and prognosis.

  4. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    determine the minimal inhibitory concentrations ( MIC ) of antimicrobial agents used in human medicine. Furthermore, it was recently reported that the A...approach, but also support the implementation of studies using a well-established wound infection model using mice and pigs that will be conducted in the...identification, antibiograms, and MIC were deter- mined using the Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, France) and Phoenix (Becton, Dickinson and Co., Franklin Lakes

  5. Respiratory viral infection predisposing for bacterial disease : a concise review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hament, JM; Kimpen, JLL; Fleer, A; Wolfs, TFW

    1999-01-01

    Although bacterial superinfection in viral respiratory disease is a clinically well documented phenomenon, the pathogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Recent studies have revealed some of the mechanisms involved. Physical damage to respiratory cells as a result of viral infection may lead

  6. Protective effect of a bacterial extract against acute exacerbation in patients with chronic bronchitis accompanied by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李靖; 郑劲平; 袁锦屏; 曾广翘; 钟南山; 林材元

    2004-01-01

    Background Immunostimulating agents made from bacterial extracts represent a class of medications that contains antigens derived from several bacterial strains and their potential ability to prevent bacterial infections results from the stimulation of the nonspecific component of the immune system. The present study investigated the effect of the oral immunostimulant Broncho-Vaxom, which includes material from eight different species of bacteria that are frequently present in the lower respiratory tract, on the frequency and severity of acute exacerbation in patients with chronic bronchitis accompanied by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Ninety patients with chronic bronchitis complicated with COPD were randomly divided into groups A and B. Forty-nine subjects in group A received oral capsules containing 7mg Broncho-Vaxom, while 41 patients in group B received similar placebo capsules. Both groups took one capsule daily for the first 10 days of each month for 3 consecutive months. The frequency of acute exacerbation, symptom scores, and lung function were recorded for the following one year period.Results There was a significant decrease in the incidence, duration, and severity of acute exacerbation, as well as a reduction in the course of antibiotics administered and in the dosage of bronchodilator and mucolytic agent in group A, as compared to group B (P<0.05, respectively). Symptom scores for cough, sputum, dyspnea, as well as symptoms observed upon auscultation of the chest also improved significantly in group A as compared to group B (P<0.05, respectively). The bacterial clearance rate in sputum cultures from patients who received no antibiotics for the first 3 months was also significantly higher in group A compared to group B (P<0.01).Conclusions Orally administered Broncho-Vaxom is associated with a decrease in the incidence of acute exacerbation and a decrease in the need for antibiotics and symptomatic relief medications in patients

  7. Development of diagnosis and therapy of bacterial infection in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease%细菌感染在慢性阻塞性肺疾病急性加重期的诊治进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余国辉; 李其皓

    2010-01-01

    细菌感染足引起慢性阻塞性肺疾病加重的主要原因,在诊断其是否由细菌感染引起时,在提高病原学检查的手段和技术的同时,同样对血清学相关指标进行检查并综合分析,也可以为细菌感染提供一定的证据,从而更好的指导抗生素在临床的使用.%Bacterial infection is the main reason that exacerbates the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD).In diagnosing whether the disease is due to bacterial infection,on one hand improvement can be made on the means and skill of etiological examination,on the other hand,the serological related indexes can be measured and then analyzed together,in turn the evidence can prove its existence,and thus guides the clinicians to better use the antibiotics.

  8. [Conjugate vaccines against bacterial infections: typhoid fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua, J; García, J A; López, C R; González, C R; Isibasi, A; Kumate, J

    1992-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides have been studied as possible vaccines against infectious diseases. However, they are capable to induce only short-run protection because of their T-independent properties and they would not be protective against infection in high-risk populations. The alternative to face this problem is to develop methods to join covalently the polysaccharide and proteins to both increase the immunogenicity of and to confer the property of T-dependence to this antigen. In order to obtain a conjugate vaccine against typhoid fever, in our laboratory we have tried to synthesize a conjugate immunogen between the Vi antigen and porins from Salmonella typhi.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayten Kadanali

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: A growing pile of evidence supports the notion that pulmonary involvement is one of the extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and vice versa.Methods: Two cross-sectional studies were performed: 1. A prevalence study of HCV infection among patients with COPD; 2. A prevalence study of COPD among patients with chronic HCV infection. COPD was diagnosed according to ATS/ERS guidelines. The prevalence of HCV infection in COPD group was compared with the result of a previous study which determined the prevalence of HCV infection in general population. Prevalence of COPD in patients with chronic HCV infection was also compared to those with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection.Results: The study included 108 patients with COPD, 68 patients with chronic HCV infection, and 60 patients with chronic HBV infection. HCV infection was observed in 8.3% of patients with COPD, and 1.2% of the control subjects (P= 0.000. The prevalence of COPD among patients with chronic HCV and HBV infection was 17.6%, and 5%, respectively (P=0.03. Comparing COPD-positive and -negative chronic HCV patients for risk factors for COPD revealed that only the mean age was higher in COPD-positive patients (60.8±9.1 years vs. 46.5±11.5 years, P=0.000. In multivariate analysis, age was found to be the only independent predictor of COPD in HCV group.Conclusions: Patients with COPD have increased prevalence of HCV infection, and patients with HCV infection, have increased prevalence of COPD. COPD may be an extrahepatic disease associated with HCV infection.

  10. Bacterial infections in cirrhosis: Role of proton pump inhibitors and intestinal permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. van Vlerken (Lotte); E.J. Huisman (Ellen); B. van Hoek (Bart); W. Renooij (W.); F.W.M. de Rooij (Felix); P.D. Siersema (Peter); K.J. van Erpecum (Karel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground Cirrhotic patients are at considerable risk for bacterial infections, possibly through increased intestinal permeability and bacterial overgrowth. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) may increase infection risk. We aimed to explore the potential association between PPI use and bacte

  11. Bacterial communities vary between sinuses in chronic rhinosinusitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom V Joss

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a common and potentially debilitating disease characterized by inflammation of the sinus mucosa for longer than 12 weeks. Bacterial colonization of the sinuses and its role in the pathogenesis of this disease is an ongoing area of research. Recent advances in culture-independent molecular techniques for bacterial identification have the potential to provide a more accurate and complete assessment of the sinus microbiome, however there is little concordance in results between studies, possibly due to differences in the sampling location and techniques. This study aimed to determine whether the microbial communities from one sinus could be considered representative of all sinuses, and examine differences between two commonly used methods for sample collection, swabs and tissue biopsies. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was applied to both swab and tissue samples from multiple sinuses of 19 patients undergoing surgery for treatment of CRS. Results from swabs and tissue biopsies showed a high degree of similarity, indicating that swabbing is sufficient to recover the microbial community from the sinuses. Microbial communities from different sinuses within individual patients differed to varying degrees, demonstrating that it is possible for distinct microbiomes to exist simultaneously in different sinuses of the same patient. The sequencing results correlated well with culture-based pathogen identification conducted in parallel, although the culturing missed many species detected by sequencing. This finding has implications for future research into the sinus microbiome, which should take this heterogeneity into account by sampling patients from more than one sinus. It may also be of clinical importance, as determination of antibiotic sensitivities using culture of a swab from a single sinus could miss relevant pathogens that are localized to another sinus.

  12. Severe bacterial infections in patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia: prevalence and clinical risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattiya Teawtrakul

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of bacterial infection in patients with NTDT was found to be moderate. Time after splenectomy >10 years, deferoxamine therapy, and iron overload may be clinical risk factors for severe bacterial infection in patients with NTDT. Bacterial infection should be recognized in splenectomized patients with NTDT, particularly those who have an iron overload.

  13. Phyllanthus species for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2011-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists.......Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists....

  14. Chronic Opisthorchis viverrini Infection Changes the Liver Microbiome and Promotes Helicobacter Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itthitaetrakool, Upsornsawan; Pinlaor, Porntip; Pinlaor, Somchai; Chomvarin, Chariya; Dangtakot, Rungtiwa; Chaidee, Apisit; Wilailuckana, Chotechana; Sangka, Arunnee; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2016-01-01

    Adults of Opisthorchis viverrini reside in the biliary system, inducing inflammation of bile ducts and cholangitis, leading to hepatobiliary disease (HBD) including cholangiocarcinoma. O. viverrini infection also has major implications for the bacterial community in bile ducts and liver. To investigate this in chronic O. viverrini infection (≥ 8 months p.i.), bacterial genomic DNA from livers of hamsters and from worms was investigated using culture techniques, PCR for Helicobacter spp. and high-throughput next-generation sequencing targeting the V3-V4 hypervariable regions of prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene. Of a total of 855,046 DNA sequence reads, 417,953 were useable after filtering. Metagenomic analyses assigned these to 93 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) consisting of 80 OTUs of bacteria, including 6 phyla and 42 genera. In the chronic O. viverrini-infected group, bacterial community composition and diversity were significantly increased compared to controls. Sequences of Fusobacterium spp. were the most common (13.81%), followed by Streptococcus luteciae (10.76%), Escherichia coli (10.18%), and Bifidobacterium spp. (0.58%). In addition, Helicobacter pylori (0.17% of sequences) was also identified in the liver of chronic O. viverrini infections, but not in normal liver. The presence of H. pylori was confirmed by PCR and by use of an antibody against bacterial antigen, supporting the metagenomics data. The identities of bacteria cultured for enrichment suggested that chronic O. viverrini infection changes the liver microbiome and promotes Helicobacter spp. growth. There may be synergy between O. viverrini and the liver microbiome in enhancing immune response-mediated hepatobiliary diseases. PMID:27806126

  15. The hematology of bacterial infections in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipursky, A; Palko, J; Milner, R; Akenzua, G I

    1976-06-01

    A series of premature infants was studied for the presence of bacterial infection. On the basis of clinical evidence and bacteriological studies, they were divided into three groups in which sepsis was considered to be proven, possible, or unlikely. Band neutrophil counts were elevated most frequently in the "sepsis-proven" group and the elevation occurred usually within 24 hours of onset of signs of disease. Qualitative changes in neutrophils (Döhle bodies, toxic granulation, and vacuolization) were more frequent in the sepsis-proven group and, together with the band count, provided valuable techniques for the diagnosis of bacterial infections. Thrombocytopenia occurred frequently in the sepsis-proven group and seemed to result from increased utilization or destruction of platelets rather than failure of production. In such cases, evidence of intravascular coagulation was minimal and it was concluded that thrombocytopenia had resulted from a direct effect of the bacteria or its products on platelets and/or endothelium.

  16. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists.

  17. New determinants of prognosis in bacterial infections in cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Juan; Fernández, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Despite major advances in the knowledge and management of liver diseases achieved in recent decades, decompensation of cirrhosis still carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality. Bacterial infections are one of the main causes of decompensation. It is very important for clinical management to be aware of the population with the highest risk of poor outcome. This review deals with the new determinants of prognosis in patients with cirrhosis and bacterial infections reported recently. Emergence of multiresistant bacteria has led to an increasing failure rate of the standard empirical antibiotic therapy recommended by international guidelines. Moreover, it has been recently reported that endothelial dysfunction is associated with the degree of liver dysfunction and, in infected patients, with the degree of sepsis. It has also been reported that relative adrenal insufficiency is frequent in the non-critically ill cirrhotic population and it is associated with a higher risk of developing infection, severe sepsis, hepatorenal syndrome and death. We advise a change in the standard empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with high risk for multiresistant infections and also to take into account endothelial and adrenal dysfunction in prognostic models in hospitalized patients with decompensated cirrhosis. PMID:24966596

  18. A STUDY OF SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTIONS IN DIABETES MELLITUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirupati Reddy Chirra

    2016-09-01

    cystitis, 9 patients had acute pyelonephritis. In Bacterial skin and mucous membrane infection, 7 otitis externa patients were there, 2 cellulitis and 4 furuncles or abscess on nose were present. In mycotic skin and mucous membrane infections, 3 were thought to have skin candida infections. There is a strong association of the infections in the diabetic mellitus patients (P<0.05. CONCLUSION Diabetes Mellitus depresses the immunity and causes a plethora of infections. This study helps the practising physicians to understand the common secondary infections and thus help them to take immediate measures to prevent further complications and arrest the natural progression of the disease.

  19. Usefulness of clinical data and rapid diagnostic tests to identify bacterial etiology in adult respiratory infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Toledano-Sierra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory tract infections are a common complaint and most of them, such as common cold and laryngitis, are viral in origin, so antibiotic use should be exceptional. However, there are other respiratory tract infections (sinusitis, pharyngitis, lower respiratory tract infections, and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where a bacterial etiology is responsible for a non-negligible percentage, and antibiotics are often empirically indicated. The aim of the study is to identify the strength of the data obtained from the symptoms, physical examination and rapid diagnostic methods in respiratory infections in which antibiotic use is frequently proposed in order to improve diagnosis and influence the decision to prescribe these drugs. The review concludes that history, physical examination and rapid tests are useful to guide the need for antibiotic treatment in diseases such as acute sinusitis, acute pharyngitis, exacerbation of lower respiratory tract infection and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, no isolated data is accurate enough by itself to confirm or rule out the need for antibiotics. Therefore, clinical prediction rules bring together history and physical examination, thereby improving the accuracy of the decision to indicate or not antibiotics.

  20. Bacterial vaccines in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: effects on clinical outcomes and cytokine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Salvador; Marco, Francisco M; Martínez-Carbonell, Juan A; Carratalá, José A

    2015-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Exacerbation episodes impair lung function leading to disease progression. Levels of inflammation markers correlate with disease severity. Bacterial immunomodulators have shown a beneficial effect in COPD, improving symptoms and reducing the rate of exacerbations. This is an observational prospective study on 30 patients diagnosed with bronchiectasis and COPD, who received bacterial autogenous vaccine for 12 months. The rate of exacerbation, severity of symptoms and lung function were studied at baseline and after treatment. In addition, plasma levels CRP, IL6, IL8, and TNFα were measured. After treatment we found a reduction in mean acute respiratory infections and signs of lung disease. Acute phase proteins IL6 and CRP increased in blood and IL8 decreased. These changes may be related to the repeated injection of inactivated bacteria. Given the implication of these factors in the pathogenesis of COPD, particularly the production of IL8, the causes and consequences of cytokine modulation by bacterial vaccines should be investigated. Vaccination with autogenous vaccines for 1 year can produce a significant clinical improvement in COPD patients, reducing the frequency of exacerbations associated to changes in the profile of markers of inflammation.

  1. Viral and atypical bacterial infections in the outpatient pediatric cystic fibrosis clinic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Nielsen, Lars P; Schiotz, Peter Oluf

    2006-01-01

    culture were recorded. RESULTS: Ninety-seven viral and 21 atypical bacterial infections were found. FEV-1 was significantly reduced during viral infection (-12.5%, p=0.048), with the exception of rhinovirus infection. A small change in FEV-1 (-3%) was seen during atypical bacterial infection (p=0...

  2. Transcriptional response of Musca domestica larvae to bacterial infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Tang

    Full Text Available The house fly Musca domestica, a cosmopolitan dipteran insect, is a significant vector for human and animal bacterial pathogens, but little is known about its immune response to these pathogens. To address this issue, we inoculated the larvae with a mixture of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus and profiled the transcriptome 6, 24, and 48 h thereafter. Many genes known to controlling innate immunity in insects were induced following infection, including genes encoding pattern recognition proteins (PGRPs, various components of the Toll and IMD signaling pathways and of the proPO-activating and redox systems, and multiple antimicrobial peptides. Interestingly, we also uncovered a large set of novel immune response genes including two broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides (muscin and domesticin, which might have evolved to adapt to house-fly's unique ecological environments. Finally, genes mediating oxidative phosphorylation were repressed at 48 h post-infection, suggesting disruption of energy homeostasis and mitochondrial function at the late stages of infection. Collectively, our data reveal dynamic changes in gene expression following bacterial infection in the house fly, paving the way for future in-depth analysis of M. domestica's immune system.

  3. [The bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and factors determining its spectrum in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guira, O; Tiéno, H; Traoré, S; Diallo, I; Ouangré, E; Sagna, Y; Zabsonré, J; Yanogo, D; Traoré, S S; Drabo, Y J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to describe the bacterial microflora of diabetic foot infection and to identify the factors which determine the bacterial spectrum in order to increase empiric antibiotic prescription in Ouagadougou. The study was a cross-sectional one, carried from July 1st, 2011 to June 30, 2012 in the departments of internal medicine and general and digestive surgery in Yalgado Ouédraogo teaching hospital. Samples for bacteriological tests consisted of aspiration of pus through the healthy skin, curettage and swab of the base of the ulceration or tissue biopsy from foot lesions. The bacteria's sensitivity to antibiotics has been tested by the qualitative method (Kirby-Bauer). The frequency of diabetic foot infection was 14.45% and the monthly incidence 5.33. The mean age of patients was 56 years and the sex ratio 1.37. Foot ulcerations were chronic in 33 (51.56%), necrotic in 51 (79.69%) and associated with osteitis in 40 (62.5%) patients. Infection was grade 3 in 70.3% cases. Thirty-nine patients had received antibiotics before hospital admission. Among the 71 samples, 62 (87.32%) cultures were positive: 53 (85.48%) monomicrobial and 9 (14.52%) bimicrobial. Aerobic Gram-positive cocci (76%) were the most frequent from ulcerations: Staphylococcus aureus (32.39%), Streptococcus sp (18.30%). Negative coagulase staphylococci have been found in 23.94% cases. Aerobic gram-negative bacilli have been isolated from 24% ulcerations. No factor was associated with the type of bacteria. Gram-positive pathogen cocci showed a high sensitivity to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and oxacillin. No methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or extended-spectrum beta lactamase Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL) have been isolated. A better design is necessary to a clarification of bacterial flora in diabetic foot infections. Prevention of bacterial resistance is also needed.

  4. Molecular characteristics and stages of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Hui Shi; Chang-He Shi

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a common viral pathogen that causes a substantial health burden worldwide. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of the natural stages of chronic HBV infection. A dynamic balance between viral replication and host immune response is pivotal to the pathogenesis of liver disease. Knowledge of the HBV genome organization and replication cycle can unravel HBV genotypes and molecular variants, which contribute to the heterogeneity in outcome of chronic HBV infection. Most HBV infections are spontaneously resolved in immunocompetent adults, whereas they become chronic in most neonates and infants at a great risk of developing complications such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Those with chronic HBV infection may present in one of the four phases of infection: immune tolerance, immune clearance [hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB)], inactive carrier state, and reactivation (HBeAg-negative CHB). Understanding the dynamic nature of chronic HBV infection is crucial in the management of HBV carriers. Long-term monitoring and optimal timing of antiviral therapy for chronic HBV infection help to prevent progression of HBV-related liver disease to its later stage, particularly in patients with higher risk markers of HCC, such as serum DNA concentration, HBeAg status, serum aminotransferase, HBV genotypes, and pre-core or core mutants.

  5. Polyphasic innate immune responses to acute and chronic LCMV infection: Innate immunity to acute & chronic viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Brian A; Uebelhoer, Luke S.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Price, Aryn A; Grakoui, Arash; Pulendran, Bali

    2013-01-01

    Resolution of acute and chronic viral infections requires activation of innate cells to initiate and maintain adaptive immune responses. Here we report that infection with acute Armstrong (ARM) or chronic Clone 13 (C13) strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) led to two distinct phases of innate immune response. During the first 72hr of infection, dendritic cells upregulated activation markers, and stimulated anti-viral CD8+ T cells, independent of viral strain. Seven days after ...

  6. Hyperbranched poly(NIPAM) polymers modified with antibiotics for the reduction of bacterial burden in infected human tissue engineered skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Joanna; Sarker, Prodip; Rimmer, Stephen; Swanson, Linda; MacNeil, Sheila; Douglas, Ian

    2011-01-01

    The escalating global incidence of bacterial infection, particularly in chronic wounds, is a problem that requires significant improvements to existing therapies. We have developed hyperbranched poly(NIPAM) polymers functionalized with the antibiotics Vancomycin and Polymyxin-B that are sensitive to the presence of bacteria in solution. Binding of bacteria to the polymers causes a conformational change, resulting in collapse of the polymers and the formation of insoluble polymer/bacteria complexes. We have applied these novel polymers to our tissue engineered human skin model of a burn wound infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. When the polymers were removed from the infected skin, either in a polymer gel solution or in the form of hydrogel membranes, they removed bound bacteria, thus reducing the bacterial load in the infected skin model. These bacteria-binding polymers have many potential uses, including coatings for wound dressings.

  7. Chronic hepatitis B infection in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    There are no standard guidelines to follow when apatient with chronic hepatitis B infection becomespregnant or desires pregnancy. Topics to considerinclude which patients to treat, when to start treatment,what treatment to use and when to stop treatment.Without any prophylaxis or antiviral therapy, a hepatitisB surface antigen and E antigen positive mother has upto a 90% likelihood of vertical transmission of hepatitisB virus (HBV) to child. Standard of care in the UnitedStates to prevent perinatal transmission consists ofadministration of hepatitis B immune globulin andHBV vaccination to the infant. The two strongest riskfactors of mother to child transmission (MTCT) of HBVinfection despite immunoprophylaxis are high maternalHBV viral load and high activity of viral replication.The goal is to prevent transmission of HBV at birthby decreasing viral load and/or decreasing activity ofthe virus. Although it is still somewhat controversial,most evidence shows that starting antivirals in thethird trimester is effective in decreasing MTCT withoutaffecting fetal development. There is a growing body ofliterature supporting the safety and efficacy of antiviraltherapies to reduce MTCT of hepatitis B. There areno formal recommendations regarding which agent tochoose. Tenofovir, lamivudine and telbivudine have allbeen proven efficacious in decreasing viral load at birthwithout known birth defects, but final decision of whichantiviral medication to use will have to be determinedby physician and patient. The antivirals may bediscontinued immediately if patient is breastfeeding, orwithin first four weeks if infant is being formula fed.

  8. Nanosized Selenium: A Novel Platform Technology to Prevent Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi

    As an important category of bacterial infections, healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are considered an increasing threat to the safety and health of patients worldwide. HAIs lead to extended hospital stays, contribute to increased medical costs, and are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In the United States, infections encountered in the hospital or a health care facility affect more than 1.7 million patients, cost 35.7 billion to 45 billion, and contribute to 88,000 deaths in hospitals annually. The most conventional and widely accepted method to fight against bacterial infections is using antibiotics. However, because of the widespread and sometimes inappropriate use of antibiotics, many strains of bacteria have rapidly developed antibiotic resistance. Those new, stronger bacteria pose serious, worldwide threats to public health and welfare. In 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported antibiotic resistance as a global serious threat that is no longer a prediction for the future but is now reality. It has the potential to affect anyone, of any age, in any country. The most effective strategy to prevent antibiotic resistance is minimizing the use of antibiotics. In recent years, nanomaterials have been investigated as one of the potential substitutes of antibiotics. As a result of their vastly increased ratio of surface area to volume, nanomaterials will likely exert a stronger interaction with bacteria which may affect bacterial growth and propagation. A major concern of most existing antibacterial nanomaterials, like silver nanoparticles, is their potential toxicity. But selenium is a non-metallic material and a required nutrition for the human body, which is recommended by the FDA at a 53 to 60 μg daily intake. Nanosized selenium is considered to be healthier and less toxic compared with many metal-based nanomaterials due to the generation of reactive oxygen species from metals, especially heavy metals. Therefore, the objectives of

  9. High prevalence of occult hepatitis C virus infection in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Inmaculada; Bartolomé, Javier; Quiroga, Juan Antonio; Carreño, Vicente

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the absence of detectable antibodies against HCV and of viral RNA in serum is called occult HCV infection. Its prevalence and clinical significance in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is unknown. HCV RNA was tested for in the liver samples of 52 patients with chronic HBV infection and 21 (40 %) of them were positive for viral RNA (occult HCV infection). Liver fibrosis was found more frequently and the fibrosis score was significantly higher in patients with occult HCV than in negative ones, suggesting that occult HCV infection may have an impact on the clinical course of HBV infection.

  10. [Occult hepatitis B virus infection in chronic hepatitis C].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Young; Park, Eui Ju

    2013-09-01

    Occult HBV infection is defined as the presence of HBV DNA in the liver (with or without detectable or undetectable HBV DNA in the serum) of individuals testing negative for HBsAg. Studies on occult HBV infection in hepatitis C patients have reported highly variable prevalence, because the prevalence of occult HBV infection varies depending on the hepatitis B risk factors and methodological approaches. The most reliable diagnostic approach for detecting occult HBV detection is through examination of liver DNA extracts. HCV has been suspected to strongly suppress HBV replication up to the point where it may be directly responsible for occult HBV infection development. However, more data are needed to arrive at a definitive conclusion regarding the role of HCV in inducing occult HBV infection. Occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients is a complex biological entity with possible relevant clinical implications. Influence of occult HBV infection on the clinical outcomes of chronic hepatitis C may be considered negative. However, recent studies have shown that occult HBV infection could be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and contribute to the worsening of the course of chronic liver disease over time in chronic hepatitis C patients. Nevertheless, the possible role of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C is still unresolved and no firm conclusion has been made up until now. It still remains unclear how occult HBV infection affects the treatment of chronic hepatitis C. Therefore, in order to resolve current controversies and understand the pathogenic role and clinical impacts of occult HBV infection in chronic hepatitis C patients, well-designed clinical studies are needed.

  11. Sex influence on chronic intestinal inflammation in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Robert S; Myles, Mathew H; Livingston, Beth A; Criley, Jennifer M; Franklin, Craig L

    2004-06-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus is a bacterial pathogen of mice that has been reported to cause chronic intestinal inflammation in A/JCr, germfree Swiss Webster, and immunodeficient mice. To the authors' knowledge, the influence of sex on development of chronic intestinal inflammation in H. hepaticus-infected mice has not been investigated. The purposes of the study reported here were to determine whether severity of intestinal inflammation differs between male and female A/JCr mice chronically infected with H. hepaticus and to characterize the mucosal immune response in these mice. The cecum of male and female A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus for 1 month and 3 months was objectively evaluated histologically for intestinal disease. Also, semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was done to measure interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-10, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), interferon-inducible protein of 10 kDa (IP-10), and monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) mRNA values in the cecal tissue of these mice. Significant differences in cecal lesion scores were not present at 1 month after infection. However, infected female mice had significantly up-regulated expression of cecal IL-10, MIP-1alpha, IP-10, and MIG mRNA compared with that in uninfected females, and expression of IL-10 and MIP-1alpha was significantly greater than that detected in infected male mice (P JCr mice, females develop more severe intestinal inflammation than do males, and the chronic mucosal inflammation is polarized toward a Th1 response that is not down-regulated by increased activity of IL-10. We propose that H. hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice will serve as a good animal model with which to study the influence of sex on bacterial-induced mucosal inflammation.

  12. Detection of intracellular bacterial communities in human urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Rosen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs. These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18% urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41% urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29% of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001. Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22% had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45% had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The

  13. Virulent bacterial infection improves aversive learning performance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babin, Aurélie; Kolly, Sylvain; Kawecki, Tadeusz J

    2014-10-01

    Virulent infections are expected to impair learning ability, either as a direct consequence of stressed physiological state or as an adaptive response that minimizes diversion of energy from immune defense. This prediction has been well supported for mammals and bees. Here, we report an opposite result in Drosophila melanogaster. Using an odor-mechanical shock conditioning paradigm, we found that intestinal infection with bacterial pathogens Pseudomonas entomophila or Erwinia c. carotovora improved flies' learning performance after a 1h retention interval. Infection with P. entomophila (but not E. c. carotovora) also improved learning performance after 5 min retention. No effect on learning performance was detected for intestinal infections with an avirulent GacA mutant of P. entomophila or for virulent systemic (hemocoel) infection with E. c. carotovora. Assays of unconditioned responses to odorants and shock do not support a major role for changes in general responsiveness to stimuli in explaining the changes in learning performance, although differences in their specific salience for learning cannot be excluded. Our results demonstrate that the effects of pathogens on learning performance in insects are less predictable than suggested by previous studies, and support the notion that immune stress can sometimes boost cognitive abilities.

  14. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  15. Evaluation of localized bacterial infection using radioisotope-labeled nucleosides imaging modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Lee, Tae Sup; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Kyo Chul; An, Gwang II; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo [KIRAMS, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sang Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Conventional diagnostic methods for infections are difficult to distinguish localized bacterial infections from sites of sterile inflammation. For this reason, the importance of developing methods to image bacterial infections is widely recognized. In this study to acquire bacterial infection imaging with radiolabeled nucleosides, in vitro bacterial thymidine kinase (tk) activities of Salmonella typhimurium with [{sup 18}F]FLT and [{sup 125}I]IVDU were measured and localized infections model in BALB/c mice was imaged with [{sup 18}F]FLT or [{sup 125}I]FIAU

  16. Genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, J; Lin, Haili; McIntosh, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of genus Phyllanthus for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection we performed a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Randomized trials comparing genus Phyllanthus vs. placebo, no intervention, general nonspecific treatment, other herbal medicine...

  17. Chronic granulomatous disease of childhood: an unusual cause of recurrent uncommon infections in a 61-year-old man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Isman-Nelkenbaum; B. Wolach; R. Gavrieli; D. Roos; E. Sprecher; E. Bash; A. Gat; H. Sprecher; R. Ben-Ami; T. Zeeli

    2011-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency that affects 1 : 250 000 of the population, which is characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and by granuloma formation. We investigated a 61-year-old man presented with a 20-year history of a relapsing skin

  18. Clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Kyoung; Lee, Chang Hun; Kim, In Hee; Kim, Seon Min; Jang, Ji Won; Kim, Seong Hun; Kim, Sang Wook; Lee, Seung Ok; Lee, Soo Teik; Kim, Dae-Ghon

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial infection is an important cause of death in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and prognostic impact of bacterial infection in hospitalized patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We retrospectively analyzed data from 409 patients consecutively admitted to a tertiary referral center with ALD diagnosis. Of a total of 544 admissions, 133 (24.4%) cases presented with bacterial infection, of which 116 were community-acquired whereas 17 were hospital-acquired. The common types of infection were pneumonia (38%), biliary tract infection (17%), soft tissue infection (12%), and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (9%). Diabetes, serum Na patients with ALD. Overall 30-day and 90-day mortalities in patients with bacterial infection were significantly (P patients with ALD. A thorough evaluation at admission or on clinical deterioration is required to detect possible infection with prompt management.

  19. Immune regulation in chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartling, Hans Jakob; Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie; Nielsen, Nick Schou;

    2016-01-01

    The immunological result of infection with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) depends on the delicate balance between a vigorous immune response that may clear the infection, but with a risk of unspecific inflammation and, or a less inflammatory response that leads to chronic infection. In general, exhaustion...... and impairment of cytotoxic function of HCV-specific T cells and NK cells are found in patients with chronic HCV infection. In contrast, an increase in immune regulatory functions is found primarily in form of increased IL-10 production possibly due to increased level and function of anti-inflammatory Tregs....... Thus, the major immune players during chronic HCV infection are characterized by a decrease of cytotoxic function and increase of inhibitory functions. This may be an approach to diminish intrahepatic and systemic inflammation. Finally, there has been increasing awareness of regulatory functions...

  20. Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of hospital acquired urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomially acquired infection. It is important to know the etiology and antibiotic susceptibility infectious agents to guide the initial empirical treatment. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of bacterial strains and their antibiotic susceptibility in nosocomially acquired urinary tract infection in a university hospital between January and June 2003. METHODS: We analyzed the data of 188 patients with positive urine culture (= 10(5 colony-forming units/mL following a period of 48 hours after admission. RESULTS: Half of patients were male. Mean age was 50.26 ± 22.7 (SD, range 3 months to 88 years. Gram-negative bacteria were the agent in approximately 80% of cases. The most common pathogens were E. coli (26%, Klebsiella sp. (15%, P. aeruginosa (15% and Enterococcus sp. (11%. The overall bacteria susceptibility showed that the pathogens were more sensible to imipenem (83%, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides; and were highly resistant to ampicillin (27% and cefalothin (30%. It is important to note the low susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (42% and norfloxacin (43%. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that if one can not wait the results of urine culture, the best choices to begin empiric treatment are imipenem, second or third generation cephalosporin and aminoglycosides. Cefalothin and ampicillin are quite ineffective to treat these infections.

  1. Bacterial Infection Complicating Varicella Infection: A 10-Year Review of Hospitalized Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golda Milo-Manson

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available An increased incidence of Streptococci pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS] infections and rheumatic fever has been reported over the past decade. The present study was conducted to determine whether a similar increase in such infections was observed after varicella, an infection previously shown to be associated with a high incidence of streptococcal infections. The charts of all children admitted with chickenpox to the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario from January 1, 1980 to December 31, 1989 were reviewed. Immunocompromised children and those hospitalized for another reason who had an incidental diagnosis of chickenpox were excluded. Twenty-five cases with bacterial infection complicating chickenpox were compared with 103 patients without secondary infection. No statistically significant differences were observed for age, gender, duration of illness prior to hospitalization or duration of hospitalization in the two groups. GAS was the most frequent isolate in the cases, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Haemophilus influenzae. The types of infection were significantly different for GAS compared with other organisms, with a predominance of skin infections in the former group (χ2 analysis, P<0.05. No increase in the incidence of GAS infections was observed over time. This study confirms the importance of GAS infections in patients with varicella, but no increase was observed in hospitalized children during the 10-year study period.

  2. Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology in Sri Lanka: Are leptospirosis and Hantaviral infection likely causes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, Chandika Damesh; Sarathkumara, Yomani Dilukshi

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease of uncertain etiology (CKDu) has been a severe burden and a public health crisis in Sri Lanka over the past two decades. Many studies have established hypotheses to identify potential risk factors although causative agents, risk factors and etiology of this disease are still uncertain. Several studies have postulated that fungal and bacterial nephrotoxins are a possible etiological factor; however, the precise link between hypothesized risk factors and the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease has yet to be proven in prior studies. Leptospirosis and Hantavirus infections are important zoonotic diseases that are naturally maintained and transmitted via infected rodent populations and which present similar clinical and epidemiological features. Both infections are known to be a cause of acute kidney damage that can proceed into chronic renal failure. Several studies have reported presence of both infections in Sri Lanka. Therefore, we hypothesized that pathogenic Leptospira or Hantavirus are possible causative agents of acute kidney damage which eventually progresses to chronic kidney disease in Sri Lanka. The proposed hypothesis will be evaluated by means of an observational study design. Past infection will be assessed by a cross-sectional study to detect the presence of IgG antibodies with further confirmatory testing among chronic kidney disease patients and individuals from the community in selected endemic areas compared to low prevalence areas. Identification of possible risk factors for these infections will be followed by a case-control study and causality will be further determined with a cohort study. If the current hypothesis is true, affected communities will be subjected for medical interventions related to the disease for patient management while considering supportive therapies. Furthermore and possibly enhance their preventive and control measures to improve vector control to decrease the risk of infection.

  3. Ribavirin monotherapy for chronic hepatitis C infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brok, Jesper; Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Adding ribavirin to interferon improves treatment response for patients with chronic hepatitis C, but the effects of ribavirin monotherapy are unclear. We conducted a systematic review to assess the benefits and harms of ribavirin monotherapy for patients with chronic hepatitis C....

  4. IL-22 Defect During Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection Triggers Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Pichavant

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is linked to episodes of exacerbations caused by bacterial infections due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Our objective was to identify during COPD, factors of susceptibility to bacterial infections among cytokine network and their role in COPD exacerbations. S. pneumoniae was used to sub-lethally challenge mice chronically exposed to air or cigarette smoke (CS and to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from non-smokers, smokers and COPD patients. The immune response and the cytokine production were evaluated. Delayed clearance of the bacteria and stronger lung inflammation observed in infected CS-exposed mice were associated with an altered production of IL-17 and IL-22 by innate immune cells. This defect was related to a reduced production of IL-1β and IL-23 by antigen presenting cells. Importantly, supplementation with recombinant IL-22 restored bacterial clearance in CS-exposed mice and limited lung alteration. In contrast with non-smokers, blood NK and NKT cells from COPD patients failed to increase IL-17 and IL-22 levels in response to S. pneumoniae, in association with a defect in IL-1β and IL-23 secretion. This study identified IL-17 and IL-22 as susceptibility factors in COPD exacerbation. Therefore targeting such cytokines could represent a potent strategy to control COPD exacerbation.

  5. 应用抗生素治疗老年慢性肾功能不全并细菌感染60例疗效分析%Clinical Effect of Antibiotics to Treat 60 Elderly Patients with Chronic Renal Insufficiency and Bacterial Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    滕玲; 覃建阳

    2012-01-01

    目的 探索应用抗生素治疗慢性肾功能不全失代偿期合并下呼吸道感染的老年患者的临床效果和对其肾功能的影响.方法 选取我院自2008年5月~2011年10月我院治疗的60例肾功能不全合并肺部感染的老年患者纳入观察组,同期选取60肾功能正常的老年下呼吸道感染的患者纳入对照组.两组患者应用头孢哌酮进行治疗,观察两组患者的总体治疗效果差异以及观察组患者治疗前后的肾功能血肌酐、尿素氮、尿酸、肌酐清除率水平差异.结果 观察组和对照组患者平均治疗时间分别为(10.15±3.23)天和(7.32±2.18)天,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);两组患者的总体治疗效果差异不明显(P>0.05),但痊愈率差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);观察组治疗前后患者的血肌酐、尿素氮、内生肌酐清除率水平与治疗前比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 肾功能不全的老年患者一旦发生下呼吸道感染,应用抗生素治疗的难度增大,治疗过程中应密切留意患者的肾功能情况,并合理控制药物用量,一旦出现肾功能衰竭应立即停药,必要时进行血液透析.%Objective Explore the clinical effect of antibiotics to treat 60 elderly patients with chronic renal insufficiency and bacterial infection, and influence to the renal function. Methods Choosing 60 elderly patients with chronic renal failure and 60 elderly patients with normal renal function, all patients were suffered from lower respiratory tract infection, who were treated by Ceftazidime in our hospital from May 2008 to October 2011. Observe the difference of clinical effect and renal function change before and after treatment. Results The average treatment time of observation group and control group were(10.15±3.23) d and (7.32±2.18) d (P<0.05); There were no statistical means of overall treatment effect(P>0.05), but difference of cure rate between two groups was significant(P<0

  6. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic change...

  7. Chronic rhinovirus infection in an adult with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, William G; Bright-Thomas, Rowland J; Tilston, Peter; Mutton, Kenneth J; Guiver, Malcolm; Webb, A Kevin; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is usually considered a self-limiting infection. We report a case of chronic infection with rhinovirus A type 33 in a 43-year-old male with CF which has persisted for over 2 years.

  8. Chronic hepatitis E virus infection in liver transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; van den Berg, Arie P.; Porte, Robert J.; Benne, Cornelis A.; Vennema, Harry; Reimerink, Johan H. J.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is known to run a self-limiting course. Sporadic cases of acute hepatitis due to infection with HEV genotype 3, present in pig populations, are increasingly recognized. Zoonotic transmission seems infrequent. The entity of unexplained chronic hepatitis after liver t

  9. Invasive fungal infections in patients with chronic granulomatous disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henriet, S.S.V.; Verweij, P.E.; Holland, S.M.; Warris, A.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are a major threat for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) patients. The present study provides a comprehensive overview of published invasive fungal infections in the CGD host through an extensive review of epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic data. In ad

  10. Chronic hepatitis E infection in lung transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Puchhammer-Stockl, Elisabeth; van der Weide, Hinke Y.; Haagsma, Elizabeth B.; Jaksch, Peter; Bejvl, Isabella; Niesters, Hubert G.; Verschuuren, Erik A. M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 has been identified in patients with autochthonous HEV infections in developed countries and is currently being recognized as an emerging zoonotic pathogen. HEV infection may lead to a chronic hepatitis in immune-compromised patients. METHODS: We studie

  11. Semen analysis in chronic bacterial prostatitis: diagnostic and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magri, Vittorio; Wagenlehner, Florian M E; Montanari, Emanuele; Marras, Emanuela; Orlandi, Viviana; Restelli, Antonella; Torresani, Erminio; Naber, Kurt G; Perletti, Gianpaolo

    2009-01-01

    The significance and diagnostic value of semen analysis in chronic bacterial prostatitis has been extensively debated and remains controversial. To investigate the diagnostic relevance of semen culture in the bacteriological workup of prostatitis patients, we retrospectively analyzed a clinical database of 696 symptomatic patients. All patients were routinely subjected to a four-glass test, followed by semen culture and analysis. This allowed to dissect from the database three different diagnostic scenarios, and to compare the 'two-glass' pre-/post- massage test and the standard 'four-glass' test with a 'five-glass' test (four-glass plus post-VB3 semen culture). The 'five-glass' test showed 3.6- or 6.5-fold increases in relative sensitivity and lesser reductions (−13.2% or −14.7%) in relative specificity for traditional uropathogens (TUs) compared with the four-glass or two-glass test, respectively. The area under the ROC curve and Jouden's index were increased, whereas positive and negative likelihood ratios were lower than comparators, indicating that the 'five-glass' assay may be superior in confirming the negative outcome of both standard tests. The five-, four-, and two-glass tests detected TUs (Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococci, etc.) in 120, 33, and 20 patients and unusual pathogens (Streptococci, other Gram-positive species, Mycoplasmata, and others) in 130, 56, and 45 patients, respectively. When patients were subjected to pharmacological treatment, including a combination of a fluoroquinolone and a macrolide, no differences in eradication rates were observed between groups diagnosed with different tests, irrespective of pathogen category. Eradication was associated with long-term sign/symptom remission; no significant intergroup differences in sign/symptom scores were observed throughout a 24-month off-therapy follow-up period. In conclusion, our data support the usefulness of semen analysis in the diagnostic workup of prostatitis patients when this

  12. The burden of invasive bacterial infections in Pemba, Zanzibar.

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    Kamala Thriemer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We conducted a surveillance study to determine the leading causes of bloodstream infection in febrile patients seeking treatment at three district hospitals in Pemba Island, Zanzibar, Tanzania, an area with low malaria transmission. METHODS: All patients above two months of age presenting to hospital with fever were screened, and blood was collected for microbiologic culture and malaria testing. Bacterial sepsis and malaria crude incidence rates were calculated for a one-year period and were adjusted for study participation and diagnostic sensitivity of blood culture. RESULTS: Blood culture was performed on 2,209 patients. Among them, 166 (8% samples yielded bacterial growth; 87 (4% were considered as likely contaminants; and 79 (4% as pathogenic bacteria. The most frequent pathogenic bacteria isolated were Salmonella Typhi (n = 46; 58%, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 12; 15%. The crude bacteremia rate was 6/100,000 but when adjusted for potentially missed cases the rate may be as high as 163/100,000. Crude and adjusted rates for S. Typhi infections and malaria were 4 and 110/100,000 and 4 and 47/100,000, respectively. Twenty three (51%, 22 (49% and 22 (49% of the S. Typhi isolates were found to be resistant toward ampicillin, chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole, respectively. Multidrug resistance (MDR against the three antimicrobials was detected in 42% of the isolates. CONCLUSIONS: In the presence of very low malaria incidence we found high rates of S. Typhi and S. pneumoniae infections on Pemba Island, Zanzibar. Preventive measures such as vaccination could reduce the febrile disease burden.

  13. PFGE and antibiotic susceptibility phenotype analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain chronically infecting Cystic Fibrosis patients

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    Giovanna Pulcrano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of chronic lung infection and following pulmonary worsening of cystic fibrosis patients. To verify whether bacterial modifications regarding motility, mucoidy, and serum susceptibility proceeded from an adaptation to chronic infection or a replacement with a new strain, sequential P. aeruginosa isolates of known phenotype collected from 5 cystic fibrosis patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electophoresis (PFGE. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of all isolates was performed by the disc diffusion method. PFGE typing demonstrated that strains dissimilar in colony morphotype and of different antibiotic susceptibility patterns could be of the same genotype. Some patients were colonized with a rather constant P. aeruginosa flora, with strains of different phenotypes but of one genotype. Instead, some patients may be colonized by more than one genotype. Secretion of mucoid exopolysaccharide and acquisition of a new antibiotic susceptibility phenotype in these strain appear to evolve during chronic colonization in cystic fibrosis patients from specific adaptation to infection rather than from acquisition of new bacterial strains.

  14. Progression of chronic hepatitis and preneoplasia in Helicobacter hepaticus-infected A/JCr mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Arlin B; Boutin, Samuel R; Whary, Mark T; Sundina, Nataliya; Ge, Zhongming; Cormier, Kathleen; Fox, James G

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter hepaticus infection induces sustained inflammation and carcinoma of the liver in A/JCr mice, and serves as a model of human cancers associated with viral hepatitis and H. pylorichronic gastritis. Here we describe the pathogenesis of premalignant disease in A/JCr mice infected with H. hepaticus. We inoculated dams intragestationally and/or pups postnatally, and evaluated offspring at 3, 6, or 12 months. Mice infected at or before 3 weeks of age, but not at 12 weeks, developed disease. Male mice were most affected, but expressed a bimodal pattern of susceptibility. Males exhibited lobular necrogranulomatous and interface (chronic active) hepatitis, while females usually developed intraportal (chronic persistent) hepatitis. Portal inflammation was slowly progressive, with tertiary lymphoid nodule development by 12 months. Hepatic bacterial load and preneoplastic lesions, including clear and tigroid cell foci of cellular alteration, were correlated with lobular hepatitis severity. No extrahepatic surrogate disease marker reliably predicted individual hepatitis grade. In conclusion, gender and bacterial exposure timing are key determinants of H. hepaticus disease outcomes. Intrahepatic inflammation is driven by local signals characterized by a vigorous but nonsterilizing immune response. Continued study of chronic hepatitis progression may reveal therapeutic targets to reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Long-term impact of systemic bacterial infection on the cerebral vasculature and microglia

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    Püntener Ursula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic infection leads to generation of inflammatory mediators that result in metabolic and behavioural changes. Repeated or chronic systemic inflammation leads to a state of innate immune tolerance: a protective mechanism against overactivity of the immune system. In this study, we investigated the immune adaptation of microglia and brain vascular endothelial cells in response to systemic inflammation or bacterial infection. Methods Mice were given repeated doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS or a single injection of live Salmonella typhimurium. Inflammatory cytokines were measured in serum, spleen and brain, and microglial phenotype studied by immunohistochemistry. To assess priming of the innate immune response in the brain, mice were infected with Salmonella typhimurium and subsequently challenged with a focal unilateral intracerebral injection of LPS. Results Repeated systemic LPS challenges resulted in increased brain IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-12 levels, despite attenuated systemic cytokine production. Each LPS challenge induced significant changes in burrowing behaviour. In contrast, brain IL-1β and IL-12 levels in Salmonella typhimurium-infected mice increased over three weeks, with high interferon-γ levels in the circulation. Behavioural changes were only observed during the acute phase of the infection. Microglia and cerebral vasculature display an activated phenotype, and focal intracerebral injection of LPS four weeks after infection results in an exaggerated local inflammatory response when compared to non-infected mice. Conclusions These studies reveal that the innate immune cells in the brain do not become tolerant to systemic infection, but are primed instead. This may lead to prolonged and damaging cytokine production that may have a profound effect on the onset and/or progression of pre-existing neurodegenerative disease.

  16. Association of Chronic HBV Infection with Chronic Lymphoproliferative Disorders: A Review and Case Report

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    Inna M. Mulina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a clinical report on the associated course of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with Castleman's disease (CD. We noticed the reactivation of previously latent chronic hepatitis B (CHB with high replicative activity of HBV DNA during the treatment of lymphoproliferative disease. This clinical case dictates the need for pre-emptive therapy of HBV infection with nucleoside analogues in patients who are receiving chemotherapy.

  17. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter

    2009-01-01

    of bacteria causing acute exacerbations. Also lung infections like pneumonia, lung abscess and empyema are more often seen in patients with COPD than in healthy subjects. With regard to extrapulmonary infections, it seems that COPD patients are not at higher risk of infection compared with subjects without......This review article focuses on the risk of infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Throughout the years there have been a number of studies describing the risk of pulmonary infections in patients with COPD, whereas only few studies have focused on the risk...... of infection outside the lungs. With increasing severity of COPD the risk of respiratory tract infection also increases. The impairment of the innate immune system is most likely responsible for both the colonization of respiratory tract with bacteria and for an increased risk of infection with new strains...

  18. Antimicrobial Nanoparticle for the Treatment of Bacterial Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornpattananangkul, Dissaya

    Liposomes are spherical lipid vesicles with bilayered membrane structure, which have been recognized as one of the most widely used carriers for delivering a myriad of pharmaceuticals. Liposomes can carry both hydrophilic and hydrophobic agents with high efficiency and protect them from undesired effects of external conditions. However, the applications of liposomes are usually limited by their instability during storage. They are inclined to fuse with one another immediately after preparation, resulting in undesired mixing, increase in size, and payload loss. To overcome this limitation, this dissertation will focus on the technology to stabilize liposomes during storage and destabilize at specific conditions in order to allow controllable therapeutic release, as well as demonstrate their application to treat one of the bacterial infection diseases, acne vulgaris. The first area of this research is stimuli-responsive liposomes development, where the liposomes are stabilized by introducing gold nanoparticles to adsorb to their surface. As a result, the liposomes are prevented from fusing with one another and undesirable payload release during storage or physiological environments. Moreover, therapeutic is controllably released depending on environment conditions, such as acidic pH and bacterial virulence factor. In case of acid-responsive liposomes, the bound gold nanoparticles can effectively prevent liposomes from fusing with one another at neutral pH value, while at acidic environment (e.g. pHtoxin. When nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes encounter with bacteria that secrete toxin, the toxin will insert into the liposome membranes and form pores, through which the encapsulated therapeutic agents are released. The released drugs subsequently impose antimicrobial effects on the toxin-secreting bacteria. It was observed that in the presence of toxin-secreting bacteria, 100% of the encapsulated antibiotics were released from the gold nanoparticle-stabilized liposomes

  19. Immune activation response in chronic HIV-infected patients: influence of Hepatitis C virus coinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Márquez

    Full Text Available We have analyzed the parameters (bacterial translocation, immune activation and regulation, presence of HCV coinfection which could be implicated in an inappropriate immune response from individuals with chronic HIV infection. The influence of them on the evolution of CD4+ T cell count has been investigated.Seventy HIV-infected patients [monoinfected by HIV (n = 20, HCV-coinfected (with (n = 25 and without (n = 25 liver cirrhosis] and 25 healthy controls were included. Median duration of HIV infection was 20 years. HIV- and HCV-related parameters, as well as markers relative to bacterial translocation, monocyte and lymphocyte activation and regulation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were the increase of CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up (12 months.Increased values of bacterial translocation, measured by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, monocyte and lymphocyte activation markers and T regulatory lymphocytes were detected in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Serum sCD14 and IL-6 were increased in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis in comparison with those with chronic hepatitis or HIV-monoinfected individuals. Time with undetectable HIV load was not related with these parameters. The presence of cirrhosis was negatively associated with a CD4+ T cell count increase.In patients with a chronic HIV infection, a persistent increase of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and monocyte and lymphocyte modifications are present. HCV-related cirrhosis is associated with more elevated serum concentrations of monocyte-derived markers. Cirrhosis influences the continued immune reconstitution of these patients.

  20. Immune Activation Response in Chronic HIV-Infected Patients: Influence of Hepatitis C Virus Coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Mercedes; Romero-Cores, Paula; Montes-Oca, Monserrat; Martín-Aspas, Andrés; Soto-Cárdenas, María-José; Guerrero, Francisca; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Clotilde; Girón-González, José-Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We have analyzed the parameters (bacterial translocation, immune activation and regulation, presence of HCV coinfection) which could be implicated in an inappropriate immune response from individuals with chronic HIV infection. The influence of them on the evolution of CD4+ T cell count has been investigated. Patients and methods Seventy HIV-infected patients [monoinfected by HIV (n = 20), HCV-coinfected (with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) liver cirrhosis)] and 25 healthy controls were included. Median duration of HIV infection was 20 years. HIV- and HCV-related parameters, as well as markers relative to bacterial translocation, monocyte and lymphocyte activation and regulation were considered as independent variables. Dependent variables were the increase of CD4+ T cell count during the follow-up (12 months). Results Increased values of bacterial translocation, measured by lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, monocyte and lymphocyte activation markers and T regulatory lymphocytes were detected in HIV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV coinfected patients. Serum sCD14 and IL-6 were increased in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis in comparison with those with chronic hepatitis or HIV-monoinfected individuals. Time with undetectable HIV load was not related with these parameters. The presence of cirrhosis was negatively associated with a CD4+ T cell count increase. Conclusion In patients with a chronic HIV infection, a persistent increase of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and monocyte and lymphocyte modifications are present. HCV-related cirrhosis is associated with more elevated serum concentrations of monocyte-derived markers. Cirrhosis influences the continued immune reconstitution of these patients. PMID:25775475

  1. Towards rational treatment of bacterial infections during extended space travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter W; Sommer, Andrei P

    2005-09-01

    In the next 15-30 years, manned space flight to Mars, our planetary neighbour, will become a reality and astronauts are likely to spend at least 2-3 years away from Earth. Time spent in such extreme environments will result in a diminution of immune status and profound changes in the human bacterial microflora. In microgravity, the efficacy of antibiotics is reduced and microbial mutation rates increase dramatically. These factors will impinge on the capacity to treat effectively the infections that will doubtless arise during such long and stressful endeavour. We highlight new rationales for the treatment of infectious disease that may be applicable to therapy in extreme environments such as deep space.

  2. Bacterial infection in an Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin Hai; Xia, Zhao Fei

    2013-03-01

    One pregnant captive Irrawaddy dolphin (Orcaella brevirostris), with a body length of 225 cm, was found dead on 8 June 2009. The dolphin was anorexic and circling at the bottom of the pool before death. Laboratory tests revealed an increased leukocyte count and decreased platelet count; increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate; and slightly decreased red blood cell count, hemoglobin, and hematocrit. Alkaline phosphatase, creatinine, and glucose were significantly decreased. Moreover, uric acid and alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels were elevated. A 57-cm fetus was recovered. The respiratory system, intestinal mucosa, mesentery and mesenteric lymph nodes, and spleen were congested and hemorrhagic. The heart, liver, and kidney appeared normal. Klebsiella spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were identified in the amniotic fluid. This is the first case report of bacterial infection in an Irrawaddy dolphin.

  3. Infection-related hemolysis and susceptibility to Gram-negative bacterial co-infection

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    Katharine eOrf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Increased susceptibility to co-infection with enteric Gram-negative bacteria, particularly non-typhoidal Salmonella, is reported in malaria and Oroya fever (Bartonella bacilliformis infection, and can lead to increased mortality. Accumulating epidemiological evidence indicates a causal association with risk of bacterial co-infection, rather than just co-incidence of common risk factors. Both malaria and Oroya fever are characterised by hemolysis, and observations in humans and animal models suggest that hemolysis causes the susceptibility to bacterial co-infection. Evidence from animal models implicates hemolysis in the impairment of a variety of host defence mechanisms, including macrophage dysfunction, neutrophil dysfunction and impairment of adaptive immune responses. One mechanism supported by evidence from animal models and human data, is the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in bone marrow, which impairs the ability of developing neutrophils to mount a competent oxidative burst. As a result, dysfunctional neutrophils become a new niche for replication of intracellular bacteria. Here we critically appraise and summarize the key evidence for mechanisms which may contribute to these very specific combinations of co-infections, and propose interventions to ameliorate this risk.

  4. The Expression of CD2 in Chronic HBV Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Li; Baotai Qi; Ping Chen; Linjing He; Ping Wang; Yuqiang Ji; Ming Xie

    2008-01-01

    It was previously reported that several kinds of intercellular adhesion molecules are closely related to chronic HBV infection. The complex of CD2 and CD58 plays an important role in enhancing the adhesion of T lymphocytes to target cells. and promoting hyperplasia and activation of T lymphocytes. In this study, we detected the level of CD2 expressed on the surface of PBMC, the expression Ievel of CD2 mRNA in PBMC and the percentage of CD2 positive cells in PBMC of patients with chronic HBV infection and compared them with the expression level of normal controls. We also determined the level of serum HBV DNA from patients with chronic HBV infection and from normal controls. The clinical characteristics of hepatic function were tested as well. The results showed that the expression of CD2 significantly increased with the severity of chronic HBV infection, which suggested that CD2 might contribute to the hepatocyte damage in chronic HBV infection. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.2008; 5(1):69-73.

  5. Preliminary molecular analysis of bacterial composition in periapical lesions with primary endodontic infections of deciduous teeth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHANG Jia-jian; YANG Qiu-bo; ZHAO Huan-ying; CAI Shuang; ZHOU Yan; SUN Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacterial composition of periapical lesions in deciduous teeth has not been well documented.This study was designed to explore the bacterial compositions,especially the dominant bacteria in periapical lesions using 16S rRNA sequencing.Methods Tissue samples were collected from 11 periapical lesions in deciduous teeth with primary endodontic infections.DNA was extracted from each sample and analyzed using 16S rRNA cloning and sequencing for the identification of bacteria.Results All DNA samples were positive for 16S rRNA gene PCR.One hundred and fifty-one phylotypes from 810 clones were identified to eight phyla,and each sample contained an average of 25.9 phylotypes.In addition,59 phylotypes were detected in more than two samples,and Fusobacterium (F.) nucleatum (8/11),Dialister (D.) invisus (8/11),Campylobacter (C.) gracilis (7/11),Escherichia (E.) coil DH1 (6/11),Aggregatibacter (A.) segnis (6/11),and Streptococcus (S.) mitis (6/11) were the most prevalent species.Furthermore,45 as-yet-uncultivated phylotypes were also identified.Conclusions Chronic periapical lesions in deciduous teeth contained polymicrobial infections.F.nucleatum,D.invisus,C.gracilis,E.coli DH1,A.segnis,and S.mitis were the most prevalent species detected by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  6. Biofilms bacterianos e infección Bacterial biofilms and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Lasa

    2005-08-01

    describe el papel que juegan los biofilms en infecciones humanas persistentes.In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths and cancer (7.1 million deaths (WHO report 2004. The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  7. Chronic hepatitis caused by persistent parvovirus B19 infection

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    Mogensen Trine H

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human infection with parvovirus B19 may lead to a diverse spectrum of clinical manifestations, including benign erythema infectiosum in children, transient aplastic crisis in patients with haemolytic anaemia, and congenital hydrops foetalis. These different diseases represent direct consequences of the ability of parvovirus B19 to target the erythroid cell lineage. However, accumulating evidence suggests that this virus can also infect other cell types resulting in diverse clinical manifestations, of which the pathogenesis remains to be fully elucidated. This has prompted important questions regarding the tropism of the virus and its possible involvement in a broad range of infectious and autoimmune medical conditions. Case Presentation Here, we present an unusual case of persistent parvovirus B19 infection as a cause of chronic hepatitis. This patient had persistent parvovirus B19 viraemia over a period of more than four years and displayed signs of chronic hepatitis evidenced by fluctuating elevated levels of ALAT and a liver biopsy demonstrating chronic hepatitis. Other known causes of hepatitis and liver damage were excluded. In addition, the patient was evaluated for immunodeficiency, since she had lymphopenia both prior to and following clearance of parvovirus B19 infection. Conclusions In this case report, we describe the current knowledge on the natural history and pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 infection, and discuss the existing evidence of parvovirus B19 as a cause of acute and chronic hepatitis. We suggest that parvovirus B19 was the direct cause of this patient's chronic hepatitis, and that she had an idiopathic lymphopenia, which may have predisposed her to persistent infection, rather than bone marrow depression secondary to infection. In addition, we propose that her liver involvement may have represented a viral reservoir. Finally, we suggest that clinicians should be aware of parvovirus B19 as an unusual

  8. Review of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2011-02-01

    Chronic renal failure patients receiving hemodialysis and continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis often encounter gastrointestinal troubles over their long treatment period. Helicobacter pylori infection has close association with development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma, and is thought to be one of the major risk factors for gastrointestinal troubles in dialysis patients. However, it is unclear whether H. pylori infection is directly associated with progression of renal dysfunction and prognosis of chronic renal failure patients. Recent consensus shows that the prevalence of H. pylori infection in chronic renal failure patients is significantly lower than in subjects with normal renal function. In the natural history of H. pylori infection in hemodialysis patients, the prevalence of infection decreases as dialysis periods progressed, in particular within the first four years after the start of treatment. However, the chance of natural eradication becomes rare for patients receiving dialysis treatment for a long time. Moreover, chronic renal failure patients with H. pylori infection have a higher incidence of gastroduodenal diseases, and therefore, are recommended to receive eradication therapies, especially for those receiving treatment for a long time and with higher risks of complication. Intensive endoscopic check-ups for the prevention of gastrointestinal events and the discovery of peptic ulcer and neoplastic diseases at an early phase may be required.

  9. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  10. Tc-99m ciprofloxacin imaging in diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-KanRyu; Seong-MinLee; Do-WhanSeong; Jun-KyuSuh; SungeunKim; WonsickChoe; YeonsookMoon; Soo-HwanPai

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the value of Tc-99m ciprofloxacin imaging in the differential diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Methods: The study included 4 normal subjects as the negative controls, 2 patients with acute prostatitis or cystourethritis as the positive controls and 59 patients diagnosed as chronic bacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome by traditional laboratory tests. In every subject, the single photon emission computer-ized tomography images were obtained 3 h after intravenous injection of Tc-99m Ciprofloxacin. The results of the imaging were compared with those of laboratory tests. Results: On the images, negative uptake was observed in all normal subjects, while strong hot uptake, in the whole prostate of acute prostatitis patients and in the whole urethra of acute cystourethritis patients. In 13 (68 %) of 19 patients categorized as chronic bacterial prostatitis by standard laboratory tests, hot uptake with less intensity than that of acute prostatitis was observed in the prostate area around the prostatic urethra. Negative uptake in the prostate was observed in 6 of 19 patients (32 %) categorized as chronic bacterial prostatitis. Interestingly, hot uptake in the prostate was exhibited in 28 (70 %) of the 40 patients categorized as chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Conclusion: Tc-99m ciprofloxacin imaging is helpful in the differential diagnosis of prostatitis syndrome. (Asian J Androl 2003 Sep; 5:179-183 )

  11. Clinical indicators for bacterial co-infection in Ghanaian children with P. falciparum infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Verena Nielsen

    Full Text Available Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40% of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0% of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%, followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%. Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl, a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6-48.9, dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0-166.0 and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7-118.6. In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4-15.8, severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0-11.1 and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9-24.2. Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  12. Comparison of antibody repertoires produced by HIV-1 infection, other chronic and acute infections, and systemic autoimmune disease.

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    Felix Breden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies (Abs produced during HIV-1 infection rarely neutralize a broad range of viral isolates; only eight broadly-neutralizing (bNt monoclonal (MAbs have been isolated. Yet, to be effective, an HIV-1 vaccine may have to elicit the essential features of these MAbs. The V genes of all of these bNt MAbs are highly somatically mutated, and the V(H genes of five of them encode a long (≥ 20 aa third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3. This led us to question whether long CDR-H3s and high levels of somatic mutation (SM are a preferred feature of anti-HIV bNt MAbs, or if other adaptive immune responses elicit them in general. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assembled a V(H-gene sequence database from over 700 human MAbs of known antigen specificity isolated from chronic (viral infections (ChI, acute (bacterial and viral infections (AcI, and systemic autoimmune diseases (SAD, and compared their CDR-H3 length, number of SMs and germline V(H-gene usage. We found that anti-HIV Abs, regardless of their neutralization breadth, tended to have long CDR-H3s and high numbers of SMs. However, these features were also common among Abs associated with other chronic viral infections. In contrast, Abs from acute viral infections (but not bacterial infections tended to have relatively short CDR-H3s and a low number of SMs, whereas SAD Abs were generally intermediate in CDR-H3 length and number of SMs. Analysis of V(H gene usage showed that ChI Abs also tended to favor distal germline V(H-genes (particularly V(H1-69, especially in Abs bearing long CDR-H3s. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The striking difference between the Abs produced during chronic vs. acute viral infection suggests that Abs bearing long CDR-H3s, high levels of SM and V(H1-69 gene usage may be preferentially selected during persistent infection.

  13. Severe bacterial non-aids infections in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, O S; Reekie, J; Ristola, M;

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine incidence rates (IR) and identify risk factors for severe bacterial non-AIDS infections (SBnAI) requiring hospital admission.......This study aimed to determine incidence rates (IR) and identify risk factors for severe bacterial non-AIDS infections (SBnAI) requiring hospital admission....

  14. Antibiotic resistance in prevalent bacterial and protozoan sexually transmitted infections

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    Karl Krupp

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of multi-drug resistant sexually transmitted infections (STIs is causing a treatment crisis across the globe. While cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea is one of the most pressing issues, extensively antibiotic resistant Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma hominis are also becoming commonplace. Experts have suggested that the failure of current treatment regimens are "largely inevitable" and have called for entirely new classes of antimicrobial agents. With the exception of several new classes of drugs primarily targeting nosocomial infections, progress has been slow. While pharmaceutical companies continue to introduce new drugs, they are based on decade-old discoveries. While there is disagreement about what constitutes new classes of antibiotics, many experts suggest that the last truly new family of antimicrobials was discovered in 1987. This review summarizes the existing literature on antibiotic resistance in common bacterial and protozoal STIs. It also briefly discusses several of the most promising alternatives to current therapies, and further examines how advances in drug delivery, formulation, concentration, and timing are improving the efficacy of existing treatments. Finally, the paper discusses the current state of pharmaceutical development for multidrug-resistant STI.

  15. Diagnosis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in infants and children with chronic liver disease: A cohort study

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    Abdel-Latif Zainab

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP is a serious complication in infants and children with chronic liver disease (CLD; however its diagnosis might be difficult. We aimed to study the feasibility of diagnosing SBP by routine ascitic fluid tapping in infants and children with CLD. Methods We enrolled thirty infants and children with biopsy-proven CLD and ascites. Ascitic fluid was examined for biochemical indices, cytology and cell count. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteriological cultures of ascitic fluid were preformed. Direct smears were prepared from ascitic fluid deposit for Gram and Zheil-Nelson staining. Results Patients were divided into three groups: Group I included five patients with SBP in which the cell count was ≥ 250/mm3 and culture was positive (16.7%, Group II, eight patients with culture negative neutrocytic ascites (CNNA with cells ≥ 250/mm3 and negative culture (26.7% and Group III, seventeen negative patients (56.6% in which cells were 3 and culture was negative. None of our patients had bacteriascites (i.e. culture positive with cells 3. Presence of fever was significantly higher in SBP and CNNA. The mean lactate dehydrogenase (LDH level was significantly higher in ascitic fluid in the infected versus sterile cases (p Conclusions SBP is a rather common complication in children with CLD. Culture of the ascitic fluid is not always diagnostic of infection. Biochemical parameters of the ascitic fluid definitely add to the diagnostic accuracy. LDH ascitic/serum ratio ≥ 0.5, an arterial-ascitic pH gradient ≥ 0.1 and total ascitic fluid protein ≤ 1 gm/dl are the most significant parameters suggesting infection.

  16. Toxoplasma gondii profilin promotes recruitment of Ly6Chi CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes that can confer resistance to bacterial infection.

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    Lori M Neal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes are essential to host defense against Toxoplasma gondii, Listeria monocytogenes and other infections. During T. gondii infection impaired inflammatory monocyte emigration results in severe inflammation and failure to control parasite replication. However, the T. gondii factors that elicit these monocytes are unknown. Early studies from the Remington laboratory showed that mice with a chronic T. gondii infection survive lethal co-infections with unrelated pathogens, including L. monocytogenes, but a mechanistic analysis was not performed. Here we report that this enhanced survival against L. monocytogenes is due to early reduction of bacterial burdens and elicitation of Ly6C+ inflammatory monocytes. We demonstrate that a single TLR11/TLR12 ligand profilin (TgPRF was sufficient to reduce bacterial burdens similar to T. gondii chronic infection. Stimulation with TgPRF was also sufficient to enhance animal survival when administered either pre- or post-Listeria infection. The ability of TgPRF to reduce L. monocytogenes burdens was dependent on TLR11 and required IFN-γ but was not dependent on IL-12 signaling. TgPRF induced rapid production of MCP-1 and resulted in trafficking of Ly6Chi CCR2+ inflammatory monocytes and Ly6G+ neutrophils into the blood and spleen. Stimulation with TgPRF reduced L. monocytogenes burdens in mice depleted with the Ly6G specific MAb 1A8, but not in Ly6C/Ly6G specific RB6-8C5 depleted or CCR2-/- mice, indicating that only inflammatory monocytes are required for TgPRF-induced reduction in bacterial burdens. These results demonstrate that stimulation of TLR11 by TgPRF is a mechanism to promote the emigration of Ly6Chi CCR2+ monocytes, and that TgPRF recruited inflammatory monocytes can provide an immunological benefit against an unrelated pathogen.

  17. Enterococcus faecalis subverts and invades the host urothelium in patients with chronic urinary tract infection.

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    Harry Horsley

    Full Text Available Bacterial urinary tract infections (UTI are a major growing concern worldwide. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli has been shown to invade the urothelium during acute UTI in mice and humans, forming intracellular reservoirs that can evade antibiotics and the immune response, allowing recurrence at a later date. Other bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Klebsiella pneumonia and Salmonella enterica have also been shown to be invasive in acute UTI. However, the role of intracellular infection in chronic UTI causing more subtle lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, a particular problem in the elderly population, is poorly understood. Moreover, the species of bacteria involved remains largely unknown. A previous study of a large cohort of non-acute LUTS patients found that Enterococcus faecalis was frequently found in urine specimens. E. faecalis accounts for a significant proportion of chronic bladder infections worldwide, although the invasive lifestyle of this uropathogen has yet to be reported. Here, we wanted to explore this question in more detail. We harvested urothelial cells shed in response to inflammation and, using advanced imaging techniques, inspected them for signs of bacterial pathology and invasion. We found strong evidence of intracellular E. faecalis harboured within urothelial cells shed from the bladder of LUTS patients. Furthermore, using a culture model system, these patient-isolated strains of E. faecalis were able to invade a transitional carcinoma cell line. In contrast, we found no evidence of cellular invasion by E. coli in the patient cells or the culture model system. Our data show that E. faecalis is highly competent to invade in this context; therefore, these results have implications for both the diagnosis and treatment of chronic LUTS.

  18. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection definition: EuroCareCF Working Group report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pressler, T; Bohmova, C; Conway, S;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection with P. aeruginosa develops in most patients with cystic fibrosis (CF); by adulthood 80% of patients are infected and chronic P. aeruginosa infection is the primary cause of increased morbidity and mortality in CF. Chronic infection is preceded by an intermittent stage...

  19. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Cacoub, Patrice; Comarmond, Cloe; Domont, Fanny; Savey, Léa; Desbois, Anne claire; Saadoun, David

    2016-01-01

    International audience; During hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection, extrahepatic manifestations are frequent and polymorphous. This article reports on a large cohort of patients with HCV-related autoimmune or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. The relationship between HCV infection and such immune-related diseases has been formally demonstrated by epidemiological, clinical, immunological and pathological data, and results of therape...

  20. An overview of the role of bacterial infection in male infertility

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    Hamed Fanaei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An important cause of male infertility is the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract. These infections affect sperm cell function and whole spermatogenesis and also cause deterioration in spermatogenesis, obstruction of the seminal tract, and impairment of spermatozoa function. The most important bacteria associated with genitourinary tract infections include chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and genital mycoplasma species. Inappropriate or delayed therapy of the bacterial infections of the genitourinary tract will lead to reduced fertility and, subsequently in severe cases, infertility. In other words, a good understanding of the interaction between bacterial infections and the reproductive system plays an important role in the treatment of infertile men. In this review article, we will discuss clinical and laboratory findings related to the bacterial infection of the genitourinary tract and its effects on male infertility.

  1. Chronic infection with Achromobacter xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients; a retrospective case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne Hansen, Christine; Pressler, Tacjana; Høiby, Niels

    2006-01-01

    patients (6 males) with chronic A. xylosoxidans infection were matched by age, FEV(1) and body mass index z-score to 15 controls (7 males) at the time of establishment of chronic infection. Clinical parameters of the groups were compared from the time of establishment of chronic infection until spring 2006...... to a decline in lung function in a subgroup of chronically infected CF patients characterised by a rapid increase in specific precipitating antibodies. Cross-infection may possibly occur....

  2. Comparison on Serum Levels of Procalcitonin of Children with Viral and Bacterial Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare and analyze serum levels of procalcitonin (PCT) of children with viral and bacterial infection and probe into the importance of determining the level of serum PCT in the diagnosis of bacterial infection in order to provide evidences of the clinical use of antibiotics. Methods A total of 85 cases of children with an average age of 8.9 years (10 months-12 years) were enrolled in this study, 53 cases were with viral infection and 32 cases with bacterial infection. We determined serum levels of PCT by semi-quantitative solid phase immunoassay, and the serum levels of PCT were divided into four grades as Results The serum level of PCT of the group with bacterial infection were signiifcantly higher than that of the group with viral infection (P Conclusions Serum PCT is a bacterial sensitive marker of bacterial infection in children, and the determination of the level of serum PCT is helpful for the diagnosis of bacterial infection, which can also be a basis for the use of antibiotics.

  3. Fecal Bacterial Communities in treated HIV infected individuals on two antiretroviral regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Cardoso, Sandra; Lozupone, Catherine; Briceño, Olivia; Alva-Hernández, Selma; Téllez, Norma; Adriana, Aguilar; Murakami-Ogasawara, Akio; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiome changes that occur in HIV positive individuals on different antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens are important to understand, as they are potentially linked with chronic inflammation and microbiome-linked comorbidities that occur at increased incidence in this population. We conducted a cross-sectional study comparing the fecal microbiomes of HIV-uninfected (HIV SN) to HIV-infected individuals on long-term ART (HIV+ LTART) from Mexico using 16S ribosomal RNA (16sRNA) targeted sequencing. These individuals were on two ART regimens based on either Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (EFV) or ritonavir-boosted Protease Inhibitors (PI) with the same backbone of Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors. Microbiome diversity was reduced in treated HIV infection compared to HIV SN (p < 0.05). Several operational taxonomic units (OTUs) related to the Ruminococcaceae family including Faecalibacterium prausnitzii were depleted in EFV and PI compared to HIV SN and negatively correlated with intestinal gut dysfunction as measured by the intestinal fatty binding protein (p < 0.05). This is the first report to address the fecal bacterial communities in HIV-infected individuals on two ARV regimens from Mexico. PMID:28262770

  4. Chronic oral infection with major periodontal bacteria Tannerella forsythia modulates systemic atherosclerosis risk factors and inflammatory markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka S; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F; Velsko, Irina M; Chen, Hao; Zheng, Donghang; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Gangula, Pandu R; Lucas, Alexandra R; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-04-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a Gram-negative anaerobic organism that inhabits the subgingival cavity and initiates connective tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption in periodontal disease (PD). PD is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease and has been linked to several systemic diseases including atherosclerosis. This study evaluated the effects of a chronic oral infection with T. forsythia ATCC 43037 on the induction of PD, inflammatory markers and atherosclerosis risk factors in hyperlipidemic ApoE(null) mice. Mice were orally infected for 12 and 24 weeks prior to euthanasia. Bacterial colonization of the oral cavity and bacteremia was confirmed via isolation of genomic DNA from oral plaque and tissues. Oral infection elicited significantly elevated levels of serum IgG and IgM antibodies and alveolar bone resorption compared to control mice. Tannerella forsythia-infected mice had increased serum amyloid A, and significantly reduced serum nitric oxide when compared to controls. Tannerella forsythia chronic infection also significantly increased serum lipoproteins suggesting altered cholesterol metabolism and potential for aortic inflammation. Despite enhanced acute phase reactants and altered lipid profiles, T. forsythia infection was associated with decreased aortic plaque. This study investigates the potential of a known periodontal bacterial pathogen found in atherosclerotic plaque in humans to accelerate atherosclerosis in hyperlipdemic mice.

  5. H pylori infection causes chronic pancreatitis in Mongolian gerbils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether chronic H pylori infection has the potential to induce pancreatitis in the Mongolian gerbil model, and whether it is dependent on an intact type Ⅳ secretion system.METHODS: Mongolian gerbils were infected with wild type (WT) H pyloritype Ⅰ strain B128 or its isogenic mutant B128 Acag Y (defective type Ⅳ secretion). After seven months of infection, H pylori was reisolated from antrum and corpus and H pylori DNA was analyzed by seminested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Inflammation and histological changes were documented in the gastric antrum, corpus, and pancreas by immunohistochemistry.Cytokine mRNA, gastric pH, plasma gastrin, amylase,lipase, and glucose levels were determined.RESULTS: The H pylori infection rate was 95%.Eight infected animals, but none of the uninfected group, developed transmural inflammation and chronic pancreatitis. Extensive interstitial fibrosis and inflammation of the pancreatic lobe adjacent to the antrum was confirmed by trichrome stain, and immunohistochemically. Pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA was significantly increased in the antral mucosa of all infected gerbils. In the corpus, only cytokine levels of WT-infected animals and those developing transmural inflammation and pancreatitis were significantly increased.Levels of lipase, but not glucose or amylase levels, were significantly reduced in the pancreatitis group. H pylori DNA was detected in infected antral and corpus tissue,but not in the pancreas.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection is able to induce chronic pancreatitis in Mongolian gerbils independently of the type Ⅳ secretion system, probably by an indirect mechanism associated with a penetrating ulcer.

  6. A case of chronic appendicopathy caused by parasitic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S. Ramsaransing; R.R. Postema (Roelf); J.L. Simons

    2010-01-01

    textabstractParasitic infection of the appendix is rarely seen, but should be considered in patients with symptoms of chronic appendicitis. It is rarely associated with histological inflammation of the appendix, therefore radiographic imaging, performed during initial workup, remains unremarkable mo

  7. Therapeutic vaccination against chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ip, Peng Peng; Nijman, Hans W.; Wilschut, Jan; Daemen, Toos

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 170 million people worldwide are chronic carriers of Hepatitis C virus (HCV). To date, there is no prophylactic vaccine available against HCV. The standard-of-care therapy for HCV infection involves a combination of pegylated interferon-α and ribavirin. This therapy, which is commonly

  8. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that p

  9. Chronic cutaneous ulcers secondary to Haemophilus ducreyi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Trisha N; Bhatti, Deepak; De Boer, Jim C; Stratov, Ivan; Spelman, Denis W

    2010-03-15

    Haemophilus ducreyi is a well recognised causative agent of genital ulcers and chancroid. We report two unusual cases of non-sexually transmitted H. ducreyi infection leading to chronic lower limb ulcers. Both patients were Australian expatriates visiting Australia from the Pacific Islands--one from Papua New Guinea and the other from Vanuatu.

  10. Antiviral Therapy for Chronic HCV Infection - Tolerability and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Maan (Raoel)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes the safety and outcome of antiviral therapy for chronic HCV infection. In the first chapters, the authors investigated (hematological) adverse events during interferon-based therapy among patients with compensated cirrhosis. By using a patient-tailored approach, int

  11. Influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent phagocytic bacterial clearance and enhances susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Keer; Metzger, Dennis W.

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a leading contributor to mortality during recent influenza pandemics. The mechanism for this influenza-induced susceptibility to secondary S. aureus infection is poorly understood. Here we show that innate antibacterial immunity was significantly suppressed during the recovery stage of influenza infection, despite the fact that MRSA super-infection had no significant effect on viral burdens. Compared to mice infected with bacteria alone, post-influenza MRSA infected mice exhibited impaired bacterial clearance, which was not due to defective phagocyte recruitment, but rather coincided with reduced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. NADPH oxidase is responsible for ROS production during phagocytic bacterial killing, a process also known as oxidative burst. We found that gp91phox-containing NADPH oxidase activity in macrophages and neutrophils was essential for optimal bacterial clearance during respiratory MRSA infections. In contrast to WT animals, gp91phox−/− mice exhibited similar defects in MRSA clearance before and after influenza infection. Using gp91phox+/− mosaic mice, we further demonstrate that influenza infection inhibits a cell-intrinsic contribution of NADPH oxidase to phagocyte bactericidal activity. Together, our results establish that influenza infection suppresses NADPH oxidase-dependent bacterial clearance and leads to susceptibility to secondary MRSA infection. PMID:24563256

  12. Multiresistant bacterial infections in liver cirrhosis: Clinical impact and new empirical antibiotic treatment policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Recently, important changes have been reported regarding the epidemiology of bacterial infections in liver cirrhosis. There is an emergence of multiresistant bacteria in many European countries and also worldwide, including the United States and South Korea. The classic empirical antibiotic treatment (third-generation cephalosporins, e.g., ceftriaxone, cefotaxime or amoxicillin-clavulanic acid) is still effective in infections acquired in the community, but its failure rate in hospital acquired infections and in some health-care associated infections is high enough to ban its use in these settings. The current editorial focuses on the different epidemiology of bacterial infections in cirrhosis across countries and on its therapeutic implications. PMID:25954474

  13. Phenotypic complementation of genetic immunodeficiency by chronic herpesvirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDuff, Donna A; Reese, Tiffany A; Kimmey, Jacqueline M; Weiss, Leslie A; Song, Christina; Zhang, Xin; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Carrero, Javier A; Boisson, Bertrand; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Israel, Alain; Picard, Capucine; Colonna, Marco; Edelson, Brian T; Sibley, L David; Stallings, Christina L; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Virgin, Herbert W

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the presentation of hereditary immunodeficiencies may be explained by genetic or environmental factors. Patients with mutations in HOIL1 (RBCK1) present with amylopectinosis-associated myopathy with or without hyper-inflammation and immunodeficiency. We report that barrier-raised HOIL-1-deficient mice exhibit amylopectin-like deposits in the myocardium but show minimal signs of hyper-inflammation. However, they show immunodeficiency upon acute infection with Listeria monocytogenes, Toxoplasma gondii or Citrobacter rodentium. Increased susceptibility to Listeria was due to HOIL-1 function in hematopoietic cells and macrophages in production of protective cytokines. In contrast, HOIL-1-deficient mice showed enhanced control of chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis or murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV68), and these infections conferred a hyper-inflammatory phenotype. Surprisingly, chronic infection with MHV68 complemented the immunodeficiency of HOIL-1, IL-6, Caspase-1 and Caspase-1;Caspase-11-deficient mice following Listeria infection. Thus chronic herpesvirus infection generates signs of auto-inflammation and complements genetic immunodeficiency in mutant mice, highlighting the importance of accounting for the virome in genotype-phenotype studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04494.001 PMID:25599590

  14. Pathogenesis, prophylaxis and treatment of infections in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Stelmach

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL patients are at high risk for infections. The pathogenesis of infection in patients with this leukemia is complex and multifactorial. Patients with CLL have a number of immune system defects, including disordered B-cell function with decreased production of normal B-cells and abnormal production of immunoglobulins, suppressed Tcell function and neutropenia. Other immune abnormalities present in CLL patients include neutrophil dysfunction, and complement deficiencies. In addition, further perturbations in immune function are related to the antileukemic therapies. Immune disturbance might be common prior to CLL diagnosis and infectious agents could trigger CLL development. Current chemotherapy-based regimens are not curative and often worsen this immune suppression. The introduction of new effective therapeutic agents such as the purine analogues and monoclonal antibodies has influenced the spectrum of infections diagnosed in CLL patients. Some conditions increase the risk for the development of infections including advanced age, decreased levels of immunoglobulins, advanced Binet stage, neutropenia and treatment with more than one line of chemotherapy. Until now it is debatable whether and when antibacterial prophylaxis could be useful in CLL patients. The prevention of infection includes antimicrobial prophylaxis, as well as immunoglobulin replacement and vaccination. Antibacterial prophylaxis should be given to CLL patients with previous severe and/or relapsing bacterial infections. This article reviews the immune defects in CLL and discusses strategies aimed at prophylaxis and treatment of infections in patients with CLL. 

  15. Chronic Ulcerative Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Griffith-Bauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus infections in HIV-infected individuals can be clinically unusual and difficult to treat due to underlying problems with cell-mediated immunity and the occurrence of antiviral resistance. Additionally, partial or incomplete restoration of immune function may result in chronic ulcerations that require rotational treatments. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old HIV-positive woman who developed the ulcerative form of chronic herpes simplex infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy and valacyclovir prophylaxis. Repeated intravenous courses of foscarnet and topical cidofovir finally controlled her erosions as her cell-mediated immunity was slowly restored. This case highlights the challenges that still exist in diagnosing and managing this rare presentation of herpes simplex virus

  16. Ciprofloxacin treatment of bacterial peritonitis associated with chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis caused by Neisseria cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taegtmeyer, M; Saxena, R; Corkill, J E; Anijeet, H; Parry, C M

    2006-08-01

    Bacterial peritonitis is a well-recognized complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) in patients with end-stage renal failure. We present a case of peritonitis due to an unusual pathogen, Neisseria cinerea, unresponsive to the standard intraperitoneal (i.p.) vancomycin and gentamicin, which responded rapidly to oral ciprofloxacin.

  17. Maximum growth rate of Mycobacterium avium in continuous culture or chronically infected BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, C M; Taylor, M A; Dennis, M W

    1987-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium is a human pathogen which may cause either chronic or disseminated disease and the organism exhibits a slow rate of growth. This study provides information on the growth rate of the organism in chronically infected mice and its maximal growth rate in vitro. M. avium was grown in continuous culture, limited for nitrogen with 0.5 mM ammonium chloride and dilution rates that ranged from 0.054 to 0.153 h-1. The steady-state concentration of ammonia nitrogen and M. avium cells for each dilution rate were determined. The bacterial saturation constant for growth-limiting ammonia was 0.29 mM (4 micrograms nitrogen/ml) and, from this, the maximal growth rate for M. avium was estimated to be 0.206 h-1 or a doubling time of 3.4 h. BALB/c mice were infected intravenously with 3 x 10(6) colony-forming units and a chronic infection resulted, typical of virulent M. avium strains. During a period of 3 months, the number of mycobacteria remained constant in the lungs, but increased 30-fold and 8,900-fold, respectively, in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The latter increase appeared to be due to proliferation in situ. The generation time of M. avium in the mesenteric lymph nodes was estimated to be 7 days.

  18. Cytokines and Chemokines as Biomarkers of Community-Acquired Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Holub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts. The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, INF-γ, MIP-1β, and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P<0.001 elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection.

  19. Bacterial Biofilms and Catheters: A Key to Understanding Bacterial Strategies in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Curtis Nickel

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite major technological improvements in catheter drainage systems, the indwelling Foley catheter remains the most common cause of nosocomial infection in medical practice. By approaching this common complicated urinary tract infection from the perspective of the biofilm strategy bacteria appear to use to overcome obstacles to produce bacteriuria, one appreciates a new understanding of these infections. An adherent biofilm of bacteria in their secretory products ascends the luminal and external surface of the catheter and drainage system from a contaminated drainage spigot or urethral meatus into the bladder. If the intraluminal route of bacterial ascent is delayed by strict sterile closed drainage or addition of internal modifications to the system, the extraluminal or urethral route assumes greater importance in the development of bacteriuria, but takes significantly longer. Bacterial growth within these thick coherent biofilms confers a large measure of relative resistance to antibiotics even though the individual bacterium remains sensitive, thus accounting for the failure of antibiotic therapy. With disruption of the protective mucous layer of the bladder by mechanical irritation, the bacteria colonizing the catheter can adhere to the bladder’s mucosal surface and cause infection. An appreciation of the role of bacterial biofilms in these infections should suggest future directions for research that may ultimately reduce the risk of catheter-associated infection.

  20. Chronic Mycobacterium marinum Infection Acts as a Tumor Promoter in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An accumulating body of research indicates there is an increased cancer risk associated with chronic infections. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of species, including M tuberculosis, which mount chronic infections and have been implicated in higher cancer risk. Several ...

  1. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement: the possible role of bacterial biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Song

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore, important to understand the comprehensive interaction between the microbiological situation and the host immune responses that lead to prosthesis infections. Evidence indicates that prosthesis infections are actually biofilm-correlated infections that are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment and the host immune responses. The authors reviewed the related literature in the context of their clinical experience, and discussed the possible etiology and mechanism leading to the infections, especially problems related to bacterial biofilm, and prophylaxis and treatment of infection, including both microbiological and surgical measures. Recent progress in research into bacterial biofilm and possible future treatment options of prosthesis-related infections are discussed.

  2. Progression of chronic pulmonary tuberculosis in mice intravenously infected with ethambutol resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ethambutol (EMB is an important first line drug, however little information on its molecular mechanism of resistance and pathogenicity of resistant isolates is available. Present work was designed to study virulence of the EMB resistant M. tuberculosis strains and the host responses in-vivo on infection of EMB resistant M. tuberculosis using Balb/c mouse model of infection. Methods: Three groups of Balb/c mice (female, age 4-6 wk; 21 mice in each group were infected intravenously with 106 CFU of M. tuberculosis H37Rv and two EMB resistant clinical isolates. Age and sex matched control animals were mock inoculated with Middlebrook 7H9 broth alone. At 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 days post-infection three animals from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and lung tissue was collected for further analysis. Results: Infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis led to progressive and chronic disease with significantly high bacillary load (p=0.02. Massive infiltration and exacerbated lung pathology with increased expression of IFN-γ and TNF-α was observed in lungs of mice infected with EMB resistant strains. The present study suggests that infection with EMB resistant M. tuberculosis leads to chronic infection with subsequent loss of lung function, bacterial persistence with elevated expression of TNF-α resulting in increased lung pathology. Conclusion: These findings highlight that EMB resistant M. tuberculosis regulates host immune response differentially and its pathogenicity is different from drug sensitive strains of M. tuberculosis.

  3. Hypoxia determines survival outcomes of bacterial infection through HIF-1alpha dependent re-programming of leukocyte metabolism *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A.A.R.; Dickinson, R.S.; Murphy, F.; Thomson, J. P.; Marriott, H.M.; Tavares, A.; Willson, J.; Williams, L.; Lewis, A.; Mirchandani, A.; Dos Santos Coelho, P.; Doherty, C.; Ryan, E.; Watts, E.; Morton, N. M.; Forbes, S.; Stimson, R. H.; Hameed, A. G.; Arnold, N.; Preston, J.A.; Lawrie, A.; Finisguerra, V.; Mazzone, M.; Sadiku, P.; Goveia, J.; Taverna, F.; Carmeliet, P.; Foster, S.J.; Chilvers, E.R.; Cowburn, A.S.; Dockrell, D.H.; Johnson, R.S.; Meehan, R. R.; Whyte, M.K.B.; Walmsley, S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxia and bacterial infection frequently co-exist, in both acute and chronic clinical settings, and typically result in adverse clinical outcomes. To ameliorate this morbidity, we investigated the interaction between hypoxia and the host response. In the context of acute hypoxia, both S. aureus and S. pneumoniae infections rapidly induced progressive neutrophil mediated morbidity and mortality, with associated hypothermia and cardiovascular compromise. Preconditioning animals through longer exposures to hypoxia, prior to infection, prevented these pathophysiological responses and profoundly dampened the transcriptome of circulating leukocytes. Specifically, perturbation of HIF pathway and glycolysis genes by hypoxic preconditioning was associated with reduced leukocyte glucose utilisation, resulting in systemic rescue from a global negative energy state and myocardial protection. Thus we demonstrate that hypoxia preconditions the innate immune response and determines survival outcomes following bacterial infection through suppression of HIF-1α and neutrophil metabolism. The therapeutic implications of this work are that in the context of systemic or tissue hypoxia therapies that target the host response could improve infection associated morbidity and mortality. PMID:28386604

  4. Pulmonary bacterial and fungal infections in human immunodeficiency virus patients: A study from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Shreevidya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-reactive patients are more prone to infections. The morbidity and mortality in HIV-reactive patients is due to opportunistic infections. Most of the infections seen in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome are endemic to that geographical region. Hence, this study was undertaken to document the occurrence of pulmonary bacterial and fungal infections in HIV patients. Materials and Methods: Expectorated and induced sputum samples were collected from 100 HIV-reactive patients and processed for bacterial and fungal pathogens including Pneumocystis carinii. Results: Of 100 samples, 66 were culture positive. Among the isolates, Mycobacterium tuberculosis constituted the highest number, 55 (83.3%, followed by other bacterial infections, 11 (16.6%, and fungi, 2 (3.03%. Tuberculosis patients had a CD4 count of less than 250 cells/μl with a mean count of 186 cells/μl and those with bacterial infections had a CD4 count of more than 300 cells/μl. The study showed that males were infected with HIV more than females and most of them belonged to the adult age group in the prime of their working life. Weight loss followed by fever and cough were the most common symptoms. Conclusion: M. tuberculosis is the most common opportunistic pathogen followed by bacterial pathogens infecting the lung in HIV. Low CD4 count is a dangerous signal of decreased immune status and higher chances of opportunistic infections and high mortality.

  5. THE USE OF PREPARATIONS BASED ON BACTERIAL LYSATES IN THE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC TONSILLITIS IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    OpenAIRE

    Kolyada T.І.; Tupotіlov A.V.; Vdovіchenko N.І; Litvinenko O.Y.

    2014-01-01

    In the therapy of decompensated form of chronic tonsillitis (CT) were used as immunomodulatory agents IRS and Ismigen. These bacterial lysates differ in the bacterial setting, the method of preparation (chemical, mechanical) and the method of application.Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the important factors that could significantly complicate the therapy of chronic tonsillitis. RA is a chronic immune inflammatory disease that progressively affects connective tissue...

  6. Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing with electrokinetics enhanced biosensors for diagnosis of acute bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tingting; Lu, Yi; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2014-11-01

    Rapid pathogen detection and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) are required in diagnosis of acute bacterial infections to determine the appropriate antibiotic treatment. Molecular approaches for AST are often based on the detection of known antibiotic resistance genes. Phenotypic culture analysis requires several days from sample collection to result reporting. Toward rapid diagnosis of bacterial infection in non-traditional healthcare settings, we have developed a rapid AST approach that combines phenotypic culture of bacterial pathogens in physiological samples and electrochemical sensing of bacterial 16S rRNA. The assay determines the susceptibility of pathogens by detecting bacterial growth under various antibiotic conditions. AC electrokinetic fluid motion and Joule heating induced temperature elevation are optimized to enhance the sensor signal and minimize the matrix effect, which improve the overall sensitivity of the assay. The electrokinetics enhanced biosensor directly detects the bacterial pathogens in blood culture without prior purification. Rapid determination of the antibiotic resistance profile of Escherichia coli clinical isolates is demonstrated.

  7. Cationic antimicrobial peptides promote microbial mutagenesis and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

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    Dominique H Limoli

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of adaptive mutations is essential for microbial persistence during chronic infections. This is particularly evident during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Thus far, mutagenesis has been attributed to the generation of reactive species by polymorphonucleocytes (PMN and antibiotic treatment. However, our current studies of mutagenesis leading to P. aeruginosa mucoid conversion have revealed a potential new mutagen. Our findings confirmed the current view that reactive oxygen species can promote mucoidy in vitro, but revealed PMNs are proficient at inducing mucoid conversion in the absence of an oxidative burst. This led to the discovery that cationic antimicrobial peptides can be mutagenic and promote mucoidy. Of specific interest was the human cathelicidin LL-37, canonically known to disrupt bacterial membranes leading to cell death. An alternative role was revealed at sub-inhibitory concentrations, where LL-37 was found to induce mutations within the mucA gene encoding a negative regulator of mucoidy and to promote rifampin resistance in both P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The mechanism of mutagenesis was found to be dependent upon sub-inhibitory concentrations of LL-37 entering the bacterial cytosol and binding to DNA. LL-37/DNA interactions then promote translesion DNA synthesis by the polymerase DinB, whose error-prone replication potentiates the mutations. A model of LL-37 bound to DNA was generated, which reveals amino termini α-helices of dimerized LL-37 bind the major groove of DNA, with numerous DNA contacts made by LL-37 basic residues. This demonstrates a mutagenic role for antimicrobials previously thought to be insusceptible to resistance by mutation, highlighting a need to further investigate their role in evolution and pathoadaptation in chronic infections.

  8. No evidence of an increase of bacterial and viral infections following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Julia; Andrews, Nick; Taylor, Brent; Miller, Elizabeth

    2009-02-25

    The suggestion that multi-antigen vaccines might overload the immune system has led to calls for single antigen vaccines. In 2003 we showed that rather than an increase there appeared to be a reduced risk of severe bacterial infection in the three months following Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine (MMR). The present analysis of illnesses in a general population is based on an additional 10 years of data for bacterial infections and also includes admissions with viral infections. Analyses were carried out using the self-controlled case-series method and separately for bacterial and viral infection cases, using risk periods of 0-30 days, 31-60 days and 61-90 days post MMR vaccine. An analysis was also carried out for those cases which were given MMR and Meningococcal serogroup C (MCC) vaccines concomitantly. A reduced risk was seen in the 0-30-day period for both bacterial infection (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.54-0.86) and viral infections (relative incidence=0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.93). There was no increased risk in any period when looking at combined viral or bacterial infections or for individual infections with the single exception of an increased risk in the 31-60 days post vaccination period for herpes infections (relative incidence=1.69, 95% CI 1.06-2.70). For the children given Meningococcal group C vaccines concomitantly no significantly increased risk was seen in either the bacterial (relative incidence=0.54, 95% CI 0.26-1.13) or viral cases (relative incidence=0.46, 95% CI 0.11-1.93). Our study confirms that the MMR vaccine does not increase the risk of invasive bacterial or viral infection in the 90 days after the vaccination and does not support the hypothesis that there is an induced immune deficiency due to overload from multi-antigen vaccines.

  9. Persistent Coxiella burnetii infection in mice overexpressing IL-10: an efficient model for chronic Q fever pathogenesis.

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    Soraya Meghari

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-10 increases host susceptibility to microorganisms and is involved in intracellular persistence of bacterial pathogens. IL-10 is associated with chronic Q fever, an infectious disease due to the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii. Nevertheless, accurate animal models of chronic C. burnetii infection are lacking. Transgenic mice constitutively expressing IL-10 in macrophages were infected with C. burnetti by intraperitoneal and intratracheal routes and infection was analyzed through real-time PCR and antibody production. Transgenic mice exhibited sustained tissue infection and strong antibody response in contrast to wild-type mice; thus, bacterial persistence was IL-10-dependent as in chronic Q fever. The number of granulomas was low in spleen and liver of transgenic mice infected through the intraperitoneal route, as in patients with chronic Q fever. Macrophages from transgenic mice were unable to kill C. burnetii. C. burnetii-stimulated macrophages were characterized by non-microbicidal transcriptional program consisting of increased expression of arginase-1, mannose receptor, and Ym1/2, in contrast to wild-type macrophages in which expression of inducible NO synthase and inflammatory cytokines was increased. In vivo results emphasized macrophage data. In spleen and liver of transgenic mice infected with C. burnetii by the intraperitoneal route, the expression of arginase-1 was increased while microbicidal pathway consisting of IL-12p40, IL-23p19, and inducible NO synthase was depressed. The overexpression of IL-10 in macrophages prevents anti-infectious competence of host, including the ability to mount granulomatous response and microbicidal pathway in tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first efficient model for chronic Q fever pathogenesis.

  10. Persistent and Recurrent Bacterial Bronchitis—A Paradigm Shift in Our Understanding of Chronic Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, Alya; Everard, Mark L.

    2017-01-01

    The recent recognition that the conducting airways are not “sterile” and that they have their own dynamic microbiome, together with the rapid advances in our understanding of microbial biofilms and their roles in the causation of respiratory diseases (such as chronic bronchitis, sinusitis, and chronic otitis media), permit us to update the “vicious circle” hypothesis of the causation of bronchiectasis. This proposes that chronic inflammation driven by persistent bacterial bronchitis (PBB) causes damage to both the epithelium, resulting in impaired mucociliary clearance, and to the airway wall, which eventually manifests as bronchiectasis. The link between a “chronic bronchitis” and a persistence of bacterial pathogens, such as non-typable Haemophilus influenzae, was first made more than 100 years ago, and its probable role in the causation of bronchiectasis was proposed soon afterward. The recognition that the “usual suspects” are adept at forming biofilms and hence are able to persist and dominate the normal dynamically changing “healthy microbiome” of the conducting airways provides an explanation for the chronic colonization of the bronchi and for the associated chronic neutrophil-dominated inflammation characteristic of a PBB. Understanding the complex interaction between the host and the microbial communities of the conducting airways in health and disease will be a key component in optimizing pulmonary health in the future. PMID:28261574

  11. Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein cannot differentiate bacterial or viral infection in COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang CH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Hao Chang,1 Kuo-Chien Tsao,2,3 Han-Chung Hu,1,4 Chung-Chi Huang,1,4 Kuo-Chin Kao,1,4 Ning-Hung Chen,1,4 Cheng-Ta Yang,1,4 Ying-Huang Tsai,4,5 Meng-Jer Hsieh4,51Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Chang-Gung University College of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Linkou Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation; 3Department of Medical Biotechnology and Laboratory Science, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 4Department of Respiratory Therapy, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 5Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Chiayi Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Chang-Gung Medical Foundation, Puzi City, TaiwanBackground: Viral and bacterial infections are the most common causes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations. Whether serum inflammatory markers can differentiate bacterial from virus infection in patients with COPD exacerbation requiring emergency department (ED visits remains controversial.Methods: Viral culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were used to identify the viruses in the oropharynx of patients with COPD exacerbations. The bacteria were identified by the semiquantitative culture of the expectorated sputum. The peripheral blood white blood cell (WBC counts, serum C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT, and clinical symptoms were compared among patients with different types of infections.Results: Viruses were isolated from 16 (22.2% of the 72 patients enrolled. The most commonly identified viruses were parainfluenza type 3, influenza A, and rhinovirus. A total of 30 (41.7% patients had positive bacterial cultures, with the most commonly found bacteria being Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Five patients (6.9% had both positive sputum cultures and virus identification. The WBC, CRP, and PCT levels of the bacteria-positive and bacteria

  12. In situ growth rates and biofilm development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations in chronic lung infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lei; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Jelsbak, Lars;

    2008-01-01

    The growth dynamics of bacterial pathogens within infected hosts are a fundamental but poorly understood feature of most infections. We have focused on the in situ distribution and growth characteristics of two prevailing and transmissible Pseudomonas aeruginosa clones that have caused chronic lung...... matrix, whereas nonmucoid variants were present mainly as dispersed cells. To obtain estimates of the growth rates of P. aeruginosa in CF lungs, we used quantitative FISH to indirectly measure growth rates of bacteria in sputum samples (reflecting the in vivo lung conditions). The concentration of r......RNA in bacteria isolated from sputa was measured and correlated with the rRNA contents of the same bacteria growing in vitro at defined rates. The results showed that most cells were actively growing with doubling times of between 100 and 200 min, with some growing even faster. Only a small stationary...

  13. The clinical analysis of three methods in the treatment of intracranial bacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of three therapeutic methods to find an optimal approach to the treatment of intracranial bacterial infection by retrospectively reviewing 33 intracranial bacterial infection patients who were admitted from 1995 to 2008 in our hospital.Methods The treatments by intermittent lumbar puncture,continuous lumbar subarachnoid space drainage,and embedment of Ommaya cyst for continuous drainage from the ventricles were performed in 15 cases,12 cases,and 6 cases respectively along wit...

  14. The Impact of Treated Bacterial Infections within One Month before Living Donor Liver Transplantation in Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Hara, Takanobu; Soyama, Akihiko; Takatsuki, Mitsuhisa; Hidaka, Masaaki; Carpenter, Izumi; Kinoshita, Ayaka; Adachi, Tomohiko; Kitasato, Amane; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The impact of treated preoperative bacterial infections on the outcome of living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is not well defined. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of pre-transplant bacterial infections within one month before LDLT and their impact on the post-transplant morbidity and mortality. Material/Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 50 adult LDLT recipients between January 2009 and October 2011. Patients were divided into two gro...

  15. Stimulation of Host Immune Defenses by a Small Molecule Protects C. elegans from Bacterial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Read Pukkila-Worley; Rhonda Feinbaum; Kirienko, Natalia V; Jonah Larkins-Ford; Conery, Annie L.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2012-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans offers currently untapped potential for carrying out high-throughput, live-animal screens of low molecular weight compound libraries to identify molecules that target a variety of cellular processes. We previously used a bacterial infection assay in C. elegans to identify 119 compounds that affect host-microbe interactions among 37,214 tested. Here we show that one of these small molecules, RPW-24, protects C. elegans from bacterial infection by stimulating...

  16. Transmammary infection in BALB/c mice with chronic toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza Aguiar, Patricia; Furtado, Raquel Dutra; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; de Lima Telmo, Paula; Martins, Lourdes Helena Rodrigues; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; da Silva, Pedro Eduardo Almeida; Scaini, Carlos James

    2015-04-01

    Human toxocariasis is a neglected public health problem. Infection of humans generally results from the accidental ingestion of embryonated Toxocara canis eggs, but it is important to broaden knowledge about other forms of transmission. This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of transmammary transmission in mice with chronic toxocariasis. BALB/c mice in groups 1 (G1) and 3 (G3) were inoculated with 1200 T. canis eggs 60days before mating, whereas those of group 2 (G2) were not infected. After delivery, the G1 neonates were transferred to G2 females to be nursed, and vice versa. Thus, the mice generated by G2 females and breastfed by G1 females could be infected only during lactation. In the G3 group, offspring were not exchanged. The search for T. canis larvae in the bodies of the lactating females and their offspring was performed after weaning and at 60days old, respectively. The frequency of transmammary infection in the mice generated by G2 uninfected females and breastfed by G1 infected females was 19.8%, which was similar to that observed (19.6%) in the mice bred and fed by G3 females. The frequency of infection in the mice generated by G1 females and breastfed by G2 females was only 4.2%, which was lower than that of G1 (p=0.0064) and G3 (p=0.0062) groups. Transmammary infection by mice with chronic toxocariasis was found to be more prevalent than congenital infection.

  17. THE CYTOKINE IP-10 IN CHRONIC HBV AND HCV INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina S. Nikolova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: IP-10 it has been studied as a predictor of treatment response in chronic HCV infected patients. The data for the HBV infection are not enough.Aim: To compare IP-10 levels in patients with chronic HBV /CHB/ and HCV infection /CHC/ and their relation to liver disease and treatment response. Material and methods: 20 patients - with CHC genotype 1 infection /on standard bi-therapy/ and 32 patients with CHB /21 pts - NUC; 11 pts - IFN/. Results: The IP-10 did not correlate with sex, age, ALT and liver fibrosis. The basal IP-10 were lower in patients with CHB (p=0,017. There was a difference in IP-10 baseline levels among the HCV patients with or without RVR (p=0,007. A negative correlation was found between basal IP-10 and RVR (r= -0,508; p=0,008. Conclusion: IP-10 could predict virological response in patients with CHC on standard bi-therapy, but not in HBV infected patients on standard therapy.

  18. Chronic West Nile virus infection in kea (Nestor notabilis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakonyi, Tamás; Gajdon, Gyula K; Schwing, Raoul; Vogl, Wolfgang; Häbich, Annett-Carolin; Thaller, Denise; Weissenböck, Herbert; Rudolf, Ivo; Hubálek, Zdenek; Nowotny, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Six kea (Nestor notabilis) in human care, naturally infected with West Nile virus (WNV) lineage 2 in Vienna, Austria, in 2008, developed mild to fatal neurological signs. WNV RNA persisted and the virus evolved in the birds' brains, as demonstrated by (phylo)genetic analyses of the complete viral genomes detected in kea euthanized between 2009 and 2014. WNV antibodies persisted in the birds, too. Chronic WNV infection in the brain might contribute to the circulation of the virus through oral transmission to predatory birds.

  19. ANA testing in the presence of acute and chronic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Christine M; Binder, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibody testing is performed to help diagnose patients who have clinical symptoms suggestive of possible autoimmune diseases. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are present in many systemic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, a positive ANA test may also be seen with non-autoimmune inflammatory diseases, including both acute and chronic infections. When the ANA test is used as an initial screen in patients with non-specific clinical symptoms, such as fever, joint pain, myalgias, fatigue, rash, or anemia, the likelihood of a positive result due to infection will increase, especially in children. This article identifies acute and chronic infectious diseases that are likely to produce a positive ANA result and summarizes recent literature addressing both the causes and consequences of these findings.

  20. Features of direct implantation in chronic foci of odontogenic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudaryan А.А.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the developed therapeutic and prophylactic complex and efficacy of immediate implantation in 66 patients with chronic foci of odontogenic infection in the periapical region. Objective: to increase preventive measures of inflammatory and infectious complications and optimization of osteo-integrative processes in immediate implantation after tooth extraction, with periapical foci of chronic infection. It was found that the use of the developed medical complex of following up direct implantation includes the use of local photodynamic therapy, platelet, rich in fibrin as a injection and membranes; this allowed to create a favorable background for the prevention of inflammatory and infectious complications in the peri-implant area and created a favorable background for the osseo-integration of implants in 97.1% of the investigated.

  1. Breastfeeding and chronic HBV infection: Clinical and social implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mihaela; Petrova; Victor; Kamburov

    2010-01-01

    Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is among the most important causes of chronic HBV infection and is the commonest mode of transmission worldwide. Currently, the presence of HBsAg, HBeAg and HBV DNA in breast milk is confirmed. Several studies have reported that breastfeeding carries no additional risk that might lead to vertical transmission. Beyond some limitations, the surveys have not demonstrated any differences in HBV transmission rate regarding feeding practices in early childho...

  2. Agglutination of Trypanosoma cruzi in infected cells treated with serum from chronically infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelken, Jennifer L; Rowland, Edwin C

    2009-04-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of Chagas disease. The chronic stage of infection is characterized by a production of neutralizing antibodies in the vertebrate host. A polyclonal antibody, anti-egressin, has been found to inhibit egress of parasites from the host cell late in the intracellular cycle, after the parasites have transformed from the replicative amastigote into the trypomastigote. It has also been found that BALB/c mouse fibroblasts in the late stages of parasite infection become permeable to molecules as large as antibodies, leading to the possibility that anti-egressin affects the intracellular parasites. This project addresses the fate of the intracellular trypomastigotes that have been inhibited from egressing the host cell. Extended cultures of infected fibroblasts treated with chronic mouse serum reduced parasite egress at all time points measured. Parasites released from infected fibroblasts treated with chronic serum had a reduced ability to infect fibroblasts in culture, yet did not lose infectivity entirely. Absorption of chronic serum with living trypomastigotes removed the anti-egressin effect. The possibility that the target of anti-egressin is a parasite surface component is further indicated by the agglutination of extracellular trypomastigotes by chronic serum. The possibility that cross-linking by antibody occurs intracellularly, thus inhibiting egress, was reinforced by cleaving purified IgG into Fab fragments, which did not inhibit egress when added to infected cultures. From this work, it is proposed that the current, best explanation of the mechanism of egress inhibition by anti-egressin is intracellular agglutination, preventing normal parasite-driven egress.

  3. [The diagnostic of chronic infection Helicobacter pylori in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereschenko, S Yu; Olkhovskiy, I A

    2014-02-01

    The epidemiological studies testify an extremely high prevalence of chronic infection of children with Helicobacter pylori in Russia. The affection consists from 50% to 80% depending on region and age of examined children. The currently in force recommendations "Maastricht IV" concerning diagnostic and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection adult patients are applied not in its fullness to children adolescent population. At the same time recently published joint conciliatory document of the European and North American associations of pediatric gastroenterologists is oriented to populations with low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and particular profile of drug resistance. Hence, an urgent need exists to develop modern local algorithm concerning diagnostic, treatment and control of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection among children and adolescents in Russia. The review presents analysis of admissibility of application in Russia's conditions of the international conciliatory documents concerning diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection in children. The data from conciliatory document of the European (ESPGHAN) and North American (NASPGHAN) associations of pediatric gastroenterologists, particular orginal research studies and one's own clinical experience were used. The advantages and shortcomings of actual methods of laboratory diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection are discussed. The approaches to application of particular diagnostic methods are considered. The enhanced indications to detection of infection and implementation of eradication therapy are proposed.

  4. Chronic ethanol feeding increases the severity of Staphylococcus aureus skin infections by altering local host defenses

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    Parlet, Corey P.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Schlueter, Annette J.

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholics are at increased risk of Staphylococcus aureus skin infection and serious sequelae, such as bacteremia and death. Despite the association between alcoholism and severe S. aureus skin infection, the impact of EtOH on anti-S. aureus cutaneous immunity has not been investigated in a model of chronic EtOH exposure. To test the hypothesis that EtOH enhances the severity of S. aureus skin infection, mice were fed EtOH for ≥12 weeks via the Meadows-Cook model of alcoholism and inoculated with S. aureus following epidermal abrasion. Evidence of exacerbated staphylococcal disease in EtOH-fed mice included: skin lesions that were larger and contained more organisms, greater weight loss, and increased bacterial dissemination. Infected EtOH-fed mice demonstrated poor maintenance and induction of PMN responses in skin and draining LNs, respectively. Additionally, altered PMN dynamics in the skin of these mice corresponded with reduced production of IL-23 and IL-1β by CD11b+ myeloid cells and IL-17 production by γδ T cells, with the latter defect occurring in the draining LNs as well. In addition, IL-17 restoration attenuated S. aureus-induced dermatopathology and improved bacterial clearance defects in EtOH-fed mice. Taken together, the findings show, in a novel model system, that the EtOH-induced increase in S. aureus-related injury/illness corresponds with defects in the IL-23/IL-17 inflammatory axis and poor PMN accumulation at the site of infection and draining LNs. These findings offer new information about the impact of EtOH on cutaneous host-defense pathways and provide a potential mechanism explaining why alcoholics are predisposed to S. aureus skin infection. PMID:25605871

  5. Chronic experimental infection by Trypanosoma cruzi in Cebus apella monkeys

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    A. Riarte

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty young male Cebus apella monkeys were infected with CAl Trypanosoma cruzi strain and reinfected with CA l or Tulahuen T.cruzi strains, with different doses and parasite source. Subpatent parasitemia was usually demonstrated in acute and chronic phases. Patent parasitemia was evident in one monkey in the acute phase and in four of them in the chronic phase after re-inoculations with high doses of CAl strain. Serological conversion was observed in all monkeys; titers were low, regardless of the methods used to investigate anti-T. cruzi specific antibodies. Higher titers were induced only when re-inoculations were perfomed with the virulent Tulahuén strain or high doses of CAl strain. Clinical electrocardiographic and ajmaline test evaluations did not reveal changes between infected and control monkeys. Histopathologically, cardiac lesions were always characterized by focal or multifocal mononuclear infiltrates and/or isolated fibrosis, as seen during the acute and chronic phases; neither amastigote nests nor active inflammation and fibrogenic processes characteristic of human acute and chronic myocarditis respectively, were observed. These morphological aspects more closely resemble those found in the "indeterminate phase" and contrast with the more diffuse and progressive pattern of the human chagasic myocarditis. All monkeys survived and no mortality was observed.

  6. A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY OF FUNGAL INFECTIONS IN CHRONICALLY DISCHARGING EARS

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    Sujatha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media (CSOM is a disease of multiple aetiology and well known for its persis tence and recurrence inspite of treatment and are the bearbug of otologist, paediatrician and general practitioner. One of the reason s for the refractoriness to treatment and chronicity is coexist ing fungal infection of the ear. OBJECTIVES: Are to find out the prevalence of fungal infections in chronic discharging ears and to identify and isolate the type of fungus prevalent in these ears . MATERIALS AND METHOD S: Tertiary care hospital level descrip tive study was conducted in 50 cases of CSOM with actively discharging ears for a period of one year starting from February 2013. For all the cases aural swabs were collected from the diseased ear and were used for direct microscopic examination in potassi um hydroxide wet mount. Ear swab was cultured on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar plate for fungal cultures. The patient characteristics were prospectively recorded and results were analysed. CONCLUSION : There is high prevalence of coexisting fungal infection in actively discharging ears of CSOM patients

  7. Chronic infection drives expression of the inhibitory receptor CD200R, and its ligand CD200, by mouse and human CD4 T cells.

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    Stefano Caserta

    Full Text Available Certain parasites have evolved to evade the immune response and establish chronic infections that may persist for many years. T cell responses in these conditions become muted despite ongoing infection. Upregulation of surface receptors with inhibitory properties provides an immune cell-intrinsic mechanism that, under conditions of chronic infection, regulates immune responses and limits cellular activation and associated pathology. The negative regulator, CD200 receptor, and its ligand, CD200, have been shown to regulate macrophage activation and reduce pathology following infection. We show that CD4 T cells also increase expression of inhibitory CD200 receptors (CD200R in response to chronic infection. CD200R was upregulated on murine effector T cells in response to infection with bacterial, Salmonella enterica, or helminth, Schistosoma mansoni, pathogens that respectively drive predominant Th1- or Th2-responses. In vitro chronic and prolonged stimuli were required for the sustained upregulation of CD200R, and its expression coincided with loss of multifunctional potential in T effector cells during infection. Importantly, we show an association between IL-4 production and CD200R expression on T effector cells from humans infected with Schistosoma haematobium that correlated effectively with egg burden and, thus infection intensity. Our results indicate a role of CD200R:CD200 in T cell responses to helminths which has diagnostic and prognostic relevance as a marker of infection for chronic schistosomiasis in mouse and man.

  8. Bacterial adenosine triphosphate as a measure of urinary tract infection

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    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Procedure detects and counts bacteria present in urine samples. Method also determines bacterial levels in other aqueous body fluids including lymph fluid, plasma, blood, spinal fluid, saliva and mucous.

  9. Multi-species bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection in otitis media

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    Thornton Ruth B

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria which are metabolically active yet unable to be cultured and eradicated by antibiotic treatment are present in the middle ear effusion of children with chronic otitis media with effusion (COME and recurrent acute otitis media (rAOM. These observations are suggestive of biofilm presence or intracellular sequestration of bacteria and may play a role in OM pathogenesis. The aim of this project is to provide evidence for the presence of otopathogenic bacteria intracellularly or within biofilm in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME or rAOM. Methods Middle ear mucosal biopsies from 20 children with COME or rAOM were examined for otopathogenic bacteria (either in biofilm or located intracellularly using transmission electron microscopy (TEM or species specific fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. One healthy control biopsy from a child undergoing cochlear implant surgery was also examined. Results No bacteria were observed in the healthy control sample. In 2 of the 3 biopsies imaged using TEM, bacteria were observed in mucus containing vacuoles within epithelial cells. Bacterial species within these could not be identified and biofilm was not observed. Using FISH with CLSM, bacteria were seen in 15 of the 17 otitis media mucosal specimens. In this group, 11 (65% of the 17 middle ear mucosal biopsies showed evidence of bacterial biofilm and 12 demonstrated intracellular bacteria. 52% of biopsies were positive for both biofilm and intracellular bacteria. At least one otopathogen was identified in 13 of the 15 samples where bacteria were present. No differences were observed between biopsies from children with COME and those with rAOM. Conclusion Using FISH and CLSM, bacterial biofilm and intracellular infection with known otopathogens are demonstrated on/in the middle ear mucosa of children with COME and/or rAOM. While their role in disease pathogenesis remains to be

  10. Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Cacoub, Patrice; Gragnani, Laura; Comarmond, Cloe; Zignego, Anna Linda

    2014-12-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are known to be at risk of developing liver complications i.e. cirrhosis and liver cancer. However, the risks of morbidity and mortality are underestimated because they do not take into account non-liver consequences of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. Numerous extrahepatic manifestations have been reported in up to 74% of patients, from perceived to disabling conditions. The majority of data concern hepatitis C virus-related autoimmune and/or lymphoproliferative disorders, from mixed cryoglobulinaemia vasculitis to frank lymphomas. More recently, other hepatitis C virus-associated disorders have been reported including cardiovascular, renal, metabolic, and central nervous system diseases. This review aims to outline most of the extrahepatic manifestations that are currently being investigated, including some of autoimmune and/or lymphoproliferative nature, and others in which the role of immune mechanisms appears less clear. Beyond the liver, hepatitis C virus chronic infection should be analyzed as a multifaceted systemic disease leading to heavy direct and indirect costs. The accurate consideration of extrahepatic consequences of such a systemic infection significantly increases the weight of its pathological burden. The need for effective viral eradication measures is underlined.

  11. High specificity ZnO quantum dots for diagnosis and treatment in bacterial infection

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    Zhang, Min; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    Early diagnosis and effective treatment of bacterial infection has become increasingly important. Herein, we developed a fluorescent nano-probe MPA@ZnO-PEP by conjugating SiO2-stabilized ZnO quantum dot (ZnO@SiO2) with bacteria-targeting peptide PEP, which was encapsulated with MPA, a near infrared (NIR) dye. The nanoprobe MPA@ZnO-PEP showed excellent fluorescence property and could specifically distinguish bacterial infection from sterile inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. The favorable biocompatability of MPA@ZnO-PEP was verified by MTT assay. This probe was further modified with antibiotic methicillin to form the theranostic nanoparticle MPA/Met@ZnO-PEP with amplified antibacterial activity. These results promised the great potential of MPA@ZnO-PEP for efficient non-invasive early diagnosis of bacterial infections and effective bacterial-targeting therapy.

  12. New Mouse Model for Chronic Infections by Gram-Negative Bacteria Enabling the Study of Anti-Infective Efficacy and Host-Microbe Interactions

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    Pletzer, Daniel; Mansour, Sarah C.; Wuerth, Kelli; Rahanjam, Negin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Only a few, relatively cumbersome animal models enable long-term Gram-negative bacterial infections that mimic human situations, where untreated infections can last for weeks. Here, we describe a simple murine cutaneous abscess model that enables chronic or progressive infections, depending on the subcutaneously injected bacterial strain. In this model, Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis epidemic isolate LESB58 caused localized high-density skin and soft tissue infections and necrotic skin lesions for up to 10 days but did not disseminate in either CD-1 or C57BL/6 mice. The model was adapted for use with four major Gram-negative nosocomial pathogens, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Escherichia coli. This model enabled noninvasive imaging and tracking of lux-tagged bacteria, the influx of activated neutrophils, and production of reactive oxygen-nitrogen species at the infection site. Screening antimicrobials against high-density infections showed that local but not intravenous administration of gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and meropenem significantly but incompletely reduced bacterial counts and superficial tissue dermonecrosis. Bacterial RNA isolated from the abscess tissue revealed that Pseudomonas genes involved in iron uptake, toxin production, surface lipopolysaccharide regulation, adherence, and lipase production were highly upregulated whereas phenazine production and expression of global activator gacA were downregulated. The model was validated for studying virulence using mutants of more-virulent P. aeruginosa strain PA14. Thus, mutants defective in flagella or motility, type III secretion, or siderophore biosynthesis were noninvasive and suppressed dermal necrosis in mice, while a strain with a mutation in the bfiS gene encoding a sensor kinase showed enhanced invasiveness and mortality in mice compared to controls infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa PA14. PMID:28246361

  13. The Role of Bacterial Vaginosis in Infection After Major Gynecologic Surgery

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    L. Lin

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Previous studies have reported an association between bacterial vaginosis (BV and postoperative fever and infection. This prospective study investigated whether the intermediate or definite stages of BV are risk factors for postoperative infection after major gynecologic surgery.

  14. Semen and urine culture in the diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis

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    L. R. Zegarra Montes

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic accuracy of semen and urine culture in the diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 70 consecutive men suspected of having chronic bacterial prostatitis along with 17 asymptomatic controls, we obtained urine and semen cultures followed 1 week later by the Meares and Stamey test, our reference standard. The interpretation of each of the cultures was blind to the results of other tests. RESULTS: 139 men were referred for evaluation of chronic bacterial prostatitis and 70 received all tests. Additionally, 17 control men volunteered to participate. The Meares and Stamey Test was positive in 69 (79% patients. The semen culture had a sensitivity of 45% and a specificity of 94%. The likelihood ratio associated with a positive semen culture was 8.1 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.2 to 55.3; the likelihood ratio associated with a negative semen culture was 0.6 (95% CI 0.5 to 0.7. The urine culture had a sensitivity of 4% and a specificity of 100%. The likelihood ratio of a positive urine culture was infinity and of a negative urine culture was 0.96 (95% CI 0.9 to 1. CONCLUSIONS: While a positive semen culture in a symptomatic patient may suffice to select and start antibiotic treatment against chronic bacterial prostatitis, a negative culture does not rule out the condition. Urine cultures alone are not useful for diagnosing CBP. The Meares and Stamey test remains important for the diagnosis of CBP in practice.

  15. Determinants of survival among HIV-infected chronic dialysis patients.

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    Rodriguez, Rudolph A; Mendelson, Michael; O'Hare, Ann M; Hsu, Ling Chin; Schoenfeld, Patricia

    2003-05-01

    Over 100 HIV-infected patients have initiated chronic dialysis at San Francisco General Hospital (SFGH) since 1985. This study employed retrospective analysis to identify determinants of and trends in survival among HIV-infected patients who have initiated chronic dialysis at SFGH from January 1, 1985 to November 1, 2002 (n = 115). Cohort patient survival was compared with survival after an AIDS-opportunistic illness in all HIV-infected patients in San Francisco during the study period. Higher CD4 count (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86 per 50 cells/mm(3) increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.80 to 0.93) and serum albumin (HR, 0.53 per 1 g/dl increase; CI, 0.36 to 0.78) at initiation of dialysis were strongly associated with lower mortality. Survival for those initiating dialysis during the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was 16.1 mo versus 9.4 mo for those initiating dialysis before this time, but this difference was not statistically significant. In adjusted analysis, only a non-statistically significant trend toward improved survival during the HAART era was noted (HR, 0.59; CI, 0.34 to 1.04). By comparison, survival for all HIV-infected patients after an AIDS-opportunistic illness in San Francisco increased from 16 mo in 1994 to 81 mo in 1996. The dramatic improvement in survival that has occurred since the mid-1990s for patients with HIV appears to be greatly attenuated in the sub-group undergoing dialysis. Although this may partly reflect confounding by race, injection drug use and HCV co-infection, future attempts to improve survival among HIV-infected dialysis patients should focus on barriers to the effective use of HAART in this group.

  16. Effect of chronic FIV infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on Mycoplasma haemofelis infection.

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    Tasker, Séverine; Caney, Sarah M A; Day, Michael J; Dean, Rachel S; Helps, Chris R; Knowles, Toby G; Lait, Philippa J P; Pinches, Mark D G; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2006-10-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on Mycoplasma haemofelis infection. Six cats chronically infected with FIV-Glasgow8 (Group X) and six FIV-free cats (Group Y) were infected with M. haemofelis on Day 0 by intravenous blood inoculation. From Day 0 until Day 86 post-infection (pi), blood samples were collected for M. haemofelis and FIV provirus quantitative real-time PCR and haematology. Three of the six cats in each of Groups X and Y were randomly selected to receive marbofloxacin treatment (2 mg/kg PO q24 h) from Day 16 to 43 pi, with the remaining cats being untreated controls with no antibiotic treatment. The M. haemofelis copy numbers and haematological data were compared between Groups X and Y, and between marbofloxacin-treated and control cats using a Mann-Whitney U-test. M. haemofelis infection was associated with development of macrocytic hypochromic anaemia. In some cats, marked variation in M. haemofelis copy number over time (>100,000-fold difference within 48 h in some cats) and/or cycling of copy number was seen. No correlation was found between FIV provirus copy number and M. haemofelis copy number or haematological variables. No significant effect of chronic FIV infection on M. haemofelis copy number kinetics or haematological changes due to M. haemofelis infection was found, other than MCHC (P=0.03). Marbofloxacin treatment was associated with a significant decrease in M. haemofelis copy number (P=0.002), although consistent clearance of infection was not demonstrated. This study reveals the presence of marked fluctuations in M. haemofelis copy number kinetics in vivo and a significant response to marbofloxacin antibiotic treatment.

  17. The treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection in HIV co-infection

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    Vogel Martin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic HCV co-infection is present in up to one third of HIV-positive patients in Europe. In recent years, apart from the traditional transmission route of intravenous drug abuse, outbreaks of sexually transmitted acute HCV infections, mainly among HIV-positive men who have sex with men, have contributed to the overall disease burden. Because the natural course of HCV infection is substantially accelerated in HIV-co-infection, end-stage liver disease has become the most frequent cause of non-AIDS related death in this population. Therefore every HIV/HCV co-infected patient should be evaluated for possible anti-HCV therapy with the goal of reaching a sustained virological response and thus cure of hepatitis C infection. The standard of care for the treatment of chronic HCV infection in HIV-infected remains a pegylated interferon in combination with weight-adapted ribavirin. HAART should not be withheld from HCV co-infected patients due to concerns of drug related hepatotoxicity and in patients with reduced CD4-cell counts HAART should be started first. Under pegylated interferon and ribavirin combination therapy drug to drug interactions and cumulated toxicity between nucleoside analogues and anti-HCV therapy may be observed and concomitant didanosine use is contraindicated and zidovudine and stavudine should be avoided if possible. The development of new drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C represents a promising perspective also for HIV positive patients. However, these substances will probably reach clinical routine for HIV patients later than HCV monoinfected patients. Therefore at present waiting for new drugs is not an alternative to a modern pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy.

  18. Randomized pilot trial of a synbiotic dietary supplement in chronic HIV-1 infection

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    Schunter Marco

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV-1 results in marked immunologic insults and structural damage to the intestinal mucosa, including compromised barrier function. While the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has been a major advancement in the treatment of HIV-1 infection, the need for novel complementary interventions to help restore intestinal structural and functional integrity remains unmet. Known properties of pre-, pro-, and synbiotics suggest that they may be useful tools in achieving this goal. Methods This was a 4-week parallel, placebo-controlled, randomized pilot trial in HIV-infected women on antiretroviral therapy. A synbiotic formulation (Synbiotic 2000® containing 4 strains of probiotic bacteria (1010 each plus 4 nondigestible, fermentable dietary fibers (2.5 g each was provided each day, versus a fiber-only placebo formulation. The primary outcome was bacterial translocation. Secondary outcomes included the levels of supplemented bacteria in stool, the activation phenotype of peripheral T-cells and monocytes, and plasma levels of C-reactive protein and soluble CD14. Results Microbial translocation, as measured by plasma bacterial 16S ribosomal DNA concentration, was not altered by synbiotic treatment. In contrast, the synbiotic formulation resulted in significantly elevated levels of supplemented probiotic bacterial strains in stool, including L. plantarum and P. pentosaceus, with the colonization of these two species being positively correlated with each other. T-cell activation phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes showed modest changes in response to synbiotic exposure, with HLA-DR expression slightly elevated on a minor population of CD4+ T-cells which lack expression of HLA-DR or PD-1. In addition, CD38 expression on CD8+ T-cells was slightly lower in the fiber-only group. Plasma levels of soluble CD14 and C-reactive protein were unaffected by synbiotic treatment in this study. Conclusions

  19. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivatives in treatment of bacterial skin infection

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    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Dong; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Huang, Joy H.; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is an effective method for killing bacterial cells in view of the increasing problem of multiantibiotic resistance. We herein reported the PACT effect on bacteria involved in skin infections using a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-Lys). Compared with its anionic ZnPc counterpart, ZnPc-Lys showed an enhanced antibacterial efficacy in vitro and in an animal model of localized infection. Meanwhile, ZnPc-Lys was observed to significantly reduce the wound skin blood flow during wound healing, indicating an anti-inflammation activity. This study provides new insight on the mechanisms of PACT in bacterial skin infection.

  20. Current concepts in the management of bacterial skin infections in children

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    Palit Aparna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial skin infections in children vary widely clinically, starting from mild superficial folliculitis to deep necrotizing fasciitis. The causative organisms are mostly Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus, with occasional involvement of Gram-negative organisms. Treatment of even the milder forms of bacterial skin infections is of importance because of the long-term morbidity associated with them. However, because of global emergence of resistant strains of bacteria, treatment of these conditions is becoming increasingly difficult. The current antibacterial resistance patterns in organisms causing skin and soft tissue infections and the problems encountered in their management in children have been discussed.

  1. Arabidopsis lysin-motif proteins LYM1 LYM3 CERK1 mediate bacterial peptidoglycan sensing and immunity to bacterial infection

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    Willmann, Roland; Lajunen, Heini M.; Erbs, Gitte; Newman, Mari-Anne; Kolb, Dagmar; Tsuda, Kenichi; Katagiri, Fumiaki; Fliegmann, Judith; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Cullimore, Julie V.; Jehle, Anna K.; Götz, Friedrich; Kulik, Andreas; Molinaro, Antonio; Lipka, Volker; Gust, Andrea A.; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of microbial patterns by host pattern recognition receptors is a key step in immune activation in multicellular eukaryotes. Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are major components of bacterial cell walls that possess immunity-stimulating activities in metazoans and plants. Here we show that PGN sensing and immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana requires three lysin-motif (LysM) domain proteins. LYM1 and LYM3 are plasma membrane proteins that physically interact with PGNs and mediate Arabidopsis sensitivity to structurally different PGNs from Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. lym1 and lym3 mutants lack PGN-induced changes in transcriptome activity patterns, but respond to fungus-derived chitin, a pattern structurally related to PGNs, in a wild-type manner. Notably, lym1, lym3, and lym3 lym1 mutant genotypes exhibit supersusceptibility to infection with virulent Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato DC3000. Defects in basal immunity in lym3 lym1 double mutants resemble those observed in lym1 and lym3 single mutants, suggesting that both proteins are part of the same recognition system. We further show that deletion of CERK1, a LysM receptor kinase that had previously been implicated in chitin perception and immunity to fungal infection in Arabidopsis, phenocopies defects observed in lym1 and lym3 mutants, such as peptidoglycan insensitivity and enhanced susceptibility to bacterial infection. Altogether, our findings suggest that plants share with metazoans the ability to recognize bacterial PGNs. However, as Arabidopsis LysM domain proteins LYM1, LYM3, and CERK1 form a PGN recognition system that is unrelated to metazoan PGN receptors, we propose that lineage-specific PGN perception systems have arisen through convergent evolution. PMID:22106285

  2. The clinical analysis of three methods in the treatment of intracranial bacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-zhi Wang; Wei Shi

    2009-01-01

    Objective To analyze the effect of three therapeutic methods to find an optimal approach to the treatment of intracranial bacterial infection by retrospectively reviewing 33 intracranial bacterial infection patients who were admitted from 1995 to 2008 in oar hospital. Methods The treatments by intermittent lumbar puncture,continuous lumbar subarachnoid space drainage, and embedment of Ommaya cyst for continuous drainage from the ventricles were performed in 15 cases, 12 cases, and 6 cases respectively along with intravenous application of full dose of antibiotics. Results Nineteen cases were cured and the best prognosis was from the group of Ommaya cyst embedment and continuous drainage from the ventricles. Conclusion Management goals are prompt recognition of the central nervous system (CNS) infection, rapid identification of causative organisms and initiation of treatment with the optimal management methods for complications. Embedment of Ommaya cyst for continuous drainage from the ventricle is a safe and effective treatment for intracranial bacterial infection.

  3. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection.

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    Brittany E Goldberg

    Full Text Available The oral microbial community (microbiota plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi's sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are

  4. Predominant pathogen competition and core microbiota divergence in chronic airway infection.

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    Rogers, Geraint B; van der Gast, Christopher J; Serisier, David J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bacterial lung infections associated with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis represent a substantial and growing health-care burden. Where Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the numerically dominant species within these infections, prognosis is significantly worse. However, in many individuals, Haemophilus influenzae predominates, a scenario associated with less severe disease. The mechanisms that determine which pathogen is most abundant are not known. We hypothesised that the distribution of H. influenzae and P. aeruginosa would be consistent with strong interspecific competition effects. Further, we hypothesised that where P. aeruginosa is predominant, it is associated with a distinct 'accessory microbiota' that reflects a significant interaction between this pathogen and the wider bacterial community. To test these hypotheses, we analysed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing data generated previously from 60 adult bronchiectasis patients, whose airway microbiota was dominated by either P. aeruginosa or H. influenzae. The relative abundances of the two dominant species in their respective groups were not significantly different, and when present in the opposite pathogen group the two species were found to be in very low abundance, if at all. These findings are consistent with strong competition effects, moving towards competitive exclusion. Ordination analysis indicated that the distribution of the core microbiota associated with each pathogen, readjusted after removal of the dominant species, was significantly divergent (analysis of similarity (ANOSIM), R=0.07, P=0.019). Taken together, these findings suggest that both interspecific competition and also direct and/or indirect interactions between the predominant species and the wider bacterial community may contribute to the predominance of P. aeruginosa in a subset of bronchiectasis lung infections.

  5. The impact of HIV infection on blood leukocyte responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic patients and patients with bloodstream infection

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    Michaëla A M Huson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: HIV-induced changes in cytokine responses to bacteria may influence susceptibility to bacterial infections and the consequent inflammatory response. Methods: We examined the impact of HIV on whole blood responsiveness to bacterial stimulation in asymptomatic subjects and patients with bacterial bloodstream infection (BSI. Whole blood was stimulated ex vivo with two bacterial Toll-like receptor agonists (lipopolysaccharide and lipoteichoic acid and two pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae and non-typhoidal Salmonella, which are relevant in HIV-positive patients. Production of interferon-γ, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 was used as a read-out. Results: In asymptomatic subjects, HIV infection was associated with reduced interferon-γ, release after stimulation and priming of the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to non-typhoidal Salmonella. In patients with BSI, we found no such priming effect, nor was there evidence for more profound sepsis-induced immunosuppression in BSI patients with HIV co-infection. Conclusions: These results suggest a complex effect of HIV on leukocyte responses to bacteria. However, in patients with sepsis, leukocyte responses were equally blunted in patients with and without HIV infection.

  6. [Microbiological diagnosis of bacterial infection associated with delivery and postpartum].

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    Padilla-Ortega, Belén; Delgado-Palacio, Susana; García-Garrote, Fernando; Rodríguez-Gómez, Juan Miguel; Romero-Hernández, Beatriz

    2016-05-01

    The newborn may acquire infections during delivery due to maternal colonization of the birth canal, by microorganisms such as Streptococcus agalactiae that caused early neonatal infection, or acquisition through the placenta, amniotic fluid or birth products. After birth, the newborn that needs hospitalization can develop nosocomial infections during their care and exceptionally through lactation by infectious mastitis or incorrect handling of human milk, which does not require to stop breastfeeding in most cases. It is important and necessary to perform microbiological diagnosis for the correct treatment of perinatal infections, especially relevant in preterm infants with low or very low weight with high mortality rates.

  7. Decreased effect of glucantime in cutaneous leishmaniasis complicated with secondary bacterial infection

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    G Sadeghian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glucantime is regarded as the first-line treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL; however, failure to treatment is a problem in many cases. Aim: The aim was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of glucantime in CL complicated with secondary bacterial infection compared to uncomplicated lesions. Methods: This experimental study was performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Center, Isfahan, Iran. A total of 161 patients enrolled in the study had CL confirmed by positive smear of lesions. All the patients were treated with systemic glucantime for 3 weeks and followed for 2 months. Response to treatment was defined as loss of infiltration, reepithelization, and negative smear. Depending on the results of bacterial cultures, the lesions were divided into two groups and the efficacy of glucantime was compared. Results: A total of 123 patients (76.4% were negative, and 38 patients (23.6% were positive for secondary bacterial infection. In groups with negative bacterial culture response to treatment was 65% (80 patients and in the other positive group, it was 31.6% (12 patients, with a difference (χ2 = 13.77, P < 0.01. Conclusion: Therapeutic effect of glucantime showed a decrease in CL lesions with secondary bacterial infection. Therefore, in the cases of unresponsiveness to treatment, the lesions should be evaluated for bacterial infection, before repeating the treatment.

  8. 77 FR 30293 - Recommendations for the Identification of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ... Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Chronic Infection AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC...) announces draft recommendations for identification of persons with HCV chronic infection, available for public comment. The recommendations are intended to increase the proportion of persons with chronic...

  9. Susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to Burkholderia infection depends on prior diet and secreted bacterial attractants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughn S Cooper

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans may be killed by certain pathogenic bacteria and thus is a model organism for studying interactions between bacteria and animal hosts. However, growing nematodes on prey bacteria may influence their susceptibility to potential pathogens. A method of axenic nematode culture was developed to isolate and quantify interactions between C. elegans and potentially pathogenic strains of the Burkholderia cepacia complex. Studying these dynamics in liquid solution rather than on agar surfaces minimized nematode avoidance behavior and resolved more differences among isolates. Most isolates of B. cenocepacia, B. ambifaria and B. cepacia caused 60-80% mortality of nematodes after 7 days, whereas isolates of B. multivorans caused less mortality (<25% and supported nematode reproduction. However, some B. cenocepacia isolates recovered from chronic infections were much less virulent (5-28% mortality. As predicted, prior diet altered the outcome of interactions between nematodes and bacteria. When given the choice between Burkholderia and E. coli as prey on agar, axenically raised nematodes initially preferred most lethal Burkholderia isolates to E. coli as a food source, but this was not the case for nematodes fed E. coli, which avoided toxic Burkholderia. This food preference was associated with the cell-free supernatant and thus secreted compounds likely mediated bacterial-nematode interactions. This model, which isolates interactions between bacteria and nematodes from the effects of prior feeding, demonstrates that bacteria can influence nematode behavior and their susceptibility to pathogens.

  10. Atypical streptococcal infection of gingiva associated with chronic mouth breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haytac, M Cenk; Oz, I Attila

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcal infections of oral tissues are mainly seen in young children who experience a variety of upper respiratory tract infections. The disease is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and ulcers on the gingiva, lips, and tonsils. This case report presents an atypical streptococcal infection of the gingiva in an 18-year-old man. The patient was referred to the periodontology department complaining of a 2-month history of gingival enlargement. He had persistent fever (39.5 degrees C) and general malaise for 2 weeks. Intraoral examination revealed extremely inflamed and enlarged gingiva with spontaneous bleeding and suppuration. Based on the otolaryngologic consultation and the hematologic, immunologic, and microbiologic tests, the final diagnosis was an atypical streptococcal gingivitis with chronic adenoid-related mouth breathing and oral hygiene neglect as contributing factors. Treatment consisted of a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen, supragingival and subgingival debridement, adenoidectomy, and scaling and root planing. A good response to nonsurgical therapy was achieved despite poor patient compliance, and no recurrence of gingival enlargement was observed after 1 year. Streptococcal gingivitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of suppurative gingival enlargements. Furthermore, chronic mouth breathing may initiate and/or contribute to this disease.

  11. Bacterial species and their associations with acute and chronic mastitis in suckler ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E M; Willis, Z N; Blakeley, M; Lovatt, F; Purdy, K J; Green, L E

    2015-10-01

    Acute mastitis in suckler ewes is often detected because of systemic signs such as anorexia or lameness, whereas chronic mastitis, characterized by intramammary abscesses with no systemic disease, is typically detected when ewes are inspected before mating. The aims of the current study were to identify the species and strains of culturable bacteria associated with acutely diseased, chronically diseased, and unaffected mammary glands to investigate whether species and strains vary by state. To investigate acute mastitis, 28 milk samples were obtained from both glands of 14 ewes with acute mastitis in one gland only. To investigate chronic mastitis, 16 ovine udders were obtained from 2 abattoirs; milk was aspirated from the 32 glands where possible, and the udders were sectioned to expose intramammary abscesses, which were swab sampled. All milk and swab samples were cultured aerobically. In total, 37 bacterial species were identified, 4 from acute mastitis, 26 from chronic mastitis, and 8 from apparently healthy glands. In chronic mastitis, the overall coincidence index of overlap of species detected in intramammary abscesses and milk was 0.60, reducing to 0.36 within individual glands, indicating a high degree of species overlap in milk and abscesses overall, but less overlap within specific glands. Staphylococcus aureus was detected frequently in all sample types; it was isolated from 10/14 glands with acute mastitis. In 5 ewes, closely related strains were present in both affected and unaffected glands. In chronic mastitis, closely related Staphylococcus aureus strains were detected in milk and abscesses from the same gland.

  12. Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus infection complicating dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesly, Fridolin J; Sluzevich, Jason C

    2014-04-01

    Chronic cutaneous varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection has not been previously reported or characterized as a complication of dermatomyositis. Two patients with non-malignancy-associated dermatomyositis, treated with long-term prednisone and methotrexate, developed persistent, painless ulcers ultimately established to be secondary to chronic VZV. The absence of pain or a history suggestive of acute VZV, and the lack of characteristic histopathology, resulted in a lengthy delay in diagnosis. Polymerase chain reaction and tissue immunohistochemistry were positive for VZV, and treatment with valacyclovir resulted in complete clearance. Diagnostic testing for VZV should thus be considered in the evaluation of ulcerative lesions in patients with dermatomyositis. The increased incidence of acute VZV in combination with the nature and duration of immunosuppressive treatment in this patient population may be contributory.

  13. Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor and bacterial infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valls Serón, M.

    2011-01-01

    Mercedes Valls Serón onderzocht een onderdeel van het fibrinolytische systeem dat verantwoordelijk is voor het oplossen van bloedstolsels. Ze keek naar de wisselwerking tussen de zogenaamde trombine-activeerbare fibrinolyse inhibitors - of TAFI - en bacteriën. De binding van TAFI aan een specifieke

  14. Insights into the bacterial and fungal ecology of endodontic infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Persoon, I.F.

    2016-01-01

    In apical periodontitis, microorganisms infect the dental root canal system and evoke an inflammation in the periapical tissues. Since the host is unable to eliminate this infection, the root canal system has to be disinfected by the dentist during endodontic therapy. After this the inflammation sho

  15. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Accuracy of Five Markers of Serious Bacterial Infection in Malawian Children with Signs of Severe Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Carrol, Enitan D.; Mankhambo, Limangeni A.; Graham Jeffers; Deborah Parker; Malcolm Guiver; Paul Newland; Banda, Daniel L; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Heyderman, Robert S; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; C Anthony Hart

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early recognition and prompt and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality from serious bacterial infections (SBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of five markers of infection: C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), CD163 and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), as markers of SBI in severely ill Malawian children. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Children prese...

  16. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection in an adult with no detectable immune deficiency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, M. de; Mol, M.J.T.M.; Bogman, M.J.J.T.; Galama, J.M.D.; Raymakers, R.A.P.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong latent infection. In some patients the host-virus balance is disturbed, resulting in a chronic active EBV infection. The following case illustrates the difficulty in diagnosing and treating chronic EBV infection. CASE: A 30-year-old woman w

  17. Aureobasidium pullulans infection in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Rodrigues de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saprophytic fungi are being increasingly recognized as etiologic agents of mycoses in immunosuppressed patients. We report a case of subcutaneous infiltration by Aureobasidium pullulans, likely due to traumatic inoculation, in a neutropenic patient during chemotherapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The patient was treated with amphotericin B deoxycholate but was subsequently switched to itraconazole, which improved the lesion. This case highlights the importance of considering unusual fungal infections in critically ill patients such as those who are immunosuppressed due to chemotherapy. Diagnostic techniques and effective antifungal therapy have improved the prognosis of these cases.

  18. Chronic Hepatitis B and C Virus Infection and Risk for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in HIV-Infected Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qing; De Luca, Andrea; Smith, Colette

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most common AIDS-defining condition in the era of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Whether chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection promote NHL in HIV-infected patients is unclear. Objective: To investigate whether chronic HB...

  19. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Vicari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE. A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 10 [9] CFU per day or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6% complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = "6Tx/6-": treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26; Group B = "12Tx": 12 months of treatment (n = 22; Group C = "6-/6Tx": no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23; Group D = "12-": no treatment (n = 24. The patients of Groups A = "6Tx/6-" and B = "12Tx" had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively. In contrast, group "12-": patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%. The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups "6Tx/6-" (15.5% and "6-/6Tx" (13.6% was lower than that found in the patients of group "12-" (45.8%. Finally, no patient of groups "6Tx/6-" and "6-/6Tx" had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group "12-" patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS.

  20. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Enzo; Vignera, La Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 109 CFU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = “6Tx/6-”: treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = “12Tx”: 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = “6-/6Tx”: no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = “12-”: no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = “6Tx/6-” and B = “12Tx” had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group “12-”: patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups “6Tx/6-” (15.5%) and “6-/6Tx” (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group “12-” (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups “6Tx/6-” and “6-/6Tx” had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group “12-” patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS. PMID:24969056

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infection. Disruption of the microbiome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are complex, and microbiome technology has provided us with a new research tool for its better understanding. There is compartmentalization of the microbiota in the various parts of the lung. Studies of the lower airway lumen microbiota in COPD have yielded confusing results, and additional studies with scrupulous attention to prevent and account for upper airway contamination of bronchoalveolar lavage samples are required. Lung tissue microbiota has been examined in three studies, which also demonstrate varied results based on the site of sampling (bronchial mucosa, lung parenchyma), and this variation extends to sampling sites within a lobe of the lung. The Vicious Circle Hypothesis embodies how an altered lung microbiome could contribute to COPD progression. Relating microbiota composition to airway and systemic inflammation and clinical outcomes are important research questions. Although various obstacles need to be surmounted, ultimately lung microbiome studies will provide new insights into how infection contributes to COPD.

  2. Manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection beyond the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Ira M; Cacoub, Patrice; Dal Maso, Luigino; Harrison, Stephen A; Younossi, Zobair M

    2010-12-01

    In addition to its effects in the liver, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can have serious consequences for other organ systems. Extrahepatic manifestations include mixed cryoglobulinemia (MC) vasculitis, lymphoproliferative disorders, renal disease, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, sicca syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis-like polyarthritis, and autoantibody production; reductions in quality of life involve fatigue, depression, and cognitive impairment. MC vasculitis, certain types of lymphoma, insulin resistance, and cognitive function appear to respond to anti-HCV therapy. However, treatments for HCV and other biopsychosocial factors can reduce quality of life and complicate management. HCV treatment has a high overall cost that increases when extrahepatic manifestations are considered. HCV appears to have a role in the pathogenesis of MC vasculitis, certain types of lymphoma, and insulin resistance. Clinicians who treat patients with HCV infections should be aware of potential extrahepatic manifestations and how these can impact and alter management of their patients.

  3. 克拉霉素对细菌生物膜表达阳性慢性鼻-鼻窦炎患者术后感染的疗效分析%Effect of clarithromycin on treatment of postoperative infections in chronic rhinosinusitis patients with positive expression of bacterial biofilm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张良春; 熊世珍; 黄维

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨克拉霉素对细菌生物膜表达阳性慢性鼻‐鼻窦炎(CRS)患者术后感染的疗效,并分析患者术后症状或体征改善状况,为临床治疗提供参考依据。方法选取医院2011年1月-2014年1月收治的CRS患者62例,根据治疗方法将所有患者分为对照组和观察组,对照组30例,进行常规治疗,口服阿莫西林/克拉维酸钾胶囊;观察组32例,应用克拉霉素治疗,观察治疗前后治疗效果,应用症状视觉模拟量表评分(VAS)进行主观方面评估,采用SPSS13.0软件进行统计分析。结果观察组治愈率为68.75%,高于对照组56.67%;两组治疗后VAS评分和鼻窦CT评分均低于治疗前;观察组治疗后VAS评分和鼻窦CT评分为(1.20±0.28)和(2.18±0.29)分,均低于对照组治疗后(3.41±0.33)和(4.64±0.31)分,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05);两组患者头痛、腹痛腹泻、恶心呕吐和哮喘等不良反应比较,差异无统计学意义。结论克拉霉素对细菌生物膜表达阳性CRS患者术后感染的疗效较好,安全性较高。%OBJECTIVE To explore the efficacy of clarithromycin in treatment of postoperative infections in the chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) patients with positive expression of bacterial biofilm and analyze the postoperative improvement of symptoms or signs of the patients so as to provide guidance for clinical treatment .METHODS A total of 62 CRS patients who were treated in the hospital from Jan 2011 to Jan 2014 were enrolled in the study and divided into the control group and the observation group according to the treatment method .The control group with 30 cases was treated with oral administration of amoxicillin‐clavulanate potassium capsule for conventional therapy ,while the observation group with 32 cases was given clarithromycin .The curative effect was observed , the subjective assessment was conducted by using

  4. Dietary Fatty Acids and Immune Response to Food-Borne Bacterial Infections

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effec...

  5. Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Infection with Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Vincent F. Tablang

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a severe and life-threatening complication in patients with ascites caused by advanced liver disease. The organisms most commonly involved are coliform bacteria and third-generation cephalosporins are the empiric antibiotics of choice. This is an uncommon case of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Listeria monocytogenes in a female patient with liver cirrhosis from autoimmune hepatitis. She did not improve with ceftriaxone and her course was complicated by hepatic encephalopathy, seizures and multi-organ failure. This case emphasizes that a high index of suspicion should be maintained for timely diagnosis and treatment. Listerial peritonitis should be suspected in patients with end-stage liver disease and inadequate response to conventional antibiotics within 48–72 h. Ampicillin/sulbactam should be initiated while awaiting results of ascitic fluid or blood culture.

  6. Parasites can enhance infections of fish with bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    In aquaculture systems, fish are commonly infected by multiple pathogens, including parasites. Parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and bacterium Edwardsiella ictaluri are two common pathogens of cultured channel catfish. The objectives were to 1) evaluate the susceptibility of Ich parasitize...

  7. Findings of bacterial microflora in piglets infected with conventional swine plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanov Jasna

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Piglets infected with the conventional swine plague virus as a result of secondary bacterial infections sometimes show an insufficiently clear clinical and pathoanatomical picture, which is why the very procedure of diagnosis is complex and the final diagnosis unreliable. That is why these investigations were aimed at examining the presence of bacterial microflora in diseased and dead pilgets which were found to have the viral antigen for CSP using the fluorescent antibody technique, in cases where the pathomorphological finding was not characteristic for conventional swine plague. Autopsies of dead piglets most often showed changes in the digestive tract and lungs, with resulting technopathy and diseases of infective nature. Such findings on knowledge of a present bacterial microflora are especially important in cases when conventional swine plague is controlled on farms and an announcement that the disease has been contained is in the offing.

  8. Antiviral treatment for chronic hepatitis B virus infection--immune modulation or viral suppression?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.C.J. Buster (Erik); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThe availability of nucleoside analogues has broadened treatment options for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV ) infection. Registered treatment for chronic hepatitis B currently consists of (pegylated) interferon, lamivudine and adefovir, while entecavir is expected to be

  9. BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FOLLOWING SPLENECTOMY FOR MALIGNANT AND NONMALIGNANT HEMATOLOGIC DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Leone

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Splenectomy, while often necessary in otherwise healthy patients after major trauma, find its primary indication for patients with an underlying malignant or nonmalignant hematologic diseases. Indications of splenectomy for hematologic diseases have been reducing in the last few years, due to improved diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In high-income countries, there is a clear decrease over calendar time in the incidence of all indication splenectomy except nonmalignant hematologic diseases. However, splenectomy, even if with different modalities including laparoscopic splenectomy and partial splenectomy, continue to be a current surgical practice both in nonmalignant hematologic diseases, such as Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP, Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA, Congenital Hemolytic Anemia such as Spherocytosis, Sickle Cell Anemia and Thalassemia and Malignant Hematological Disease, such as lymphoma. Today millions of people in the world are splenectomized. Splenectomy, independently of its cause, induces an early and late increase in the incidence of venous thromboembolism and infections. Infections remain the most dangerous complication of splenectomy. After splenectomy, the levels of antibody are preserved but there is a loss of memory B cells against pneumococcus and tetanus, and the loss of marginal zone monocytes deputed to immunological defense from capsulated bacteria. Commonly, the infections strictly correlated to the absence of the spleen or a decreased or absent splenic function are due to encapsulated bacteria that are the most virulent pathogens in this set of patients. Vaccination with polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines again Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis should be performed before the splenectomy. This practice reduces but does not eliminate the occurrence of overwhelming infections due to capsulated bacteria. At present, most of infection found in splenectomized patients

  10. Pathogenesis of occult chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rocio Aller de la Fuente; María L Gutiérrez; Javier Garcia-Samaniego; Conrado Fernández-Rodriguez; Jose Luis Lledó; Gregorio Castellano

    2011-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) is characterized by hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in serum in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) presenting HBsAg-negative and anti-HBc positive serological patterns. Occult HBV status is associated in some cases with mutant viruses undetectable by HBsAg assays; but more frequently it is due to a strong suppression of viral replication and gene expression. OBI is an entity with world-wide diffusion. The failure to detect HBsAg, despite the persistence of the viral DNA, is due in most cases to the strong suppression of viral replication and gene expression that characterizes this "occult" HBV infection; although the mechanisms responsible for suppression of HBV are not well understood. The majority of OBI cases are secondary to overt HBV infection and represent a residual low viremia level suppressed by a strong immune response together with histological derangements which occurred during acute or chronic HBV infection. Much evidence suggests that it can favour the progression of liver fibrosis and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  11. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia; Ramayo-Caldas, Yuliaxis; Estellé, Jordi; Ma, Tao; Madsen, Lise; Kristiansen, Karsten; Svensson-Frej, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes.

  12. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Bak Holm

    Full Text Available The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite this, the impact of parasite infection on the intestinal microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance of the Lactobacillus genus. In parallel, chronic T. muris infection resulted in a significant shift in the balance between regulatory and inflammatory T cells in the intestinal adaptive immune system, in favour of inflammatory cells. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic parasite infection strongly influences the intestinal microbiota and the adaptive immune system. Our results illustrate the complex interactions between these factors in the intestinal tract, and contribute to furthering the understanding of this interplay, which is of crucial importance considering that 500 million people globally are suffering from these infections and their potential use for therapeutic purposes.

  13. Occult hepatitis B infection and its possible impact on chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habibollahi Peiman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As a well-recognized clinical phenomenon, persistent detectable viral genome in liver or sera in the absence of other serological markers for active hepatitis B virus (HBV replication is called occult HBV infection. The main mechanism through which occult infection occurs is not completely understood and several possible explanations, such as integration into human genome and maintenance in peripheral mononuclear cells, exist. Occult HBV infection has been reported in different populations, especially among patients with Hepatitis C (HCV related liver disease. The probable impact of occult HBV in patients with chronic HCV infection has been previously investigated and the evidence suggests a possible correlation with lower response to anti-viral treatment, higher grades of liver histological changes, and also developing hepatocellular carcinoma. However, in the absence of conclusive results, further studies should be conducted to absolutely assess the impact of occult HBV contamination on the HCV related liver disease.

  14. [Amyloidosis associated with chronic granulomatous disease in a patient with a renal transplant and recurrent urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Ablanedo, P; Seco, M

    2002-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a group of syndromes which share a defect in a component of the phagocyte NADPH-oxidase complex. Without this enzyme activity, phagocytic cells cannot produce superoxide, peroxide, and other potent microbicidal radicals, and are less able to kill ingested pathogens. The clinical picture is characterised by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and abnormal tissue granuloma formation. On the other hand, amyloidosis is a systemic disease with renal involvement occurring in the majority of cases. Recurrent amyloidosis is a rare but well documented event in renal transplant recipients. However, graft loss secondary to amyloidosis has been noted infrequently. In addition, de novo amyloidosis has not been previously associated with graft loss. We report here a renal transplant recipient with chronic granulomatous disease and history of recurrent urinary tract infections, who developed nephrotic syndrome and progressive renal insufficiency secondary to de novo AA amyloidosis leading to graft loss 66 months after transplantation.

  15. Effect of chronic feline immunodeficiency infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Séverine; Caney, Sarah M A; Day, Michael J; Dean, Rachel S; Helps, Chris R; Knowles, Toby G; Lait, Philippa J P; Pinches, Mark D G; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, and efficacy of marbofloxacin treatment, on 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemominutum' infection. Six cats chronically infected with FIV-Glasgow8 (group A) and six FIV-free cats (group B) were infected with 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' on day 0 by intravenous inoculation of blood. From day 0 to 105 post-infection (pi), blood samples were collected for 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' and FIV provirus quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and haematological examination. Three of the six cats in each of the groups were randomly selected to receive marbofloxacin treatment (2mg/kg PO SID) from day 49 to day 76 pi, with the remaining cats being untreated controls. Maximum 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number was reached around day 30 pi. No overt cycling or marked variation in copy number was observed. No significant effect of FIV infection on 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number kinetics or anaemia indices was found. No correlation was found between FIV provirus copy number and 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number or haematological variables. Although marbofloxacin treatment was associated with a significant decrease in 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' copy number, the copy number plateaued during treatment, with no negative PCR results. Additionally, after termination of marbofloxacin treatment the copy numbers of the treated cats increased to reach levels similar to those of the untreated cats within 7-10 days. This study documents, for the first time, the infection kinetics and antibiotic responsiveness of 'Candidatus M. haemominutum' infection.

  16. Serial observations of chronic rotavirus infection in an immunodeficient child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, I; Kimura, T; Murakami, T; Haruki, K; Yamazaki, K; Seto, Y; Minekawa, Y; Funamoto, H

    1991-01-01

    Chronic rotavirus infection of an infant with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was studied by virological examinations in association with long-term observation of his symptoms and immune status. During eleven months of hospitalization, the patient was suffering from incurable severe diarrhea with persisting excretion of rotaviruses detected by electron microscopy and the reversed-passive hemagglutination (R-PHA) test and had transient hepatitis symptom despite multiple administrations of human gammaglobulin and high calorie fluids. The detected viruses were morphologically recognized as rotavirus with double capsid structure. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoretic (PAGE) analysis of their genomic RNAs showed the long electropherotype of group A virus with abnormal migration profiles changing considerably from the early to the late phase of illness: (1) The 11th segment became undetectable; (2) the molecular weight of the 6th segment slightly increased; (3) seven to fourteen extra segments appeared; and (4) PAGE patterns of viral genomic RNAs changed every three or four months. These findings suggest that chronic infection with rotavirus accompanied the generation of extra viral genomic segments and their unusual assortments in an immunodeficient host.

  17. Altered T cell costimulation during chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luisa; Salmen, Siham; Peterson, Darrell L; Montes, Henry; Colmenares, Melisa; Hernández, Manuel; Berrueta-Carrillo, Leidith E; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    T-cell response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vigorous, polyclonal and multi-specific in patients with acute hepatitis who ultimately clear the virus, whereas it is narrow and inefficient in patients with chronic disease, where inappropriate early activation events could account for viral persistence. We investigated the induction of activation receptors and cytokine production in response to HBcAg and crosslinking of CD28 molecules, in CD4+ cells from a group of chronically infected patients (CIP) and naturally immune subjects (NIS). We demonstrated that CD4+ cells from CIP did not increase levels of CD40L and CD69 following stimulation with HBcAg alone or associated to CD28 crosslinking, in contrast to subjects that resolved the infection (p<0.01). Furthermore, CD4+ cells from CIP produced elevated levels of IL-10 in response to HBcAg. These results suggest that a predominant inhibitory environment may be responsible for altered T cell costimulation, representing a pathogenic mechanism for viral persistence.

  18. [Extrahepatic manifestations of chronic hepatitis C virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchner, K P; Berg, T

    2009-05-01

    Current data suggest that HCV infection should be regarded as a systemic infectious disease with multiorgan involvement. More than 50 % of HCV-positive patients develop during the course of the disease at least one extrahepatic manifestation (EHM). The EHMs are often the first and only clinical signs of a chronic hepatitis C. Evidence of HCV infection should always be sought out in cases of unspecific chronic fatigue and/or rheumatic, haematological, endocrine or dermatological disorders. Key pathogenetic factors for the development of EHM are undisputably the HCV lymphotropism and cryoglobulinaemia. Nevertheless, the exact pathogenesis of many EHM still remains unclear. The therapeutic approach to EHM should concentrate on the eradication of HCV. Antiviral therapy in the form of peg-interferon and ribavirin should be regarded as the first-line therapy. Viral response leads mostly to a consecutive clinical response. However, in the case of HCV-related cytopaenias or neuropathies, antiviral therapy may trigger an aggravation of these conditions. Thus, organ-involvement, severity and course of the EHM should be always taken into account when choosing the appropriate therapeutic strategy. Immunosuppressive drugs, plasmapheresis and lately rituximab are counted among therapies that can be applied complementarly or alternatively to the antiviral therapy.

  19. Perinatal Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS Enhances Susceptibility to Viral and Secondary Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn A. Claude

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies suggest childhood exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS leads to increased incidence of infections of the lower respiratory tract. The objective of this study was to determine whether perinatal exposure to ETS increases the incidence, morbidity and severity of respiratory influenza infection and whether a secondary bacterial challenge at the peak of a pre-existing viral infection creates an enhanced host-pathogen susceptibility to an opportunistic infection. Timed-pregnant female Balb/c mice were exposed to either ETS for 6 h/day, 7 d/week beginning on gestation day 14 and continuing with the neonates to 6 weeks of age. Control animals were exposed to filtered air (FA. At the end of exposure, mice were intranasally inoculated with a murine-adapted influenza A. One week later, an intranasal inoculation of S. aureus bacteria was administered. The respective treatment groups were: bacteria only, virus only or virus+bacteria for both FA and ETS-exposed animals for a total of six treatment groups. Animal behavior and body weights were documented daily following infection. Mice were necropsied 1-day post-bacterial infection. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF cell analysis demonstrated perinatal exposure to ETS, compared to FA, leads to delayed but enhanced clinical symptoms and enhanced total cell influx into the lungs associated with viral infection followed by bacterial challenge. Viral infection significantly increases the number of neutrophils entering the lungs following bacterial challenge with either FA or ETS exposure, while the influx of lymphocytes and monocytes is significantly enhanced only by perinatal ETS exposure. There is a significant increase in peribronchiolar inflammation following viral infection in pups exposed to ETS compared with pups exposed to FA, but no change is noted in the degree of lung injury between FA and ETS-exposed animals following bacterial challenge. The data suggests perinatal exposure to ETS

  20. Organelle targeting during bacterial infection: insights from Listeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Alice; Stavru, Fabrizia; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular bacterium responsible for severe foodborne infections, is now recognized as a multifaceted model in infection biology. Comprehensive studies of the molecular and cellular basis of the infection have unraveled how the bacterium crosses the intestinal and feto-placental barriers, invades several cell types in which it multiplies and moves, and spreads from cell to cell. Interestingly, although Listeria does not actively invade host cell organelles, it can interfere with their function. We discuss the effect of Listeria on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the mechanisms leading to the fragmentation of the mitochondrial network and its consequences, and review the strategies used by Listeria to subvert nuclear functions, more precisely to control host gene expression at the chromatin level.

  1. Bacterial population and biodegradation potential in chronically crude oil-contaminated marine sediments are strongly linked to temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Bargiela, Rafael

    2015-06-29

    Two of the largest crude oil-polluted areas in the world are the semi-enclosed Mediterranean and Red Seas, but the effect of chronic pollution remains incompletely understood on a large scale. We compared the influence of environmental and geographical constraints and anthropogenic forces (hydrocarbon input) on bacterial communities in eight geographically separated oil-polluted sites along the coastlines of the Mediterranean and Red Seas. The differences in community compositions and their biodegradation potential were primarily associated (P < 0.05) with both temperature and chemical diversity. Furthermore, we observed a link between temperature and chemical and biological diversity that was stronger in chronically polluted sites than in pristine ones where accidental oil spills occurred. We propose that low temperature increases bacterial richness while decreasing catabolic diversity and that chronic pollution promotes catabolic diversification. Our results further suggest that the bacterial populations in chronically polluted sites may respond more promptly in degrading petroleum after accidental oil spills.

  2. Temporal and anatomical host resistance to chronic Salmonella infection is quantitatively dictated by Nramp1 and influenced by host genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy P Loomis

    Full Text Available The lysosomal membrane transporter, Nramp1, plays a key role in innate immunity and resistance to infection with intracellular pathogens such as non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS. NTS-susceptible C57BL/6 (B6 mice, which express the mutant Nramp1D169 allele, are unable to control acute infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. Introducing functional Nramp1G169 into the B6 host background, either by constructing a congenic strain carrying Nramp1G169 from resistant A/J mice (Nramp-Cg or overexpressing Nramp1G169 from a transgene (Nramp-Tg, conferred equivalent protection against acute Salmonella infection. In contrast, the contributions of Nramp1 for controlling chronic infection are more complex, involving temporal and anatomical differences in Nramp1-dependent host responses. Nramp-Cg, Nramp-Tg and NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice survived oral Salmonella infection equally well for the first 2-3 weeks, providing evidence that Nramp1 contributes to the initial control of NTS bacteremia preceding establishment of chronic Salmonella infection. By day 30, increased host Nramp1 expression (Tg>Cg provided greater protection as indicated by decreased splenic bacterial colonization (Tgbacterial growth within MLN as effectively as 129×1/SvJ mice, Nramp-Cg and Nramp-Tg mice eventually succumbed to infection. These data indicate: 1 discrete, anatomically localized host resistance is conferred by Nramp1 expression in NTS-susceptible mice, 2 restriction of systemic bacterial growth in the spleens of NTS-susceptible mice is enhanced by Nramp1 expression and dose-dependent, and 3 host genes other than Nramp1 also contribute to the ability of NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice to control bacterial replication during chronic infection.

  3. Temporal and anatomical host resistance to chronic Salmonella infection is quantitatively dictated by Nramp1 and influenced by host genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Wendy P; Johnson, Matthew L; Brasfield, Alicia; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; Yi, Jaehun; Miller, Samuel I; Cookson, Brad T; Hajjar, Adeline M

    2014-01-01

    The lysosomal membrane transporter, Nramp1, plays a key role in innate immunity and resistance to infection with intracellular pathogens such as non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS). NTS-susceptible C57BL/6 (B6) mice, which express the mutant Nramp1D169 allele, are unable to control acute infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium following intraperitoneal or oral inoculation. Introducing functional Nramp1G169 into the B6 host background, either by constructing a congenic strain carrying Nramp1G169 from resistant A/J mice (Nramp-Cg) or overexpressing Nramp1G169 from a transgene (Nramp-Tg), conferred equivalent protection against acute Salmonella infection. In contrast, the contributions of Nramp1 for controlling chronic infection are more complex, involving temporal and anatomical differences in Nramp1-dependent host responses. Nramp-Cg, Nramp-Tg and NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice survived oral Salmonella infection equally well for the first 2-3 weeks, providing evidence that Nramp1 contributes to the initial control of NTS bacteremia preceding establishment of chronic Salmonella infection. By day 30, increased host Nramp1 expression (Tg>Cg) provided greater protection as indicated by decreased splenic bacterial colonization (Tgbacterial growth within MLN as effectively as 129×1/SvJ mice, Nramp-Cg and Nramp-Tg mice eventually succumbed to infection. These data indicate: 1) discrete, anatomically localized host resistance is conferred by Nramp1 expression in NTS-susceptible mice, 2) restriction of systemic bacterial growth in the spleens of NTS-susceptible mice is enhanced by Nramp1 expression and dose-dependent, and 3) host genes other than Nramp1 also contribute to the ability of NTS-resistant 129×1/SvJ mice to control bacterial replication during chronic infection.

  4. Evaluation of Chinese medicine Qian-Yu for chronic bacterial prostatitis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhu Wu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Qian-Yu (QY, a Chinese medicine formula, has anti-inflammatory and broad spectrum anti-bacterial activity. This study is undertaken to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effects of Qian-Yu (QY in chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP. Materials and Methods : The potential of QY in the treatment of CBP was evaluated using a CBP animal model by examining the anti-inflammatory activity. Its consequences were analyzed by immunological and histopathological methods. Experimental chronic bacterial prostatitis was induced by instillation of bacterial suspension of Escherichia coli 7.5 ΄ 10 5 CFU/ml into the prostatic urethra. Animals were followed up for four weeks and then treated with either 7 mg/kg QY or 7 mg/kg positive control agent-Qianlietai (QLT or 1 ml of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS for the controls. Ten rats in each group were sacrificed at the end of four weeks. The inhibition of inflammation and its consequences were analyzed histologically. Prostatic IL-8, SIgA and zinc concentrations were measured by ELISA, RIA and ICP-AES, respectively. The data was expressed as mean ± S.D. Least-significant difference (LSD of one-way ANOVA (SPSS 12.0 was used to determine the differences of scores. Results : The histopathology showed resolving prostatitis in QY-and QLT-treated groups and the immunology showed reduction of IL-8 and increment of SIgA contents in prostatic tissues as compared to the control groups. The prostatic zinc levels were higher in the QY-and QLT-treated groups than those in the controls. These results suggested that QY is effective in CBP treatment.

  5. Diagnosis and Treatment of Infective Endocarditis in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ling Tao; Xue-mei Li; Xue-wang Li; Jie Ma; Guang-li Ge; Li-meng Chen; Hang Li; Bao-tong Zhou; Yang Sun; Wen-ling Ye; Qi Miao

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical features of hemodialysis patients complicated by infective endo-carditis.Methods The clinical features of six such patients admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hos-pital during the year 1990 to 2009 were analyzed. All of them were diagnosed based on Chinese Children Diagnostic Criteria for Infective Endocarditis.Results The average age of the six patients was 52.3±19.3 years old. Four were males. Vascular ac-cesses at the onset of infective endocarditis were as follows: permanent catheters in three, temporary cathe-ters in two, and arteriovenous fistula in one. Three were found with mitral valve involvement, two with aor-tic valve involvement, and one with both. Five vegetations were found by transthoraeic echocardiography, and one by transesophageal echocardiography. Four had positive blood culture results. The catheters were all removed. Four of the patients were improved by antibiotics treatment, in which two were still on hemodialy-sis in the following 14-24 months and the other two were lost to follow-up. One patient received surgery, but died of heart failure after further hemodialysis for three months. One was well on maintenance hemodi-alysis for three months after surgery.Conclusions Infective endocarditis should be suspected when hemodialysis patients suffer from long-term fever, for which prompt blood culture and transthoracic echocardiography confirmation could be performed. Transesophageal echocardiography could be considered even when transthoracic echocardiogra-phy produces negative findings. With catheters removed, full course of appropriate sensitive antibiotics and surgery if indicated could improve the outcome of chronic hemodialysis patients complicated by infective endocarditis.

  6. Association between prenatal exposure to bacterial infection and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Sørensen, Holger J; Mortensen, Erik L;

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that prenatal exposure to nonviral infection may be associated with increased risk of schizophrenia, and we hypothesized an association between maternal bacterial infection during pregnancy and elevated offspring risk of schizophrenia. Data on maternal infections from...... the Copenhagen Perinatal Cohort were linked with the Danish National Psychiatric Register. Offspring cases of narrowly defined schizophrenia (International Classification of Diseases, Eighth Revision [ICD-8]) and more broadly defined schizophrenia (ICD-8 and ICD-10) were identified before the ages of 32......-34 and 45-47 years, respectively. The effect of prenatal exposure to bacterial infections was adjusted for prenatal exposure to analgesics and parental social status. In a risk set of 7941 individuals, 85 cases (1.1%) of ICD-8 schizophrenia were identified by the age of 32-34 years and 153 cases (1...

  7. Skin, soft tissue and systemic bacterial infections following aquatic injuries and exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, James H; Lopez, Fred A

    2015-03-01

    : Bacterial infections following aquatic injuries occur commonly in fishermen and vacationers after freshwater and saltwater exposures. Internet search engines were queried with the key words to describe the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic and treatment strategies and outcomes of both the superficial and the deeper invasive infections caused by more common, newly emerging and unusual aquatic bacterial pathogens. Main findings included the following: (1) aquatic injuries often result in gram-negative polymicrobial infections with marine bacteria; (2) most marine bacteria are resistant to 1st- and 2nd-generation penicillins and cephalosporins; (3) nontuberculous, mycobacterial infections should be considered in late-onset, culture-negative and antibiotic-resistant marine infections; (4) superficial marine infections and pre-existing wounds exposed to seawater may result in deeply invasive infections and sepsis in immunocompromised patients. With the exception of minor marine wounds demonstrating localized cellulitis, most other marine infections and all gram-negative and mycobacterial marine infections will require therapy with antibiotic combinations.

  8. [Some immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with bacteriophages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagava, K I; Metskhvarishvili, G D; Gachechiladze, K K; Korinteli, I A; Khoĭle, N; Dzuliashvili, M G

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the study was to reveal the possible immunological changes in children with bacterial infections treated with commercial bacteriophage preparations administered per os. In case of medical indications (for treatment or diagnostic) blood sampling was carried out. In serum the antibodies against bacteriophage preparations - phage cocktail components (phages against Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Proteus vulgaris, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were investigated. The neutralisation reaction was used. There were processed samples from 65 children with following diagnoses: sepsis, bacterial pneumonia, urinary tract infection, bacterial infections of upper respiratory ways, bacterial diarrhea. In samples taken in the first days of treatment antibodies were revealed in infants up to one month (I group) in 0/29 cases - 0%, in infants aged from one month till one year (II group)- 1/25 - 4.0%, in children aged from 1 till 15 years (III group) - 3/9 - 33.3%; data after 14-20 days from the beginning of treatment - I group - 0/9 - 0%, II group - 4/15 - 26.7%, III group - 5/5 - 100%; data after 30-60 days from the beginning of the treatment - I group - 1/5 - 20.0%, II group - 6/10 - 60.0%, III group - 3/3 - 100%. Bacteriophages neitralisation degree varied between 50,7% and 97.3%. Any regularity regarding different components of used phage preparations was not established. In case of inclusion of commercial phage preparations administered per os in the treatment of bacterial infections in children, the anti-phage neutralizing antibodies are produced by the macroorganism. This fact limits the duration of phage therapy and its usage in the treatment of future bacterial infections in treated patients. Production of anti-phage antibodies in young infants is substantially less expressed and this indicates to purposefulness and presumably higher efficacy of bacteriophage therapy in this age period.

  9. Gene expression in response to bacterial blight infection in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@After a comprehensive screening of 47 rice lines inoculat_ed at different development stages with 7 different strains of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae , we selected 2 strains CR1 and CR7 from CNRRI,China. They gave a resistant and susceptible interaction respectively, when they were used to infect 15 d old seedlings of C101PKT.

  10. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; Kistler, J.O.; Belibasakis, G.N.; Valimaa, H.; de Soet, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infection prevention in dentistry is an important topic that has gained more interest in recent years and guidelines for the prevention of cross-transmission are common practice in many countries. However, little is known about the real risks of cross-transmission, specifically in the dental healthc

  11. Anaphylatoxins - Their role in bacterial infection and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, Pieter-Jan; van Strijp, Jos

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the complement system plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of infection and inflammation. Especially the complement activation products C3a and C5a, known as the anaphylatoxins, are potent proinflammatory mediators. In addition to their evident role in innate immunity, it is clear

  12. Clavanin A improves outcome of complications from different bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Osmar N; Fensterseifer, Isabel C M; Rodrigues, Elaine A; Holanda, Hortência H S; Novaes, Natasha R F; Cunha, Junia P A; Rezende, Taia M B; Magalhães, Kelly G; Moreno, Susana E; Jerônimo, Márcio S; Bocca, Anamélia L; Franco, Octavio L

    2015-03-01

    The rapid increase in the incidence of multidrug-resistant infections today has led to enormous interest in antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as suitable compounds for developing unusual antibiotics. In this study, clavanin A, an antimicrobial peptide previously isolated from the marine tunicate Styela clava, was selected as a purposeful molecule that could be used in controlling infection and further synthesized. Clavanin A was in vitro evaluated against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as toward L929 mouse fibroblasts and skin primary cells (SPCs). Moreover, this peptide was challenged here in an in vivo wound and sepsis model, and the immune response was also analyzed. Despite displaying clear in vitro antimicrobial activity toward Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, clavanin A showed no cytotoxic activities against mammalian cells, and in acute toxicity tests, no adverse reaction was observed at any of the concentrations. Moreover, clavanin A significantly reduced the S. aureus CFU in an experimental wound model. This peptide also reduced the mortality of mice infected with E. coli and S. aureus by 80% compared with that of control animals (treated with phosphate-buffered saline [PBS]): these data suggest that clavanin A prevents the start of sepsis and thereby reduces mortality. These data suggest that clavanin A is an AMP that could improve the development of novel peptide-based strategies for the treatment of wound and sepsis infections.

  13. STUDIES ON THE TUBERCULIN REACTION AND ON SPECIFIC HYPERSENSITIVENESS IN BACTERIAL INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsser, H

    1921-10-31

    The work reported in the preceding sections justifies, we think, a number of definite conclusions. In addition to this, some of the experiments indicate a line of thought which may lead to considerable alteration in our conceptions, both of phenomena of bacterial hypersensitiveness and of infection. 1. In guinea pigs two fundamentally different types of intradermal reactions may be observed. One of these is the immediate, transitory reaction which develops in animals sensitized against proteins (horse serum, etc.) and may be regarded as one of the manifestations of general protein hypersensitiveness, or anaphylaxis; the other is the tuberculin type of skin reaction which develops more slowly, leads to a more profound injury of the tissues and is independent of anaphylaxis as ordinarily conceived. 2. The tuberculin type of hypersensitiveness (as well as probably the typhoidin, mallein, abortin reactions, etc.) does not develop at all in guinea pigs sensitized with proteins, like horse serum, etc. While this form of hypersensitiveness may eventually be induced with materials not bacterial in origin, it has been observed up to date only as a reaction of bacterial infection. 3. Methods of treatment with protein material from bacterial cultures which sensitize guinea pigs to anaphylactic reactions with the bacterial extracts, do not sensitize them to the tuberculin type of reaction. Such sensitization is easily accomplished only by infecting the animals with living organisms. No reliable method of sensitizing guinea pigs to such reactions with dead bacterial material has as yet been worked out, though a few hopeful experiments have been obtained with massive injections of large amounts of the acid-precipitable substances (nucleoproteins?) from bacterial extracts. 4. In animals made hypersensitive to the tuberculin type of reaction by infection with living bacteria, the reaction may be elicited by intradermal injections of bacterial extracts from which all coagulable

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the tissue detection of bacterial pathogens associated with porcine infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    sequences within intact cells. FISH allows direct histological localization of the bacteria in the tissue and thereby a correlation between the infection and the histopathological changes present. This chapter presents protocols for FISH identification of bacterial pathogens in fixed deparaffinized tissue......Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an efficient technique for the identification of specific bacteria in tissue of both experimental and spontaneous infections. The method detects specific sequences of nucleic acids by hybridization of fluorescently labeled probes to complementary target...

  15. Relationship Between Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Seif-Rabiei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available There is some evidence indicating the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of extragastrointestinal diseases including skin, vascular, and autoimmune disorders, as well as some respiratory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between H. pylori and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. In a case-control study, 90 patients with COPD and 90 age- and sex- matched control subjects were included. Serum samples were tested for anti-H. pylori and anti-CagA IgG by ELISA. A physician completed a questionnaire including demographic characteristics, habitual history, and spirometric findings for each patient. Of 90 patients with COPD 66 (51% had mild, 31 (34.4% moderate, and 13 (14.4% sever disease. There was no significant association between H. pylori IgG seropositivity and COPD. Serum levels of anti-CagA IgG were significantly higher in patients with COPD than in the control subjects (P < 0.001. No association was observed between H. pylori infection and severity of COPD. The results suggest that there is an association between CagA-positive H. pylori infections and COPD. Further studies should be planned to investigate the potential pathogenic mechanisms that might underlie these associations.

  16. Changes in HIV RNA and CD4 cell count after acute HCV infection in chronically HIV-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gras, L.; Wolf, F. de; Smit, C.; Prins, M.; Meer, J.T. van der; Vanhommerig, J.W.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Schinkel, J.; Geskus, R.B.; Warris, A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Little is known about the impact of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection on HIV-1 disease progression. We investigated CD4 cell count and HIV RNA concentration changes after HCV infection in individuals chronically infected with HIV-1. METHODS: We selected individuals that had the l

  17. Recurrent bacterial peritonitis caused by Neisseria cinerea in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, M J; DeBin, J A; Preston, K E; Chiu, C; Haqqie, S S

    1996-10-01

    We present an unusual case of recurrent (chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis) CAPD-associated peritonitis caused by Neisseria cinerea. Using DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, we determined that the recurrent infection was caused by reinfection with a different N. cinerea strain rather than relapse with the index strain and that the probable origin of the reinfecting organism was the patient's upper respiratory tract.

  18. Synthetic furanones inhibit quorum-sensing and enhance bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.; Hentzer, Morten;

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections by killing the bacteria or inhibiting their growth, but resistance to antibiotics can develop readily. The discovery that bacterial quorum-sensing regulates bacterial virulence as well as the formation of biofilms opens up new ways...

  19. Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is cured by L-Methionine in combination with antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Datey, Akshay; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-11-02

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with 80-90% of infections. Within the biofilm, bacteria are refractile to antibiotics, requiring concentrations >1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Proteins, carbohydrates and DNA are the major components of biofilm matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms, which are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a major component. Herein, we report for the first time that L-Methionine (L-Met) at 0.5 μM inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm formation and disassembles established PA biofilm by inducing DNase expression. Four DNase genes (sbcB, endA, eddB and recJ) were highly up-regulated upon L-Met treatment along with increased DNase activity in the culture supernatant. Since eDNA plays a major role in establishing and maintaining the PA biofilm, DNase activity is effective in disrupting the biofilm. Upon treatment with L-Met, the otherwise recalcitrant PA biofilm now shows susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This was reflected in vivo, in the murine chronic PA lung infection model. Mice treated with L-Met responded better to antibiotic treatment, leading to enhanced survival as compared to mice treated with ciprofloxacin alone. These results clearly demonstrate that L-Met can be used along with antibiotic as an effective therapeutic against chronic PA biofilm infection.

  20. Differential expression of uterine NO in pregnant and nonpregnant rats with intrauterine bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, L; Nowicki, B; Yallampalli, C

    2001-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the uterine host defense against bacterial infection. In nonpregnant rats, NO production in the uterus was shown to be lower, and inducible NO synthase (NOS) expression was undetectable. However, studies in pregnant rats show abundant expression of inducible NOS with significant elevation in NO production in the uterus. We have recently reported that intrauterine Escherichia coli infection caused a localized increase in uterine NO production and inducible NOS expression in the nonpregnant rat. In our present study, we examined whether the uterine NO production, NOS expression, and uterine tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein are increased in pregnant rats with intrauterine pathogenic Escherichia coli infection. Unlike the nonpregnant state, the NO production in the infected uterine horn of pregnant rats was not significantly elevated after bacterial inoculation compared with the contralateral uterine horn. The expression of uterine NOS (types II and III) also did not show significant upregulation in the infected horn. This is in contrast to that in nonpregnant animals, in which type II NOS was induced in the uterus on infection. Moreover, intrauterine infection induced an elevated expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha protein in the infected horn both of nonpregnant and of pregnant rats. These data suggest that the sequential stimulation of NOS expression, especially the inducible isoform, and generation of uterine NO are lacking during pregnancy despite an elevated tumor necrosis factor-alpha after infection. In summary, NO synthesis response may be maximal at pregnancy, and infection may not further induce the NO system. Present studies, together with our previous report that intrauterine infection-induced lethality in pregnancy rats was amplified with the inhibition of NO, suggest that pregnancy is a state predisposed for increased complications associated with intrauterine infection and

  1. Widespread bacterial infection affecting Rana temporaria tadpoles in mountain areas

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    Rocco Tiberti

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodic mass die-offs of Rana temporaria tadpole populations have occurred in the ponds of prealpine mountain areas of Brescia (northern Italy since the early 2000s. The author reports some observational data and analytical results from three sites: tadpoles from mortality events had erythema, especially on the legs, suggestive of septicemia. Bacterial culture of these tadpoles revealed Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas sobria, two organisms often associated with Red leg disease. Egg mass counts from 29 pastureland ponds did not revealed breeding activity declines over five years in the Monte Guglielmo area. Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas sobria usually behave as opportunistic bacteria that can become pathogenic after suppression of the immune system by endogenous or exogenous stressors. Thus, a plurality of environmental factors may contribute to mortality events; some of them are discussed, including loss of high altitude breeding ponds resulting in overcrowding and poor water quality in remaining ponds and the presence of other pathogens.

  2. Chronic hepatitis B infection presenting with chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids (CLIPPERS): a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Weng, Ching-Fu; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Chen, Ya-Fang; Liu, Fei-Chih; Liou, Horng-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Chronic lymphocytic inflammation with pontine perivascular enhancement responsive to steroids is a brainstem disorder characterized by perivascular pathologic reaction with lymphocyte infiltration and leading to diplopia, facial palsy, dysarthria, and gait ataxia. It was thought to be an autoimmune disorder without distinct pathogenesis. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection has been proposed in correlation with autoimmune diseases, including central nervous system demyelinating di...

  3. Impact of bacterial infections on aging and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strickertsson, Jesper A B; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2014-01-01

    The commensal floras that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract play critical roles in immune responses, energy metabolism, and even cancer prevention. Pathogenic and out of place commensal bacteria, can however have detrimental effects on the host, by introducing genomic instability and mitochondri...... infections impact DNA repair and damage, and the consequence on the mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. We argue that in the gastrointestinal tract, these mechanisms can contribute to tumorigenesis as well as cellular aging of the digestive system....

  4. Function of monocytes in chronic HCV infection: Role for IL-10 and interferon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Liu (Bi Sheng)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractHepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes persistent infection in about 80% of the infected individuals. The symptoms are initially mild in those persistently infected patients, and it may take decades before the serious consequences of chronic HCV infection become apparent. Up to 20% of infec

  5. Hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary bacterial infection in beef cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Xiuyuan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vitamin A is essential for normal growth, development, reproduction, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, immune function and vision. Hypovitaminosis A can lead to a series of pathological damage in animals. This report describes the case of hypovitaminosis A associated with secondary complications in calves. Case presentation From February to March in 2011, 2-and 3-month old beef calves presented with decreased eyesight, apparent blindness and persistent diarrhea occurred in a cattle farm of Hubei province, China. Based on history inspection and clinical observation, we made a tentative diagnosis of hypovitaminosis A. The disease was confirmed as a congenital vitamin A deficiency by determination of the concentrations of vitamin A in serum and feed samples. Furthermore, pathological and microbiological examination showed that the disease was associated with pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli infection and mucosal barriers damage in intestines. The corresponding treatments were taken immediately, and the disease was finally under control for a month. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of hypovitaminosis A coupled to secondary infection of E. coli in beef cattle, advancing our knowledge of how vitamin A affects infection and immunity in animals. This study could also be contributed to scientific diagnosis and treatments of complex hypovitaminosis A in cattle.

  6. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for Treatment; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance for industry entitled ``Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs...

  7. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    2000-01-01

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe pneu

  8. Duration of fever and serious bacterial infections in children : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elshout, Gijs; Monteny, Miriam; van der Wouden, Johannes C.; Koes, Bart W.; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Parents of febrile children frequently contact primary care. Longer duration of fever has been related to increased risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI). However, the evidence for this association remains controversial. We assessed the predictive value of duration of fever for SBI

  9. Primary role of electron work function for evaluation of nanostructured titania implant surface against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golda-Cepa, M; Syrek, K; Brzychczy-Wloch, M; Sulka, G D; Kotarba, A

    2016-09-01

    The electron work function as an essential descriptor for the evaluation of metal implant surfaces against bacterial infection is identified for the first time. Its validity is demonstrated on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to nanostructured titania surfaces. The established correlation: work function-bacteria adhesion is of general importance since it can be used for direct evaluation of any electrically conductive implant surfaces.

  10. Chronic Trichuris muris infection decreases diversity of the intestinal microbiota and concomitantly increases the abundance of lactobacilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jacob Bak; Sorobetea, Daniel; Kiilerich, Pia

    2015-01-01

    microbiota by 16S ribosomal-RNA gene-based sequencing. Our results demonstrate that persistent T. muris infection dramatically affects the large-intestinal microbiota, most notably with a drop in the diversity of bacterial communities, as well as a marked increase in the relative abundance......The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance...... microbiota, as well as potential downstream effects on the immune system, remain largely unknown. We have assessed the influence of chronic infection with the large-intestinal nematode Trichuris muris, a close relative of the human pathogen Trichuris trichiura, on the composition of the murine intestinal...

  11. Dual sofosbuvir and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L; Ward, H; Kattakuzhy, S; Wilson, E; Kottilil, S

    2016-01-01

    Sofosbuvir is the first pan-genotypic direct acting antiviral agent to be approved. This article provides an overview of the pharmacology of sofosbuvir and ribavirin and a comprehensive summary of the phase 2 and 3 studies supporting dual sofosbuvir and ribavirin therapy for chronic hepatitis C infection. With the production of generic formulations of sofosbuvir, we anticipate this regimen leading the first wave for widespread, IFN-free treatment and becoming first line for all genotypes (including genotype 1) for much of the world-in particular in developing and middle income countries. We discuss the continued challenges with this regimen including among patients with decompensated liver disease and post-liver transplant, and renal failure. We address concerns of emerging resistance. We also discuss the future prospects including the global uptake of sofosbuvir and ribavirin for the treatment of all genotypes.

  12. Besifloxacin: a novel anti-infective for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L Comstock

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Timothy L Comstock1, Paul M Karpecki2, Timothy W Morris3, Jin-Zhong Zhang41Global Medical Affairs, Pharmaceuticals, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USA; 2Koffler Vision Group, Lexington, KY, USA; 3Research and Development Microbiology and Sterilization Sciences, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USA; 4Global Preclinical Development, Bausch and Lomb, Inc., Rochester, NY, USAAbstract: Bacterial conjunctivitis, commonly known as pink eye, is demographically unbiased in its prevalence and can be caused by a variety of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. Timely empiric treatment with a broad-spectrum anti-infective, such as a topical fluoroquinolone, is critical in preventing potentially irreversible ocular damage. However, the rise in ocular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates and the patterns of fluoroquinolone resistance for patients with other ocular bacterial infections mandate the need for new agents targeted for ocular use. Besifloxacin, a novel broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone, is approved for the treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis. It has a uniquely balanced dual-targeting activity that inhibits both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and is associated with a lower incidence of resistance development. Besifloxacin is not marketed in other formulations, ensuring that its exposure is limited to bacterial populations in and around the eye. This specifically precludes any bacterial exposure to besifloxacin resulting from systemic use, which further reduces the likelihood of emergence of bacterial resistance. In vitro, besifloxacin has demonstrated equivalent or superior activity compared with other commonly used topical antibiotics. In clinical trials, besifloxacin has consistently demonstrated efficacy and safety in the treatment of patients with bacterial conjunctivitis. Besifloxacin is considered safe and is well tolerated with no observed contraindications.Keywords: conjunctivitis, fluoroquinolones, besifloxacin

  13. Wound Chronicity, Inpatient Care, and Chronic Kidney Disease Predispose to MRSA Infection in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Christopher; May, Kerry; Hale, Thomas; Allard, Bernard; Rowlings, Naomi; Freeman, Amy; Harrison, Jessica; McCann, Jane; Wraight, Paul

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the microbiological profile of diabetes-related foot infections (DRFIs) and the impact of wound duration, inpatient treatment, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Postdebridement microbiological samples were collected from individuals presenting with DRFIs from 1 January 2005 to 31 December 2007. RESULTS A total of 653 specimens were collected from 379 individuals with 36% identifying only one isolate. Of the total isolates, 77% were gram-positive bacteria (staphylococci 43%, streptococci 13%). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from 23%; risk factors for MRSA included prolonged wound duration (odds ratio 2.31), inpatient management (2.19), and CKD (OR 1.49). Gram-negative infections were more prevalent with inpatient management (P = 0.002) and prolonged wound duration (P < 0.001). Pseudomonal isolates were more common in chronic wounds (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS DRFIs are predominantly due to gram-positive aerobes but are usually polymicrobial and increase in complexity with inpatient care and ulcer duration. In the presence of prolonged duration, inpatient management, or CKD, empiric MRSA antibiotic cover should be considered. PMID:19587371

  14. Autophagy and bacterial infection: an evolving arms race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Augustine; Roy, Craig R

    2013-09-01

    Autophagy is an important membrane transport pathway that is conserved among eukaryotic cells. Although first described as an intracellular catabolic pathway used to break down self-components, autophagy has been found to play an important role in the elimination of intracellular pathogens. A variety of host mechanisms exist for recognizing and targeting intracellular bacteria to autophagosomes. Several intracellular bacteria have evolved ways to manipulate, inhibit, or avoid autophagy in order to survive in the cell. Thus, the autophagy pathway can be viewed as an evolutionarily conserved host response to infection.

  15. Respirable bacteriophages for the treatment of bacterial lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Susan; Semler, Diana D; Goudie, Amanda D; Lynch, Karlene H; Matinkhoo, Sadaf; Finlay, Warren H; Dennis, Jonathan J; Vehring, Reinhard

    2013-12-01

    This review article discusses the development of respiratory therapeutics containing bacteriophages indicated for lung infections, specifically those that have become increasingly difficult to treat because of antibiotic resistance. Recent achievements and remaining problems are presented for each step necessary to develop a bacteriophage-containing dosage form for respiratory drug delivery, including selection of appropriate bacteriophages for therapy, processing and purification of phage preparations, formulation into a stable, solid dosage form, and delivery device selection. Safety and efficacy studies in animals and human subjects are also reviewed.

  16. Activity of Norspermidine on Bacterial Biofilms of Multidrug-Resistant Clinical Isolates Associated with Persistent Extremity Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardile, Anthony P; Woodbury, Ronald L; Sanchez, Carlos J; Becerra, Sandra C; Garcia, Rebecca A; Mende, Katrin; Wenke, Joseph C; Akers, Kevin S

    2016-11-19

    Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor for numerous pathogenic bacteria and is cited as a central event in the pathogenesis of chronic human infections, which is in large part due to excessive extracellular matrix secretion and metabolic changes that occur within the biofilm rendering them highly tolerant to antimicrobial treatments. Polyamines, including norspermidine, play central roles in bacterial biofilm development, but have also recently been shown to inhibit biofilm formation in select strains of various pathogenic bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the biofilm dispersive and inhibitory activities of norspermidine against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii(n = 4), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 5) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 4) associated with chronic extremity wound infections using the semi-quantitative 96-well plate method and confocal laser microscopy. In addition to the antibiofilm activity, biocompatibility of norspermidine was also evaluated by measuring toxicity in vitro to human cell lines and whole porcine tissue explants using MTT viability assay and histological analysis. Norspermidine (5-20 mM) had variable dispersive and inhibitory activity on biofilms which was dependent on both the strain and species. Of the clinical bacterial species evaluated herein, A. baumannii isolates were the most sensitive to the effect of norspermidine, which was in part due to the inhibitory effects of norspermidine on bacterial motility and expression of genes involved in the production of homoserine lactones and quorum sensing molecules both essential for biofilm formation. Importantly, exposure of cell lines and whole tissues to norspermidine for prolonged periods of time (≥24 h) was observed to reduce viability and alter tissue histology in a time and concentration dependent manner, with 20 mM exposure having the greatest negative effects on both

  17. Interleukin-17 and innate immunity in infections and chronic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isailovic, Natasa; Daigo, Kenji; Mantovani, Alberto; Selmi, Carlo

    2015-06-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17) includes several cytokines among which IL-17A is considered as one of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine being central to the innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-17 is produced by unconventional T cells, members of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), mast cells, as well as typical innate immune cells, such as neutrophils and macrophages located in the epithelial barriers and characterised by a rapid response to infectious agents by recruiting neutrophils as first line of defence and inducing the production of antimicrobial peptides. Th17 responses appear pivotal in chronic and acute infections by bacteria, parasites, and fungi, as well as in autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and psoriatic arthritis. The data discussed in this review cumulatively indicate that innate-derived IL-17 constitutes a major element in the altered immune response against self antigens or the perpetuation of inflammation, particularly at mucosal sites. New drugs targeting the IL17 pathway include brodalumab, ixekizumab, and secukinumab and their use in psoriatic disease is expected to dramatically impact our approach to this systemic condition.

  18. BACTERIAL PATTERN OF APPENDIX IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC APPENDICITIS WITH ITS CLINICAL CORRELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surajit

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute appendicitis is a common, sometimes confusing and often treacherous cause of acute abdomen at all ages. The only way to reduce morbidity and to prevent mortality is to perform appendicectomy before perforation or gangrene occurs. As appendicectomy is a very common practice, it is essential to know in detail the various etiological factors that precipitate appendicitis. Bacterial invasion being a very common cause makes it imperative that we have a clear picture of the bacterial pattern of appendix in acute and recurrent appendicitis and to correlate this with clinical findings. A proper idea of bacterial flora of appendix thus helps us not only to prevent postoperative complication, but also to impart effective conservative treatment by pinpointing sensitive drugs. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES Knowledge of bacterial flora of appendix also has socio-economic benefits through low rates of post-operative complications, reduced hospital stay and also reduced indiscriminate use of multiple costly drugs. The aim of this study is to establish the bacterial profile in acute as well as recurrent appendicitis and to correlate the findings with the severity of the disease. MATERIALS AND METHODS This study was conducted on 90 patients irrespective of age and sex who attended the emergency and OPD during the course of the work with symptoms suggestive of appendicitis. Following appendicectomy, each of the specimens was cut into two pieces. One was sent for histopathological examination and other was sent for bacterial culture. RESULT The commonest bacteria isolated were Escherichia coli in 67.78% cases, which is a facultative anaerobe and it was closely accompanied by Klebsiella species in 47.78% cases. Other isolates that were recorded included Staphylococcus aureus in 3.33% cases with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus species in 2.22% cases each. Mixed infections were seen in phlegmonous, gangrenous and perforative appendicitis. Bacteroides

  19. Chronic lymphoedema caused by recurrent infections in a patient with allergic hand eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Skov, Lone; Jensen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is very common and may be complicated by secondary infections. Chronic lymphoedema is a potentially debilitating condition, which may occur due to secondary infections or the dermatitis itself. The problem of chronic lymphoedema following allergic contact dermatitis ha...

  20. Chronic pulmonary infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, C S; Hansen, C R; Pressler, T;

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of chronic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patient are still unclear. Method All patients treated in the Copenhagen CF centre (N=278) from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 were included. Each patient chronically infected with S...

  1. Bacterial Infection Increases Reproductive Investment in Burying Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reavey, Catherine E.; Silva, Farley W. S.; Cotter, Sheena C.

    2015-01-01

    The Nicrophorus genus lives and breeds in a microbe rich environment. As such, it would be expected that strategies should be in place to counter potentially negative effects of the microbes common to this environment. In this study, we show the response of Nicrophorus vespilloides to the common soil bacterium, Bacillus subtilis. Phenoloxidase (PO) levels are not upregulated in response to the challenge and the bacteria are observed to multiply within the haemolymph of the host. Despite the growth of B. subtilis, survival is not affected, either in virgin or in breeding beetles. Some limit on bacterial growth in the haemolymph does seem to be occurring, suggesting mechanisms of resistance, in addition to tolerance mechanisms. Despite limited detrimental effects on the individual, the challenge by Bacillus subtilis appears to act as a cue to increase reproductive investment. The challenge may indicate a suite of negative environmental conditions that could compromise future breeding opportunities. This could act as a cue to increase parental investment in the current bout. PMID:26529021

  2. Chronic lymphoedema caused by recurrent infections in a patient with allergic hand eczema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice Dyring-Andersen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis is very common and may be complicated by secondary infections. Chronic lymphoedema is a potentially debilitating condition, which may occur due to secondary infections or the dermatitis itself. The problem of chronic lymphoedema following allergic contact dermatitis has been infrequently reported. We report a case of a 47-year-old woman with severe allergic contact dermatitis complicated by chronic, intractable lymphoedema of the hands and forearms. This case report reminds us that allergic hand dermatitis may be complicated by a chronic and debilitating state of lymphoedema. Also, it underlines the importance of fast and adequate treatment of both the dermatitis and the secondary infections.

  3. RIG-I detects infection with live Listeria by sensing secreted bacterial nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Zeinab; Schlee, Martin; Roth, Susanne; Mraheil, Mobarak Abu; Barchet, Winfried; Böttcher, Jan; Hain, Torsten; Geiger, Sergej; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Fritz, Jörg H; Civril, Filiz; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Ruland, Jürgen; Hartmann, Gunther; Chakraborty, Trinad; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-01-01

    Immunity against infection with Listeria monocytogenes is not achieved from innate immune stimulation by contact with killed but requires viable Listeria gaining access to the cytosol of infected cells. It has remained ill-defined how such immune sensing of live Listeria occurs. Here, we report that efficient cytosolic immune sensing requires access of nucleic acids derived from live Listeria to the cytoplasm of infected cells. We found that Listeria released nucleic acids and that such secreted bacterial RNA/DNA was recognized by the cytosolic sensors RIG-I, MDA5 and STING thereby triggering interferon β production. Secreted Listeria nucleic acids also caused RIG-I-dependent IL-1β-production and inflammasome activation. The signalling molecule CARD9 contributed to IL-1β production in response to secreted nucleic acids. In conclusion, cytosolic recognition of secreted bacterial nucleic acids by RIG-I provides a mechanistic explanation for efficient induction of immunity by live bacteria. PMID:23064150

  4. Anti-bacterial effects of enzymatically-isolated sialic acid from glycomacropeptide in a Helicobacter pylori-infected murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hye-Ji; Koh, Hong Bum; Kim, Hee-Kyoung; Cho, Hyang Hyun

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization of the stomach mucosa and duodenum is the major cause of acute and chronic gastroduodenal pathology in humans. Efforts to find effective anti-bacterial strategies against H. pylori for the non-antibiotic control of H. pylori infection are urgently required. In this study, we used whey to prepare glycomacropeptide (GMP), from which sialic acid (G-SA) was enzymatically isolated. We investigated the anti-bacterial effects of G-SA against H. pylori in vitro and in an H. pylori-infected murine model. MATERIALS/METHODS The anti-bacterial activity of G-SA was measured in vitro using the macrodilution method, and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production was measured in H. pylori and AGS cell co-cultures by ELISA. For in vivo study, G-SA 5 g/kg body weight (bw)/day and H. pylori were administered to mice three times over one week. After one week, G-SA 5 g/kg bw/day alone was administered every day for one week. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA to determine the anti-inflammatory effects of G-SA. In addition, real-time PCR was performed to measure the genetic expression of cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA). RESULTS G-SA inhibited the growth of H. pylori and suppressed IL-8 production in H. pylori and in AGS cell co-cultures in vitro. In the in vivo assay, administration of G-SA reduced levels of IL-1β and IL-6 pro-inflammatory cytokines whereas IL-10 level increased. Also, G-SA suppressed the expression of cagA in the stomach of H. pylori-infected mice. CONCLUSION G-SA possesses anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect in an experimental H. pylori-infected murine model. G-SA has potential as an alternative to antibiotics for the prevention of H. pylori infection and H. pylori-induced gastric disease prevention. PMID:28194260

  5. Linezolid concentrations in infected soft tissue and bone following repetitive doses in diabetic patients with bacterial foot infections1

    OpenAIRE

    Traunmüller, Friederike; Schintler, Michael V.; Spendel, Stephan; Popovic, Martin; Mauric, Oliver; Scharnagl, Erwin; Joukhadar, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The present study aimed at assessing unbound extracellular concentrations of linezolid in inflamed soft tissue and bone of diabetic patients suffering from severe bacterial foot infections. Linezolid was administered intravenously twice daily at a dosage of 600mg. At steady-state conditions, the microdialysis technique was utilised to sample serially interstitial space fluid from inflamed subcutaneous adipose tissue and metatarsal bone from 0?8h post dose in three represen...

  6. Scintigraphic images of bacterial infection using aptamers directly labeled with {sup 99m}Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, S.R.; Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: sararoberta7@hotmail.com, E-mail: crisrcorrea@gmail.com, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Barros, A.L.B.; Diniz, S.O.F.; Cardoso, V.N., E-mail: brancodebarros@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: valbertcardoso@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: simoneodilia@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Departamento de Analises Clinicas e Toxicologicas

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is specie of great medical importance and is the most commonly agent found in infections of soft tissues, bone infections and bone prostheses. In this study, aptamers selected to S. aureus were labeled by the direct method with {sup 99m}Tc and used for bacterial infection identification by scintigraphy. The radiolabeled aptamers radiochemical purity and stability were assessed by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three groups of Swiss mice (n=6) were used for the scintigraphic imaging studies. The first group was infected intramuscularly in the right thigh with S. aureus, the second group with C. albicans and the third group received zymosan to induce aseptic inflammation. After 24 h, radiolabeled aptamers (18 MBq) were injected by the tail vein. Scintigraphic images were acquired at 1 h and 4 h postinjection. The radiolabeling yield with {sup 99m}Tc was over 90%. The radiolabeled aptamers were stable in 0.9% saline, plasma and cysteine excess. The scintigraphic image profiles showed high uptake in the kidneys and bladder in all groups, indicating a main renal excretion consistent with the hydrophilic nature of the molecule. No accumulation of radioactivity was observed in the thyroid, stomach, liver and spleen, indicating acceptable levels of radiochemical impurities. The group infected with S. aureus showed a visible uptake in the infected right thigh at 1 h post-injection. For the control groups (C. albicans and zymosan) visible differences between the right and left thighs were not observed. The radiolabeled aptamers were able to distinguish aseptic inflammation from bacterial infection and bacterial from fungal infection. (author)

  7. Gut microbiota promote hematopoiesis to control bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Arya; Yáñez, Alberto; Price, Jeremy G; Chow, Andrew; Merad, Miriam; Goodridge, Helen S; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2014-03-12

    The commensal microbiota impacts specific immune cell populations and their functions at peripheral sites, such as gut mucosal tissues. However, it remains unknown whether gut microbiota control immunity through regulation of hematopoiesis at primary immune sites. We reveal that germ-free mice display reduced proportions and differentiation potential of specific myeloid cell progenitors of both yolk sac and bone marrow origin. Homeostatic innate immune defects may lead to impaired early responses to pathogens. Indeed, following systemic infection with Listeria monocytogenes, germ-free and oral-antibiotic-treated mice display increased pathogen burden and acute death. Recolonization of germ-free mice with a complex microbiota restores defects in myelopoiesis and resistance to Listeria. These findings reveal that gut bacteria direct innate immune cell development via promoting hematopoiesis, contributing to our appreciation of the deep evolutionary connection between mammals and their microbiota.

  8. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  9. Inflammation in the middle ear of children with recurrent or chronic otitis media is associated with bacterial load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stol, K.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Graamans, K.; Engel, J.A.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Hays, J.P.; Warris, A.; Hermans, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral upper respiratory tract infections have been described as an important factor in the development of otitis media (OM), although it is unclear whether they facilitate bacterial OM or can directly cause OM. To clarify the role of viral infections in OM, we compared the relative contr

  10. Chronic exposure to low dose bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits leptin signaling in vagal afferent neurons.

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    de La Serre, Claire B; de Lartigue, Guillaume; Raybould, Helen E

    2015-02-01

    Bacterially derived factors are implicated in the causation and persistence of obesity. Ingestion of a high fat diet in rodents and obesity in human subjects is associated with chronic elevation of low plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a breakdown product of Gram-negative bacteria. The terminals of vagal afferent neurons are positioned within the gut mucosa to convey information from the gut to the brain to regulate food intake and are responsive to LPS. We hypothesized that chronic elevation of LPS could alter vagal afferent signaling. We surgically implanted osmotic mini-pumps that delivered a constant, low-dose of LPS into the intraperitoneal cavity of rats (12.5 μg/kg/hr for 6 weeks). LPS-treated rats developed hyperphagia and showed marked changes in vagal afferent neuron function. Chronic LPS treatment reduced vagal afferent leptin signaling, characterized by a decrease in leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, LPS treatment decreased cholecystokinin-induced satiety. There was no alteration in leptin signaling in the hypothalamus. These findings offer a mechanism by which a change in gut microflora can promote hyperphagia, possibly leading to obesity.

  11. Use of Multiplex PCR for Diagnosis of Bacterial Infection Respiratory Mixed

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    Al-ssum, R. M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Atypical bacteria grow very slowly in culture or they do not grow at all leading to delays in detection and diagnosis. PCR multiplex was performed on template DNAs extracted from seventy three collected specimens. Thirty seven showed positive indication for the presence of bacterial infection. The incidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumonia and Legionella pneumophila as a single infecting agent was 31.5%, 27.5% and 20 % respectively. Dual agent infection caused by Mycoplasma + Chlamydia, Mycoplasma + Legionella and Legionella + Chlamydia was 24%, 20% and 15% respectively. Triple agent infection caused by Legionella + Mycoplasma + Chlamydia was 17.5%. The etiology of the infection was M. pneumoniae, L. pneumophila or C. pneumoniae as a single etiology or in combination of two or three organisms.

  12. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

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    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  13. Plant-activated bacterial receptor adenylate cyclases modulate epidermal infection in the Sinorhizobium meliloti–Medicago symbiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Chang Fu; Garnerone, Anne-Marie; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Batut, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia have coevolved a facultative nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Establishment of the symbiosis requires bacterial entry via root hair infection threads and, in parallel, organogenesis of nodules that subsequently are invaded by bacteria. Tight control of nodulation and infection is required to maintain the mutualistic character of the interaction. Available evidence supports a passive bacterial role in nodulation and infection after the microsymbiont has trig...

  14. The diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of five markers of serious bacterial infection in Malawian children with signs of severe infection.

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    Enitan D Carrol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early recognition and prompt and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality from serious bacterial infections (SBI. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of five markers of infection: C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1, CD163 and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, as markers of SBI in severely ill Malawian children. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Children presenting with a signs of meningitis (n = 282 or pneumonia (n = 95, were prospectively recruited. Plasma samples were taken on admission for CRP, PCT, sTREM-1 CD163 and HMGB1 and the performance characteristics of each test to diagnose SBI and to predict mortality were determined. Of 377 children, 279 (74% had SBI and 83 (22% died. Plasma CRP, PCT, CD163 and HMGB1 and were higher in HIV-infected children than in HIV-uninfected children (p<0.01. In HIV-infected children, CRP and PCT were higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005, and PCT and CD163 were higher in non-survivors (p = 0.001, p = 0.05 respectively. In HIV-uninfected children, CRP and PCT were also higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005, and CD163 was higher in non-survivors (p = 0.05. The best predictors of SBI were CRP and PCT, and areas under the curve (AUCs were 0.81 (95% CI 0.73-0.89 and 0.86 (95% CI 0.79-0.92 respectively. The best marker for predicting death was PCT, AUC 0.61 (95% CI 0.50-0.71. CONCLUSIONS: Admission PCT and CRP are useful markers of invasive bacterial infection in severely ill African children. The study of these markers using rapid tests in a less selected cohort would be important in this setting.

  15. The Diagnostic and Prognostic Accuracy of Five Markers of Serious Bacterial Infection in Malawian Children with Signs of Severe Infection

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    Carrol, Enitan D.; Mankhambo, Limangeni A.; Jeffers, Graham; Parker, Deborah; Guiver, Malcolm; Newland, Paul; Banda, Daniel L.; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Heyderman, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Early recognition and prompt and appropriate antibiotic treatment can significantly reduce mortality from serious bacterial infections (SBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of five markers of infection: C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT), soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), CD163 and high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1), as markers of SBI in severely ill Malawian children. Methodology and Principal Findings Children presenting with a signs of meningitis (n = 282) or pneumonia (n = 95), were prospectively recruited. Plasma samples were taken on admission for CRP, PCT, sTREM-1 CD163 and HMGB1 and the performance characteristics of each test to diagnose SBI and to predict mortality were determined. Of 377 children, 279 (74%) had SBI and 83 (22%) died. Plasma CRP, PCT, CD163 and HMGB1 and were higher in HIV-infected children than in HIV-uninfected children (p<0.01). In HIV-infected children, CRP and PCT were higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005), and PCT and CD163 were higher in non-survivors (p = 0.001, p = 0.05 respectively). In HIV-uninfected children, CRP and PCT were also higher in children with SBI compared to those with no detectable bacterial infection (p<0.0005), and CD163 was higher in non-survivors (p = 0.05). The best predictors of SBI were CRP and PCT, and areas under the curve (AUCs) were 0.81 (95% CI 0.73–0.89) and 0.86 (95% CI 0.79–0.92) respectively. The best marker for predicting death was PCT, AUC 0.61 (95% CI 0.50–0.71). Conclusions Admission PCT and CRP are useful markers of invasive bacterial infection in severely ill African children. The study of these markers using rapid tests in a less selected cohort would be important in this setting. PMID:19675669

  16. Immune therapy including dendritic cell based therapy in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sk Md Fazle Akbar; Norio Horiike; Morikazu Onji

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global public health problem. Of the approximately 2 billion people who have been infected worldwide, more than 400 million are chronic carriers of HBV. Considerable numbers of chronic HBV carriers suffer from progressive liver diseases. In addition, all HBV carriers are permanent source of this virus. There is no curative therapy for chronic HBV carriers. Antiviral drugs are recommended for about 10% patients, however, these drugs are costly, have limited efficacy, and possess considerable side effects.Recent studies have shown that immune responses of the host to the HBV are critically involved at every stage of chronic HBV infection: (1) These influence acquisition of chronic HBV carrier state, (2) They are important in the context of liver damages, (3) Recovery from chronic HBV-related liver diseases is dependent on nature and extent of HBV-specific immune responses.However, induction of adequate levels of HBV-specific immune responses in chronic HBV carriers is difficult.During the last one decade, hepatitis B vaccine has been administered to chronic HBV carriers as a therapeutic approach (vaccine therapy). The present regimen of vaccine therapy is safe and cheap, but not so effective.A dendritic cell-based therapeutic vaccine has recently been developed for treating chronic HBV infection. In this review, we will discuss about the concept, scientific logics, strategies and techniques of development of HBV-specific immune therapies including vaccine therapy and dendritic cell-based vaccine therapy for treating chronic HBV infection.

  17. Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp. associated with chronic and self-medicated urinary tract infections in Vietnam

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    Poulsen Louise

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infections among women worldwide. E. coli often causes more than 75% of acute uncomplicated UTI, however, little is known about how recurrent UTIs and indiscriminate use of antimicrobials affect the aetiology of UTIs. This study aimed to establish the aetiology of UTI in a population of recurrent and self-medicated patients referred from pharmacies to a hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam and to describe genotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility of the associated bacterial pathogens. The aetiology of bacterial pathogens associated with UTI (defined as ≥ 104 CFU/ml urine was established by phenotypic and molecular methods. Enterococcus faecalis isolates were typed by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST, Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Methods Urine samples from 276 patients suffering symptoms of urinary tract infection were collected and cultured on Flexicult agar® allowing for detection of the most common urine pathogens. Patients were interviewed about underlying diseases, duration of symptoms, earlier episodes of UTI, number of episodes diagnosed by doctors and treatment in relation to UTI. All tentative E. faecalis and E. faecium isolates were identified to species level by PCR, 16S rRNA and partial sequencing of the groEL gene. E. faecalis isolates were further characterized by Multi Locus Sequence Typing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Results Mean age of 49 patients was 48 yrs (range was 11–86 yrs and included 94% women. On average, patients reported to have suffered from UTI for 348 days (range 3 days-10 years, and experienced 2.7 UTIs during the previous year. Cephalosporins were reported the second drug of choice in treatment of UTI at the hospital. E. faecalis (55.1%, E. coli (12.2% and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (8.2% were main bacterial pathogens. MIC testing of E. faecalis showed

  18. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  19. Deep dermatophyte infection with chronic draining nodules in an immunocompromised patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidovich, C W; Kornfeld, B W; Gentry, R H; Fitzpatrick, J E

    1995-04-01

    Chronic superficial dermatophyte infection may predispose the immunocompromised patient to invasive or disseminated involvement. We report a case of deep dermatophyte infection in a patient treated with long-term corticosteroid therapy for lung disease. The patient responded well to oral griseofulvin. Previously reported cases are reviewed along with recent investigative findings in the pathogenesis of chronic dermatophyte infections. Recommendations are made for diagnosis and therapy.

  20. In Situ Characterization of Splenic Brucella melitensis Reservoir Cells during the Chronic Phase of Infection in Susceptible Mice.

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    Delphine Hanot Mambres

    Full Text Available Brucella are facultative intracellular Gram-negative coccobacilli that chronically infect humans as well as domestic and wild-type mammals, and cause brucellosis. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2a induced by IL-4/IL-13 via STAT6 signaling pathways have been frequently described as a favorable niche for long-term persistence of intracellular pathogens. Based on the observation that M2a-like macrophages are induced in the spleen during the chronic phase of B. abortus infection in mice and are strongly infected in vitro, it has been suggested that M2a macrophages could be a potential in vivo niche for Brucella. In order to test this hypothesis, we used a model in which infected cells can be observed directly in situ and where the differentiation of M2a macrophages is favored by the absence of an IL-12-dependent Th1 response. We performed an in situ analysis by fluorescent microscopy of the phenotype of B. melitensis infected spleen cells from intranasally infected IL-12p40-/- BALB/c mice and the impact of STAT6 deficiency on this phenotype. Most of the infected spleen cells contained high levels of lipids and expressed CD11c and CD205 dendritic cell markers and Arginase1, but were negative for the M2a markers Fizz1 or CD301. Furthermore, STAT6 deficiency had no effect on bacterial growth or the reservoir cell phenotype in vivo, leading us to conclude that, in our model, the infected cells were not Th2-induced M2a macrophages. This characterization of B. melitensis reservoir cells could provide a better understanding of Brucella persistence in the host and lead to the design of more efficient therapeutic strategies.

  1. [Diversity of soil bacterial community in banana orchards infected with wilt disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bo; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Xiao-yu; Zhou, Deng-bo; Tan, Xin; Gao, Zhu-fen; Zhang, Xi-yan; Qi, Chun-lin

    2013-08-01

    Six soil samples including 3 wilt disease-infected samples and 3 disease-free samples were collected from the banana orchards in 3 areas in Lingao County, Hainan Province of South China. The soil physical and chemical properties were determined by conventional methods, and the diversity of soil bacterial community was analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Then, the relationships between the soil bacterial community composition and the soil physical and chemical properties were investigated. In the same areas, most of the soil physical and chemical properties were poorer in disease-infected than in disease-free banana orchards, with the most obvious difference in soil available P content and pH. The T-RFLP analysis showed the diversity of soil bacterial community was richer in disease-infected than in disease-free banana orchards. The lengths of the dominant T-RFs in the 3 areas were 144, 147 and 233 bp, respectively. Through the comparison with phylogenetic assignment tool, it was deduced that the dominant species in the 3 areas were Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus and Eubacterium ruminantium. The distribution of most T-RFs was related to the soil alkaline hydrolyzable N, available K, available P and water content, and the relative abundance of most T-RFs was richer in disease-infected than in disease-free banana orchards.

  2. Pipecolic acid enhances resistance to bacterial infection and primes salicylic acid and nicotine accumulation in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel-Adghough, Drissia; Stahl, Elia; Návarová, Hana; Zeier, Juergen

    2013-11-01

    Distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. We have recently identified pipecolic acid (Pip), a lysine-derived non-protein amino acid, as a critical regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and basal immunity to bacterial infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. In Arabidopsis, Pip acts as an endogenous mediator of defense amplification and priming. For instance, Pip conditions plants for effective biosynthesis of the phenolic defense signal salicylic acid (SA), accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin, and expression of defense-related genes. Here, we show that tobacco plants respond to leaf infection by the compatible bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tabaci (Pstb) with a significant accumulation of several amino acids, including Lys, branched-chain, aromatic, and amide group amino acids. Moreover, Pstb strongly triggers, alongside the biosynthesis of SA and increases in the defensive alkaloid nicotine, the production of the Lys catabolites Pip and α-aminoadipic acid. Exogenous application of Pip to tobacco plants provides significant protection to infection by adapted Pstb or by non-adapted, hypersensitive cell death-inducing P. syringae pv maculicola. Pip thereby primes tobacco for rapid and strong accumulation of SA and nicotine following bacterial infection. Thus, our study indicates that the role of Pip as an amplifier of immune responses is conserved between members of the rosid and asterid groups of eudicot plants and suggests a broad practical applicability for Pip as a natural enhancer of plant disease resistance.

  3. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens.

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    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K Christopher; McSorley, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity.

  4. Salmonella Infection Enhances Erythropoietin Production by the Kidney and Liver, Which Correlates with Elevated Bacterial Burdens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin-Xi; Benoun, Joseph M.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella infection profoundly affects host erythroid development, but the mechanisms responsible for this effect remain poorly understood. We monitored the impact of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and found that systemic infection induced anemia, splenomegaly, elevated erythropoietin (EPO) levels, and extramedullary erythropoiesis in a process independent of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI2) or flagellin. The circulating EPO level was also constitutively higher in mice lacking the expression of signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). The expression level of EPO mRNA was elevated in the kidney and liver but not increased in the spleens of infected mice despite the presence of extramedullary erythropoiesis in this tissue. In contrast to data from a previous report, mice lacking EPO receptor (EPOR) expression on nonerythroid cells (EPOR rescued) had bacterial loads similar to those of wild-type mice following Salmonella infection. Indeed, treatment to reduce splenic erythroblasts and mature red blood cells correlated with elevated bacterial burdens, implying that extramedullary erythropoiesis benefits the host. Together, these findings emphasize the profound effect of Salmonella infection on erythroid development and suggest that the modulation of erythroid development has both positive and negative consequences for host immunity. PMID:27456828

  5. The importance of bacterial and viral infections associated with adult asthma exacerbations in clinical practice.

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    Motoyasu Iikura

    Full Text Available Viral infection is one of the risk factors for asthma exacerbation. However, which pathogens are related to asthma exacerbation in adults remains unclear.The relation between various infections and adult asthma exacerbations was investigated in clinical practice.The study subjects included 50 adult inpatients due to asthma exacerbations and 20 stable outpatients for comparison. The pathogens from a nasopharyngeal swab were measured by multiplex PCR analysis.Asthma exacerbations occurred after a common cold in 48 inpatients. The numbers of patients with viral, bacterial, or both infections were 16, 9, and 9, respectively. The dominant viruses were rhinoviruses, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, and metapneumovirus. The major bacteria were S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Compared to pathogen-free patients, the patients with pathogens were older and non-atopic and had later onset of disease, lower FeNO levels, lower IgE titers, and a higher incidence of comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Compared to stable outpatients, asthma exacerbation inpatients had a higher incidence of smoking and comorbid sinusitis, COPD, or pneumonia. Viruses were detected in 50% of stable outpatients, but a higher incidence of rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus infections was observed in asthma exacerbation inpatients. H. influenzae was observed in stable asthmatic patients. Other bacteria, especially S. pneumoniae, were important in asthma exacerbation inpatients.Viral or bacterial infections were observed in 70% of inpatients with an asthma exacerbation in clinical practice. Infection with S. pneumoniae was related to adult asthma exacerbation.

  6. Asymptomatic cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium bovis present exacerbated tissue pathology and bacterial dissemination.

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    Álvaro Menin

    Full Text Available Rational discovery of novel immunodiagnostic and vaccine candidate antigens to control bovine tuberculosis (bTB requires knowledge of disease immunopathogenesis. However, there remains a paucity of information on the Mycobacterium bovis-host immune interactions during the natural infection. Analysis of 247 naturally PPD+ M. bovis-infected cattle revealed that 92% (n = 228 of these animals were found to display no clinical signs, but presented severe as well as disseminated bTB-lesions at post-mortem examination. Moreover, dissemination of bTB-lesions positively correlated with both pathology severity score (Spearman r = 0.48; p<0.0001 and viable tissue bacterial loads (Spearman r = 0.58; p = 0.0001. Additionally, granuloma encapsulation negatively correlated with M. bovis growth as well as pathology severity, suggesting that encapsulation is an effective mechanism to control bacterial proliferation during natural infection. Moreover, multinucleated giant cell numbers were found to negatively correlate with bacterial counts (Spearman r = 0.25; p = 0.03 in lung granulomas. In contrast, neutrophil numbers in the granuloma were associated with increased M. bovis proliferation (Spearman r = 0.27; p = 0.021. Together, our findings suggest that encapsulation and multinucleated giant cells control M. bovis viability, whereas neutrophils may serve as a cellular biomarker of bacterial proliferation during natural infection. These data integrate host granuloma responses with mycobacterial dissemination and could provide useful immunopathological-based biomarkers of disease severity in natural infection with M. bovis, an important cattle pathogen.

  7. Isolation of bacteria causing secondary bacterial infection in the lesions of cutaneous leishmaniasis

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    Ziaie Hengameh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL is a parasitic disease characterized by single or multiple ulcerations. Secondary bacterial infection is one of the complications of the disease that can increase the tissue destruction and the resulting scar. Objective: To effectively determine the incidence of real secondary bacteria infection in cutaneous leishmaniasis, we designed the current study. Methods and Materials: This was a cross-sectional study performed in Skin Diseases and Leishmaniasis Research Centre, Isfahan, Iran. In this study, 854 patients with confirmed CL were enrolled. Samples were taken from all the patients. Sterile swaps were achieved for the ulcer exudates and scraping was used for nonulcerated lesions. All the samples were transferred to tryptic soy broth medium. After 24 h of incubation in 37°C, they were transferred to eosin methylene blue agar (EBM and blood agar. Laboratory tests were used to determine the species of bacteria. All of the collected data were analyzed by SPSS software and chi-square. Results: Among 854 patients with confirmed cutaneous leishmaniasis, 177 patients (20.7% had positive cultures for secondary bacterial infection. Bacteria isolated from the lesions were as follows: Staphylococcus aureus - 123 cases (69.4%, coagulase negative Staphylococcus - 41 cases (23.1%, E. coil - 7 cases (3.9%, Proteus - 3 cases (1.7% and Klebsiella - 3 cases (1.7%. Conclusions: The incidence of secondary bacterial infection in lesions of CL was 20.7%. The most common isolated pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus . The incidence of secondary bacterial infection was significantly more in the ulcerated lesions as compared with nonulcerated lesions ( P = 0.00001.

  8. Bacterial infections in Lilongwe, Malawi: aetiology and antibiotic resistance

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    Makoka Mwai H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life-threatening infections present major challenges for health systems in Malawi and the developing world because routine microbiologic culture and sensitivity testing are not performed due to lack of capacity. Use of empirical antimicrobial therapy without regular microbiologic surveillance is unable to provide adequate treatment in the face of emerging antimicrobial resistance. This study was conducted to determine antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in order to inform treatment choices and generate hospital-wide baseline data. Methods Culture and susceptibility testing was performed on various specimens from patients presenting with possible infectious diseases at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi. Results Between July 2006 and December 2007 3104 specimens from 2458 patients were evaluated, with 60.1% from the adult medical service. Common presentations were sepsis, meningitis, pneumonia and abscess. An etiologic agent was detected in 13% of patients. The most common organisms detected from blood cultures were Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella species and Streptococcus pneumoniae, whereas Streptococcus pneumoniae and Cryptococcus neoformans were most frequently detected from cerebrospinal fluid. Haemophilus influenzae was rarely isolated. Resistance to commonly used antibiotics was observed in up to 80% of the isolates while antibiotics that were not commonly in use maintained susceptibility. Conclusions There is widespread resistance to almost all of the antibiotics that are empirically used in Malawi. Antibiotics that have not been widely introduced in Malawi show better laboratory performance. Choices for empirical therapy in Malawi should be revised accordingly. A microbiologic surveillance system should be established and prudent use of antimicrobials promoted to improve patient care.

  9. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy.

  10. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome:effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enzo Vicari; Sandro La Vignera; Roberto Castiglione; Rosita A Condorelli; Lucia O Vicari; Aldo E Calogero

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the inlfuence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate‑vesiculitis(PV) or prostate‑vesiculo‑epididymitis(PVE). Atotal of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis(CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin(200mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7days monthly for 12months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3(450×109 CFU per day) or no treatment. Ninety‑ifve of them(89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. GroupA = “6Tx/6‑”: treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6months(n=26); GroupB = “12Tx”: 12months of treatment(n=22); GroupC = “6‑/6Tx”: no treatment for the initial 6months and treatment in the last 6months(n=23); GroupD = “12‑”: no treatment(n=24). The patients of GroupsA = “6Tx/6‑” and B= “12Tx” had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis(88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group “12‑”: patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis(33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups “6Tx/6‑”(15.5%) and “6‑/6Tx”(13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group “12‑”(45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups “6Tx/6‑” and “6‑/6Tx” had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group “12‑” patients. Long‑term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS.

  11. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP.

  12. Ginseng treatment reduces bacterial load and lung pathology in chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Z; Johansen, H K; Faber, V

    1997-01-01

    the inflammation and antibody responses could be changed by treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine ginseng. An aqueous extract of ginseng was injected subcutaneously, and cortisone and saline were used as controls. Two weeks after challenge with P. aeruginosa, the ginseng-treated group showed a significantly...... resembling a TH1-like response. On the basis of these results it is suggested that ginseng may have the potential to be a promising natural medicine, in conjunction with other forms of treatment, for CF patients with chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection....

  13. A multicenter comparative study of cefepime versus broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy in moderate and severe bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaró Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety and efficacy of cefepime empiric monotherapy compared with standard broad-spectrum combination therapy for hospitalized adult patients with moderate to severe community-acquired bacterial infections were evaluated. In an open-label, multicenter study, 317 patients with an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II score ranging from >5 to =19 were enrolled with documented pneumonia (n=196, urinary tract infection (n=65, intra-abdominal infection (n=38, or sepsis (n=18. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive cefepime 1 to 2 g IV twice daily or three times a day or IV ampicillin, cephalothin, or ceftriaxone ± aminoglycoside therapy for 3 to 21 days. For both treatment groups, metronidazole, vancomycin, or macrolide therapy was added as deemed necessary. The primary efficacy variable was clinical response at the end of therapy. Two hundred ninety-six (93% patients met evaluation criteria and were included in the efficacy analysis. Diagnoses included the following: 180 pneumonias (90 cefepime, 90 comparator, 62 urinary tract infections (29 cefepime, 33 comparator, 37 intra-abdominal infections (19 cefepime, 18 comparator, and 17 sepses (8 cefepime, 9 comparator. At the end of therapy, overall clinical success rates were 131/146 (90% for patients treated with cefepime vs 125/150 (83% for those treated with comparator (95% confidence interval [CI]: - 2.6% to 16.3%. The clinical success rate for patients with community-acquired pneumonia, the most frequent infection, was 86% for both treatment groups. Among the patients clinically evaluated, 162 pathogens were isolated and identified before therapy. The most commonly isolated pathogens were Escherichia coli (n=49, Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=29, Haemophilus influenzae (n=14, and Staphylococcus aureus (n=11. Bacteriologic eradication/presumed eradication was 97% for cefepime vs 94% for comparator-treated patients. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 16% of

  14. The current understanding of the treatment chronic non-bacterial prostatitis with inflammatory component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Vinnik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A literature review is dedicated to one of the most urgent problems of modern andrology – the treatment of chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CP with inflammatory component. Over the past decades, despite numerous methods of prevention and treatment offered by the Russian and foreign urologists, the incidence of CP has been steadily progressing. Treatment of patients with CP should be comprehensive and be sure to include the effects on all the links in the pathogenesis of the disease. It is different depending on the age of the patient and the presence and nature of CP manifestations, including changes in mental status, especially disease progression, stage and phase inflammatory activity in the prostate, the degree of involvement in the disease process nearby organs, immune status and other factors. The proposed scientific review covers the basic techniques of therapeutic effect on patients with CP. Given in article data allows a more rational approach to the treatment of these patients.

  15. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Simon; Sidani, Sacha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT). A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P PERT), and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO. PMID:27446865

  16. 感染表型慢性阻塞性肺疾病%Infective phenotype chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁静; 赵静; 王孟昭; 蔡柏蔷

    2015-01-01

    COPD是一种慢性炎症性病变,可累及大小气道、肺实质以及肺血管.引起COPD的危险因素众多,其中下呼吸道感染,尤其是细菌感染是导致COPD发生及急性加重的一个重要原因,以至有学者提出一个全新概念——感染表型COPD.本文拟对感染表型COPD概念提出背景及感染表型COPD的特征作一综述.%Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a chronic inflammatory disease which involved large/small airways,pulmonary parenchyma and vessels.Many risk factors can cause COPD,including lower respiratory tract infection and especially bacterial infection in lower respiratory tract is an important cause to lead to COPD and acute exacerbation of COPD.Based on this,some investigators present a new concept——infective phenotype COPD.This review focuses on the background of presenting this new concept of infective phenotype COPD and discusses the characteristics of this kind of COPD.

  17. Probiotic Activity of a Bacterial Strain Isolated from Ancient Permafrost Against Salmonella Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursova, O; Potapov, V; Brouchkov, A; Pogorelko, G; Griva, G; Fursova, N; Ignatov, S

    2012-09-01

    Bacillus cereus strain F, collected from relict permafrost located in Siberia, was analyzed for probiotic activity in the mouse Salmonella enterica model. Viable bacterial cells were found in frozen soils taken at Mammoth Mountain in Yakutia from a depth below the level of seasonal thawing. Geological data indicated the absence of a thawing within millions of years of deposited soils, which helped to ensure the ancient origin of our sample. According to DNA analysis, bacterial cells collected from the relict permafrost appeared to be B. cereus strain F. The morphology of these bacteria was analyzed using atomic force microscopy. B. cereus strain F was assessed as a nonpathogenic bacterium by evaluation of its pathogenicity. A S. enterica model is described in mice after per oral inoculation and serves as a model for the human carrier state. Using this model, probiotic activity by the bacterial strain isolated from the ancient permafrost has been shown against Salmonella infection in mice.

  18. Hepatitis E virus genotype three infection of human liver chimeric mice as a model for chronic HEV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn); S.D. Pas (Suzan); G. van der Net (Guido); R.A. de Man (Robert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart); A. Boonstra (Andre); T. Vanwolleghem (Thomas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractGenotype (gt) 3 hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are emerging in Western countries. Immunosuppressed patients are at risk of chronic HEV infection and progressive liver damage, but no adequate model system currently mimics this disease course. Here we explore the possibilities of in vi

  19. SECONDARY BACTERIAL INFECTION IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH PROLONGED AND SEVERE DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Generally, in dengue shock syndrome antibiotics are not advised. But unrecognised bacterial infection is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality, probably because of increased vascular permeability. OBJECTIVES To assess the incidence of secondary bacterial infection in adult patients with prolonged and severe dengue fever. METHODS A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days. Prior to institution of antibiotic therapy, two sets of blood cultures were taken from patients. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Severity of fever & associated symptoms assessed. Ultrasonography done to find out development of ascites and pleural effusions. RESULTS Sixty patients (60.0% males with a mean age of 33.5 years (SD 12.1 were studied. The average duration of fever was 6.9 days (SD 1.6. Fifteen patients (25% had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=3, coliforms (n=7, pseudomonas (n=2 and 3 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches and joints paint at admission and high grade fever, third space fluid accumulation and significant drop in platelets compared to culture-negative group. CONCLUSIONS A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture-positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the course of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia in dengue fever, low platelet count and severe symptoms at presentation may be helpful.

  20. Hindlimb suspension and SPE-like radiation impairs clearance of bacterial infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghong Li

    Full Text Available A major risk of extended space travel is the combined effects of weightlessness and radiation exposure on the immune system. In this study, we used the hindlimb suspension model of microgravity that includes the other space stressors, situational and confinement stress and alterations in food intake, and solar particle event (SPE-like radiation to measure the combined effects on the ability to control bacterial infections. A massive increase in morbidity and decrease in the ability to control bacterial growth was observed using 2 different types of bacteria delivered by systemic and pulmonary routes in 3 different strains of mice. These data suggest that an astronaut exposed to a strong SPE during extended space travel is at increased risk for the development of infections that could potentially be severe and interfere with mission success and astronaut health.

  1. Analysis of Gram-positive bacterial infection in patients following liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hong; YU De-lei; REN lei; ZHONG Lin; PENG Zhi-hai; TENG Mu-jian

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver transplantation is the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure,however infection after transplantation is a serious clinical complication.The purpose of this research was to investigate the molecular epidemiology and the influence of multidrug-resistant Gram-positive infection in patients,following liver transplantation,to provide reference for clinical treatment and prevention of Gram-positive bacterial infection.Methods We isolated and detected bacteria from phlegm,throat swabs,urine,wound or wound secretions,blood,and fecal samples from 221 liver transplant patients in our hospital from January 2007 to April 2010.All isolated bacterial strains were identified and tested by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) drug-sensitive detection using the BioMerieux ATB bacterial identification instrument and repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (REP-PCR)detection of bacterial homology.Risk factors were calculated by multivariate Logistic regression analysis.Results We collected 250 specimens from 221 patients hospitalized following liver transplantation surgery,of which 29patients developed multiple infections.Sixty-five Gram-positive bacterial strains were isolated from different specimens from 53 infectious patients.We detected 29 multidrug-resistant Gram-positive strains from 29 patients (44.62%),including 20 Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) strains (68.97%) and nine Enterococcus strains (31.03%).All 20 S.aureus strains were highly resistant to aminoglycosides (gentamicin),cephalosporins (cefoxitin),quinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin),lincomycins (clindamycin),penicillin,and erythromycin.The resistance rate reached 100% in some cases.The S.aureus strains were highly sensitive to vancomycin and oxazolidinone (linezolid),with MIC50 <2 μg/ml for both.The nine Enterococci strains were also highly resistant to aminoglycosides,quinolones,and penicillins,and highly sensitive to vancomycin

  2. Tissue characterization of skin ulcer for bacterial infection by multiple statistical analysis of echo amplitude envelope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Masaaki; Yoshida, Kenji; Kohta, Masushi; Kubo, Takabumi; Ishiguro, Toshimichi; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Hozumi, Naohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    To characterize skin ulcers for bacterial infection, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters were estimated by the multiple statistical analysis of the echo amplitude envelope based on both Weibull and generalized gamma distributions and the ratio of mean to standard deviation of the echo amplitude envelope. Measurement objects were three rat models (noninfection, critical colonization, and infection models). Ultrasound data were acquired using a modified ultrasonic diagnosis system with a center frequency of 11 MHz. In parallel, histopathological images and two-dimensional map of speed of sound (SoS) were observed. It was possible to detect typical tissue characteristics such as infection by focusing on the relationship of QUS parameters and to indicate the characteristic differences that were consistent with the scatterer structure. Additionally, the histopathological characteristics and SoS of noninfected and infected tissues were matched to the characteristics of QUS parameters in each rat model.

  3. Role of the Inflammasome, IL-1β, and IL-18 in Bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoranjan Sahoo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The inflammasome is an important innate immune pathway that regulates at least two host responses protective against infections: (1 secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 and (2 induction of pyroptosis, a form of cell death. Inflammasomes, of which different types have been identified, are multiprotein complexes containing pattern recognition receptors belonging to the Nod-like receptor family or the PYHIN family and the protease caspase-1. The molecular aspects involved in the activation of different inflammasomes by various pathogens are being rapidly elucidated, and their role during infections is being characterized. Production of IL-1β and IL-18 and induction of pyroptosis of the infected cell have been shown to be protective against many infectious agents. Here, we review the recent literature concerning inflammasome activation in the context of bacterial infections and identify important questions to be answered in the future.

  4. Effect of levofloxacin treatment on semen hyperviscosity in chronic bacterial prostatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, L O; Castiglione, R; Salemi, M; Vicari, B O; Mazzarino, M C; Vicari, E

    2016-05-01

    Changes in seminal fluid viscosity (SFV), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cytokines and seminal leucocyte concentration related to microbiological outcome in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) were studied. One hundred and ten infertile patients with CBP (positive sperm culture ≥10(5) colony-forming units [CFU] ml(-1), pathogens or Chlamydia in expressed prostatic secretions) were treated with levofloxacin 500 mg daily for 14 consecutive days per month for 3 months. In case of bacterial prostatitis, two conditions were examined: responders, eradication of 0 to 10(3) to <10(5) CFU ml(-1) (n = 32). Compared with poor responders, responders showed a significant increase of sperm progressive motility and a significant decrease in seminal leucocyte count, SFV, liquefaction time, ROS production (in all fractions and conditions), seminal tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6. None of these variables showed significant differences compared with a control group of 37 fertile men. On the other hand, the poor responders showed significant changes in these variables compared with matched pretreatment values. In patients with CBP, antibiotic therapy alone leads to eradication in ≈71%, with improvement of sperm progressive motility, SFV and the framework of prooxidative factors. However, in the remaining ≈29% with poor antibiotic responsiveness, a deterioration of all variables is observed.

  5. Efficacy of a marine bacterial nuclease against biofilm forming microorganisms isolated from chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Shields

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The persistent colonization of paranasal sinus mucosa by microbial biofilms is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS. Control of microorganisms within biofilms is hampered by the presence of viscous extracellular polymers of host or microbial origin, including nucleic acids. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of extracellular DNA in biofilm formation by bacteria associated with CRS. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Obstructive mucin was collected from patients during functional endoscopic sinus surgery. Examination of the mucous by transmission electron microscopy revealed an acellular matrix punctuated occasionally with host cells in varying states of degradation. Bacteria were observed in biofilms on mucosal biopsies, and between two and six different species were isolated from each of 20 different patient samples. In total, 16 different bacterial genera were isolated, of which the most commonly identified organisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus and α-haemolytic streptococci. Twenty-four fresh clinical isolates were selected for investigation of biofilm formation in vitro using a microplate model system. Biofilms formed by 14 strains, including all 9 extracellular nuclease-producing bacteria, were significantly disrupted by treatment with a novel bacterial deoxyribonuclease, NucB, isolated from a marine strain of Bacillus licheniformis. Extracellular biofilm matrix was observed in untreated samples but not in those treated with NucB and extracellular DNA was purified from in vitro biofilms. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate that bacteria associated with CRS form robust biofilms which can be reduced by treatment with matrix-degrading enzymes such as NucB. The dispersal of bacterial biofilms with NucB may offer an additional therapeutic target for CRS sufferers.

  6. Drosophila embryos as model systems for monitoring bacterial infection in real time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Vlisidou

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila embryos are well studied developmental microcosms that have been used extensively as models for early development and more recently wound repair. Here we extend this work by looking at embryos as model systems for following bacterial infection in real time. We examine the behaviour of injected pathogenic (Photorhabdus asymbiotica and non-pathogenic (Escherichia coli bacteria and their interaction with embryonic hemocytes using time-lapse confocal microscopy. We find that embryonic hemocytes both recognise and phagocytose injected wild type, non-pathogenic E. coli in a Dscam independent manner, proving that embryonic hemocytes are phagocytically competent. In contrast, injection of bacterial cells of the insect pathogen Photorhabdus leads to a rapid 'freezing' phenotype of the hemocytes associated with significant rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. This freezing phenotype can be phenocopied by either injection of the purified insecticidal toxin Makes Caterpillars Floppy 1 (Mcf1 or by recombinant E. coli expressing the mcf1 gene. Mcf1 mediated hemocyte freezing is shibire dependent, suggesting that endocytosis is required for Mcf1 toxicity and can be modulated by dominant negative or constitutively active Rac expression, suggesting early and unexpected effects of Mcf1 on the actin cytoskeleton. Together these data show how Drosophila embryos can be used to track bacterial infection in real time and how mutant analysis can be used to genetically dissect the effects of specific bacterial virulence factors.

  7. Establishment of a Multiplex PCR System to Diagnose Tuberculosis and Other Bacterial Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to rapidly diagnose and differentiate tuberculosis from other bacterial infections, a 16S rRNA gene (16s rDNA)-directed multiplex PCR system was developed. In this system, a pair of universal primers and a tubercle bacillus (Tb)-specific primer were designed based on highly conserved regions and Tb species-specific variable region of bacterial 16s rDNA. A 360bp fragment was detected in all bacteria tested, and a 210bp fragment was found only in Tb. 19 species of known bacteria including Tb were used for evaluating specificity, universality and sensitivity of the PCR. Candida albicans and human diploid cell served as controls. It was found that both 210bp and 360bp fragments were amplified only in Tb, and only 360 bp fragment was detected in other 18 species of general bacteria. Candida albicans and human cells were negative for both 360bp and 210bp fragments.The lowest detectable level of the PCR was 10 fg of DNA for Escherichia coli and 100 fg of DNA for Tb. The results indicated that this multiplex PCR system for the simultaneous detection of Tb and other common bacteria had higher specificity and sensitivity, as well as good universality and might be useful to rapidly diagnose bacterial infections and effectively distinguish tuberculosis from other bacterial involvement.

  8. Platelet concentrates: reducing the risk of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Korte D

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dirk de Korte,1 Jan H Marcelis2 1Department of Product and Process Development, Sanquin Blood Bank, Amsterdam, 2Department of Microbiology, St Elisabeth Hospital, Tilburg, the Netherlands Abstract: The introduction of a combination of interventions during collection of whole-blood or platelet concentrates has been successful in lowering the degree of bacterial contamination in the final product, the platelet concentrate, by 50%–75%. These interventions were improved donor questionnaires, best-practice skin disinfection, and diversion of first blood volume. These interventions have reduced the number of bacteria present in the platelet concentrates. In combination with screening for bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates with a culture method, the degree of transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection has been reduced significantly. Due to the very low initial bacteria counts upon collection of the products, the need for improved sensitivity of early screenings tests or highly selective point-of-issue tests remains. The latter should be rapid and easy to perform. An alternative approach might be the implementation of pathogen-inactivation methods for cellular blood products to reduce the amount of pathogens. However, these methods are costly, and so far not proved to be cost-effective, especially in countries with an already-low incidence of transfusion-transmitted infections by viruses, parasites, or bacteria. Keywords: blood products, bacterial contamination, screening, point of issue, pathogen inactivation

  9. Viral-bacterial co-infection in Australian Indigenous children with acute otitis media

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    Whiley David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute otitis media with perforation (AOMwiP affects 40% of remote Indigenous children during the first 18 months of life. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are the primary bacterial pathogens of otitis media and their loads predict clinical ear state. Our hypothesis is that antecedent respiratory viral infection increases bacterial density and progression to perforation. Methods A total of 366 nasopharyngeal swabs from 114 Indigenous children were retrospectively examined. A panel of 17 respiratory viruses was screened by PCR, and densities of S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis were estimated by quantitative real time PCR. Data are reported by clinical ear state. Results M. catarrhalis (96%, H. influenzae (91%, S. pneumoniae (89% and respiratory viruses (59% were common; including rhinovirus (HRV (38%, polyomavirus (HPyV (14%, adenovirus (HAdV (13%, bocavirus (HBoV (8% and coronavirus (HCoV (4%. Geometric mean bacterial loads were significantly higher in children with acute otitis media (AOM compared to children without evidence of otitis media. Children infected with HAdV were 3 times more likely (p Conclusion This study confirms a positive association between nasopharyngeal bacterial load and clinical ear state, exacerbated by respiratory viruses, in Indigenous children. HAdV was independently associated with acute ear states.

  10. Etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler breeding center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardasheliya, S N; Kalashnikova, V A; Dzhikidze, E K

    2011-10-01

    We studied etiologic structure of bacterial intestinal infections in monkeys of Adler nursery. A total of 533 monkeys with diarrhea syndrome and monkeys dead from intestinal infections, as well as clinically healthy monkeys and animals dead from other pathologies were examined by bacteriological and molecular-genetic methods. Pathogenic enterobacteria Shigella and Salmonella and microaerophile Campylobacter were found in 5 and 19%, respectively. A high percentage (49%) of intestinal diseases of unknown etiology was revealed in monkeys. The fact that the number of detected opportunistic enterobacteria did not differ in healthy and diseased monkeys suggests that they are not involved into the etiology of intestinal disease.

  11. Prevalence of Bacterial Urinary Tract Infections in Patients before and after of Kidney Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeili, R.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Urinary tract infections and bacteremia are the major problems in renal transplant patients, which are mostly due to immunesuppressive regimens, surgery, and exposure to the germs in hospital. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacterial agents in the blood and urine samples of kidney transplant candidates. Material and Methods: In this one-year-long study, thirty-three renal transplant candidates were assessed for urine and blood cultures. One urine and blood samples from each patient before transplantation and three samples after transplantation were collected. The Samples, using standard microbiological methods, were investigated and infectious organisms identified. Results: In 133 urine samples, Escherichia coli (20.5%, Enterobacter spp. (5.3%, Klebsiella spp. (3 % and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1.5% were isolated. In the blood samples, Enterobacter spp. (9.1%, Escherichia coli (6.8%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (3.8% and Klebsiella spp. (0.8% were isolated. Conclusion: The results indicate that urinary tract infection was high in patients with transplanted kidney, and E. coli is the most common cause of this infection. Keywords: Kidney Transplantation; Bacterial infections; Urinary Tract and Blood Infections; Escherichia Coli

  12. The Salmonella effector AvrA mediates bacterial intracellular survival during infection in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huixia; Jones, Rheinallt M; Neish, Andrew S

    2012-01-01

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella typhimurium secretes the preformed AvrA effector protein into host cells. This acetyltransferase has been shown to modulate mammalian intestinal immune and survival responses by inhibition of JNK MAPK. To study the role of this effector in natural enteric infection, we used a mouse model to compare wild-type S. typhimurium to an isogenic AvrA null Salmonella mutant. Salmonella lacking AvrA induced increased intestinal inflammation, more intense systemic cytokine responses, and increased apoptosis in epithelial cells. Increased apoptosis was also observed in extra epithelial macrophages. AvrA null-infected mice consistently showed higher bacterial burden within mucosal lymphoid tissues, spleen and liver by 5 days post infection, which indicated a more severe clinical course. To study the molecular mechanisms involved, recombinant adenoviruses expressing AvrA or mutant AvrA proteins were constructed, which showed appropriate expression and mediated the expected inhibition of JNK signalling. Cultured epithelial cells and macrophages transduced with AvrA expressing adenovirus were protected from apoptosis induced by exogenous stimuli. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that Salmonella AvrA modulates survival of infected macrophages likely via JNK suppression, and prevents macrophage death and rapid bacterial dissemination. AvrA suppression of apoptosis in infected macrophages may allow for establishment of a stable intracellular niche typical of intracellular pathogens.

  13. A novel outbred mouse model of 2009 pandemic influenza and bacterial co-infection severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J McHugh

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses pose a significant health risk and annually impose a great cost to patients and the health care system. The molecular determinants of influenza severity, often exacerbated by secondary bacterial infection, are largely unclear. We generated a novel outbred mouse model of influenza virus, Staphylococcus aureus, and co-infection utilizing influenza A/CA/07/2009 virus and S. aureus (USA300. Outbred mice displayed a wide range of pathologic phenotypes following influenza virus or co-infection ranging broadly in severity. Influenza viral burden positively correlated with weight loss although lung histopathology did not. Inflammatory cytokines including IL-6, TNF-α, G-CSF, and CXCL10 positively correlated with both weight loss and viral burden. In S. aureus infection, IL-1β, G-CSF, TNF-α, and IL-6 positively correlated with weight loss and bacterial burden. In co-infection, IL-1β production correlated with decreased weight loss suggesting a protective role. The data demonstrate an approach to identify biomarkers of severe disease and to understand pathogenic mechanisms in pneumonia.

  14. Pathogen-Specific Local Immune Fingerprints Diagnose Bacterial Infection in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Chan-Yu; Roberts, Gareth W.; Kift-Morgan, Ann; Donovan, Kieron L.; Topley, Nicholas; Eberl, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of bacterial infection is crucial for effective and targeted treatment, yet routine microbiological identification is inefficient and often delayed to an extent that makes it clinically unhelpful. The immune system is capable of a rapid, sensitive and specific detection of a broad spectrum of microbes, which has been optimized over millions of years of evolution. A patient's early immune response is therefore likely to provide far better insight into the true nat...

  15. DMPD: Role of Nods in bacterial infection. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available SVG File (.svg) HTML File (.html) CSML File (.csml) Open .csml file with CIOPlayer Open .csml file with CIO... 2007 Apr;9(5):629-36. Epub 2007 Jan 27. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Role of Nods in bacterial infect...Player - ※CIO Playerのご利用上の注意 Open .csml file with CIO Open .csml file with CIO - ※CIOのご利用上の注意 ...

  16. Bacterial infection of mudfish Clarias gariepinus (Siluriformes: Clariidae) fingerlings in tropical nursery ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpi, Gabriel; Offem, Benedict

    2011-06-01

    Bacterial infection among the most common cultured mudfish Clarias gariepinus in Africa, has become a cause of concern, because it constitutes the largest economic loss in fish farms. In order to provide useful biological data of the pathogens for good management practices, samples were collected monthly between January 2008 and December 2009 in three monoculture nursery ponds, located in three different positions: upriver (A, grassland), mid-river (B, mixed forest and grassland) and downriver (C, rainforest) along 200 km length of Cross River floodplains, Nigeria. A total of 720 fingerlings between 15.1 and 20.7 g were analyzed to determine the degree of infection. The bacterial pathogens were taken from their external surfaces, and were isolated and identified by standard methods. The caudal fins of fingerlings from pond A had the highest bacterial load (5.8 x 10(3) cfu/g), while the least counts (1.2 x 103 cfu/g) were identified on the head of fish from pond C, with Flexibacter columnaris as the major etiological agent. Pseudomonas fluorescens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus luteus were identified as co-isolates with P. fluorescens as dominant (0.7 x 10(2) cfu/mL) co-isolates in pond water. Clinical signs of five white spots with red periphery appeared on the external surface of infected fish. All the fish sampled, died after 4 to 9 days. There was no significant difference in the bacterial counts between different ponds, but the difference between fish organs/parts examined was significant. Fish from these ponds are therefore potentially dangerous to consumers and highly devalued, with the economic impact to producers. Preventive methods to avoid these infections are recommended.

  17. Combining Flagellin and human β-defensin-3 to combat bacterial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra eSabag

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and therapeutic use of antibiotics made a major contribution to the reduction of human morbidity and mortality. However, the growing resistance to antibiotics has become a matter of huge concern. In this study we aimed to develop an innovative approach to treat bacterial infections utilizing two components: the human antibacterial peptide β-defensin-3 (BD3 and the bacterial protein flagellin (F. This combination was designed to provide an efficient weapon against bacterial infections with the peptide killing the bacteria directly, while the flagellin protein triggers the immune system and acts against bacteria escaping from the peptide’s action. We designed, expressed and purified the fusion protein FBD3 and its two components, the F protein and the native BD3 peptide. FBD3 fusion protein and native BD3 peptide had antibacterial activity in vitro against various bacterial strains. FBD3 and F proteins could also recognize their receptor expressed on target cells and stimulated secretion of IL-8. In addition, F and FBD3 proteins had a partial protective effect in mice infected by pathogenic E. coli bacteria that cause a lethal disease. Moreover, we were able to show partial protection of mice infected with E. coli using a flagellin sequence from Salmonella.We also explored flagellin’s basic mechanisms of action, focusing on its effects on CD4+ T cells from healthy donors. We found that F stimulation caused an increase in the mRNA levels of the Th1 response cytokines IL12A and IFNγ. In addition, F stimulation affected its own receptor.

  18. Increase in Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Febrile Neutropenic Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Joon Hee; Kim, Seul-Ki; Kim, Seong Koo; Han, Seung Beom; Lee, Jae Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Cho, Bin; Jeong, Dae Chul; Kang, Jin Han; Kim, Hack-Ki

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative bacteria has increased recently in febrile neutropenic patients with the increase of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. This study aimed to identify the distribution of causative bacteria and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in bacteremia diagnosed in febrile neutropenic children. Materials and Methods The medical records of febrile neutropenic children diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 an...

  19. In vitro Evaluation of the Effct of Bacterial Extract, Isolated From Infected Hydatid Cysts, on Protoscolex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardari M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To date, surgery has been the treatment of choice for hydatid cyst, with regard to danger of leakage of hydatid cyst contents into viscera and production of secondary cysts, aftr spread of protoscolices. Diffrent scolicidal agents get injected into cyst for preventing the secondary cyst production, which may cause diffrent side effcts in host, especially in the surrounding tissues. In this research, the scolicidal effcts of bacterial extract isolated from infected hydatid cyst was evaluated. Methods: In this experimental-laboratorial study, at fist, isolation and identifiation of the infecting bacteria of hydatid cyst were performed at the level of species. Thn, total the bacterial extract was prepared by sonication method, and serial dilutions 1.1, 1.2, 1.4, 1.8, 1.16, 1.32 and 1.64( were prepared using sterile saline as the solvent. Th obtained alive larvae at the times of 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 minutes were placed in those dilutions and mean of dead protoscoleces were determined using eosin exclusive staining method. Results: Th identifid bacteria isolated from the infected hydatid cysts were as follows: E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, S. saprophyticus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Th extract of isolated bacteria at the mentioned times had no considerable scolicidal effcts. For example, the whole extract of P. aeruginosa aftr 60 minutes of exposure showed a maximum of 13.17%. scolicidal effct. Conclusion: Th results of this study showed low scolicidal effct of bacterial extracts isolated from hydatid cyst. Degeneration of scolices in infected cysts can be due to other reasons than bacterial extract.

  20. Endothelial Dysfunction Correlates with Liver Fibrosis in Chronic HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Barone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection can exert proatherogenic activities due to its direct action on vessel walls and/or via the chronic inflammatory process involving the liver. Aims. To clarify the role of HCV in atherosclerosis development in monoinfected HCV patients at different degrees of liver fibrosis and with no risk factors for coronary artery disease. Methods. Forty-five patients were included. Clinical, serological, and anthropometric parameters, liver fibrosis (transient liver elastometry (fibroscan and aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI, carotid intima-media thickness (c-IMT, and brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD were assessed. Patients were divided into 3 tertiles according to fibroscan values. Results. Patients in the third tertile (fibroscan value >11.5 KPa showed FMD values were significantly lower than second and first tertiles (4.7±1.7% versus 7.1±2.8%, p=0.03. FMD values were inversely related to liver elastomeric values. c-IMT values were normal. The risk for endothelial dysfunction development in the third tertile (p=0.02 was 6.9 higher than the first tertile. A fibroscan value >11.5 KPa had a positive predictive power equal to 79% for endothelial dysfunction. Conclusions. HCV advanced liver fibrosis promotes atherosclerosis by inducing endothelial dysfunction independently of common cardiovascular risk factors.

  1. The woodchuck as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This review describes the woodchuck and the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) as an animal model for pathogenesis and therapy of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and disease in humans. The establishment of woodchuck breeding colonies, and use of laboratory-reared woodchucks infected with defined WHV inocula, have enhanced our understanding of the virology and immunology of HBV infection and disease pathogenesis, including major sequelae like chronic hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of persistent WHV infection and of viral load on the natural history of infection and disease progression has been firmly established along the way. More recently, the model has shed new light on the role of host immune responses in these natural processes,and on how the immune system of the chronic carrier can be manipulated therapeutically to reduce or delay serious disease sequelae through induction of the recovery phenotype. The woodchuck is an outbred species and is not well defined immunologically due to a limitation of available host markers. However, the recent development of several key host response assays for woodchucks provides experimental opportunities for further mechanistic studies of outcome predictors in neonatal- and adult-acquired infections. Understanding the virological and immunological mechanisms responsible for resolution of self-limited infection, and for the onset and maintenance of chronic infection, will greatly facilitate the development of successful strategies for the therapeutic eradication of established chronic HBV infection. Likewise, the results of drug efficacy and toxicity studies in the chronic carrier woodchucks are predictive for responses of patients chronically infected with HBV. Therefore, chronic WHV carrier woodchucks provide a well-characterized mammalian model for preclinical evaluation of the safety and efficacy of drug candidates, experimental therapeutic vaccines, and immunomodulators for the treatment and

  2. Mutation screening of the IL-1 receptor antagonist gene in chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis of childhood and adolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beck, C.; Girschick, H. J.; Morbach, H.; Schwarz, T.; Yimam, T.; Frenkel, J.; van Gijn, M. E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis CNO is an inflammatory disorder of the musculoskeletal system with unknown etiology. In addition to bone inflammation, patients may present with inflammatory involvement of other tissues including, e.g.,skin. Recently, a novel syndrome due to deficiency

  3. [Use of transport medium in sputum bacterial culture examination of lower airway infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, Masato; Kitaguchi, Sayako; Ichihashi, Hideo; Tsuji, Fumio; Ohmori, Takashi; Haraguchi, Ryuta; Tohda, Yuji

    2006-06-01

    Our medical institution does not have a bacterial culture facility, requiring outsourcing of bacterial culture tests. Due to the time elapsed from the time of specimen collection to culturing, the identification of causative bacteria in respiratory tract infections tends to be difficult. We therefore used transport medium for sputum bacteria examinations. Expectorated purulent or purulent-mucous sputum specimens were collected from 32 patients with lower respiratory tract infection. We divided each of the sputum specimens into the two treatment groups: transport medium (Seedswab gamma2) ndar and stad disinfection container. Paired samples prepared from each patient were sent out for bacterial culture together. The time elapsed from collection to delivery to the lab were as follows: day 0 (same day, n = 14 patients), day 1 (n = 15), day 2 (n = 2), and day 3 (n = 1). The identified causative bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 6 patients), Haemophilus influenzae (n =5), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 4), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2), Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 1), and Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 1). Samples prepared by each of the two methods gave similar results. The utility of transport medium for examination of general bacteria for lower airway infection from sputum samples was not demonstrated. The rate of detection of bacteria decreased, when the transport of samples was delayed. Therefore, we need to send the sputum specimens as quickly as possible.

  4. The effects of vaccination and immunity on bacterial infection dynamics in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Coward

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica infections are a significant global health issue, and development of vaccines against these bacteria requires an improved understanding of how vaccination affects the growth and spread of the bacteria within the host. We have combined in vivo tracking of molecularly tagged bacterial subpopulations with mathematical modelling to gain a novel insight into how different classes of vaccines and branches of the immune response protect against secondary Salmonella enterica infections of the mouse. We have found that a live Salmonella vaccine significantly reduced bacteraemia during a secondary challenge and restrained inter-organ spread of the bacteria in the systemic organs. Further, fitting mechanistic models to the data indicated that live vaccine immunisation enhanced both the bacterial killing in the very early stages of the infection and bacteriostatic control over the first day post-challenge. T-cell immunity induced by this vaccine is not necessary for the enhanced bacteriostasis but is required for subsequent bactericidal clearance of Salmonella in the blood and tissues. Conversely, a non-living vaccine while able to enhance initial blood clearance and killing of virulent secondary challenge bacteria, was unable to alter the subsequent bacterial growth rate in the systemic organs, did not prevent the resurgence of extensive bacteraemia and failed to control the spread of the bacteria in the body.

  5. Colistimethate sodium for the treatment of chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis: an evidence-based review of its place in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koerner-Rettberg C

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cordula Koerner-Rettberg, Manfred Ballmann Department of Pediatric Pneumology, University Children’s Hospital of Ruhr University Bochum at St Josef-Hospital, Bochum, Germany Abstract: Chronic bacterial respiratory-tract infections are a major driving force in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease and promote chronic lung-function decline, destruction, and progression to respiratory failure at a premature age. Gram-negative bacteria colonizing the airways in CF are a major problem in CF therapy due to their tendency to develop a high degree of resistance to antibiotic agents over time. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominating bacterial strain infecting the CF lung from early childhood on, and multiresistant strains frequently develop after years of therapy. Colistin has been used for treating pulmonary bacterial infections in CF for decades due to its very good Gram-negative activity. However, drawbacks include concerns regarding toxicity when being applied systemically, and the lack of approval for application by inhalation in the USA for many years. Other antibiotic substances for systemic use are available with good to excellent Gram-negative and anti-Pseudomonas activity, while there are only three substances approved for inhalation use in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infection with proven benefit in CF. The emergence of multiresistant strains leaving nearly no antibiotic substance as a treatment option, the limited number of antibiotics with high activity against P. aeruginosa, the concerns about increasing the risk of antibiotic resistance by continuous antibiotic therapy, the development of new drug formulations and drug-delivery devices, and, finally, the differing treatment strategies used in CF centers call for defining the place of this “old” drug, colistimethate, in today’s CF therapy. This article reviews the available evidence to reflect on the place of colistimethate sodium in the therapy of chronic

  6. Regulatory T cell suppressive potency dictates the balance between bacterial proliferation and clearance during persistent Salmonella infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner M Johanns

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of persistent infection is dictated by the balance between opposing immune activation and suppression signals. Herein, virulent Salmonella was used to explore the role and potential importance of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells in dictating the natural progression of persistent bacterial infection. Two distinct phases of persistent Salmonella infection are identified. In the first 3-4 weeks after infection, progressively increasing bacterial burden was associated with delayed effector T cell activation. Reciprocally, at later time points after infection, reductions in bacterial burden were associated with robust effector T cell activation. Using Foxp3(GFP reporter mice for ex vivo isolation of regulatory T cells, we demonstrate that the dichotomy in infection tempo between early and late time points is directly paralleled by drastic changes in Foxp3(+ Treg suppressive potency. In complementary experiments using Foxp3(DTR mice, the significance of these shifts in Treg suppressive potency on infection outcome was verified by enumerating the relative impacts of regulatory T cell ablation on bacterial burden and effector T cell activation at early and late time points during persistent Salmonella infection. Moreover, Treg expression of CTLA-4 directly paralleled changes in suppressive potency, and the relative effects of Treg ablation could be largely recapitulated by CTLA-4 in vivo blockade. Together, these results demonstrate that dynamic regulation of Treg suppressive potency dictates the course of persistent bacterial infection.

  7. A longitudinal study of lung bacterial pathogens in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    C. Alanin, M.; G. Nielsen, K.; von Buchwald, C.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), impaired mucociliary clearance leads to an accumulation of secretions in the airways and susceptibility to repeated bacterial infections. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial flora in non-chronic and chronic infections i...

  8. Development of fatal intestinal inflammation in MyD88 deficient mice co-infected with helminth and bacterial enteropathogens.

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    Libo Su

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Infections with intestinal helminth and bacterial pathogens, such as enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, continue to be a major global health threat for children. To determine whether and how an intestinal helminth parasite, Heligomosomoides polygyrus, might impact the TLR signaling pathway during the response to a bacterial enteropathogen, MyD88 knockout and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were infected with H. polygyrus, the bacterial enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium, or both. We found that MyD88 knockout mice co-infected with H. polygyrus and C. rodentium developed more severe intestinal inflammation and elevated mortality compared to the wild-type mice. The enhanced susceptibility to C. rodentium, intestinal injury and mortality of the co-infected MyD88 knockout mice were found to be associated with markedly reduced intestinal phagocyte recruitment, decreased expression of the chemoattractant KC, and a significant increase in bacterial translocation. Moreover, the increase in bacterial infection and disease severity were found to be correlated with a significant downregulation of antimicrobial peptide expression in the intestinal tissue in co-infected MyD88 knockout mice. Our results suggest that the MyD88 signaling pathway plays a critical role for host defense and survival during helminth and enteric bacterial co-infection.

  9. Nutritional status in chronically hospitalized stroke patients complicated with pulmonary infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Maomao Han; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    Complicated pulmonary infection following stroke has traditionally been considered an aspirated infection by many physicians, and little attention has been paid to concomitant protein-energy malnutrition. In the present study, we hypothesized that protein-energy malnutrition may be present in hospitalized chronic stroke patients complicated with pulmonary infection. The results revealed that body protein and fat stores were significantly depleted in stroke patients with pulmonary infection. Protein-energy malnutrition was present in 12 of 27 patients with pulmonary infection. In comparison, only eight of 42 stroke patients without pulmonary infection exhibited protein-energy malnutrition. A significantly higher prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition was found in the pulmonary infection group, suggesting that protein-energy malnutrition is more likely to be present in hospitalized chronic stroke patients with pulmonary infection.

  10. (68) Ga-labeled Ciprofloxacin Conjugates as Radiotracers for Targeting Bacterial Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satpati, Drishty; Arjun, Chanda; Krishnamohan, Repaka; Samuel, Grace; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2016-05-01

    With an aim of developing a bacteria-specific molecular imaging agent, ciprofloxacin has been modified with a propylamine spacer and linked to two common bifunctional chelators, p-SCN-Bz-DOTA and p-SCN-Bz-NOTA. The two ciprofloxacin conjugates, CP-PA-SCN-Bz-DOTA (1) and CP-PA-SCN-Bz-NOTA (2), were radiolabeled with (68)Ga in >90% radiochemical yield and were moderately stable in vitro for 4 h. The efficacy of (68)Ga-1 and (68)Ga-2 has been investigated in vitro in Staphylococcus aureus cells where bacterial binding of the radiotracers (0.9-1.0% for (68)Ga-1 and 1.6-2.3% for (68)Ga-2) could not be blocked in the presence of excess amount of unlabeled ciprofloxacin. However, uptake of radiotracers in live bacterial cells was significantly higher (p 68)Ga-1 and (68)Ga-2 was tested in vivo in rats where the infected muscle-to-inflamed muscle ((68)Ga-1: 2 ± 0.2, (68)Ga-2: 3 ± 0.5) and infected muscle-to-normal muscle ratios ((68)Ga-1: 3 ± 0.4, (68)Ga-2: 6.6 ± 0.8) were found to improve at 120 min p.i. Fast blood clearance and renal excretion was observed for both the radiotracers. The two (68)Ga-labeled infection targeting radiotracers could discriminate between bacterial infection and inflammation in vivo and are worthy of further detailed investigation as infection imaging agents at the clinical level.

  11. Metabolic Requirements of Escherichia coli in Intracellular Bacterial Communities during Urinary Tract Infection Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt S. Conover

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is the primary etiological agent of over 85% of community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs. Mouse models of infection have shown that UPEC can invade bladder epithelial cells in a type 1 pilus-dependent mechanism, avoid a TLR4-mediated exocytic process, and escape into the host cell cytoplasm. The internalized UPEC can clonally replicate into biofilm-like intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs of thousands of bacteria while avoiding many host clearance mechanisms. Importantly, IBCs have been documented in urine from women and children suffering acute UTI. To understand this protected bacterial niche, we elucidated the transcriptional profile of bacteria within IBCs using microarrays. We delineated the upregulation within the IBC of genes involved in iron acquisition, metabolism, and transport. Interestingly, lacZ was highly upregulated, suggesting that bacteria were sensing and/or utilizing a galactoside for metabolism in the IBC. A ΔlacZ strain displayed significantly smaller IBCs than the wild-type strain and was attenuated during competitive infection with a wild-type strain. Similarly, a galK mutant resulted in smaller IBCs and attenuated infection. Further, analysis of the highly upregulated gene yeaR revealed that this gene contributes to oxidative stress resistance and type 1 pilus production. These results suggest that bacteria within the IBC are under oxidative stress and, consistent with previous reports, utilize nonglucose carbon metabolites. Better understanding of the bacterial mechanisms used for IBC development and establishment of infection may give insights into development of novel anti-virulence strategies.

  12. Identification and expression profiles of multiple genes in Nile tilapia in response to bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pridgeon, Julia W; Aksoy, Mediha; Klesius, Phillip H; Li, Yuehong; Mu, Xingjiang; Srivastava, Kunwar; Reddy, Gopal

    2011-11-15

    To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in response of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to bacterial infection, suppression subtractive cDNA hybridization technique was used to identify upregulated genes in the posterior kidney of Nile tilapia at 6h post infection with Aeromonas hydrophila. A total of 31 unique expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified from 192 clones of the subtractive cDNA library. Quantitative PCR revealed that nine of the 31 ESTs were significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with A. hydrophila at an injection dose of 10(5)CFU per fish (≈ 20% mortality). Of the nine upregulated genes, four were also significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with A. hydrophila at an injection dose of 10(6)CFU per fish (≈ 60% mortality). Of the four genes induced by A. hydrophila at both injection doses, three were also significantly (ptilapia at 6h post infection with Streptococcus iniae at doses of 10(6) and at 10(5)CFU per fish (≈ 70% and ≈ 30% mortality, respectively). The three genes induced by both bacteria included EST 2A05 (similar to adenylate kinase domain containing protein 1), EST 2G11 (unknown protein, shared similarity with Salmo salar IgH locus B genomic sequence with e value of 0.02), and EST 2H04 (unknown protein). Significant upregulation of these genes in Nile tilapia following bacterial infections suggested that they might play important roles in host response to infections of A. hydrophila and S. iniae.

  13. The red flour beetle as a model for bacterial oral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Milutinović

    Full Text Available Experimental infection systems are important for studying antagonistic interactions and coevolution between hosts and their pathogens. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and the spore-forming bacterial insect pathogen Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt are widely used and tractable model organisms. However, they have not been employed yet as an efficient experimental system to study host-pathogen interactions. We used a high throughput oral infection protocol to infect T. castaneum insects with coleopteran specific B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis (Btt bacteria. We found that larval mortality depends on the dietary spore concentration and on the duration of exposure to the spores. Furthermore, differential susceptibility of larvae from different T. castaneum populations indicates that the host genetic background influences infection success. The recovery of high numbers of infectious spores from the cadavers indicates successful replication of bacteria in the host and suggests that Btt could establish infectious cycles in T. castaneum in nature. We were able to transfer plasmids from Btt to a non-pathogenic but genetically well-characterised Bt strain, which was thereafter able to successfully infect T. castaneum, suggesting that factors residing on the plasmids are important for the virulence of Btt. The availability of a genetically accessible strain will provide an ideal model for more in-depth analyses of pathogenicity factors during oral infections. Combined with the availability of the full genome sequence of T. castaneum, this system will enable analyses of host responses during infection, as well as addressing basic questions concerning host-parasite coevolution.

  14. Foreign Body Infection Models to Study Host-Pathogen Response and Antimicrobial Tolerance of Bacterial Biofilm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Nowakowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The number of implanted medical devices is steadily increasing and has become an effective intervention improving life quality, but still carries the risk of infection. These infections are mainly caused by biofilm-forming staphylococci that are difficult to treat due to the decreased susceptibility to both antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. To understand the particular pathogenesis and treatment tolerance of implant-associated infection (IAI animal models that closely resemble human disease are needed. Applications of the tissue cage and catheter abscess foreign body infection models in the mouse will be discussed herein. Both models allow the investigation of biofilm and virulence of various bacterial species and a comprehensive insight into the host response at the same time. They have also been proven to serve as very suitable tools to study the anti-adhesive and anti-infective efficacy of different biomaterial coatings. The tissue cage model can additionally be used to determine pharmacokinetics, efficacy and cytotoxicity of antimicrobial compounds as the tissue cage fluid can be aspirated repeatedly without the need to sacrifice the animal. Moreover, with the advance in innovative imaging systems in rodents, these models may offer new diagnostic measures of infection. In summary, animal foreign body infection models are important tools in the development of new antimicrobials against IAI and can help to elucidate the complex interactions between bacteria, the host immune system, and prosthetic materials.

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin for the imaging of bacterial infections with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, Oliver; Brunner, Martin; Zeitlinger, Markus; Mueller, Ulrich; Lackner, Edith; Joukhadar, Christian; Mueller, Markus [Medical University Vienna, Division of Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Vienna (Austria); Ziegler, Sophie; Minar, Erich [Medical University Vienna, Division of Angiology, Department of Internal Medicine II, Vienna (Austria); Dobrozemsky, Georg [Medical University Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria); Medical University Vienna, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Vienna (Austria); Mitterhauser, Markus; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Dudczak, Robert; Kletter, Kurt [Medical University Vienna, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2005-02-01

    The suitability of the{sup 18}F-labelled fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin ([{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin) for imaging of bacterial infections with positron emission tomography (PET) was assessed in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro experiments, suspensions of various E. colistrains were incubated with different concentrations of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin (0.01-5.0 {mu}g/ml) and radioactivity retention was measured in a gamma counter. For the in vivo experiments, 725 {+-} 9 MBq [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin was injected intravenously into four patients with microbiologically proven bacterial soft tissue infections of the lower extremities and time-radioactivity curves were recorded in infected and uninfected tissue for 5 h after tracer injection. Binding of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin to bacterial cells was rapid, non-saturable and readily reversible. Moreover, bacterial binding of the agent was similar in ciprofloxacin-resistant and ciprofloxacin-susceptible clinical isolates. These findings suggest that non-specific binding rather than specific binding to bacterial type II topoisomerase enzymes is the predominant mechanism of bacterial retention of the radiotracer. PET studies in the four patients with microbiologically proven bacterial soft tissue infections demonstrated locally increased radioactivity uptake in infected tissue, with peak ratios between infected and uninfected tissue ranging from 1.8 to 5.5. Radioactivity was not retained in infected tissue and appeared to wash out with a similar elimination half-life as in uninfected tissue, suggesting that the kinetics of [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin in infected tissue are governed by increased blood flow and vascular permeability due to local infection rather than by a binding process. Taken together, our results indicate that [{sup 18}F]ciprofloxacin is not suited as a bacteria-specific infection imaging agent for PET. (orig.)

  16. Clinical prediction model to aid emergency doctors managing febrile children at risk of serious bacterial infections: Diagnostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G. Nijman (Ruud); Y. Vergouwe (Yvonne); M.J. Thompson (Matthew); M.V. Veen (Mirjam Van); A.H.J. van Meurs (Alfred); J. van der Lei (Johan); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); R. Oostenbrink (Rianne)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To derive, cross validate, and externally validate a clinical prediction model that assesses the risks of different serious bacterial infections in children with fever at the emergency department. Design: Prospective observational diagnostic study. Setting: Three paediatric em

  17. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  18. UGT-29 protein expression and localization during bacterial infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is routinely used as an animal model to delineate complex molecular mechanisms involved in the host response to pathogen infection. Following up on an earlier study on host-pathogen interaction, we constructed a ugt-29::GFP transcriptional fusion transgenic worm strain to examine UGT-29 protein expression and localization upon bacterial infection. UGT-29 orthologs can be found in higher organisms including humans and is proposed as a member of the UDP-Glucoronosyl Transferase family of proteins which are involved in phase II detoxification of compounds detrimental to the host organism. Under uninfected conditions, UGT-29::GFP fusion protein was highly expressed in the C. elegans anterior pharynx and intestine, two major organs involved in detoxification. We further evaluated the localization of the enzyme in worms infected with the bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The infected ugt-29::GFP transgenic strain exhibited increased fluorescence in the pharynx and intestine with pronounced fluorescence also extending to body wall muscle. This transcriptional fusion GFP transgenic worm is a convenient and direct tool to provide information on UGT detoxification enzyme gene expression and could be a useful tool for a number of diverse applications.

  19. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilé eLópez Hernández

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as a valuate tools to explore host-pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio, and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g. Caenorhabditis elegans in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favour of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host-pathogen interactions.

  20. Hepatitis C virus quasispecies and pseudotype analysis from acute infection to chronicity in HIV-1 co-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, R Bridget; Tarr, Alexander W; Hue, Stephane; Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Gilson, Richard; Ball, Jonathan K; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Pillay, Deenan

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infected patients who acquire HCV infection have higher rates of chronicity and liver disease progression than patients with HCV mono-infection. Understanding early events in this pathogenic process is important. We applied single genome sequencing of the E1 to NS3 regions and viral pseudotype neutralization assays to explore the consequences of viral quasispecies evolution from pre-seroconversion to chronicity in four co-infected individuals (mean follow up 566 days). We observed that one to three founder viruses were transmitted. Relatively low viral sequence diversity, possibly related to an impaired immune response, due to HIV infection was observed in three patients. However, the fourth patient, after an early purifying selection displayed increasing E2 sequence evolution, possibly related to being on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Viral pseudotypes generated from HCV variants showed relative resistance to neutralization by autologous plasma but not to plasma collected from later time points, confirming ongoing virus escape from antibody neutralization.

  1. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhen Mikael

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis

  2. Fungal and Bacterial Infection Mitigation with Antibiotic and Antifungal Loaded Biopolymer Sponges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Ashley Cox

    Musculoskeletal injuries are some of the most prevalent injuries in both civilian and military populations and their infections can be difficult to treat, often resulting in multiple surgeries and increased costs. In both previous and recent military operations, extremity injuries have been the most common battlefield injuries and many involve complex, open fractures. These extremity injuries are especially susceptible to multiple pathogenic, and sometimes drug resistant, bacteria and fungi. Fungal infections have recently become increasingly problematic in both military and civilian populations and have significantly higher amputation rates than those from bacterial infections. Many of these bacterial and fungal strains adhere to tissue and implanted orthopaedic hardware within wounds, forming biofilms. These problematic, often polymicrobial, infections threaten the health of the patient, but the risk also exists of spreading within hospitals to become prominent resistant infections. Local antimicrobial delivery releases high levels of antimicrobials directly to injured wound tissue, overcoming sub-bactericidal or subfungicidal antimicrobial levels present in the avascular wound zones. This research will determine the ability of modified chitosan sponges, buffered with sodium acetate or blended with polyethylene glycol (PEG), to act as short term adjunctive therapies to initial surgical treatment for delivering both antibiotics and/or antifungals for early abatement of infection. The objective of this work was to evaluate both types of modified sponges for in vitro and in vivo material characteristics and device functionality. In vitro analysis demonstrated both the buffered and PEG modified chitosan sponges exhibited increased degradation and functional cytocompatibility. The chitosan/PEG sponges were able to be loaded with hydrophobic antifungals and the sponges released in vitro biologically active concentrations, alone or in combination with the antibiotic

  3. Synthesis and biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in a model of bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roohi, S.; Mushtaq, A. [Isotope Production Div., Pakistan Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Malik, S.A. [Dept. of Biological Sciences, Quaid-e-Azam Univ., Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2005-07-01

    Vancomycin Hydrochloride is an antibiotic produced by the growth of certain strains of Streptomyces orientalis. As vancomycin hydrochloride is poorly absorbed after oral administration; it is given intravenously for therapy of systemic infections. Vancomycin was labeled with technetium-99m pertechnetate using SnCl{sub 2} . 2H{sub 2}O as reducing agent. The labeling efficiency depends on ligand/reductant ratio, pH, and volume of reaction mixture. Radiochemical purity and stability of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was determined by thin layer chromatography. Biodistribution studies of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin were performed in a model of bacterial infection in Sprague-Dawley rats. A significantly higher accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin was seen at sites of S. aureus infected animals. Whereas uptake of {sup 99m}Tc-Vancomycin in turpentine inflamed rats were quite low. (orig.)

  4. Osteomyelitis in a Paleozoic reptile: ancient evidence for bacterial infection and its evolutionary significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Robert R.; Scott, Diane M.; Pynn, Bruce R.; Modesto, Sean P.

    2011-06-01

    We report on dental and mandibular pathology in Labidosaurus hamatus, a 275 million-year-old terrestrial reptile from North America and associate it with bacterial infection in an organism that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement. Analysis of the surface and internal mandibular structure using mechanical and CT-scanning techniques permits the reconstruction of events that led to the pathology and the possible death of the individual. The infection probably occurred as a result of prolonged exposure of the dental pulp cavity to oral bacteria, and this exposure was caused by injury to the tooth in an animal that is characterized by reduced tooth replacement cycles. In these early reptiles, the reduction in tooth replacement is an evolutionary innovation associated with strong implantation and increased oral processing. The dental abscess observed in L. hamatus, the oldest known infection in a terrestrial vertebrate, provides clear evidence of the ancient association between terrestrial vertebrates and their oral bacteria.

  5. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and post-liver transplantation diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Ma; Wen-Wei Yan

    2005-01-01

    Patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have a significantly increased prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus compared to controls or HBV-infected patients.Moreover, the incidence rate of post-liver transplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM) also appears to be higher among patients with HCV infection. PTDM is often associated with direct viral infection, autoimmune disorders, and immunosuppressive regimen. Activation of tumor necrosis factor-α may be the link between HCV infection and diabetes. In this article, we reviewed the epidemiologic association between HCV infection and PTDM, highlighting the most recent pathophysiologic insights into the mechanisms underlying this association.

  6. Metabolic Manifestations and Complications Associated With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Robert J; Gish, Robert G

    2016-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with many extrahepatic manifestations that contribute to morbidity and mortality. It is especially important to be aware of metabolic manifestations and serious complications that affect other organs and cancer risks. Chronic HCV infection itself contributes to de novo development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis, both of which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Through these metabolic pathways (as well as through other hypothesized mechanisms that involve lipid metabolism, systemic inflammatory signals, and endothelial dysfunction), chronic HCV infection also contributes to significant systemic cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While chronic HCV infection contributes to incident development of metabolic complications, the presence of concurrent metabolic diseases also contributes to disease progression, such as higher risks of hepatocellular carcinoma and progression to advanced fibrosis, among patients with chronic HCV infection. The implications of these observations are particularly important given the rising prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, concurrent nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, either as a result of underlying metabolic syndrome or as a direct result of HCV-induced fatty liver disease, further complicates the management of chronic HCV-infected patients. Greater awareness is needed toward the systemic manifestations of chronic HCV infection, with focused attention on the associated metabolic manifestations and complications. Successful treatment and cure of chronic HCV infection with the currently available, highly effective antiviral therapies will significantly improve long-term outcomes among these patients. It is also important to recognize and address the associated metabolic manifestations and complications to reduce cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality.

  7. Clinical features of bacterial vaginosis in a murine model of vaginal infection with Gardnerella vaginalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Gilbert

    Full Text Available Bacterial vaginosis (BV is a dysbiosis of the vaginal flora characterized by a shift from a Lactobacillus-dominant environment to a polymicrobial mixture including Actinobacteria and gram-negative bacilli. BV is a common vaginal condition in women and is associated with increased risk of sexually transmitted infection and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm birth. Gardnerella vaginalis is one of the most frequently isolated bacterial species in BV. However, there has been much debate in the literature concerning the contribution of G. vaginalis to the etiology of BV, since it is also present in a significant proportion of healthy women. Here we present a new murine vaginal infection model with a clinical isolate of G. vaginalis. Our data demonstrate that this model displays key features used clinically to diagnose BV, including the presence of sialidase activity and exfoliated epithelial cells with adherent bacteria (reminiscent of clue cells. G. vaginalis was capable of ascending uterine infection, which correlated with the degree of vaginal infection and level of vaginal sialidase activity. The host response to G. vaginalis infection was characterized by robust vaginal epithelial cell exfoliation in the absence of histological inflammation. Our analyses of clinical specimens from women with BV revealed a measureable epithelial exfoliation response compared to women with normal flora, a phenotype that, to our knowledge, is measured here for the first time. The results of this study demonstrate that G. vaginalis is sufficient to cause BV phenotypes and suggest that this organism may contribute to BV etiology and associated complications. This is the first time vaginal infection by a BV associated bacterium in an animal has been shown to parallel the human disease with regard to clinical diagnostic features. Future studies with this model should facilitate investigation of important questions regarding BV etiology, pathogenesis and

  8. Phage Therapy in Bacterial Infections Treatment: One Hundred Years After the Discovery of Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisek, Agata Anna; Dąbrowska, Iwona; Gregorczyk, Karolina Paulina; Wyżewski, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    The therapeutic use of bacteriophages has seen a renewal of interest blossom in the last few years. This reversion is due to increased difficulties in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria. Bacterial resistance to antibiotics, a serious problem in contemporary medicine, does not implicate resistance to phage lysis mechanisms. Lytic bacteriophages are able to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria at the end of the phage infection cycle. Thus, the development of phage therapy is potentially a way to improve the treatment of bacterial infections. However, there are antibacterial phage therapy difficulties specified by broadening the knowledge of the phage nature and influence on the host. It has been shown during experiments that both innate and adaptive immunity are involved in the clearance of phages from the body. Immunological reactions against phages are related to the route of administration and may vary depending on the type of bacterial viruses. For that reason, it is very important to test the immunological response of every single phage, particularly if intravenous therapy is being considered. The lack of these data in previous years was one of the reasons for phage therapy abandonment despite its century-long study. Promising results of recent research led us to look forward to a phage therapy that can be applied on a larger scale and subsequently put it into practice.

  9. Piperine metabolically regulates peritoneal resident macrophages to potentiate their functions against bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Xu, Li-Hui; Huang, Mei-Yun; Zha, Qing-Bing; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Hou, Xiao-Feng; Shi, Zi-Jian; Lin, Qiu-Ru; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2015-10-20

    Pepper, a daily-used seasoning for promoting appetite, is widely used in folk medicine for treating gastrointestinal diseases. Piperine is the major alkaloid in pepper and possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. However, the mechanism for linking metabolic and medicinal activities of piperine remains unknown. Here we report that piperine robustly boosts mTORC1 activity by recruiting more system L1 amino acid transporter (SLC7A5/SLC3A2) to the cell membrane, thus promoting amino acid metabolism. Piperine-induced increase of mTORC1 activity in resident peritoneal macrophages (pMΦs) is correlated with enhanced production of IL-6 and TNF-α upon LPS stimulation. Such an enhancement of cytokine production could be abrogated by inhibitors of the mTOR signaling pathway, indicating mTOR's action in this process. Moreover, piperine treatment protected resident pMΦs from bacterium-induced apoptosis and disappearance, and increased their bacterial phagocytic ability. Consequently, piperine administration conferred mice resistance against bacterial infection and even sepsis. Our data highlight that piperine has the capacity to metabolically reprogram peritoneal resident macrophages to fortify their innate functions against bacterial infection.

  10. Clinical evaluation of technetium-99m infecton for the localisation of bacterial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, K.E. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Vinjamuri, S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Hall, A.V. [Medical Microbiology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Solanki, K. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Siraj, Q.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bomanji, J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Das, S. [Medical Microbiology, St. Bartholomew`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-05-01

    The aim of the study was to distinguish infection from inflammation in patients with suspected infection using technetium-99m Infecton. Ninety-nine patients (102 studies) referred for infection evaluation underwent imaging with 400 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-Infecton at 1 and 4 h. Most patients had appropriate microbiological tests and about half (56) had radiolabelled white cell scans as well. No adverse effects were noted in any patient. The clinical efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-Infecton depended in part on whether imaging was undertaken during antibiotic therapy for infection or not. In consultation with the microbiologist, 5-14 days of appropriate and successful antibiotic therapy was considered adequate to classify some results as true-negatives. The figures for sensitivity and specificity of {sup 99m}Tc-Infecton for active or unsuccessfully treated infection were 83% and 91% respectively. It is concluded that {sup 99m}Tc-Infecton imaging contributed to the differential diagnosis of inflammation. It is being used as the first imaging modality when bacterial infection is suspected. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Morphological description of bacterial infection of digestive glands in the terrestrial isopod porcellio scaber (Isopoda, crustacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobne; Strus; Znidarsic; Zidar

    1999-01-01

    Morphological studies of the hepatopancreas of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber revealed bacterial infection. The percentage of infected animals collected from the same site varied from 0 to 10% during the 4 years of study. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy revealed that infected glands differed from those in healthy isopods. The most prominent sign was white spots between 100 and 200 &mgr;m in diameter along the entire gland. These spots were aggregations of vacuoles in the cells that were densely filled with bacteria in different phases of the developmental cycle that included the formation of small, dense, rod-shaped infective bacteria and much larger spherical multiplying cells filled with aggregates of polysomes and a chromatin network. Occasionally, large sphericles were filled with homogeneous electron-dense material. Bacteria were not observed in the cell nucleus. Small vacuoles of less than 5 &mgr;m were filled predominately with spherical bacteria but rod-shaped forms were also present in large numbers. Larger vacuoles of 10 to 20 &mgr;m in the main were densely filled with rod-shaped bacteria. According to the literature on the morphological characteristics of bacteria infecting invertebrates, those described in our study would be classified in the genus Rickettsiella. However, most recent investigations show that besides morphological investigations, genetic ones are also needed to define the taxonomic position of bacteria that infect invertebrates. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Infections associated with chronic granulomatous disease: linking genetics to phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ari, Josef; Wolach, Ofir; Gavrieli, Ronit; Wolach, Baruch

    2012-08-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited primary immunodeficiency characterized by the absence or malfunction of the NADPH oxidase in phagocytic cells. As a result, there is an impaired ability to generate superoxide anions and the subsequent reactive oxygen intermediates. Consequently, CGD patients suffer from two clinical manifestations: recurrent, life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and excessive inflammatory reactions leading to granulomatous lesions. Although the genotype of CGD was linked to the phenotypic expression of the disease, this connection is still controversial and poorly understood. Certain correlations were reported, but the clinical expression of the disease is usually unpredictable, regardless of the pattern of inheritance. CGD mainly affects the lungs, lymph nodes, skin, GI tract and liver. Patients are particularly susceptible to catalase-positive microorganisms, including Staphyloccocus aureus, Nocardia spp. and Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia marcescens, Burkholderia cepacea and Salmonella spp. Unusually, catalase-negative microorganisms were reported as well. New antibacterial and antimycotic agents considerably improved the prognosis of CGD. Therapy with IFN-γ is still controversial. Bone marrow stem cell transplantation is currently the only curative treatment and gene therapy needs further development. In this article, the authors discuss the genetic, functional and molecular aspects of CGD and their impact on the clinical expression, infectious complications and the hyperinflammatory state.

  13. Mortality in patients with chronic and cleared hepatitis C viral infection: a nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Lars Haukali; Krarup, Henrik; Jepsen, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    It is unknown whether mortality differs between patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication and those who cleared the virus after infection. We examined the impact of chronic HCV replication on mortality among Danish patients testing positive for HCV antibodies....

  14. Phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yun, Xia; Luo, Hui; Liu, Jian Ping

    2013-01-01

    Phyllanthus species for patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection have been assessed in clinical trials, but no consensus regarding their usefulness exists. When compared with placebo or no intervention, we were unable to identify convincing evidence that phyllanthus species...... are beneficial in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Some randomised clinical trials have compared phyllanthus species versus antiviral drugs....

  15. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection in mice induces chronic lung inflammation, iBALT formation, and fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhulika Jupelli

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP lung infection can induce chronic lung inflammation and is associated with not only acute asthma but also COPD exacerbations. However, in mouse models of CP infection, most studies have investigated specifically the acute phase of the infection and not the longer-term chronic changes in the lungs. We infected C57BL/6 mice with 5 × 10(5 CP intratracheally and monitored inflammation, cellular infiltrates and cytokine levels over time to investigate the chronic inflammatory lung changes. While bacteria numbers declined by day 28, macrophage numbers remained high through day 35. Immune cell clusters were detected as early as day 14 and persisted through day 35, and stained positive for B, T, and follicular dendritic cells, indicating these clusters were inducible bronchus associated lymphoid tissues (iBALTs. Classically activated inflammatory M1 macrophages were the predominant subtype early on while alternatively activated M2 macrophages increased later during infection. Adoptive transfer of M1 but not M2 macrophages intratracheally 1 week after infection resulted in greater lung inflammation, severe fibrosis, and increased numbers of iBALTS 35 days after infection. In summary, we show that CP lung infection in mice induces chronic inflammatory changes including iBALT formations as well as fibrosis. These observations suggest that the M1 macrophages, which are part of the normal response to clear acute C. pneumoniae lung infection, result in an enhanced acute response when present in excess numbers, with greater inflammation, tissue injury, and severe fibrosis.

  16. Comparative study between occult hepatitis C virus infection and chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, M; López-Alcorocho, J M; Rodríguez-Iñigo, E; Castillo, I; Carreño, V

    2007-01-01

    We have recently described the presence of occult hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (HCV-RNA in liver in the absence of anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA) in patients with persistently abnormal liver function tests of unknown aetiology. The aim of this study was to compare the characteristics of patients with occult HCV infection vs those of patients with chronic hepatitis C. We compared clinical features of 68 patients with occult HCV infection and 69 untreated chronic HCV patients (anti-HCV and serum HCV-RNA positive), matched for age, gender, duration of abnormal liver function tests and body mass index. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were higher (P HCV, but cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly higher in patients with occult HCV infection (P HCV patients had higher gamma-globulin (P = 0.005), alpha-foetoprotein (P HCV than in occult HCV infection. Mean percentage of infected hepatocytes was higher (P = 0.001) in chronic HCV (10.1%) than in occult HCV infection (5.3%). This occult HCV infection is a milder disease than chronic HCV, and this could be related to the significantly lower number of infected hepatocytes observed in occult HCV.

  17. Innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV/HIV-1 co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Landay, Alan L; Sandberg, Johan K

    2010-04-01

    Innate immune responses are critical in the defense against viral infections. NK cells, myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and invariant CD1d-restricted NKT cells mediate both effector and regulatory functions in this early immune response. In chronic uncontrolled viral infections such as HCV and HIV-1, these essential immune functions are compromised and can become a double edged sword contributing to the immunopathogenesis of viral disease. In particular, recent findings indicate that innate immune responses play a central role in the chronic immune activation which is a primary driver of HIV-1 disease progression. HCV/HIV-1 co-infection is affecting millions of people and is associated with faster viral disease progression. Here, we review the role of innate immunity and chronic immune activation in HCV and HIV-1 infection, and discuss how mechanisms of innate immunity may influence protection as well as immunopathogenesis in the HCV/HIV-1 co-infected human host.

  18. Zabofloxacin for chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocsis, B; Szabo, D

    2016-09-01

    Treatment of lower respiratory tract infection poses as an ongoing challenge among respiratory tract diseases. Bacterial infections are causes of acute exacerbations in chronic bronchitis and indications for antibacterial therapy. Several antibiotics were applied to treat bacterial infections in chronic bronchitis, among them fluoroquinolones are considered potent, broad-spectrum agents with excellent tissue penetration. This monograph focuses on zabofloxacin, a novel fluoroquinolone agent recently approved and launched in South Korea, and summarizes the drug's antibacterial efficacy, pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity. Recent advances concerning fluoroquinolones in chronic bronchitis will be discussed, along with a comparison between zabofloxacin and moxifloxacin. Zabofloxacin has proved to be noninferior to moxifloxacin against major community-acquired Gram-positive and Gram-negative respiratory tract pathogens and found to be well tolerated in both oral and parenteral administrations. These features can make it a potential antimicrobial agent in therapy of chronic bronchitis and other lower respiratory tract infections.

  19. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients: implications for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang; Høiby, Niels

    2012-07-01

    During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated by genetic variation. Mucoidy, hypermutability and acquirement of mutational antibiotic resistance are important adaptive phenotypes that are selected during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. This review dicsusses the role played by these phenotypes for the tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and show that mucoidy and hypermutability change the architecture of in vitro formed biofilms and lead to increase tolerance to antibiotics. Production of high levels of beta-lactamase impairs penetration of beta-lactam antibiotics due to inactivation of the antibiotic. In conclusion, these data underline the importance of biofilm prevention strategies by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy before phenotypic diversification during chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis.

  20. Analysis of Campylobacter jejuni infection in the gnotobiotic piglet and genome-wide identification of bacterial factors required for infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Linn, Aileen; Macleod, Kareen; MacCallum, Amanda; Hardy, Simon P.; Douce, Gill; Watson, Eleanor; Dagleish, Mark P.; Thompson, Hal; Stevenson, Andy; Kennedy, David; Baig, Abiyad; Coward, Chris; Maskell, Duncan J.; Smith, David G. E.; Grant, Andrew J.; Everest, Paul

    2017-01-01

    To investigate how Campylobacter jejuni causes the clinical symptoms of diarrhoeal disease in humans, use of a relevant animal model is essential. Such a model should mimic the human disease closely in terms of host physiology, incubation period before onset of disease, clinical signs and a comparable outcome of disease. In this study, we used a gnotobiotic piglet model to study determinants of pathogenicity of C. jejuni. In this model, C. jejuni successfully established infection and piglets developed an increased temperature with watery diarrhoea, which was caused by a leaky epithelium and reduced bile re-absorption in the intestines. Further, we assessed the C. jejuni genes required for infection of the porcine gastrointestinal tract utilising a transposon (Tn) mutant library screen. A total of 123 genes of which Tn mutants showed attenuated piglet infection were identified. Our screen highlighted a crucial role for motility and chemotaxis, as well as central metabolism. In addition, Tn mutants of 14 genes displayed enhanced piglet infection. This study gives a unique insight into the mechanisms of C. jejuni disease in terms of host physiology and contributing bacterial factors. PMID:28281647

  1. Relationship between bacterial infection and evaluation using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Shimizu, Ayako; Narimatsu, Masahiro; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeshige, Fumio; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the relationship between bacterial infections in carious dentin when detected by two different methods -- polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent. Dentin was removed every 300 micro m in the direction of the pulp chamber in 10 extracted molars with occlusal dentin caries and 3 extracted sound molars. Dentin surfaces were evaluated using DIAGNOdent, and dentinal tissue samples were removed by using a round bur before and after each removal. Bacterial DNA in the dentinal tissues was detected by PCR, using primers based on the nucleotide sequence of a conserved region of the 16S rDNA, and yielded a PCR product of 466 bp. The rates of bacterial detection increased as the DIAGNOdent values increased. In the 10 specimens, the lowest DIAGNOdent value at which bacteria were detected was 15.6; at DIAGNOdent values below 15.6, no bacteria were detected. The results of a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for the DIAGNOdent values showed that the area under the ROC curve was 0.91. This study clarified the relationship between the DIAGNOdent values of dentin caries and the rates of bacterial detection.

  2. Elucidating Sources and Roles of Granzymes A and B during Bacterial Infection and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maykel A. Arias

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available During bacterial sepsis, proinflammatory cytokines contribute to multiorgan failure and death in a process regulated in part by cytolytic cell granzymes. When challenged with a sublethal dose of the identified mouse pathogen Brucella microti, wild-type (WT and granzyme A (gzmA−/− mice eliminate the organism from liver and spleen in 2 or 3 weeks, whereas the bacteria persist in mice lacking perforin or granzyme B as well as in mice depleted of Tc cells. In comparison, after a fatal challenge, only gzmA−/− mice exhibit increased survival, which correlated with reduced proinflammatory cytokines. Depletion of natural killer (NK cells protects WT mice from sepsis without influencing bacterial clearance and the transfer of WT, but not gzmA−/− NK, cells into gzmA−/− recipients restores the susceptibility to sepsis. Therefore, infection-related pathology, but not bacterial clearance, appears to require gzmA, suggesting the protease may be a therapeutic target for the prevention of bacterial sepsis without affecting immune control of the pathogen.

  3. Neospora caninum: Chronic and congenital infection in consecutive pregnancies of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuz, Monica L; Shkap, Varda; Wollkomirsky, Ricardo; Leibovich, Benjamin; Savitsky, Igor; Fleiderovitz, Ludmila; Noam, Sugar; Elena, Blinder; Molad, Thea; Golenser, Jacob

    2016-03-30

    Neospora caninum, the causative agent of bovine neosporosis is the major cause of abortion in cattle worldwide. The principal route of transmission is via in utero infection of the offspring. Congenitally-infected dams remain persistently infected for life and might undergo abortions in consecutive pregnancies. In the present study, the effect of N. caninum in chronic and congenital infection was examined. CD1 mice were infected intra-peritoneally with live tachyzoites of the NcIs491 isolate, while non-infected mice served as a control. There were no clinical signs of infection observed following inoculation, but high titers of specific anti- N. caninum antibodies were detected. A month after infection, when chronic-infection was established, mice were mated. Fertility, litter size and mortality rate were monitored within two generations of four consecutive pregnancies. During a nine months period of the study all females maintained high level of antibodies, while the non- infected control mice remained seronegative. There was no difference in the fertility rate of the dams, or in the litter size of infected and control mice. Mortality of offspring of the first and second generations of the infected dams was observed within the two first weeks of life. The vertical transmission was analyzed by PCR assay of offspring brains. PCR positive results were found in all 13 litters of the first generation tested during four consecutive pregnancies. The rate of vertical transmission slightly decreased in successive pregnancies being 74.2%, 59.5%, 48.1% and 40% for the first to fourth pregnancies respectively. In the second generation 21 out of 28 litters were found positive and the overall rate of vertical transmission was 28.5%. In chronically and congenitally infected dams N. caninum infection was maintained during all successive pregnancies for about 9 months. The results show that CD-1 outbred mice are a suitable model for studying chronic and congenital neosporosis.

  4. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Lilian M; Loviso, Claudia L; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K; Dionisi, Hebe M; Lozada, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  5. Diverse Bacterial Groups Contribute to the Alkane Degradation Potential of Chronically Polluted Subantarctic Coastal Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Lilian M.; Loviso, Claudia L.; Borglin, Sharon; Jansson, Janet K.; Dionisi, Hebe M.; Lozada, Mariana

    2015-11-07

    We aimed to gain insight into the alkane degradation potential of microbial communities from chronically polluted sediments of a subantarctic coastal environment using a combination of metagenomic approaches. A total of 6178 sequences annotated as alkane-1-monooxygenases (EC 1.14.15.3) were retrieved from a shotgun metagenomic dataset that included two sites analyzed in triplicate. The majority of the sequences binned with AlkB described in Bacteroidetes (32 ± 13 %) or Proteobacteria (29 ± 7 %), although a large proportion remained unclassified at the phylum level. Operational taxonomic unit (OTU)-based analyses showed small differences in AlkB distribution among samples that could be correlated with alkane concentrations, as well as with site-specific variations in pH and salinity. A number of low-abundance OTUs, mostly affiliated with Actinobacterial sequences, were found to be only present in the most contaminated samples. On the other hand, the molecular screening of a large-insert metagenomic library of intertidal sediments from one of the sampling sites identified two genomic fragments containing novel alkB gene sequences, as well as various contiguous genes related to lipid metabolism. Both genomic fragments were affiliated with the phylum Planctomycetes, and one could be further assigned to the genus Rhodopirellula due to the presence of a partial sequence of the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. This work highlights the diversity of bacterial groups contributing to the alkane degradation potential and reveals patterns of functional diversity in relation with environmental stressors in a chronically polluted, high-latitude coastal environment. In addition, alkane biodegradation genes are described for the first time in members of Planctomycetes.

  6. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren;

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 567574 Abstract Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates...

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of bacterial strains isolated from chronic apical periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminita Marutescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to investigate the microbiota of root filled teeth with apical periodontitis and to determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of microbial strains isolated from twenty nine apical lesion samples taken from patients with fibrous chronic apical lesions. The present study has highlighted the polymicrobial nature of the root canal infections and the importance of facultatively anaerobic, Gram positive bacteria found in 90.74% of the isolated microorganims. The present study has shown an increased resistance of microorganisms to conventional antibiotics, which included penicillin, erythromycin and amoxicillin, as well as tetracyclines, although the last ones have been used sparingly in the past decade. The results of antibiotic sensitivity obtained in this study underline the importance of the microbiological diagnosis and antibiotic susceptibility testing in the choice of therapeutic agents used for the treatment of chronic apical lesions. Further studies with clinical correlation of effectiveness of these antibiotics and cultures taken after administration of antibiotics as well as recording of disappearance of symptoms are also recommended.

  8. Invasive Aspergillus infections in hospitalized patients with chronic lung disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessolossky M

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Mireya Wessolossky,1 Verna L Welch,2 Ajanta Sen,1 Tara M Babu,1 David R Luke21Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA; 2Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc, Collegeville, PA, USABackground: Although invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA is more prevalent in immunocompromised patients, critical care clinicians need to be aware of the occurrence of IPA in the nontraditional host, such as a patient with chronic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to describe the IPA patient with chronic lung disease and compare the data with that of immunocompromised patients.Methods: The records of 351 patients with Aspergillus were evaluated in this single-center, retrospective study for evidence and outcomes of IPA. The outcomes of 57 patients with chronic lung disease and 56 immunocompromised patients were compared. Patients with chronic lung disease were defined by one of the following descriptive terms: emphysema, asthma, idiopathic lung disease, bronchitis, bronchiectasis, sarcoid, or pulmonary leukostasis.Results: Baseline demographics were similar between the two groups. Patients with chronic lung disease were primarily defined by emphysema (61% and asthma (18%, and immunocompromised patients primarily had malignancies (27% and bone marrow transplants (14%. A higher proportion of patients with chronic lung disease had a diagnosis of IPA by bronchoalveolar lavage versus the immunocompromised group (P < 0.03. The major risk factors for IPA were found to be steroid use in the chronic lung disease group and neutropenia and prior surgical procedures in the immunocompromised group. Overall, 53% and 69% of chronic lung disease and immunocompromised patients were cured (P = 0.14; 55% of chronic lung patients and 47% of immunocompromised patients survived one month (P = 0.75.Conclusion: Nontraditional patients with IPA, such as those with chronic lung disease, have outcomes and mortality similar to that in the

  9. The use of C-reactive protein in predicting bacterial co-Infection in children with bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Fares

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bronchiolitis is a potentially life-threatening respiratory illness commonly affecting children who are less than two years of age. Patients with viral lower respiratory tract infection are at risk for co-bacterial infection. Aim: The aim of our study was to evaluate the use of C-reactive protein (CRP in predicting bacterial co-infection in patients hospitalized for bronchiolitis and to correlate the results with the use of antibiotics. Patients and Methods: This is a prospective study that included patients diagnosed with bronchiolitis admitted to Makassed General Hospital in Beirut from October 2008 to April 2009. A tracheal aspirate culture was taken from all patients with bronchiolitis on admission to the hospital. Blood was drawn to test C-reactive protein level, white cell count, transaminases level, and blood sugar level. Results: Forty-nine patients were enrolled in the study and were divided into two groups. Group 1 included patients with positive tracheal aspirate culture and Group 2 included those with negative culture. All patients with a CRP level ≥2 mg/dL have had bacterial co-infection. White cell count, transaminases and blood sugar levels were not predictive for bacterial co-infection. The presence of bacterial co-infection increased the length of hospital stay in the first group by 2 days compared to those in the second group. Conclusion: Bacterial co-infection is frequent in infants with moderate to severe bronchiolitis and requires admission. Our data showed that a CRP level greater than 1.1 mg/dL raised suspicion for bacterial co-infection. Thus, a tracheal aspirate should be investigated microbiologically in all hospitalized patients in order to avoid unnecessary antimicrobial therapy and to shorten the duration of the hospital stay.

  10. The Effect of Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis on Semen Quality in Adult Men: A Meta-Analysis of Case-control Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yonggang; Liu, Chengcheng; Cui, Dong; Han, Guangwei; Yi, Shanhong

    2014-01-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is caused by bacterial infection and maintains a condition of lower urinary tract infection. It may be a cause of male infertility. However, studies showed inconsistent results regarding the effect of CBP on several parameters of semen. Hence, we conducted a meta-analysis to examine the effect of CBP on basic semen parameters. A systematic review was conducted with Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, and two Chinese databases (CNKI and WANG FANG) to identify relevant studies that involved the effect of CBP on semen parameters up to July 2014. Both RevMan5.2 and STATA 12.0 software were used for the statistical analysis. Based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, seven studies were included. The study illustrated that sperm vitality, sperm total motility, and the percentage of progressively motile sperm from CBP patients were significantly lower than controls (SMD(95%CI) −0.81[−1.14, −0.47], −1.00[−1.28, −0.73], −0.41 [−0.70, −0.12], P<0.05, respectively). However, CBP had no significant effect on semen volume, sperm concentration and the duration of semen liquefaction. In summary, our study revealed that there was a significant negative effect of CBP on sperm vitality, sperm total motility, and the percentage of progressively motile sperm. Additional, studies with larger number of subjects are needed. PMID:25429735

  11. Dietary fatty acids and immune response to food-borne bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Lisa M; Balan, Kannan V; Babu, Uma S

    2013-05-22

    Functional innate and acquired immune responses are required to protect the host from pathogenic bacterial infections. Modulation of host immune functions may have beneficial or deleterious effects on disease outcome. Different types of dietary fatty acids have been shown to have variable effects on bacterial clearance and disease outcome through suppression or activation of immune responses. Therefore, we have chosen to review research across experimental models and food sources on the effects of commonly consumed fatty acids on the most common food-borne pathogens, including Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp., Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Shigella sp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Staphylococcus aureus. Altogether, the compilation of literature suggests that no single fatty acid is an answer for protection from all food-borne pathogens, and further research is necessary to determine the best approach to improve disease outcomes.

  12. [Autochthonous acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Vicente, Diego; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2008-07-01

    Rapid diagnosis of acute viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system (meningitis and encephalitis) is highly important for the clinical management of the patient and helps to establish early therapy that may solve life-threatening situations, to avoid unnecessary empirical treatments, to reduce hospital stay, and to facilitate appropriate interventions in the context of public health. Molecular techniques, especially real-time polymerase chain reaction, have become the fastest and most sensitive diagnostic procedures for autochthonous viral meningitis and encephalitis, and their role is becoming increasingly important for the diagnosis and control of most frequent acute bacterial meningitides. Automatic and closed systems may encourage the widespread and systematic use of molecular techniques for the diagnosis of these neurological syndromes in most laboratories.

  13. Occult hepatitis B virus infection is not associated with disease progression of chronic hepatitis C virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junhyeon; Lee, Sang Soo; Choi, Yun Suk; Jeon, Yejoo; Chung, Jung Wha; Baeg, Joo Yeong; Si, Won Keun; Jang, Eun Sun; Kim, Jin-Wook; Jeong, Sook-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    AIM To clarify the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection (OBI) and the association between OBI and liver disease progression, defined as development of liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), worsening of Child-Pugh class, or mortality in cases of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. METHODS This prospective cohort study enrolled 174 patients with chronic HCV infection (chronic hepatitis, n = 83; cirrhosis, n = 47; HCC, n = 44), and evaluated disease progression during a mean follow-up of 38.7 mo. OBI was defined as HBV DNA positivity in 2 or more different viral genomic regions by nested polymerase chain reaction using 4 sets of primers in the S, C, P and X open reading frame of the HBV genome. RESULTS The overall OBI prevalence in chronic HCV patients at enrollment was 18.4%, with 16.9%, 25.5% and 13.6% in the chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis and HCC groups, respectively (P = 0.845). During follow-up, 52 patients showed disease progression, which was independently associated with aspartate aminotransferase > 40 IU/L, Child-Pugh score and sustained virologic response (SVR), but not with OBI positivity. In 136 patients who were not in the SVR state during the study period, OBI positivity was associated with neither disease progression, nor HCC development. CONCLUSION The prevalence of OBI in chronic HCV patients was 18.4%, and OBI was not associated with disease progression in South Koreans. PMID:27895431

  14. Quasispecies composition and diversity do not reveal any predictors for chronic classical swine fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenckel, Maria; Blome, Sandra; Beer, Martin; Höper, Dirk

    2017-03-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) can run acute, chronic, and prenatal courses in both domestic pigs and wild boar. Although chronic infections are rare events, their epidemiological impact is very high due to the long-term shedding of virus. So far, little is known about the factors that influence disease course and outcome from either the host or virus's perspective. To elucidate the viral determinants, we analyzed the role of the viral populations for the development of chronic CSF virus (CSFV) infections. Three different animal trials that had led to both chronic and acute infections were chosen for a detailed analysis by deep sequencing. The three inocula represented sub-genogroups 2.1 and 2.3, and two viruses were wild-type CSFV, one derived from an infectious cDNA clone. These viruses and samples derived from acutely and chronically infected animals were subjected to next-generation sequencing. Subsequently, the derived full-length genomes were compared at both the consensus and the quasispecies level. At consensus level, no differences were observed between the parental viruses and the viruses obtained from chronically infected animals. Despite a considerable level of variability at the quasispecies level, no indications were found for any predictive pattern with regard to the chronicity of the CSFV infections. While there might be no direct marker for chronicity, moderate virulence of some CSFV strains in itself seems to be a crucial prerequisite for the establishment of long-term infections which does not need further genetic adaption. Thus, general host and virus factors need further investigation.

  15. Detection of Fastidious Vaginal Bacteria in Women with HIV Infection and Bacterial Vaginosis

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    Caroline Mitchell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fastidious bacteria have been associated with bacterial vaginosis (BV using PCR methods. We assessed the prevalence of these bacteria in HIV-1 infected women and their relationship with vaginal pH and shedding of HIV-1 RNA. Methods. 64 cervicovaginal lavage (CVL samples were collected from 51 women. Vaginal microbiota were characterized using 8 bacterium-specific quantitative PCR assays. Results. Women with the fastidious bacteria Bacterial Vaginosis Associated Bacterium (BVAB 1, 2, and 3 showed a trend to increased HIV-1 shedding (OR 2.59–3.07, P=.14–.17. Absence of Lactobacillus crispatus (P<.005 and presence of BVAB2 (P<.001 were associated with elevated vaginal pH. BVAB1, 2, and 3 were highly specific indicators of BV in HIV-infected women, with specificities of 89%–93%. Conclusions. Fastidious bacteria (BVAB 1, 2, and 3 remain specific indicators of BV in HIV-infected women, and BVAB2 may contribute to the elevated vaginal pH that is a hallmark of this syndrome.

  16. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy.

  17. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Subhashis; Saeed, Usman; Havlichek, Daniel H; Stein, Gary E

    2015-01-01

    Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. PMID:26185459

  18. Profile of oritavancin and its potential in the treatment of acute bacterial skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra S

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subhashis Mitra, Usman Saeed, Daniel H Havlichek, Gary E Stein Department of Infectious Diseases, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA Abstract: Oritavancin, a semisynthetic derivative of the glycopeptide antibiotic chloroeremomycin, received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections caused by susceptible Gram-positive bacteria in adults in August 2014. This novel second-generation semisynthetic lipoglycopeptide antibiotic has activity against a broad spectrum of Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. Oritavancin inhibits bacterial cell wall synthesis and is rapidly bactericidal against many Gram-positive pathogens. The long half-life of this drug enables a single-dose administration. Oritavancin is not metabolized in the body, and the unchanged drug is slowly excreted by the kidneys. In two large Phase III randomized, double-blind, clinical trials, oritavancin was found to be non-inferior to vancomycin in achieving the primary composite end point in the treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections. Adverse effects noted were mostly mild with nausea, headache, and vomiting being the most common reported side effects. Oritavancin has emerged as another useful antimicrobial agent for treatment of acute Gram-positive skin and skin structure infections, including those caused by MRSA and VISA. Keywords: antibiotic, Gram-positive bacteria, MRSA, VRSA, vancomycin, MIC

  19. Novel PI3Kγ Mutation in a 44-Year-Old Man with Chronic Infections and Chronic Pelvic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoischen, Alexander; Veltman, Joris; Allsop, Stephen A.; Granadillo, Victor J. Anciano; William, Arsani; Netea, Mihai G.; Dimitrakoff, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    A 44-year-old man is presented here with 14 years of chronic purulent sinusitis, a chronic fungal rash of the scrotum, and chronic pelvic pain. Treatment with antifungal therapy resulted in symptom improvement, however he was unable to establish an effective long-term treatment regimen, resulting in debilitating symptoms. He had undergone extensive work-up without identifying a clear underlying etiology, although Candida species were cultured from the prostatic fluid. 100 genes involved in the cellular immune response were sequenced and a missense mutation was identified in the Ras-binding domain of PI3Kγ. PI3Kγ is a crucial signaling element in leukotaxis and other leukocyte functions. We hypothesize that his mutation led to his chronic infections and pelvic pain. PMID:23861857

  20. Bone SPECT/CT detection of a sequestrum in chronic-infected nonunion of the tibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jan L

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Sequestra are dead pieces of bone most often seen in long bones affected with prior or current infection. In addition to antibiotic therapy, chronic osteomyelitis with sequestration requires surgical debridement for cure. The author presents a case of tibial fracture associated with chr......Abstract: Sequestra are dead pieces of bone most often seen in long bones affected with prior or current infection. In addition to antibiotic therapy, chronic osteomyelitis with sequestration requires surgical debridement for cure. The author presents a case of tibial fracture associated...... with chronic osteomyelitis, nonunion, and the presence of a sequestrum that was detected by bone SPECT/CT.  ...

  1. Is chronic hepatitis C virus infection a risk factor for breast cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominique; Larrey; Marie-Cécile; Bozonnat; Ihab; Kain; Georges-Philippe; Pageaux; Eric; Assenat

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the prevalence of breast tumors in adult females with chronic hepatitis C virus(HCV) infection.METHODS:Prospective,single-center study,based on female outpatients consulting in a liver unit,for 1 year.The study group included females with present and/or past history of chronic infection by HCV.Patients with spontaneous recovery were excluded.Chronic hepatitis had been proved by liver biopsy in the majority of cases and/or biological markers of inflammation and fibrosis.The control group incl...

  2. Sofosbuvir and Simeprevir Treatment of a Stem Cell Transplanted Teenager With Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischler, Björn; Priftakis, Peter; Sundin, Mikael

    2016-06-01

    There have been no previous reports on the use of interferon-free combinations in pediatric patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. An infected adolescent with severe sickle cell disease underwent stem cell transplantation and subsequent treatment with sofosbuvir and simeprevir during ongoing immunosuppression. Despite the emergence of peripheral edema as a side effect, treatment was continued with sustained antiviral response.

  3. Case Report: Chronic Recurrent Unilateral Pulmonary Infection: Result of Congenital Unilateral Agenesis of Pulmonary Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Abu Saleh, Walid K; Ramchandani, Mahesh; Scheinin, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Unilateral agenesis of the pulmonary artery (UAPA) is a rare congenital anomaly. This report describes a 52-year-old female who gave a long history of chronic, recurrent, left-sided pulmonary infections related to UAPA. For many years, she was managed medically but the infection continued to recur. She eventually underwent left pneumonectomy and made a good recovery.

  4. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori does not provoke major systemic inflammation in healthy adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Fröhlich, M

    1999-01-01

    It has been suggested that chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in particular infection with virulent strains producing the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, may increase the risk of coronary heart disease by generation of a persistent low-grade inflammatory stimulus. We...

  5. Shared immune and repair markers during experimental toxoplasma chronic brain infection and schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Tomasik (Jakub); T.L. Schultz (Tracey L.); W. Kluge (Wolfgang); R.H. Yolken (Robert H.); S. Bahn (Sabine); V.B. Carruthers (Vern B.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractChronic neurologic infection with Toxoplasma gondii is relatively common in humans and is one of the strongest known risk factors for schizophrenia. Nevertheless, the exact neuropathological mechanisms linking T gondii infection and schizophrenia remain unclear. Here we utilize a mouse m

  6. Immune recovery in acute and chronic HIV infection and the impact of thymic stromal lymphopoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelpi, Marco; Hartling, Hans J; Thorsteinsson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    that promotes CD4+ T cells homeostatic polyclonal proliferation and regulates Th17/regulatory T-cell balance, immunological functions known to be affected during primary HIV infection. The aim of this study was to describe immune recovery in primary and chronic HIV infection and possible impact of TSLP. METHODS...

  7. Pattern recognition receptor responses in children with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiberg, Ida Louise; Winther, Thilde Nordmann; Paludan, Søren Riis

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that hepatitis B virus (HBV) affects the expression and function of Toll like receptors (TLRs), but data on TLR function in HBV infection are mainly from adult patients. The natural history of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is distinctly different in children...

  8. Systematic review and meta-analysis: Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signoretti, Marianna; Archibugi, Livia; Stigliano, Serena; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence on small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) is conflicting. Aim The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the prevalence of SIBO in CP and to examine the relationship of SIBO with symptoms and nutritional status. Methods Case-control and cross-sectional studies investigating SIBO in CP patients were analysed. The prevalence of positive tests was pooled across studies, and the rate of positivity between CP cases and controls was calculated. Results In nine studies containing 336 CP patients, the pooled prevalence of SIBO was 36% (95% confidence interval (CI) 17–60%) with considerable heterogeneity (I2 = 91%). A sensitivity analysis excluding studies employing lactulose breath test gave a pooled prevalence of 21.7% (95% CI 12.7–34.5%) with lower heterogeneity (I2 = 56%). The odds ratio for a positive test in CP vs controls was 4.1 (95% CI 1.6–10.4) (I2 = 59.7%). The relationship between symptoms and SIBO in CP patients varied across studies, and the treatment of SIBO was associated with clinical improvement. Conclusions One-third of CP patients have SIBO, with a significantly increased risk over controls, although results are heterogeneous, and studies carry several limitations. The impact of SIBO and its treatment in CP patients deserve further investigation.

  9. Prevalence of Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth among Chronic Pancreatitis Patients: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Therrien

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP exhibit numerous risk factors for the development of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. Objective. To determine the prevalence of SIBO in patients with CP. Methods. Prospective, single-centre case-control study conducted between January and September 2013. Inclusion criteria were age 18 to 75 years and clinical and radiological diagnosis of CP. Exclusion criteria included history of gastric, pancreatic, or intestinal surgery or significant clinical gastroparesis. SIBO was detected using a standard lactulose breath test (LBT. A healthy control group also underwent LBT. Results. Thirty-one patients and 40 controls were included. The patient group was significantly older (53.8 versus 38.7 years; P < 0.01. The proportion of positive LBTs was significantly higher in CP patients (38.7 versus 2.5%: P < 0.01. A trend toward a higher proportion of positive LBTs in women compared with men was observed (66.6 versus 27.3%; P = 0.056. The subgroups with positive and negative LBTs were comparable in demographic and clinical characteristics, use of opiates, pancreatic enzymes replacement therapy (PERT, and severity of symptoms. Conclusion. The prevalence of SIBO detected using LBT was high among patients with CP. There was no association between clinical features and the risk for SIBO.

  10. Novel bacterial phylotypes associated with the healthy feline oral cavity and feline chronic gingivostomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolieslager, Sanne M J; Bennett, David; Johnston, Norman; Riggio, Marcello P

    2013-06-01

    Feline chronic gingivostomatitis (FCGS) is a painful inflammatory disease of the oral cavity. Treatment options for FCGS are very limited and little is known regarding its aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of putative novel species in the oral cavity of cats with and without FCGS. Bacterial DNA was extracted from oral swabs and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The 16S rRNA genes of 54 clones representing distinct potentially novel species were sequenced (1202-1325 base pairs). Obtained sequences were compared to the BLAST database, aligned using the ClustalW2 alignment tool and a phylogenetic tree created. Twenty-two clones (18 from control and four from FCGS samples) had a similarity of less than 97% and were considered novel. The proportion of novel phylotypes in each group was 19.6% (control) and 2.3% (FCGS). In the derived phylogenetic tree, 15 novel phylotypes clustered together and branched away from known species and phyla. This suggests the presence of a group of novel, previously unidentified bacteria that are associated with the feline oral cavity in both health and disease.

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide inhibits influenza virus infection of human macrophages and the consequent induction of CD8+ T cell immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Vissers, M.; Kleijn, S. de; Zomer, A.L.; Kedzierska, K.; Grant, E.; Reading, P.C.; Hermans, P.W.M.; Ferwerda, G.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that infection with influenza A virus (IAV) facilitates secondary bacterial disease. However, there is a growing body of evidence that the microbial context in which IAV infection occurs can affect both innate and adaptive responses to the virus. To date, these studies have be

  12. Serum interleukin-6 in the diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinlian; Wang, Mingfang; Zhu, Yueyong; Lin, Su

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The diagnostic accuracy of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in predicting bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients remains unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis is to explore the potential diagnostic value of IL-6 in cirrhotic patients. Methods: We systematically searched PubMed, Embase (via OvidSP), Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, and Scopus for studies published from inception to October 2015. Studies were enrolled if they included assessment of the accuracy of IL-6 in the diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients and provided sufficient data to construct a 2 × 2 contingency table. Results: Totally, 535 studies were searched in the initial database and finally 6 studies involving 741 patients were included for the final analysis. The pooled sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.85 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64–0.94), 0.91 (95% CI, 0.80–0.96) and 52.89 (95% CI, 15.21–183.86), respectively. The pooled positive likelihood ratio was 8.99 (95% CI, 4.13–19.55) and the pooled negative likelihood ratio was 0.17 (95% CI, 0.07–0.43). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.92–0.96). Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests IL-6 has a high diagnostic value for the differentiation of bacterial infection in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:27741137

  13. Elevation of serum thymidine kinase 1 in a bacterial infection: canine pyometra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, H; Hagman, R; Wang, L; Eriksson, S

    2013-01-01

    Pyometra is a bacterial infection of the uterus that is common in dogs and is potentially life-threatening if delayed in diagnosis and/or treatment. Thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) is a cytosolic enzyme involved in DNA precursor synthesis, and it is also present in serum from patients with malignant diseases. TK1 has been used as a cell proliferation biomarker for many years in human medicine and recently in dogs. However, little is known regarding serum TK1 levels in individuals with bacterial infection. The objective of this study was to determine the activity of serum TK1 in dogs with pyometra and compare it with hematologic and biochemical parameters, e.g., acute phase proteins and inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein and Prostaglandin F(2α). Serum and plasma TK1 activity of 40 healthy female dogs and 54 dogs with pyometra were analyzed using an optimized [(3)H]-thymidine phosphorylation assay. TK1 activities in serum or plasma were significantly higher in dogs with pyometra as compared with healthy female dogs (mean ± SD: 4.0 ± 7.3 pmol/min/mL in the pyometra group and 1.07 ± 0.34 pmol/min/mL in healthy control group). However, there was no difference in TK1 activity between systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) positive (n = 38) and SIRS negative (n = 16) pyometra cases. Furthermore, the plasma TK1 activity decreased in six and increased in one pyometra patients (n = 10), 24 h after ovariohysterectomy. No significant correlations (P > 0.05) were found between TK1 activity and hematological or other biochemical parameters. In conclusion, the TK1 activity was significantly elevated in dogs with pyometra. Further studies are needed to evaluate the mechanism and role of serum TK1 activity in bacterial infections and its possible diagnostic or prognostic value.

  14. Viral-bacterial interactions and risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Pyles, Richard B; Miller, Aaron L; Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2011-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is a common complication of upper respiratory tract infection whose pathogenesis involves both viruses and bacteria. We examined risks of acute otitis media associated with specific combinations of respiratory viruses and acute otitis media bacterial pathogens. Data were from a prospective study of children ages 6 to 36 months and included viral and bacterial culture and quantitative PCR for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus, and human metapneumovirus. Repeated-measure logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between specific viruses, bacteria, and the risk of acute otitis media complicating upper respiratory tract infection. In unadjusted analyses of data from 194 children, adenovirus, bocavirus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis were significantly associated with AOM (P virus loads (≥3.16 × 10(7) copies/ml) experienced increased acute otitis media risk. Higher viral loads of bocavirus and metapneumovirus were not significantly associated with acute otitis media. In adjusted models controlling for the presence of key viruses, bacteria, and acute otitis media risk factors, acute otitis media risk was independently associated with high RSV viral load with Streptococcus pneumoniae (odds ratio [OR], 4.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.90 and 10.19) and Haemophilus influenzae (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.38 and 3.02). The risk was higher for the presence of bocavirus and H. influenzae together (OR, 3.61; 95% CI, 1.90 and 6.86). Acute otitis media risk differs by the specific viruses and bacteria involved. Acute otitis media prevention efforts should consider methods for reducing infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus, bocavirus, and adenovirus in addition to acute otitis media bacterial pathogens.

  15. Distinct immune responses of juvenile and adult oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to viral and bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Timothy J; Vergnes, Agnes; Montagnani, Caroline; de Lorgeril, Julien

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, massive mortality events of Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) have been reported worldwide and these disease events are often associated with Ostreid herpesvirus type 1 (OsHV-1). Epidemiological field studies have also reported oyster age and other pathogens of the Vibrio genus are contributing factors to this syndrome. We undertook a controlled laboratory experiment to simultaneously investigate survival and immunological response of juvenile and adult C. gigas at different time-points post-infection with OsHV-1, Vibrio tasmaniensis LGP32 and V. aestuarianus. Our data corroborates epidemiological studies that juveniles are more susceptible to OsHV-1, whereas adults are more susceptible to Vibrio. We measured the expression of 102 immune-genes by high-throughput RT-qPCR, which revealed oysters have different transcriptional responses to OsHV-1 and Vibrio. The transcriptional response in the early stages of OsHV-1 infection involved genes related to apoptosis and the interferon-pathway. Transcriptional response to Vibrio infection involved antimicrobial peptides, heat shock proteins and galectins. Interestingly, oysters in the later stages of OsHV-1 infection had a transcriptional response that resembled an antibacterial response, which is suggestive of the oyster's microbiome causing secondary infections (dysbiosis-driven pathology). This study provides molecular evidence that oysters can mount distinct immune response to viral and bacterial pathogens and these responses differ depending on the age of the host.

  16. Current progress in the development of therapeutic vaccines for chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Ghasemi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B is still a major public health issue despite the successful prophylactic vaccination attempts. Chronicity of hepatitis B virus(HBV is mainly due to its ability to debilitate host's immune system. Therefore, major measures have been taken to stop this process and help patients with chronic hepatitis B infection recover from their illness. While satisfactory results have been achieved using preventive HBV vaccines, a reliable and effective therapeutic treatment is still in need of extensive studies. Current treatments for chronic hepatitis B include direct antiviral agents and nucleoside/nucleotide analogs, which are not always effective and are also costly. In addition, due to the fact that chronic HBV is responsible for debilitation of the immune system, studies have focused on developing therapeutic vaccines to help host's immune system recover and limit the infection. Several approaches including but not restricted to recombinant peptide-based, DNA-based, viral vector-based, and cell-based approaches are currently in use to develop therapeutic vaccines against the chronic form of HBV infection. In the current review, the authors will first discuss the role of the immune system in chronic hepatitis B infection and will then focus on latest advancements in therapeutic vaccination of HBV especially the clinical trials that have been carried out so far.

  17. Bacterial infection as a likely cause of adverse reactions to polyacrylamide hydrogel fillers in cosmetic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise; Breiting, Vibeke; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background. The etiology of long-lasting adverse reactions to gel fillers used in cosmetic surgery is not known. Bacterial infection and immunological reaction to the product have been suggested. Methods. We performed a case-control study, with 77 biopsies and 30 cytology specimens originating from...... in the presence of polyacrylamide filler in cosmetic surgery, possibly due to a biofilm mode of growth. Adequate skin preparation and use of sterile technique in these procedures are mandatory, but antibiotic prophylaxis prior to injection of nondegradable gels like polyacrylamide should be explored as well....

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): evaluation from clinical, immunological and bacterial pathogenesis perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Borchers, Michael T; Panos, Ralph J

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a disease manifested by significantly impaired airflow, afflicts ∼14.2 million cases in the United States alone with an estimated 63 million people world-wide. Although there are a number of causes, the predominant cause is excessive tobacco smoke. In fact, in China, there have been estimates of 315,000,000 people that smoke. Other less frequent causes are associated with indirect cigarette smoke, air pollutants, biomass fuels, and genetic mutations. COPD is often associated with heart disease, lung cancer, osteoporosis and conditions can worsen in patients with sudden falls. COPD also affects both innate and adaptive immune processes. Cigarette smoke increases the expression of matrix metalloproteases and proinflammatory chemokines and increases lung titers of natural killer cells and neutrophils. Yet, neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by the phagocytic respiratory burst and phagocytosis is impaired by nicotine. In contrast to innate immunity in COPD, dendritic cells represent leukocytes recruited to the lung that link the innate immune responses to adaptive immune responses by activating naïve T cells through antigen presentation. The autoimmune process that is also a significant part of inflammation associated with COPD. Moreover, coupled with restricted FEV1 values, are the prevalence of patients with single or multiple infections by bacteria, viruses and fungi. Finally, we focus on one of the more problematic infectious agents, the Gram-negative opportunistic pathogenic bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Specifically, we delve into the development of highly problematic biofilm infections that are highly refractory to conventional antibiotic therapies in COPD. We offer a non-conventional, biocidal treatment that may be effective for COPD airway infections as well as with combinations of current antibiotic regimens for more effective treatment outcomes and relief for patients with COPD.

  19. Peripheral T Cell Apoptosis and Its Role in Generalized Bacterial Infections: A Minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, Helen R.; Norkin, Maxim N.; Leplina, Olga Yu.; Khonina, Nataliya A.; Tihonova, Marina A.; Ostanin, Alexander A.

    2001-07-01

    In the present review we have attempted to analyze recent findings concerning apoptosis of mature peripheral T cells. The great attention is made to the factors underlying resistance or sensitivity of mature T lymphocytes to activation-induced cell death. The role of preactivation and altered costimulation is discussed in this regard. Besides, the possible role of cytokines in the modulation of T cell apoptosis is emphasized. Particular attention is paid to the studies of apoptosis disorders in the pathogenesis of generalized bacterial infections. In this connection some own results are summarized as well. To characterize T cell death and its role in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections an anti-CD3-mAb or Con A-induced apoptosis in patients with severe and generalized forms of surgical infections have been investigated. We have found a significant increase of activation-induced lymphocyte apoptosis and a high level of apoptosis in freshly isolated lymphocytes in patients with surgical infections. Alternatively, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from surgical patients without infectious complications did not exhibit a marked enhancement of activation-induced cell death. Activation-induced T cell death in surgical infections appeared to be Fas-dependent, involved reactive oxygen intermediates and was partly prevented by pro-inflammatory cytokines, among which IL-2 exhibited the most pronounced anti-apoptotic activity. Likewise, APACHE II score, as a marker of the infection severity, directly correlated with a rate of activation-induced T cell apoptosis. Accelerated T cell apoptosis at the early stage of infection was revealed in survivors and non-survivors, that appears to designate a common pathway for the restriction of systemic inflammation. At the late stage of infection altered T cell apoptosis could account for different outcomes, since the patients with lethal outcome showed 2-fold increase in activation-induced cell death compared to the opposite group

  20. Synthetic Cationic Peptide IDR-1002 Provides Protection against Bacterial Infections through Chemokine Induction and Enhanced Leukocyte Recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nijnik, Anastasia; Madera, Laurence; Ma, Shuhua;

    2010-01-01

    activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study...... aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor...

  1. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Gook Huh; Myoung-Don Oh; You-Sun Kim; Jong-Sung Lee; Tae-Yeob Jeong; Soo-Hyung Ryu; Jung-Hwan Lee; Jeong-Seop Moon; Yun-Kyung Kang; Myung-Shup Shim

    2008-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is one of the most frequent gastro-intestinal manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Protozoa and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that can easily infect these patients.Among the NTM,Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently observed pathogen in HIV-infected patients.However,NTMs other than MAC have not been reported as a gastrointestinal pathogen as yet.We present a case of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient in whom Mycobacterium ulcerans and cryptosporidium co-infection is evidenced from colonic tissue.

  2. An observational study to monitor the efficacy and tolerability of levofloxacin 500 mg once daily for treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Meliegy, Amr Ismail; Torky, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic prostatitis is a common urological problem in men <50-year-old. Untypical uropathogens and an intact blood prostate barrier cause difficulty in using antibiotics to treat the infection. Patients and Methods: In this open-label, observational study, levofloxacin 500 mg was given once daily for 28 days for treatment of chronic prostatitis. The primary efficacy measurement was the disappearance of all pre-treatment symptoms. Efficacy analysis is based on the per protocol population (PPP), all other analyses use the intent to treat (ITT) population. Results: The ITT included 154 men and the PPP included 151 (results are for the ITT unless otherwise indicated). Mean age was 42 ± 9 years, common concomitant conditions were diabetes mellitus (7%) and hypertension (5%). All symptoms decreased at day 28. Notably, the rate of dysuria decreased from 86.1% to 10.6%, painful ejaculation from 71% to 2.6% and perineal discomfort from 60.3% to 7.3%. A cure of condition was identified in 58.9%. No treatment failures were reported. Physician-reported adherence to study medication was 96.8%. Conclusion: Levofloxacin appears to be an effective antibiotic for treating symptoms of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Levofloxacin was well-tolerated in this population. PMID:25657549

  3. Clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braga Eduardo Lorens

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is increasingly common and affects the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C. Highly active antiretroviral therapy has improved the life expectancy of HIV infected patients, but, by extending survival, it permits the development of HCV cirrhosis. This study tried to evaluate clinical and epidemiological features of patients with chronic hepatitis C co-infected with HIV. We evaluated 134 HCV-infected patients: i group A - 65 co-infected HCV/HIV patients, ii group B - 69 mono-infected HCV patients. The impact of HIV infection on HCV liver disease was analyzed using Child's score, ultrasound findings and liver histology. Patients were subjected to HCV genotyping and anti-HBs dosage. Patients mean age was 42.4 years (±9.1 and 97 (72.4% were males. Injected drug use and homo/bisexual practice were more frequently encountered in the co-infected group: 68.3% and 78.0%, respectively. Antibodies against hepatitis B virus (anti-HBs were found in only 38.1% of the patients (66.7% group A x 33.3% group B. Ten out of 14 individuals (71.4% who had liver disease (Child B or C and 25 out of 34 (73.5% who showed ultrasound evidence of chronic liver disease were in the co-infection group. HCV genotype-2/3 was more frequently encountered in co-infected patients (36.9% group A vs. 21.8% group B. Conclusions: a HIV infection seems to adversely affect the clinical course of chronic hepatitis C, b injected drug use, bi/homosexual practice and genotype-2/3 were more frequently encountered in co-infected patients, c immunization against HBV should be encouraged in these patients.

  4. Photodynamic therapy can induce non-specific protective immunity against a bacterial infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Kinoshita, Manabu; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is known to induce an immune response against the tumor, in addition to its well-known direct cell-killing and vascular destructive effects. PDT is becoming increasingly used as a therapy for localized infections. However there has not to date been a convincing report of an immune response being generated against a microbial pathogen after PDT in an animal model. We have studied PDT as a therapy for bacterial arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse knee. We had previously found that PDT of an infection caused by injection of MRSA (5X107 CFU) into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin and 635- nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes, gave a biphasic dose response. The greatest reduction of MRSA CFU was seen with a fluence of 20 J/cm2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. We then tested the hypothesis that the host immune response mediated by neutrophils was responsible for most of the beneficial antibacterial effect. We used bioluminescence imaging of luciferase expressing bacteria to follow the progress of the infection in real time. We found similar results using intra-articular methylene blue and red light, and more importantly, that carrying out PDT of the noninfected joint and subsequently injecting bacteria after PDT led to a significant protection from infection. Taken together with substantial data from studies using blocking antibodies we believe that the pre-conditioning PDT regimen recruits and stimulates neutrophils into the infected joint which can then destroy bacteria that are subsequently injected and prevent infection.

  5. Ceragenins – a new weapon to fight multidrug resistant bacterial infections

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    Urszula Surel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms is one of the most challenging problems. Often, a single mutation in a bacterial cell leads to the formation of a new drug resistance mechanism. The ceragenins are a novel class of antibiotic, offering great promise in future treatment of infections. These cationic antimicrobial lipids are net positively charged cholic acid derivates that are electrostatically attracted to the negatively charged membranes of bacteria, certain viruses, fungi, and protozoa. After membrane insertion, they interfere with membrane organisation, resulting in membrane dysfunction and cell death. This review focuses on the broad spectrum of antibacterial activity of ceragenins, and their potential to become a new group of antibiotics for prevention and treatment of infections, especially those caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  6. Bacterial infections from aquatic species: potential for and prevention of contact zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenen, O L M; Evans, J J; Berthe, F

    2013-08-01

    As aquaculture production and the consumption of aquaculture products increase, the possibility of contracting zoonotic infections from either handling or ingesting these products also increases. The principal pathogens acquired topically from fish or shellfish through spine/pincer puncture or open wounds are Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Mycobacterium marinum, Streptococcus iniae, Vibrio vulnificus and V. damsela. These pathogens, which are all indigenous to the aquatic environment, have also been associated with disease outbreaks in food fish. Outbreaks are often related to management factors, such as the quality and quantity of nutrients in the water and high stocking density, which can increase bacterial loads on the external surface of the fish. As a result, diseased fish are more likely to transmit infection to humans. This review provides an account of human cases of zoonoses throughout the world from the principal zoonotic pathogens of fish and shellfish.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2623 regulates bacillary growth by ATP-Binding: requirement for establishing chronic persistent infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E Drumm

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  9. Chronic Lyme Disease and Co-infections: Differential Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoff, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In Lyme disease concurrent infections frequently occur. The clinical and pathological impact of co-infections was first recognized in the 1990th, i.e. approximately ten years after the discovery of Lyme disease. Their pathological synergism can exacerbate Lyme disease or induce similar disease manifestations. Co-infecting agents can be transmitted together with Borrelia burgdorferi by tick bite resulting in multiple infections but a fraction of co-infections occur independently of tick bite. Clinically relevant co-infections are caused by Bartonella species, Yersinia enterocolitica, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In contrast to the USA, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA) and babesiosis are not of major importance in Europe. Infections caused by these pathogens in patients not infected by Borrelia burgdorferi can result in clinical symptoms similar to those occurring in Lyme disease. This applies particularly to infections caused by Bartonella henselae, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Chlamydia trachomatis primarily causes polyarthritis. Chlamydophila pneumoniae not only causes arthritis but also affects the nervous system and the heart, which renders the differential diagnosis difficult. The diagnosis is even more complex when co-infections occur in association with Lyme disease. Treatment recommendations are based on individual expert opinions. In antibiotic therapy, the use of third generation cephalosporins should only be considered in cases of Lyme disease. The same applies to carbapenems, which however are used occasionally in infections caused by Yersinia enterocolitica. For the remaining infections predominantly tetracyclines and macrolides are used. Quinolones are for alternative treatment, particularly gemifloxacin. For Bartonella henselae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Chlamydophila pneumoniae the combination with rifampicin is recommended. Erythromycin is the drug of choice for

  10. Aerobic bacterial profile and antibiotic resistance in patients with diabetic foot infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cezimbra Perim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTINTRODUCTION: This study aimed to determine the frequencies of bacterial isolates cultured from diabetic foot infections and assess their resistance and susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics.METHODS: This prospective study included 41 patients with diabetic foot lesions. Bacteria were isolated from foot lesions, and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and/or broth method [minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC].RESULTS: The most common location of ulceration was the toe (54%, followed by the plantar surface (27% and dorsal portion (19%. A total of 89 bacterial isolates were obtained from 30 patients. The infections were predominantly due to Gram-positive bacteria and polymicrobial bacteremia. The most commonly isolated Gram-positive bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The most commonly isolated Gram-negative bacteria were Proteus spp. and Enterobacterspp., followed by Escherichia coli, Pseudomonasspp., and Citrobacterspp. Nine cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA had cefoxitin resistance, and among these MRSA isolates, 3 were resistant to vancomycin with the MIC technique. The antibiotic imipenem was the most effective against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and gentamicin was effective against Gram-negative bacteria.CONCLUSIONS: The present study confirmed the high prevalence of multidrug-resistant pathogens in diabetic foot ulcers. It is necessary to evaluate the different microorganisms infecting the wound and to know the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates from the infected wound. This knowledge is crucial for planning treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, reducing resistance patterns, and minimizing healthcare costs.

  11. Structured approach to design of diagnostic test evaluation studies for chronic progressive infections in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Toft, Nils; Gardner, Ian Andrew

    2011-05-12

    Diagnostic test evaluations (DTEs) for chronic infections are challenging because a protracted incubation period has to be considered in the design of the DTE, and the adverse effects of infection may be widespread and progressive over an animal's entire life. Frequently, the specific purpose of the test is not formally considered when a test is evaluated. Therefore, the result is often a DTE where test sensitivity and specificity estimates are biased, either because of problems with establishing the true infection status or because the test detects another aspect of the infection (and analyte) than originally intended. The objective of this paper is to outline a structured approach to the design and conduct of a DTE for diagnostic tests used for chronic infections in animals, and intended for different purposes. We describe the process from reflections about test purpose and the underlying target condition through considerations of the pathogenesis, and specification of a practical case definition, which can subsequently be used in the DTE for the specific purpose. The process is illustrated by two examples of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections in cattle. MAP infections are chronic and can result in different adverse effects at different time points during the incubation period. The description provides input on the process and deductive reasoning which are integral parts to develop a high-quality design of a DTE for chronic infectious diseases.

  12. Therapeutic strategies for a functional cure of chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhong Chang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection with the viral DNA polymerase inhibitors or pegylated alpha-interferon has led to a significant retardation in HBV-related disease progression and reduction in mortality related to chronic hepatitis B associated liver decompensation and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, chronic HBV infection remains not cured. The reasons for the failure to eradicate HBV infection by long-term antiviral therapy are not completely understood. However, clinical studies suggest that the intrinsic stability of the nuclear form of viral genome, the covalently closed circular (ccc DNA, sustained low level viral replication under antiviral therapy and homeostatic proliferation of hepatocytes are the critical virological and pathophysiological factors that affect the persistence and therapeutic outcomes of HBV infection. More importantly, despite potent suppression of HBV replication in livers of the treated patients, the dysfunction of HBV-specific antiviral immunity persists. The inability of the immune system to recognize cells harboring HBV infection and to cure or eliminate cells actively producing virus is the biggest challenge to finding a cure. Unraveling the complex virus–host interactions that lead to persistent infection should facilitate the rational design of antivirals and immunotherapeutics to cure chronic HBV infection.

  13. RANTES gene single nucleotide polymorphisms and expression in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Zhong-ping; ZHAO Xiu-ying; HUANG De-zhuang; HE Li-xiang; CHEN Yu; ZHAO Chun-hui; ZHENG Bo-jian

    2005-01-01

    Background Regulated on activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) plays a critical role in T-lymphocyte activation and proliferation. The process is involved in both acute and chronic phases of inflammation. The present study was to ascertain the possible correlations between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and the RANTES gene polymorphisms and their expression. Methods The study included 130 HBV negative healthy donors and 152 patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) virus infection. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) were used to detect RANTES gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). RANTES levels in the platelet depleted plasma were detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results RANTES alleles -403G, -28C and In1.1T were the predominant alleles in the subjects studied. No significant correlation was found between CHB infection and the RANTES alleles, while a significant correlation was found between CHB infection and increased RANTES expression in platelet depleted plasma (P<0.05). Conclusions SNPs in RANTES gene do not affect chronic HBV infection or the outcome of interferon-α treatment in patients positive for HBV "e" antigen (HBeAg+). However, patients with CHB infection express the higher levels of plasma RANTES, which is thus associated with CHB infection.

  14. Evaluation of (99m)Tc(i)-tricarbonyl complexes of fluoroquinolones for targeting bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Baishya, Rinku; Halder, Kamal Krishna; Sen, Tuhinadri; Sarkar, Bharat R; Ganguly, Shantanu; Das, M K; Debnath, Mita Chatterjee

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to develop (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-labeled fluoroquinolones as novel SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for imaging bacterial infection. Fluoroquinolones, e.g., ofloxacin (OFX), levofloxacin (LVX), lomefloxacin (LMX) and norfloxacin (NFX) were labeled with a fac-[(99m)Tc(CO)(3)(H(2)O)(3)](+) precursor. The radiochemical purity of the radiopharmaceuticals exceeded 97% as determined by thin layer chromatography and HPLC. No further purification was necessary before injection. The Re(CO)(3) complex of one of the fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin) was synthesized using [Re(CO)(3)(H(2)O)(3)]OTf and Re(CO)(5)Br precursors in separate experiments and characterized by IR, NMR and mass spectroscopic analysis. These studies revealed the formation of a single species in which the piperazinyl nitrogen and the -COOH group attached to the benzoxazine ring system of quinolone were involved in co-ordination to the Re(CO)(3) core. The HPLC elution pattern and retention time of the Re(CO)(3)-LVX complex were comparable to those of the corresponding (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-complex proving their similarity. When incubated in isotonic saline and serum up to 24 h (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-labeled fluoroquinolones exhibited good in vitro stability. Biodistribution studies performed at different time points on rats intramuscularly infected with S. aureus as well as on rats with sterile inflammation revealed a higher uptake in the infected area than the turpentine induced inflamed area. The uptake in infected thigh was significant with (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-OFX followed by (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-LVX. The mean ratios of the uptake in infected/non-infected thighs were 4.75 and 4.27 at 8 h and 24 h, respectively, for (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-OFX and 4.42 and 4.18 at 24 h and 8 h, respectively, for (99m)Tc(CO)(3)-LVX. The above abscess to muscle ratios were higher than reported for (99m)Tc-ciprofloxacin and other (99m)Tc-labeled fluoroquinolones. Scintigraphy studies also showed a significant uptake in the infectious lesions

  15. Ascites bacterial burden and immune cell profile are associated with poor clinical outcomes in the absence of overt infection.

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    Kevin J Fagan

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections, most commonly spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with ascites, occur in one third of admitted patients with cirrhosis, and account for a 4-fold increase in mortality. Bacteria are isolated from less than 40% of ascites infections by culture, necessitating empirical antibiotic treatment, but culture-independent studies suggest bacteria are commonly present, even in the absence of overt infection. Widespread detection of low levels of bacteria in ascites, in the absence of peritonitis, suggests immune impairment may contribute to higher susceptibility to infection in cirrhotic patients. However, little is known about the role of ascites leukocyte composition and function in this context. We determined ascites bacterial composition by quantitative PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing in 25 patients with culture-negative, non-neutrocytic ascites, and compared microbiological data with ascites and peripheral blood leukocyte composition and phenotype. Bacterial DNA was detected in ascitic fluid from 23 of 25 patients, with significant positive correlations between bacterial DNA levels and poor 6-month clinical outcomes (death, readmission. Ascites leukocyte composition was variable, but dominated by macrophages or T lymphocytes, with lower numbers of B lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Consistent with the hypothesis that impaired innate immunity contributes to susceptibility to infection, high bacterial DNA burden was associated with reduced major histocompatibility complex class II expression on ascites (but not peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages. These data indicate an association between the presence of ascites bacterial DNA and early death and readmission in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. They further suggest that impairment of innate immunity contributes to increased bacterial translocation, risk of peritonitis, or both.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection: An overview of bacterial virulence factors and pathogenesis

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    Cheng-Yen Kao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis and disease outcomes are mediated by a complex interplay between bacterial virulence factors, host, and environmental factors. After H. pylori enters the host stomach, four steps are critical for bacteria to establish successful colonization, persistent infection, and disease pathogenesis: (1 Survival in the acidic stomach; (2 movement toward epithelium cells by flagella-mediated motility; (3 attachment to host cells by adhesins/receptors interaction; (4 causing tissue damage by toxin release. Over the past 20 years, the understanding of H. pylori pathogenesis has been improved by studies focusing on the host and bacterial factors through epidemiology researches and molecular mechanism investigations. These include studies identifying the roles of novel virulence factors and their association with different disease outcomes, especially the bacterial adhesins, cag pathogenicity island, and vacuolating cytotoxin. Recently, the development of large-scale screening methods, including proteomic, and transcriptomic tools, has been used to determine the complex gene regulatory networks in H. pylori. In addition, a more available complete genomic database of H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastrointestinal diseases worldwide is helpful to characterize this bacterium. This review highlights the key findings of H. pylori virulence factors reported over the past 20 years.

  17. Improved outcome of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is associated with induction of a Th1-dominated cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, C; Jensen, P O; Kobayashi, O;

    2002-01-01

    patients, the lungs of susceptible BALB/c mice were re-infected with P. aeruginosa 14 days after the initial infection. Singly-infected BALB/c mice, as well as non-infected mice, were used as controls. Decreased mortality and milder lung inflammation in re-infected BALB/c mice, as well as a tendency......Repeated challenge with antigen is involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of pulmonary diseases. Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) experience recurrent pulmonary colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa before establishment of chronic lung infection. To mimic recurrent lung infections in CF...... production, in chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection in CF....

  18. Methamphetamine mediates immune dysregulation in a murine model of chronic viral infection.

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    Uma eSriram

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant that not only affects the brain and cognitive functions but also greatly impacts the host immune system, rendering the body susceptible to infections and exacerbating the severity of disease. Although there is gathering evidence about METH abuse and increased incidence of HIV and other viral infections, not much is known about the effects on the immune system in a chronic viral infection setting. We have used the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV chronic mouse model of viral infection in a chronic METH environment and demonstrate that METH significantly increases CD3 marker on splenocytes and programmed death -1 (PD-1 expression on T cells, a cell surface signaling molecule known to inhibit T cell function and cause exhaustion in a lymphoid organ. Many of these METH effects were more pronounced during early stage of infection, which are gradually attenuated during later stages of infection. An essential cytokine for T-lymphocyte homeostasis, Interleukin-2 (IL-2 in serum was prominently reduced in METH-exposed infected mice. In addition, the serum pro-inflammatory (TNF, IL12 p70, IL1β, IL-6 and KC-GRO and Th2 (IL-2, IL-10 and IL-4 cytokine profiles were also altered in the presence of METH. Interestingly CXCR3, an inflammatory chemokine receptor, showed significant increase in the METH treated LCMV infected mice. Similarly, compared to only infected mice, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in METH exposed LCMV infected mice were up regulated. Collectively, our data suggest that METH alters systemic, peripheral immune responses and modulates key markers on T cells involved in pathogenesis of chronic viral infection.

  19. Occult hepatitis B virus infection and cryptogenic chronic hepatitis in an area with intermediate prevalence of HBV infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Javad Kaviani; Behzad Behbahani; Mohammad Jafar Mosallaii; Fatemeh Sari-Aslani; Seyed Alireza Taghavi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To assess the possible role of occult HBV infection in the pathogenesis of chronic hepatitis in Iranian patients.METHODS: After exclusion of autoimmune, metabolic and viral etiologies, 104 consecutive adult patients with histologic and biochemical features of chronic hepatitis and negative HBsAg were enrolled in the study.Qualitative PCR with a sensitivity of 150 × 103 copies/L,using two primers for Pre-S and core regions was applied to measure presence of HBV DNA in serum of the patients.RESULTS: All 104 patients completed the study.Qualitative HBV DNA was positive in two patients (1.9%).CONCLUSION: Occult HBV infection has negligible role in the pathogenesis of cryptogenic chronic hepatitis in Iranian patients.

  20. Bacterial etiology of bloodstream infections and antimicrobial resistance in Dhaka, Bangladesh, 2005–2014

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    Dilruba Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infections due to bacterial pathogens are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Bangladesh and other developing countries. In these countries, most patients are treated empirically based on their clinical symptoms. Therefore, up to date etiological data for major pathogens causing bloodstream infections may play a positive role in better healthcare management. The aim of this study was to identify the bacterial pathogens causing major bloodstream infections in Dhaka, Bangladesh and determine their antibiotic susceptibility pattern. Methods From January 2005 to December 2014, a total of 103,679 single bottle blood samples were collected from both hospitalized and domiciliary patients attending Dhaka hospital, icddrb, Bangladesh All the blood samples were processed for culture using a BACT/Alert blood culture machine. Further identification of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed using standard microbiological procedures. Results Overall, 13.6% of the cultured blood samples were positive and Gram-negative (72.1% bacteria were predominant throughout the study period. Salmonella Typhi was the most frequently isolated organism (36.9% of samples in this study and a high percentage of those strains were multidrug-resistant (MDR. However, a decreasing trend in the S. Typhi isolation rate was observed and, noticeably, the percentage of MDR S. Typhi isolated declined sharply over the study period. An overall increase in the presence of Gram-positive bacteria was observed, but most significantly we observed the percentage of MDR Gram-positive bacteria to double over the study period. Overall, Gram positive bacteria were more resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics than Gram-negative bacteria, but the MDR level was high in both groups. Conclusions This study identified the major bacterial pathogens involved with BSI in Dhaka, Bangladesh and also revealed their

  1. Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen.

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    Ashkan Javid

    Full Text Available Insulin-insufficient type 1 diabetes is associated with attenuated bactericidal function of neutrophils, which are key mediators of innate immune responses to microbes as well as pathological inflammatory processes. Neutrophils are central to immune responses to the Lyme pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. The effect of hyperglycemia on host susceptibility to and outcomes of B. burgdorferi infection has not been examined. The present study investigated the impact of sustained obesity-independent hyperglycemia in mice on bacterial clearance, inflammatory pathology and neutrophil responses to B. burgdorferi. Hyperglycemia was associated with reduced arthritis incidence but more widespread tissue colonization and reduced clearance of bacterial DNA in multiple tissues including brain, heart, liver, lung and knee joint. B. burgdorferi uptake and killing were impaired in neutrophils isolated from hyperglycemic mice. Thus, attenuated neutrophil function in insulin-insufficient hyperglycemia was associated with reduced B. burgdorferi clearance in target organs. These data suggest that investigating the effects of comorbid conditions such as diabetes on outcomes of B. burgdorferi infections in humans may be warranted.

  2. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy using zinc phthalocyanine derivative for bacterial skin infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Yaxin; Li, Linsen; Zhou, Shanyong; Chen, Jincan; Hu, Ping; Huang, Mingdong

    2014-09-01

    Folliculitis, furunculosis and acne vulgaris are very common skin disorders of the hair follicles and are associated with large grease-producing (sebaceous) glands. Although the detailed mechanisms involved these skin disorders are not fully understood, it is believed that the bacteria Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus aureus are the key pathogenic factors involved. Conventional treatments targeting the pathogenic factors include a variety of topical and oral medications such as antibiotics. The wide use of antibiotics leads to bacterial resistance, and hence there is a need for new alternatives in above bacterial skin treatment. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on an initial photosensitization of the infected area, followed by irradiation with visible light, producing singlet oxygen which is cytotoxic to bacteria. Herein we reported a zinc phthalocyanine derivative, pentalysine β-carbonylphthalocyanine zinc (ZnPc-(Lys)5) and its PACT effect for the bacteria involved in these skin