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Sample records for chronic achilles tendon

  1. Ipsilateral free semitendinosus tendon graft transfer for reconstruction of chronic tears of the Achilles tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gougoulias Nikolaos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many techniques have been developed for the reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in chronic tears. In presence of a large gap (greater than 6 centimetres, tendon augmentation is required. Methods We present our method of minimally invasive semitendinosus reconstruction for the Achilles tendon using one para-midline and one midline incision. Results The first incision is a 5 cm longitudinal incision, made 2 cm proximal and just medial to the palpable end of the residual tendon. The second incision is 3 cm long and is also longitudinal but is 2 cm distal and in the midline to the distal end of the tendon rupture. The distal and proximal Achilles tendon stumps are mobilised. After trying to reduce the gap of the ruptured Achilles tendon, if the gap produced is greater than 6 cm despite maximal plantar flexion of the ankle and traction on the Achilles tendon stumps, the ipsilateral semitendinosus tendon is harvested. The semitendinosus tendon is passed through small incisions in the substance of the proximal stump of the Achilles tendon, and it is sutured to the Achilles tendon. It is then passed beneath the intact skin bridge into the distal incision, and passed from medial to lateral through a transverse tenotomy in the distal stump. With the ankle in maximal plantar flexion, the semitendinosus tendon is sutured to the Achilles tendon at each entry and exit point Conclusion This minimally invasive technique allows reconstruction of the Achilles tendon using the tendon of semitendinosus preserving skin integrity over the site most prone to wound breakdown, and can be especially used to reconstruct the Achilles tendon in the presence of large gap (greater than 6 centimetres.

  2. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M

    2015-03-01

    Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in healthy runners during walking and running. Since plantar flexion moment is related to the Achilles tendon loading, rocker shoes might be considered in the conservative management of Achilles tendinopathy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of running and walking in a group of patients with Achilles tendinopathy wearing standard shoes versus rocker shoes. Cross-over. Thirteen Achilles tendinopathy patients (mean age 48 ± 14.5 years) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis wearing standard running shoes and rocker shoes during running and walking. Surface electromyography of triceps surae and tibialis anterior was recorded simultaneously. Patients had symptoms for an average of 22.5 months (median 11.5 months) and VISA-A scores were 54 ± 16. With the rocker shoes, the peak plantar flexion moment was reduced by 13% in both running (0.28 N m/kg, pshoes in walking. There was no difference between electromyography peak amplitudes of triceps surae between two shoe sessions in both activities. When used by patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy, rocker shoes cause a significant reduction in plantar flexion moment in the late stance phase of running and walking without substantial adaptations in triceps surae muscular activity. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Site Content AOFAS / FootCareMD / Treatments Percutaneous Achilles Tendon Lengthening Page Content ​ Pre-operative incision markings along ... What is the goal of a percutaneous Achilles tendon lengthening? The goal of this procedure is to ...

  4. Achilles tendon injuries in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvist, M

    1994-09-01

    Two-thirds of Achilles tendon injuries in competitive athletes are paratenonitis and one-fifth are insertional complaints (bursitis and insertion tendinitis). The remaining afflictions consist of pain syndromes of the myotendineal junction and tendinopathies. The majority of Achilles tendon injuries from sport occur in males, mainly because of their higher rates of participation in sport, but also with tendinopathies a gender difference is probably indicated. Athletes in running sports have a high incidence of Achilles tendon overuse injuries. About 75% of total and the majority of partial tendon ruptures are related to sports activities usually involving abrupt repetitive jumping and sprinting movements. Mechanical factors and a sedentary lifestyle play a role in the pathology of these injuries. Achilles tendon overuse injuries occur at a higher rate in older athletes than most other typical overuse injuries. Recreational athletes with a complete Achilles tendon rupture are about 15 years younger than those with other spontaneous tendon ruptures. Following surgery, about 70 to 90% of athletes have a successful comeback after Achilles tendon injury. Surgery is required in about 25% of athletes with Achilles tendon overuse injuries and the frequency of surgery increases with patient age and duration of symptoms as well as occurrence of tendinopathic changes. However, about 20% of injured athletes require a re-operation for Achilles tendon overuse injuries, and about 3 to 5% are compelled to abandon their sports career because of these injuries. Myotendineal junction pain should be treated conservatively. Partial Achilles tendon ruptures are primarily treated conservatively, although the best treatment method of chronic partial rupture seems to be surgery. Complete Achilles tendon ruptures of athletes are treated surgically, because this increases the likelihood of athletes reaching preinjury activity levels and minimises the risk of re-ruptures. Marked forefoot

  5. Rocker shoes reduce Achilles tendon load in running and walking in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobhani, Sobhan; Zwerver, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Edwin; Postema, Klaas; Dekker, Rienk; Hijmans, Juha M.

    OBJECTIVES: Relative rest and pain relief play an important role in the management of Achilles tendinopathy, and might be achieved by reducing the load on the Achilles tendon. Previous studies have provided evidence that rocker shoes are able to decrease the ankle internal plantar flexion moment in

  6. Achilles Tendonitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you use crutches or wear a walking boot to keep weight off your foot. I ce: ... 2014 More on this topic for: Teens Jumper's Knee Proximal Biceps Tendonitis Safety Tips: Basketball Safety Tips: ...

  7. Achillodynia. Radiological imaging of acute and chronic overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syha, R.; Springer, F.; Grosse, U.; Tuebingen Univ.; Ketelsen, D.; Kramer, U.; Horger, M.; Ipach, I.; Schick, F.

    2013-01-01

    In the past decades the incidence of acute and chronic disorders of the Achilles tendon associated with sport-induced overuse has steadily increased. Besides acute complete or partial ruptures, achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain syndrome), which is often associated with tendon degeneration, represents the most challenging entity regarding clinical diagnostics and therapy. Therefore, the use of imaging techniques to differentiate tendon disorders and even characterize structure alterations is of growing interest. This review article discusses the potential of different imaging techniques with respect to the diagnosis of acute and chronic tendon disorders. In this context, the most commonly used imaging techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasound, and color-coded Doppler ultrasound (US). These modalities allow the detection of acute tendon ruptures and advanced chronic tendon disorders. However, the main disadvantages are still the low capabilities in the detection of early-stage degeneration and difficulties in the assessment of treatment responses during follow-up examinations. Furthermore, differentiation between chronic partial ruptures and degeneration remains challenging. The automatic contour detection and texture analysis may allow a more objective and quantitative interpretation, which might be helpful in the monitoring of tendon diseases during follow-up examinations. Other techniques to quantify tendon-specific MR properties, e.g. based on ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, also seem to have great potential with respect to the precise detection of degenerative tendon disorders and their differentiation at a very early stage. (orig.)

  8. No effects of PRP on ultrasonographic tendon structure and neovascularisation in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vos, R. J.; Weir, A.; Tol, J. L.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Weinans, H.; van Schie, H. T. M.

    2011-01-01

    To assess whether a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection leads to an enhanced tendon structure and neovascularisation, measured with ultrasonographic techniques, in chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Sports medical department of The

  9. Wound management with negative pressure wound therapy in postoperative infection after open reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saku, Isaku; Kanda, Shotaro; Saito, Toshihiro; Fukushima, Takashi; Akiyama, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Deep infection after reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture is a major and intractable complication. We report a case of late deep infection following a surgery for chronic Achilles tendon rupture, and its simple and successful treatment with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Six months following the reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture, a deep infection developed and reconstructed part of the tendon ruptured again. After appropriate debridement. There is no definitive treatment strategy for postoperative infection following open Achilles tendon repair. NPWT was applied to the wound, to promote wound healing and healthy granulation. In our case, NPWT promoted the wound healing and the infected Achilles tendon with tendon loss formed a healthy bridge with granulation tissue spontaneously. The patient resumed her normal activities of daily living, without requiring tendon transfer surgery. NPWT seems to be a simple and successful candidate for this situation. NPWT seems to be effective for the treatment of postoperative infection following Achilles tendon repair, even in cases of tendon loss. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of chronic Achilles tendon pain by Kinesio taping in an amateur badminton player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-hoon; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of Kinesio taping on a patient with chronic Achilles tendon pain. Case report. A 22-year-old male amateur badminton player slipped on the ground as he landed after jumping while playing badminton, resulting in chronic Achilles tendon pain of the dominant (right) leg. We performed Achilles tendon taping (ATT) over 5 weeks. The patient's ultrasonography showed that the tendon thickness was moderately reduced from 0.42 cm to 0.37 cm and that the angles of active dorsiflexion and active plantar flexion without pain increased from 15° to 20° and from 20° to 45°, respectively. The Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire score increased from 64 to 95, and the load-induced pain assessment score decreased from 6 to 0. The pain threshold increased from 0.8 kg to 10 kg. The tenderness at 3 kg, assessed on a numeric rating scale, decreased from 7 to 0, and the patient was able to play badminton and soccer without pain. We verified the effect with an increase in the active ankle joint range of motion and the VISA-A questionnaire score, which was achieved by a decrease in tenderness and pain from repeated ATT application. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Achilles tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    To fix your torn Achilles tendon, the surgeon will: Make a cut down the back of your heel Make several small cuts rather than one large cut After that, the surgeon will: Bring the ends of your tendon together Sew the ends together Stitch the wound closed

  12. Good outcome after stripping the plantaris tendon in patients with chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a problem that is generally difficult to treat. The pain is frequently most prominent on the medial side of the mid-portion of the tendon, where the plantaris tendon is running parallel to the Achilles tendon. The purpose of this study was to assess whether excision of the

  13. Achilles tendon and sports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F.; Huber, W.; Nehrer, S.

    2002-01-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [de

  14. Magnetic Resonance Signal, Rather Than Tendon Volume, Correlates to Pain and Functional Impairment in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaerdin, A.; Bruno, J.; Movin, T.; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, M.; Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Depts. of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To depict abnormal tendon matrix composition using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic Achilles tendinopathy, and correlate intratendinous signal alterations to pain and functional impairment. Material and Methods: MRI of the Achilles tendon was performed on 25 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy (median age 50, range 37-71 years). All patients suffered from pain in the mid-portion of the Achilles tendon. Intratendinous signal was calculated from five different sagittal sequences, using a computerized 3D seed-growing technique. Pain and functional impairment were evaluated using a questionnaire completed by patients. Results: Severity of pain and functional impairment correlated to increased mean intratendinous signal in the painful tendon in all MR sequences (P 0.05). Difference in mean intratendinous signal between symptomatic and contralateral asymptomatic tendons was highly significant in all sequences (P <0.05) except on T2-weighted images (P = 0.6). Conclusion: Severity of pain and disability correlated to increased MR signal rather than to tendon volume in patients with unilateral mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  15. Plantarflexor muscle function in healthy and chronic Achilles tendon pain subjects evaluated by the use of EMG and PET imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Bojsen-Møller, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achilles tendon pathologies may alter the coordinative strategies of synergistic calf muscles. We hypothesized that both surface electromyography and positron emission tomography would reveal differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic legs in Achilles tendinopathy patients...... and between healthy controls. METHODS: Eleven subjects with unilateral chronic Achilles tendon pain (28 years) and eleven matched controls (28 years) were studied for triceps surae and flexor hallucis longus muscle activity in response to repetitive isometric plantarflexion tasks performed at 30% of maximal...... the electromyography showed greater relative amplitude in the symptomatic leg, the results based on muscle glucose uptake suggested relatively similar behavior of both legs in the patient group. Higher glucose uptake in the symptomatic Achilles tendon suggests a higher metabolic demand....

  16. [Achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermann, H; Hüfner, T; Tscherne, H

    2000-03-01

    The treatment of acute of Achilles tendon rupture experienced a dynamic development in the last ten years. Decisive for this development was the application of MRI and above all the ultrasonography in the diagnostics of the pathological changes and injuries of tendons. The question of rupture morphology as well as different courses of healing could be now evaluated objectively. These advances led consequently to new modalities in treatment concepts and rehabilitation protocols. The decisive input for improvements of the outcome results and particularly the shortening of the rehabilitation period came with introduction of the early functional treatment in contrast to immobilizing plaster treatment. In a prospective randomized study (1987-1989) at the Trauma Dept. of the Hannover Medical School could show no statistical differences comparing functional non-operative with functional operative therapy with a special therapy boot (Variostabil/Adidas). The crucial criteria for therapy selection results from the sonographically measured position of the tendon stumps in plantar flexion (20 degrees). With complete adaptation of the tendons' ends surgical treatment does not achieve better results than non-operative functional treatment in term of tendon healing and functional outcome. Regarding the current therapeutic standards each method has is advantages and disadvantages. Both, the operative and non-operative functional treatment enable a stable tendon healing with a low risk of re-rupture (1-2%). Meanwhile there is consensus for early functional after-treatment of the operated Achilles' tendons. There seems to be a trend towards non-operative functional treatment in cases of adequate sonographical findings, or to minimal invasive surgical techniques.

  17. Validation of a novel ultrasound measurement of achilles tendon length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Riecke, Anja Falk; Boesen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: A clinically applicable and accurate method for measuring Achilles tendon length is needed to investigate the influence of elongation of the Achilles tendon after acute rupture. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultrasonographic (US) length measurement...... of the Achilles tendon-aponeurosis complex. METHODS: Both legs of 19 non-injured subjects were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and US. The length from calcaneus to the medial head of m. Gastrocnemius was measured by three independent US examiners. Repeated US measurements were performed and compared...... to be further assessed in the setting of acute Achilles tendon rupture. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This new ultrasound measurement might allow for length measurement of ruptured Achilles tendons in the acute and chronic state after rupture. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II....

  18. Spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture in alkaptonuria | Mohammed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous Achilles tendon ruptures are uncommon. We present a 46-year-old man with spontaneous Achilles tendon rupture due to ochronosis. To our knowledge, this has not been previously reported in Sudan literature. The tendon of the reported patient healed well after debridement and primary repairs.

  19. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong [Shilla General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture.

  20. The roentgenographic findings of achilles tendon rupture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seouk, Kang Hyo; Keun, Rho Yong

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of a lateral view of the ankles in Achilles tendon rupture. We performed a retrospective analysis of the roentgenographic findings of 15 patients with surgically proven Achilles tendon rupture. Four groups of 15 patients(normal, ankle sprain, medial lateral malleolar fracture, and calcaneal fracture) were analysed as reference groups. Plain radiographs were reviewed with regard to Kager's triangle, Arner's sign, Toygar's angle, ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon, sharpness of the anterior margin of Achilles tendon, and meniscoid smooth margin of the posterior skin surface of the ankle. Kager's triangle was deformed and disappeared after rupture of the Achilles tendon in nine patients(60%) with operative verification of the rupture, six patients(40%) had a positive Arner's sign, while none had a diminished Toygars angle. In 13 patients(87%) with a ruptured Achilles tendon, the thickness of this was nonuniform compared with the reference group. The anterior margin of the Achilles tendon became serrated and indistinct in 14 patients(93%) in whom this was ruptured. An abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon was noted in nine patient(60%), and nonparallelism between the anterior margin of the Achilles tendon and posterior skin surface of the ankle was detected in 11 patients(73%). The posterior skin surface of the ankle had a nodular surface margin in 13 patients(87%). A deformed Kager's triangle and Achilles tendon, and an abnormal ill defined radiolucent shadow through the Achilles tendon in a lateral view of the ankles are important findings for the diagnesis of in diagnosing achilles tendon rupture

  1. Achillodynia. Radiological imaging of acute and chronic overuse injuries of the Achilles tendon; Achillodynie. Radiologische Bildgebung bei akuten und chronischen Ueberlastungsschaeden der Achillessehne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Springer, F.; Grosse, U. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Kramer, U.; Horger, M. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Ipach, I. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Orthopaedic Surgery; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology

    2013-11-15

    In the past decades the incidence of acute and chronic disorders of the Achilles tendon associated with sport-induced overuse has steadily increased. Besides acute complete or partial ruptures, achillodynia (Achilles tendon pain syndrome), which is often associated with tendon degeneration, represents the most challenging entity regarding clinical diagnostics and therapy. Therefore, the use of imaging techniques to differentiate tendon disorders and even characterize structure alterations is of growing interest. This review article discusses the potential of different imaging techniques with respect to the diagnosis of acute and chronic tendon disorders. In this context, the most commonly used imaging techniques are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), B-mode ultrasound, and color-coded Doppler ultrasound (US). These modalities allow the detection of acute tendon ruptures and advanced chronic tendon disorders. However, the main disadvantages are still the low capabilities in the detection of early-stage degeneration and difficulties in the assessment of treatment responses during follow-up examinations. Furthermore, differentiation between chronic partial ruptures and degeneration remains challenging. The automatic contour detection and texture analysis may allow a more objective and quantitative interpretation, which might be helpful in the monitoring of tendon diseases during follow-up examinations. Other techniques to quantify tendon-specific MR properties, e.g. based on ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences, also seem to have great potential with respect to the precise detection of degenerative tendon disorders and their differentiation at a very early stage. (orig.)

  2. Achilles tendon rupture in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deangelis, Joseph P; Wilson, Kristina M; Cox, Charles L; Diamond, Alex B; Thomson, A Brian

    2009-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures commonly affect middle-aged athletes and can result in considerable functional impairment. While the cause is multifactorial, the greatest risk is present for athletes involved in sports that involve sudden acceleration and deceleration. A thorough history and physical examination can accurately yield a diagnosis, but when question remains, magnetic resonance imaging is superior to ultrasound-guided evaluation. The best evidence available suggests that operative treatment has a lower rate of rerupture, a higher rate of return to the same level of sport participation, and a higher complication rate, if an open technique is used. Percutaneous methods of fixation have lower complication rates without an increase in the rate of rerupture when compared with open methods. Augmentation of an Achilles tendon repair has demonstrated no clinical benefit. Rehabilitation with early mobilization leads to improved patient-reported outcomes.

  3. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-12-15

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7-21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy.

  4. Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy accelerates Achilles tendon repair by promoting neurite regeneration☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Aibai, Minawa; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Nuerduola, Yeermike; Satewalede, Turde; Buranbai, Darehan; Hunapia, Beicen; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Bai, Jingping; Kizaibek, Murat

    2012-01-01

    Active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy facilitates the functional recovery of a ruptured Achilles tendon. However, protein expression during the healing process remains a controversial issue. New Zealand rabbits, aged 14 weeks, underwent tenotomy followed immediately by Achilles tendon microsurgery to repair the Achilles tendon rupture. The tendon was then immobilized or subjected to postoperative early motion treatment (kinesitherapy). Mass spectrography results showed that after 14 days of motion treatment, 18 protein spots were differentially expressed, among which, 12 were up-regulated, consisting of gelsolin isoform b and neurite growth-related protein collapsing response mediator protein 2. Western blot analysis showed that gelsolin isoform b was up-regulated at days 7–21 of motion treatment. These findings suggest that active Achilles tendon kinesitherapy promotes the neurite regeneration of a ruptured Achilles tendon and gelsolin isoform b can be used as a biomarker for Achilles tendon healing after kinesitherapy. PMID:25317130

  5. Mechanical properties of the human Achilles tendon, in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsgaard, M; Nielsen, C H; Hegnsvad, S

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography has been widely applied for in vivo measurements of tendon mechanical properties. Assessments of human Achilles tendon mechanical properties have received great interest. Achilles tendon injuries predominantly occur in the tendon region between the Achilles-soleus myotendinous...... Achilles tendon in vivo by the use of ultrasonography and 2) assess the between-day reproducibility of these measurements....

  6. Achilles tendon rupture - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... will cover your foot and go to your knee. Your toes will be pointing downward. The cast will be changed every 2 to 3 weeks to help stretch your tendon. If you have a leg brace, splint, or boot, it will keep you from moving your foot. ...

  7. MRI of normal achilles tendon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollandi, G.A. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Perrone, R. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Garlaschi, G. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E. [Institute of Radiology, Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    1995-12-01

    To investigate the normal internal structure of tendons 11 volunteers without clinical evidence of tendinopathy were examined using conventional spin-echo T1-, T2- and proton-density weighted sequences. The Achilles tendon was chosen because of its high frequency of injury in athletic activity, large size, superficial position and because it is oriented nearly parallel to the static magnetic field, therefore minimizing the ``magic angle phenomenon``. The tendons exhibited areas of slighly increased signal in four T1-weighted and in all but one proton-density-weighted scans. No intratendinous signal was detected in T2-weighted images. The possible origin of these findings is discussed. We conclude that the knowledge of these normal signals may be useful to avoid incorrectly diagnosing as pathological. (orig.). With 2 figs.

  8. Thompson Test in Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer Albertson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available HPI: A 26-year old male presented to the emergency department after experiencing the acute onset of left ankle pain while playing basketball. Upon jumping, he felt a “pop” in his left posterior ankle, followed by pain and difficulty ambulating. His exam was notable for a defect at the left Achilles tendon on palpation. The practitioner performed a Thompson test, which was positive (abnormal on the left. Significant Findings: The left Achilles tendon had a defect on palpation, while the right Achilles tendon was intact. When squeezing the right (unaffected calf, the ankle spontaneously plantar flexed, indicating a negative (normal Thompson test. Upon squeeze of the left (affected calf, the ankle did not plantar flex, signifying a positive (abnormal Thompson test. The diagnosis of left Achilles tendon rupture was confirmed intraoperatively one week later. Discussion: The Achilles tendon (also: calcaneal tendon or heel cord is derived from the medial and lateral heads of the gastrocnemius muscle, as well as the soleus muscle. Rupture of the Achilles tendon most commonly occurs in the distal tendon, approximately 2-6 cm from its attachment to the calcaneal tuberosity, in an area of hypovascularity known as the “watershed” or “critical” zone.1-3 The Thompson test (also: Simmonds-Thompson test, described by Simmonds in 1957 and Thompson in 1962, is done while the patient is in the prone position, with feet hanging over the end of a table/gurney, or with the patient kneeling on a stool or chair.4-5 Squeezing the calf of an unaffected limb will cause the ankle to plantar flex, but squeezing the calf of a limb with an Achilles tendon rupture will cause no motion. The sensitivity of the Thompson’s test for the diagnosis of a complete Achilles tendon rupture is 96-100% and the specificity is 93-100%, but data is limited.6-8

  9. Complications of Supine Surgical Achilles Tendon Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcel, John J; Sage, Katherine; Guyton, Gregory P

    2018-02-01

    Open Achilles tendon surgery with the patient in the supine position potentially avoids the complications of the prone position, but the safety and viability of the supine position for this procedure are not known. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that supine positioning for open repair of acute Achilles tendon ruptures would be safe, with low wound and neurologic complication rates. Supine position safety in acute Achilles tendon repair was investigated. Consecutive cases of supine Achilles tendon surgical repair performed by one surgeon from 2010 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were included if they were surgically treated with primary repair in the supine position within 15 days of injury and did not undergo concomitant surgery. A paramedian incision 1 cm medial to the Achilles sheath was used. Initial chart review identified 161 patients who underwent any type of Achilles tendon surgery in the supine position, of whom 45 patients met the inclusion criteria. This group included 39 men and 6 women with an average age of 41 years (range, 20-66 years). Median length of follow-up was 116 days (range, 25-1,589 days). Average body mass index was 29 kg/m 2 (range, 23-36 kg/m 2 ). There were no infections, sural nerve injuries, or reruptures. The supine position was safe for primary open Achilles tendon repair, with no wound or neurologic complications. Level IV, Case Series.

  10. Management of open achilles tendon injury: Primary repair and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Achilles tendon injuries have progressive increase worldwide in the last few decades. This is attributable to increase in both competitive and recreational sports. In most of the literature written on Achilles tendon injuries there were rarely any information about open Achilles tendon lacerations. In fact, Achilles ...

  11. Long-term functional outcome of bilateral spontaneous and simultaneous Achilles tendon ruptures.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, Prasad

    2012-10-01

    Bilateral simultaneous ruptures are rare comprising less than 1% of all Achilles tendon ruptures. Risk factors for bilateral ruptures include chronic diseases and medications such as corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones. There is little in the literature on the long-term functional outcome of bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures. This article present a series of 3 cases of simultaneous and spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon ruptures with a minimum of 5-year follow up suggesting a good functional outcome.

  12. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. PURPOSE: The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute...... Achilles tendon rupture. METHODS: In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  13. Motor responses to experimental Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    of the exercise are affected by Achilles tendon pain. Objective The authors aimed to determine the effects of experimental Achilles tendon pain on motor function during one-legged weight bearing ankle plantar and dorsal flexion exercises. Methods In a crossover study, with 16 healthy subjects tested on two...... before, during and after either experimental Achilles tendon pain or a non-painful control condition. Pain was induced by intratendinous injections of hypertonic saline with isotonic saline injections as control. Joint kinematics, ground reaction force frequency contents and average EMG amplitudes were...... calculated. Results Compared with the control condition experimental Achilles tendon pain reduced the EMG activity in agonistic, synergistic and antagonistic muscles, and increased the ground reaction force frequency content around 10 Hz, during both eccentric and concentric movement phases. Conclusions...

  14. Achilles tendon rupture; assessment of nonoperative treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute Achilles tendon rupture is a frequent and potentially disabling injury. Over the past decade a change in treatment ofacute Achilles tendon rupture away from operative towards non-operative treatment has taken place. However, the optimal non-operative treatment protocol remains...... to be clarified, particularly the role of weight-bearing during early rehabilitation. Also, there is a need for a clinically applicable and accurate measurement to detect patients in risk of developing Achilles tendon elongation. PURPOSE: The aim of this PhD thesis was to evaluate non-operative treatment of acute...... Achilles tendon rupture. METHODS: In study I, a cross-sectional survey was performed investigating the chosen treatment protocols across Scandinavia. In study II, the effect of immediate weight-bearing on patient reported and functional outcomes was investigated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT...

  15. Terminology for Achilles tendon related disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; van Sterkenburg, M. N.; Wiegerinck, J. I.; Karlsson, J.; Maffulli, N.

    2011-01-01

    The terminology of Achilles tendon pathology has become inconsistent and confusing throughout the years. For proper research, assessment and treatment, a uniform and clear terminology is necessary. A new terminology is proposed; the definitions hereof encompass the anatomic location, symptoms,

  16. Endoscopic adhesiolysis for extensive tibialis posterior tendon and Achilles tendon adhesions following compound tendon rupture

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2013-01-01

    Tendon adhesion is one of the most common causes of disability following tendon surgery. A case of extensive peritendinous adhesions of the Achilles tendon and tibialis posterior tendon after compound rupture of the tendons was reported. This was managed by endoscopic adhesiolysis of both tendons. The endoscopic approach allows early postoperative mobilisation which can relieve the tendon adhesion.

  17. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders

  18. Achilles tendon: US diagnosis of pathologic conditions. Work in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blei, C.L.; Nirschl, R.P.; Grant, E.G.

    1986-06-01

    Twenty-three patients were prospectively examined with ultra-sound (US) for acute or recurrent Achilles tendon symptoms. Three types of pathologic conditions of the Achilles tendon were found: tendinitis/tenosynovitis, acute tendon trauma, and postoperative changes. US appears to enable differentiation of these conditions and to contribute to the diagnosis of a broad range of Achilles tendon disorders.

  19. [The Achilles tendon in sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segesser, B; Goesele, A; Renggli, P

    1995-06-01

    Achillodynia is a generic term for various types of ailments in the region of the Achilles tendon. For adequate therapy a specific diagnosis is absolutely necessary. Besides an accurate anamnesis and the right choice of terrain and shoes, as well as a clinical examination where one has to specifically keep an eye on muscular imbalance between the gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle and disorders of the ligamentous control of the calcaneus caused by fibular ligament instabilities, a procedure such as radiology, ultrasound, and MR imaging is inevitable. From the differential diagnosis point of view a distinction between peritendinitis, mechanically triggered bursitis (calcaneal and subachilles), bony alterations of the calcaneus (calcaneus spur, Haglund exostosis persistent nucleus of the apophysis, fatigue fracture, etc) and a partial or total rupture (a one-time occurrence or multiple occurrences) has to be made. Occasionally, entrapment of the ramus calcaneus of the sural nerve causes calcaneal pain. If clinically not confirmed, lumbar pain ought to be taken into consideration (discopathy, Bechterew disease, etc). Metabolic disorders (especially uric acid) and underlying rheumatic diseases must be excluded. The therapy of achillodynia includes local and peroral antiphlogistic medication as a concomitant measure. More important is the causal influence of etiological factors, i.e., the correction of muscular imbalance, ensuring control of the calcaneus through bandages and adjustment of sport shoes, changes in training buildup and exercise intensity, just to mention a few. If necessary, surgically splitting the peritendineum, sanitation of a partial rupture, bursectomy and removal of mechanically obstructive exostosis must be done.

  20. The Risk of Achilles Tendon Rupture in the Patients with Achilles Tendinopathy: Healthcare Database Analysis in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Yasui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Disorders of the Achilles tendon can be broadly classified into acute and chronic entities. Few studies have established chronic Achilles tendinopathy as a precursor to acute Achilles ruptures. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Achilles tendinopathy and rupture, clarifying the incidence of rupture in the setting of underlying tendinopathy. Methods. The United Healthcare Orthopedic Dataset from the PearlDiver Patient Record Database was used to identify patients with ICD-9 codes for Achilles rupture and/or Achilles tendinopathy. The number of patients with acute rupture, chronic tendinopathy, and rupture following a prior diagnosis of tendinopathy was assessed. Results. Four percent of patients with an underlying diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy went on to sustain a rupture (7,232 patients. Older patients with tendinopathy were most vulnerable to subsequent rupture. Conclusions. The current study demonstrates that 4.0% of patients who were previously diagnosed with Achilles tendinopathy sustained an Achilles tendon rupture. Additionally, older patients with Achilles tendinopathy were most vulnerable. These findings are important as they can help clinicians more objectively council patients with Achilles tendinopathy.

  1. Different Achilles Tendon Pathologies Show Distinct Histological and Molecular Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Klatte-Schulz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Reasons for the development of chronic tendon pathologies are still under debate and more basic knowledge is needed about the different diseases. The aim of the present study was therefore to characterize different acute and chronic Achilles tendon disorders. Achilles tendon samples from patients with chronic tendinopathy (n = 7, chronic ruptures (n = 6, acute ruptures (n = 13, and intact tendons (n = 4 were analyzed. The histological score investigating pathological changes was significantly increased in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to acute ruptures. Inflammatory infiltration was detected by immunohistochemistry in all tendon pathology groups, but was significantly lower in tendinopathy compared to chronic ruptures. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis revealed significantly altered expression of genes related to collagens and matrix modeling/remodeling (matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in tendinopathy and chronic ruptures compared to intact tendons and/or acute ruptures. In all three tendon pathology groups markers of inflammation (interleukin (IL 1β, tumor necrosis factor α, IL6, IL10, IL33, soluble ST2, transforming growth factor β1, cyclooxygenase 2, inflammatory cells (cluster of differentaition (CD 3, CD68, CD80, CD206, fat metabolism (fatty acid binding protein 4, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α, adiponectin, and innervation (protein gene product 9.5, growth associated protein 43, macrophage migration inhibitory factor were detectable, but only in acute ruptures significantly regulated compared to intact tendons. The study gives an insight into structural and molecular changes of pathological processes in tendons and might be used to identify targets for future therapy of tendon pathologies.

  2. [Development of Achilles tendon rupture in skiing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckert, K; Benedetto, K P; Vogel, A

    1983-06-01

    This is an analysis of decline of rupture of the Achilles tendon in skiing while there is a steady increase of skiing injuries. Three groups, equipped with three different types of ski boots were observed once on a plane slope on the other hand on a bump track. The simultaneous size of angle of knee and ankle was measured by telemetry. The high plastic ski boot, which obstructs the ankle forward and lateral is apart from the rise of heel in the boot, the safety binding and the new skiing style the main reason for decline of rupture of the Achilles tendon in skiing.

  3. Micromechanical properties and collagen composition of ruptured human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Philip; Kovanen, Vuokko; Hölmich, Per

    2013-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive.......The Achilles tendon is one of the strongest tendons in the human body, and yet it frequently ruptures, which is a substantial clinical problem. However, the cause of ruptures remains elusive....

  4. MANAGEMENT OF OPEN ACHILLES TENDON INJURY: PRIMARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching Hospital, Edo State, Nigeria over a period of 5 years. There were 52 cases of open Achilles tendon ... Postoperatively, below knee Plaster of. Paris cast were applied, with the ankle in Plantigrade position .... contracture and a below knee boot cast is applied in a plantigrade position in order to facilitate mobilization.

  5. Triple Achilles Tendon Rupture: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Hofer, Deann

    We present a case report with 1-year follow-up data of a 57-year-old male soccer referee who had sustained an acute triple Achilles tendon rupture injury during a game. His triple Achilles tendon rupture consisted of a rupture of the proximal watershed region, a rupture of the main body (mid-watershed area), and an avulsion-type rupture of insertional calcific tendinosis. The patient was treated surgically with primary repair of the tendon, including tenodesis with anchors. Postoperative treatment included non-weightbearing for 4 weeks and protected weightbearing until 10 weeks postoperative, followed by formal physical therapy, which incorporated an "antigravity" treadmill. The patient was able to return to full activity after 26 weeks, including running and refereeing, without limitations. Copyright © 2017 The American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanical characteristics of the eccentric Achilles tendon exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marius; Aaboe, Jens; Bliddal, Henning

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Eccentric exercise has been shown to provide good short-term clinical results in the treatment of painful mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathies. However, the mechanisms behind the positive effects of eccentric rehabilitation regimes are not known, and research into the biomechan......BACKGROUND: Eccentric exercise has been shown to provide good short-term clinical results in the treatment of painful mid-portion chronic Achilles tendinopathies. However, the mechanisms behind the positive effects of eccentric rehabilitation regimes are not known, and research....... No differences in Achilles tendon loads were found. INTERPRETATION: This descriptive study demonstrates differences in the movement biomechanics between the eccentric and concentric phases of one-legged full weight bearing ankle dorsal and plantar flexion exercises. In particular, the findings imply...

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for Achilles tendon pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Maffulli1, Umile Giuseppe Longo2, Filippo Spiezia2, Vincenzo Denaro21Centre for Sports and Exercise Medicine, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, England; 2Department of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome, ItalyAbstract: Minimally invasive trauma and orthopedic surgery is increasingly common, though technically demanding. Its use for pathologies of the Achilles tendon (AT hold the promise to allow faster recovery times, shorter hospital stays, and improved functional outcomes when compared to traditional open procedures, which can lead to difficulty with wound healing because of the tenuous blood supply and increased chance of wound breakdown and infection. We present the recent advances in the field of minimally invasive AT surgery for tendinopathy, acute ruptures, chronic tears, and chronic avulsions of the AT. In our hands, minimally invasive surgery has provided similar results to those obtained with open surgery, with decreased perioperative morbidity, decreased duration of hospital stay, and reduced costs. So far, the studies on minimally invasive orthopedic techniques are of moderate scientific quality with short follow-up periods. Multicenter studies with longer follow-up are needed to justify the long-term advantages of these techniques over traditional ones.Keywords: tendinopathy, rupture, percutanous repair, less invasive

  8. Effects of 12-wk eccentric calf muscle training on muscle-tendon glucose uptake and SEMG in patients with chronic Achilles tendon pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masood, Tahir; Kalliokoski, Kari; Magnusson, S Peter

    2014-01-01

    High-load eccentric exercises have been a key component in the conservative management of chronic Achilles tendinopathy. This study investigated the effects of a 12-wk progressive, home-based eccentric rehabilitation program on ankle plantar flexors' glucose uptake (GU) and myoelectric activity a...

  9. Achilles Tendon Repair, A Modified Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrab Keyhani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available   Background: Wound complications following open repair for acute Achilles tendon ruptures (AATR remain the subject of significant debate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of covering repaired AATR using well-nourished connective tissues (paratenon and deep fascia to avoid complications after open repair.   Methods: In this case series study, open repair was performed for 32 active young patients with AATR. After the tendon was repaired, the deep fascia and paratenon was used to cover the Achilles tendon. Patients were followed for two years and any wound complication was recorded. During the last visit, the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle-hind foot score was completed for all patients. Calf circumference and ankle range of motion were measured and compared with the contralateral side. Patients were asked about returning to previous sports activities and limitations with footwear. Results: Only, one patient developed deep wound infection (3%. None of the patients had any discomfort around the operation area, limitation with footwear, sural nerve injury, re-rupture, and skin adhesion. The AOFAS score averaged 92.5±6. Two patients (7% were unable to return to previous sports activities because of moderate pain in heavy physical exercises. The calf circumference and ankle ROM were similar between healthy and operated sides. Conclusion: The present study showed that fascial envelope for full covering of the repaired Achilles tendon may help to prevent the occurrence of wound complications.

  10. Percutaneous & Mini Invasive Achilles tendon repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmont Michael R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rupture of the Achilles tendon is a considerable cause of morbidity with reduced function following injury. Recent studies have shown little difference in outcome between the techniques of open and non-operative treatment using an early active rehabilitation programme. Meta-analyses have shown that non-operative management has increased risk of re-rupture whereas surgical intervention has risks of complications related to the wound and iatrogenic nerve injury. Minimally invasive surgery has been adopted as a way of reducing infections rates and wound breakdown however avoiding iatrogenic nerve injury must be considered. We discuss the techniques and outcomes of percutaneous and minimally invasive repairs of the Achilles tendon.

  11. ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE AND PLATELET RICH PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Zedde

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon rupture is currently one of the most frequent injuries in athletes. Such rupture may be caused by a sudden dorsiflexion of the ankle, pushing off with the weight bearing forefoot while extending the knee or violent dorsiflexion of a plantar flexed foot. The treatment goal consists of restoring the normal tendon length and tension, as well as the function and strength of the gastrocnemius-soleus complex. The biological repair process can be enhanced in all stages of recovery with the use of PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma without any side effects.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalabi, A. [Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden). Center for Surgical Sciences Divisions of Radiology and Orthopedics

    2004-09-01

    The main objective of this thesis was to evaluate and monitor the morphological response following treatment interventions in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy by using different MRI techniques. For this purpose, we investigated different types of sequences, including gadolinium contrast medium-enhanced T1-WI images (CME T1-WI), and developed a precise method to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal of the Achilles tendon. Study I aimed at evaluating 15 patients with chronic, painful Achilles tendinosis, before and 2 years after surgical treatment. There was marked regression of the intratendinous signal postoperatively. The most sensitive sequence for depicting an intratendinous lesion in this study was CME T1-WI images. They showed a regression of the intratendinous signal abnormality from 13/15 patients preoperatively to 4/15 postoperatively. The clinical outcome was excellent in eight, good in five, fair in one and poor in one patient. In study II, the early contrast agent enhancement in the dynamically enhanced MRI signal (DEMRI) was correlated with the histopathologic findings in 15 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Early contrast enhancement (within the first 72 s) was seen in DEMRI in the symptomatic Achilles tendons, with a significant difference compared to the asymptomatic contralateral tendons. Increased severity of tendon changes, including fiber structure abnormality, increased vascularity, rounding of nuclei, and increased amount of glycosaminoglycans, correlated to CME. In study III, we developed a computerized 3-D seed-growing MRI technique to measure tendon volume and mean intratendinous signal. This technique showed an excellent inter- and intra-observer reliability. The technique was also used to follow up prospectively the tendon adaptation and healing described in studies IV-VI. In study IV, using serial MRI during a period of 1 year, we evaluated the biological effect of tendon repair following iatrogenic

  13. Use of fluroquinolone and risk of Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Obel, Niels; Hallas, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several case-control studies have reported that the use of fluoroquinolone increases the risk of rupture of the Achilles tendon. Our aim was to estimate this risk by means of a population-based cohort approach. SETTING: Data on Achilles tendon ruptures and fluoroquinolone use were...... retrieved from three population-based databases that include information on residents of Funen County (population: 470,000) in primary and secondary care during the period 1991-1999. A study cohort of all 28,262 first-time users of fluoroquinolone and all incident cases of Achilles tendon ruptures were...... identified. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The incidence rate of Achilles tendon ruptures among users and non-users of fluoroquinolones and the standardised incidence rate ratio associating fluoroquinolon use with Achilles tendon rupture were the main outcome measures. RESULTS: Between 1991 and 2002 the incidence...

  14. Asymmetrical Achilles tendon ossification and rare rear heel pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Abu Bakar Siddiq

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendon ossification is not a frequent association of posterior heel pain in pain physicians’ daily practice. The condition has been reportedly common following rear heel trauma (repetitive heel stress injury, surgery (club foot surgery; however, some endocrino-metabolic, haematological disorders can also contribute to Achilles tendon ossification. Shape of ossified tendon mass varies from discrete (single/multiple to extensive variety; and as per literature review, in bilateral cases they are alike. To be intriguing, here in this write-up, we demonstrate asymmetrical (in terms of clinical features and radioimaging findings, bilateral Achilles tendon ossification in a 70-year-old retired farmer, first time in literature.

  15. Ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendon: a rare entity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Abhishek J; Arora, Richa

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the Achilles tendon is a rare clinical entity comprising of one or more segments of variable sized ossified masses in the fibrocartilaginous substance of the tendon. The etiology of ossification of the Achilles tendon is multifactorial with recurrent trauma and surgery comprising major predisposing factors, with others being metabolic, systemic, and infectious diseases. The possibility of a genetic predisposition towards this entity has also been raised, but has not yet been proven. We present a rare case of ossification of the bilateral Achilles tendons without any history of trauma or surgery in a 48-year-old female patient

  16. Comparison of Achilles Tendon Loading Between Male and Female Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Greenhalgh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recreational running is an activity with multiple reported health benefits for both sexes, however, chronic injuries caused by excessive and/or repetitive loading of the Achilles tendon are common. Males have been identified as being at an increased risk of suffering an injury to the Achilles tendon and as such, knowledge of differences in loading between the sexes may provide further information to better understand why this is the case. The aim of the current investigation was to determine whether gender differences in the Achilles tendon load exist in recreational runners. Fifteen male (age 26.74 ± 5.52 years, body height 1.80 ± 0.11 m and body mass 74.22 ± 7.27 kg and fifteen female (age 25.13 ± 6.39 years, body height 1.68 ± 0.12 m and body mass 67.12 ± 9.11 kg recreational runners volunteered to take part in the current investigation. Participants completed 10 trials running at 4.0 m·s-1 ±5% striking a force platform (1000 Hz with their right foot. Ankle joint kinematics were synchronously recorded (250 Hz using an optoelectric motion capture system. Ankle joint kinetics were computed using Newton-Euler inverse-dynamics. Net external ankle joint moments were then calculated. To estimate Achilles tendon kinetics the plantarflexion moment calculated was divided by an estimated Achilles tendon moment arm of 0.05 m. Differences in Achilles tendon kinetics were examined using independent sample t-tests (p<0.05. The results indicate that males were associated with significantly (p<0.05 greater Achilles tendon loads than females. The findings from this study support the notion that male recreational runners may be at greater risk of Achilles tendon pathology.

  17. Human Achilles tendon glycation and function in diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppe, Christian; Svensson, Rene Brüggebusch; Kongsgaard, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients have an increased risk of foot ulcers, and glycation of collagen may increase tissue stiffness. We hypothesized that the level of glycemic control (glycation) may affect Achilles tendon stiffness, which can influence gait pattern. We therefore investigated the relationship between...... collagen glycation, Achilles tendon stiffness parameters and plantar pressure in poorly (n = 22) and well (n = 22) controlled diabetic patients, including healthy age matched (45-70 yrs) controls (n = 11). There were no differences in any of outcome parameters (collagen cross-linking or tendon stiffness...... concentrations (55%, P tendon material stiffness was higher in DB (54%, P tendon material stiffness and skin connective...

  18. Nonoperative, dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Lauridsen, Hanne Bloch

    2015-01-01

    Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon comp......Acute Achilles tendon rupture alters the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle-tendon complex that can affect functional performance and the risk of repeat injury. The purpose of the present study was to compare the biomechanical properties of the plantar flexor muscle...

  19. Randomised controlled trial evaluating the short-term analgesic effect of topical diclofenac on chronic Achilles tendon pain: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussin, Erin Rebecca; Cairns, Brian; Bovard, Jim; Scott, Alexander

    2017-05-04

    To determine if a topically applied non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (diclofenac) can provide short-term pain relief for chronic Achilles tendinopathy (CAT), in order to inform the development of a new rehabilitation protocol. Pilot double-blind, cross-over randomised controlled trial providing participants with tertiary care. The study was conducted at a single research centre in Vancouver, BC. Sixteen adults with unilateral CAT and three adults with bilateral CAT participated. Participants received two successive treatments (10% diclofenac gel or placebo gel) in random order over a 3-day period. There was a 1-week washout period between the treatments. Allocation was by simple randomisation, and the participants as well as the assessing/treating researcher were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary outcome measure was pain level (0-10) during tendon loading (hopping). Secondary outcome measures included pain at rest, pressure pain threshold of the Achilles tendon and symptom improvement. Nineteen adults participated in the study, and all were included in the analysis. Diclofenac gel significantly reduced the average pain during tendon loading (pdiclofenac. Pain at rest was decreased and pressure pain threshold increased with diclofenac treatment, but not with placebo gel. There were no observed or reported side effects of either treatment. In this small, short-term study, diclofenac was able to improve symptoms and reduce pain during tendon loading in participants with CAT, whereas placebo gel was not. A future study of diclofenac as a supplement to rehabilitation, with longer follow-up and powered to detect a difference between diclofenac and placebo, is indicated. ISRCTN60151284, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN60151284 ETHICS: UBC Clinical Research Ethics Board approval was obtained for this research. The certificate number of the ethics certificate of approval to conduct research is H15-00999. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise

  20. Finite Element Analysis of the Achilles Tendon While Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anițaș Răzvan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Achilles tendon is the most frequent recipient of traumatic injuries. The aim of this study is to identify and describe the varying load at ankle level and especially at the Achilles tendon’s insertion on the calcaneus.

  1. Quadriceps tendon allografts as an alternative to Achilles tendon allografts: a biomechanical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabe, Isaac; Hunter, Shawn

    2014-12-01

    Quadriceps tendon with a patellar bone block may be a viable alternative to Achilles tendon for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL-R) if it is, at a minimum, a biomechanically equivalent graft. The objective of this study was to directly compare the biomechanical properties of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon allografts. Quadriceps and Achilles tendon pairs from nine research-consented donors were tested. All specimens were processed to reduce bioburden and terminally sterilized by gamma irradiation. Specimens were subjected to a three phase uniaxial tension test performed in a custom environmental chamber to maintain the specimens at a physiologic temperature (37 ± 2 °C) and misted with a 0.9 % NaCl solution. There were no statistical differences in seven of eight structural and mechanical between the two tendon types. Quadriceps tendons exhibited a significantly higher displacement at maximum load and significantly lower stiffness than Achilles tendons. The results of this study indicated a biomechanical equivalence of aseptically processed, terminally sterilized quadriceps tendon grafts with bone block to Achilles tendon grafts with bone block. The significantly higher displacement at maximum load, and lower stiffness observed for quadriceps tendons may be related to the failure mode. Achilles tendons had a higher bone avulsion rate than quadriceps tendons (86 % compared to 12 %, respectively). This was likely due to observed differences in bone block density between the two tendon types. This research supports the use of quadriceps tendon allografts in lieu of Achilles tendon allografts for ACL-R.

  2. Stereological quantification of immune-competent cells in baseline biopsy specimens from achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragsnaes, Maja Skov; Fredberg, Ulrich; Stribolt, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on the presence and function of immune-competent cells in chronic tendinopathic tendons and their potential role in inflammation and tissue healing as well as in predicting long-term outcome. PURPOSE: To quantify subtypes of immune-competent cells in biopsy specimens....... METHODS: Fifty patients with nonruptured chronic Achilles tendinopathy and 15 healthy participants were included. At time of inclusion, an ultrasound examination was performed immediately before an ultrasound-guided Achilles tendon biopsy specimen was obtained. Tissue samples were evaluated......(+)) using a stereological technique. A follow-up examination was conducted more than 4 years (range, 4-9 years) after the biopsy procedure to evaluate the long-term presence of Achilles tendon symptoms. RESULTS: Macrophages, T lymphocytes, mast cells, and natural killer cells were observed in the majority...

  3. Development and reliability of the Achilles Tendon Length Measure and comparison with the Achilles Tendon Resting Angle on patients with an Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is a need for a valid, reliable, and easily applicable clinical measure of the length of the Achilles tendon (AT) after rupture. This study examines the reliability of a new ruler based measurement, the Achilles Tendon Length Measure (ATLM) in comparison with the goniometer......-based Achilles Tendon Resting Angle (ATRA). METHODS: Measurements were performed by two independent physiotherapists eight weeks after AT rupture on 28 patients treated non-operatively. RESULTS: The mean (SD) injured ATLM was 56.5 (2.3)cm, ICC2.1 0.91(CI [0.72-0.97]), SEM 0.7cm (SEM% 1.2), MDC 1.9cm (MDC% 3...

  4. Quantification of cell density in rat Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couppé, Christian; Svensson, René B; Heinemeier, Katja M

    2017-01-01

    Increased tendon cell nuclei density (TCND) has been proposed to induce tendon mechanical adaptations. However, it is unknown whether TCND is increased in tendon tissue after mechanical loading and whether such an increase can be quantified in a reliable manner. The aim of this study was to develop...... a reliable method for quantification of TCND and to investigate potential changes in TCND in rat Achilles tendons in response to 12 weeks of running. Eight adult male Sprague-Dawley rats ran (RUN) on a treadmill with 10° incline, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk (17-20 m/min) for 12 weeks (which improved tendon mechanical...... properties) and were compared with 11 control rats (SED). Tissue-Tek-embedded cryosections (10 µm) from the mid region of the Achilles tendon were cut longitudinally on a cryostat. Sections were stained with alcian blue and picrosirius red. One blinded investigator counted the number of tendon cell nuclei 2...

  5. Is Z Division of the Achilles Tendon always Necessary in Wide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In posterior approach to the back of tibia and ankle, mere retraction of the Achilles tendon can expose the operation site but when this exposure is not enough, Z division of the Achilles tendon is recommended in literature. The main objective of the study is to find out if Z division of the Achilles tendon is always ...

  6. Nonoperative dynamic treatment of acute achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Bencke, Jesper; Bloch Lauridsen, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dynamic rehabilitation has been suggested to be an important part of nonoperative treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture that results in functional outcome and rerupture rates comparable with those of operative treatment. However, the optimal role of weight-bearing during early...... rehabilitation remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to compare immediate weight-bearing with non-weight-bearing in a nonoperative dynamic treatment protocol for Achilles tendon rupture. METHODS: The study was conducted as a blinded, randomized, controlled, parallel superiority trial. Patients eighteen...... to sixty years of age were eligible for inclusion. Both groups were treated nonoperatively with controlled early motion. The intervention group was allowed full weight-bearing from day one, and the control group was non-weight-bearing for six weeks. The primary outcome was the Achilles tendon Total Rupture...

  7. Validity and Reliability of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    strong correlations with the physical subscores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (r = .70 to .75; p questionnaire (r = .71; p ...The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present...... study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately...

  8. Could Ossification of the Achilles Tendon Have a Hereditary Component?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chawki Cortbaoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ossification of the Achilles tendon (OTA is an unusual clinical condition. It is characterized by the presence of an ossified mass within the fibrocartilaginous substance of the Achilles tendon. The etiology of the ossification of the Achilles tendon is unknown. Review of the literature suggests that its etiology is multifactorial. The major contributing factors are trauma and surgery with other minor causes such as systemic diseases, metabolic conditions, and infections. To our knowledge, no previous reports suggest any genetic/hereditary predisposition in OAT. We report 3 siblings who have OAT with no history of any of the aforementioned predisposing factors. Could OAT have a hereditary component as one of its etiologies?

  9. Imaging and Treatment of Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: It is estimated that 30-50% of sports injuries are caused by tendon disorders. Chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy is a frequent problem, particularly occurring in athletes but also affecting inactive people. Diagnosis is made based on clinical findings and currently

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of Achilles tendon xanthomas in familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liem, M.S.L.; Bloem, J.L.; Schipper, J.

    1992-01-01

    The demonstration of tendon xanthomas is helpful in diagnosing heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We investigated the possibility the lipid element with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in seven patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and six controls. Although the mean relative signal intensities measured on long TR/TE spin echo sequences of the tendon were significantly higher in patients than in controls, the lack of such elevation does not rule out the presence of such lesions. MR imaging and US provide equal information on the anatomy of the Achilles tendon; as an abnormally increased signal intensity within the xanthoma on MRI was found in only a minority of our patients, the value of MRI in the demonstration of Achilles tendon xanthomas is limited when using conventional T1 and T2 spin echo sequences. (orig./DG)

  11. Biomechanical properties of Achilles tendon repair augmented with a bioadhesive-coated scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Michael; Vollenweider, Laura; Murphy, John L; Xu Fangmin; Lyman, Arinne; Lew, William D; Lee, Bruce P, E-mail: b-lee@nerites.com [Nerites Corporation, 505 S. Rosa Road, Suite 123, Madison, WI 53719 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The Achilles tendon is the most frequently ruptured tendon. Both acute and chronic (neglected) tendon ruptures can dramatically affect a patient's quality of life, and require a prolonged period of recovery before return to pre-injury activity levels. This paper describes the use of an adhesive-coated biologic scaffold to augment primary suture repair of transected Achilles tendons. The adhesive portion consisted of a synthetic mimic of mussel adhesive proteins that can adhere to various surfaces in a wet environment, including biologic tissues. When combined with biologic scaffolds such as bovine pericardium or porcine dermal tissues, these adhesive constructs demonstrated lap shear adhesive strengths significantly greater than that of fibrin glue, while reaching up to 60% of the strength of a cyanoacrylate-based adhesive. These adhesive constructs were wrapped around transected cadaveric porcine Achilles tendons repaired with a combination of parallel and three-loop suture patterns. Tensile mechanical testing of the augmented repairs exhibited significantly higher stiffness (22-34%), failure load (24-44%), and energy to failure (27-63%) when compared to control tendons with suture repair alone. Potential clinical implications of this novel adhesive biomaterial are discussed.

  12. Experimental diabetes induces structural, inflammatory and vascular changes of Achilles tendons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo R de Oliveira

    Full Text Available This study aims to demonstrate how the state of chronic hyperglycemia from experimental Diabetes Mellitus can influence the homeostatic imbalance of tendons and, consequently, lead to the characteristics of tendinopathy. Twenty animals were randomly divided into two experimental groups: control group, consisting of healthy rats and diabetic group constituted by rats induced to Diabetes Mellitus I. After twenty-four days of the induction of Diabetes type I, the Achilles tendon were removed for morphological evaluation, cellularity, number and cross-sectional area of blood vessel, immunohistochemistry for Collagen type I, VEGF and NF-κB nuclear localization sequence (NLS and nitrate and nitrite level. The Achilles tendon thickness (µm/100g of diabetic animals was significantly increased and, similarly, an increase was observed in the density of fibrocytes and mast cells in the tendons of the diabetic group. The average number of blood vessels per field, in peritendinous tissue, was statistically higher in the diabetic group 3.39 (2.98 vessels/field when compared to the control group 0.89 (1.68 vessels/field p = 0.001 and in the intratendinous region, it was observed that blood vessels were extremely rare in the control group 0.035 (0.18 vessels/field and were often present in the tendons of the diabetic group 0.89 (0.99 vessels/field. The immunohistochemistry analysis identified higher density of type 1 collagen and increased expression of VEGF as well as increased immunostaining for NFκB p50 NLS in the nucleus in Achilles tendon of the diabetic group when compared to the control group. Higher levels of nitrite/nitrate were observed in the experimental group induced to diabetes. We conclude that experimental DM induces notable structural, inflammatory and vascular changes in the Achilles tendon which are compatible with the process of chronic tendinopathy.

  13. Effects of Therapeutic Physical Agents on Achilles Tendon Microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Ping; Chiang, Hongsen; Shih, Kao-Shang; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Lin, Leou-Chyr; Hsu, Wei-Li; Huang, Yung-Cheng; Wang, Hsing-Kuo

    2015-07-01

    Controlled laboratory study. To measure Achilles tendon microcirculation (total hemoglobin [THb] and oxygen saturation [StO2]) before and after the application of a physical agent in asymptomatic participants, and to compare differences between application location and physical agent dosage. Tendon microcirculation can be altered by superficial heating or cryotherapy. Fifty-one healthy adults (median age, 22 years; range, 20-34 years) were recruited and randomly assigned into 1 of 4 groups. Participants in each group received an intervention consisting of 1 of the following 4 physical agents: ultrasound (n = 12), interferential current (n = 14), low-level laser (n = 11), or vibration massage (n = 14). In each group, the selected intervention was applied at 2 different doses (ultrasound, 0.8 or 1.2 W/cm(2); laser, 5.4 or 18 J) or target locations (vibration and electrostimulation, calf muscle or Achilles tendon). For each participant, each dose or target location was randomly applied to 1 randomly selected lower leg (each leg receiving only 1 of the 2 options). The StO2 values significantly increased after ultrasound at both doses (Pinterferential current or low-level laser. Tendon microcirculation increases after ultrasound and vibration massage intervention concentrated on the Achilles tendon. These modalities may be considered for the purpose of temporarily increasing microcirculation in the tendon.

  14. Structural integrity is decreased in both Achilles tendons in people with unilateral Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, Sean I; Rosengarten, Samuel D; Daffy, John; Cook, Jill

    2015-07-01

    A high proportion of Achilles tendinopathy patients develop bilateral symptoms with human and animal studies showing bilateral histological changes associated with overuse/pathology in one tendon. The current study examined changes in tendon structure, assessed semi-quantitatively using ultrasound tissue characterisation, in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic tendon in unilateral Achilles tendinopathy patients in comparison to individuals with no history of tendinopathy. Cross-sectional case-control study. Participants with Achilles tendinopathy (n=21), with varying severity and length of clinical symptoms, and six participants with no history of tendinopathy were recruited. Tendons were scanned using ultrasound tissue characterisation, which captures contiguous transverse ultrasound images every 0.2mm and renders a 3-dimensional image. Ultrasound tissue characterisation quantifies tendon structure by measuring the stability of echopattern over contiguous transverse images. Four echo-types were discriminated and expressed as a percentage. Antero-posterior diameter of all tendons was measured. Significant differences were observed in the proportion of normal tendon structure between all three groups (ptendinopathy. Future studies need to investigate whether these changes increase the risk of developing symptoms. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calf Endurance and Achilles Tendon Structure in Classical Ballet Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellers, Jennifer A; van Ostrand, Katrina; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare

    2017-06-15

    Optimal lower leg function is critical for ballet dancers to meet their occupational requirements. Achilles tendon injury is particularly detrimental to ballet dancers. While standardized measures have been validated and incorporated into clinical practice for use in people with Achilles tendon injury, normative ranges specific to the dancer population have not been described. The purpose of this pilot study was to observe the performance of pre-professional ballet students and professional ballet dancers on a well-established test battery for lower leg functional performance as well as ultra-sonographic evaluation of the structure of their Achilles tendons. The dancers in this study had significantly shorter Achilles tendons than non-dancers (p = 0.016). Dancers demonstrated significantly higher maximum heel-rise height on the heel-rise test for calf endurance (p < 0.001) but performed significantly less work than non-dancers (p = 0.014). The results of this study support the use of the heel-rise test as a tool for screening and to guide rehabilitation.

  16. Achilles tendon rupture: a review of etiology, population, anatomy, risk factors, and injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Gregory William

    2010-02-01

    Sports participation has undergone an increase in recent decades. Injury due to sporting activity has also recently risen. The Achilles tendon has been one of the most common sports-related injuries. A 2 in 100,000 individual Achilles tendon injury rate increased to a 12 in 100,000 individual injury rate in less than 10 years. The injury is typically observed in men in the fourth to fifth decades of life. Male to female injury ratios range from 2:1 to 12:1. Running, jumping, and agility activities involving eccentric loading and explosive plyometric contractions are usual mechanisms. Natural aging allows predisposing chronic degeneration of the tendon. Blood flow decreases and stiffness increases with aging to decrease the ability to withstand stress. Noninflammatory tendinosis and chronic tendinopathy are 2 separate processes proposed for tendon degeneration and subsequent rupture. Rupture typically occurs 2 to 6 cm proximal to the calcaneal insertion. Predisposing factors are grouped into 2 categories: intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Avoidance of degenerative changes within the tendon is the primary method to prevent rupture. Regular physical activity as athletes age also promotes tendon hypertrophy, increases nutrient delivery, and reduces collagen fiber fatigue.

  17. Type 1 Achilles tendon rupture caused by grooming trauma in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Achilles tendon rupture is uncommon in small animal practice. A 9-month-old, female, mixed breed dog (weighing 2.2kg) was referred to our hospital with a primary complaint of right hind limb lameness. Complete right Achilles tendon rupture was diagnosed by physical examination and radiography. The tendon was ...

  18. Plaie du tendon d'Achille: technique chirurgicale mini-invasive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    English abstract. The Achilles tendon is the largest and strongest tendon in the body. It was in 1883 that Pollailon described first surgical intervention inaugurating the era of surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures. "Open surgical" repair appears to be the surest way for ensuring a solid contact of the ends, allowing a ...

  19. Substitution of porcine small intestinal submucosa for rabbit Achilles tendon, an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yan; Dai, Kerong

    2002-09-25

    To study the effect of substitution of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) for rabbit Achilles tendon. Porcine SIS was taken out and processed. Part of Achilles tendons of 20 rabbits' right legs were removed and substituted by porcine SIS and the Achilles tendon of the left legs were used as controls. One, four, eight, twelve, and sixteen weeks after the operation 4 rabbits were killed and their right Achilles tendons were taken out to be examined histologically and their maximum load was tested. One week after the operation, the porcine SIS was already fused with the remaining part of rabbit Achilles tendon. Sixteen weeks after all the Achilles tendons looked like normal one. The maximum load of experimental Achilles tendon was 48 N +/- 9 N one week after the operation, and increased gradually. In the 16th week after the operation, the maximum load was 178 N +/- 6 N for the experimental Achilles tendon and 174 N +/- 10 N for the control tendon. The differences of maximum load between different weeks after operation, except that between one week and 4 weeks after, were statistically significant (P Achilles tendon is effective, thus proving the feasibility of in vivo tissue engineering technology.

  20. A photoactivated nanofiber graft material for augmented Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Tao; Senthil-Kumar, Prabhu; Dubbin, Karen; Aznar-Cervantes, Salvador D; Datta, Néha; Randolph, Mark A; Cenis, José L; Rutledge, Gregory C; Kochevar, Irene E; Redmond, Robert W

    2012-10-01

    Suture repair of Achilles tendon rupture can cause infection, inflammation and scarring, while prolonged immobilization promotes adhesions to surrounding tissues and joint stiffness. Early mobilization can reduce complications provided the repair is strong enough to resist re-rupture. We have developed a biocompatible, photoactivated tendon wrap from electrospun silk (ES) to provide additional strength to the repair that could permit early mobilization, and act as a barrier to adhesion formation. ES nanofiber mats were prepared by electrospinning. New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgical transection of the Achilles tendon and repair by: (a) SR: standard Kessler suture + epitendinous suture (5-0 vicryl). (b) ES/PTB: a single stay suture and a section of ES mat, stained with 0.1% Rose Bengal (RB), wrapped around the tendon and bonded with 532 nm light (0.3 W/cm(2) , 125 J/cm(2) ). (c) SR + ES/PTB: a combination of (a) and (b). Gross appearance, extent of adhesion formation and biomechanical properties of the repaired tendon were evaluated at Days 7, 14, or 28 post-operatively (n = 8 per group at each time point). Ultimate stress (US) and Young's modulus (E) in the SR group were not significantly different from the ES/PTB group at Days 7 (US, P = 0.85; E, P = 1), 14 (US, P = 0.054; E, P = 1), and 28 (US, P = 0.198; E, P = 0.12) post-operatively. Adhesions were considerably greater in the SR group compared to the ES/PTB group at Days 7 (P = 0.002), 14 (P tendon repair site provides considerable benefit in Achilles tendon repair. Lasers Surg. Med. 44: 645-652, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Imaging method of minute injured area at achilles tendon from multiple MR Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokui, Takahiro; Imura, Masataka; Kuroda, Yoshihiro; Oshiro, Osamu; Oguchi, Makoto; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Tabata, Yoshito; Ishigaki, Rikuta

    2011-01-01

    Ruptures of Achilles tendon frequently occur while doing sports. Since two-thirds of the people who suffered from the rupture of Achilles tendon feel the pain at Achilles tendon before rupture, to detect the predictor of the rupture is possible. Achilles tendon is soft tissue consisting of unidirectionally-aligned collagen fibers. Therefore, ordinary MRI scanner, ultrasonic instrument or X-ray scanner cannot acquire medical images of Achilles tendon. However, because MR signal intensity changes according to the angle between static magnetic field direction and fiber orientation, MR device can detect strong signal when the angle is 55 deg. In this research, the authors propose the imaging method to detect injured area at Achilles tendon. The method calculates and visualizes the value representing fiber tropism from the matching between MR signal intensity and the model of signal intensity of angle dependence. (author)

  2. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R. (Dept. of Radiology, Emory Univ. Orthopedics and Spine Center, Atlanta, GA (United States)), e-mail: cpierr3@emory.edu

    2010-05-15

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  3. MRI of the Achilles tendon: A comprehensive review of the anatomy, biomechanics, and imaging of overuse tendinopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierre-Jerome, Claude; Moncayo, Valeria; Terk, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the largest tendon in the body; it plays an important role in the biomechanics of the lower extremity. It can withstand great forces, especially during sporting exercises and pivoting. The pathologies related to the Achilles tendon are diverse and many carry undesirable consequences. We retrospectively analyzed the images of patients who underwent examinations of the ankle/foot region to review the anatomy of the Achilles tendon and its surroundings and to search for pathologies consistent with overuse injuries. The anatomy of the tendon is described from origin to insertion. The imaging characteristics of the Achilles tendon including pitfalls are reviewed. We also describe the Achilles overuse injuries: paratenonitis, tendinosis, tendon tear, atypical tear, tendon re-tear, retrocalcaneal bursitis, retro-Achilles bursitis, Haglund's deformity, and tendon calcification. We present other entities like tendon ossification and failed transplanted Achilles tendon, with emphasis on MRI

  4. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired w...

  5. Sonoelastography shows that Achilles tendons with insertional tendinopathy are harder than asymptomatic tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Cai, Yehua; Hua, Yinghui; Shi, Jun; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yi

    2017-06-01

    To seek differences of Achilles tendon hardness between insertional tendinopathy (IT) and asymptomatic controls by using computer-assisted quantification on axial-strain sonoelastography (ASE). The study consisted of 37 non-athletic patients presenting with Achilles tendon pain in one or two tendons. Both tendons were examined clinically. Among the 74 tendons, 16 were diagnosed and categorized into an IT group and 29 into an asymptomatic group. The remaining 29 tendons were excluded due to non-insertional tendinopathy, ruptures, previous surgery or mixed disorders. The tendons in the IT and asymptomatic groups were examined with both ASE and conventional ultrasound. Computer-assisted quantification on ASE was conducted to extract parameters of tendon hardness, including the 20th percentile (H20), median (H50) and skewness (Hsk) of the hardness within tendon, as well as the ratio of the mean hardness within tendon to that outside tendon (Hratio). The H20 (p = 0.003), H50 (p = 0.004) and Hratio (p = 0.002) were larger and Hsk (p = 0.001) was smaller at distal thirds of IT tendons than those of asymptomatic tendons. For differentiation between two groups, the Hsk achieved the best value (0.815) of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, with a sensitivity of 81.3 %, a specificity of 86.2 % and an accuracy of 84.4 %. Computer-assisted quantification on ASE shows that IT tendons are harder than asymptomatic tendons. It might act as a potentially useful technique for identification and risk stratification of IT patients and thus be valuable in day-by-day clinical practice for monitoring IT progression and for evaluating therapeutic effects. III.

  6. Treatment of Achilles tendon rupture using different methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubor Predrag

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Today there are controversies about searching for the ideal surgical method (conservatively with plaster cast, with open and percutaneous tenorrhaphy for repairing a ruptured Achilles tendon. The aim of this study study was to examine the results of treating Achilles tendon ruptures in patients by using the following methods: percutaneous suturing, open surgery technique and non-surgical treatment by plaster cast immobilisation. Methods. Forty two patients treated at our facility in the period August 2003 - September 2010 for Achilles tendon ruptures were included in the study. They were operated on by using different orthopedic procedures (percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon, open surgery, plaster cast only and two anaesthesia technique (spinal aneasthesia and local infiltrational anaesthesia. The following parameters were monitored after interventions performed and compared: duration of hospital stay, postsurgical complications, incidence of the reruptures of the Achilles tendon and time for full leg functionality. Results. The patients sustained their respective injuries in the following manner: 8 of them while pursuing sports activities, 24 while pursuing recreational activities, 4 at workplace, 4 while performing everyday activities, and 2 of the patients did not know how they had sustained their injuries. The average age of the patients was 40.5, with 37 (88% men and 5 (12% women. Surgeries were performed under spinal anaesthesia in 29 (69% patients, and in 5 (12% patients tenorrhaphy was performed under local anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was not used in 8 (19% patients treated with plaster cast. We performed percutaneous reconstruction of the Achilles tendon in 19 (45% patients. A total of 14 (33% patients were treated under spinal anaesthesia, and 5 (11.9% under local infiltrational anaesthesia with 2% xylocain. We treated 15 (36% patients with open surgery. The patients treated conservatively stayed in

  7. Histological Changes in the Proximal and Distal Tendon Stumps Following Transection of Achilles Tendon in the Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qattan, Mohammad M; Mawlana, Ola Helmi; Mohammed Ahmed, Raeesa Abdel-Twab; Hawary, Khalid

    2016-05-01

    To determine tendon stump changes following unrepaired Achilles tendon lacerations in an animal model. An experimental study. King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to January 2014. Arabbit model was developed and studied tendon retraction and histological changes in the proximal and distal stumps following transection of the Achilles tendon. Over a period of 12 weeks, retraction of the distal tendon stump was minimal (2 - 3 mm). In contrast, retraction of the proximal tendon stump peaked to reach 6 mm at 4 weeks post-injury and plateaued to reach 7 - 8 mm at the 12-week interval. Following complete transection of the Achilles tendon, tendon retraction correlated with the density of myofibroblast expression within the tendon stump. Further research is needed to investigate the pathophysiology of these findings.

  8. Histological Changes in the Proximal and Distal Tendon Stumps Following Transection of Achilles Tendon in the Rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Qattan, M. M.; Hawary, K.; Mawlana, O. H.; Ahmed, R. A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine tendon stump changes following unrepaired Achilles tendon lacerations in an animal model. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from October 2013 to January 2014. Methodology: Arabbit model was developed and studied tendon retraction and histological changes in the proximal and distal stumps following transection of the Achilles tendon. Result: Over a period of 12 weeks, retraction of the distal tendon stump was minimal (2 - 3 mm). In contrast, retraction of the proximal tendon stump peaked to reach 6 mm at 4 weeks post-injury and plateaued to reach 7 - 8 mm at the 12-week interval. Conclusion: Following complete transection of the Achilles tendon, tendon retraction correlated with the density of myofibroblast expression within the tendon stump. Further research is needed to investigate the pathophysiology of these findings. (author)

  9. Effect of taurine on rat Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Ovunc; Lineaweaver, William C; Cavusoglu, Turker; Binboga, Erdal; Uyanikgil, Yigit; Zhang, Feng; Pekedis, Mahmut; Yagci, Tugay

    2015-01-01

    Taurine has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant characteristics. We have introduced taurine into a tendon-healing model to evaluate its effects on tendon healing and adhesion formation. Two groups of 16 rats underwent diversion and repair of the Achilles tendon. One group received a taurine injection (200 mg/ml) at the repair site, while the other group received 1 ml of saline. Specimens were harvested at 6 weeks and underwent biomechanical and histological evaluation. No tendon ruptured. Average maximum load was significantly greater in the taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p taurine-applied group compared with the control group (p  0.05). After histological assessment, we found that fibroblast proliferation, edema, and inflammation statistically decreased in the treatment group (p taurine may have an effect on adhesion formation.

  10. Blood circulation of patellar and achilles tendons during contractions and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Ikebukuro, Toshihiro

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies using ultrasonography have demonstrated that training-induced changes in the mechanical properties of tendons in plantar flexors (i.e., Achilles tendon) are lower than those in knee extensors (i.e., patellar tendon). However, the mechanisms for these phenomena are unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in blood circulation of patellar and Achilles tendons by repeated muscle contractions and heating. Eleven healthy males participated in this study. During and after repeated muscle contractions (50 repetitions at 50% of the isometric maximum voluntary contraction for 3 s with 3-s relaxations) and heating (20 min), blood volume (total hemoglobin (THb)) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of the patellar and Achilles tendons were measured using red laser lights. During repeated muscle contractions, StO2 of the patellar tendon decreased significantly, but that of the Achilles tendon did not. During heating, THb and StO2 increased significantly for both tendons. Increases in THb and StO2 of the patellar tendon were significantly higher than those of the Achilles tendon (both P heating were higher than those of the Achilles tendon. This result appears to be related to the differences in the plasticity of the mechanical properties of the patellar and Achilles tendons.

  11. Thicker Achilles tendons are a risk factor to develop Achilles tendinopathy in elite professional soccer players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhingan, Sachin; Perry, Mark; O’Driscoll, Gary; Lewin, Colin; Teatino, Raphael; Malliaras, Peter; Maffulli, Nicola; Morrissey, Dylan

    2011-01-01

    Summary The primary aim of this prospective cohort study was to compare the incidence of Achilles tendinopathy symptoms in elite soccer players with and without baseline asymptomatic ultrasound abnormalities. This study also investigated the relationship between baseline tendon thickness and development of symptoms. Using ultrasonography, 18 players were examined in 2009 for the existence of hypoechoicity, paratenon blurring, focal thickening and/or neovascularisation, and anteroposterior tendon thickness was measured. Symptom development during the follow-up period was assessed by interview one year later. Baseline mid-tendon thickness was greater (p=0.041) in tendons that experienced symptoms [median (IQR): 0.53 (0.51–0.55) cm] in the following year than tendons remaining asymptomatic [0.48 (0.45–0.52) cm]. No association between the existence of baseline ultrasound signs and development of symptoms in the following year was observed (Chi-Square: 1.180, p=0.277). A thicker baseline mid-tendon thickness was identified as a risk indicator for the development of Achilles tendinopathy in elite soccer players. PMID:23738247

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the Achilles tendon using ultrashort TE (UTE) pulse sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robson, M.D.; Benjamin, M.; Gishen, P.; Bydder, G.M. E-mail: gbydder@ucsd.edu

    2004-08-01

    AIM: To assess the potential value of imaging the Achilles tendon with ultrashort echo time (UTE) pulse sequences. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four normal controls and four patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were examined in the sagittal and transverse planes. Three of the patients were examined before and after intravenous gadodiamide. RESULTS: The fascicular pattern was clearly demonstrated within the tendon and detail of the three distinct fibrocartilaginous components of an 'enthesis organ' was well seen. T2* measurements showed two short T2* components. Increase in long T2 components with reduction in short T2 components was seen in tendinopathy. Contrast enhancement was much more extensive than with conventional sequences in two cases of tendinopathy but in a third case, there was a region of reduced enhancement. CONCLUSION: UTE pulse sequences provide anatomical detail not apparent with conventional sequences, demonstrate differences in T2* and show patterns of both increased and decreased enhancement in tendinopathy.

  13. Validity and reliability of the Achilles tendon total rupture score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganestam, Ann; Barfod, Kristoffer; Klit, Jakob; Troelsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    The best treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture remains debated. Patient-reported outcome measures have become cornerstones in treatment evaluations. The Achilles tendon total rupture score (ATRS) has been developed for this purpose but requires additional validation. The purpose of the present study was to validate a Danish translation of the ATRS. The ATRS was translated into Danish according to internationally adopted standards. Of 142 patients, 90 with previous rupture of the Achilles tendon participated in the validity study and 52 in the reliability study. The ATRS showed moderately strong correlations with the physical subscores of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (r = .70 to .75; p questionnaire (r = .71; p validity. For study and follow-up purposes, the ATRS seems reliable for comparisons of groups of patients. Its usability is limited for repeated assessment of individual patients. The development of analysis guidelines would be desirable. Copyright © 2013 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The roles of TGF-beta1 gene transfer on collagen formation during Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Mao, ZeBing; Wei, XueLei; Lin, Lin; Chen, LianXu; Wang, HaiJun; Fu, Xin; Zhang, JiYing; Yu, ChangLong

    2009-05-29

    Collagen content and cross-linking are believed to be major determinants of tendon structural integrity and function. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 on the collagen content and cross-linking of Achilles tendons, and on the histological and biomechanical changes occurring during Achilles tendon healing in rabbits. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transfected with the TGF-beta1 gene were surgically implanted into experimentally injured Achilles tendons. Collagen proteins were identified by immunohistochemical staining and fiber bundle accumulation was revealed by Sirius red staining. Achilles tendons treated with TGF-beta1-transfected BMSCs showed higher concentrations of collagen I protein, more rapid matrix remodeling, and larger fiber bundles. Thus TGF-beta1 can promote mechanical strength in healing Achilles tendons by regulating collagen synthesis, cross-link formation, and matrix remodeling.

  15. Bevacizumab Improves Achilles Tendon Repair in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tempfer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Effective wound-healing generally requires efficient re-vascularization after injury, ensuring sufficient supply with oxygen, nutrients, and various cell populations. While this applies to most tissues, tendons are mostly avascular in nature and harbor relatively few cells, probably contributing to their poor regenerative capacity. Considering the minimal vascularization of healthy tendons, we hypothesize that controlling angiogenesis in early tendon healing is beneficial for repair tissue quality and function. Methods: To address this hypothesis, Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody blocking VEGF-A signaling, was locally injected into the defect area of a complete tenotomy in rat Achilles tendon. At 28 days post-surgery, the defect region was investigated using immunohistochemistry against vascular and lymphatic epitopes. Polarization microscopy and biomechanical testing was used to determine tendon integrity and gait analysis for functional testing in treated vs non-treated animals. Results: Angiogenesis was found to be significantly reduced in the Bevacizumab treated repair tissue, accompanied by significantly reduced cross sectional area, improved matrix organization, increased stiffness and Young’s modulus, maximum load and stress. Further, we observed an improved gait pattern when compared to the vehicle injected control group. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study we propose that reducing angiogenesis after tendon injury can improve tendon repair, potentially representing a novel treatment-option.

  16. The results of 163 Achilles tendon ruptures treated by a minimally invasive surgical technique and functional aftertreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansdaal, J. R.; Goslings, J. C.; Reichart, M.; Govaert, G. A. M.; van Scherpenzeel, K. M.; Haverlag, R.; Ponsen, K. J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is still controversy regarding the optimal surgical technique and post-operative treatment of acute Achilles tendon ruptures. We evaluated a treatment protocol for Achilles tendon ruptures consisting of a minimally invasive Achilles tendon repair combined with early full weight

  17. Structured white light scanning of rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alex; Easton, Katrina; Devanaboyina, Pavan Teja; Wu, Jian-Ping; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Lloyd, David

    2016-11-07

    The cross-sectional area (CSA) of a material is used to calculate stress under load. The mechanical behaviour of soft tissue is of clinical interest in the management of injury; however, measuring CSA of soft tissue is challenging as samples are geometrically irregular and may deform during measurement. This study presents a simple method, using structured light scanning (SLS), to acquire a 3D model of rabbit Achilles tendon in vitro for measuring CSA of a tendon. The Artec Spider™ 3D scanner uses structured light and stereophotogrammetry technologies to acquire shape data and reconstruct a 3D model of an object. In this study, the 3D scanner was integrated with a custom mechanical rig, permitting 360-degree acquisition of the morphology of six New Zealand White rabbit Achilles tendons. The reconstructed 3D model was then used to measure CSA of the tendon. SLS, together with callipers and micro-CT, was used to measure CSA of objects with a regular or complex shape, such as a drill flute and human cervical vertebra, for validating the accuracy and repeatability of the technique. CSA of six tendons was measured with a coefficient of variation of less than 2%. The mean CSA was 9.9±1.0mm 2 , comparable with those reported by other researchers. Scanning of phantoms demonstrated similar results to μCT. The technique developed in this study offers a simple and accurate method for effectively measuring CSA of soft tissue such as tendons. This allows for localised calculation of stress along the length, assisting in the understanding of the function, injury mechanisms and rehabilitation of tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Elastographic Findings of Achilles Tendons in Asymptomatic Professional Male Volleyball Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Mehtap; Idilman, Ilkay S; Ipek, Ali; Ikiz, Sinem Sigit; Bektaser, Bulent; Gumus, Mehmet

    2016-12-01

    Elastography is a new sonographic technique that evaluates the elasticity of different tissues such as the Achilles tendon. In this study, we aimed to investigate the elastographic findings of Achilles tendons in professional athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. Twenty-one professional male volleyball players with no history of Achilles trauma were included in this study. Twenty-one healthy male volunteers with similar ages and body mass indices were selected as control participants. All participants underwent sonographic and elastographic evaluations of the Achilles tendons to evaluate Achilles tendon thickness and stiffness. We observed thickening in many of the thirds of the Achilles tendons (right proximal, right middle, left middle, and left distal thirds) of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers. We did not detect any abnormalities according to the sonographic evaluations in both athletes and healthy volunteers. In the elastographic evaluations, we observed softening in the middle thirds of the Achilles tendons of athletes according to the main types (P < .001) and subtypes (P < .001 for right; and P = .002 for left middle third). There was no difference observed in the elastographic evaluations of the proximal and distal thirds. On sonography and elastography, we observed thickening and softening in Achilles tendons of athletes in comparison with healthy volunteers who had similar ages and body mass indices. These changes could be associated with early tendon degeneration. Further longitudinal studies may support this consideration. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  19. Comparative anatomy of rabbit and human achilles tendons with magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Geoffrey P; Koike, Yoichi; Uhthoff, Hans K; Lecompte, Martin; Trudel, Guy

    2006-02-01

    We sought to describe the comparative anatomy of the Achilles tendon in rabbits and humans by using macroscopic observation, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasonography. The calcaneus-Achilles tendon-gastrocnemius-soleus complexes from 18 New Zealand white rabbits underwent ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and gross anatomic sectioning; these results were compared with those from a cadaveric gastrocnemius-soleus-Achilles tendon-calcaneus specimen from a 68-y-old human male. The medial and lateral gastrocnemius muscle tendons merged 5.2 +/- 0.6 mm proximal to the calcaneal insertion macroscopically, at 93% of their course, different from the gastrocnemius human tendons, which merged at 23% of their overall course. The rabbit flexor digitorum superficialis tendon, corresponding to the flexor digitorum longus tendon in human and comparable in size with the gastrocnemius tendons, was located medial and anterior to the medial gastrocnemius tendon proximally and rotated dorsally and laterally to run posterior to the Achilles tendon-calcaneus insertion. In humans, the flexor digitorum longus tendon tracks posteriorly to the medial malleolus. The soleus muscle and tendon are negligible in the rabbit; these particular comparative anatomic features in the rabbit were confirmed on the MR images. Therefore the rabbit Achilles tendon shows distinctive gross anatomical and MR imaging features that must be considered when using the rabbit as a research model, especially for mechanical testing, or when generalizing results from rabbits to humans.

  20. Blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Bülow, J; Kjaer, M

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal to the calc......This study evaluated blood flow in the peritendinous space of the human Achilles tendon during rest and 40-min dynamical contraction of m. triceps surae. In 10 healthy volunteers 133Xe was injected in to the peritendinous space just ventrally to the Achilles tendon 2 and 5 cm proximal....... Lymph drainage from the area was found to be negligible both during rest and exercise. We conclude that dynamical calf muscle contractions result in increased peritendinous blood flow at the Achilles tendon in humans....

  1. Marked innervation but also signs of nerve degeneration in between the Achilles and plantaris tendons and presence of innervation within the plantaris tendon in midportion Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, C; Harandi, V M; Alfredson, H; Forsgren, S

    2015-06-01

    The plantaris tendon is increasingly recognised as an important factor in midportion Achilles tendinopathy. Its innervation pattern is completely unknown. Plantaris tendons (n=56) and associated peritendinous tissue from 46 patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy and where the plantaris tendon was closely related to the Achilles tendon were evaluated. Morphological evaluations and stainings for nerve markers [general (PGP9.5), sensory (CGRP), sympathetic (TH)], glutamate NMDA receptor and Schwann cells (S-100β) were made. A marked innervation, as evidenced by evaluation for PGP9.5 reactions, occurred in the peritendinous tissue located between the plantaris and Achilles tendons. It contained sensory and to some extent sympathetic and NMDAR1-positive axons. There was also an innervation in the zones of connective tissue within the plantaris tendons. Interestingly, some of the nerve fascicles showed a partial lack of axonal reactions. New information on the innervation patterns for the plantaris tendon in situations with midportion Achilles tendinopathy has here been obtained. The peritendinous tissue was found to be markedly innervated and there was also innervation within the plantaris tendon. Furthermore, axonal degeneration is likely to occur. Both features should be further taken into account when considering the relationship between the nervous system and tendinopathy.

  2. Inflammatory and metabolic alterations of Kager's fat pad in chronic achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, Marie Christine Helby; Fredberg, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager's fat pad. METHODS: A biopsy was taken from Kager's fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation...... inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager's fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients.......BACKGROUND: Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager's fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between...

  3. Nonlinear model for viscoelastic behavior of Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Wang, Xiong; Rahouadj, Rachid

    2010-11-01

    Although the mechanical properties of ligament and tendon are well documented in research literature, very few unified mechanical formulations can describe a wide range of different loadings. The aim of this study was to propose a new model, which can describe tendon responses to various solicitations such as cycles of loading, unloading, and reloading or successive relaxations at different strain levels. In this work, experiments with cycles of loading and reloading at increasing strain level and sequences of relaxation were performed on white New Zealand rabbit Achilles tendons. We presented a local formulation of thermodynamic evolution outside equilibrium at a representative element volume scale to describe the tendon's macroscopic behavior based on the notion of relaxed stress. It was shown that the model corresponds quite well to the experimental data. This work concludes with the complexity of tendons' mechanical properties due to various microphysical mechanisms of deformation involved in loading such as the recruitment of collagen fibers, the rearrangement of the microstructure (i.e., collagens type I and III, proteoglycans, and water), and the evolution of relaxed stress linked to these mechanisms.

  4. A Rare Case of Simultaneous Acute Bilateral Quadriceps Tendon Rupture and Unilateral Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yee Leong

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There have been multiple reported cases of bilateral quadriceps tendon ruptures (QTR in the literature. These injuries frequently associated with delayed diagnosis, which results in delayed surgical treatment. In very unusual cases, bilateral QTRs can be associated with other simultaneous tendon ruptures. Case Report: We present a rare case of bilateral QTR with a simultaneous Achilles Tendon Rupture involving a 31 years old Caucasian man who is a semi-professional body builder taking anabolic steroids. To date bilateral QTR with additional TA rupture has only been reported once in the literature and to our knowledge this is the first reported case of bilateral QTR and simultaneous TA rupture in a young, fit and healthy individual. Conclusion: The diagnosis of bilateral QTR alone can sometimes be challenging and the possibility of even further tendon injuries should be carefully assessed. A delay in diagnosis could result in delay in treatment and potentially worse outcome for the patient. Keywords: Quadriceps tendon rupture; Achilles tendon rupture; Bilateral.

  5. Achilles Tendon Open Repair Augmented With Distal Turndown Tendon Flap and Posterior Crural Fasciotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Hamza; Selek, Hakan Y; Harput, Gulcan; Oznur, Ali; Baltaci, Gul

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the outcomes after open repair of Achilles tendon rupture augmented with a distal turndown gastrocnemius flap and deep posterior crural fasciotomy based on the modified Lindholm technique. Twenty-three patients with acute Achilles tendon injury underwent open end-to-end tendon repair augmented with a distal turndown gastrocnemius flap and deep posterior compartment fasciotomy. The concentric and eccentric muscle strength was measured using a functional squat system, and dynamic balance was assessed using the Y-balance test with anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral reach distances. Jump performance was assessed using the vertical jump and 1-leg hop tests. All patients returned to their preinjury activity level, and their mean American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot scale score was 98.2 ± 2.3 after surgery. No significant difference was found between the involved and uninvolved extremities in terms of concentric and eccentric muscle strength (p = .82 and p = .53, respectively). In addition, no significant differences were seen between legs in the vertical jump (p = .16), one-leg hop (p = .15), and balance (p > .05) tests. Open end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon rupture with augmentation and fasciotomy of the deep posterior compartment healed without any major complications. Functional performance of the involved leg after recovery was similar to that of the uninvolved leg. The modified Lindholm surgical technique described in our report appears to be a useful intervention for acute Achilles tendon rupture. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Experimental study on co-culture of human fibroblasts on decellularized Achilles tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhibing; Zhang, Xia; Guo, Xinyu; Qin, Chuan

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the preparation of decellularized Achilles tendons and the effect of co-culture of human fibroblasts on the scaffold so as to provide a scaffold for the tissue engineered ligament reconstruction. Achilles tendons of both hind limbs were harvested from 10 male New Zealand white rabbits (5-month-old; weighing, 4-5 kg). The Achilles tendons were decellularized using trypsin, Triton X-100, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and then gross observation, histological examination, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observation were performed; the human fibroblasts were seeded on the decellularized Achilles tendon, and then cytocompatibility was tested using the cell counting kit 8 method at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 days after co-culture. At 4 weeks after co-culture, SEM, HE staining, and biomechanical test were performed for observing cell-scaffold composite, and a comparison was made with before and after decellularization. After decellularization, the tendons had integrated aponeurosis and enlarged volume with soft texture and good toughness; there was no loose connective tissue and tendon cells between tendon bundles, the collagen fibers arranged loosely with three-dimensional network structure and more pores between tendon bundles; and it had good cytocompatibility. At 4 weeks after co-culture, cells migrated into the pores, and three-dimensional network structure disappeared. By biomechanical test, the tensile strength and Young's elastic modulus of the decellularized Achilles tendon group decreased significantly when compared with normal Achilles tendons group and cell-scaffold composite group (P Achilles tendons group and cell-scaffold composite group (P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in elongation at break among 3 groups (P > 0.05). The decellularized Achilles tendon is biocompatible to fibroblasts. It is suit for the scaffold for tissue engineered ligament reconstruction.

  7. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on Achilles tendon healing in a rabbit model

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki Takamura; Toshito Yasuda; Atsushi Nakano; Hiroaki Shima; Masashi Neo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of PRP on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits during the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases by histological examination and quantitative assessments. Methods: Fifty mature male Japanese albino rabbits with severed Achilles tendons were divided into two equal groups and treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or left untreated. Tendon tissue was harvested at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks after treatment, and sections ...

  8. Achilles tendon and sports; Die Achillessehne im Sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulreich, N.; Kainberger, F. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria); Huber, W.; Nehrer, S. [Univ.-Klinik fuer Orthopaedie Wien (Austria)

    2002-10-01

    Because of the rising popularity of recreational sports activities achillodynia is an often associated symptom with running, soccer and athletics. Therefore radiologist are frequently asked to image this tendon. The origin of the damage of the Achilles tendon is explained by numerous hypothesis, mainly a decreased perfusion and a mechanical irritation that lead to degeneration of the tendon. High-resolution technics such as sonography and magnetic resonance imaging show alterations in the structure of the tendon which can be graduated and classified. Manifestations like tendinosis, achillobursitis, rupture and Haglunds disease can summarized as the tendon overuse syndrom. A rupture of a tendon is mostly the result of a degeneration of the collagenfibres. The task of the radiologist is to acquire the intrinsic factors for a potential rupture. (orig.) [German] Aufgrund des starken Anstiegs des Freizeitsportes sind Achillodynien ein besonders mit Laufsport, Fussball und Leichtathletik assoziiertes Symptom und die Indikation zur radiologischen Abklaerung wird oft gestellt. Die Entstehung von Sehnenschaeden wird durch eine Reihe von Hypothesen erklaert, wobei eine gestoerte Gewebeperfusion und eine mechanische Irritation als Hauptursachen angesehen werden, die zur Degeneration des Sehnengewebes und des umgebenden Gleitlagers fuehren. Sie koennen aufgrund sonographischer und MR-tomographischer Zeichen meist klar klassifiziert und graduiert werden, wobei hochaufloesende Techniken eine wesentliche Voraussetzung fuer die subtile Analyse der Sehnenstruktur darstellen. Die einzelnen klinischen Erscheinungsformen wie Tendinose, Achillobursitis, Haglund-Ferse und Sehnenruptur koennen unter dem Begriff des ''Sehnenueberlastungssyndroms'' (Tendon overuse syndrome) subsummiert werden. Rupturen der Achillessehne treten so gut wie immer bei bereits vorgeschaedigtem Kollagenfasergewebe auf, und der radiologischen Diagnostik kommt wesentliche Bedeutung dabei zu

  9. Presence of Bacteria in Spontaneous Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolf, Christer G; Fu, Sai-Chuen; Hopkins, Chelsea; Luan, Ju; Ip, Margaret; Yung, Shu-Hang; Friman, Göran; Qin, Ling; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2017-07-01

    The structural pathology of Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures resembles tendinopathy, but the causes remain unknown. Recently, a number of diseases were found to be attributed to bacterial infections, resulting in low-grade inflammation and progressive matrix disturbance. The authors speculate that spontaneous AT ruptures may also be influenced by the presence of bacteria. Bacteria are present in ruptured ATs but not in healthy tendons. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Patients with spontaneous AT ruptures and patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction were recruited for this study. During AT surgical repair, excised tendinopathic tissue was collected, and healthy tendon samples were obtained as controls from hamstring tendon grafts used in ACL reconstruction. Half of every sample was reserved for DNA extraction and the other half for histology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted using 16S rRNA gene universal primers, and the PCR products were sequenced for the identification of bacterial species. A histological examination was performed to compare tendinopathic changes in the case and control samples. Five of 20 AT rupture samples were positive for the presence of bacterial DNA, while none of the 23 hamstring tendon samples were positive. Sterile operating and experimental conditions and tests on samples, controlling for harvesting and processing procedures, ruled out the chance of postoperative bacterial contamination. The species identified predominantly belonged to the Staphylococcus genus. AT rupture samples exhibited histopathological features characteristic of tendinopathy, and most healthy hamstring tendon samples displayed normal tendon features. There were no apparent differences in histopathology between the bacterial DNA-positive and bacterial DNA-negative AT rupture samples. The authors have demonstrated the presence of bacterial DNA in ruptured AT samples. It may suggest the potential involvement of bacteria

  10. Diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries in the emergency department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gibbons, Lynda

    2013-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) injury is an overuse injury often seen in professional and recreational athletes. It tends to affect men, particularly those in their thirties and forties, more than women, and is typically seen in people who are intermittently active. To ensure AT ruptures are identified and treated effectively, early intervention in emergency departments (EDs) is crucial. This article discusses how advanced nurse practitioners can use their comprehensive problem-solving, clinical decision-making and clinical judgement skills to manage patients who present with suspected AT injury. It also describes the anatomy of tendon rupture, the aetiology and mechanism of injuries, and the importance of assessment and diagnostic tools, therapeutic techniques and management strategies. Finally, it considers the psychological effect this injury can have on patients, while in the ED and after discharge. A case study is included as an example of ED management.

  11. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingel, Jessica; Petersen, M Christine H; Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager's fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager's fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager's fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager's fat pad. A biopsy was taken from Kager's fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager's fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager's fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients.

  12. [Role of MRI in the study of the Achilles tendon and patellar tendon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frocrain, L; Rochcongar, P; Gouriff, Y; Husson, J L; Gagey, N; De Korvin, B; Duvauferrier, R

    1988-12-01

    The possibilities of MRI and radiography with mammogram to diagnose mechanical tendinitis have been prospectively evaluated in thirty sportsmen. Sixteen had Achilles tendon lesion, fourteen had patellar ligament lesion. Each patient included in the study was programmed for radiography with mammogram and MRI of the pathologic tendon and the controlateral tendon. These examinations were separately interpreted by two reviewers who had no knowledge of pain location. The number of tendinitis diagnosis based on X-ray and MRI was approximatively the same. But the microtearings were more often diagnosed on MRI data than on X-ray data (10/1). Eight patients underwent an operation. The surgery findings always confirmed the MRI diagnoses. MRI seems to be the examination of choice to evaluate the tendon injuries and particularly microtearings before surgery.

  13. Subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and ipsilateral fracture of the medial malleolus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Paula J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although ankle fractures and an Achilles tendon rupture are relatively frequent in isolation, their association in the same injury is uncommon. Case presentation A 38 year old male tree surgeon fell six meters from a tree, sustaining a subcutaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon and an ipsilateral closed fracture of the medial malleolus. The injuries were diagnosed following clinical examination and imaging. Conclusion This injury combination is infrequent, and management of the Achilles tendon rupture should take into account the necessity not to secondarily displace the fracture of the medial malleollus.

  14. Running shoes increase achilles tendon load in walking: an acoustic propagation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wearing, Scott C; Reed, Lloyd; Hooper, Sue L; Bartold, Simon; Smeathers, James E; Brauner, Torsten

    2014-08-01

    Footwear remains a prime candidate for the prevention and rehabilitation of Achilles tendinopathy because it is thought to decrease tension in the tendon through elevation of the heel. However, evidence for this effect is equivocal. This study used an acoustic transmission technique to investigate the effect of running shoes on Achilles tendon loading during barefoot and shod walking. Acoustic velocity was measured in the Achilles tendon of 12 recreationally active males (age, 31 ± 9 yr; height, 1.78 ± 0.06 m; weight, 81.0 ± 16.9 kg) during barefoot and shod walking at matched self-selected speed (3.4 ± 0.7 km·h). Standard running shoes incorporating a 10-mm heel offset were used. Vertical ground reaction force and spatiotemporal parameters were determined with an instrumented treadmill. Axial acoustic velocity in the Achilles tendon was measured using a custom-built ultrasonic device. All data were acquired at a rate of 100 Hz during 10 s of steady-state walking. Statistical comparisons between barefoot and shod conditions were made using paired t-tests and repeated-measure ANOVA. Acoustic velocity in the Achilles tendon was highly reproducible and was typified by two maxima (P1, P2) and minima (M1, M2) during walking. Footwear resulted in a significant increase in step length, stance duration, and peak vertical ground reaction force compared with barefoot walking. Peak acoustic velocity in the Achilles tendon (P1, P2) was significantly higher with running shoes. Peak acoustic velocity in the Achilles tendon was higher with footwear, suggesting that standard running shoes with a 10-mm heel offset increase tensile load in the Achilles tendon. Although further research is required, these findings question the therapeutic role of standard running shoes in Achilles tendinopathy.

  15. Healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits--evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Wilson Campos; de Castro, Ubiratam Brum; Paulino, Eduardo; Vasconcellos, Leonardo de Souza; Madureira, Ana Paula; Magalhães, Maria Angélica Baron; Mendes, Daniel Victor Moreira; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Resende, Vivian

    2014-12-12

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide valuable findings for tendon regeneration. A non-invasive image method that can effectively evaluate the quality of the scar tissue has not yet been employed. Thirteen New Zealand rabbits were divided into two groups: group 1--non-treated control (n = 4); group 2--surgical intervention (n = 9). The central portion of the Achilles tendon was resected, and after 30 days, DCE-MRI was performed. Contrast enhancement methods were applied using the region of interest (ROI) technique. In the medium third of the Achilles tendon, the intra-substantial signal intensity and the presence of hyper-intense intra-tendon focus points and of signal heterogeneity were evaluated. Antero-posterior and transversal diameters of the tendon were measured. The Achilles tendon was removed and dissected free from other tissues. Sections from the central part of the tendon were stained for histological analysis. The difference between the contrast enhancement curves of the control and surgical groups (p tendon sheath, which presented irregular contours and intense contrast enhancement. On histology, the Achilles tendon presented diffuse widening of the tendon sheath and wedge-shaped areas with scarring tissue rich in disordered collagen fibres. These findings were related to alteration in the intra-substantial signal intensity, with hyper-signal focus points in the DCE-MRI. MRI with perfusion could be a useful technique for evaluating tissue and fibrous scarring in tendons.

  16. Calcitonin effect on Achilles tendon healing. An experimental study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrou, C G; Karachalios, T S; Khaldi, L; Karantanas, A H; Lyritis, G P

    2009-01-01

    A positive potential effect of Calcitonin (CT) on Achilles tendon healing was investigated as well as the ability of MRI to follow the tendon healing process. A standardized tenotomy of the Achilles tendon was performed on forty-two rabbits. Twenty-one animals received daily 21 IU /kg Calcitonin intramuscularly (treatment group CT) during the experiment and the remaining received saline solution (control group P). Seven animals from each group were killed at one, two and three weeks postoperatively. All animals had serial MRI scans and tendon samples underwent biomechanical and histological testing. For both groups, animals of the same subgroup showed statistically significant difference in signal intensity values of MRI between the 1st and 3rd week (pTendon samples from group CT showed statistically significant difference in ultimate tensile strength compared to controls at 2 (ptendon healing stages. It is suggested that Calcitonin enhances Achilles tendon healing process.

  17. Tendon mineralization is accelerated bilaterally and creep of contralateral tendons is increased after unilateral needle injury of murine achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Etienne John Ogilvy; Shrive, Nigel G; Rosvold, Joshua M; Thornton, Gail M; Frank, Cyril B; Hart, David A

    2013-10-01

    Heterotopic mineralization may result in tendon weakness, but effects on other biomechanical responses have not been reported. We used a needle injury, which accelerates spontaneous mineralization of murine Achilles tendons, to test two hypotheses: that injured tendons would demonstrate altered biomechanical responses; and that unilateral injury would accelerate mineralization bilaterally. Mice underwent left hind (LH) injury (I; n = 11) and were euthanized after 20 weeks along with non-injured controls (C; n = 9). All hind limbs were examined by micro computed tomography followed by biomechanical testing (I = 7 and C = 6). No differences were found in the biomechanical responses of injured tendons compared with controls. However, the right hind (RH) tendons contralateral to the LH injury exhibited greater static creep strain and total creep strain compared with those LH tendons (p ≤ 0.045) and RH tendons from controls (p ≤ 0.043). RH limb lesions of injured mice were three times larger compared with controls (p = 0.030). Therefore, despite extensive mineralization, changes to the responses we measured were limited or absent 20 weeks postinjury. These results also suggest that bilateral occurrence should be considered where tendon mineralization is identified clinically. This experimental system may be useful to study the mechanisms of bilateral new bone formation in tendinopathy and other conditions. Copyright © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  18. Ultrasonographic tissue characterisation of human Achilles tendons: quantification of tendon structure through a novel non-invasive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.T.M. van Schie (Hans); R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan); S. de Jonge (Suzan); E.M. Bakker (Erwin); M.P. Heijboer (Rien); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); J.L. Tol (Johannes); H.H. Weinans (Harrie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To asses if three-dimensional imaging of the Achilles tendon by Ultrasonographic Tissue Characterisation (UTC) can differentiate between symptomatic and asymptomatic tendons. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Sports medical department of The Hague medical centre. PATIENTS:

  19. The influence of physical activity during youth on structural and functional properties of the Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenskjold, A; Kongsgaard, M; Larsen, J O

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners w...... did not appreciably influence the mechanical, structural, or biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in adult long distance runners.......Achilles tendinopathy is a highly prevalent sports injury. Animal studies show a growth response in tendons in response to loading in the immature phase but not after puberty maturation. The aim of this investigation was to examine the structural and material properties in long distance runners who...... were either physically active (HAY) or inactive (LAY) in young age. Twelve men in HAY group and eight men in LAY group participated. Structural, functional, and biochemical properties of Achilles tendon were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound video recordings, mechanical tests...

  20. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengkun; Ma, Kui; Li, Hong; Jiang, Jia; Chen, Shiyi

    2016-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET) artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA) is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  1. Foot posture is associated with morphometry of the peroneus longus muscle, tibialis anterior tendon, and Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murley, G S; Tan, J M; Edwards, R M; De Luca, J; Munteanu, S E; Cook, J L

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between foot type and the morphometry of selected muscles and tendons of the lower limb. Sixty-one healthy participants (31 male, 30 female; aged 27.1 ± 8.8 years) underwent gray-scale musculoskeletal ultrasound examination to determine the anterior-posterior (AP) thickness of tibialis anterior, tibialis posterior, and peroneus longus muscles and tendons as well as the Achilles tendon. Foot type was classified based on arch height and footprint measurements. Potentially confounding variables (height, weight, hip and waist circumference, rearfoot and ankle joint range of motion, and levels of physical activity) were also measured. Multiple linear regression models were used to determine the association between foot type with muscle and tendon morphometry accounting for potentially confounding variables. Foot type was significantly and independently associated with AP thickness of the tibialis anterior tendon, peroneus longus muscle, and Achilles tendon, accounting for approximately 7% to 16% of the variation. Flat-arched feet were associated with a thicker tibialis anterior tendon, a thicker peroneus longus muscle, and a thinner Achilles tendon. Foot type is associated with morphometry of tendons that control sagittal plane motion of the rearfoot; and the peroneus longus muscle that controls frontal plane motion of the rearfoot. These findings may be related to differences in tendon loading during gait. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon: a histomorphological study in pigs with clinical significance for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanakis, Stylianos; Gkasdaris, Grigorios; Daneva, Eleni; Givissis, Panagiotis; Papathanasiou, Jannis; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2017-01-01

    Tendons contain neurosensory elements called mechanoreceptors which contribute to the neuromuscular system as sources of reflex signals. The literature is lacking in histological assessment of mechanoreceptors of the Achilles tendon in piglets and our aim was to indicate their types, location and quantity. The study was performed using histological tissue samples from the Achilles tendon of ten healthy pigs, five left, five right, six males, four females. The samples were taken up to 12 hours after death. Immediately after removal, the tendons were placed in the laboratory where sections were taken and examined microscopically. The tendons were stained with the gold chloride method. The results showed that Golgi tendon organs, free nerve endings and Pacinian-like corpuscles were found in the Achilles tendon of pigs. Most structures were near the osteotendinous and myotendinous junctions, away from the middle portion of the tendon. As shown in other studies and similarly in ours, mechanoreceptors tend to be close to the distant thirds and not in the middle third of the tendon. This study could have clinical application on human Achilles tendon and its repair after damage. IV.

  3. Functional rehabilitation of patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark-Christensen, Troels; Troelsen, Anders; Kallemose, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    . RESULTS: Re-rupture rate, other complications, strength, range of motion, duration of sick leave, return to sport and patient satisfaction were examined. There were no statistically significant differences between groups. A trend favoring functional rehabilitation was seen regarding the examined outcomes......PURPOSE: The optimal treatment for acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) is continuously debated. Recent studies have proposed that the choice of either operative or non-operative treatment may not be as important as rehabilitation, suggesting that functional rehabilitation should be preferred over...... traditional immobilization. The purpose of this meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was to compare functional rehabilitation to immobilization in the treatment of ATR. METHOD: This meta-analysis was conducted using the databases: PubMed, EMBASE, Rehabilitation and Sports Medicine Source, AMED...

  4. Ultrasonographic Tendon Alteration in Relation to Parathyroid Dysfunction in Chronic Hemodialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlia A. Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To find the nature of tendon involvement in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients on regular hemodialysis (RD, and its relationship to parathyroid hormone (PTH level using ultrasonography (US. Method A total of 50 CKD patients on RD subjected to musculoskeletal examination of knee and ankle, laboratory evaluation, and US of quadriceps tendon and Achilles tendon were involved. Results Ankle joint tenderness was the most frequent sign on examination. US of the Achilles tendons showed tenderness during probing in 44% patients, calcific deposition in 24% patients, abnormal peritendon tissue in 20% patients, and abnormal anteroposterior (A-P middle and distal one-third thicknesses of the Achilles tendon in 20% and 18% patients, respectively. PTH positively correlated with the duration of dialysis, serum phosphorus level, presence of calcific deposit, and increased thickness of the Achilles tendon. Conclusion The most common ultrasonographic finding in CKD patients on RD was Achilles tendon tenderness during probing. PTH level positively correlated with the duration of dialysis, presence of calcific deposit, and increased thickness of Achilles tendon.

  5. Effect of Calendula officinalis cream on achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, A A; Perez, M O; Vieira, C P; Esquisatto, M A M; Rodrigues, R A F; Gomes, L; Pimentel, E R

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, the scientific community has undertaken research on plant extracts, searching for compounds with pharmacological activities that can be used in diverse fields of medicine. Calendula officinalis L. is known to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and wound healing properties when used to treat skin burns. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of C. officinalis on the initial phase of Achilles tendon healing. Wistar rats were separated in three groups: Calendula (Cal)-rats with a transected tendon were treated with topical applications of C. officinalis cream and then euthanized 7 days after injury; Control (C)-rats were treated with only vehicle after transection; and Normal (N)-rats without tenotomy. Higher concentrations of hydroxyproline (an indicator of total collagen) and non-collagenous proteins were observed in the Cal group in relation to the C group. Zymography showed no difference in the amount of the isoforms of metalloproteinase-2 and of metalloproteinase-9, between C and Cal groups. Polarization microscopy images analysis showed that the Cal group presented a slightly higher birefringence compared with the C group. In sections of tendons stained with toluidine blue, the transected groups presented higher metachromasy as compared with the N group. Immunocytochemistry analysis for chondroitin-6-sulfate showed no difference between the C and Cal groups. In conclusion, the topical application of C. officinalis after tendon transection increases the concentrations of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the collagen organization in the initial phase of healing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Factors influencing the tensile strength of repaired Achilles tendon: a biomechanical experiment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Bai, Jing Ping; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Redat, Darebai; Yilihamu, Tuoheti; Xinlin, Baoltri; Hu, Geyang; Tang, Bin; Liang, Bing; Sun, Qi

    2010-10-01

    Operative treatment has been advocated as the method of choice to repair Achilles tendon rupture as surgery results in reduced re-rupture rate and faster rehabilitation. Many surgical techniques have been introduced allowing for postoperative early motion of the ankle joint. However, it is currently very difficult for surgeons to determine the optimal treatment conditions for ruptured Achilles tendon with an increasing number of end-to-end suture methods, suture materials, and epitenon suture techniques. In the present biomechanical experiment study based on an orthogonal design, thirty-two New Zealand white rabbits received Achilles tendon tenotomy and subsequent operative treatment to repair the tendon employing four end-to-end suture methods, four suture materials, and four epitenon suture techniques. The tensile strength of the repaired Achilles tendon was investigated at four rehabilitation periods, and in comparison with the results of another sixteen rabbits with normal Achilles tendons. The end-to-end suture method contributed most to the final Achilles tendon tensile strength in addition to rehabilitation period, with the highest values occurring with the use of the parachute-like ("Pa" bone) suture method. The other two factors, namely, suture material and epitenon suture technique, had relatively little influence on the results. The parachute-like ("Pa" bone) surgical technique is superior to the other three end-to-end suture methods, with enhanced tensile strength of the repaired tendon. This method allows for postoperative early kinesitherapy of the ankle and knee joints. Therefore, this technique is highly recommended in clinical situations for treatment of ruptured Achilles tendon. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Time-Dependent Alterations of MMPs, TIMPs and Tendon Structure in Human Achilles Tendons after Acute Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkwitz, Susann; Schmock, Aysha; Kurtoglu, Alper; Tsitsilonis, Serafeim; Manegold, Sebastian; Wildemann, Britt; Klatte-Schulz, Franka

    2017-10-20

    A balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) is required to maintain tendon homeostasis. Variation in this balance over time might impact on the success of tendon healing. This study aimed to analyze structural changes and the expression profile of MMPs and TIMPs in human Achilles tendons at different time-points after rupture. Biopsies from 37 patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were taken at surgery and grouped according to time after rupture: early (2-4 days), middle (5-6 days), and late (≥7 days), and intact Achilles tendons served as control. The histological score increased from the early to the late time-point after rupture, indicating the progression towards a more degenerative status. In comparison to intact tendons, qRT-PCR analysis revealed a significantly increased expression of MMP-1, -2, -13, TIMP-1, COL1A1, and COL3A1 in ruptured tendons, whereas TIMP-3 decreased. Comparing the changes over time post rupture, the expression of MMP-9, -13, and COL1A1 significantly increased, whereas MMP-3 and -10 expression decreased. TIMP expression was not significantly altered over time. MMP staining by immunohistochemistry was positive in the ruptured tendons exemplarily analyzed from early and late time-points. The study demonstrates a pivotal contribution of all investigated MMPs and TIMP-1, but a minor role of TIMP-2, -3, and -4, in the early human tendon healing process.

  8. Repair of Achilles tendon defect with autologous ASCs engineered tendon in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dan; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Peihua; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Wen Jie; Cao, Yilin; Liu, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Adipose derived stem cells (ASCs) are an important cell source for tissue regeneration and have been demonstrated the potential of tenogenic differentiation in vitro. This study explored the feasibility of using ASCs for engineered tendon repair in vivo in a rabbit Achilles tendon model. Total 30 rabbits were involved in this study. A composite tendon scaffold composed of an inner part of polyglycolic acid (PGA) unwoven fibers and an outer part of a net knitted with PGA/PLA (polylactic acid) fibers was used to provide mechanical strength. Autologous ASCs were harvested from nuchal subcutaneous adipose tissues and in vitro expanded. The expanded ASCs were harvested and resuspended in culture medium and evenly seeded onto the scaffold in the experimental group, whereas cell-free scaffolds served as the control group. The constructs of both groups were cultured inside a bioreactor under dynamic stretch for 5 weeks. In each of 30 rabbits, a 2 cm defect was created on right side of Achilles tendon followed by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-seeded scaffold in the experimental group of 15 rabbits, or by the transplantation of a 3 cm cell-free scaffold in the control group of 15 rabbits. Animals were sacrificed at 12, 21 and 45 weeks post-surgery for gross view, histology, and mechanical analysis. The results showed that short term in vitro culture enabled ASCs to produce matrix on the PGA fibers and the constructs showed tensile strength around 50 MPa in both groups (p > 0.05). With the increase of implantation time, cell-seeded constructs gradually form neo-tendon and became more mature at 45 weeks with histological structure similar to that of native tendon and with the presence of bipolar pattern and D-periodic structure of formed collagen fibrils. Additionally, both collagen fibril diameters and tensile strength increased continuously with significant difference among different time points (p tendon tissue with fibril structure observable only at 45 weeks

  9. Achilles tendon of wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Verônica de Souza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction:Both laser therapy and eccentric exercises are used in tendon injuries. However, the association of these physiotherapeutic modalities is yet little investigated.Objective:To evaluate the effect of low-level laser therapy associated to eccentric exercise (downhill walking on Achilles tendinopathy of Wistar rats.Method:Eighteen Achilles tendon from 15 adult male Wistar rats were used. Tendons were distributed in six groups (laser, eccentric exercise, laser and eccentric exercise, rest, contralateral tendon, and healthy tendon. Unilateral tendinopathy was surgically induced by transversal compression followed by scarification of tendon fibers. The treatments laser therapy (904 nm, 3J/cm² and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 12 m/min; 50 min/day; 15o inclination treadmill began 24 hours after surgery and remained for 20 days. Clinical and biomechanical analyzes were conducted. Achilles tendon was macroscopically evaluated and the transversal diameter measured. Euthanasia was performed 21 days after lesion induction. Tendons of both limbs were collected and frozen at -20°C until biomechanical analysis, on which the characteristic of maximum load (N, stress at ultimate (MPa and maximum extension (mm were analyzed.Results:Swelling was observed within 72 hours postoperative. No fibrous adhesions were observed nor increase in transversal diameter of tendons. Animals with the exercised tendons, but not treated with laser therapy, presented lower (p=0.0000 locomotor capacity. No difference occurred be-tween groups for the biomechanical characteristics maximum load (p=0.4379, stress at ultimate (p=0.4605 and maximum extension (p=0.3820 evaluated, even considering healthy and contralateral tendons.Conclusion:The concomitant use of low-level laser and the eccentric exercise of downhill walking, starting 24 hours after surgically induced tendinopathy, do not result in a tendon with the same biomechanical resistance or elasticity

  10. Effects of botulinum toxin A injection on healing and tensile strength of ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuzuner, Serdar; Özkan, Özlenen; Erin, Nuray; Özkaynak, Sibel; Cinpolat, An; Özkan, Ömer

    2015-04-01

    Tendon lacerations are most commonly managed with surgical repair. Postoperative complications such as adhesions and ruptures often occur with immobilization. Early postoperative mobilization is therefore advised to minimize complications and time required to return to daily life. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT-A) can be used to enhance healing and prevent rupture in mobilized animals with Achilles tenotomy. Twenty-seven rabbits were divided into 3 groups, namely, I, II, and III, after surgical 1-sided Achilles tenotomy and end-to-end repair. The control group for biomechanical comparisons consisted of randomly selected contralateral (unoperated) healthy Achilles tendons. Group I received BoNT-A (4 U/kg) injection into the calf muscles. One week later, electromyographical confirmation was performed to establish the effects of injection. Surgery was then performed. Animals in the second group (n = 9, group II) were immobilized with a cast postoperatively. The third group (n = 9, group III) was mobilized immediately with no cast or BoNT-A. Tendons were harvested and gap formation or ruptures as well as strength of the repaired tendon were assessed 6 weeks after surgery. Achilles tendons healed in all animals injected with BoNT-A, whereas all were ruptured in group III. All Achilles tendons of animals in groups I and II healed. However, group I repaired tendons were biomechanically equivalent to healthy tendons, whereas group II repaired tendons demonstrated significantly decreased tensile strength (P = 0.009). The present study suggests that local injection of BoNT-A can be used for treatment of tendon rupture and may replace the use of cast for immobilization. However, further studies are needed to determine whether BoNT-A injection can have a beneficial effect on the healing of tendon repairs in humans.

  11. Cross-linking in collagen by nonenzymatic glycation increases the matrix stiffness in rabbit achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, G Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174-180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendon. The glycation process was initiated by incubating the Achilles tendons (n = 6) in phosphate-buffered saline containing ribose, whereas control tendons (n = 6) were incubated in phosphate-buffered saline without ribose. Eight weeks following glycation, the biomechanical attributes as well as the degree of collagen cross-linking were determined to examine the potential associations between matrix stiffness and molecular properties of collagen. Compared to nonglycated tendons, the glycated tendons showed increased maximum load, stress, strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness indicating that glycation increases the matrix stiffness in the tendons. Glycation of tendons resulted in a considerable decrease in soluble collagen content and a significant increase in insoluble collagen and pentosidine. Analysis of potential associations between the matrix stiffness and degree of collagen cross-linking showed that both insoluble collagen and pentosidine exhibited a significant positive correlation with the maximum load, stress, and strain, Young's modulus of elasticity, and toughness (r values ranging from.61 to.94) in the Achilles tendons. However, the soluble collagen content present in neutral salt buffer, acetate buffer, and acetate buffer containing pepsin showed an inverse relation with the various biomechanical attributes tested (r values ranging from.22 to.84) in the Achilles tendons. The results of the study demonstrate that glycation-induced collagen cross

  12. The structural and mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon 2 years after surgical repair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geremia, J.M.; Bobbert, M.F.; Casa Nova, M.; Ott, R.D.; De Aguiar Lemos, F.; De Oliveira Lupion, R.; Frasson, V.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute ruptures of the Achilles tendon affect the tendon's structural and mechanical properties. The long-term effects of surgical repair on these properties remain unclear. Purpose To evaluate effects of early mobilization versus traditional immobilization rehabilitation programs 2 years

  13. Early Ankle Mobilization Promotes Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Asilehan, Batiza; Wupuer, Aikeremu; Qianman, Bayixiati; Jialihasi, Ayidaer; Tangkejie, Wulanbai; Maimaitiaili, Abudouheilil; Shawutali, Nuerai; Badelhan, Aynaz; Niyazebieke, Hadelebieke; Aizezi, Adili; Aisaiding, Amuding; Bakyt, Yerzat; Aibek, Rakimbaiev; Wuerliebieke, Jianati

    2016-01-01

    The use of early mobilization of the ankle joint without orthosis in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture has been advocated as the optimal management. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes in a postoperative rabbit model of Achilles tendon rupture between early mobilization and immobilized animals using a differential proteomics approach. In total, 135 rabbits were randomized into the control group (n=15), the postoperative cast immobilization (PCI) group (n=60), and the early mobilization (EM) group (n=60). A rupture of the Achilles tendon was created in each animal model and repaired microsurgically, and tendon samples were removed at 3, 7, 14, and 21 days postoperatively. Proteins were separated using 2-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, NCBI database searches, and bioinformatics analyses. A series of differentially expressed proteins were identified between groups, some of which may play an important role in Achilles tendon healing. Notable candidate proteins that were upregulated in the EM group were identified, such as CRMP-2, galactokinase 1, tropomyosin-4, and transthyretin. The healing of ruptured Achilles tendons appears to be affected at the level of protein expression with the use of early mobilization. The classic postoperative treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with an orthosis ignored the self-protecting instinct of humans. With a novel operative technique, the repaired tendon can persist the load that comes from traction in knee and ankle joint functional movement. In addition, kinesitherapy provided an excellent experimental outcome via a mechanobiological mechanism. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Collagen fibril size and crimp morphology in ruptured and intact Achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S P; Qvortrup, K; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    The present study examined the hypothesis that collagen fibril diameter and crimp angle in ruptured human Achilles tendons differed from that of intact ones. Tissue samples were obtained from the central core (distal core) and the posterior periphery (distal superficial) at the rupture site, and ...... tendon rupture site. Moreover, the lack of symptoms prior to the rupture suggests that clinical tendinopathy is not an etiological factor in complete tendon ruptures....

  15. In-vitro tensile testing machine for vibration study of fresh rabbit Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Gian M.; Scalise, Alessandro; Scalise, Lorenzo; Pianosi, Antonella

    2001-10-01

    A lot of people, overall athletic one suffer from tendinitis or complete rupture of the Achilles tendon. This structure becomes inflamed and damaged mainly from a variety of mechanical forces and sometimes due to metabolic problems, such as diabetes or arthritis. Over the past three decades extensive studies have been performed on the structural and mechanical properties of Achilles tendon trying to explain the constitutive equations to describe and foresee tendon behavior. Among the various mechanical parameters, the vibrational behavior is also of interest. Several investigations are performed in order to study how the Achilles tendon vibrations influence the response of the muscle proprioception and human posture. The present article describes how in vitro tensile experiments can be performed, taking into account the need to simulate physiological condition of Achilles tendon and thus approaching some opened problems in the design of the experimental set-up. A new system for evaluating tendon vibrations by non contact techniques is proposed. Preliminary simple elongation tests are made extracting the main mechanical parameters: stress and strain at different fixed stretches, in order to characterize the tissue. Finally, a vibration study is made at each pretensioned tendon level evaluating the oscillating curves caused by a small hammer.

  16. Effect of repeated freezing-thawing on the Achilles tendon of rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lianxu; Wu, Yanping; Yu, Jiakuo; Jiao, Zhaode; Ao, Yingfang; Yu, Changlong; Wang, Jianquan; Cui, Guoqing

    2011-06-01

    The increased use of allograft tissue in the reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament has brought more focus to the effect of storage and treatment on allograft. The purpose of this study was to observe the effect of histology and biomechanics on Achilles tendon in rabbits through repeated freezing-thawing before allograft tendon transplantation. Rabbit Achilles tendons were harvested and processed according to the manufacture's protocol of tissue bank, and freezing-thawing was repeated three times (group 1) and ten times (group 2). Those received only one cycle were used as controls. Then, tendons in each group were selected randomly to make for histological observations and biomechanics test. Histological observation showed that the following changes happened as the number of freezing-thawing increased: the arrangement of tendon bundles and collagen fibrils became disordered until ruptured, cells disrupted and apparent gaps appeared between tendon bundle because the formation of ice crystals. There were significant differences between the experimental and control groups in the values of maximum load, energy of maximum load and maximum stress, whereas no significant differences existed in other values such as stiffness, maximum strain, elastic modulus, and energy density. Therefore, repeated freezing-thawing had histological and biomechanical effect on Achilles tendon in rabbits before allograft tendon transplantation. This indicates that cautions should be taken in the repeated freezing-thawing preparation of allograft tendons in clinical application.

  17. Sonoelastography can be used to monitor the restoration of Achilles tendon elasticity after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehmert, S; Jung, E M; Kügler, T; Klein, S; Gehmert, S; Zeitler, K; Loibl, M; Prantl, L

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate an ultrasound approach for depicting elastic recovery after stem cell application on injured Achilles tendons. A rabbit Achilles tendon injury model was used and randomized hind limbs received an extracellular matrix either with autologous mesenchymal stem cells (group 2, n = 6) or without (group 3, n = 6). The cells were harvested from the rabbits' nuchal fat body. Untreated Achilles tendons (group 1, n = 6) served as controls. Specimens were harvested after 8 weeks and analyzed longitudinally for elasticity using a high resolution 6-15 MHz matrix linear probe. For each tendon, real-time color-coded sonoelastography sequences were recorded for 20 seconds and 10 color histogram frames were obtained. Defined regions of interest (ROIs) were placed on the injury (n = 3) and on the adjacent uninjured tendon tissue (n = 3). In total, 180 measurements were obtained for semi-quantitative analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA demonstrated a higher elasticity for the stem cell-seeded matrix (group 2) in comparison to the unseeded matrix (group 3) (p tendon tissue treated with stem cell-seeded matrix (group 2) and the uninjured Achilles tendons (group 1) (p > 0.05). Moreover, no differences were found between the measurements at different points in time (p > 0.05). Our results indicate that autologous mesenchymal stem cell application successfully restores the mechanical properties of injured tendon tissue. Furthermore, sonoelastography makes it possible to monitor the elasticity of injured Achilles tendons. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Hemodynamic study for the healing process of ruptured achilles tendon by dynamic MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Toshiyuki; Hamanishi, Hiroji; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Mizuno, Kosaku

    2000-01-01

    Dynamic MR imaging with a combination of fast MR imaging technique and intravenous bolus administration of Gd-DTPA is a useful method to evaluate the vascularity of the soft tissue. By using this technique, we evaluated the healing processes of ruptured Achilles tendon. Eighteen patients who underwent percutaneous suture of the ruptured Achilles tendon were examined monthly by dynamic MRI in their course of healing. We evaluated time intensity curve obtained from each data of dynamic MRI. Time intensity curve showed slow fill in-slow wash out pattern 4 weeks after operation. Eight weeks after operation, the time course of the fill in-wash out changed to be shorter. Rapid fill in-rapid wash out pattern was observed about 12 weeks after surgery. After that period, time intensity curve tended to change into non-fitting pattern. (normal pattern) Eight functional parameters were obtained from time-intensity curve. We analyzed which parameters are useful for evaluation of tendon healing. In addition, we studied the healing processes of rabbit Achilles tendon following surgical incision. Twelve rabbits underwent tenotomy of Achilles tendon. The tendons excised at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 weeks after operation were examined using microangiography and a light microscope. Four weeks after tenotomy, many capillary vessels filled with Gd-DTPA were observed in the ruptured area. About 10 weeks after operation, the capillary vessels decreased and collageneous fibers were arranged along the long axis of the tendon. This term would be thought to correspond to the condition about 12-14 weeks after surgery in clinical cases. From this study, dynamic MRI is thought to be useful method to know the hemodynamic conditions of the healing tendons. Especially, four parameters-Mean Transit Time, Corrected Transit Time, Time to Peak, Inflection Width, -seemed to have absolute value and be useful for the quantitative evaluation of the healing processes in human Achilles tendon. (author)

  19. Hemodynamic study for the healing process of ruptured achilles tendon by dynamic MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuno, Toshiyuki [Hyogo Rehabilitation Center (Japan); Hamanishi, Hiroji; Nishikawa, Tetsuo; Mizuno, Kosaku

    2000-12-01

    Dynamic MR imaging with a combination of fast MR imaging technique and intravenous bolus administration of Gd-DTPA is a useful method to evaluate the vascularity of the soft tissue. By using this technique, we evaluated the healing processes of ruptured Achilles tendon. Eighteen patients who underwent percutaneous suture of the ruptured Achilles tendon were examined monthly by dynamic MRI in their course of healing. We evaluated time intensity curve obtained from each data of dynamic MRI. Time intensity curve showed slow fill in-slow wash out pattern 4 weeks after operation. Eight weeks after operation, the time course of the fill in-wash out changed to be shorter. Rapid fill in-rapid wash out pattern was observed about 12 weeks after surgery. After that period, time intensity curve tended to change into non-fitting pattern. (normal pattern) Eight functional parameters were obtained from time-intensity curve. We analyzed which parameters are useful for evaluation of tendon healing. In addition, we studied the healing processes of rabbit Achilles tendon following surgical incision. Twelve rabbits underwent tenotomy of Achilles tendon. The tendons excised at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 weeks after operation were examined using microangiography and a light microscope. Four weeks after tenotomy, many capillary vessels filled with Gd-DTPA were observed in the ruptured area. About 10 weeks after operation, the capillary vessels decreased and collageneous fibers were arranged along the long axis of the tendon. This term would be thought to correspond to the condition about 12-14 weeks after surgery in clinical cases. From this study, dynamic MRI is thought to be useful method to know the hemodynamic conditions of the healing tendons. Especially, four parameters-Mean Transit Time, Corrected Transit Time, Time to Peak, Inflection Width, -seemed to have absolute value and be useful for the quantitative evaluation of the healing processes in human Achilles tendon. (author)

  20. Clinical commentary of the evolution of the treatment for chronic painful mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkan Alfredson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion was for many years, and still is in many countries, treated with intratendinous revision surgery. However, by coincidence, painful eccentric calf muscle training was tried, and it showed very good clinical results. This finding was unexpected and led to research into the pain mechanisms involved in this condition. Today we know that there are very few nerves inside, but multiple nerves outside, the ventral side of the chronic painful Achilles tendon mid-portion. These research findings have resulted in new treatment methods targeting the regions with nerves outside the tendon, methods that allow for a rapid rehabilitation and fast return to sports.

  1. Achilles tendon injuries in elite athletes: lessons in pathophysiology from their equine counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson-Kane, Janet C; Rich, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Superficial digital flexor tendon (SDFT) injury in equine athletes is one of the most well-accepted, scientifically supported companion animal models of human disease (i.e., exercise-induced Achilles tendon [AT] injury). The SDFT and AT are functionally and clinically equivalent (and important) energy-storing structures for which no equally appropriate rodent, rabbit, or other analogues exist. Access to equine tissues has facilitated significant advances in knowledge of tendon maturation and aging, determination of specific exercise effects (including early life), and definition of some of the earliest stages of subclinical pathology. Access to human surgical biopsies has provided complementary information on more advanced phases of disease. Importantly, equine SDFT injuries are only a model for acute ruptures in athletes, not the entire spectrum of human tendonopathy (including chronic tendon pain). In both, pathology begins with a potentially prolonged phase of accumulation of (subclinical) microdamage. Recent work has revealed remarkably similar genetic risk factors, including further evidence that tenocyte dysfunction plays an active role. Mice are convenient but not necessarily accurate models for multiple diseases, particularly at the cellular level. Mechanistic studies, including tendon cell responses to combinations of exercise-associated stresses, require a more thorough investigation of cross-species conservation of key stress pathway auditors. Molecular evidence has provided some context for the poor performance of mouse models; equines may provide better systems at this level. The use of horses may be additionally justifiable based on comparable species longevity, lifestyle factors, and selection pressure by similar infectious agents (e.g., herpesviruses) on general cell stress pathway evolution. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions

  2. An advanced glycation endproduct (AGE)-rich diet promotes accumulation of AGEs in Achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Dorthe; Svensson, Rene B; Scheijen, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated the rela......Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) accumulate in long-lived tissue proteins like collagen in bone and tendon causing modification of the biomechanical properties. This has been hypothesized to raise the risk of orthopedic injury such as bone fractures and tendon ruptures. We evaluated...... the relationship between AGE content in the diet and accumulation of AGEs in weight-bearing animal Achilles tendon. Two groups of mice (C57BL/6Ntac) were fed with either high-fat diet low in AGEs high-fat diet (HFD) (n = 14) or normal diet high in AGEs (ND) (n = 11). AGE content in ND was six to 50-fold higher...... than HFD The mice were sacrificed at week 40 and Achilles and tail tendons were carefully excised to compare weight and nonweight-bearing tendons. The amount of the AGEs carboxymethyllysine (CML), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone (MG-H1) and carboxyethyllysine (CEL) in Achilles and tail tendon...

  3. Cross-Linking in Collagen by Nonenzymatic Glycation Increases the Matrix Stiffness in Rabbit Achilles Tendon

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, G. Kesava

    2004-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of connective tissue matrix proteins is a major contributor to the pathology of diabetes and aging. Previously the author and colleagues have shown that nonenzymatic glycation significantly enhances the matrix stability in the Achilles tendon (Reddy et al., 2002, Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 399, 174–180). The present study was designed to gain further insight into glycation-induced collagen cross-linking and its relationship to matrix stiffness in the rabbit Achilles tendo...

  4. Ultrasound strain mapping of Achilles tendon compressive strain patterns during dorsiflexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimenti, Ruth L; Flemister, A Samuel; Ketz, John; Bucklin, Mary; Buckley, Mark R; Richards, Michael S

    2016-01-04

    Heel lifts are commonly prescribed to patients with Achilles tendinopathy, yet little is known about the effect on tendon compressive strain. The purposes of the current study were to (1) develop a valid and reliable ultrasound elastography technique and algorithm to measure compressive strain of human Achilles tendon in vivo, (2) examine the effects of ankle dorsiflexion (lowering via controlled removal of a heel lift and partial squat) on compressive strain of the Achilles tendon insertion and (3) examine the relative compressive strain between the deep and superficial regions of the Achilles tendon insertion. All tasks started in a position equivalent to standing with a 30mm heel lift. An ultrasound transducer positioned over the Achilles tendon insertion was used to capture radiofrequency images. A non-rigid image registration-based algorithm was used to estimate compressive strain of the tendon, which was divided into 2 regions (superficial, deep). The bland-Altman test and intraclass correlation coefficient were used to test validity and reliability. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare compressive strain between regions and across tasks. Compressive strain was accurately and reliably (ICC>0.75) quantified. There was greater compressive strain during the combined task of lowering and partial squat compared to the lowering (P=.001) and partial squat (P<.001) tasks separately. There was greater compressive strain in the deep region of the tendon compared to the superficial for all tasks (P=.001). While these findings need to be examined in a pathological population, heel lifts may reduce tendon compressive strain during daily activities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Endosopic achilles tendon augmentation with a graft loop anatomic and radiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Shazly, Ossama; Abou Elsoud, Maged M; Desouky, Ahmed

    2011-09-01

    Mini-invasive techniques are commonly used for repair of tendon Achilles (TA) rupture. However, the use of these techniques is limited when graft augmentation is needed. A radiological study was conducted on 18 normal ankles using multi-slice CT scan with soft tissue reconstruction to determine the endoscopic landmarks for Achilles tendon insertion. The surgical procedure was performed on six whole lower limb formaldehyde preserved specimens. Endoscopic-assisted TA augmentation with a graft loop was done for all specimens. Postoperative assessment of the tunnel was done using multi-slice CT scan. Anatomic dissection showed that the sural nerve and neurovascular bundle were intact in all specimens. With the technique described a graft loop can be delivered endoscopically for Achilles tendon augmentation. The technique was found to be safe for the sural nerve and medial neurovascular structures. Copyright © 2010 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. EMG monitoring during functional non-surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüfner, Tobias; Wohifarth, Kai; Fink, Matthias; Thermann, H; Rollnik, Jens D

    2002-07-01

    After surgical therapy of Achilles tendon rupture, neuromuscular changes may persist, even one year after surgery. We were interested whether these changes are also evident following a non-surgical functional therapy (Variostabil therapy boot/Adidas). Twenty-one patients with complete Achilles tendon rupture were enrolled in the study (mean age 38.5 years, range 24 to 60; 18 men, three women) and followed-up clinically and with surface EMG of the gastrocnemius muscles after four, eight, 12 weeks, and one year after rupture. EMG differences between the affected and non-affected side could only be observed at baseline and after four weeks following Achilles tendon rupture. The results from our study show that EMG changes are not found following non-surgical functional therapy.

  7. A simple suture-guiding device for minimally invasive Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obut, Sinan; Gultekin, Alper; Unal, Meric; Serarslan, Ulaş; Tuhanioğlu, Ümit

    2017-01-01

    Our hypothesis is to utilize a simple suture-guiding device for minimally invasive repair of Achilles tendon without any extra cost with a minimal risk of rerupture. The purpose of this study is to investigate the results of our minimally invasive technique for Achilles tendon repair using a simple ovarian clamp for suture guiding. Twenty patients with acute Achilles tendon rupture were treated with minimally invasive repair by an expert orthopaedic surgeon. Instead of an Achillon device, an ovarian clamp was directed to the proximal and distal parts of the Achilles tendon. All data relating to daily activities, walking, climbing stairs, sports activity, American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) and Thermannscores were recorded. Sural nerve was evaluated with physical examination for paraesthesia, hyperaesthesia, lateralis cruris and foot pain in all patient controls. The average AOFAS score was 97.06 (76-100). All patients had intact Achilles tendon at last control. No rerupture was observed. Average time taken to return to work was 30.8 days (28-60 days). After 6 months, all patients returned to their previous sports activities. For Achilles tendon ruptures, minimally invasive repair techniques have shown successful results with low complication rates. Besides their success, some suture-guiding devices bring extra costs for patients or health insurance. Minimally invasive techniques may be performed with devices without any extra cost. Our new suture-guiding device provides knot placement under paratenon like Achillon device to improve outcomes, provides early return to work and minimizes the complications. Finally, our suture-guiding device has no extra cost.

  8. Role of tissue-engineered artificial tendon in healing of a large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid

    2013-09-01

    Treatment of large Achilles tendon defects is technically demanding. Tissue engineering is an option. We constructed a collagen-based artificial tendon, covered it with a polydioxanon (PDS) sheath, and studied the role of this bioimplant on experimental tendon healing in vivo. A 2-cm tendon gap was created in the left Achilles tendon of rabbits (n = 120). The animals were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (no implant), treated with tridimensional-collagen, and treated with tridimensional-collagen-bidimensional-PDS implants. Each group was divided into 2 subgroups of 60 and 120 days postinjury (DPI). Another 50 pilot animals were used to study the host-implant interaction. Physical activity of the animals was scored and ultrasonographic and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured tendons were investigated weekly. After euthanasia, macro, micro, and nano morphologies and biophysical and biomechanical characteristics of the healing tendons were studied. Treatment improved function of the animals, time dependently. At 60 and 120 DPI, the treated tendons showed significantly higher maximum load, yield, stiffness, stress, and modulus of elasticity compared with controls. The collagen implant induced inflammation and absorbed the migrating fibroblasts in the defect area. By its unique architecture, it aligned the fibroblasts and guided their proliferation and collagen deposition along the stress line of the tendon and resulted in improved collagen density, micro-amp, micro-ohm, water uptake, and delivery of the regenerated tissue. The PDS-sheath covering amplified these characteristics. The implants were gradually absorbed and replaced by a new tendon. Minimum amounts of peritendinous adhesion, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis were observed in the treated groups. Some remnants of the implants were preserved and accepted as a part of the new tendon. The implants were cytocompatible, biocompatible, biodegradable, and effective in tendon healing and regeneration. This

  9. Outcome following use of the Achillon jig for the repair of acutely ruptured Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Howard; Agrawal, Yuvraj; Blundell, Chris; Davies, Mark B

    2017-03-01

    We report a series of 143 patients who underwent limited open Achilles tendon repair using the Achillon device at a mean follow-up of 25 months. All patients attending our institution with a diagnosis of acute Achilles tendon rupture were considered for operative repair using the Achillon jig unless they declined surgery or met the exclusion criteria. Following surgery patients were contacted and asked to complete an Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS). The clinical records were reviewed for evidence of complications, demographic information and evidence of re-rupture. Statistical analysis of subgroups including age at presentation, delay to surgery and patients with complications was carried out using the Kruskal Wallis non-parametric test. We report no re-ruptures at a mean of 25 months (minimum 12 months) following surgery. The mean ATRS score was 84/100 (range 15-100). There was no statistical significance between any of the subgroups analyzed. In conclusion, acute Achilles repair using the Achillon jig is safe, with a low re-rupture rate, excellent ATRS scores at a minimum of 12 months post-operatively and low complications. The incidence of sural nerve injury is much lower than published series of percutaneous Achilles tendon repair without the use of a jig. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Association Between Knee Osteoarthritis and Functional Changes in Ankle Joint and Achilles Tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbaz, Avi; Magram-Flohr, Irina; Segal, Ganit; Mor, Amit; Debi, Ronen; Kalichman, Leonid

    Increasing evidence has shown that biomechanical forces often drive the progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA). Attention should be given to the changes in adjacent joints and their relation to knee OA. The purpose of the present study was to examine the changes in Achilles tendon thickness of individuals with knee OA and to evaluate the correlation between Achilles tendon thickness and knee OA severity in a case-control prospective observational study. A total of 93 participants with no previous ankle injuries were recruited. Of the 93 participants, 63 had knee OA of the medial compartment and 30 served as controls. The subjects underwent a clinical examination that included measurements of weight, height, Achilles tendon thickness, and 1-leg heel rise. The subjects also underwent a computerized gait test and completed the Hebrew version of the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index and 36-item short-form (SF-36) health survey. Significant difference was found in Achilles tendon thickness between the subjects with knee OA and the healthy controls (17.1 ± 3.4 versus 15.1 ± 3.1; p = .009). Significant differences were also found between the 2 groups in the 1-leg heel rise test, Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index scores, SF-36 scores, and all gait measures. Significant correlations were found between the Achilles tendon thickness and the following measures: weight (r = 0.46), body mass index (r = 0.55), Kellgren and Lawrence OA severity grade (r = 0.25), 1-leg heel rises (r = -0.50), and SF-36 score (r = -0.25). Subjects with knee OA presented with a thicker Achilles tendon compared with the healthy controls. Furthermore, a significant correlation between Achilles tendon thickness and knee OA severity was found. A comprehensive assessment of the Achilles tendon and ankle joint should be a part of the knee OA evaluation process. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  11. The effects of CrossFit and minimalist footwear on Achilles tendon kinetics during running

    OpenAIRE

    Sinclair, Jonathan Kenneth; Sant, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current investigation was to comparatively assess the influence of barefoot, CrossFit, minimalist and conventional footwear on the loads experienced by the Achilles tendon during running. Twelve male runners (27.81 ± 7.02 years, height 1.77 ± 0.11 cm and body mass 76.22 ±\\ud 7.04 kg) ran at 4.0 m·s-1 in each of the four footwear conditions. Achilles tendon forces were calculated using a musculoskeletal modelling approach allowing the magnitudinal and temporal aspects of the Ach...

  12. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Achilles Tendon: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Song

    Full Text Available To evaluate the potential effects of irreversible electroporation ablation on the Achilles tendon in a rabbit model and to compare the histopathological and biomechanical changes between specimens following electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation.A total of 140 six-month-old male New Zealand rabbits were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups, 70 in the radiofrequency ablation group and 70 in the electroporation group. In situ ablations were applied directly to the Achilles tendons of rabbits using typical electroporation (1800 V/cm, 90 pulses and radiofrequency ablation (power control mode protocols. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluations were performed to examine the effects of electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation over time.Both electroporation and radiofrequency ablation produced complete cell ablation in the target region. Thermal damage resulted in tendon rupture 3 days post radiofrequency ablation. In contrast, electroporation-ablated Achilles tendons preserved their biomechanical properties and showed no detectable rupture at this time point. The electroporation-ablated tendons exhibited signs of recovery, including tenoblast regeneration and angiogenesis within 2 weeks, and the restoration of their integral structure was evident within 12 weeks.When applying electroporation to ablate solid tumors, major advantage could be that collateral damage to adjacent tendons or ligaments is minimized due to the unique ability of electroporation ablation to target the cell membrane. This advantage could have a significant impact on the field of tumor ablation near vital tendons or ligaments.

  13. The Effects of Irreversible Electroporation on the Achilles Tendon: An Experimental Study in a Rabbit Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yue; Zheng, Jingjing; Yan, Mingwei; Ding, Weidong; Xu, Kui; Fan, Qingyu; Li, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effects of irreversible electroporation ablation on the Achilles tendon in a rabbit model and to compare the histopathological and biomechanical changes between specimens following electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation. A total of 140 six-month-old male New Zealand rabbits were used. The animals were randomly divided into two groups, 70 in the radiofrequency ablation group and 70 in the electroporation group. In situ ablations were applied directly to the Achilles tendons of rabbits using typical electroporation (1800 V/cm, 90 pulses) and radiofrequency ablation (power control mode) protocols. Histopathological and biomechanical evaluations were performed to examine the effects of electroporation ablation and radiofrequency ablation over time. Both electroporation and radiofrequency ablation produced complete cell ablation in the target region. Thermal damage resulted in tendon rupture 3 days post radiofrequency ablation. In contrast, electroporation-ablated Achilles tendons preserved their biomechanical properties and showed no detectable rupture at this time point. The electroporation-ablated tendons exhibited signs of recovery, including tenoblast regeneration and angiogenesis within 2 weeks, and the restoration of their integral structure was evident within 12 weeks. When applying electroporation to ablate solid tumors, major advantage could be that collateral damage to adjacent tendons or ligaments is minimized due to the unique ability of electroporation ablation to target the cell membrane. This advantage could have a significant impact on the field of tumor ablation near vital tendons or ligaments.

  14. Fluoroquinolone-induced bilateral rupture of the Achilles tendon: clinical and sonographic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Busilacchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The fluoroquinolones are antibiotics widely used in the clinical practice. The concomitant use of corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones in elderly patients is recognised as a risk factor for developing clinically relevant tendon lesions. Fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathy is underreported in the literature. Clinical case. A 67-year-old man, came to our observation complaining of 5 days history of bilateral heel pain. The patient had a medical history of sarcoidosis and was treated with a daily dose of 5 mg of prednisone. He was initially given oral levofloxacin (500 mg/die for 10 days, because of an acute respiratory infection. Two days before the end of the antibiotic therapy, he developed bilateral heel pain. He denied any history of trauma. Physical examination revealed swelling and marked tenderness with mild palpation of the Achilles tendons at the calcaneal insertion. The ultrasound evaluation of the Achilles tendons revealed the following main abnormalities: diffuse thickening, loss of the “fibrillar” echotexture, blurred margins, and bilateral partial tendon tears. Discussion. Bilateral Achilles tendon pain and rupture has been described as a rare adverse effect of fluoroquinolone treatment. Most of the fluoroquinolone-induced tendinopathies of the Achilles tendon are due to ciprofloxacin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of bilateral Achilles tendon rupture due to levofloxacin. The risk/benefit ratio of the fluoroquinolones should be carefully considered and these drugs should be prescribed cautiously in elderly patients treated with corticosteroids. This case can be regarded as a representative example of the potential clinical efficacy of sonography in daily rheumatological practise.

  15. Static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Koji; Noguchi, Masahiko; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2008-07-01

    Since tendons show viscoelastic behavior, dynamic viscoelastic properties should be assessed in addition to static biomechanical properties. We evaluated differences between static and dynamic biomechanical properties of the regenerating rabbit Achilles tendon following tenotomy. At 3, 6, or 12 weeks after right Achilles tenotomy, the right (regenerating) and left (control) tendons were collected with the calcaneus from 49 rabbits. A unidirectional failure test and a dynamic viscoelastic test were conducted. Tensile strength and Young's modulus (static biomechanical properties) in the regenerating group at Week 6 were significantly greater than at Week 3, while at Week 12, these were significantly greater than at Week 6. However, even at Week 12, both parameters were less than in the control group. The value of tan delta represents dynamic viscoelasticity, a smaller tan delta indicates greater elasticity. tan delta for the regenerating group was significantly greater than for the control group at Week 3, but regenerating and control groups did not significantly differ at Week 6. No marked change was seen from Weeks 6 to 12 in the regenerating group, and no significant difference in tan delta was evident between the regenerating and control groups at Week 12. Dynamic biomechanical properties of regenerating rabbit Achilles tendons may improve more rapidly than static biomechanical properties. Ability to tolerate dynamic movement in the healing Achilles tendon may improve more rapidly than ability to withstand static stresses.

  16. Tendon Length, Calf Muscle Atrophy, and Strength Deficit After Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: Long-Term Follow-up of Patients in a Previous Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Juuso; Lantto, Iikka; Piilonen, Juuso; Flinkkilä, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Siira, Pertti; Laine, Vesa; Niinimäki, Jaakko; Pajala, Ari; Leppilahti, Juhana

    2017-09-20

    In this prospective study, we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess long-term Achilles tendon length, calf muscle volume, and muscle fatty degeneration after surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture. From 1998 to 2001, 60 patients at our center underwent surgery for acute Achilles tendon rupture followed by early functional postoperative rehabilitation. Fifty-five patients were reexamined after a minimum duration of follow-up of 13 years (mean, 14 years), and 52 of them were included in the present study. Outcome measures included Achilles tendon length, calf muscle volume, and fatty degeneration measured with MRI of both the affected and the uninjured leg. The isokinetic plantar flexion strength of both calves was measured and was correlated with the structural findings. The Achilles tendon was, on average, 12 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] = 8.6 to 15.6 mm; p muscles were 63 cm (13%; p muscle atrophy. Increased Achilles tendon length is associated with smaller calf muscle volumes and persistent plantar flexion strength deficits after surgical repair of Achilles tendon rupture. Strength deficits and muscle volume deficits are partly compensated for by FHL hypertrophy, but 11% to 13% deficits in soleus and gastrocnemius muscle volumes and 12% to 18% deficits in plantar flexion strength persist even after long-term follow-up. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  17. A DELPHI STUDY OF RISK FACTORS FOR ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY- OPINIONS OF WORLD TENDON EXPERTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paul J.; Barry, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Achilles tendinopathy can be a debilitating chronic condition for both active and inactive individuals. The identification of risk facors is important both in preventing but also treating tendinopathy, many factors have been proposed but there is a lack of primary epidemiological data. The purpose of this study was to develop a statement of expert consensus on risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy in active and sedentary patient populations to inform a primary epidemiological study. Study design Delphi study Methods and Measures An online Delphi study was completed inviting participation from world tendon experts. The consensus was developed using three rounds of the Delphi technique. The first round developed a complete list of potential risk factors, the second round refined this list but also separated the factors into two population groups – active/athletic and inactive/sedentary. The third round ranked this list in order of perceived importance. Results Forty-four experts were invited to participate, 16 participated in the first round (response rate 40%) and two dropped out in the second round (resulting in a response rate of 35%). A total of 27 intrinsic and eight extrinsic risk factors were identified during round one. During round two only 12 intrinsic and five extrinsic risk factors were identified as important in active/athletic tendinopathy while 14 intrinsic and three extrinsic factors were identified as important for inactive/sedentary tendinopathy. Conclusions Risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy were identified based on expert consensus, and these factors provide a basis for primary epidemiological studies. Plantarflexor strength was identified as the primary modifiable factor in the active/athletic group while systemic factors were identified as important in the inactive/sedentary group, many of the potential factors suggested for either group were non-modifiable. Non-modifiable factors include: previous tendinopathy

  18. Science to Practice: Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth S; Martin, Jack; Thelen, Darryl

    2017-05-01

    Compression-based ultrasonographic (US) elastography is associated with time-dependent mechanical and histologic changes of the healing tendon in a transected rabbit model of the Achilles tendon. This finding will lead to continued development of quantitative US, which can be used to objectively assess a diseased or healing tendon. With advances in the method used, clinical translation of tendon elastography may enable clinicians to diagnose tendon damage and track healing, which should improve both treatment and outcome.

  19. Improved healing of transected rabbit Achilles tendon after a single injection of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund, Carina; Aspenberg, Per

    2003-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures in humans might be treated more efficiently with the help of a growth factor. Cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2 has been shown to induce formation of tendon-like tissue. Cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2 has a positive effect on mechanical parameters for tendon healing in a rabbit model with Achilles tendon transection. Controlled laboratory study. The right Achilles tendon of 40 rabbits was transected without tendon suture. Cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2 (10 micro g) or vehicle control (acetate buffer) was injected locally 2 hours postoperatively. All tendons were tested biomechanically at 8 and 14 days, and treated tendons were histologically and radiographically evaluated at 56 days. At 14 days, both failure load and stiffness of treated tendons were increased by 35%. The treated tendons had significantly larger callus size at 8 and 14 days. Histologic and radiographic examination showed no signs of ossification in the treated tendons after 56 days. A single injection of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2 led to a stronger and stiffer tendon callus than that in the controls without inducing bone formation. Similar results from a larger animal model would suggest a possible future use of cartilage-derived morphogenetic protein-2 in the treatment of human Achilles tendon ruptures.

  20. Cas rare de rupture bilatérale des tendons d'Achille sans notion de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    La rupture bilatérale du tendon d'Achille est rare. La plupart des patients rapportent une notion de maladie systémique ou un antécédent de chirurgie du genou. Nous rapportons le cas d'une lésion rare dans la littérature, une rupture bilatérale des tendons achiléens sans notions de maladies auto-immunes ni de traitement ...

  1. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppe, Christian; Magnusson, S.P.; Lonsdale, Markus; Friberg, Lars; Svensson, Rene B.; Kjaer, Michael; Neergaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Following Achilles tendon rupture, running is often allowed after 6 months. However, tendon healing is slow and the metabolic status of the tendon at this point is unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate tendon metabolism (glucose uptake) and vascularization at 3, 6 and 12 months after Achilles tendon rupture as measured using PET and power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). The study group comprised 23 patients with surgically repaired Achilles tendon rupture who were investigated at 3 months (n = 7), 6 months (n = 7) and 12 months (n = 9) after surgery. The triceps surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ( 18 F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment (VISA-A) questionnaire. Relative glucose uptake ( 18 F-FDG) was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at all time-points (6, 3 and 1.6 times higher at 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively; P ≤ 0.001), and was also higher in the tendon core than in the periphery at 3 and 6 months (P ≤ 0.02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P < 0.05 for both), but had normalized by 12 months. These data demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust negative correlation between tendon metabolism and patient-reported outcome suggests that a high metabolic activity 6 months after the injury may be related to a poor clinical healing outcome. (orig.)

  2. Tendon Mineralization Is Progressive and Associated with Deterioration of Tendon Biomechanical Properties, and Requires BMP-Smad Signaling in the Mouse Achilles Tendon Injury Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kairui; Asai, Shuji; Hast, Michael W.; Liu, Min; Usami, Yu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Soslowsky, Louis J.; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic tendon mineralization can develop following tendon rupture or trauma surgery. The pathogenesis of ectopic tendon mineralization and its clinical impact have not been fully elucidated yet. In this study, we utilized a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to determine whether ectopic tendon mineralization alters the biomechanical properties of the tendon and whether BMP signaling is involved in this condition. A complete transverse incision was made at the midpoint of the right Achilles tendon in 8-week-old CD1 mice and the gap was left open. Ectopic cartilaginous mass formation was found in the injured tendon by 4 weeks post-surgery and ectopic mineralization was detected at 8–10 weeks post-surgery. Ectopic mineralization grew over time and volume of the mineralized materials of 25-weeks samples was about 2.5 fold bigger than that of 10-weeks samples, indicating that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive. In vitro mechanical testing showed that max force, max stress and mid-substance modulus in the 25-weeks samples were significantly lower than the 10-weeks samples. We observed substantial increases in expression of bone morphogenetic protein family genes in injured tendons 1 week post-surgery. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that phosphorylation of both Smad1 and Smad3 were highly increased in injured tendons as early as 1 week post-injury and remained high in ectopic chondrogenic lesions 4 weeks post-injury. Treatment with the BMP receptor kinase inhibitor (LDN193189) significantly inhibited injury-induced tendon mineralization. These findings indicate that injury-induced ectopic tendon mineralization is progressive, involves BMP signaling and associated with deterioration of tendon biomechanical properties. PMID:26825318

  3. Achilles tendon length and medial gastrocnemius architecture in children with cerebral palsy and equinus gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Tishya A L; Cheatwood, Allison P; Rethlefsen, Susan A; Hara, Reiko; Perez, Francisco J; Kay, Robert M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine both the tendon and muscle components of the medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit in children with cerebral palsy (CP) and equinus gait, with or without contracture. We also examined a small number of children who had undergone prior surgical lengthening of the triceps surae to address equinus contracture. Ultrasound was used to measure Achilles tendon length and muscle-tendon architectural parameters in children of ages 5 to 12 years. Muscle and tendon parameters were compared among 4 groups: Control group (N=40 limbs from 21 typically developing children), Static Equinus group (N=23 limbs from 15 children with CP and equinus contracture), Dynamic Equinus group (N=12 limbs from 7 children with CP and equinus gait without contracture), and Prior Surgery group (N=10 limbs from 6 children with CP who had prior gastrocnemius recession or tendo-achilles lengthening). The groups were compared using analysis of variance and Scheffe post hoc tests. The CP groups had longer Achilles tendons and shorter muscle bellies than the Control group (Parchitecture. These architectural features likely affect function, possibly contributing to functional deficits such as plantarflexor weakness after surgery. Level II, prospective comparative study.

  4. Therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells to treat Achilles tendon injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, M H C; Oliveira, R J; Eça, L P M; Pereira, I S O; Hermeto, L C; Matuo, R; Fernandes, W S; Silva, R A; Antoniolli, A C M B

    2014-12-12

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon diminishes quality of life. The gold-standard therapy is a surgical suture, but this presents complications, including wound formation and inflammation. These complications spurred evaluation of the therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from adipose tissue. New Zealand rabbits were divided into 6 groups (three treatments with two time points each) evaluated at either 14 or 28 days after surgery: cross section of the Achilles tendon (CSAT); CSAT + Suture; and CSAT + MSC. A comparison between all groups at both time points showed a statistically significant increase in capillaries and in the structural organization of collagen in the healed tendon in the CSAT + Suture and CSAT + MSC groups at the 14-day assessment. Comparison between the two time points within the same group showed a statistically significant decrease in the inflammatory process and an increase in the structural organization of collagen in the CSAT and CSAT + MSC groups. A study of the genomic integrity of the cells suggested a linear correlation between an increase of injuries and culture time. Thus, MSC transplantation is a good alternative for treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures because it may be conducted without surgery and tendon suture and, therefore, has no risk of adverse effects resulting from the surgical wound or inflammation caused by nonabsorbable sutures. Furthermore, this alternative treatment exhibits a better capacity for wound healing and maintaining the original tendon architecture, depending on the arrangement of the collagen fibers, and has important therapeutic potential.

  5. Sonographic measurements of the achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad are reliable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Finn E; Jensen, Signe; Stallknecht, Sandra E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine intra- and interobserver reliability and precision of sonographic (US) scanning in measuring thickness of the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, and heel fat pad in patients with heel pain. METHODS: Seventeen consecutive patients referred with heel pain were included. Two...

  6. The amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex in infants is related to body position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, Janneke L. M.; Bos, Arend F.; vd Hoeven, Johannes H.; Brouwer, Oebele F.; Sollie, Krystyna M.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) in healthy infants is modulated by changes in body position (prone vs. supine). The amplitude of the ATR was compared at postnatal day 1, months 2, 3 and 6, while infants were placed in prone and supine position. The ATR was

  7. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan

    2013-01-01

    the 14C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of 14C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of 14C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples...... is revealed by nuclear bomb 14C....

  8. Unrecognised Acute Rupture of the Achilles Tendon in Severe Ankle Sprain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kin Wai Lam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inversion ankle sprain is a common sport injury. It commonly refers to the injury of lateral collateral ligaments of the ankle. Failure to detect the concomitant injuries would lead to inappropriate treatment and suboptimal result. A case of unrecognised rupture of the Achilles tendon in a patient with severe inversion ankle sprain is reported.

  9. [Successive ruptures of patellar and Achilles tendons. Anabolic steroids in competitive sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, J; Prokop, A; Skouras, E

    2008-01-01

    Derivatives of testosterone or of 19-nor-testosterone are used as anabolics for the purpose of improving performance although the effect of anabolics is known still to be under discussion. The use of anabolic steroids continues among competitive athletes despite increased controls and increasingly frequent dramatic incidents connected with them. Whereas metabolic dysfunction during anabolic use is well documented, ruptures of the large tendons are rarely reported. Within 18 months, a 29-year-old professional footballer needed surgery for rupture of the patellar tendon and of both Achilles tendons. Carefully directed questioning elicited confirmation that he had taken different anabolic steroids regularly for 3 years with the intention of improving his strength. After each operation anabolic steroids were taken again at a high dosage during early convalescence and training. Minimally invasive surgery and open suturing techniques led to complete union of the Achilles tendons in good time. Training and anabolic use (metenolon 300 mg per week) started early after suturing of the patellar tendon including bone tunnels culminated in histologically confirmed rerupture after 8 weeks. After a ligament reconstruction with a semitendinosus tendon graft with subsequent infection, the tendon and reserve traction apparatus were lost. Repeated warnings of impaired healing if anabolic use was continued had been given without success. In view of the high number of unrecorded cases in competitive and athletic sports, we can assume that the use of anabolic steroids is also of quantitative relevance in the operative treatment of tendon ruptures.

  10. Effect of cyclic training model on terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon: an experimental study

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    Chang-lin HUANG

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of cyclic training on histomorphology of the terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon, and explore its preventive effect on training-based enthesiopathy. Methods  Seventy-two Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control group, jumping group, running group and cyclic training group, 18 for each. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week. The terminal insertion tissues of bilateral Achilles tendons were harvested from these rabbits for observing the pathomorphological changes under light microscope, and pathological scoring and statistical analysis were carried out. Results  Light microscopy showed that the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage in the Achilles tendon insertion region were severely damaged in the jumping group, and though the tendon fibers were damaged severely, the injury to the fibrocartilage was comparatively less serious in the running group. The injuries to the tendon fibers and fibrocartilage were milder in the cyclic training group than in the jumping group and running group. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, the histopathology score of insertion of Achilles tendon was 1.17±0.12, 2.19±0.15, 3.23±0.20, 4.66±0.16, 4.71±0.18, 4.63±0.13 respectively in the jumping group, and 1.16±0.13, 1.15±0.14, 2.18±0.12, 2.99±0.15, 3.98±0.16, 4.01±0.12 respectively in the running group. Increase in pathological score appeared earlier in the jumping group than in the running group, and a significant increase began at the 3rd week. The difference in pathological score between the two groups originated mainly from the changes in the tidemark. In the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week, the pathological score of Achilles tendon insertion was 1.13±0.14, 1.16±0.17, 1.15±0.13, 2.18±0.13, 2.17±0.12, 2.92±0.11 respectively in the cyclic training group, and they showed no significant changes as compared with control

  11. The Effect of Phospholipids (Surfactant on Adhesion and Biomechanical Properties of Tendon: A Rat Achilles Tendon Repair Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kursat Dabak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesion of the tendon is a major challenge for the orthopedic surgeon during tendon repair. Manipulation of biological environment is one of the concepts to prevent adhesion. Lots of biochemicals have been studied for this purpose. We aimed to determine the effect of phospholipids on adhesion and biomechanical properties of tendon in an animal tendon repair model. Seventy-two Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups. Achilles tendons of rats were cut and repaired. Phospholipids were applied at two different dosages. Tendon adhesion was determined histopathologically and biomechanical test was performed. At macroscopic evaluation of adhesion, there are statistically significant differences between multiple-dose phospholipid injection group and Control group and also hyaluronic acid group and Control group (p0.008. Ultimate strength was highest at hyaluronic acid injection group and lowest at multiple-dose phospholipid injection group. Single-dose phospholipids (surfactant application may have a beneficial effect on the tendon adhesion. Although multiple applications of phospholipids seem the most effective regime to reduce the tendon adhesion among groups, it deteriorated the biomechanical properties of tendon.

  12. Augmented Versus Nonaugmented Repair of Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Quan; Lin, Xiang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Although simple end-to-end repair of the Achilles tendon is common, many augmented repair protocols have been implemented for acute Achilles tendon rupture. However, whether augmented repair is better than nonaugmented repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture is still unknown. To conduct a meta-analysis to determine whether augmented surgical repair of an acute Achilles tendon rupture improved subjective patient satisfaction without an increase in rerupture rates. Secondary outcomes assessed included infections, ankle range of motion, calf muscle strength, and minor complications. Meta-analysis. A systematic literature search of peer-reviewed articles was conducted to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing augmented repair and nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture from January 1980 to August 2016 in the electronic databases of PubMed, Web of Science (SCI-E/SSCI/A&HCI), and EMBASE. The keywords (Achilles tendon rupture) AND (surg* OR operat* OR repair* OR augment* OR non-augment* OR end-to-end OR sutur*) were combined, and results were limited to human RCTs and controlled clinical trials published in the English language. Four RCTs involving 169 participants were eligible for inclusion; 83 participants were treated with augmented repair and 86 were treated with nonaugmented repair. Augmented repair led to similar responses when compared with nonaugmented repair for acute Achilles tendon rupture (93% vs 90%, respectively; P = .53). The rerupture rates showed no significant difference for augmented versus nonaugmented repair (7.2% vs 9.3%, respectively; P = .69). No differences in superficial and deep infections occurred in augmented (7 infections) and nonaugmented (8 infections) repair groups during postoperative follow-up ( P = .89). The average incisional infection rate was 8.4% with augmented repair and 9.3% with nonaugmented repair. No significant differences in other complications were found between augmented (7.2%) and

  13. The Effect of Sodium Hyaluronate on Ligamentation and Biomechanical Property of Tendon in Repair of Achilles Tendon Defect with Polyethylene Terephthalate Artificial Ligament: A Rabbit Tendon Repair Model

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    Shengkun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the most common ruptured tendon of human body. Reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate (PET artificial ligament is recommended in some serious cases. Sodium hyaluronate (HA is beneficial for the healing of tendon injuries. We aimed to determine the effect of sodium hyaluronate in repair of Achilles tendon defect with PET artificial ligament in an animal tendon repair model. Sixteen New Zealand White rabbits were divided into two groups. Eight rabbits repaired with PET were assigned to PET group; the other eight rabbits repaired with PET along with injection of HE were assigned to HA-PET group. All rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks postoperatively for biomechanical and histological examination. The HA-PET group revealed higher biomechanical property compared with the PET group. Histologically, more collagen tissues grew into the HA-PET group compared with PET group. In conclusion, application of sodium hyaluronate can improve the healing of Achilles tendon reconstruction with polyethylene terephthalate artificial ligament.

  14. The effects of substance P on the biomechanic properties of ruptured rat Achilles' tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Adelheid E; Burssens, Peter J; Vercruysse, Chris W; Vanderstraeten, Guy G; Verbeeck, Ronald M

    2006-02-01

    To determine whether injection of substance P into the paratendinous region of a ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendon alters the biomechanic properties of the tendon. Interventional animal study. Animal laboratory at a university hospital. Ninety-six 2-month-old, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Injection of saline, substance P (10(-6)micromol/kg of body weight [BW] or 10(-8)micromol/kg BW) associated with neutral endopeptidase inhibitors, or neutral endopeptidase inhibitors alone into the paratendinous region of ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendons from the second until the sixth day postoperatively. Stress at maximal load and work to maximal load and stiffness. Stress at maximal load was higher in the groups injected with substance P than in the saline group in the first, second, and sixth weeks. Work to maximal load was higher from the second until the sixth weeks in the substance P-treated groups than in the saline group. Stiffness did not differ between the 4 groups in any of the weeks. Injection of substance P into the paratendinous region of ruptured and subsequently sutured rat Achilles' tendons improved tendon healing by enhancing stress at maximal load and work to maximal load. However, stiffness was not significantly affected.

  15. [Effects of exogenous prostaglandin E2 on collagen content of Achilles tendon of rabbits in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Tang, Kanglai; Deng, Yinshuan; Xie, Meiming; Chang, Dehai; Tao, Xu; Xu, Jianzhong

    2012-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production increases in human tendon fibroblasts after the tendon injuries and repetitive mechanical loading in vitro. To analyze the relations between PGE2 and tendinopathy by observing the changes of collagen content and proportion after the Achilles tendon of rabbits is repeatedly exposed to PGE2. Twenty-four Japanese rabbits (aged 3-4 months, weighing 2.0-2.5 kg, and male or female) were equally randomized into 2 groups according to injection dose of PGE2: low dose group (50 ng) and high dose group (500 ng). Corresponding PGE2 (0.2 mL) was injected into the middle segment of the Achilles tendon of hindlimb, the same dose saline into the same site of the other side as controls once a week for 4 weeks or 8 weeks. The Achilles tendons were harvested at 4 and 8 weeks after injection. HE staining was used to observe the cell structure and matrix, and picric acid-sirius red staining to observe the distribution and types of collagen fibers, and transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the density of the unit area and diameter of collagen fibers. HE staining showed that collagen structural damage was observed in low dose and high dose groups. Picric acid-sirius red staining showed that the content of type I collagen significantly decreased while the content of type III collagen significantly increased in experimental side of 2 groups at 4 and 8 weeks after injection when compared with control sides (P Achilles tendon of rabbit to PGE2 can cause the decrease of type I collagen, the increase of type III collagen, the reverse ratio of type I to type III, reduced unit density of collagen fibers, and thinner collagen fibers diameter, which is related with tendinopathy.

  16. Improved Achilles tendon healing by early mechanical loading in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jihong; Jiang, Dianming; Wen, Shuzheng; Jing, Shangfei; Fan, Dongsheng; Hao, Zengtao; Han, Chaoqian

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the structure and the attachment strength of a healing tendon-bone interface and the role of mechanical loading in tendon healing. Sixty rabbits underwent unilateral detachment and repair of the Achilles tendon. Thirty animals were immobilized (Group A), and the others wereallowed loadingimmediately postoperatively (Group B). Animals were sacrificed at 4 weeks and evaluated for histological and biomechanical testing. Statistical analysis was performed with an independent t test with significance set at P = 0.05. The ultimate stress was greater in group B (4.598 ± 1.321 N/mm(2)) compared with the control group (3.388 ± 0.994 N/mm(2)) (P tendon-to-bone interface with a larger area of chondrocytes was found in group B (P tendon-to-bone interface.

  17. Healing of Achilles tendon partial tear following focused shockwave: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu YC

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Chun Hsu,1,* Wei-Ting Wu,2,* Ke-Vin Chang,2–4 Der-Sheng Han,2–4 Li-Wei Chou5–7 1Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, 3National Taiwan University College of Medicine, 4Community and Geriatric Research Center, National Taiwan University Hospital, Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei, 5Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, China Medical University Hospital, 6Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, 7Department of Rehabilitation, Asia University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Achilles tendinopathy is a common cause of posterior heel pain and can progress to partial tendon tear without adequate treatment. Effects of traditional treatments vary, and many recent reports focus on the use of extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT for Achilles tendinopathy but not for Achilles tendon partial tear. Here, we report the case of a 64-year-old female suffering from severe left heel pain for half a year. All treatment and rehabilitation were less effective until ESWT was applied. Each course of focused shockwave therapy included 2500 shots with energy flux density from 0.142 mJ/mm2 to 0.341 mJ/mm2. The visual analog scale decreased from nine to one degree. High-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasonography was performed before and 1 month after the treatment, which revealed healing of the torn region and decrease in inflammation. ESWT had shown to be an alternative treatment for Achilles tendon partial tear under safety procedure and ultrasound observation. Keywords: focused shockwave, Achilles tendon, partial tear, ultrasonography

  18. Reliability and validation of the Dutch Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opdam, K T M; Zwiers, R; Wiegerinck, J I; Kleipool, A E B; Haverlag, R; Goslings, J C; van Dijk, C N

    2018-03-01

    Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) have become a cornerstone for the evaluation of the effectiveness of treatment. The Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) is a PROM for outcome and assessment of an Achilles tendon rupture. The aim of this study was to translate the ATRS to Dutch and evaluate its reliability and validity in the Dutch population. A forward-backward translation procedure was performed according to the guidelines of cross-cultural adaptation process. The Dutch ATRS was evaluated for reliability and validity in patients treated for a total Achilles tendon rupture from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2014 in one teaching hospital and one academic hospital. Reliability was assessed by the intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), Cronbach's alpha and minimal detectable change (MDC). We assessed construct validity by calculation of Spearman's rho correlation coefficient with domains of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles questionnaire (VISA-A) and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for pain in rest and during running. The Dutch ATRS had a good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.852) and a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.96). MDC was 30.2 at individual level and 3.5 at group level. Construct validity was supported by 75 % of the hypothesized correlations. The Dutch ATRS had a strong correlation with NRS for pain during running (r = -0.746) and all the five subscales of the Dutch FAOS (r = 0.724-0.867). There was a moderate correlation with the VISA-A-NL (r = 0.691) and NRS for pain in rest (r = -0.580). The Dutch ATRS shows an adequate reliability and validity and can be used in the Dutch population for measuring the outcome of treatment of a total Achilles tendon rupture and for research purposes. Diagnostic study, Level I.

  19. Achilles Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Five ailments which can cause pain in the achilles tendon area are: (1) muscular strain, involving the stretching or tearing of muscle or tendon fibers; (2) a contusion, inflammation or infection called tenosynovitis; (3) tendonitis, the inflammation of the tendon; (4) calcaneal bursitis, the inflammation of the bursa between the achilles tendon…

  20. High voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment, synthesis, and angiogenesis after Achilles tendon partial rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érika P. Rampazo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify the efficacy of high voltage pulsed current in collagen realignment and synthesis and in angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats. Method Forty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups of 10 animals each: sham, cathodic stimulation, anodic stimulation, and alternating stimulation. Their Achilles tendons were submitted to direct trauma by a free-falling metal bar. Then, the treatment was administered for six consecutive days after the injury. In the simulation group, the electrodes were positioned on the animal, but the device remained off for 30 minutes. The other groups used a frequency of 120 pps, sensory threshold, and the corresponding polarity. On the seventh day, the tendons were removed and sent for histological slide preparation for birefringence and Picrosirius Red analysis and for blood vessel quantification. Results No significant difference was observed among the groups regarding collagen realignment (types I or III collagen or quantity of blood vessels. Conclusion High voltage pulsed current for six consecutive days was not effective in collagen realignment, synthesis, or angiogenesis after the partial rupturing of the Achilles tendon in rats.

  1. Achilles tendon moment arm in humans is not affected by inversion/eversion of the foot: a short report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Susann; Morse, Christopher I; Winwood, Keith L; Hodson-Tole, Emma; McEwan, Islay M

    2018-01-01

    The triceps surae primarily acts as plantarflexor of the ankle joint. However, the group also causes inversion and eversion at the subtalar joint. Despite this, the Achilles tendon moment arm is generally measured without considering the potential influence of inversion/eversion of the foot during plantarflexion. This study investigated the effect of foot inversion and eversion on the plantarflexion Achilles tendon moment arm. Achilles tendon moment arms were determined using the centre-of-rotation method in magnetic resonance images of the left ankle of 11 participants. The foot was positioned at 15° dorsiflexion, 0° or 15° plantarflexion using a Styrofoam wedge. In each of these positions, the foot was either 10° inverted, neutral or 10° everted using an additional Styrofoam wedge. Achilles tendon moment arm in neutral foot position was 47.93 ± 4.54 mm and did not differ significantly when the foot was positioned in 10° inversion and 10° eversion. Hence, inversion/eversion position of the foot may not considerably affect the length of the Achilles tendon moment arm. This information could be useful in musculoskeletal models of the human lower leg and foot and when estimating Achilles tendon forces during plantarflexion with the foot positioned in inversion or eversion.

  2. Suture holding capacity of the Achilles tendon during the healing period: an in vivo experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Yakup; Kara, Hasan; Cabukoglu, Cengiz; Esemenli, Tanil

    2006-02-01

    Early motion and weightbearing is known to promote the healing of Achilles tendon repair. It is important to be informed about the repair strength for a secure rehabilitation. There are reports about the initial repair strength of Achilles tendons; however, they are mainly in vitro studies that represent the time zero strength of the repair. Softening of the tendon observed during the biological process of the tendon healing, which may effect the suture holding capacity and in turn the repair strength of the tendon has not been evaluated before. In the current study, the suture holding capacity of rabbit Achilles tendon was observed at various times during the healing period. The suture holding capacity of the tendon at the end of the first and third weeks after surgery was found to be similar within 30% of the control tendon. However, at the end of the fourth week it was doubled reaching 65% of the control tendon. Intrinsic tendon insufficiency which causes a decrease in the suture holding capacity of the tendon may lead to pull-out of the suture material during the postoperative third week. This period is precarious for early motion and weightbearing since the suture holding capacity of the tendon doubled relative to the previous three weeks.

  3. Serial Changes of Tendon Histomorphology and Strain Elastography After Induced Achilles Tendinopathy in Rabbits: An In Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Nam Joon; Kang, Chang Ho; Lee, Young Hen; Jeon, Hae Jeong

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and compare the serial changes of morphology and strain in the early process of Achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model. A total of 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent ligation of one of their Achilles tendons to induce ischemic injury. Both inflamed and contralateral Achilles tendons were serially evaluated with 3 follow-ups: the first on days 3 to 5, the second on days 9 to 13, and the third and last follow-up on days 15 to 20 after surgery. During each examination, tendon thickness was measured and red, green, and blue pixel intensities of the elastogram were analyzed using color histogram analysis software. Differences between the inflamed and control group were compared. The mean thickness of the inflamed tendons increased during consecutive follow-ups and was significantly larger than that of control tendons (P tendons was also serially increased and was higher than that in the control tendons, indicating softening. However, the difference was significant only in the second and third follow-ups (P Tendon thickening and softening developed during the early process of Achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model. Tendon softening may present later than thickening. © 2017 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  4. Evaluation of absorbable and nonabsorbable sutures for repair of achilles tendon rupture with a suture-guiding device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Baris; Ulku, Tekin Kerem; Gereli, Arel; Karahan, Mustafa; Turkmen, Metin

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional and clinical results of Achilles tendon repairs with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using nonabsorbable versus absorbable sutures. We hypothesized that the absorbable suture would have clinical results comparable to those of the nonabsorbable suture for Achilles tendon repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding system. From January 2010 to September 2013, 48 consecutive patients who had sustained a spontaneous rupture of the Achilles tendon underwent operative repair with an Achilles tendon suture-guiding device using 2 different suture types. All ruptures were acute. The patients were divided equally into 2 groups according to suture type. In the nonabsorbable suture group, No. 2 braided nonabsorbable polyethylene terephthalate sutures were used, and in the absorbable suture group, braided absorbable polyglactin sutures were used. The average age of the patients was 38 years (range, 28-50 years). Functional outcome scores and complications were evaluated. All patients had an intact Achilles repair after surgery. The American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS) hindfoot clinical outcome scores were 98 (range, 90-100) in the nonabsorbable suture group and 96.8 (range, 87-100) in the absorbable suture group. All patients returned to their previous work. The absorbable suture group had fewer postoperative complications (0%) than the nonabsorbable suture group (12.5%) (P guiding system was associated with a lower incidence of suture reaction; however, functionally the results were not notably different from those using a traditional nonabsorbable suture. We conclude that repair with absorbable sutures is appropriate for Achilles tendon ruptures. Level II, prospective comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. [Surgical treatment of chronic non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy in runners using bipolar radiofrequency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal-Burró, J; López-Capapé, D; Igualada-Blázquez, C; Ortiz-Espada, A; Martín-García, A

    2016-01-01

    To present the surgical technique with release of peritendon and radiofrequency as an effective treatment for athletes with chronic tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon body. This is a retrospective case series descriptive type study. The series consists of 17 Achilles tendon surgeries in 13 patients, who habitually run. The study included patients with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy refractory to conservative treatments. After a minimum follow-up of 12 months, clinical improvement of the athletes was assessed using the Nirschl pain scale, as well as athletic performance. An improvement was obtained in 94% of symptoms and a return to the previous performance in of 70% of cases in the 12 months follow-up. Peritendon release combined with bipolar radiofrequency is presented as an effective solution in this condition, for which there is currently no consensus on the best treatment. In patients in whom, after an appropriate conservative treatment for a sufficient period (at least 6 months) the non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy persists, open adhesiolysis combined with bipolar radiofrequency is a safe and with a high success rate clinical and functional intervention. In high performance athletes this technique allows a return to previous activity in a high percentage of cases. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Local biochemical and morphological differences in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, U.; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is high and underlying etiology as well as biochemical and morphological pathology associated with the disease is largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to describe biochemical and morphological differences in chronic Achilles tendinopathy....... The expressions of growth factors, inflammatory mediators and tendon morphology were determined in both chronically diseased and healthy tendon parts....

  7. Ruptured human Achilles tendon has elevated metabolic activity up to 1 year after repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Couppé, Christian; Lonsdale, Markus

    2016-01-01

    demonstrate that the healing process as determined by metabolic activity and vascularization continues for 6 months after injury when large loads are typically allowed on the tendon. Indeed, metabolic activity remained elevated for more than 1 year after injury despite normalized vascularization. The robust...... surae complex was loaded over 20 min of slow treadmill walking while a radioactive tracer ((18)F-FDG) was administered prior to PET. Vascularization was measured in terms of PDUS flow activity, and patient-reported outcomes were scored using the Achilles tendon rupture score (ATRS) and sports assessment.......02), but lower at 12 months (P = 0.06). Relative glucose uptake was negatively related to ATRS at 6 months after repair (r = -0.89, P ≤ 0.01). PDUS flow activity was higher in repaired tendons than in intact tendons at 3 and 6 months (P 

  8. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells influence early tendon-healing in a rabbit achilles tendon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alphonsus K S; Ang, Abel D; Goh, James C H; Hui, James H P; Lim, Aymeric Y T; Lee, Eng Hin; Lim, Beng Hai

    2007-01-01

    A repaired tendon needs to be protected for weeks until it has accrued enough strength to handle physiological loads. Tissue-engineering techniques have shown promise in the treatment of tendon and ligament defects. The present study tested the hypothesis that bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells can accelerate tendon-healing after primary repair of a tendon injury in a rabbit model. Fifty-seven New Zealand White rabbits were used as the experimental animals, and seven others were used as the source of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The injury model was a sharp complete transection through the midsubstance of the Achilles tendon. The transected tendon was immediately repaired with use of a modified Kessler suture and a running epitendinous suture. Both limbs were used, and each side was randomized to receive either bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a fibrin carrier or fibrin carrier alone (control). Postoperatively, the rabbits were not immobilized. Specimens were harvested at one, three, six, and twelve weeks for analysis, which included evaluation of gross morphology (sixty-two specimens), cell tracing (twelve specimens), histological assessment (forty specimens), immunohistochemistry studies (thirty specimens), morphometric analysis (forty specimens), and mechanical testing (sixty-two specimens). There were no differences between the two groups with regard to the gross morphology of the tendons. The fibrin had degraded by three weeks. Cell tracing showed that labeled bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells remained viable and present in the intratendinous region for at least six weeks, becoming more diffuse at later time-periods. At three weeks, collagen fibers appeared more organized and there were better morphometric nuclear parameters in the treatment group (p tendon repair can improve histological and biomechanical parameters in the early stages of tendon-healing.

  9. Correspondence of high-frequency ultrasound and histomorphometry of healing rabbit Achilles tendon tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Puippe, Gilbert; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-04-01

    Static and dynamic high-frequency ultrasound of healing rabbit Achilles tendons were set in relationship to histomorphometric analyses at three and six weeks post-surgery. Twelve New Zealand White rabbits received a clean-cut Achilles tendon laceration (the medial and lateral Musculus gastrocnemius) and were repaired with a four-strand Becker suture. Six rabbits got additionally a tight polyester urethane tube at the repair site in order to vary the adhesion extent. Tendons were analysed by static and dynamic ultrasound (control: healthy contralateral legs). The ultrasound outcome was corresponded to the tendon shape, tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, collagen fibre orientation and adhesion extent. The spindle-like morphology of healing tendons (ultrasound) was confirmed by the swollen epitenon (histology). Prediction of adhesion formation by dynamic ultrasound assessment was confirmed by histology (contact region to surrounding tissue). Hyperechogenic areas corresponded to acellular zones with aligned fibres and hypoechogenic zones to not yet oriented fibres and to cell-rich areas. These findings add new in-depth structural knowledge to the established non-invasive analytical tool, ultrasound.

  10. The effect of platelet-rich plasma on Achilles tendon healing in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Masaki; Yasuda, Toshito; Nakano, Atsushi; Shima, Hiroaki; Neo, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of PRP on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits during the inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases by histological examination and quantitative assessments. Fifty mature male Japanese albino rabbits with severed Achilles tendons were divided into two equal groups and treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or left untreated. Tendon tissue was harvested at 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 weeks after treatment, and sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and monoclonal antibodies against CD31 and type I collagen. Collagen fibers proliferated more densely early after severance, and subsequent remodeling of the collagen fibers and approximation of normal tendinous tissue occurred earlier in the PRP group than in the control group. The fibroblast number was significantly higher in the PRP group than in the control group at 1 and 2 weeks. Similarly, the area ratio of CD31-positive cells was significantly higher in the PRP group than in the control group at 1 and 2 weeks. Positive staining for type I collagen was more intense in the PRP group than in the control group after 3 weeks, indicating tendon maturation. Administration of PRP shortened the inflammatory phase and promoted tendon healing during the proliferative phase. Copyright © 2016 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Performance outcomes after repair of complete achilles tendon ruptures in national basketball association players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Nirav H; Old, Andrew B; Tabb, Loni P; Garg, Rohit; Toossi, Nader; Cerynik, Douglas L

    2013-08-01

    A complete rupture of the Achilles tendon is a devastating injury. Variables affecting return to competition and performance changes for National Basketball Association (NBA) players are not readily evident. Players in the NBA who ruptured their Achilles tendons and who underwent surgical repair would have more experience in the league, and the performance of those who were able to return to competition would be decreased when compared with their performance before injury and with their control-matched peers. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Data for 18 basketball players with Achilles tendon repair over a 23-year period (1988-2011) were obtained from injury reports, press releases, and player profiles. Variables included age, body mass index (BMI), player position, and number of years playing in the league. Individual season statistics were obtained, and the NBA player efficiency rating (PER) was calculated for 2 seasons before and after injury. Controls were matched by playing position, number of seasons played, and performance statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the effect of each factor. At the time of injury, the average age was 29.7 years, average BMI was 25.6, and average playing experience was 7.6 years. Seven players never returned to play an NBA game, whereas 11 players returned to play 1 season, with 8 of those players returning for ≥2 seasons. Players who returned missed an average of 55.9 games. The PER was reduced by 4.57 (P = .003) in the first season and by 4.38 (P = .010) in the second season. When compared with controls, players demonstrated a significant decline in the PER the first season (P = .038) and second season (P = .081) after their return. The NBA players who returned to play after repair of complete Achilles tendon ruptures showed a significant decrease in playing time and performance. Thirty-nine percent of players never returned to play.

  12. Electromyographic Analysis of the Triceps Surae Muscle Complex During Achilles Tendon Rehabilitation Program Exercises

    OpenAIRE

    Mullaney, Michael; Tyler, Timothy F.; McHugh, Malachy; Orishimo, Karl; Kremenic, Ian; Caggiano, Jessica; Ramsey, Abi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Specific guidelines for therapeutic exercises following an Achilles tendon repair are lacking. Hypothesis: A hierarchical progression of triceps surae exercises can be determined on the basis of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Study Design: Randomized laboratory trial. Methods: Bipolar surface electrodes were applied over the medial and lateral heads of the gastrocnemius as well as the soleus on 20 healthy lower extremities (10 participants, 27 ± 5 years old). Muscle activity wa...

  13. Restoration of ankle joint, quality of life dynamics and assessment of achilles tendon rupture consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Vitomskyi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to investigate the dynamics of restoration of the amplitude of motion in the ankle joint, the quality of life and to assess the effects of the breakdown of the Achilles tendon. Material: patients (n=59, of which n=30 – the main group and n=29 – the control group were examined at 4, 8 and 16 weeks after surgery. Indicators registered with the help of: goniometry; the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score; the scale of an assessment of consequences and results of Leppilahti implications. Results: the decrease of the total amplitude of the motion in the ankle joint takes place due to the deficiency of the amplitude of the dorsal flexion. At the end of the study the dorsal flexion rates were significantly better among the patients of main group. In particular, its deficit was 3.2 ± 1.85° in the main group and 6.8 ± 2.06° in the control group. The final total score Me (25; 75 was also better according to the questionnaire of the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score: 82 (78; 84 points against 74 (72; 77 points (p <0.01. An assessment of consequences according to the Leppilahti score was 83.8 ± 8.58 points in the main group and 70.7 ± 10.58 points in the control group (p <0.01. Conclusions: means of physical rehabilitation help recover the amplitude of movement in the ankle joint, improve the quality of life and the effects after the rupture of the Achilles tendon. The correct methodological approach and combination of tools further improves the results.

  14. Validation and cross-cultural adaptation of Greek version of Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzopoulos, Panagiotis; Ververidis, Athanasios; Giakas, Giannis; Drosos, Georgios I

    2017-07-27

    The purpose of this study was the translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Achilles Tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) in Greek population. The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the original version of ATRS in Greek language was performed according to the methodology described by Beaton et al. Validation and test-retest reliability were evaluated in forty-six patients, treated surgically for acute Achilles tendon rupture. Validity was evaluated by correlation of total and all subscale scores of Greek version of Manchester Foot Pain and Disability Index (MFPDI). Test-retest reliability evaluated with interclass correlation coefficient and Crombach's α coefficient was used for internal consistency. The internal consistency (α=0.96) and test-retest reliability (ICC=0.97) were excellent. There were no ceiling and floor effects during test-retest assessment. The Greek version of ATRS showed strong correlation with all subscales and overall score of MFPDI (pain subscale: R=-0.954, pGreek version of ATRS was successfully adapted in Greek population and it appears to be a valid and reliable instrument to evaluate outcomes in Greek speaking patients after Achilles tendon rupture. Level III. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Histopathological findings in chronic tendon disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvinen, M; Józsa, L; Kannus, P; Järvinen, T L; Kvist, M; Leadbetter, W

    1997-04-01

    Tendon injuries and other tendon disorders represent a common diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in sports medicine, resulting in chronic and long-lasting problems. Tissue degeneration is a common finding in many sports-related tendon complaints. In the great majority of spontaneous tendon ruptures, chronic degenerative changes are seen at the rupture site of the tendon (1). Systemic diseases and diseases specifically deteriorating the normal structure of the tendon (i.e. foreign bodies, and metabolic, inherited and infectious tendon diseases) are only rarely the cause of tendon pathology. Inherited diseases, such as various hereditary diseases with disturbed collagen metabolism and characteristic pathological structural alterations (Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfani syndrome, homocystinuria (ochronosis)), represent approximately 1% of the causes of chronic tendon complaints (2), whereas foreign bodies are somewhat more common and are found in less than 10% of all chronic tendon problems (1). Rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis are typical systemic diseases that cause chronic inflammation in tendon and peritendinous tissues. Altogether, these 'specific' disorders represented less than 2% of the pathological alterations found in the histological analysis of more than 1000 spontaneously ruptured tendons (1, 3, 4). In this material, degenerative changes were seen in a great majority of the tendons, indicating that a spontaneous tendon rupture is a typical clinical end-state manifestation of a degenerative process in the tendon tissue. The role of overuse in the pathogenesis of chronic tendon injuries and disorders is not completely understood. It has been speculated that when tendon is overused it becomes fatigued and loses its basal reparative ability, the repetitive microtraumatic processes thus overwhelming the ability of the tendon cells to repair the fiber damage. The intensive repetitive activity, which often is eccentric by nature, may lead to cumulative

  16. Quantitative US Elastography Can Be Used to Quantify Mechanical and Histologic Tendon Healing in a Rabbit Model of Achilles Tendon Transection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yohei; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Sasho, Takahisa; Fukawa, Taisuke; Akatsu, Yorikazu; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kenji; Nagashima, Kengo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2017-05-01

    Purpose To determine the time-dependent change in strain ratios (SRs) at the healing site of an Achilles tendon rupture in a rabbit model of tendon transection and to assess the correlation between SRs and the mechanical and histologic properties of the healing tissue. Materials and Methods Experimental methods were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. The Achilles tendons of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 limbs) were surgically transected. The SRs of Achilles tendons were calculated by using compression-based quantitative ultrasonographic elastography measurements obtained 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after transection. After in vivo elastography, the left Achilles tendon was harvested for mechanical testing of ultimate load, ultimate stress, elastic modulus, and linear stiffness, and the right tendons were harvested for tissue histologic analysis with the Bonar scale. Time-dependent changes in SRs, mechanical parameters, and Bonar scale scores were evaluated by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. The correlation between SRs and each measured variable was evaluated by using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Results Mean SRs and Bonar scale values decreased as a function of time after transection, whereas mechanical parameters increased (P tendon. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  17. The effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on achilles tendon healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duygulu, Fuat; Karaoğlu, Sinan; Zeybek, N Dilara; Kaymaz, F Figen; Güneş, Tamer

    2006-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of subcutaneously injected nicotine on transversely transected and sutured achilles tendon healing in an experimental rabbit model. Adult New Zealand rabbits (n=22) weighting 3,000-3,500 g were used in this experimental study. Rabbits were randomly divided into two groups. Achilles tendon was transversely incised and repaired in all animals. In the experiment group subcutaneous injection of Nicotine tartrate 3 mg/kg/day was done. In the control group Serum physiologic injection was done at the same dosage. The injections were made three times a day in equal dosages. Nicotine and SF injections were made until the end of the 8-week, and then all animals were euthanized. Both light microscopic and electron microscopic evaluations were made on 14 animals. In N group light microscopic evaluation showed a visible gap in repair site. The total tendon score represented in N group was less than in SF group. The statistical analysis of the groups was significantly different for total tendon scores (P=0.002). Beside this electron microscopic examination showed inactive and degenerated fibroblasts and irregular collagen fibrils around them as well as collagen synthesis interruption in N group. Biomechanical evaluation was made on eight animals. The average tensile strength values in Group N (139.47+/-44.55 N) were significantly lower than those in Group SF (265.9+/-39.01 N) (z=2.309, P=0.029). Nicotine is the major chemical component common to all cigarettes and previously has been shown to affect wound and fracture healing adversely. The results of this study show that nicotine impairs achilles tendon healing after a surgical repair.

  18. Biomechanical and histologic comparison of Achilles tendon ruptures reinforced with intratendinous and peritendinous plantaris tendon grafts in rabbits: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhami, Kuru; Gokhan, Maralcan; Ulukan, Inan; Eray, Bozan M; Levent, Altinel; Ciğdem, Tokyol

    2004-11-01

    We hypothesized that the closer the reinforcing graft was to the repair zone, the more strength the healed tendon would achieved. Therefore, we compared the ruptured rabbit Achilles tendons reinforced with intratendinous and peritendinous plantaris grafts. The experimental study was performed on Achilles tendons of 20 rabbits. First, they were divided into two groups: group I (n=10) underwent intratendinous graft and end-to-end tenorraphy, and group P (n=10) were repaired end-to-end and then reinforced with a peritendinous plantaris graft. An above-knee cast was applied during 6 weeks postoperatively. The two groups were compared to each other biomechanically and histologically. Seven randomly selected rabbits from each group were used for biomechanical evaluation. The remaining six rabbits (three from each group) were used for histologic comparison. Non-operated sides (n=20) served as the control group. The mean maximum load at rupture of the repaired and control groups was 159.9+/-31 N, 83+/-7.5 N, and 207.5+/-35 N for group I, group P, and the control group, respectively. Values between groups were significantly different considering maximum load and absorbed energy to rupture. There was no significant difference between groups I and P in respect to strain. Control group tendons (groups I-C and P-C) had significantly more lengthening capability than operated tendons. Macroscopically, group I tendons were thicker and stiffer than group P tendons. Histologically, differences between the group I and group P specimens revealed that the healing process was faster in tendons augmented intratendinously. In reinforcing Achilles tendon repair, the site of the tendon graft affected the result. When the graft was used intratendinously, the healed tendon was more similar biomechanically to normal tendon and had more graft-tendon orientation histologically than the tendon augmented peritendinously.

  19. Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Achilles Tendon Healing in Rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafbeygi, Arash; Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; Lebaschi, Amir Hussein; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Husseini, Seyed Abouzar; Niazi, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Tendon injuries are common and it takes a long time for an injured tendon to heal. Adverse phenomena such as adhesion and rupture are associated with these injuries. Finding a method to reduce the time required for healing which improves the final outcome, will lead to decreased frequency and intensity of adverse consequences. This study was designed to investigate the effects of basic fibroblast growth factor on the healing of the Achilles tendon in rabbits. In 10 New Zealand white rabbits, Achilles tendon was cut at the intersection of the distal and middle thirds on both hind legs. One microgram of recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was injected in the proximal and distal stumps of the cut tendon on the right side (study group). Normal saline of equal volume was injected on the left side in the same way (control group). Then the tendons were repaired with 5/0 nylon using modified Kessler technique. A cast was made to immobilize each leg. On day 42, rabbits were euthanized and both hind legs were amputated. Tensometry and histopathologic examination were done on specimens. In tensometric studies, more force was required to rupture the repair site in study group. In histopathologic examination, collagen fibers had significantly better orientation and organization in the study group. No difference was noted regarding number of fibroblast and fibrocytes, and degree of angiogenesis in the two groups. Application of basic fibroblast growth factor at tendon repair site improves the healing process through improvement of collagen fiber orientation and increase in biomechanical resistance.

  20. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction enhances naked plasmid DNA transfection in rabbit Achilles tendons in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, L; Zhang, L; Wang, L; Jiang, Y; Luo, Y; Peng, Y; Lin, L

    2012-07-01

    The study was to investigate the probability of increasing the transfection of the gene in tendons by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), and to search for the most suitable transfection conditions. A mixture of microbubbles and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) plasmids was injected into rabbit Achilles tendons by different administration routes and the tendons were ultrasound pulse by different ultrasonic conditions in order to determine the most appropriate conditions. Then, the rabbits were divided into four groups: (1) ultrasound + microbubbles + plasmid; (2) ultrasound+ plasmid; (3) microbubble + plasmid; (4) plasmid only. EGFP expression in the tendons and other tissues, and the damage to tendon and paratenon were all observed. The results showed that EGFP expression in the tendon was higher by ultrasound pulse with 2 W cm(-2) of output intensity and a 20% duty cycle for 10 min. Local injection was determined to be the better administration route. Among the four groups, EGFP expression in Group 1 was higher than that in other groups. EGFP expression was highest on seventh day, then it gradually decrease over time, and lasted more than 56 days. EGFP expression was not found in other tissues. There was no obvious injury caused by UTMD. Under suitable conditions, it is feasible to use UTMD as a safe and effective gene transfection therapy for tendon injuries.

  1. Structure and component alteration of rabbit Achilles tendon in tissue culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosaka, Yoshinao; Ueda, Hiromi; Yamasaki, Tadatsugu; Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsuda, Naoya; Takehana, Kazushige

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate alterations of cultured tendon tissues to determine whether tissue culture is a useful method for biological analyses of the tendon. Tendon tissues for tissue culture were isolated from Achilles tendons of rabbits. The tendon segments were placed one segment per well and incubated in growth medium consisting of Dullbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with 5% fetal bovine serum at 37 degrees C in a humidified atmosphere with 5% CO(2) for various periods. The alignment of collagen fibrils was preserved for 48 h, but tendon structure has disintegrated at 96 h. Alcian blue staining and gelatine zymography revealed that proteoglycan markedly diminished and that matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) activity was upregulated sharply at 72 and 96 h. The ratio of collagen fibrils with large diameter had increased and the mean diameter and mass average diameter value had reached maximum at 48 h. The values then decreased and mean diameters at 72 and 96 h were significantly different from that at 48 h. At 96 h, the ratio of collagen fibrils with small diameters had increased and collagen fibrils with large diameters had disappeared. These findings indicate that structural alteration is possible to be induced by disintegration of collagen fibrils and disappearance of glycosaminoglycans from extracellular matrix (ECM), subsequent of upregulation of MMPs activity. Although the study period is limited, the tissue culture method is available for investigating cell-ECM interaction in tendons.

  2. Changes in blood circulation of the contralateral Achilles tendon during and after acupuncture and heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, K; Yajima, H; Takayama, M; Ikebukuro, T; Mizoguchi, H; Takakura, N

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of acupuncture and heating (application of hot pack) treatments on blood circulation in the contralateral Achilles tendon. During the treatments (10 min for acupuncture, 20 min for heating) and recovery period (40 min), the blood volume (THb) and oxygen saturation (StO2) of the treated and the non-treated tendons were measured using red laser lights. During both treatments, THb and StO2 of the treated tendon increased significantly from the resting level. The increased THb and StO2 of the treated tendon were maintained until the end of the recovery period after removal of the acupuncture needle, although these values decreased after removal of the hot pack. Although THb of the non-treated sides did not change during both acupuncture and heating treatments, it increased gradually after removal of the acupuncture needle or the hot pack. For both treatments, the amount of increase in THb of the non-treated tendon was significantly correlated to that of the treated tendon during the last phase of recovery period. These results obtained from the healthy subjects imply that blood circulation in the injured tendon in a plaster cast may be improved by applying acupuncture or heating treatments to the contralateral healthy limb. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Plantar fascia anatomy and its relationship with Achilles tendon and paratenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecco, Carla; Corradin, Marco; Macchi, Veronica; Morra, Aldo; Porzionato, Andrea; Biz, Carlo; De Caro, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Although the plantar fascia (PF) has been studied quite well from a biomechanical viewpoint, its microscopic properties have been overlooked: nothing is known about its content of elastic fibers, the features of the extracellular matrix or the extent of innervation. From a functional and clinical standpoint, the PF is often correlated with the triceps surae muscle, but the anatomical grounds for this link are not clear. The aim of this work was to focus on the PF macroscopic and microscopic properties and study how Achilles tendon diseases might affect it. Twelve feet from unembalmed human cadavers were dissected to isolate the PF. Specimens from each PF were tested with various histological and immunohistochemical stains. In a second stage, 52 magnetic resonance images (MRI) obtained from patients complaining of aspecific ankle or foot pain were analyzed, dividing the cases into two groups based on the presence or absence of signs of degeneration and/or inflammation of the Achilles tendon. The thickness of PF and paratenon was assessed in the two groups and statistical analyses were conducted. The PF is a tissue firmly joined to plantar muscles and skin. Analyzing its possible connections to the sural structures showed that this fascia is more closely connected to the paratenon of Achilles tendon than to the Achilles tendon, through the periosteum of the heel. The PF extended medially and laterally, continuing into the deep fasciae enveloping the abductor hallucis and abductor digiti minimi muscles, respectively. The PF was rich in hyaluronan, probably produced by fibroblastic-like cells described as ‘fasciacytes’. Nerve endings and Pacini and Ruffini corpuscles were present, particularly in the medial and lateral portions, and on the surface of the muscles, suggesting a role for the PF in the proprioception of foot. In the radiological study, 27 of the 52 MRI showed signs of Achilles tendon inflammation and/or degeneration, and the PF was 3.43 ± 0.48 mm

  4. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K Kim

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8. We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10-6 for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries.

  5. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (p<5x10-8). We found, however, four and three polymorphisms with p-values that were borderline significant (p<10−6) for Achilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  6. Effects of stress-shielding on the dynamic viscoelasticity and ordering of the collagen fibers in rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Kazuya; Kido, Masamitsu; Nagae, Masateru; Ikeda, Takumi; Shirai, Toshiharu; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Arai, Yuji; Oda, Ryo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effects of stress-shielding on both viscoelastic properties and microstructure of collagen fibers in the Achilles tendon by proton double-quantum filtered ((1) H-DQF) NMR spectroscopy. The right hind-limbs of 20 Japanese white rabbits were immobilized for 4 weeks in a cast with the ankle in plantarflexion. Dynamic viscoelasticity of the Achilles tendons was measured using a viscoelastic spectrometer. Proton DQF NMR signals were analyzed to determine the residual dipolar coupling of bound water molecules in the Achilles tendons. Both the dynamic storage modulus (E') and dynamic loss modulus (E″) decreased significantly in the Achilles tendons of the stress-shielding group. The results of the (1) H-DQF NMR examination demonstrated significantly reduced residual dipolar coupling in the Achilles tendons of this same group. The disorientation of collagen fibers by stress-shielding should contribute to degradation of the dynamic storage and loss moduli. The alterations of the collagen fiber orientation that contributed to the function of tendinous tissue can be evaluated by performing an analysis of (1) H DQF NMR spectroscopy. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  7. Impact of drying and thiel embalming on mechanical properties of achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Matthias André; Van Der Straeten, Catherine; De Lepeleere, Bram; Opsomer, Gert-Jan; Van Hoof, Tom; Victor, Jan

    2015-11-01

    Biomechanical research and orthopedic training is regularly carried out on human cadavers. Given the post-mortem decay, these cadavers were usually frozen or embalmed. The embalming method according to Dr. Thiel was often praised for the preservation of natural texture. The main aim of this article was to quantitatively analyze the impact of this embalming technique on the biomechanical properties. To that extent, Achilles tendons (calcaneal tendons) of seven cadavers have been tested. For each cadaver, a first tendon was tested following a fresh-frozen conservation, the other following the Thiel embalming process. The results indicated a significant difference in Young's modulus between both groups (P values = 0.046). The secondary aim of this article was to analyze the impact of exposure to room conditions and associated dehydration on the biomechanical properties of cadaver tissue. Therefore, each tendon was tested before and after 2 hr of exposure to room conditions. The resulting dehydration caused a significant increase of the Young's modulus for the thawed fresh-frozen tendons. The properties of the Thiel embalmed tendons were not significantly altered. In conclusion, this research promoted the use of fresh-frozen specimens for biomechanical testing. Effort should, however, be made to minimize dehydration of the tested specimens. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Biomechanic study of the tensile strength of lyophilized and deep frozen human Achilles tendons following gamma and ethylene oxide sterilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, G; Gerbersdorf, M; Dörner, P; Lengsfeld, M; Griss, P

    1991-01-01

    By a failed first operation allogenic tissues, as human Achilles tendons are offered for anterior cruciate ligament replacement. The effects of freeze-drying and primary Gamma- or EO-sterilization on the mechanical properties of 62 complete and 74 bisected tendons again fresh frozen controls were investigated under axial tension. A significant decrease of tensile strength for the freeze-dried preparations of 33% for the whole and 43% for the bisected tendons were observed, while Gamma- or EO-sterilizations showed a smaller deleterious effect on the tendons. Considering only the primary mechanical strength complete freeze-dried or complete and bisected irradiated Achilles tendons show sufficient tensile strength for anterior cruciate ligament replacement.

  9. Imaging in chronic achilles tendinopathy: a comparison of ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and surgical findings in 27 histologically verified cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aastroem, M. [Department of Orthopaedics, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Gentz, C.F. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Nilsson, P. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Rausing, A. [Department of Pathology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Sjoeberg, S. [Department of Radiology, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden); Westlin, N. [Department of Orthopaedics, Malmoe University Hospital (Sweden)

    1996-10-01

    Objective. To compare information gained by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in chronic achilles tendinopathy with regard to the nature and severity of the lesion. Design. Imaging of both achilles tendons with ultrasonography and MRI was performed prior to unilateral surgery. Operative findings and histological biopsies together served as a reference. Patients. Twenty-seven patients (22 men, 5 women; mean age 44 years; 21 athletes) suffering from chronic achilles tendinopathy participated in the study. Eighteen patients had unilateral and 9 had bilateral symptoms. Results and conclusions. Surgical findings included 4 partial ruptures, 21 degenerative lesions and 2 macroscopically normal cases. Microscopy revealed tendinosis (degeneration) in all tendon biopsies, including cases with a partial rupture, but only slight changes in the paratendinous tissues (paratenon). Ultrasonography was positive in 21 of 26 and MRI in 26 of 27 cases. Severe intratendinous abnormalities and a sagittal tendon diameter >10 mm suggested a partial rupture. In tendons with a false negative result histopathological changes were mild and a tendency towards a better clinical outcome was noted in the sonographic cases. Assessment of the paratenon was unreliable with both methods. Ultrasonography and MRI give similar information and may have their greatest potential as prognostic instruments. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Influence of running shoes and cross-trainers on Achilles tendon forces during running compared with military boots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, P J; Atkins, S

    2015-06-01

    Military recruits are known to be susceptible to Achilles tendon pathology. The British Army have introduced footwear models, the PT-03 (cross-trainer) and PT1000 (running shoes), in an attempt to reduce the incidence of injuries. The aim of the current investigation was to examine the Achilles tendon forces of the cross-trainer and running shoe in relation to conventional army boots. Ten male participants ran at 4.0 m/s in each footwear condition. Achilles tendon forces were obtained throughout the stance phase of running and compared using repeated-measures ANOVAs. The results showed that the time to peak Achilles tendon force was significantly shorter when running in conventional army boots (0.12 s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (0.13 s) and running shoe (0.13 s). Achilles tendon loading rate was shown to be significantly greater in conventional army boots (38.73 BW/s) in comparison with the cross-trainer (35.14 BW/s) and running shoe (33.57 BW/s). The results of this study suggest that the running shoes and cross-trainer footwear are associated with reductions in Achilles tendon parameters that have been linked to the aetiology of injury, and thus it can be hypothesised that these footwear could be beneficial for military recruits undertaking running exercises. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. ADVANTAGES OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF ACHILLES TENDON RUPTURE BY PERCUTANEOUS SUTURE AS OPPOSED TO NONSURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Vidić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the body, and its rupture appears to be the most common injury of the tendomuscular apparatus. This type of injury is more frequent in sportsmen, especially those who play tennis, gymnastics, skiing, handball, football, basketball and athletics. Also, the ruptures are common in people who engage in sports activities for recreation. They appear more often in males, in proportion of 3:1. It appears reciprocally in 25- 30% of the cases. The rupture is easily diagnosed by means of clinical examination (Thompson's test and ultrasonography.The aim of the analysis was to point to the advantages of surgical treatment of a fresh Achilles tendon rupture as opposed to non-surgical treatment by plaster immobilization.The examination was performed on 35 patients, of which 16 (45,71% were treated operatively and 19 (54,29% were treated nonoperatively. The average age of the patients was 38.8 years, that is 37.1 for those treated operatively and 40.2 for those treated nonoperatively. Among the examinees, there were 29(82,86% men and 6 (17,14% women. The operative treatment method consisted of percutaneous suturing, whereas the nonoperative treatment involved the circular above the knee plaster immobilization. All operatively treated patients underwent the surgical treatment in the first 48 hours from the time when the injury had occured. Anesthesia was local and infiltrative.The obtained results showed that there were no unhealed ruptures or re-ruptures. In the group of patients who did not undergo the surgery, there was 1 re-rupture and 1 unhealed rupture, after which the surgical treatment had to be performed in both cases. In the group of operated patients there were no infections, however, 1 thromboembolism occured. Recovery of muscular strenght of the tendon and the realization of the full range of movement required less time in the operated patients. The ultrasonographic findings in the operated patients

  12. Angle analysis of Haglund syndrome and its relationship with osseous variations and Achilles tendon calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Chang; Cheng, Yu-Min; Fu, Yin-Chih; Tien, Yin-Chun; Chen, Shen-Kai; Huang, Peng-Ju

    2007-02-01

    Haglund syndrome is a cause of posterior heel pain. The prominent posterosuperior projection into the retrocalcaneal bursa is thought to be a major etiology. Many methods have been proposed to measure the posterosuperior projection of the tuberosity into this bursa. The Fowler angle and the parallel pitch lines are the most frequently used. However, the relation between symptomatic Haglund syndrome and the measuring methods, especially the Fowler angle and parallel pitch lines, is not clear. The purposes of this paper were to study the predictive value of the most frequently used measurement methods to evaluate bursal impingement and to determine if other osseous variations and Achilles tendon calcification are associated with the development of Haglund syndrome. From October, 1996, to March, 2003, we evaluated 37 heels in 31 patients with symptomatic Haglund syndrome, and 40 heels in 27 individuals without posterior heel pain. On a lateral view radiograph, the Fowler angle, and the parallel pitch lines were measured, in addition to Achilles tendon calcification and the osseous variations, such as a posterior calcaneal step spur or plantar osseous projection. The average Fowler angles in the control group and study group were 62.31 +/- 7.79 degrees and 60.14 +/- 7.01 degrees, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.490). The positive parallel pitch lines in the symptomatic group were 56.8% and in the control group 42.5%. There was no statistically significant difference (p = 0.474) between the groups. No statistically significant differences were noted between the groups concerning the Fowler angle and parallel pitch lines. The posterior calcaneal step spur and Achilles tendon calcification were statistically significant between these two groups. The Fowler angle and parallel pitch lines were of little predictive value for the Haglund syndrome.

  13. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of Persian Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Noureddin Nakhostin; Naghdi, Soofia; Hasanvand, Sahar; Fakhari, Zahra; Kordi, Ramin; Nilsson-Helander, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    To cross-culturally adapt the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) to Persian language and to preliminary evaluate the reliability and validity of a Persian ATRS. A cross-sectional and prospective cohort study was conducted to translate and cross-culturally adapt the ATRS to Persian language (ATRS-Persian) following steps described in guidelines. Thirty patients with total Achilles tendon rupture and 30 healthy subjects participated in this study. Psychometric properties of floor/ceiling effects (responsiveness), internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability, standard error of measurement (SEM), smallest detectable change (SDC), construct validity, and discriminant validity were tested. Factor analysis was performed to determine the ATRS-Persian structure. There were no floor or ceiling effects that indicate the content and responsiveness of ATRS-Persian. Internal consistency was high (Cronbach's α 0.95). Item-total correlations exceeded acceptable standard of 0.3 for the all items (0.58-0.95). The test-retest reliability was excellent [(ICC)agreement 0.98]. SEM and SDC were 3.57 and 9.9, respectively. Construct validity was supported by a significant correlation between the ATRS-Persian total score and the Persian Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (PFAOS) total score and PFAOS subscales (r = 0.55-0.83). The ATRS-Persian significantly discriminated between patients and healthy subjects. Explanatory factor analysis revealed 1 component. The ATRS was cross-culturally adapted to Persian and demonstrated to be a reliable and valid instrument to measure functional outcomes in Persian patients with Achilles tendon rupture. II.

  14. [The application of contralateral acupuncture for rehabilitation after acute closed achilles tendon rupture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Ye, Xiangming; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Wenjie

    2017-03-12

    To observe the differences of affected-side ankle plantar flexors function and clinical efficacy between contralateral acupuncture combined with rehabilitation training and rehabilitation training alone for patients with acute closed achilles tendon rupture. Seventy-four patients with acute closed achilles tendon rupture were randomly assigned to an observation group and a control group, 37 cases in each group. Patients in the both groups were treated with routine rehabilitation training after the operation for 12 weeks; besides, patients in the observation group were treated with contralateral acupuncture at Zusanli (ST 36), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Chengshan (BL 57), Taixi (KI 3) before rehabilitation training in the first 6 weeks. The treatment were given once a day, 5 times as 1 course with 2 d at the interval. The Biodex System 4 multi-joint dynamometers system was applied to test and compare affected-side plantar flexion peak torque (PFPT), peak torque/body weight (PT/BW) and total work (TW) after 6 weeks, 8 weeks and 12 weeks. The efficacy evaluation was conducted after 6 weeks and 12 weeks, and the follow-up visit was conducted 12 weeks after end of treatment. The PFPT, PT/BW, TW in the observation group were significantly superior to those in the control group after 8 weeks and 12 weeks of treatment (all P observation group were higher than those in the control group[89.2% (33/37) vs 70.3% (26/37), 94.6% (35/37) vs 75.7% (28/37), both P postoperative rehabilitation of acute closed achilles tendon rupture, the contralateral acupuncture combined with rehabilitation training could improve ankle plantar flexors function and clinical efficacy better than rehabilitation training only.

  15. Sport-Specific Capacity to Use Elastic Energy in the Patellar and Achilles Tendons of Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Hans-Peter; Rieder, Florian; Kösters, Alexander; Müller, Erich; Seynnes, Olivier R

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: During running and jumping activities, elastic energy is utilized to enhance muscle mechanical output and efficiency. However, training-induced variations in tendon spring-like properties remain under-investigated. The present work extends earlier findings on sport-specific profiles of tendon stiffness and cross-sectional area to examine whether years of distinct loading patterns are reflected by tendons' ability to store and return energy. Methods: Ultrasound scans were performed to examine the morphological features of knee extensor and plantar flexor muscle-tendon units in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players, and sedentary controls. Tendon strain energy and hysteresis were measured with combined motion capture, ultrasonography, and dynamometry. Results: Apart from the fractional muscle-to-tendon cross-sectional area ratio being lower in the knee extensors of ski jumpers (-31%) and runners (-33%) than in water polo players, no difference in the considered muscle-tendon unit morphological features was observed between groups. Similarly, no significant difference in tendon energy storage or energy return was detected between groups. In contrast, hysteresis was lower in the patellar tendon of ski jumpers (-33%) and runners (-30%) compared to controls, with a similar trend for the Achilles tendon (significant interaction effect and large effect sizes η 2 = 0.2). Normalized to body mass, the recovered strain energy of the patellar tendon was ~50% higher in ski jumpers than in water polo players and controls. For the Achilles tendon, recovered strain energy was ~40% higher in ski jumpers and runners than in controls. Discussion: Advantageous mechanical properties related to tendon spring-like function are observed in elite athletes whose sport require effective utilization of elastic energy. However, the mechanisms underpinning the better tendon capacity of some athletes to retain elastic energy could not be ascribed to intrinsic or

  16. Characteristics of human infant primary fibroblast cultures from Achilles tendons removed post-mortem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Primary cell cultures were investigated as a tool for molecular diagnostics in a forensic setting. Fibroblast cultures had been established from human Achilles tendon resected at autopsies, from cases of sudden infant death syndrome and control infants who died in traumatic events (n=41). After...... into the study. High interpersonal variation in growth rates and cell doubling time was seen, but no statistically significant differences were found with increasing age of the donor (mean 19 weeks), length of post-mortem interval prior to sampling (6-100h), or increase in years of storage. Fibroblast cultures...

  17. Effect of cyclic training model on terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon: an experimental study

    OpenAIRE

    Chang-lin HUANG; Wang GAO; Tao HUANG; Zhen-hai GUO

    2012-01-01

    Objective  To observe the effect of cyclic training on histomorphology of the terminal structure of rabbit Achilles tendon, and explore its preventive effect on training-based enthesiopathy. Methods  Seventy-two Japanese white rabbits were randomly assigned to four groups: control group, jumping group, running group and cyclic training group, 18 for each. Three rabbits of each group were sacrificed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 6th, 8th and 10th week. The terminal insertion tissues of bilateral Achil...

  18. The effects of intratendinous and retrocalcaneal intrabursal injections of corticosteroid on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugate, Ronald; Pennypacker, Jason; Saunders, Marnie; Juliano, Paul

    2004-04-01

    The use of corticosteroid injections in the treatment of retrocalcaneal bursitis is controversial. We assessed the effects of corticosteroid injections, both within the tendon substance and into the retrocalcaneal bursa, on the biomechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons. The systemic effects of bilateral corticosteroid injections were also studied. The rabbits were divided into three treatment groups. The rabbits in Group I received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of normal saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, those in Group II received injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the left side and injections of saline solution into the Achilles tendon on the right, and those in Group III received injections of corticosteroid into the Achilles tendon on the left side and injections of corticosteroid into the retrocalcaneal bursa on the right. These injections were given weekly for three weeks. At four weeks after the final injection, the tendons were harvested and were tested biomechanically to determine failure load, midsubstance strain and total strain, modulus of elasticity, failure stress, and total energy absorbed. The site of failure was also documented. The groups were compared according to the location of the injections, the type of injection (steroid or saline solution), and the total systemic load of steroid. Specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of corticosteroid showed significantly decreased failure stress compared with those from limbs that had received intratendinous injections of saline solution (p = 0.008). Specimens from limbs that had received intrabursal injections of corticosteroid demonstrated significantly decreased failure stress (p = 0.05), significantly decreased total energy absorbed (p = 0.017), and significantly increased total strain (p = 0.049) compared with specimens from limbs that had received intratendinous

  19. Effects of transforming growth factor-beta1 and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yu; Mao, ZeBin; Wei, XueLei; Lin, Lin; Chen, LianXu; Wang, HaiJun; Fu, Xin; Zhang, JiYing; Yu, Changlong

    2009-07-01

    Repaired Achilles tendons typically take weeks before they are strong enough to handle physiological loads. Gene therapy is a promising treatment for Achilles tendon defects. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the histological/biomechanical effects of Transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) and vascular endothelial growth factor 165 (VEGF(165)) gene transfer on Achilles tendon healing in rabbits. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (BMSCs) were transduced with adenovirus carrying human TGF-beta1 cDNA (Ad-TGF-beta1), human VEGF(165) cDNA (Ad-VEGF(165)), or both (PIRES-TGF-beta1/VEGF(165)) Viruses, no cDNA (Ad-GFP), and the BMSCs without gene transfer and the intact tendon were used as control. BMSCs were surgically implanted into the experimentally injured Achilles tendons. TGF-beta1 distribution, cellularity, nuclear aspect ratio, nuclear orientation angle, vascular number, collagen synthesis, and biomechanical features were measured at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. The TGF-beta1 and TGF beta 1/VEGF(165) co-expression groups exhibited improved parameters compared with other groups, while the VEGF(165) expression group had a negative impact. In the co-expression group, the angiogenesis effects of VEGF(165) were diminished by TGF-beta1, while the collagen synthesis effects of TGF-beta1 were unaltered by VEGF(165). Thus treatment with TGF-beta1 cDNA-transduced BMSCs grafts is a promising therapy for acceleration and improvement of tendon healing, leading to quicker recovery and improved biomechanical properties of Achilles tendons.

  20. The prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon injuries in Australian football players beyond a time-loss definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docking, S I; Rio, E; Cook, J; Orchard, J W; Fortington, L V

    2018-03-23

    Little is known about the prevalence and associated of morbidity of tendon problems. With only severe cases of tendon problems missing games, players that have their training and performance impacted are not captured by traditional injury surveillance. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of Achilles and patellar tendon problems in elite male Australian football players using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre (OSTRC) overuse questionnaire, compared to a time-loss definition. Male athletes from 12 professional Australian football teams were invited to complete a monthly questionnaire over a 9-month period in the 2016 pre- and competitive season. The OSTRC overuse injury questionnaire was used to measure the prevalence and severity of Achilles and patellar tendon symptoms and was compared to traditional match-loss statistics. A total of 441 participants were included. Of all participants, 21.5% (95% CI: 17.9-25.6) and 25.2% (95% CI 21.3-29.4) reported Achilles or patellar tendon problems during the season, respectively. Based on the traditional match-loss definition, a combined 4.1% of participants missed games due to either Achilles or patellar tendon injury. A greater average monthly prevalence was observed during the pre-season compared to the competitive season. Achilles and patellar tendon problems are prevalent in elite male Australian football players. These injuries are not adequately captured using a traditional match-loss definition. Prevention of these injuries may be best targeted during the off- and pre-season due to higher prevalence of symptoms during the pre-season compared to during the competitive season. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Medial gastrocnemius muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Lee; Barrett, Rod; Lichtwark, Glen

    2012-10-11

    Individuals with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) typically experience muscle weakness. The mechanisms responsible for muscle weakness in spastic CP are complex and may be influenced by the intrinsic mechanical properties of the muscle and tendon. The purpose of this study was to investigate the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle fascicle active torque-length and Achilles tendon properties in young adults with spastic CP. Nine relatively high functioning young adults with spastic CP (GMFCS I, 17±2 years) and 10 typically developing individuals (18±2 years) participated in the study. Active MG torque-length and Achilles tendon properties were assessed under controlled conditions on a dynamometer. EMG was recorded from leg muscles and ultrasound was used to measure MG fascicle length and Achilles tendon length during maximal isometric contractions at five ankle angles throughout the available range of motion and during passive rotations imposed by the dynamometer. Compared to the typically developing group, the spastic CP group had 33% lower active ankle plantarflexion torque across the available range of ankle joint motion, partially explained by 37% smaller MG muscle and 4% greater antagonistic co-contraction. The Achilles tendon slack length was also 10% longer in the spastic CP group. This study confirms young adults with mild spastic CP have altered muscle-tendon mechanical properties. The adaptation of a longer Achilles tendon may facilitate a greater storage and recovery of elastic energy and partially compensate for decreased force and work production by the small muscles of the triceps surae during activities such as locomotion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles on MR images in patients with achilles tendon abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Adrienne [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Radiology Department, Aarau (Switzerland); Mamisch, Nadja; Buck, Florian M.; Pfirrmann, Christian W.A.; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Radiology Department, Zuerich (Switzerland); Espinosa, Norman [University Hospital Balgrist Zuerich, Orthopedic Surgery Department, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. Forty-five consecutive patients (mean 51 years; range 14-84 years) with achillodynia were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) images of the calf. The frequency of oedema and fatty degeneration in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles was determined in patients with normal tendons, tendinopathy and in patients with a partial tear or a complete tear of the Achilles tendon. Oedema was encountered in 35% (7/20) of the patients with tendinopathy (n = 20; range 13-81 years), and in 47% (9/19) of the patients with partial tears or complete tears (n = 19; 28-78 years). Fatty degeneration was encountered in 10% (2/20) of the patients with tendinopathy, and in 32% (6/19) of the patients with tears. The prevalence of fatty degeneration was significantly more common in patients with a partial or complete tear compared with the patients with a normal Achilles tendon (p = 0.032 and p = 0.021, respectively). Oedema and fatty degeneration of the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles are common in patients with Achilles tendon abnormalities. (orig.)

  3. Severe Functional Debilitations After Complications Associated With Acute Achilles Tendon Rupture With 9 Years of Follow-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Sveen, Thor Magnus; Ganestam, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect of deep infection, sural nerve injury, and repeat rupture in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 324 patients had made a claim to the Danish Patient Insurance Association from 1992 to 2010 for a compli......The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term effect of deep infection, sural nerve injury, and repeat rupture in the treatment of acute Achilles tendon rupture. A total of 324 patients had made a claim to the Danish Patient Insurance Association from 1992 to 2010...... for a complication after acute Achilles tendon rupture. Of the 324 patients, 119 (36.7%) (77 [64.7%] males and 42 [35.3%] females) returned the Achilles tendon total rupture score and the 36-item short-form survey questionnaires. Patients with deep infection (n = 10), sural nerve injury (n = 10), and repeat rupture......, respectively. No significant differences were found among the subpopulations with deep infection, injury to the sural nerve, or repeat rupture. The physical evaluation investigating tendon length and heel rise work revealed a statistically significant difference between the affected and unaffected limb after...

  4. Human Achilles tendon plasticity in response to cyclic strain: effect of rate and duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Sebastian; Mersmann, Falk; Tettke, Martin; Kraft, Marc; Arampatzis, Adamantios

    2014-11-15

    High strain magnitude and low strain frequency are important stimuli for tendon adaptation. Increasing the rate and duration of the applied strain may enhance the adaptive responses. Therefore, our purpose was to investigate the effect of strain rate and duration on Achilles tendon adaptation. The study included two experimental groups (N=14 and N=12) and a control group (N=13). The participants of the experimental groups exercised according to a reference protocol (14 weeks, four times a week), featuring a high strain magnitude (~6.5%) and a low strain frequency (0.17 Hz, 3 s loading/3 s relaxation) on one leg and with either a higher strain rate (one-legged jumps) or a longer strain duration (12 s loading) on the other leg. The strain magnitude and loading volume were similar in all protocols. Before and after the interventions, the tendon stiffness, Young's modulus and cross-sectional area were examined using magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and dynamometry. The reference and long strain duration protocols induced significantly increased (P<0.05) tendon stiffness (57% and 25%), cross-sectional area (4.2% and 5.3%) and Young's modulus (51% and 17%). The increases in tendon stiffness and Young's modulus were higher in the reference protocol. Although region-specific tendon hypertrophy was also detected after the high strain rate training, there was only a tendency of increased stiffness (P=0.08) and cross-sectional area (P=0.09). The control group did not show any changes (P=0.86). The results provide evidence that a high strain magnitude, an appropriate strain duration and repetitive loading are essential components for an efficient adaptive stimulus for tendons. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Changes in ADC Caused by Tensile Loading of Rabbit Achilles Tendon: Evidence for Water Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S.; Gemmell, S. J.; Helmer, K. G.; Grigg, P.; Wellen, J. W.; Hoffman, A. H.; Sotak, C. H.

    2000-06-01

    Water diffusion measurements were performed on rabbit Achilles tendons during static tensile loading and tendons in an unloaded state. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was measured along two directions: parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the tendon. Tendons were studied after being prepared in two ways: (a) after being stored frozen in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and (b) freshly isolated. Statistically significant directional anisotropy was observed in the ADC in all tendons. The ADC was significantly greater in the direction parallel to the long axis of the tendon than in the perpendicular direction. The anisotropy is attributed to the greater restrictions seen by the water molecules in the perpendicular direction and is consistent with the known geometry of the tendon. Storage in PBS caused tendons to swell. This increased the ADC measured along both directions and reduced the anisotropy. The existence of anisotropy in the ADC was not related to the orientation of the specimen in the magnet. The ADC increased along both directions following the application of a 5-N tensile load; the increase was greatest along the perpendicular axis of the tendon. In order to determine whether load-related changes in the ADC reflected changes in interfibrilar spacing, we used electron microscopy to measure load-related changes in fibril spacing. Load-related changes in fiber spacing could not account for the observed changes in the ADC. The increase in ADC caused by loading was attributed to the extrusion of tendon water into a bulk phase along the outside surface of the tendon. In PBS-stored samples, enough fluid was extruded that it could be visualized. The transient response of the ADC to a 5-N tensile load was also studied. The absolute ADC in both directions increased with loading and recovered to baseline upon unloading. The transient changes in ADC, for both loading and unloading, had a mean time constant of approximately 15 min. The magnitude of

  6. Chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a case study of treatment incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, Graston Technique, ART, eccentric exercise, and cryotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miners, Andrew L; Bougie, Tracy L

    2011-12-01

    To describe the subjective pain and functional improvements of a patient with chronic Achilles tendinopathy following a treatment plan incorporating active and passive tissue warm-up, followed respectively by soft tissue mobilization utilizing both Graston Technique(®) and Active Release Techniques(®), eccentric exercise, and static stretching in combination with cryotherapy. The primary characterization of chronic Achilles tendinopathy is gradual onset of pain and dysfunction focused in one or both Achilles tendons arising secondary to a history of repetitive use or excessive overload. Conservative treatment is commonly the initial strategy for patient management. Tissue heating, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric training, and static stretching with cryotherapy were implemented to reduce pain and improve function. A specific protocol of heat, soft tissue mobilization, eccentric exercise, stretching, and cryotherapy appeared to facilitate a rapid and complete recovery from chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  7. Enveloping bioabsorbable polyglycolide membrane and immobilization in Achilles tendon repair: A comparative experimental study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pihlajamäki, Harri; Tynninen, Olli; Karjalainen, Pertti; Rokkanen, Pentti

    2008-02-01

    Using qualitative and histoquantitative methods, we investigated the effect of immobilization versus nonimmobilization on the biodegradation process, implant-tissue interaction, and scar formation after enveloping a rejoined rabbit Achilles tendon with a self-reinforced polyglycolide (SR-PGA) membrane. The soleus and gastrocnemius tendons of the right hind legs of 40 rabbits were transected. After suturing the ends, the seam was enveloped with the bioabsorbable membrane. Twenty ankles were immobilized with cast, 20 remained nonimmobilized. All nonoperated left ankles served as intact controls. During the follow-up of 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks, scar formation, tissue response, and membrane biodegradation were studied histologically and histomorphometrically. The amount of scar tissue, highest at 3 weeks, gradually approached intact controls. SR-PGA degradation in both cast and noncast specimens was near complete by 24 weeks. Signs of an inflammatory process were most prominent at 3 weeks and diminished gradually by 24 weeks. No significant difference between cast and noncast specimens was noted at any time point regarding the amount of scar tissue, degradation process of PGA, or intensity of inflammatory reaction. In the present experimental setting, cast immobilization influenced neither scar formation nor speed of degradation during reunion of transected Achilles tendon ends as compared with nonimmobilization. No differences in the reunion process of the tendon ends were seen between the immobilized and nonimmobilized groups. Moreover, inflammatory cells were similar in both groups and reflected a transient tissue reaction to the membrane. Within the follow-up, the seam area (cross-sectional) approached that of intact controls. (c) 2007 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Controlled release of collagen-binding SDF-1α from the collagen scaffold promoted tendon regeneration in a rat Achilles tendon defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jie; Mou, Chenchen; Shi, Qin; Chen, Bing; Hou, Xianglin; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiaoran; Zhuang, Yan; Shi, Jiajia; Chen, Yanyan; Dai, Jianwu

    2018-04-01

    It had been demonstrated that stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) could promote in situ tendon regeneration by recruiting endogenous cells. However, native SDF-1α diffuses too fast in vivo, reducing its local concentration and efficacy. In this study, we prepared a recombinant SDF-1α containing a collagen-binding domain (CBD-SDF-1α) and developed a functional collagen scaffold by tethering CBD-SDF-1α on the collagen scaffold for in situ tendon regeneration. CBD-SDF-1α could induce the migration of mesenchymal stem cells, dermal fibroblasts and Achilles tendon fibroblasts in vitro, and achieve controlled release from the collagen scaffold. In a rat Achilles tendon defect model, the functional scaffold could increase the recruitment of CXCR4 positive fibroblast-like cells and the deposition of Tenascin-C at 7 days after implantation. After 4 and 12 weeks, the functional collagen scaffold could promote the expression of type I collagen, increase the diameters of collagen fibrils and improve the mechanical properties of regenerated tendons. Hence, the functional scaffold increased the efficacy of tendon regeneration by controlling release of SDF-1α, enhancing the recruitment of fibroblast-like cells and providing instructive microenvironment and mechanical support for tendon regeneration. Therefore, CBD-SDF-1α-modified collagen scaffold could serve as a practical application for tendon regeneration. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures: An Experimental Study on Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Baran; Güler, Serkan; Çeçen, Berivan; Kumtepe, Erdem; Bağrıyanık, Alper; Özkal, Sermin; Ali Özcan, M; Özsan, Hayri; Şanlı, Namık; Tatari, M Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendon ruptures are characterized by a long recovery period, high re-rupture rate and late return to work. To overcome these difficulties and augment tendon repair, many agents have been used. To determine the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures in rabbits. Animal experimentation. The study included 14 New Zealand albino rabbits that were divided randomly into 2 groups, A and B, each containing seven rabbits. On day zero, all 28 Achilles tendons were tenotomized and repaired. In group A, the tendons were injected with PRP post-surgery, whereas those in group B were left untreated. On day 28, the right tendons in both groups were examined histopathologically via both light and electron microscopy, and the left tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing. The histological and biomechanical findings in both light and electron microscopy in group A were better than those in group B, but the difference was not significant. According to Tang's scale, the mean value in Group A was 3.57, while it was 3.0 in Group B. The mean value of Group A for the length of collagen bands was 48.09 nm while the mean value of Group B was 46.58 nm (p=0.406). In biomechanical tests, although stiffness values were higher in group A, the difference between groups was not significant. In addition, maximum load values did not differ between groups A and B. PRP had no effect on the healing process 28 days post-Achilles tendon rupture.

  10. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures: An Experimental Study on Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, Baran; Güler, Serkan; Çeçen, Berivan; Kumtepe, Erdem; Bağrıyanık, Alper; Özkal, Sermin; Ali Özcan, M.; Özsan, Hayri; Şanlı, Namık; Tatari, M. Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Achilles tendon ruptures are characterized by a long recovery period, high re-rupture rate and late return to work. To overcome these difficulties and augment tendon repair, many agents have been used. Aims: To determine the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP) in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures in rabbits. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study included 14 New Zealand albino rabbits that were divided randomly into 2 groups, A and B, each containing seven rabbits. On day zero, all 28 Achilles tendons were tenotomized and repaired. In group A, the tendons were injected with PRP post-surgery, whereas those in group B were left untreated. On day 28, the right tendons in both groups were examined histopathologically via both light and electron microscopy, and the left tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing. Results: The histological and biomechanical findings in both light and electron microscopy in group A were better than those in group B, but the difference was not significant. According to Tang’s scale, the mean value in Group A was 3.57, while it was 3.0 in Group B. The mean value of Group A for the length of collagen bands was 48.09 nm while the mean value of Group B was 46.58 nm (p=0.406). In biomechanical tests, although stiffness values were higher in group A, the difference between groups was not significant. In addition, maximum load values did not differ between groups A and B. Conclusion: PRP had no effect on the healing process 28 days post-Achilles tendon rupture. PMID:26966624

  11. The Effect of Autologous Platelet Rich Plasma in the Treatment of Achilles Tendon Ruptures: An Experimental Study on Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baran Şen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Achilles tendon ruptures are characterized by a long recovery period, high re-rupture rate and late return to work. To overcome these difficulties and augment tendon repair, many agents have been used. Aims: To determine the effect of autologous platelet rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures in rabbits. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: The study included 14 New Zealand albino rabbits that were divided randomly into 2 groups, A and B, each containing seven rabbits. On day zero, all 28 Achilles tendons were tenotomized and repaired. In group A, the tendons were injected with PRP post-surgery, whereas those in group B were left untreated. On day 28, the right tendons in both groups were examined histopathologically via both light and electron microscopy, and the left tendons were subjected to biomechanical testing. Results: The histological and biomechanical findings in both light and electron microscopy in group A were better than those in group B, but the difference was not significant. According to Tang’s scale, the mean value in Group A was 3.57, while it was 3.0 in Group B. The mean value of Group A for the length of collagen bands was 48.09 nm while the mean value of Group B was 46.58 nm (p=0.406. In biomechanical tests, although stiffness values were higher in group A, the difference between groups was not significant. In addition, maximum load values did not differ between groups A and B. Conclusion: PRP had no effect on the healing process 28 days post-Achilles tendon rupture.

  12. The composite anterolateral thigh flap for achilles tendon and soft tissue defect reconstruction with tendon repair by fascia with double or triple folding technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Seung Ki; Kim, Sang Wha; Kim, Youn Hwan; Hwang, Kyu Tae

    2015-11-01

    Rupture of the Achilles tendon is usually managed by surgical intervention. Recurrent tendon ruptures, segmental tendon defects, and overlying soft tissue defects render reconstructive procedures challenging. In this report, we present double or triple folding technique of the anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap, and report the clinical outcomes of the reconstruction of combined defects, including the Achilles tendon and overlying soft tissue. From 2008 to 2013, 7 patients underwent reconstruction of combined Achilles tendon and soft tissue defects. The sizes of the soft tissue defects ranged from 9 × 5 to 12 × 5 cm(2) . Combined defects were reconstructed with ALT free flap including the vastus lateralis fascia and rectus femoris fascia, using a double or triple folding technique. The ALT free flap covered the soft tissue defect and the fascia was folded two or three times into a tendon-like structure. Three patients had full-layer defects of the Achilles tendon, and four patients had partial defects over half the layer. The dimension of the skin paddle of the ALT flap was 12 × 6 to 16 × 8 cm(2), and the dimension of the fascia was 12 × 8 to 16 × 10 cm(2). All the donor sites were closed primarily. All the flaps survived completely without complication. The mean follow-up period was 14.9 months. All patients were able to stand and ambulate. The double or triple folding technique of the ALT free flap represents simple, economical use of tissue, with minimal donor site morbidity. Thus, this technique may be useful and versatile reconstructive option for combined defects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 5-year results of the 1.5cm incision Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Samuel K K; Slocum, Amanda; Lui, T H

    2017-12-01

    To study a hypothesis that the cost-effective 1.5cm medial incision Achilles tendon repair technique will provide good functional outcomes which are maintained for over 5 years. Prospective study of 12 consecutive cases with a minimal 5-year follow-up were recruited from April 2008 to November 2010. Cases whom were mentally incompetent or those which required concomitant procedures were excluded. Outcomes measures included the numeric pain rating scale, motor power strength, range of motion, functional scoring using the AOFAS hindfoot score and patient's self-assessment using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). No re-ruptures or sural nerve injured were identified after a minimal 5-year follow-up. Pain was minimal at 0.5/10, calf power was 5/5 and ankle range was good (plantarflexion: 38°/dorsiflexion: 21°). The AOFAS hindfoot score was 97.4 and all 5 sub-categories of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS) were good. The 1.5cm medial incision repair of the Achilles tendon is an economically sound surgical technique, with minimal complications, which gives good medium length functional outcomes. IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Lin, Zhen; Ni, Ming; Thien, Christine; Day, Robert E; Gardiner, Bruce; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Smith, David W; Wang, Allan; Lloyd, David G; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Qiujian; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy-like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early-stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Ageing, deep vein thrombosis and male gender predict poor outcome after acute Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arverud, E Domeij-; Anundsson, P; Hardell, E; Barreng, G; Edman, G; Latifi, A; Labruto, F; Ackermann, P W

    2016-12-01

    Patients with an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) take a long time to heal, have a high incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and widely variable functional outcomes. This variation in outcome may be explained by a lack of knowledge of adverse factors, and a subsequent shortage of appropriate interventions. A total of 111 patients (95 men, 16 women; mean age 40.3, standard deviation 8.4) with an acute total ATR were prospectively assessed. At one year post-operatively a uniform outcome score, Achilles Combined Outcome Score (ACOS), was obtained by combining three validated, independent, outcome measures: Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score, heel-rise height test, and limb symmetry heel-rise height. Predictors of ACOS included treatment; gender; age; smoking; body mass index; time to surgery; physical activity level pre- and post-injury; symptoms; quality of life and incidence of DVT. There were three independent variables that correlated significantly with the dichotomised outcome score (ACOS), while there was no correlation with other factors. An age of less than 40 years old was the strongest independent predictor of a good outcome one year after ATR (odds ratio (OR) 0.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08 to 0.51), followed by female gender (OR) 4.18, 95% CI 1.01 to 17.24). Notably, patients who did not have a DVT while immobilised post-operatively had a better outcome (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.80). Over the age of 40 years, male gender and having a DVT while immobilised are independent negative predictors of outcome in patients with an acute ATR. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1635-41. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  16. Electromyographic Analysis of the Triceps Surae Muscle Complex During Achilles Tendon Rehabilitation Program Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Michael; Tyler, Timothy F.; McHugh, Malachy; Orishimo, Karl; Kremenic, Ian; Caggiano, Jessica; Ramsey, Abi

    2011-01-01

    Background: Specific guidelines for therapeutic exercises following an Achilles tendon repair are lacking. Hypothesis: A hierarchical progression of triceps surae exercises can be determined on the basis of electromyographic (EMG) activity. Study Design: Randomized laboratory trial. Methods: Bipolar surface electrodes were applied over the medial and lateral heads of the gastrocnemius as well as the soleus on 20 healthy lower extremities (10 participants, 27 ± 5 years old). Muscle activity was recorded during 8 therapeutic exercises commonly used following an Achilles repair. Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs) were also performed on an isokinetic device. The effect of exercise on EMG activity (% MVIC) was assessed using repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni corrections for planned pairwise comparisons. Results: Seated toe raises (11% MVIC) had the least amount of activity compared with all other exercises (P < 0.01), followed by single-leg balance on wobble board (25% MVIC), prone ankle pumps (38% MVIC), supine plantarflexion with red elastic resistance (45% MVIC), normal gait (47% MVIC), lateral step-ups (60% MVIC), single-leg heel raises (112% MVIC), and single-leg jumping (129% MVIC). Conclusion: There is an increasing progression of EMG activity for exercises that target the triceps surae muscle complex during common exercises prescribed in an Achilles tendon rehabilitation program. Seated toe raises offer relatively low EMG activity and can be utilized as an early rehabilitative exercise. In contrast, the single-leg heel raise and single-leg jumping should be utilized only during later-stage rehabilitation. Clinical Relevance: EMG activity in the triceps surae is variable with common rehab exercises. PMID:23016056

  17. Evaluation of surgical treatment for ruptured Achilles tendon in 31 athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallageas, R; Bordes, J; Daviet, J-C; Mabit, C; Coste, C

    2013-09-01

    In the past few decades, the incidence of Achilles tendon rupture has increased in parallel with increased sports participation. Although the optimal treatment remains controversial, there is a trend towards surgical treatment in athletes. Surgical repair of ruptured Achilles tendon in athlete results in good functional and objective recovery, irrespective of the type of surgery performed. Subsidiarily, are the results different between percutaneous surgery (PS) and standard open surgery (OS)? This was a cross-sectional study of 31 patients who presented with a ruptured Achilles tendon that occurred during sports participation. Percutaneous surgery was performed in 16 patients and open surgery in 15 patients between 2005 and 2009. The objective recovery status was evaluated by open chain goniometry, measurement of leg muscle atrophy and assessment of isokinetic strength. The functional analysis was based on the delay, level of sports upon return, AOFAS and VAS for pain. Our series of Achilles tendon rupture patients consisted of 88% men and 12% women, with an average age of 38 years. In 71% of cases, the rupture occurred during eccentric loading. After a follow-up of 15 months, the muscle atrophy was 13 mm after PS and 24 mm after OS (P=0.01). A strength deficit of 19% in the plantar flexors was found in the two groups. No patient experienced a rerupture. The return to sports occurred at 130 days after PS and 178 days after OS (P=0.005). The average AOFAS score was 94 and the VAS was 0.5. There were no differences in ankle range of motion between the two groups. The majority (77%) of patients had returned to their preinjury level of sports activity. The return to activities of daily living was slower in our study than in studies based in Anglo-Saxon countries; this can be explained by the different sick leave coverage systems. Percutaneous surgery resulted in a faster return to sports (about 130 days) and less muscle atrophy than open surgery. Our results for

  18. Kazakh therapy on differential protein expression of Achilles tendon healing in a 7-day postoperative rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuerai, Shawutali; Ainuer, Jialili; Jiasharete, Jielile; Darebai, Redati; Kayrat, Aldyarhan; Tang, Bin; Jiangannur, Zheyiken; Bai, Jingping; Makabel, Bolat

    2011-12-01

    To compare the effect of cast immobilization with that of early Kiymil arkili emdew (Kazakh exercise therapy) on the post-operative healing of Achilles tendon rupture in rabbits, and to observe the influence of early Kiymil arkili emdew on the differentially expressed proteins in the healing tendon. Forty-five New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into three groups (Arm A: control group; Arm B: postoperative immobilization group; and Arm C: postoperative early Kiymil arkili emdew group). After tenotomy, the rabbits of the two experimental groups received microsurgery to repair the ruptured tendons, and then received either cast immobilization or early Kiymil arkili emdew treatment. Achilles tendon tissue samples were collected 7 days after the surgery, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF-MS technique were used to analyze differentially expressed proteins in the tendon tissue of the three Arms. A total of 462.67 +/- 11.59, 532.33 +/- 27.79, and 515.33 +/- 6.56 protein spots were detected by the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels in the Achilles tendon samples of the rabbits in Arms A, B, and C, respectively. Nineteen differentially expressed protein spots were randomly selected from Arm C. Among them, 7 were unique, and 15 had five times higher abundance than those in Arm B. These included annexin A2, gelsolin isoforms and alpha-1 Type III collagen. It was confirmed by western blot that gelsolin isoform b, annexin A2, etc. had specific and incremental expression in Arm C. The self-protective instincts of humans were overlooked in the classical postoperative treatment for Achilles tendon rupture with cast immobilization. Kiymil arkili emdew induced the specific and incremental expression of proteins in the repaired Achilles tendon in the early healing stage in a rabbit model, compared with those treated with postoperative cast immobilization. These differentially expressed proteins may contribute to the healing of the Achilles tendon via

  19. Regeneration of Achilles' tendon: the role of dynamic stimulation for enhanced cell proliferation and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongman; Guarino, Vincenzo; Gloria, Antonio; Ambrosio, Luigi; Tae, Giyoong; Kim, Young Ha; Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The tissue engineering of tendon was studied using highly elastic poly(L-lactide-co-epsilon-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds and focusing on the effect of dynamic tensile stimulation. Tenocytes from rabbit Achilles tendon were seeded (1.0 x 10(6) cells/scaffold) onto porous PLCL scaffolds and cultured for periods of 2 weeks and 4 weeks. This was performed in a static system and also in a bioreactor equipped with tensile modulation which mimicked the environmental surroundings of tendons with respect to tensile extension. The degradation of the polymeric scaffolds during the culture was relatively slow. However, there was an indication that cells accelerated the degradation of PLCL scaffolds. The scaffold/cell adducts from the static culture exhibited inferior strength (at 2 weeks 350 kPa, 4 weeks 300 kPa) compared to the control without cells (at 2 weeks 460 kPa, 4 weeks 340 kPa), indicating that the cells contributed to the enhanced degradation. On the contrary, the corresponding values of the adducts from the dynamic culture (at 2 weeks 430 kPa, 4 weeks 370 kPa) were similar to, or higher than, those from the control. This could be explained by the increased quantity of cells and neo-tissues in the case of dynamic culture compensating for the loss in tensile strength. Compared with static and dynamic culture conditions, mechanical stimulation played a crucial role in the regeneration of tendon tissue. In the case of the dynamic culture system, cell proliferation was enhanced and secretion of collagen type I was increased, as evidenced by DNA assay and histological and immunofluorescence analysis. Thus, tendon regeneration, indicated by improved mechanical and biological properties, was demonstrated, confirming the effect of mechanical stimulation. It could be concluded that the dynamic tensile stimulation appeared to be an essential factor in tendon/ligament tissue engineering, and that elastic PLCL co-polymers could be very beneficial in this process.

  20. The plantaris tendon and a potential role in mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy: an observational anatomical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sterkenburg, Maayke N.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; Kleipool, Roeland P.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2011-01-01

    The source of pain and the background to the pain mechanisms associated with mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy have not yet been clarified. Intratendinous degenerative changes are most often addressed when present. However, it is questionable if degeneration of the tendon itself is the main cause of

  1. Shewanella algae infection after surgical treatment of Haglund's heel and rupture of the Achilles tendon.] [Article in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of the Achilles tendon, which was treated surgically as well. The post-operative healing process proved to be protracted with a number of surgical wound revisions being necessary. A microbiology culture showed the presence of S. algae and after proper antibiotic treatment the patient recovered quickly....

  2. Increasing incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture and a noticeable decline in surgical treatment from 1994 to 2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ganestam, Ann; Kallemose, Thomas; Troelsen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    . There was no difference in incidence of acute Achilles tendon rupture in the rural compared with urban geographical areas. A steady decline in surgical treatment was found over the whole period, with a noticeable decline from 2009 to 2013, possibly reflecting a rapid change in clinical practice following a range of high...

  3. Mechanical alterations of rabbit Achilles' tendon after immobilization correlate with bone mineral density but not with magnetic resonance or ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Guy; Koike, Yoichi; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Doherty, Geoff; Dinh, Laurent; Lecompte, Martin; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2007-12-01

    To assess the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound (US) imaging, or bone mineral density (BMD) in predicting the mechanical properties of immobilized rabbit Achilles' tendons. Experimental study. Basic university laboratory. Twenty-eight rabbits. Twelve rabbits had 1 hindlimb casted for 4 weeks and 10 rabbits were casted for 8 weeks. Contralateral legs and 12 normal hindlimbs served as controls. Achilles' tendon dimensions on MRI and US, T1- and T2-signal intensities on MRI, classification of abnormalities on MRI and US; BMD of the calcaneus with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Biomechanic measures consisted of peak load, stiffness, and stress. Imaging variables were correlated with biomechanic alterations. Immobilized Achilles' tendons were weaker and showed decreased mechanical stress compared with their contralateral legs and controls (all PAchilles' tendons after immobilization. However, neither increased MRI nor US signal abnormality was found. BMD was lower in immobilized calcanei and larger in contralateral legs than controls. Only BMD correlated with both the decreased peak load (R2=.42, PAchilles' tendon. This study established weakened mechanical properties of immobilized Achilles' tendons. BMD of the calcaneus, but not MRI and US, was predictive of the mechanical alterations in immobilized Achilles' tendons. BMD may be a useful biomarker to monitor disease and recovery in Achilles' tendons.

  4. Frequency characteristics of human muscle and cortical responses evoked by noisy Achilles tendon vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mildren, Robyn L; Peters, Ryan M; Hill, Aimee J; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Carpenter, Mark G; Inglis, J Timothy

    2017-05-01

    Noisy stimuli, along with linear systems analysis, have proven to be effective for mapping functional neural connections. We explored the use of noisy (10-115 Hz) Achilles tendon vibration to examine somatosensory reflexes in the triceps surae muscles in standing healthy young adults ( n = 8). We also examined the association between noisy vibration and electrical activity recorded over the sensorimotor cortex using electroencephalography. We applied 2 min of vibration and recorded ongoing muscle activity of the soleus and gastrocnemii using surface electromyography (EMG). Vibration amplitude was varied to characterize reflex scaling and to examine how different stimulus levels affected postural sway. Muscle activity from the soleus and gastrocnemii was significantly correlated with the tendon vibration across a broad frequency range (~10-80 Hz), with a peak located at ~40 Hz. Vibration-EMG coherence positively scaled with stimulus amplitude in all three muscles, with soleus displaying the strongest coupling and steepest scaling. EMG responses lagged the vibration by ~38 ms, a delay that paralleled observed response latencies to tendon taps. Vibration-evoked cortical oscillations were observed at frequencies ~40-70 Hz (peak ~54 Hz) in most subjects, a finding in line with previous reports of sensory-evoked γ-band oscillations. Further examination of the method revealed 1 ) accurate reflex estimates could be obtained with vibration; 2 ) responses did not habituate over 2 min of exposure; and importantly, 3 ) noisy vibration had a minimal influence on standing balance. Our findings suggest noisy tendon vibration is an effective novel approach to characterize somatosensory reflexes during standing. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We applied noisy (10-115 Hz) vibration to the Achilles tendon to examine the frequency characteristics of lower limb somatosensory reflexes during standing. Ongoing muscle activity was coherent with the noisy vibration (peak coherence ~40 Hz), and

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Tendon Healing by Using MR T2 Mapping in a Rabbit Achilles Tendon Transection Model Treated with Platelet-rich Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukawa, Taisuke; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Watanabe, Atsuya; Sasho, Takahisa; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Muramatsu, Yuta; Akatsu, Yorikazu; Katsuragi, Joe; Endo, Jun; Osone, Fumio; Sato, Yasunori; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2015-09-01

    To determine if magnetic resonance (MR) imaging T2 mapping can be used to quantify histologic tendon healing by using a rabbit Achilles tendon transection model treated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). Experiments were approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. The Achilles tendons of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 limbs) were surgically transected, and PRP (in the test group) or saline (in the control group) was injected into the transection site. The rabbits were sacrificed 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Thereafter, T2 mapping and histologic evaluations were performed by using the Bonar scale. A mixed-model multivariate analysis of variance was used to test the effects of time and PRP treatment on the T2 value and Bonar grade, respectively. The correlation between the T2 value and Bonar grade was also assessed by using the Spearman correlation coefficient. The Bonar scale values decreased in both groups during tendon healing. The T2 value also shortened over time (P tendon healing. While T2 and Bonar grade were lower at all time points in tendons treated with PRP, there was no significant difference between the treatment and control tendons.

  6. Overload and neovascularization of Achilles tendons in young artistic and rhythmic gymnasts compared with controls: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarnicola, A; Maccagnano, G; Di Leo, M; Tafuri, S; Moretti, B

    2014-08-01

    The incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is very high in young female gymnasts (17.5 %). According to literature, ecography screenings show the tendons thickening, but at the same time it does not reveal a direct link to the clinical picture. The neovessels are involved in the pathophysiological process of Achilles tendinopathy. For this reason, we wanted to verify there between perfusion tendon values and the type of sport activity. We performed a clinical observational study monitoring the oximetry of the Achilles tendon and the epidemiological data of 52 elite female (artistic and rhythmic) gymnasts versus 21 age-matched controls. Analyzing the main limb, we revealed statistically higher oximetry values in the artistic gymnasts group (69.5 %) compared to the rhythmic gymnasts group (67.1 %) (t = 2.13; p = 0.01) and the sedentary group (66.2 %) (t = 2.70; p = 0.004), but we did not find any differences between rhythmic gymnasts group and the sedentary group (t = 0.68; p = 0.24). The multiple logistic regression model highlighted that the oximetry value of the main limb is not influenced by age, knowledge of the main limb, years of general and gymnastic sports activity (p > 0.05). We discovered an increase of Achilles tendon perfusion in the main limb in the artistic gymnast group. We hypothesize that specific figures of artistic sports activity are responsible for muscle overload and gastrocnemius-soleus group and, at the same time, these figures cause hyperperfusion of the tendon. Prospective longitudinal studies could explain if this could become a predictive sign of the next Achilles tendinopathy onset.

  7. Uphill running improves rat Achilles tendon tissue mechanical properties and alters gene expression without inducing pathological changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemeier, K M; Skovgaard, D; Bayer, M L

    2012-01-01

    after the intervention, and local tendon glucose-uptake was measured before and after the intervention with positron emission tomography. No differences were detected between runners and controls in tissue histology or in glucose uptake, indicating that tendon pathology was not induced. Greater tendon...... tissue modulus (P ... was increased, while collagen I was unchanged, and decreases were seen in noncollagen matrix components (fibromodulin and biglycan), matrix degrading enzymes, transforming growth factor-ß1, and connective tissue growth factor. In conclusion, the tested model could not be validated as a model for Achilles...

  8. The effect of butyric acid with autogenous omental graft on healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahani, S; Moslemi, H R; Dehghan, M M; Sedaghat, R; Mazaheri Nezhad, R; Rezaee Moghaddam, D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the role of local injection of butyric acid (BA) with autogenous omental graft was evaluated in healing of experimental Achilles tendon injury in rabbits. Nine adult male New Zealand rabbits were anesthetized and a partial thickness tenotomy was created on both hindlimbs. In treated group, omental graft was secured in place using BA soaked polygalactin 910 suture. In control group, the graft was sutured without BA. Butyric acid and normal saline were injected daily to treatment and control groups for three days, respectively. Based on the findings, on day 15 after injury, the tendon sections showed that healing rate in BA treated group was higher than that in control group. Furthermore, at days 28 and 45, comparison between BA treated and control groups demonstrated that BA increased the healing rate but with no significance. In summary, results of this study show that application of BA with autogenous omental graft can improve healing process of damaged Achilles tendon.

  9. Fibril deformation under load of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick, Johnathan L; Abusara, Ziad; Andrews, Stephen H; Xu, Minjia; Khurshid, Saad; Chatha, Jansher; Hart, David A; Shrive, Nigel G

    2018-04-10

    Microscopic visualization under load of the region connecting ligaments/tendons to bone, the enthesis, has been performed previously; however, specific investigation of individual fibril deformation may add insight to such studies. Detailed visualization of fibril deformation would inform on the mechanical strategies employed by this tissue in connecting two mechanically disparate materials. Clinically, an improved understanding of enthesis mechanics may help guide future restorative efforts for torn or injured ligaments/tendons, where the enthesis is often a point of weakness. In this study, a custom ligament/tendon enthesis loading device was designed and built, a unique method of sample preparation was devised, and second harmonic and two-photon fluorescence microscopy were used to capture the fibril-level load response of the rabbit Achilles tendon and medial collateral ligament femoral entheses. A focus was given to investigation of the mechanical problem of fibril embedment. Resultant images indicate a rapid (occurring over approximately 60 μm) change in fibril orientation at the interface of ligament/tendon and calcified fibrocartilage early in the loading regime, before becoming relatively constant. Such a change in fibril angle helps confirm the materially graded region demonstrated by others, while, in this case, providing additional insight into fibril bending. We speculate that the scale of the mechanical problem (i.e., fibril diameters being on the order of 250 nm) allows fibrils to bend over the small (relative to the imaging field of view, but large relative to fibril diameter) distances observed; thus, potentially lessening required embedment lengths. Nevertheless, this behavior merits further investigation to be confirmed. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res. © 2018 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Characterization of in vivo Achilles tendon forces in rabbits during treadmill locomotion at varying speeds and inclinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John R; Juncosa, Natalia; Galloway, Marc T; Boivin, Gregory P; Butler, David L

    2004-11-01

    The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing the speed and inclination of the treadmill increases the peak Achilles tendon forces and their rates of rise and fall in force. Implantable force transducers (IFT) were inserted in the confluence of the medial and lateral heads of the left gastrocnemius tendon in 11 rabbits. IFT voltages were successfully recorded in 8 animals as the animals hopped on a treadmill at each of two speeds (0.1 and 0.3 mph) and inclinations (0 degrees and 12 degrees). Instrumented tendons were isolated shortly after sacrifice and calibrated. Contralateral unoperated tendons were failed in uniaxial tension to determine maximum or failure force, from which safety factor (ratio of maximum force to peak in vivo force) was calculated for each activity. Peak force and the rates of rise and fall in force significantly increased with increasing treadmill inclination (prabbit Achilles tendon and other tendon repairs. Force patterns can also serve as input data for mechanical stimulation of tissue-engineered constructs in culture. Such approaches are expected to help accelerate tendon repair after injury.

  11. The long-term clinical and MRI results following eccentric calf muscle training in chronic Achilles tendinosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaerdin, Anna; Shalabi, Adel; Movin, Tomas; Svensson, Leif

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term results following eccentric calf-muscle training in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. A total of 24 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included in a study evaluating MRI findings and clinical symptoms before and after 3 months of daily eccentric calf-muscle strength training. Median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 6-120). Four of the patients did not perform the prescribed treatment for different reasons and were followed for 14 months. The resulting 20 treated patients completed 4.2-year (range 29-58 months) follow up. Tendon volume was evaluated by using 3D seed growing technique and signal abnormalities were visually semi-quantitatively graded. Level of pain and performance was categorized using a questionnaire completed by the patient. In the symptomatic treated patients, median intensity level of pain decreased from moderate/severe at time of inclusion to mild at follow up (p 3 (SD 2.0) at time of inclusion and 6.4 cm 3 (SD 2.0) at follow up (p = 0.18). The four symptomatic non-treated tendons did not improve regarding pain, performance, intratendinous signal or tendon volume. We found decreased pain, improved performance and decreased intratendinous signal both compared to index examination and immediately after the 3 months training regimen in a 4.2-year clinical and MRI follow up, in a group of patients treated with heavy loaded eccentric calf-muscle training for chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The improvements were greater at 4.2-year follow up, despite no further active treatment, than immediately after the treatment. This may indicate a good long-term prognosis for Achilles tendinosis patients. (orig.)

  12. Proteomic analysis of differential protein expression of achilles tendon in a rabbit model by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at 21 days postoperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jielile, Jiasharete; Jialili, Ainuer; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Shawutali, Nuerai; Redati, Darebai; Chen, Jiangtao; Tang, Bin; Bai, Jingping; Aldyarhan, Kayrat

    2011-10-01

    Postoperative early kinesitherapy has been advocated as an optimal method for treating Achilles tendon rupture. However, an insight into the rationale of how early kinesitherapy contributes to healing of Achilles tendon remains to be achieved, and research in the area of proteomic analysis of Achilles tendon has so far been lacking. Forty-two rabbits were randomized into control group, immobilization group, and early motion group, and received postoperative cast immobilization and early motion treatments. Achilles tendon samples were prepared 21 days following microsurgery, and the proteins were separated with two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Differentially expressed proteins were first recognized by PDQuest software, and then identified using peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry, and database searching. A total of 463  ±  12, 511  ±  39, and 513  ±  80 protein spots were successfully detected in the two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels for the Achilles tendon samples of rabbits in the control group, immobilization group, and early motion group, respectively. There were 15, 8, and 9 unique proteins in these three groups, respectively, and some differentially expressed proteins were also identified in each group. It was indicated that some of the differentially expressed proteins were involved in various metabolism pathways and may play an important role in healing of Achilles tendon rupture. Postoperative early kinesitherapy resulted in differentially expressed proteins in ruptured Achilles tendon compared with those treated with postoperative cast immobilization. These differentially expressed proteins may contribute to healing of Achilles tendon rupture through a mechanobiological mechanism due to the application of postoperative early kinesitherapy.

  13. Effects of repetitive freeze–thawing cycles on T2 and T2* of the Achilles tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Eric Y.; Bae, Won C.; Statum, Sheronda; Du, Jiang; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In this study we sought to evaluate the effects of multiple freezing and thawing cycles on two MR parameters to study Achilles tendon, T2 and T2*. Materials and methods: Four fresh Achilles tendons were imaged on a 3T clinical scanner and again after 1, 2, 4, and 5 freeze–thaw cycles with spin-echo (SE) and ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences. Regions of interest were manually drawn over the entire Achilles tendon and mono-exponential curves were used to determine T2 and T2* relaxation times. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in mean T2 or T2* values between the fresh specimens and after subsequent cycles of freeze–thaw treatment (p > 0.1). Linear regression between SE T2 values at baseline and after successive freeze–thaw cycles demonstrated moderate agreement (r = 0.60) whereas UTE T2* values at baseline and after successive-freeze thaw cycles demonstrated strong agreement (r = 0.92). Conclusion: These findings suggest that changes between specimens seen in vitro are due to factors other than frozen storage. Furthermore, our results suggest that there is stronger agreement between baseline (fresh) and successive freeze–thaw T2* values of tendon obtained with the UTE technique in comparison to T2 values obtained with a conventional clinical CPMG technique

  14. Structural and mechanical multi-scale characterization of white New-Zealand rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Dumas, Dominique; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Marie, Vanessa; Tran, Nguyen; Wang, Xiong; Cleymand, Franck

    2013-10-01

    Multi-scale characterization of structures and mechanical behavior of biological tissues are of huge importance in order to evaluate the quality of a biological tissue and/or to provide bio-inspired scaffold for functional tissue engineering. Indeed, the more information on main biological tissue structures we get, the more relevant we will be to design new functional prostheses for regenerative medicine or to accurately evaluate tissues. From this perspective, we have investigated the structures and their mechanical properties from nanoscopic to macroscopic scale of fresh ex-vivo white New-Zealand rabbit Achilles tendon using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tensile tests to provide a "simple" model whose parameters are relevant of its micro or nano structure. Thus, collagen fiber's crimping was identified then measured from SHG images as a plane sine wave with 28.4 ± 5.8 μm of amplitude and 141 ± 41 μm of wavelength. Young's moduli of fibrils (3.0 GPa) and amorphous phases (223 MPa) were obtained using TH-AFM. From these investigations, a non-linear Zener model linking a statistical Weibull's distribution of taut fibers under traction to crimp fibers were developed. This model showed that for small strain (tendon observations under static or dynamic solicitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. SURGICAL PERCUTANEOUS TREATMENT OF AN ACUTE RUPTURE OF ACHILLES TENDON IN ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarko Dasic

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have registered that with growing interest of the middle-aged in sport activities in our country the incidence of Achilles tendon ruptures has increased. It was usually preceded by its degenerative changes. Our aim was to examine the results of Achiles tendon rupture treatment in the group treated with our modified percutaneous technique with double - crossed suture.We compared these results with those obtained by the treatment with the nonsurgical method.Our study included 139 patients who gained injuries during their sports activities. They were active professionals or ex-active who continued training sports for recreation, and finally, amateurs who trained sports for the sake of recreation. We also analyzed differences in the results of those three groups after the treatment and checked them statistically.The results have showed superiority of this percutaneous operative treatment because of its simple operative technique, possibility of doing it in the local anaesthesia, continuous ultrasonographic following of the rupture during the process of healing up and shorter immobilisation time, practically without hospitalization and rare complications.

  16. Frequency of Achilles Tendon Xanthoma in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Taro; Inagaki-Tanimura, Kyoko; Nagao, Mototsugu; Sato, Yuki; Sudo, Mariko; Okajima, Fumitaka; Sugihara, Hitoshi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2017-09-01

    We studied the frequency of Achilles tendon xanthoma (ATX) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Furthermore, we investigated the differences in clinical findings between ACS patients with and without ATX. Patients with ACS (n=335) were admitted to the coronary care unit of Nippon Medical School between July 2011 and December 2014. Informed consent for the measurement of Achilles tendon thickness (ATT) on a radiograph was obtained from 228 patients without tendon rupture. ATT of each side was measured on the radiograph in patients with ACS and in those with acromegaly (n=18), non-familial hypercholesterolemia (non-FH; n=96), and familial hypercholesterolemia (FH; n=31). ATT of the right and left side in ACS patients were 6.9±1.3 and 7.0±1.6 (mm; mean± SD). In acromegaly, non-FH, and FH patients, ATT of the right/left side were 6.6±1.1/6.7±1.1, 6.2±0.9/6.6±1.0, and 9.4±3.3/10.0±3.1, respectively. ATX (ATT ≥9 mm) was found in 26 (11.4%) patients with ACS. Patients with acromegaly and non-FH had no ATX, whereas all patients with FH had ATX. No differences in age and serum lipid profiles were observed between ACS patients with and without ATX. The levels of body mass index and glycated hemoglobin of ACS patients with ATX were significantly greater than those in ACS patients without ATX (26.8±4.0 vs. 23.9±3.3, p<0.05, and 6.9±1.4% 6.3±1.3%, p<0.05, respectively). This is the first report in which the frequency of ACS patients with ATX was 11.4%. The serum lipid profiles of ACS patients with ATX were similar to those without ATX. In the future, ACS patients with ATX will be diagnosed as having FH.

  17. [Comparative study on animal model of acute Achilles tendon rupture with surgical treatment using platelet-rich plasma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Martínez, J C; Vásquez, C R; Ceja, C B; Fuentes, C C E; Sesma, J F; Benítez, A G

    2012-01-01

    To compare the functional and histologicalal course of two animal model groups with acute Achilles tendon tears using platelet rich plasma. An open clinical trial was conducted with dogs donated by the animal facility of the Autonomous University of Puebla (BUAP, for its acronym in Spanish). Dogs were divided into 2 groups: a control group and a problem group. Intentional surgical Achilles tendon tear was performed to them. The Krackow technique was used to repair the tendon and the control group received platelet rich plasma (PRP) as a clot; the other group did not receive PRP. The dogs were seen at 4 weeks to check functionality using the Farell and Schwarz scale to assess the degree of limping. They were sacrificed at week 5; the tendons were removed and sent to the histopathology lab. Functionality results according to the Farell and Schwarz scale showed grades I and II in the problem group, and grades IV and V in the control group. Histologically, the problem group showed moderate vascular proliferation and abundant fibroblastic proliferation. The control group had mild to moderate vascular proliferation and moderate fibroblastic proliferation. PRP improves tendon healing and this has repercussions on functional recovery.

  18. Regional molecular and cellular differences in the female rabbit Achilles tendon complex: potential implications for understanding responses to loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Elise S; Andersson, Gustav; Scott, Alexander; Reno, Carol R; Hart, David A; Thornton, Gail M

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was: (i) to analyze the morphology and expression of extracellular matrix genes in six different regions of the Achilles tendon complex of intact normal rabbits; and (ii) to assess the effect of ovariohysterectomy (OVH) on the regional expression of these genes. Female New Zealand White rabbits were separated into two groups: (i) intact normal rabbits (n = 4); and (ii) OVH rabbits (n = 8). For each rabbit, the Achilles tendon complex was dissected into six regions: distal gastrocnemius (DG); distal flexor digitorum superficialis; proximal lateral gastrocnemius (PLG); proximal medial gastrocnemius; proximal flexor digitorum superficialis; and paratenon. For each of the regions, hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histological evaluation of intact normal rabbit tissues and mRNA levels for proteoglycans, collagens and genes associated with collagen regulation were assessed by real-time reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction for both the intact normal and OVH rabbit tissues. The distal regions displayed a more fibrocartilaginous phenotype. For intact normal rabbits, aggrecan mRNA expression was higher in the distal regions of the Achilles tendon complex compared with the proximal regions. Collagen Type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression levels were increased in the PLG compared to the DG in the intact normal rabbit tissues. The tendons from OVH rabbits had lower gene expressions for the proteoglycans aggrecan, biglycan, decorin and versican compared with the intact normal rabbits, although the regional differences of increased aggrecan expression in distal regions compared with proximal regions persisted. The tensile and compressive forces experienced in the examined regions may be related to the regional differences found in gene expression. The lower mRNA expression of the genes examined in the OVH group confirms a potential effect of systemic estrogen on tendon. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  19. Efficacy of early controlled motion of the ankle compared with no motion after non-operative treatment of an acute Achilles tendon rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Hølmich, Per

    2016-01-01

    controlled motion of the ankle in weeks 3-8 after rupture. The control group is immobilized. In total, 130 patients will be included from one big orthopedic center over a period of 2½ years. The primary outcome is the patient-reported Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score evaluated at 12 months post...... affects functional and patient-reported outcomes. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is performed as a blinded, randomized, controlled trial with patients allocated in a 1:1 ratio to one of two parallel groups. Patients aged from 18 to 70 years are eligible for inclusion. The intervention group performs early...... of acute Achilles tendon rupture in a randomized setup. The study uses the patient-reported outcome measure, the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score, as the primary endpoint, as it is believed to be the best surrogate measure for the tendon's actual capability to function in everyday life. TRIAL...

  20. Elevated Knee Joint Kinetics and Reduced Ankle Kinetics Are Present During Jogging and Hopping After Achilles Tendon Ruptures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willy, Richard W; Brorsson, Annelie; Powell, Hayley C; Willson, John D; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-04-01

    Deficits in plantarflexor function are common after an Achilles tendon rupture. These deficits may result in an altered distribution of joint loads during lower extremity tasks. We hypothesized that, regardless of treatment, the Achilles tendon-ruptured limb would exhibit deficits in ankle kinematics and joint power while exhibiting elevated knee joint power and patellofemoral joint loads during walking, jogging, and hopping. We further hypothesized that this loading pattern would be most evident during jogging and hopping. Controlled laboratory study. Thirty-four participants (17 participants treated surgically, 17 treated nonsurgically) were tested at a mean 6.1 ± 2.0 years after an Achilles tendon rupture. Lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed while participants completed walking, jogging, and single-legged hopping trials. Patellofemoral joint stress was calculated via a musculoskeletal model. Data were analyzed via mixed-model repeated analyses of variance (α = .05) and the limb symmetry index (LSI). No differences ( P ≥ .05) were found between the surgical and nonsurgical groups. In both groups, large side-to-side deficits in the plantarflexion angle at toeoff (LSI: 53.5%-73.9%) were noted during walking, jogging, and hopping in the involved limb. Side-to-side deficits in the angular velocity were only present during jogging (LSI: 93.5%) and hopping (LSI: 92.5%). This pattern was accompanied by large deficits in eccentric (LSI: 80.8%-94.7%) and concentric (LSI: 82.2%-84.7%) ankle joint powers in the involved limb during all tasks. Interestingly, only jogging and hopping demonstrated greater knee joint loads when compared with the uninvolved limb. Concentric knee power was greater during jogging (LSI: 117.2%) and hopping (LSI: 115.9%) compared with the uninvolved limb. Similarly, peak patellofemoral joint stress was greater in the involved limb during jogging (LSI: 107.5%) and hopping (LSI: 107.1%), while only hopping had a greater loading

  1. Calf Muscle Performance Deficits Remain 7 Years After an Achilles Tendon Rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Annelie; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin; Olsson, Nicklas; Nilsson Helander, Katarina

    2018-02-01

    Optimizing calf muscle performance seems to play an important role in minimizing impairments and symptoms after an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR). The literature lacks long-term follow-up studies after ATR that describe calf muscle performance over time. The primary aim was to evaluate calf muscle performance and patient-reported outcomes at a mean of 7 years after ATR in patients included in a prospective, randomized controlled trial. A secondary aim was to evaluate whether improvement in calf muscle performance continued after the 2-year follow-up. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-six subjects (13 women, 53 men) with a mean age of 50 years (SD, 8.5 years) were evaluated at a mean of 7 years (SD, 1 year) years after their ATR. Thirty-four subjects had surgical treatment and 32 had nonsurgical treatment. Patient-reported outcomes were evaluated with Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) and Physical Activity Scale (PAS). Calf muscle performance was evaluated with single-leg standing heel-rise test, concentric strength power heel-rise test, and single-legged hop for distance. Limb Symmetry Index (LSI = injured side/healthy side × 100) was calculated for side-to-side differences. Seven years after ATR, the injured side showed decreased values in all calf muscle performance tests ( P performance did not continue after the 2-year follow-up. Heel-rise height increased significantly ( P = .002) between the 1-year (10.8 cm) and the 7-year (11.5 cm) follow-up assessments. The median ATRS was 96 (of a possible score of 100) and the median PAS was 4 (of a possible score of 6), indicating minor patient-reported symptoms and fairly high physical activity. No significant differences were found in calf muscle performance or patient-reported outcomes between the treatment groups except for the LSI for heel-rise repetitions. Continued deficits in calf muscle endurance and strength remained 7 years after ATR. No continued improvement in calf muscle performance

  2. Substance P accelerates hypercellularity and angiogenesis in tendon tissue and enhances paratendinitis in response to Achilles tendon overuse in a tendinopathy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Gustav; Backman, Ludvig J; Scott, Alexander; Lorentzon, Ronny; Forsgren, Sture; Danielson, Patrik

    2011-10-01

    Tenocytes produce substance P (SP), and its receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R)) is expressed throughout the tendon tissue, especially in patients with tendinopathy and tissue changes (tendinosis) including hypercellularity and vascular proliferation. Considering the known effects of SP, one might ask whether SP contributes to these changes. To test whether development of tendinosis-like changes (hypercellularity and angiogenesis) is accelerated during a 1-week course of exercise with local administration of SP in an established Achilles tendinopathy model. Rabbits were subjected to a protocol of Achilles tendon overuse for 1 week, in conjunction with SP injections in the paratenon. Exercised control animals received NaCl injections or no injections, and unexercised, uninjected controls were also used. Tenocyte number and vascular density, as well as paratendinous inflammation, were evaluated. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation to detect NK-1R were conducted. Results There was a significant increase in tenocyte number in the SP-injected and NaCl-injected groups compared with both unexercised and exercised, uninjected controls. Tendon blood vessels increased in number in the SP-injected group compared with unexercised controls, a finding not seen in NaCl-injected controls or in uninjected, exercised animals. Paratendinous inflammation was more pronounced in the SP-injected group than in the NaCl controls. NK-1R was detected in blood vessel walls, nerves, inflammatory cells and tenocytes. SP accelerated the development of tendinosis-like changes in the rabbit Achilles tendon, which supports theories of a potential role of SP in tendinosis development; a fact of clinical interest since SP effects can be effectively blocked. The angiogenic response to SP injections seems related to paratendinitis.

  3. Is the Dresden technique a mechanical design of choice suitable for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures? A biomechanical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente, C; Carreño-Zillmann, G; Marambio, H; Henríquez, H

    2016-01-01

    To compare the mechanical failure of the Dresden technique for Achilles tendon repair with the double modified Kessler technique controlled repair technique. The maximum resistance of the two repair techniques are also compared. A total of 30 Achilles tendon ruptures in bovine specimens were repaired with an Ethibond(®) suture to 4.5cm from the calcaneal insertion. Each rupture was randomly distributed into one of two surgical groups. After repair, each specimen was subjected to a maximum traction test. The mechanical failure (tendon, suture, or knot) rates (proportions) were compared using the exact Fisher test (α=.05), and the maximum resistances using the Student t test (α=.05). There was a difference in the proportions of mechanical failures, with the most frequent being a tendon tear in the Dresden technique, and a rupture of the suture in the Kessler technique. The repair using the Dresden technique performed in the open mode, compared to the Kessler technique, has a more suitable mechanical design for the repair of middle third Achilles tendon ruptures on developing a higher tensile resistance in 58.7%. However, its most common mechanical failure was a tendon tear, which due to inappropriate loads could lead to lengthening of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Achilles Tendinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people who play sports, such as tennis or basketball, only on the weekends. Most cases of Achilles ... tight calf muscles also can increase tendon strain. Training choices. Running in worn-out shoes can increase ...

  5. Repair of chronic distal biceps brachii tendon rupture using free autogenous semitendinosus tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, D W; Bach, B R; Bojchuk, J

    1996-02-01

    Distal biceps brachii tendon ruptures occur much less frequently than do their proximal counterparts. Distal tendon ruptures usually are associated with considerable function deficits and may require surgical treatment. Repair of chronic distal biceps brachii ruptures are extremely unusual. A free autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used to reconstruct the distal biceps tendon by reattaching the graft to the radial tuberosity via a 2-incision technique in a patient with symptoms and a chronic injury.

  6. UTE-T2⁎ Analysis of Diseased and Healthy Achilles Tendons and Correlation with Clinical Score: An In Vivo Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Qiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare T2⁎ value of healthy and diseased Achilles tendons (AT with a recently introduced three-dimensional ultrashort echo time (3D-UTE sequence and analyze the correlation between T2⁎ value and clinical scores. Methods. Ten patients with symptomatic Achilles tendon and ten healthy volunteers were investigated with 3D-UTE sequence on a 3T magnetic resonance (MR scanner. T2⁎ values of four regions in Achilles tendons were calculated. The clinical outcomes of patients were evaluated according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS score and Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS. An independent sample t-test was used to compare the differences of T2⁎ value and clinical scores between two groups. The Pearson correlation coefficient between clinical scores and T2⁎ values was assessed. Results. The T2⁎ values of Achilles tendon were statistically significantly different between patients and volunteers. The Pearson correlation coefficients between T2⁎ and AOFAS or ATRS scores of patients were r=-0.733 and r=-0.634, respectively. Conclusion. The variability of T2⁎ in healthy and pathologic AT can be quantified by UTE-T2⁎. T2⁎ may be a promising marker to detect and diagnose AT tendinopathy. UTE-T2⁎ could give a precise guidance to clinical outcome.

  7. Endogenous substance P production in the Achilles tendon increases with loading in an in vivo model of tendinopathy-peptidergic elevation preceding tendinosis-like tissue changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backman, L J; Andersson, G; Wennstig, G; Forsgren, S; Danielson, P

    2011-06-01

    To quantify the intratendinous levels of substance P (SP) at different stages of overload in an established model for Achilles tendinopathy (rabbit). Also, to study the distribution of the SP-receptor, the NK-1R, and the source of SP, in the tendon. Animals were subjected to the overuse protocol for 1, 3 or 6 weeks. One additional group served as unexercised controls. Immunoassay (EIA), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and in situ hybridisation (ISH) were performed. EIA revealed increased SP-levels in the Achilles tendon of the exercised limb in all the experimental groups as compared to in the controls (statistically significant; p=0.01). A similar trend in the unexercised Achilles tendon was observed but was not statistically significant (p=0.14). IHC and in ISH illustrated reactions of both SP and NK-1R mainly in blood vessel walls, but the receptor was also found on tenocytes. Achilles tendon SP-levels are elevated already after 1 week of loading. This shows that increased SP-production precedes tendinosis, as tendinosis-like changes occur only after a minimum of 3 weeks of exercise, as shown in a recent study using this model. We propose that central neuronal mechanism may be involved as similar trends were observed in the contralateral Achilles tendon.

  8. Diagnostic failure of ciprofloxacin-induced spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture: case-report and medical-legal considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantalone, A; Abate, M; D'Ovidio, C; Carnevale, A; Salini, V

    2011-01-01

    Rare side-effects of fluoroquinolone therapy are tendinitis and tendon rupture. Many reports have demonstrated that the concomitant use of corticosteroids, in patients aged 60 years or older, increase the risk substantially. We present a case of spontaneous bilateral Achilles tendon rupture induced by ciprofloxacin and methylprednisolone. A 61-year-old woman was diagnosed with Bronchiolitis Obliterans with Organizing Pneumonia (BOOP) and was started on oral ciprofloxacin 500 mg twice daily for 3 weeks and on oral methylprednisolone 16 mg twice daily for 2 weeks. The diagnosis was made after doctors, rather than stop drug therapy and advise complete rest, had mistakenly prescribed for the woman to undergo physiotherapy and local NSAIDs, thus favoring the onset of tendon ruptures and resulting in surgical and legal implications. Inspired by this case, we also submit a brief review on professional liability in Orthopaedics.

  9. The long-term clinical and MRI results following eccentric calf muscle training in chronic Achilles tendinosis

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    Gaerdin, Anna; Shalabi, Adel [Karolinska University Hospital/Huddinge, Departments of Radiology, Karolinska Institutet, Clintec, Stockholm (Sweden); Movin, Tomas [Karolinska University Hospital/Huddinge, Karolinska Institutet, Departments of Orthopedics, Stockholm (Sweden); Svensson, Leif [Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital/Huddinge, Departments of Medical Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    To evaluate the long-term results following eccentric calf-muscle training in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. A total of 24 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy were included in a study evaluating MRI findings and clinical symptoms before and after 3 months of daily eccentric calf-muscle strength training. Median duration of symptoms was 18 months (range 6-120). Four of the patients did not perform the prescribed treatment for different reasons and were followed for 14 months. The resulting 20 treated patients completed 4.2-year (range 29-58 months) follow up. Tendon volume was evaluated by using 3D seed growing technique and signal abnormalities were visually semi-quantitatively graded. Level of pain and performance was categorized using a questionnaire completed by the patient. In the symptomatic treated patients, median intensity level of pain decreased from moderate/severe at time of inclusion to mild at follow up (p < 0.05). Median level of performance increased from severe impairment at time of inclusion to normal at follow up (p < 0.05). 12 out of 20 patients had raised intratendinous signal at time of inclusion compared to 2 out of 20 patients at follow up (p < 0.001). Mean tendon-volume measured 6.7 cm{sup 3} (SD 2.0) at time of inclusion and 6.4 cm{sup 3} (SD 2.0) at follow up (p = 0.18). The four symptomatic non-treated tendons did not improve regarding pain, performance, intratendinous signal or tendon volume. We found decreased pain, improved performance and decreased intratendinous signal both compared to index examination and immediately after the 3 months training regimen in a 4.2-year clinical and MRI follow up, in a group of patients treated with heavy loaded eccentric calf-muscle training for chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The improvements were greater at 4.2-year follow up, despite no further active treatment, than immediately after the treatment. This may indicate a good long-term prognosis for Achilles tendinosis patients

  10. Weft-knitted silk-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) mesh scaffold combined with collagen matrix and seeded with mesenchymal stem cells for rabbit Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyuan; Yang, Yadong; Zhang, Keji; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian

    2015-02-01

    Natural silk fibroin fiber scaffolds have excellent mechanical properties, but degrade slowly. In this study, we used poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA, 10:90) fibers to adjust the overall degradation rate of the scaffolds and filled them with collagen to reserve space for cell growth. Silk fibroin-PLGA (36:64) mesh scaffolds were prepared using weft-knitting, filled with type I collagen, and incubated with rabbit autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). These scaffold-cells composites were implanted into rabbit Achilles tendon defects. At 16 weeks after implantation, morphological and histological observations showed formation of tendon-like tissues that expressed type I collagen mRNA and a uniformly dense distribution of collagen fibers. The maximum load of the regenerated Achilles tendon was 58.32% of normal Achilles tendon, which was significantly higher than control group without MSCs. These findings suggest that it is feasible to construct tissue engineered tendon using weft-knitted silk fibroin-PLGA fiber mesh/collagen matrix seeded with MSCs for rabbit Achilles tendon defect repair.

  11. Comparative Gene Approach to the Investigation of SNPs within the Tenascin-C Gene in Achilles Tendon Injury in the Canine Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina R Kieves

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the tenascin-C (TNC gene in a population of dogs with atraumatic Achilles tendon rupture.Background: In humans, Achilles tendinopathy has been extensively studied for numerous polymorphisms within several genes and has been associated with polymorphisms in collagen (COL5A1 and the TNC genes.Evidentiary value: This study serves as a starting point for evaluating a genetic component of Achilles tendinopathy in the dog.Methods: Whole blood from twenty dogs with atraumatic Achilles tendon rupture and 14 matched control samples were used. DNA was extracted from whole blood run with primers designed around two SNPs previously identified to be related to Achilles tendinopathy in humans. One SNP was located in exon 29, and one exon 17 of the canine TNC gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was run on the samples and they were sequenced. Sequences of the affected canine population were compared to the control sample sequences.Results: There were no significant differences in genotype or allele frequency of the SNPs rs13321 and rs2104772 between any of the affected and control subjects with a p-value of 1.0.Conclusion: This study evaluated a population of canines with atraumatic Achilles tendon rupture for SNPs in the TNC gene. We found no difference in gene sequence for the study population compared to age, sex, and breed matched controls.Application: Though the data from this study did not show a correlation between the specific polymorphisms investigated, it is possible that other SNPs within the TNC gene or other genes involved in tendon composition and repair such as collagen may be associated with atraumatic Achilles tendon injury in the dog. 

  12. The effect of running, strength, and vibration strength training on the mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legerlotz, Kirsten; Schjerling, Peter; Langberg, Henning

    2007-01-01

    (HVST; n = 6), and high strength-trained (HST; n = 6) group. After a 12-wk-long experimental period, the Achilles tendon was tested mechanically and the cross-sectional area, the soleus and gastrocnemius muscle mass, and mRNA concentration of collagen I, collagen III, tissue inhibitor...... on the mechanical, morphological, and biochemical properties of the Achilles tendon. Sixty-four female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into five groups: nonactive age-matched control (AMC; n = 20), voluntary wheel running (RT; n = 20), vibration strength-trained (LVST; n = 12), high-vibration strength-trained...... of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), transforming growth factor-beta, connective tissue growth factor, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 was determined. Neither in the LVST nor in the HVST group could any adaptation of the Achilles tendon be detected, although the training had an effect on the gastrocnemius muscle mass...

  13. No midterm advantages in the middle term using small intestinal submucosa and human amniotic membrane in Achilles tendon transverse tenotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yushu; Peng, Yinbo; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min; Redmond, Robert W; Ni, Tao

    2016-11-24

    The study was aimed to compare the effects of small intestinal submucosa (SIS) and human amniotic membrane (HAM) on Achilles tendon healing. A total of 48 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups. A full-thickness transverse tenotomy was made at the right leg of the rabbits. Then, the laceration site was wrapped with HAM (P/A group) or SIS (P/S group). The ultimate stress (US) and Young's modulus (E) of the tendons were detected for biomechanical analysis. Histological evaluation was performed using hematoxylin and eosin, immunohistochemical, and immunofluorescent stain. Expression of collagen I was detected by western blot analysis, and levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α were measured. Finally, adhesion formation was evaluated. There were no significant differences in filamentous adhesion, cross-sectional areas of the laceration sites, levels of inflammatory response, and collagen type I expression between the P/A and P/S groups (p > 0.05). Compared with the P/A group, the US and E values were significantly higher in the P/S group at day 7 (p Achilles tendon injury in the early stage of healing.

  14. Surgical treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures: the comparison of open and percutaneous methods in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, Güney; Doral, Mahmut Nedim; Turhan, Egemen; Dönmez, Gürhan; Atay, Ahmet Özgür; Kaya, Defne

    2014-09-01

    This study was intended to investigate the healing properties of open and percutaneous techniques in a rabbit model and compare histological, electron microscopical, and biomechanical findings of the healed tendon between the groups. Twenty-six rabbits were randomly assigned to two groups of thirteen rabbits each. Percutaneous tenotomy of the Achilles tendon (AT) was applied through a stab incision on the right side 1.5 cm above the calcaneal insertion in all animals. Using the same Bunnell suture, the first group was repaired with the open and the second group was repaired with the percutaneous method. ATs were harvested at the end of eight weeks for biomechanical and histological evaluation. When the sections were evaluated for fibrillar density under electron microscopy, it was noted that fibrils were more abundant in the percutaneous repair group. The tendon scores in the percutaneous group were less than the open group indicating closer histological morphology to normal. The difference was not significant (p=0.065). The mean force to rupture the tendon was 143.7± 9.5 N in percutaneous group and 139.2±8.2 N in the open group. The difference was not significant (p=0.33). Percutaneous techniques provide as good clinical results as the open techniques do. The healing tendon shows better findings in histological and electron microscopical level with percutaneous technique.

  15. Knitted poly-lactide-co-glycolide scaffold loaded with bone marrow stromal cells in repair and regeneration of rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hong Wei; Goh, James C H; Thambyah, Ashvin; Teoh, Swee Hin; Lee, Eng Hin

    2003-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the morphology and biomechanical function of Achilles tendons regenerated using knitted poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) loaded with bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs). The animal model used was that of an adult female New Zealand White rabbit with a 10-mm gap defect of the Achilles tendon. In group I, 19 hind legs with the created defects were treated with allogeneic bMSCs seeded on knitted PLGA scaffold. In group II, the Achilles tendon defects in 19 hind legs were repaired using the knitted PLGA scaffold alone, and in group III, 6 hind legs were used as normal control. The tendon-implant constructs of groups I and II were evaluated postoperatively at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks using macroscopic, histological, and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, specimens from group I (n = 7), group II (n = 7), and group III (n = 6) were harvested for biomechanical test 12 weeks after surgery. Postoperatively, at 2 and 4 weeks, the histology of group I specimens exhibited a higher rate of tissue formation and remodeling as compared with group II, whereas at 8 and 12 weeks postoperation, the histology of both group I and group II was similar to that of native tendon tissue. The wound sites of group I healed well and there was no apparent lymphocyte infiltration. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the regenerated tendons were composed of collagen types I and type III fibers. The tensile stiffness and modulus of group I were 87 and 62.6% of normal tendon, respectively, whereas those of group II were about 56.4 and 52.9% of normal tendon, respectively. These results suggest that the knitted PLGA biodegradable scaffold loaded with allogeneic bone marrow stromal cells has the potential to regenerate and repair gap defect of Achilles tendon and to effectively restore structure and function.

  16. Passive stiffness of the ankle and plantar flexor muscle performance after Achilles tendon repair: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Pollyana R T; Santos, Thiago R T; Procópio, Paula R S; Chelidonopoulos, Jessica H D; Zambelli, Roberto; Ocarino, Juliana M

    Deficits in ankle muscle strength and ankle stiffness may be present in those subjects who underwent surgical treatment for an Achilles tendon rupture. The presence of these long-term deficits may contribute to a lower performance during daily activities and may be linked to future injuries. To compare the ankle passive stiffness and the plantar flexor muscle performance in patients who underwent unilateral surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture with nonsurgical subjects. Twenty patients who underwent unilateral surgical treatment of Achilles tendon rupture [surgical (SU) group], and twenty nonsurgical subjects [non-surgical (NS) group] participated in this study. The ankle passive stiffness was evaluated using a clinical test. The concentric and eccentric plantar flexors performance (i.e. peak torque and work) was evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer at 30°/s. The surgical ankle of the surgical group presented lower stiffness compared to the non-surgical ankle (mean difference=3.790; 95%CI=1.23-6.35) and to the non-dominant ankle of the non-surgical group (mean difference=-3.860; 95%CI=-7.38 to -0.33). The surgical group had greater absolute asymmetry of ankle stiffness (mean difference=-2.630; 95%CI=-4.61 to -0.65) and greater absolute asymmetry of concentric (mean difference=-8.3%; 95%CI=-13.79 to -2.81) and eccentric (mean difference=-6.9%; 95%CI=-12.1 to -1.7) plantar flexor work compared to non-surgical group. There was no other difference in stiffness and plantar flexor performance. Patients who underwent surgical repair of the Achilles tendon presented with long-term (1 year or more) deficits of ankle stiffness and asymmetries of ankle stiffness and plantar flexor work in the affected ankle compared to the uninjured side in the surgical group and both sides on the nonsurgical group. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. Tendon Derived Stem Cells Promote Platelet-Rich Plasma Healing in Collagenase-Induced Rat Achilles Tendinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Tendon injuries are common, difficult to cure and usually healed with fibrosis and scar tissue. The aim of this study was to evaluate tendon derived stem cells (TDSCs and platelet rich plasma (PRP in the treatment of collagenase induced Achilles tendinopathy in rat. Methods: Four and 8 weeks (n=18 after TDSCs, PRP, PRP with TDSC or PBS (control injection into collagenase or saline (sham injected rat Achilles tendon, tendon tissue was harvested and tendon quality was evaluated by histology and biomechanical testing. TDSCs were cultured and treated by 10% PRP, and the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway and tenocyte-related genes were detected by western blot analysis. Results: Compared to the control, PRP treatment resulted in better healing of injured tendons with improved histological outcomes and biomechanical functions. The addition of TDSCs to PRP treatment significantly enhanced the effects of PRP treatment alone. TDSC injection alone had little effect on tendon healing. PRP and PRP with TDSC treatments of collagenase induced tendon injuries also increased the mRNA and protein expression of tenocyte-related genes (type I collagen, SCX, Tenascin C and activated the focal adhesion kinase (FAK and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Treatment of TDSCs in vitro with 10% PRP significantly increased the phosphorylation levels of FAK and ERK1/2 and the protein levels of tenocyte-related genes (Col I, SCX and Tenascin C. Inhibition of the FAK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways abolished the effect of PRP. Conclusion: This study concludes that PRP combined with TDSCs is potentially effective for the treatment of tendinopathy. The PRP induced, FAK and ERK1/2 dependent activation of tenocyte related genes in TDSCs in vitro suggests that the beneficial healing effect of the PRP with TDSC combination might occur by means of an improved TDSC differentiation toward the tenocyte lineage. Thus, a PRP with TDSC combination

  18. Histomorphometric analysis of the Achilles tendon of Wistar rats treated with laser therapy and eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V. de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Low-level laser therapy is recommended for the treatment of tendinopathies despite the contradictory results related to the ideal dose of energy, wavelength and time of application. This study aimed to assess the effects of laser therapy and eccentric exercise on tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon of Wistar rats. Forty-eight adult male rats were randomly distributed into four groups (L= laser; E= eccentric exercise; LE = laser and eccentric exercise; and R= rest. Laser therapy (904nm/3J/cm2 and/or eccentric exercise (downhill walking; 15o incline treadmill; 12m/min; 50min/day was started 24h after induction of unilateral tendinopathy and remained for 20 days. At 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after lesion induction, three rats from each group were euthanized and the tendons were collected for histological and morphometric analyses. There was no difference among groups or among times for the characteristics hemorrhage (p=0.4154, fibrinous adhesion formation (p=0.0712, and organization of collagen fibers (p=0.2583 and of the connective tissue (p=0.1046. For these groups, regardless of the time, eccentric exercise led to epitenon thickening (p=0.0204, which was lower in the group treated with laser therapy. Histological analysis revealed differences (p=0.0032 in the number of inflammatory cells over time. They were more numerous in the group that only exercised. This result was confirmed by morphometric analysis, which showed a significant interaction (groups x time for this characteristic. Eccentric exercise increased (p=0.0014 the inflammatory infiltrate over time (3 and 21 days. However, association with laser therapy reduced inflammatory reaction. On the other hand, the combination of the treatments increased angiogenesis in morphometric (p=0.0000 and histological (p=0.0006 analyses compared with the other groups, while the isolated application of low-level laser reduced this characteristic over time. Animals maintained at rest presented the

  19. Acute achilles tendon repair: strength outcomes after an acute bout of exercise in recreational athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David A; Barnes, Adam F; Rund, Angela M; Kaz, Ari J; Tyndall, James A; Millis, Andrew A

    2014-02-01

    This is the first study to evaluate the effect of an acute bout of exercise on strength evaluation after Achilles tendon (AT) rupture and repair. Forty patients sustained an acute AT injury and met inclusion criteria for this study. At a minimum of 12 months after operative repair, patients were measured for (1) calf circumference, (2) bilateral isokinetic strength on a Cybex dynamometer before and after 30 minutes of walking at 70% maximal exertion, and (3) subjective evaluation by AAOS lower limb core and foot and ankle modules. Follow-up occurred at a mean of 32.4 ± 20.7 (range, 12-80) months after surgery, and patients were on average 44.4 ± 8.6 (range, 20-62) years old. One-tailed Student's paired t tests analyzed significance for strength and fatigue between the involved and uninvolved ankle (P exercise. Dorsiflexion strength of the involved ankle increased 6% to 11% for peak torque (P = .070) and 1% to 25% for peak work (P = .386). Reported AAOS lower limb core and foot and ankle scores averaged 99.8 and 96.0, respectively. After an AT rupture with repair, patients had less plantarflexion strength, and equal dorsiflexion strength in the operative leg compared to the uninvolved, normal leg. However, subjective results indicated near normal pain and function despite mild plantarflexion strength deficits. Dorsiflexion strength was normal after repair and remained normal even after an acute bout of exercise. Plantarflexion strength ratios postexercise remained similar to pre-exercise after acute exercise bouts. Athletes reported a "flat tire" feeling while running, which suggests a probable gait adjustment as cause for long-term plantarflexion strength deficits. Level III, cohort study.

  20. Factors associated with calf muscle endurance recovery 1 year after achilles tendon rupture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, Geoff P; Jomha, Nadr M; Suchak, Amar A; Beaupré, Lauren A

    2010-06-01

    Cohort study. To describe calf muscle endurance recovery and to explore factors predictive of poor calf muscle endurance recovery 1 year after surgical repair of an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR). ATR is a common sports-related injury and is often managed with open surgical repair. After ATR repair most patients return to usual activities 6 months after surgery. However, calf endurance impairment can persist up to 6 years, possibly impacting performance of daily activities and sport. A secondary analysis of a 73-patient cohort from a randomized controlled trial assessing the effects of early weight bearing after surgical repair of an ATR was performed. Calf muscle endurance recovery was measured by single-heel raises using a customized counting device at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. Descriptive statistics were used to outline recovery of calf muscle endurance. Physical and patient-reported outcomes were examined for their association with calf-muscle endurance recovery. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to explore variables associated with recovery of calf endurance 1 year postoperatively. Mean recovery of calf muscle endurance was 76% at 1 year. Multivariate regression analysis showed an association of being female, reporting no resting pain at 3 months, and physical functioning and calf endurance at 6 months, with better recovery of calf endurance at 1 year. Calf muscle endurance at 1 year remained impaired in a considerable portion of the sample. Pain, gender, and physical functioning are likely important factors in determining recovery of calf muscle endurance. Prognosis, level 2b.J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2010;40(6):345-351, Epub 15 April 2010. doi:10.2519/jospt.2010.3204.

  1. Direct Radiofrequency Application Improves Pain and Gait in Collagenase-Induced Acute Achilles Tendon Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Pu Tsai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF is often used as a supplementary and alternative method to alleviate pain for chronic tendinopathy. Whether or how it would work for acute tendon injury is not addressed in the literatures. Through detailed pain and gait monitoring, we hypothesized that collagenase-induce acute tendinopathy model may be able to answer these questions. Gait parameters, including time, distance, and range of motion, were recorded and analyzed using a walking track equipped with a video-based system. Expression of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP, and galanin were used as pain markers. Beta-III tubulin and Masson trichrome staining were used as to evaluate nerve sprouting, matrix tension, and degeneration in the tendon. Of fourteen analyzed parameters, RF significantly improved stance phase, step length, preswing, and intermediary toe-spread of gait. Improved gait related to the expression of substance P, CGRP, and reduced nerve fiber sprouting and matrix tension, but not galanin. The study indicates that direct RF application may be a valuable approach to improve gait and pain in acute tendon injury. Altered gait parameters may be used as references to evaluate therapeutic outcomes of RF or other treatment plan for tendinopathy.

  2. Achilles tendon stress is more sensitive to subject-specific geometry than subject-specific material properties: A finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Wencke; Shim, Vickie B; Obst, Steven; Lloyd, David G; Newsham-West, Richard; Barrett, Rod S

    2017-05-03

    This study used subject-specific measures of three-dimensional (3D) free Achilles tendon geometry in conjunction with a finite element method to investigate the effect of variation in subject-specific geometry and subject-specific material properties on tendon stress during submaximal isometric loading. Achilles tendons of eight participants (Aged 25-35years) were scanned with freehand 3D ultrasound at rest and during a 70% maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Ultrasound images were segmented, volume rendered and transformed into subject-specific 3D finite element meshes. The mean (±SD) lengths, volumes and cross-sectional areas of the tendons at rest were 62±13mm, 3617±984mm 3 and 58±11mm 2 respectively. The measured tendon strain at 70% MVIC was 5.9±1.3%. Subject-specific material properties were obtained using an optimisation approach that minimised the difference between measured and modelled longitudinal free tendon strain. Generic geometry was represented by the average mesh and generic material properties were taken from the literature. Local stresses were subsequently computed for combinations of subject-specific and generic geometry and material properties. For a given geometry, changing from generic to subject-specific material properties had little effect on the stress distribution in the tendon. In contrast, changing from generic to subject-specific geometry had a 26-fold greater effect on tendon stress distribution. Overall, these findings indicate that the stress distribution experienced by the living free Achilles tendon of a young and healthy population during voluntary loading are more sensitive to variation in tendon geometry than variation in tendon material properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Intradiurnal fluctuations of off-resonance saturation effects in healthy human achilles tendons assessed with a 3D ultrashort echo time MRI sequence at 3 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, U.; Syha, R.; Kessler, D.E.; Bongers, M.; Seith, F.; Nikolaou, K.; Springer, F. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Partovi, S.; Robbin, M. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schick, F. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology

    2015-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation in healthy subjects has an impact on off-resonance saturation ratios (OSR) or the volume of the Achilles tendon after a prolonged time of reduced levels of physical activity. 7 healthy volunteers were repeatedly investigated on 3 consecutive days on a 3 T whole body MR scanner using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging sequence with a Gaussian off-resonance saturation pulse at a frequency offset of 2000 Hz to calculate OSR values. For accurate volumetric quantification of the Achilles tendon, a newly developed contour detection snake algorithm was applied on high-resolution isotropic T2-weighted SPACE sequence datasets. Single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to estimate test-retest reliability. For OSR and tendon volume measurements on three consecutive days, excellent reproducibility could be achieved with ICC values above 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Comparing the results of all three days, a statistically significant mean individual percentage decrease (-4.1 ± 1.5 %; p=0.001) of calculated tendon OSR values was found for the evening measurements. No statistically significant difference between tendon volumes in the morning and the evening could be detected (p=0.589). The results of this in-vivo study demonstrate a significant influence of gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation after reduced physical activity on OSR values in the Achilles tendon, but not on tendon volume. Taken together with the demonstrated excellent reproducibility, these findings are important for future studies investigating temporal changes of the Achilles tendon microstructure.

  5. Intradiurnal fluctuations of off-resonance saturation effects in healthy human achilles tendons assessed with a 3D ultrashort echo time MRI sequence at 3 tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosse, U.; Syha, R.; Kessler, D.E.; Bongers, M.; Seith, F.; Nikolaou, K.; Springer, F.; Partovi, S.; Robbin, M.; Schick, F.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation in healthy subjects has an impact on off-resonance saturation ratios (OSR) or the volume of the Achilles tendon after a prolonged time of reduced levels of physical activity. 7 healthy volunteers were repeatedly investigated on 3 consecutive days on a 3 T whole body MR scanner using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) imaging sequence with a Gaussian off-resonance saturation pulse at a frequency offset of 2000 Hz to calculate OSR values. For accurate volumetric quantification of the Achilles tendon, a newly developed contour detection snake algorithm was applied on high-resolution isotropic T2-weighted SPACE sequence datasets. Single-measure intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated to estimate test-retest reliability. For OSR and tendon volume measurements on three consecutive days, excellent reproducibility could be achieved with ICC values above 0.96 and 0.97, respectively. Comparing the results of all three days, a statistically significant mean individual percentage decrease (-4.1 ± 1.5 %; p=0.001) of calculated tendon OSR values was found for the evening measurements. No statistically significant difference between tendon volumes in the morning and the evening could be detected (p=0.589). The results of this in-vivo study demonstrate a significant influence of gravitational interstitial fluid accumulation after reduced physical activity on OSR values in the Achilles tendon, but not on tendon volume. Taken together with the demonstrated excellent reproducibility, these findings are important for future studies investigating temporal changes of the Achilles tendon microstructure.

  6. Use of an anti-gravity treadmill in the rehabilitation of the operated achilles tendon: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Amol; Granot, Allison

    2011-01-01

    Achilles surgical patients were evaluated using an "anti-gravity" Alter-G (AG) treadmill that allows for reduction of weightbearing pressure on the lower extremity. We studied our hypothesis, which was based on our prior clinical findings, that being able to run on the AG treadmill at 85% of body weight is sufficient to clear patients to run with full body weight outside. Patients undergoing Achilles tendon rupture or insertional repair surgery were prospectively studied. They were compared with a control group that had similar surgeries and a similar rehabilitation program during the same time period: the variable was not using the AG treadmill. The criteria for the study group to be allowed to run outside was being able to run for at least 10 minutes on the AG at 85% of body weight. Each group had 8 patients who underwent surgery for 2 complete tendon ruptures and 6 insertional repairs. There was no significant difference between the AG and control group as to age and postoperative follow-up. AG patients began their initial run on the treadmill at 70% of their body weight at 13.9 ± 3.4 weeks, 85% at 17.6 ± 3.9 weeks, and outside running at 18.1 ± 3.9 weeks. The control group's return to running outside time was 20.4 ± 4.1 weeks. This was not significantly different (p = .27). We confirmed our hypothesis that being able to run at 85% of body weight after Achilles surgery was sufficient to clear patients to run outside. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Power Doppler ultrasonography of painful Achilles tendons and entheses in patients with and without spondyloarthropathy-a comparison with clinical examination and contrast-enhanced MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiell, Charlotte; Szkudlarek, Marcin; Hasselquist, Maria

    2013-01-01

    /or enthesis due to sports-related causes and 10 CTRLs were examined at the Achilles tendons and entheses with US, MRI and clinical assessment. Intratendinous changes, entheseal changes, bursitis and peritendonitis were assessed. An US interobserver substudy was performed in nine persons. US findings showed...

  8. The microvascular volume of the achilles tendon is increased in patients with tendinopathy at rest and after a 1-hour treadmill run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Harrison, Adrian; Simonsen, Lene

    2013-01-01

    :Controlled laboratory study. METHODS:Real-time harmonic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) measurements of the MV of the Achilles tendon were taken in 18 volunteers (9 patients with AT, 9 healthy controls). The CEU analyses were conducted before exercise, immediately after a 1-hour treadmill run, and 24 hours after...

  9. Chronic alterations in growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I signaling lead to changes in mouse tendon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R H; Clausen, N M; Schjerling, P

    2014-01-01

    RNA expression (targets: GAPDH, RPLP0, IGF-IEa, IGF-IR, COL1A1, COL3A1, TGF-β1, TGF-β2, TGF-β3, versican, scleraxis, tenascin C, fibronectin, fibromodulin, decorin) in the Achilles tendon, and the mRNA expression was also measured in calf muscle (same targets as tendon plus IGF-IEb, IGF-IEc). We found that GHR......The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) axis is an important stimulator of collagen synthesis in connective tissue, but the effect of chronically altered GH/IGF-I levels on connective tissue of the muscle-tendon unit is not known. We studied three groups of mice; 1) giant......-/- mice had significantly lower collagen fibril volume fraction in Achilles tendon, as well as decreased mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagen types I and III in muscle compared to CTRL. In contrast, the mRNA expression of IGF-I isoforms and collagens in bGH mice was generally high in both tendon...

  10. Ultrasound guided electrocoagulation in patients with chronic non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, M Ilum; Torp-Pedersen, S; Koenig, M Juhl

    2006-01-01

    High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated.......High resolution colour Doppler ultrasound shows intratendinous Doppler activity in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Treatment of this neovascularisation with sclerosing therapy seems to relieve the pain. However, the procedure often has to be repeated....

  11. Effects of maturation and advanced glycation on tensile mechanics of collagen fibrils from rat tail and Achilles tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Rene B; Smith, Stuart T; Moyer, Patrick J; Magnusson, S Peter

    2018-02-13

    Connective tissues are ubiquitous throughout the body and consequently affect the function of many organs. In load bearing connective tissues like tendon, the mechanical functionality is provided almost exclusively by collagen fibrils that in turn are stabilized by covalent cross-links. Functionally distinct tendons display different cross-link patterns, which also change with maturation, but these differences have not been studied in detail at the fibril level. In the present study, a custom built nanomechanical test platform was designed and fabricated to measure tensile mechanics of individual fibrils from rat tendons. The influence of animal maturity (4 vs. 16 week old rats) and functionally different tendons (tail vs. Achilles tendons) were examined. Additionally the effect of methylglyoxal (MG) treatment in vitro to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) was investigated. Age and tissue type had no significant effect on fibril mechanics, but MG treatment increased strength and stiffness without inducing brittleness and gave rise to a distinct three-phase mechanical response corroborating that previously reported in human patellar tendon fibrils. That age and tissue had little mechanical effect, tentatively suggest that variations in enzymatic cross-links may play a minor role after initial tissue formation. Tendons are connective tissues that connect muscle to bone and carry some of the greatest mechanical loads in the body, which makes them common sites of injury. A tendon is essentially a biological rope formed by thin strands called fibrils made of the protein collagen. Tendon function relies on the strength of these fibrils, which in turn depends on naturally occurring cross-links between collagen molecules, but the mechanical influence of these cross-links have not been measured before. It is believed that beneficial cross-linking occurs with maturation while additional cross-linking with aging may lead to brittleness, but this study provides

  12. Autologous tenocyte therapy for experimental Achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Yu, Qian; Wu, Bing; Lin, Zhen; Pavlos, Nathan J; Xu, Jiake; Ouyang, Hongwei; Wang, Allan; Zheng, Ming H

    2011-08-01

    Tendinopathy of the Achilles tendon is a chronic degenerative condition that frequently does not respond to treatment. In the current study, we propose that autologous tenocytes therapy (ATT) is effective in treating tendon degeneration in a collagenase-induced rabbit Achilles tendinopathy model. Chronic tendinopathy was created in the left Achilles tendon of 44 rabbits by an intratendonous injection of type I collagenase. Forty-two rabbits were randomly allocated into three groups of 14 and received control treatment; autologous tenocytes digested from tendon tissue; and autologous tenocytes digested from epitendineum tissue. For cell tracking in vivo, the remaining two animals were injected with autologous tenocytes labeled with a nano-scale super-paramagnetic iron oxide (Feridex). Rabbits were sacrificed at 4 and 8 weeks after the therapeutic injection, and tendon tissue was analyzed by histology, immunostaining, and biomechanical testing to evaluate tissue repair. Autologous tenocyte treatment improved tendon remodeling, histological outcomes, collagen content, and tensile strength of tendinopathic Achilles tendons. Injected tenocytes were integrated into tendon matrix and could be tracked up to 8 weeks in vivo. Immunohistochemistry showed that ATT improved type I collagen expression in repaired tendon but did not affect type III collagen and secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine expression. ATT may be a useful treatment of chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

  13. Expression, content, and localization of insulin-like growth factor I in human achilles tendon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jens L; Heinemeier, Katja M; Langberg, Henning

    2006-01-01

    In animals insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) stimulates collagen production by fibroblasts and is expressed in tendons together with its binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4). However, the presence of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in human tendon tissue is not described. Tissue IGF-I content was examined by immunof...... the tendon fibroblasts and that mRNA for IGF-I and IGFBP-4 can be determined in human tendon tissue. The present study adds support for the roles of IGF-I and IGFBP-4 in the regulation of tendon adaptive responses to mechanical loading....

  14. Effects of cell-to-collagen ratio in stem cell-seeded constructs for Achilles tendon repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juncosa-Melvin, Natalia; Boivin, Gregory P; Galloway, Marc T; Gooch, Cindi; West, John R; Butler, David L

    2006-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the hypotheses that implantation of cell-seeded constructs in a rabbit Achilles tendon defect model would 1) improve repair biomechanics and matrix organization and 2) result in higher failure forces than measured in vivo forces in normal rabbit Achilles tendon (AT) during an inclined hopping activity. Autogenous tissue-engineered constructs were fabricated in culture between posts in the wells of silicone dishes at four cell-to-collagen ratios by seeding mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from 18 adult rabbits at each of two seeding densities (0.1 x 10(6) and 1 x 10(6) cell/mL) in each of two collagen concentrations (1.3 and 2.6 mg/mL). After 5 days of contraction, constructs having the two highest ratios (0.4 and 0.8 M/mg) were damaged by excessive cell traction forces and could not be used in subsequent in vivo studies. Constructs at the lower ratios (0.04 and 0.08 M/mg) were implanted in bilateral, 2 cm long gap defects in the rabbit's lateral Achilles tendon. At 12 weeks after surgery, both repair tissues were isolated and either failed in tension (n = 13) to determine their biomechanical properties or submitted for histological analysis (n = 5). No significant differences were observed in any structural or mechanical properties or in histological appearance between the two repair conditions. However, the average maximum force and maximum stress of these repairs achieved 50 and 85% of corresponding values for the normal AT and exceeded the largest peak in vivo forces (19% of failure) previously recorded in the rabbit AT. Average stiffness and modulus were 60 and 85% of normal values, respectively. New constructs with lower cell densities and higher scaffold stiffness that do not excessively contract and tear in culture and that further improve the repair stiffness needed to withstand various levels of expected in vivo loading are currently being investigated.

  15. New imaging methods for non-invasive assessment of mechanical, structural and biochemical properties of Human Achilles tendon: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fouré

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of tendon play a fundamental role to passively transmit forces from muscle to bone, withstand sudden stretches and act as a mechanical buffer allowing the muscle to work more efficiently. The use of non-invasive imaging methods for the assessment of human tendon’s mechanical, structural and biochemical properties in vivo is relatively young in sports medicine, clinical practice and basic science. Non-invasive assessment of the tendon properties may enhance the diagnosis of tendon injury and the characterization of recovery treatments. While ultrasonographic imaging is the most popular tool to assess the tendon’s structural and, indirectly, mechanical properties, ultrasonographic elastography and ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (UHF MRI have recently emerged as potentially powerful techniques to explore tendon tissues. This paper highlights some methodological cautions associated with conventional ultrasonography and perspectives for in vivo human Achilles tendon assessment using ultrasonographic elastography and UHF MRI.

  16. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  17. A new device combining mechanical stimulation of plantar sole and Achilles' tendon to alleviate the consequences of muscle deconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Marie-Hélène; Fryziel, Fabrice; Noel, Jean-Pierre; Tiffreau, Vincent; Digumber, Marc; Bastide, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Limb immobilization or confinement to bed results in a severe atrophy and weakness of lower leg muscles. Full recovery of muscle strength and physical function is rare and may impact the patient's outcome. Studies performed on rodents have demonstrated that the deleterious structural and functional adaptations which occur during muscle deconditioning can be counteracted through adequate physiological stimuli. Thus, based on this fundamental work, we developed a device that combines mechanical stimulation of proprioceptors located in the plantar sole and Achilles' tendon. The device is adapted to patients immobilized and confined to bed. Stimulations can be applied on muscle in passive state. The protocol is non-invasive and is well accepted by patients. This paper presents the technical features of the device, as well as preliminary results of the first clinical study. This device might allow considering new therapeutic strategies for prevention of atrophy in many pathologies.

  18. A relationship between spinal new bone formation in ankylosing spondylitis and the sonographically determined Achilles tendon enthesophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Can, Meryem; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Keser, Gokhan; Kurum, Esra; Inal, Vedat; Yazisiz, Veli; Birlik, Merih; Emmungil, Hakan; Atagunduz, Pamir; Direskeneli, Haner; McGonagle, Dennis; Pay, Salih

    2016-03-01

    Spinal new bone formation is a major but incompletely understood manifestation of ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We explored the relationship between spinal new bone formation and ultrasound (US)-determined Achilles enthesophytes to test the hypothesis that spinal new bone formation is part of a generalized enthesis bone-forming phenotype. A multicenter, case control study of 225 consecutive AS patients and 95 age/body mass index (BMI) matched healthy controls (HC) was performed. US scans of Achilles tendons and cervical and lumbar spine radiographs were obtained. All images were centrally scored by one investigator for US and one for radiographs, blinded to medical data. The relation between syndesmophytes (by modified Stoke Ankylosing Spondylitis Spine Score (mSASSS) and the number of syndesmophytes) and enthesophytes (with a semi-quantitative scoring of the US findings) was investigated. AS patients had significantly higher US enthesophyte scores than HCs (2.1(1.6) vs. 1.6(1.6); p = 0.004). The difference was significant in males (p = 0.001) but not in females (p = 0.5). The enthesophyte scores significantly correlated with mSASSS scores (ρ = 0.274, p formation.

  19. Differentially expressed proteins on postoperative 3 days healing in rabbit Achilles tendon rupture model after early kinesitherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialili, Ainuer; Jielile, Jiasharete; Abudoureyimu, Shajidan; Sabirhazi, Gulnur; Redati, Darebai; Bai, Jing-Ping; Bin, Liang; Duisabai, Sailike; Aishan, Jiangaguli; Kasimu, Haxiaobieke

    2011-04-01

    Surgical repair of Achilles tendon (AT) rupture should immediately be followed by active tendon mobilization. The optimal time as to when the mobilization should begin is important yet controversial. Early kinesitherapy leads to reduced rehabilitation period. However, an insight into the detailed mechanism of this process has not been gained. Proteomic technique can be used to separate and purify the proteins by differential expression profile which is related to the function of different proteins, but research in the area of proteomic analysis of AT 3 days after repair has not been studied so far. Forty-seven New Zealand white rabbits were randomized into 3 groups. Group A (immobilization group, n equal to 16) received postoperative cast immobilization; Group B (early motion group, n equal to 16) received early active motion treatments immediately following the repair of AT rupture from tenotomy. Another 15 rabbits served as control group (Group C). The AT samples were prepared 3 days following the microsurgery. The proteins were separated employing two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). PDQuest software version 8.0 was used to identify differentially expressed proteins, followed by peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) and tandem mass spectrum analysis, using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) protein database retrieval and then for bioinformatics analysis. A mean of 446.33, 436.33 and 462.67 protein spots on Achilles tendon samples of 13 rabbits in Group A, 14 rabbits in Group B and 13 rabbits in Group C were successfully detected in the 2D-PAGE. There were 40, 36 and 79 unique proteins in Groups A, B and C respectively. Some differentially expressed proteins were enzyme with the gel, matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). We successfully identified 9 and 11 different proteins in Groups A and B, such as GAPDH, phosphoglycerate kinase 1, pro-alpha-1 type 1 collagen

  20. The effect of platelet rich plasma from bone marrow aspirate with added bone morphogenetic protein-2 on the Achilles tendon-bone junction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Jun; Nam, Hyok-Woo; Hur, Chang-Yong; Park, Misu; Yang, Hee Seok; Kim, Byung-Soo; Park, Jung-Ho

    2011-12-01

    To determine if exogenously injected bone marrow derived platelet-rich plasma (PRP) plus bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 could accelerate the healing of bone-tendon junction injuries and increase the junction holding strength during the early regeneration period. A direct injury model of the bone-tendon junction was made using an Achilles tendon-calcaneus bone junction in a rabbit. In the PRP/BMP-2/fibrin group, 0.05 mL of bone marrow derived PRP and 100 ng/mL of BMP-2 both incorporated into 0.1 mL of fibrin glue were injected into Achilles tendon-calcaneus bone junctions. The effect of the intervention was tested by comparing the results of an intervention group to a control group. The results of biomechanical testing, and histological and gross analyses were compared between the 2 groups at the following time points after surgery: 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 8 weeks. Histologic examinations showed that woven bone developed in tendon-bone junctions at 2 weeks after surgery in the PRP/BMP-2/fibrin group. Mechanical test results showed no significant difference between the PRP/BMP-2/fibrin and control groups at 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, but the mean maximal load in the PRP/BMP-2/fibrin group was significantly higher than in the control group (p rabbit model of tendon-bone junction injury.

  1. Injection techniques of platelet-rich plasma into and around the Achilles tendon: a cadaveric study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, Johannes I.; Reilingh, Mikel L.; de Jonge, Milko C.; van Dijk, C. Niek; Kerkhoffs, Gino M.

    2011-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections are used to treat (Achilles) tendinopathies. Platelet-rich plasma has been injected at different locations, but the feasibility of PRP injections and the distribution after injection have not been studied. To evaluate (1) the feasibility of ultrasound-guided PRP

  2. Augmented Repair of Degenerative Tears of Tendo Achilles Using Peroneus Brevis Tendon: Early Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawari Akhil A

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of degenerated ruptures of the tendoachilles is a challenge. Ruptured tendons and the remaining tendon ends are abnormal. A number of methods have been described in literature reconstruct the tendoachilles, but with variable results. We used peroneus brevis tendon in 20 patients to augment the repair of degenerated tendoachilles tears by creating a dynamic loop as described by Teuffer et al. All patients were followed up for atleast 18 months. At the last postoperative visit, 18 out of 20 patients were able to do a toe raise. Eighty-five per cent of patients had excellent or good results and 15% had fair or poor results using modified Rupp scoring. Advantages offered by this procedure are the use of a single incision and mini incision and use of a dispensable tendon such as the peroneus brevis without entirely depending on the damaged tendon for healing.

  3. Impact of combinatory growth factor application on rabbit Achilles tendon injury with operative versus conservative treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konerding, Moritz A; Arlt, Friederike; Wellmann, Axel; Li, Vincent; Li, William

    2010-02-01

    Acute Achilles tendon (AT) rupture is a common injury with a comparatively high complication rate. Presently, surgical treatments compete with nonoperative treatment modalities. The aim of this study was to elucidate the possible beneficial effects of short-term combinatory application of growth factors on tendon healing during operative or conservative treatment. In this controlled laboratory study, the left ATs of 40 adult New Zealand White rabbits were transected and either sutured or treated conservatively. Half of the animals from each treatment modality group repetitively received a mixture of VEGF165, bFGF, and rPDGF which was administered peritendineally. The left legs were immobilized with external fixateurs for 6 weeks. The ATs were harvested 3 months after intervention. Tensile strength tests revealed no significant differences between operative and conservative treatments. Compared to the normal right ATs, 60% of the average breaking strength was reached 3 months after surgery. Growth factor application did not result in significant improvements. Only a tendency towards higher blood vessel densities was noted in the groups treated with the factors. Collagen type I/III ratios also displayed no significant differences. This study indicates that there is no difference in the biomechanical outcome of conservative versus operative AT rupture treatment and only a marginal impact of short-term combinatory growth and angiogenesis factor application.

  4. Functional weight-bearing mobilization after Achilles tendon rupture enhances early healing response: a single-blinded randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkering, Kars P; Aufwerber, Susanna; Ranuccio, Francesco; Lunini, Enricomaria; Edman, Gunnar; Ackermann, Paul W

    2017-06-01

    Functional weight-bearing mobilization may improve repair of Achilles tendon rupture (ATR), but the underlying mechanisms and outcome were unknown. We hypothesized that functional weight-bearing mobilization by means of increased metabolism could improve both early and long-term healing. In this prospective randomized controlled trial, patients with acute ATR were randomized to either direct post-operative functional weight-bearing mobilization (n = 27) in an orthosis or to non-weight-bearing (n = 29) plaster cast immobilization. During the first two post-operative weeks, 15°-30° of plantar flexion was allowed and encouraged in the functional weight-bearing mobilization group. At 2 weeks, patients in the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group received a stiff orthosis, while the functional weight-bearing mobilization group continued with increased range of motion. At 6 weeks, all patients discontinued immobilization. At 2 weeks, healing metabolites and markers of procollagen type I (PINP) and III (PIIINP) were examined using microdialysis. At 6 and 12 months, functional outcome using heel-rise test was assessed. Healing tendons of both groups exhibited increased levels of metabolites glutamate, lactate, pyruvate, and of PIIINP (all p bearing mobilization group demonstrated significantly higher concentrations of glutamate compared to the non-weight-bearing cast immobilization group (p = 0.045).The upregulated glutamate levels were significantly correlated with the concentrations of PINP (r = 0.5, p = 0.002) as well as with improved functional outcome at 6 months (r = 0.4; p = 0.014). Heel-rise tests at 6 and 12 months did not display any differences between the two groups. Functional weight-bearing mobilization enhanced the early healing response of ATR. In addition, early ankle range of motion was improved without the risk of Achilles tendon elongation and without altering long-term functional outcome. The relationship between

  5. Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score at 3 months can predict patients' ability to return to sport 1 year after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Christensen, Marianne; Budolfsen, T

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate how the Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS) at 3 months and 1 year after injury is associated with a patient's ability to return to work and sports as well as to investigate whether sex and age influence ATRS after 3 months and 1 year. METHOD: This is a retrospective...... study analysing the data from the Danish Achilles tendon Database. A total of 366 patients were included. Logistic regression was conducted to describe the effect of ATRS on return to work and sports. The effect of age and sex on ATRS was analysed by linear regression. RESULTS: Three months after injury...... patients had a significantly increased chance of return to sport after 1 year with an increased ATRS (OR 1.06, p = 0.001) but a non-significant effect on return to work. After 1 year, patients had a significantly increased probability of having returned to sport (OR 1.11, p

  6. Venous thromboembolism rates in patients with lower limb immobilization after Achilles tendon injury are unchanged after the introduction of prophylactic aspirin: audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, I; Dunbar, L; Eathorne, A; Weatherall, M; Beasley, R

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: We audited venous thromboembolism (VTE) in Achilles injuries after the use of prophylactic aspirin. We audited 218 patients with Achilles injury requiring lower limb immobilization for ≥ 1 week. Fourteen patients (6.4%, 95% CI 3.6% to 10.5%) developed symptomatic and confirmed VTE. The incidence was similar to the 6.3% identified in the same patient group prior to the use of aspirin. We report a follow-up audit of the incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients requiring lower limb immobilization because of Achilles tendon injury, since the introduction of a policy to routinely prescribe 100 mg of aspirin daily. We studied 218 patients aged 18-65 years who attended the Orthopaedic Assessment Unit at Wellington Hospital between January 2013 and December 2014 with Achilles tendon injury requiring lower limb immobilization for ≥ 1 week. Information on assessment of VTE risk, prescription of aspirin and symptomatic VTE occurring within 70 days of immobilization was obtained and compared with the same information collected with the same method in the same patient group between January 2006 and December 2007, before the policy to routinely prescribe aspirin was introduced. A total of 189 of 218 (93%) patients were prescribed aspirin, as compared with 0.5% previously. Fourteen patients (6.4%, 95% confidence interval 3.6-10.5%) developed symptomatic radiologically confirmed VTE (10 distal deep vein thromboses [DVTs], two proximal DVTs, one pulmonary embolism [PE], and one PE with distal DVT). Aspirin was prescribed to all patients who subsequently developed a VTE; in one of 14, a recognized risk factor was documented. The VTE incidence was similar to the 6.3% identified in the previous audit. Lower limb immobilization following Achilles tendon injury confers a high risk of VTE even with aspirin prophylaxis. Consideration should be given to prophylaxis with low molecular weight heparin during lower limb immobilization following Achilles tendon

  7. Central pain processing is altered in people with Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompra, Nefeli; van Dieën, Jaap H; Coppieters, Michel W

    2016-08-01

    Tendinopathy is often a chronic condition. The mechanisms behind persistent tendon pain are not yet fully understood. It is unknown whether, similar to other persistent pain states, central pain mechanisms contribute to ongoing tendon pain. We investigated the presence of altered central pain processing in Achilles tendinopathy by assessing the conditioned pain modulation (CPM) effect in people with and without Achilles tendinopathy. 20 people with Achilles tendinopathy and 23 healthy volunteers participated in this cross-sectional study. CPM was assessed by the cold pressor test. The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was recorded over the Achilles tendon before and during immersion of the participant's hand into cold water. The CPM effect was quantified as the absolute difference in PPT before and during the cold pressor test. An increase in PPT was observed in the Achilles tendinopathy and control group during the cold pressor test (ptendinopathy group (mean difference=36.4 kPa, SD=68.1 kPa; ptendinopathy compared to people without Achilles tendinopathy. A reduced conditioned pain modulation effect reflects altered central pain processing which is believed to contribute to the persistence of pain in other conditions. Altered central pain processing may also be an important factor in persistent tendon pain that has traditionally been regarded to be dominated by peripheral mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  8. Value of quantitative MRI parameters in predicting and evaluating clinical outcome in conservatively treated patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsehaie, J; Poot, D H J; Oei, E H G; Verhaar, J A N; de Vos, R J

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate whether baseline MRI parameters provide prognostic value for clinical outcome, and to study correlation between MRI parameters and clinical outcome. Observational prospective cohort study. Patients with chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy were included and performed a 16-week eccentric calf-muscle exercise program. Outcome measurements were the validated Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) questionnaire and MRI parameters at baseline and after 24 weeks. The following MRI parameters were assessed: tendon volume (Volume), tendon maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), tendon maximum anterior-posterior diameter (AP), and signal intensity (SI). Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and minimum detectable changes (MDCs) for each parameter were established in a reliability analysis. Twenty-five patients were included and complete follow-up was achieved in 20 patients. The average VISA-A scores increased significantly with 12.3 points (27.6%). The reliability was fair-good for all MRI-parameters with ICCs>0.50. Average tendon volume and CSA decreased significantly with 0.28cm 3 (5.2%) and 4.52mm 2 (4.6%) respectively. Other MRI parameters did not change significantly. None of the baseline MRI parameters were univariately associated with VISA-A change after 24 weeks. MRI SI increase over 24 weeks was positively correlated with the VISA-A score improvement (B=0.7, R 2 =0.490, p=0.02). Tendon volume and CSA decreased significantly after 24 weeks of conservative treatment. As these differences were within the MDC limits, they could be a result of a measurement error. Furthermore, MRI parameters at baseline did not predict the change in symptoms, and therefore have no added value in providing a prognosis in daily clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Current evidence of extracorporeal shock wave therapy in chronic Achilles tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdesmeyer, Ludger; Mittermayr, Rainer; Fuerst, Martin; Al Muderis, Munjed; Thiele, Richard; Saxena, Amol; Gollwitzer, Hans

    2015-12-01

    Chronic Achilles tendinopathy has been described as the most common overuse injury in sports medicine. Several treatment modalities such as activity modification, heel lifts, arch supports, stretching exercises, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, and eccentric loading are known as standard treatment mostly without proven evidence. After failed conservative therapy, invasive treatment may be considered. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) has been successfully used in soft-tissue pathologies like lateral epicondylitis, plantar fasciitis, tendinopathy of the shoulder and also in bone and skin disorders. Conclusive evidence recommending ESWT as a treatment for Achilles tendinopathy is still lacking. In plantar fasciitis as well as in calcific shoulder tendinopathy shock wave therapy is recently the best evaluated treatment option. This article analysis the evidence based literature of ESWT in chronic Achilles tendinopathy. Recently published data have shown the efficacy of focused and radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. All rights reserved.

  10. Age related blood flow around the Achilles tendon during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Olesen, J; Skovgaard, D

    2001-01-01

    Injuries due to the overuse of tendons increase with age, and it has been suggested that this correlates with hypovascularity of the tendon. In the present study, the peritendinous blood flow was determined using xenon-133 washout at rest and during standardised intermittent exercise of the calf-...... that the peritendinous blood flow to the zone of the tendon with the highest incidence of injury from overuse is unaltered by age during exercise, and indicates that factors other than blood flow are important for the increased incidence with age of injuries from overuse.......Injuries due to the overuse of tendons increase with age, and it has been suggested that this correlates with hypovascularity of the tendon. In the present study, the peritendinous blood flow was determined using xenon-133 washout at rest and during standardised intermittent exercise of the calf......-muscle (1.5 s contraction, 1.5 s rest, 40 min) in young (n = 6; 26 years), middle-aged (n = 6; 48 years), and older (n = 6; 74 years) individuals. At rest, the older individuals had a lower peritendinous blood flow compared with the two other age groups. During exercise, blood flow in all three groups rose...

  11. Long-term follow-up after tibialis anterior tendon shortening in combination with Achilles tendon lengthening in spastic equinus in cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kläusler, Michèle; Speth, Bernhard Maria; Brunner, Reinald; Tirosh, Oren; Camathias, Carlo; Rutz, Erich

    2017-10-01

    Using Tibialis Anterior Shortening (TATS) in combination with Achilles Tendon Lengthening (TAL) to treat spastic equinus in children with cerebral palsy (CP) was described in 2011. Short-term results have indicated a good outcome, especially an improvement of the drop foot in swing phase and the correction of equinus in stance phase. The aim of this study was to analyse the results of the long-term follow-up and to determine the relapse rate of TATS and TAL. The kinematics of the sagittal, frontal and transversal planes were measured by using instrumented 3D gait analysis at three defined time points and then described using the Gait Profile Score (GPS) and Movement Analysis Profile (MAP). The data was exported into Gaitabase and then the preoperative (T0), short- term (T1) and long-term (T2) follow-up data was statistically compared. 23 patients (mean age at index-surgery=14.9years) were included, there was a mean follow-up time of 5.8 years. 3 children (13%) have shown a relapse. The data of 12 children with spastic hemiplegia (12 legs), as well as 8 children with spastic diplegia (10 legs) has been analysed. There has been a significant (pchildren with CP. Postoperatively all subjects were able to walk without an AFO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of TGF-β inhibition during acute exercise on Achilles tendon extracellular matrix

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potter, Ross M; Huynh, Richard T; Volper, Brent D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of TGF-β1 in regulating tendon extracellular matrix after acute exercise. Wistar rats exercised (n = 15) on a treadmill for four consecutive days (60 min/day) or maintained normal cage activity. After each exercise bout, the peritendinous space o...... suggest that TGF-β1 signaling is necessary for the regulation of tendon cross-link formation, as well as collagen and LOX gene transcription in an exercise-dependent manner....

  13. Influence of intramuscular fiber orientation on the Achilles tendon curvature using three-dimensional finite element modeling of contracting skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugasa, Ryuta; Yamamura, Naoto; Sinha, Shantanu; Takagi, Shu

    2016-10-03

    Tendon curvature plays a key role in mechanical gain (amplifying the joint excursion relative to fiber length change) during joint motion, but the mechanism remains unresolved. A three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was used to investigate the influence of intramuscular fiber orientation upon the curvature pattern of the Achilles tendon during active muscular contraction. Two simulation models, with fiber pennation angles of θ = 25° and 47° were tested for the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles. A smaller pennation angle (25°) of the soleus muscle fibers was accompanied by a large change in curvature whereas a larger pennation angle (47°) of the soleus muscle was accompanied by small effects. These results suggest that the fiber pennation angle determines the curvature of the tendon, and the magnitude of the curvature varies along the length of the aponeurosis. Such FE modeling has the potential of determining changes in force output consequent to changes in intramuscular fiber orientation arising from resistance training or unloading, and provides mechanism for predicting the risk of Achilles tendon ruptures. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heel-Rise Height Deficit 1 Year After Achilles Tendon Rupture Relates to Changes in Ankle Biomechanics 6 Years After Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Annelie; Willy, Richard W; Tranberg, Roy; Grävare Silbernagel, Karin

    2017-11-01

    It is unknown whether the height of a heel-rise performed in the single-leg standing heel-rise test 1 year after an Achilles tendon rupture (ATR) correlates with ankle biomechanics during walking, jogging, and jumping in the long-term. To explore the differences in ankle biomechanics, tendon length, calf muscle recovery, and patient-reported outcomes at a mean of 6 years after ATR between 2 groups that, at 1-year follow-up, had less than 15% versus greater than 30% differences in heel-rise height. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Seventeen patients with less than 15% (30% group) side-to-side difference in heel-rise height at 1 year after ATR were evaluated at a mean (SD) 6.1 (2.0) years after their ATR. Ankle kinematics and kinetics were sampled via standard motion capture procedures during walking, jogging, and jumping. Patient-reported outcome was evaluated with Achilles tendon Total Rupture Score (ATRS), Physical Activity Scale (PAS), and Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS). Tendon length was evaluated by ultrasonography. The Limb Symmetry Index (LSI = [Injured Side ÷ Healthy Side] × 100) was calculated for side differences. The >30% group had significantly more deficits in ankle kinetics during all activities compared with patients in the 30% group, compared with the <15% group, also had significantly lower values in heel-rise height (LSI, 72% and 95%, respectively; P < .001) and heel-rise work (LSI, 58% and 91%, respectively; P < .001) and significantly larger side-to-side difference in tendon length (114% and 106%, respectively; P = .012). Achilles tendon length correlated with ankle kinematic variables ( r = 0.38-0.44; P = .015-.027) whereas heel-rise work correlated with kinetic variables ( r = -0.57 to 0.56; P = .001-.047). LSI tendon length correlated negatively with LSI heel-rise height ( r = -0.41; P = .018). No differences were found between groups in patient-reported outcome ( P = .143-.852). Height obtained during the single-leg standing heel

  15. Collagen fibril size and crimp morphology in ruptured and intact Achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, S P; Qvortrup, K; Larsen, Jytte Overgaard

    2002-01-01

    density and diameter distribution of fibrils were analyzed using stereological techniques of digitized electron microscopy biopsy cross-sections, while crimp angle was measured by the changing banding pattern of collagen fibers when rotated between crossed polars. Nine of 10 persons with tendon ruptures...

  16. Evidence of accumulated stress in Achilles and anterior knee tendons in elite badminton players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Boesen, Morten Ilum; Koenig, Merete Juhl

    2011-01-01

    Tendon-related injuries are a major problem, but the aetiology of tendinopathies is unknown. In tendinopathies as well as during unaccustomed loading, intra-tendinous flow can be detected indicating that extensive loading can provoke intra-tendinous flow. The aim of present study is to evaluate t...

  17. Microtrauma stimulates rat Achilles tendon healing via an early gene expression pattern similar to mechanical loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerman, Malin; Aspenberg, Per; Eliasson, Pernilla

    2014-01-01

    . Sixteen of the 19 genes were regulated after 3 h, in the same way as after loading. In conclusion, needling increased strength, and there was a striking similarity between the gene expression response to needling and mechanical loading. This suggests that the response to loading in early tendon healing...

  18. Eccentric overload training in patients with a chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. H.M. Wittink; R. de Knikker; T. Takken; J.J. Kingma

    2007-01-01

    Background: Eccentric overload training seems to be a promising conservative intervention in patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The efficacy of eccentric overload training on the outcome measures of pain and physical functioning are not exactly clear. Study design: Systematic review of the

  19. Magnetization transfer in human achilles tendon assessed by a 3D ultrashort echo time sequence. Quantitative examinations in healthy volunteers at 3T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syha, R.; Grosse, U.; Springer, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Martirosian, P.; Schick, F. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Section on Experimental Radiology; Ketelsen, D.; Claussen, C.D. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2011-11-15

    Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) imaging provides insight into interactions between free and bounded water. Newly developed ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequences implemented on whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) scanners allow MTC imaging in tissues with extremely fast signal decay such as tendons. The aim of this study was to develop a technique for the quantification of the MT effect in healthy Achilles tendons in-vivo at 3 Tesla. 16 normal tendons of volunteers with no history of tendinopathy were examined using a 3D-UTE sequence with a rectangular on-resonant excitation pulse and a Fermi-shaped off-resonant MT preparation pulse. The frequency of the MT pulse was varied from 1 to 5 kHz. MT effects were calculated in terms of the MT ratio (MTR) between measurements without and with MT preparation. Direct saturation effects of MT preparation on the signal intensity were evaluated using numerical simulation of Bloch equations. One patient with tendinopathy was examined to exemplarily show changes of MTR under pathologic conditions. Calculation of MTR data was feasible in all examined tendons and showed a decrease from 0.53 {+-} 0.05 to 0.25 {+-} 0.03 (1 kHz to 5 kHz) for healthy volunteers. Evaluation of variation with gender and dominance of ankle revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05). In contrast, the patient with confirmed tendinopathy showed MTR values between 0.36 (1 kHz) and 0.19 (5 kHz). MT effects in human Achilles tendons can be reliably assessed in-vivo using a 3D UTE sequence at 3 T. All healthy tendons showed similar MTR values (coefficient of variation 10.0 {+-} 1.2 %). The examined patient showed a clearly different MT effect revealing a changed microstructure in the case of tendinopathy. (orig.)

  20. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G.; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. PMID:27635037

  1. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model - wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier Bürgisser, Gabriella; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bachmann, Elias; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G; Giovanoli, Pietro; Buschmann, Johanna

    2016-09-15

    After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization), or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization), while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks) a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011), and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points). Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Rabbit Achilles tendon full transection model – wound healing, adhesion formation and biomechanics at 3, 6 and 12 weeks post-surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Meier Bürgisser

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available After tendon rupture repair, two main problems may occur: re-rupture and adhesion formation. Suitable non-murine animal models are needed to study the healing tendon in terms of biomechanical properties and extent of adhesion formation. In this study 24 New Zealand White rabbits received a full transection of the Achilles tendon 2 cm above the calcaneus, sutured with a 4-strand Becker suture. Post-surgical analysis was performed at 3, 6 and 12 weeks. In the 6-week group, animals received a cast either in a 180 deg stretched position during 6 weeks (adhesion provoking immobilization, or were re-casted with a 150 deg position after 3 weeks (adhesion inhibiting immobilization, while in the other groups (3 and 12 weeks a 180 deg position cast was applied for 3 weeks. Adhesion extent was analyzed by histology and ultrasound. Histopathological scoring was performed according to a method by Stoll et al. (2011, and the main biomechanical properties were assessed. Histopathological scores increased as a function of time, but did not reach values of healthy tendons after 12 weeks (only around 15 out of 20 points. Adhesion provoking immobilization led to an adhesion extent of 82.7±9.7%, while adhesion inhibiting immobilization led to 31.9±9.8% after 6 weeks. Biomechanical properties increased over time, however, they did not reach full strength nor elastic modulus at 12 weeks post-operation. Furthermore, the rabbit Achilles tendon model can be modulated in terms of adhesion formation to the surrounding tissue. It clearly shows the different healing stages in terms of histopathology and offers a suitable model regarding biomechanics because it exhibits similar biomechanics as the human flexor tendons of the hand.

  3. Application of porous-media theory to the investigation of water ADC changes in rabbit Achilles tendon caused by tensile loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J.; Helmer, K. G.; Grigg, P.; Sotak, C. H.

    2004-09-01

    The water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in rabbit Achilles tendon is anisotropic, diffusion-time dependent, and changes as a function of tensile load. Water ADC changes of tendon under mechanical load are thought to be due to the extrusion of water from the more restricted tendon core to a relatively unrestricted bulk phase at the periphery (rim) of the tendon. Tensile loading may influence water ADC values by changing the spatial separation of restricting barriers (e.g., increasing the tendon fibril packing density). To explore this issue, we have applied porous-media theory to the investigation of water ADC changes in rabbit Achilles tendon under two different mechanical loading conditions (a baseline condition with a minimal tensile stress and a second in which the tensile stress was approximately 1 MPa). Diffusion sensitivity was applied in directions parallel and perpendicular to the long axis of the tendon. The short diffusion-time behavior of the resulting time-dependent ADC curves was used to indirectly infer information regarding the average surface area to volume ratio of the space available for molecular diffusion. From these values, we estimated a 40% reduction in volume available for diffusion in the perpendicular direction after tensile loading, but only a 10% reduction in the parallel direction. These differences are consistent with the known geometry of the tendon microstructure and suggest an increase in fibril packing density upon loading. The long diffusion-time behavior of the time-dependent ADC curves was used to indirectly infer the tortuosity of the diffusion pathways through the interstitial space. The tortuosity in the direction perpendicular to the tendon long axis was approximately 2.5 times greater than that in the parallel direction. Stimulated-echo measurement of the ADC values at longer diffusion times resulted in T1 spin editing of water with shorter T1 values (and correspondingly lower ADC values). The resulting increase in

  4. Achilles Tendon Penetration for Continuous 810 nm and Superpulsed 904 nm Lasers Before and After Ice Application: An In Situ Study on Healthy Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerud, Sturla; Naterstad, Ingvill Fjell; Bjordal, Jan Magnus; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Alvaro Brandão; Magnussen, Liv Heide; Leonardo, Patrícia Sardinha; Marques, Ricardo Henrique; Joensen, Jon

    2017-10-01

    There is a lack of knowledge about the influence tissue temperature may have on laser light penetration and tendon structure. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether penetration of laser energy in human Achilles tendons differed before and after ice pack application. The Achilles tendons (n = 54) from 27 healthy young adults were irradiated with two class 3B lasers (810 nm 200 mW continuous mode laser and a 904 nm 60 mW superpulsed mode laser). The optical energy penetrating the Achilles area was measured before and after 20 min of ice application. Measurements were obtained after 30, 60, and 120 sec irradiation with the 904 nm laser and after 30 and 60 sec irradiation with the 810 nm laser. Achilles tendon thickness was measured with ultrasonography. Optical energy penetration increased significantly (p lasers and at all time points from 0.34% to 0.39% of energy before ice application to 0.43-0.52% of energy after ice application for the 904 nm laser and from 0.24% to 0.25% of energy before ice application to 0.30-0.31% of energy after ice application for the 810 nm laser. The energy loss per centimeter of irradiated tissue was significantly higher (p laser light increased significantly through healthy Achilles tendons subjected to 20 min of cooling. These findings occurred in the presence of a significant reduction in skin temperature and Achilles tendon thickness.

  5. Acute Achilles tendon rupture: Mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop suture vs. open repair with modified Kessler suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chongyang; Qu, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury of the foot and ankle. However, the optimal treatment strategy for Achilles tendon rupture is still not established. This study was conducted to compare the efficacy and complications of mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures and open repair with modified Kessler sutures. We evaluated data from 60 patients with acute closed Achilles tendon ruptures who underwent mini-incision repair with double-Tsuge loop sutures (n = 30) or open repair with modified Kessler sutures (n = 30) from 2006 to 2010 in an ongoing prospective study conducted by us and have finished at least 18-month follow-up or finished the study. The AOFAS Ankle-Hindfoot score, ATRS, maximal ankle range of motion and the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation were recorded to compare the efficacy. The complications were also evaluated. During a mean follow-up of 25 months after surgery, the time to achieve 20 continuous single heel raises after operation of patients in Group Mini was significantly shorter than patients in Group Open. Moreover, the mini-incision with double-Tsuge repair was associated with a significantly shorter operating time, smaller incision length, and lower rate of complications. The mini-incision with double-Tsuge suture method in our study was shown to provide earlier strength recovery, as well as shorter operation time, less complications and improved cosmetic appearance. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary gene response to mechanical loading in healing rat Achilles tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eliasson, Pernilla; Andersson, Therese; Hammerman, Malin

    2013-01-01

    testing, microarray, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Mechanical testing showed that 5 min of loading each day for 4 days created stronger tissue. The microarray analysis after one loading episode identified 15 regulated genes. Ten genes were analyzed in a repeat experiment...... with new rats using qRT-PCR. This confirmed the increased expression of four genes: early growth response 2 (Egr2), c-Fos, FosB, and regulation of G protein signaling 1 (Rgs1). The other genes were unaltered. We also analyzed the expression of early growth response 1 (Egr1), which is often co......-regulated with c-Fos or Egr2, and found that this was also increased after loading. Egr1, Egr2, c-Fos, and FosB are transcription factors that can be triggered by numerous stimuli. However, Egr1 and Egr2 are necessary for normal tendon development, and can induce ectopic expression of tendon markers. The five...

  7. Post-surgical care of a professional ballet dancer following calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobsar, Bradley; Alcantara, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The extraordinary physical demands placed upon ballet dancers are only now being appreciated as comparable to that of other highly competitive athletic pursuits. The professional ballet dancer presents with an array of injuries associated with their physically vigorous performance requirements. In keeping with evidence-based practice, we describe the chiropractic care of a professional ballet dancer following surgical calcaneal exostectomy and debridement with re-attachment of the left Achilles tendon. The care provided involves an array of modalities from exercise and rehabilitation to spinal manipulative therapy. PMID:19421349

  8. Soleus Atrophy Is Common After the Nonsurgical Treatment of Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures: A Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Surgical and Nonsurgical Functional Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Juuso; Lantto, Iikka; Flinkkila, Tapio; Ohtonen, Pasi; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Siira, Pertti; Laine, Vesa; Leppilahti, Juhana

    2017-05-01

    It remains controversial whether nonsurgical or surgical treatment provides better calf muscle strength recovery after an acute Achilles tendon rupture (ATR). Recent evidence has suggested that surgery might surpass nonsurgical treatment in restoring strength after an ATR. To assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings could explain calf muscle strength deficits and the difference between nonsurgical and surgical treatments in restoring calf muscle strength. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. From 2009 to 2013, 60 patients with acute ATRs were randomized to surgery or nonsurgical treatment with an identical rehabilitation protocol. The primary outcome measure was the volume of calf muscles assessed using MRI at 3 and 18 months. The secondary outcome measures included fatty degeneration of the calf muscles and length of the affected Achilles tendon. Additionally, isokinetic plantarflexion strength was measured in both legs. At 3 months, the study groups showed no differences in muscle volumes or fatty degeneration. However, at 18 months, the mean differences between affected and healthy soleus muscle volumes were 83.2 cm 3 (17.7%) after surgery and 115.5 cm 3 (24.8%) after nonsurgical treatment (difference between means, 33.1 cm 3 ; 95% CI, 1.3-65.0; P = .042). The study groups were not substantially different in the volumes or fatty degeneration of other muscles. From 3 to 18 months, compensatory hypertrophy was detected in the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) and deep flexors in both groups. In the nonsurgical treatment group, the mean difference between affected and healthy FHL muscle volumes was -9.3 cm 3 (12%) and in the surgical treatment group was -8.4 cm 3 (10%) ( P ≤ .001). At 18 months, Achilles tendons were, on average, 19 mm longer in patients treated nonsurgically compared with patients treated surgically ( P atrophy (ρ = 0.449-0.611; P atrophy compared with surgical treatment. The mean Achilles tendon length was 19 mm longer

  9. Synthesis, characterization and histomorphometric analysis of cellular response to a new elastic DegraPol® polymer for rabbit Achilles tendon rupture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Calcagni, Maurizio; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Neuenschwander, Peter; Milleret, Vincent; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Tendon rupture repair is a surgical field where improvements are still required due to problems such as repeat ruptures, adhesion formation and joint stiffness. In the current study, a reversibly expandable and contractible electrospun tube based on a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer was implanted around a transected and conventionally sutured rabbit Achilles tendon. The material used was DegraPol® (DP), a polyester urethane. To make DP softer, more elastic and surgeon-friendly, the synthesis protocol was slightly modified. Material properties of conventional and new DP film electrospun meshes are presented. At 12 weeks post-surgery, tenocyte and tenoblast density, nuclei and width, collagen fibre structure and inflammation levels were analyzed histomorphometrically. Additionally, a comprehensive histological scoring system by Stoll et al. (2011) was used to compare healing outcomes. Results showed that there were no adverse reactions of the tendon tissue following the implant. No differences were found whether the DP tube was applied or not for both traditional and new DP materials. As a result, the new DP material was shown to be an excellent carrier for delivery of growth factors, stem cells and other agents responsible for tendon healing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Temporal and spatial expression of TGF-beta1 in an Achilles tendon section model after application of platelet-rich plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyras, Dimitrios N; Kazakos, Konstantinos; Tryfonidis, Marios; Agrogiannis, George; Botaitis, Sotirios; Kokka, Anna; Drosos, George; Tilkeridis, Konstantinos; Verettas, Dionysios

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on TGF-beta1 expression during tendon healing. We used 48 skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits. 24 rabbits received the PRP, and 24 rabbits served as an untreated control group. Equal numbers of animals were sacrificed at 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th week. The surgical procedure involved a transverse incision to transect the Achilles tendon. A volume of 1ml of PRP was then injected into the tendon mass in the PRP group. Histological and immunohistochemical evaluations with an anti-TGF-beta primary antibody were performed. The pattern of expression of TGF-beta1 in the PRP group was characterized by a significant upregulation during the first 2 weeks and subsequently significant downregulation in the 3rd and 4th week in comparison with the controls. Our results suggest that PRP may affect the tendon healing process by altering the expression of TGF-beta1. Copyright (c) 2009 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cellular response of healing tissue to DegraPol tube implantation in rabbit Achilles tendon rupture repair: an in vivo histomorphometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Meier-Bürgisser, Gabriella; Bonavoglia, Eliana; Neuenschwander, Peter; Milleret, Vincent; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2013-05-01

    In tendon rupture repair, improvements such as higher primary repair strength, anti-adhesion and accelerated healing are needed. We developed a potential carrier system of an electrospun DegraPol tube, which was tightly implanted around a transected and conventionally sutured rabbit Achilles tendon. Histomorphometric analysis of the tendon tissue 12 weeks postoperation showed that the tenocyte density, tenocyte morphology and number of inflammation zones were statistically equivalent, whether or not DegraPol tube was implanted; only the collagen fibres were slightly less parallelly orientated in the tube-treated case. Comparison of rabbits that were operated on both hind legs with ones that were operated on only one hind leg showed that there were significantly more inflammation zones in the two-leg cases compared to the one-leg cases, while the implantation of a DegraPol tube had no such adverse effects. These findings are a prerequisite for using DegraPol tube as a carrier system for growth factors, cytokines or stem cells in order to accelerate the healing process of tendon tissue. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Optimization image of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) T2 fast spin echo (FSE) with variation echo train length (ETL) on the rupture tendon achilles case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzamil, Akhmad; Haries Firmansyah, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    The research was done the optimization image of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) T2 Fast Spin Echo (FSE) with variation Echo Train Length (ETL) on the Rupture Tendon Achilles case. This study aims to find the variations Echo Train Length (ETL) from the results of ankle’s MRI image and find out how the value of Echo Train Length (ETL) works on the MRI ankle to produce optimal image. In this research, the used ETL variations were 12 and 20 with the interval 2 on weighting T2 FSE sagittal. The study obtained the influence of Echo Train Length (ETL) on the quality of ankle MRI image sagittal using T2 FSE weighting and analyzed in 25 images of five patients. The data analysis has done quantitatively with the Region of Interest (ROI) directly on computer MRI image planes which conducted statistical tests Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR). The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) was the highest finding on fat tissue, while the Contras to Noise Ratio (CNR) on the Tendon-Fat tissue with ETL 12 found in two patients. The statistics test showed the significant SNR value of the 0.007 (pTendon tissue, 0.364 (p>0.05) of the Fat, 0.912 (p>0.05) of the Fibula, and 0.436 (p>0.05) of the Heel Bone. For the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) of the Tendon-FAT tissue was about 0.041 (p>0.05). The results of the study showed that ETL variation with T2 FSE sagittal weighting had difference at Tendon tissue and Tendon-Fat tissue for MRI imaging quality. SNR and CNR were an important aspect on imaging optimization process to give the diagnose information.

  13. Evaluation of low-level laser therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and their combination on the healing of Achilles tendon in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdi, Amin; Sharifi, Davood; Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Khansari, Mohammadreza; Dorbeh, Shahab Sarrout

    2015-05-01

    Tendon repair is still one of the challenges for rehabilitation. Various treatments for tendon injuries have been used in recent decade. This study was established to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment alone, and using combined method on the healing of Achilles tendon in rabbits. Seventy-two healthy mature male white New Zealand rabbits were divided randomly into four groups of 18 animals each: control: partial tenotomy with no treatment, only 1 mL normal saline was injected on days 1, 8, and 15 at the site of splitting; PRP: partial tenotomy with PRP treatment on days 1, 8, and 15 at the site of splitting; LLLT: partial tenotomy with LLLT (K30 hand-held probe, AZOR, Technica, Russia, 650 nm, 30 mW, surface area = 1 cm(2), 60 S/cm(2), energy density = 1.8 J/cm(2)) for 15 consecutive days; LLLT + PRP: partial tenotomy with LLLT + PRP. At the end of trial, the rabbits were euthanatized and tendon specimens were harvested and were submitted for histopathological evaluation, hydroxyproline levels, and biomechanical measurement. The Tukey post hoc test was performed. The results for these parameters showed that PRP or LLLT alone has significant advantages over untreated animals (P  0.05) between the two groups of LLLT and PRP. However, the treatments combining PRP and LLLT showed significant results in comparison of PRP or LLLT alone (P tendon decreases by using the two therapies combined.

  14. Can Achilles tendon be used as a new distal landmark for coronal tibial component alignment in total knee replacement surgery? An observational MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiftikçi U

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uğur Tiftikçi,1 Sancar Serbest,1 Veysel Burulday2 1Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, 2Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kırıkkale University, Kırıkkale, Turkey Background: In total knee arthroplasty, it is better to use more than one reference point for correct alignment of the components. By measuring the distances of Achilles tendon (AT and other conventional landmarks from the mechanical axis in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of the ankle, we aimed to demonstrate that, as a novel landmark which can help for correct alignment in the coronal plane, AT is a better option than other landmarks. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was done on 53 ankle MRIs that met the criteria for inclusion to the study among 158 ankle MRIs. After identification of the mechanical axis, the distances of distal landmarks, which were extensor hallucis longus tendon (EHLT, tibialis anterior tendon (TAT, dorsalis pedis artery (DPA, AT, extensor digitorum longus tendon (EDLT, and malleoli, were measured from the mechanical axis and were statistically evaluated. Results: In proximal measurements, the distances of the landmarks to the mechanical axis (on average were AT, 2.64±1.62 mm lateral; EHLT, 3.89±2.45 mm medial; DPA, 4.69±2.39 mm medial; TAT, 8.24±3.60 mm medial; and EDLT, 14.2±4.14 mm lateral (P<0.001. In distal measurements, the distances of the landmarks to the mechanical axis (on average were AT, 1.99±1.24 mm medial; EHLT, 4.27±2.49 mm medial; DPA, 4.79±2.10 mm medial; TAT, 12.9±4.07 mm medial; and EDLT, 12.18±4.17 mm lateral (P<0.001. Conclusion: In this study, the mechanical axis line, which is the center of talus, passes through the AT. Our MRI investigations showed that the AT, EHLT, DPA, and malleolar center (3–5 mm medial may help in correct alignment. Keywords: total knee arthroplasty, tibial component, alignment, distal references, landmark, MRI, Achilles tendon

  15. Effectiveness of xenogenous-based bovine-derived platelet gel embedded within a three-dimensional collagen implant on the healing and regeneration of the Achilles tendon defect in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineering is an option in reconstructing large tendon defects and managing their healing and regeneration. We designed and produced a novel xenogeneic-based bovine platelet, embedded it within a tissue-engineered collagen implant (CI) and applied it in an experimentally induced large tendon defect model in rabbits to test whether bovine platelets could stimulate tendon healing and regeneration in vivo. One hundred twenty rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental and pilot groups. In all the animals, the left Achilles tendon was surgically excised and the tendon edges were aligned by Kessler suture. Each group was then divided into three groups of control (no implant), treated with CI and treated with collagen-platelet implant. The pilot groups were euthanized at 10, 15, 30 and 40 days post-injury (DPI), and their gross and histologic characteristics were evaluated to study host-graft interaction mechanism. To study the tendon healing and its outcome, the experimental animals were tested during the experiment using hematologic, ultrasonographic and various methods of clinical examinations and then euthanized at 60 DPI and their tendons were evaluated by gross pathologic, histopathologic, scanning electron microscopic, biophysical and biochemical methods. Bovine platelets embedded within a CI increased inflammation at short term while it increased the rate of implant absorption and matrix replacement compared with the controls and CI alone. Treatment also significantly increased diameter, density, amount, alignment and differentiation of the collagen fibrils and fibers and approximated the water uptake and delivery behavior of the healing tendons to normal contralaterals (p tendons and reduced peritendinous adhesion, muscle fibrosis and atrophy, and therefore, it improved the clinical scores and physical activity related to the injured limb when compared with the controls (p Achilles tendon in rabbit. This strategy may be a valuable option in the

  16. Effect of position, time in the season, and playing surface on Achilles tendon ruptures in NFL games: a 2009-10 to 2016-17 review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Michael K; Borchers, James R; Hoffman, Joshua T; Krill, Matthew L; Hewett, Timothy E

    2017-09-01

    Achilles tendon (AT) ruptures are a potentially career-altering and ending injury. Achilles tendon ruptures have a below average return-to-play rate compared to other common orthopaedic procedures for National Football League (NFL) players. The objective of this study was to monitor the incidence and injury rates (IR) of AT ruptures that occurred during the regular season in order to evaluate the influence of player position, time of injury, and playing surface on rupture rates. A thorough online review was completed to identify published injury reports and public information regarding AT ruptures sustained during regular season and post-season games in the National Football League (NFL) during the 2009-10 to 2016-17 seasons. Team schedules, player position details and stadium information was used to determine period of the season of injury and playing surface. IRs were calculated per 100 team games (TG). Injury rate ratios (IRR) were utilized to compare IRs. During eight monitored seasons, there were 44 AT ruptures in NFL games. A majority of AT ruptures were sustained in the first eight games of the regular season (n = 32, 72.7%). There was a significant rate difference for the first and second four-game segments of the regular season compared to the last two four-game segments of the regular season. Defensive players suffered a majority of AT ruptures (n = 32, 72.7%). The IR on grass was 1.00 per 100 TG compared to 1.08 per 100 TG on artificial turf (IRR: 0.93, p = .80). A significant increase in AT ruptures occurred in the first and second four game segments of the regular season compared to the last two-four game segments of the regular season. Defensive players suffered a majority of AT ruptures compared to offensive or specialist players. There was no difference between AT rupture rates and playing surface in games.

  17. Achilles Tendon Rupture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sudden starts and stops — such as soccer, basketball and tennis. Steroid injections. Doctors sometimes inject steroids ... or slippery surfaces. Dress properly for cold-weather training, and wear well-fitting athletic shoes with proper ...

  18. Effect of High-Volume Injection, Platelet-Rich Plasma, and Sham Treatment in Chronic Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Anders Ploug; Hansen, Rudi; Boesen, Morten Ilum

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Injection therapies are often considered alongside exercise for chronic midportion Achilles tendinopathy (AT), although evidence of their efficacy is sparse. PURPOSE: To determine whether eccentric training in combination with high-volume injection (HVI) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP...

  19. Small hook thread (Quill) and soft felt internal splint to increase the primary repair strength of lacerated rabbit Achilles tendons: biomechanical analysis and considerations for hand surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Feldman, Kirill; Tervoort, Theo A; Fessel, Gion; Snedeker, Jess G; Giovanoli, Pietro; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2011-07-01

    For the prevention of re-rupture during early healing phase, the primary repair strength of repaired lacerated tendons in hand surgery should be maximal and the reconstructed diameter minimal. Two new repair methods (small hook thread and internal splint) were assessed for strength and reconstructed diameter characteristics. Achilles tendons of 43 female New Zealand White rabbits were sectioned 2 cm above the calcaneus. Specimens were divided into 7 groups and repaired as follows: Kirchmayr method 2-strand with 4.0 polypropylene thread; Becker method 4-strand; 6-strand; internal splint; Kirchmayr method small hook 2-strand; Becker method small hook 4-strand, non-modified tendon. Load until failure, load until gap formation, gap length, cross-sectional area and failure stress were determined. The small hook 2-strand suture had 1.3 fold higher loads until failure compared to a conventional 2-strand suture, P<0.05. The internal splint had a similar load until failure (22 N (SD 6)) as the conventional 2-strand suture (23 N (SD 4)); around half the load until failure of the conventional 4-strand suture (38 N (SD 9)). Load until gap formation correlated positively with load until failure (y=0.65+3.6; r(2)=0.72). The running suture increased the cross-sectional area at the repair site by a factor of 1.3. Using a small hook thread instead of a 4.0 polypropylene thread significantly increases the primary repair strength with the same number of strands. Internal splints may be an alternative to conventional 2-strand sutures for bridging large gaps. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spatial characterization of T1 and T2 relaxation times and the water apparent diffusion coefficient in rabbit Achilles tendon subjected to tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J; Helmer, K G; Grigg, P; Sotak, C H

    2005-03-01

    Tendons exhibit viscoelastic mechanical behavior under tensile loading. The elasticity arises from the collagen chains that form fibrils, while the viscous response arises from the interaction of the water with the solid matrix. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of water in response to the application of a load is crucial to the understanding of the origin of the viscous response. Three-dimensional MRI mapping of rabbit Achilles tendons was performed at 2.0 T to characterize the response of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water to tensile loading. The ADC was measured in directions both parallel (ADC( parallel)) and perpendicular (ADC( perpendicular)) to the long axis of the tendon. At a short diffusion time (5.8 ms) MR parameter maps showed the existence of two regions, here termed "core" and "rim", that exhibited statistically significant differences in T(1), T(2), and ADC( perpendicular) under the baseline loading condition. MR parameter maps were also generated at a second loading condition of approximately 1 MPa. At a diffusion time of 5.8 ms, there was a statistically significant increase in the rim region for both ADC( perpendicular) (57.5%) and ADC( parallel) (20.5%) upon tensile loading. The changes in core ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)), as well as the relaxation parameters in both core and rim regions, were not statistically significant. The effect of diffusion time on the ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values was investigated by creating maps at three additional diffusion times (50.0, 125.0, 250.0 ms) using a diffusion-weighted, stimulated-echo (DW-STE) pulse sequence. At longer diffusion times, ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values increased rather than approaching a constant value. This observation was attributed to T(1) spin-editing during the DW-STE pulse sequence, which resulted in the loss of short-T(1) components (with correspondingly lower ADCs) at longer diffusion times

  1. 2D motion analysis of rabbits after Achilles tendon rupture repair and histological analysis of extracted tendons: can the number of animals be reduced by operating both hind legs simultaneously?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Johanna; Müller, Angela; Nicholls, Flora; Achermann, Rita; Bürgisser, Gabriella Meier; Baumgartner, Walter; Calcagni, Maurizio; Giovanoli, Pietro

    2013-10-01

    Considering the 3Rs principle in animal experiments, there is a demand to perform research experiments with the fewest number of animals possible while warranting the welfare of the animals. Orthopaedic experimental studies involving operations on the hind legs of rabbits are either performed on one hind leg with the second hind leg serving as control or on both hind legs simultaneously (control: rabbits with no operations at all). The Achilles tendon of rabbits was transected and sutured, and the two-dimensional motion pattern of animals having only one leg operated was compared to rabbits having both hind legs operated (control: non-treated animals). Step length, maximum ankle angle, minimum ankle angle and the resulting range of motion of both hind legs were determined weekly over a time span from 3 weeks to 12 weeks post-operation. The results were fitted by a linear mixed effects model including time dependency. Moreover, all tendon specimen were analysed histologically. Tenocyte and tenoblast density, tenocyte and tenoblast nuclei width, inflammation level and collagen fibre alignment were determined. Statistically significant differences in the motion pattern were found when one-leg treated and two-leg treated animals were compared. However, the absolute differences were on average less than 20%. Histologically, 1-leg treated animals had tendon tissue with higher cell density, but lower inflammation and less ondulated collagen fibres compared to 2-leg treated animals; the nuclei width was the same for both groups. With regard to welfare, all animals were fine during the experiments. While comparative studies should be performed with one-leg treated animals due to interaction effects, for proof-of-principle studies, operating two legs per animal may be justified as the welfare of the animals is warranted. This is a great benefit in the sense of the 3Rs because up to 50% of animals can be spared. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therapy of the Achilles Tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Achilles Tendinitis Methods : From 4th August, 2008 to 14th August, 2008, 1 female patient diagnosed as Chronic Achilles Tendinitis (clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results : The patient's chief complaints- Lt. heel pain and stiffness, dorsi-flexion limitation, nodules in the achilles tendon- were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of achilles tendinitis. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  3. Gastrocnemius fascicle and achilles tendon length at the end of the eccentric phase in a single and multiple countermovement hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidstone, Daniel E; van Werkhoven, Herman; Needle, Alan R; Rice, Paige E; McBride, Jeffrey M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare fascicle and tendon length of the gastrocnemius at the end of the eccentric phase during a hop utilizing a single countermovement (sCM) versus multiple countermovement (mCM1, mCM2, mCM3) strategy. Seventeen healthy males performed nine hopping trials of sCM and nine trials of mCM. Ankle and knee joint angle and lower leg length from videography and muscle ultrasound were used to calculate muscle-tendon unit (MTU), fascicle and tendon length. Sacral marker data was used to determine hopping height. Force- and displacement-time curves were utilized to calculate work. Muscle activity of the lateral and medial gastrocnemius was also measured. Fascicle length was significantly shorter (mCM3: 6.2 ± 1.5 cm, sCM: 7.3 ± 2.0 cm) and tendon length was significantly longer (mCM3: 36.5 ± 3.6 cm, sCM: 35.5 ± 3.8 cm) at the end of the eccentric phase in mCM3 in comparison to sCM. Maximal hopping height (mCM: 14.6 ± 3.1 cm, sCM: 13.1 ± 2.5 cm), eccentric phase gastrocnemius muscle activity (mCM medial gastrocnemius: 0.10 ± 0.03 mV, mCM lateral gastrocnemius: 0.08 ± 0.04 mV, sCM medial gastrocnemius: 0.07 ± 0.03 mV, sCM lateral gastrocnemius: 0.05 ± 0.04 mV), and both eccentric (mCM3: 46.6 ± 19.4 J, sCM: 38.5 ± 15.9 J) and concentric work (mCM3: 87.6 ± 26.5 J, sCM: 80.9 ± 27.6 J) were significantly higher for mCM3 compared to sCM. The results indicate that a multiple countermovement hop strategy results in shorter fascicle length and longer tendon length at the end of the eccentric phase. In addition, greater eccentric phase muscle activity during the third countermovement (mCM3) in comparison to a single countermovement hop (sCM) was observed. A multiple countermovement strategy appears to result in higher hopping height and greater work done in both the eccentric and concentric phase indicating possible contribution of stored

  4. Incidence of midportion Achilles tendinopathy in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Jonge (Suzan); C. van den Berg; R.J. de Vos (Robert-Jan); H.J.L. van der Heide; A. Weir (Adam); J.A.N. Verhaar (Jan); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita); J.L. Tol (Johannes)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground Achilles tendon disorders, like Achilles tendinopathy, are very common among athletes. In the general population, however, knowledge about the incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is lacking. Design Cross-sectional study. Methods In a cohort of 57.725 persons registered in

  5. Incidence of midportion Achilles tendinopathy in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, S.; van den Berg, C.; de Vos, R. J.; van der Heide, H. J. L.; Weir, A.; Verhaar, J. A. N.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M. A.; Tol, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendon disorders, like Achilles tendinopathy, are very common among athletes. In the general population, however, knowledge about the incidence of Achilles tendinopathy is lacking. Design Cross-sectional study. In a cohort of 57.725 persons registered in primary care, the number of patients

  6. Role of tissue engineered collagen based tridimensional implant on the healing response of the experimentally induced large Achilles tendon defect model in rabbits: a long term study with high clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimandi-Parizi, Abdolhamid; Oryan, Ahmad; Moshiri, Ali

    2013-05-14

    Tendon injury is one of the orthopedic conditions poses with a significant clinical challenge to both the surgeons and patients. The major limitations to manage these injuries are poor healing response and development of peritendinous adhesions in the injured area. This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel collagen implant on tendon healing in rabbits. Seventy five mature White New-Zealand rabbits were divided into treated (n = 55) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. The defects of the treated animals were filled with collagen implants and repaired with sutures, but in control rabbits the defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in the injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by measuring the diameter, temperature and bioelectrical characteristics of the injured area. Clinical examination was done and scored. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 and 60 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) and the control animals at 120 days post injury (DPI). The lesions of all animals were examined at macroscopic and microscopic levels and the dry matter content, water delivery and water uptake characteristics of the lesions and normal contralateral tendons of both groups were analyzed at 120 DPI. This novel collagen implant was biodegradable, biocompatible and possibly could be considered as a substitute for auto and allografts in clinical practice in near future.

  7. The Tendon Structure Returns to Asymptomatic Values in Nonoperatively Treated Achilles Tendinopathy but Is Not Associated With Symptoms: A Prospective Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Suzan; Tol, Johannes L.; Weir, Adam; Waarsing, Jan H.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; de Vos, Robert-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tendinopathy is characterized by alterations in the tendon structure, but there are conflicting results on the potential of tendon structure normalization and no large studies on the quantified, ultrasonographic tendon structure and its association with symptoms. Purpose: To determine

  8. Eccentric exercise in treatment of Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, J; Larsen, C C; Bieler, T

    2007-01-01

    Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia.......Prognosis and treatment of Achilles tendon pain (achillodynia) has been insufficiently studied. The purpose of the present study was to examine the long-term effect of eccentric exercises compared with stretching exercises on patients with achillodynia....

  9. Tendon response to pharmaco-mechanical stimulation of the chronically retracted rotator cuff in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Karl; Farshad, Mazda; Meyer, Dominik C; Conze, Philipp; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Gerber, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Chronic tearing of tendons is associated with molecular and structural alterations causing biomechanical changes, which compromise musculotendinous function and become limiting factors for tendon repair. This study investigated the histological response of chronically retracted sheep rotator cuff tendons to mechanical and pharmacological stimulation in view of tendon repair. Sixteen weeks after experimental release of the infraspinatus tendon in 20 sheep, the retracted musculotendinous unit was subjected to continuous traction either with [anabolic steroids (nandrolone) group/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) group] or without (control group) additional pharmacological treatment during 6 weeks. A new degeneration score for tendinous tissues (DSTT), based on established knowledge on histological changes associated with tendon degeneration, was used for histological analysis at the time of tendon release, at the beginning of continuous re-lengthening and at repair in all animals. The DSTT score (inter-observer correlation: r = 0.83), quantifiably representing tendon degeneration, improved from 15.5 (SD 1.3) points before to 9.8 (SD 3.8) points after re-lengthening. It improved in a qualitatively and quantitatively similar fashion if pharmacological stimulation was added. The nandrolone group improved from 13.7 (SD 1.6) to 9.8 (SD 1.9) and the IGF group from 13.3 (SD 3.6) to 8.8 (SD 1.8) points. Mechanical stimulation significantly reduced tissue degeneration. However, the addition of a pharmacological stimulation with anabolic steroids or IGF had neither a measurable positive nor negative effect on the degenerative process. Therefore, this investigation does neither support the additional pharmacological use of the anabolic steroid nandrolone or of IGF decanoate for restoration of tendon degeneration, nor otherwise provide evidence for additional tendon damage, if those substances are used to alter the muscular metabolism.

  10. Retrocalcaneal bursitis but not Achilles tendinopathy is characterized by increased pressure in the retrocalcaneal bursa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-03-01

    We questioned whether different forms of Achilles tendon overuse injuries can be differentiated by retrocalcaneal bursa pressure measurement. Retrocalcaneal bursa pressure was determined by using invasive pressure measurement in patients suffering from retrocalcaneal bursitis (n=13) or Achilles tendinopathy (n=15), respectively. Standardized measurements were taken with the subject lying prone. Initially, the foot and ankle was in a spontaneous, unsupported position. Then passive dorsiflexion was induced by an increasing pressure which was applied in five defined steps against the plantar forefoot. Mean pressures found in unloaded position were 30.5 (SD 28.9) mmHg in retrocalcaneal bursitis and -9.9 (SD 17.2) mmHg in Achilles tendinopathy (pbursitis and 32.5 (SD 48.9) mmHg for Achilles tendinopathy (p=0,051). Higher retrocalcaneal bursa pressure values were found in patients suffering from chronic retrocalcaneal bursitis. This result supports the hypothesis that retrocalcaneal bursa hypertension leads to an impingement lesion of the corresponding anterior Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Percutaneous ultrasonic debridement of tendinopathy-a pilot Achilles rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamineni, Srinath; Butterfield, Timothy; Sinai, Anthony

    2015-05-20

    Tendinopathy is a common clinical pathology, with mixed treatment results, especially when chronic. In this study, we examine the effects of an ultrasonic debridement modality in a rabbit tendinopathy model. We asked four questions: (1) Was it possible to create and visualize with ultrasound a tendinopathy lesion in a rabbit Achilles tendon? (2) Was it possible to guide a 19-gauge ultrasonic probe into the tendinopathy lesion? (3) Following ultrasonic treatment, was tendinopathy debris histologically present? and (4) Was the collagen profile qualitatively and quantitatively normalized following treatment? Skeletally mature female New Zealand white rabbits (n = 12) were injected with, ultrasonography localization, 0.150 ml of collagenase into the Achilles tendon. The collagenase-induced Achilles tendinopathy (3 weeks) was treated with percutaneous ultrasonic debridement. The tendons were harvested, at 3 weeks after treatment, and were subjected to histological assessment (modified Movin score) and biochemical analysis (collagen isoform content). Histopathological examination revealed that all tendons injected with collagenase showed areas of hypercellularity and focal areas of tendon disorganization and degeneration. The treated tendons had lower (improved) histopathological scores than injured tendons (P tendon, to qualitative and semi-quantitative levels of a normal tendon. We were successfully able to create a collagenase-injected tendinopathy lesion in a rabbit Achilles tendon and visualize the lesion with an ultrasound probe. A 19-gauge ultrasonic probe was inserted into the tendinopathic lesion under direct ultrasound guidance, and minimal tendinopathic debris remained after treatment. The treated tendon demonstrated a normalized qualitative and semi-quantitative collagen profile and improved histological appearance in the short term. This technique demonstrates scientific merit with respect to the minimally invasive treatment of tendinopathy and warrants

  12. Identifying factors related to Achilles tendon stress, strain, and stiffness before and after 6 months of growth in youth 10-14 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A

    2012-09-21

    The purposes of this study were (1) determine if youth peak Achilles tendon (AT) strain, peak AT stress, and AT stiffness, measured during an isometric plantar flexion, differed after six months (mos) of growth, and (2) determine if sex, physical activity level (Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ-C)), and/or growth rate (GR) were related to these properties. AT stress, strain, and stiffness were quantified in 20 boys (13.47±0.81 years) and 22 girls (11.18±0.82 years) at 2 times (0 and 6 mos). GR (change in height in 6 mos) was not significantly different between boys and girls (3.5±1.4 and 3.4±1.1cm/6 mos respectively). Peak AT strain and stiffness (mean 3.8±0.4% and 128.9±153.6N/mm, respectively) did not differ between testing sessions or sex. Peak AT stress (22.1±2.4 and 24.0±2.1MPa at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) did not differ between sex and increased significantly at 6 mos due to a significant decrease in AT cross-sectional area (40.6±1.3 and 38.1±1.6mm(2) at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) with no significant difference in peak AT force (882.3±93.9 and 900.3± 65.5N at 0 and 6 mos, respectively). Peak AT stress was significantly greater in subjects with greater PAQ-C scores (9.1% increase with 1 unit increase in PAQ-C score) and smaller in subjects with faster GRs (13.8% decrease with 1cm/6 mos increase in GR). These results indicate that of the AT mechanical properties quantified, none differed between sex, and only peak AT stress significantly differed after 6 months and was related to GR and physical activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Achilles Impingement Tendinopathy on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark J; Mourelatos, Jan; Mar, Alice

    Haglund's syndrome is impingement of the retrocalcaneal bursa and Achilles tendon caused by a prominence of the posterosuperior calcaneus. Radiographic measurements are not sensitive or specific for diagnosing Haglund's deformity. Localization of a bone deformity and tendinopathy in the same sagittal section of a magnetic resonance imaging scan can assist with the diagnosis in equivocal cases. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of Haglund's syndrome in patients presenting with Achilles tendinopathy and note any associated findings to determine the criteria for a diagnosis of Haglund's syndrome. We reviewed 40 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles tendinopathy and 19 magnetic resonance imaging scans with Achilles high-grade tears and/or ruptures. Achilles tendinopathy was often in close proximity to the superior aspect of the calcaneal tuberosity, consistent with impingement (67.5%). Patients with Achilles impingement tendinopathy were more often female (p tendinopathy (p = .014) or Achilles tendon rupture (p = .010). Impingement tendinopathy occurred medially (8 of 20) and centrally (10 of 20) more often than laterally (2 of 20) and was associated with a posterior prominence or hyperconvexity with a loss of calcaneal recess more often than a superior projection (22 of 27 versus 8 of 27; p tendinopathy might be more appropriate terminology for Haglund's syndrome, because the bone deformity is often subtle. Of the 27 images with Achilles impingement tendinopathy, 10 (37.0%) extended to a location prone to Achilles tendon rupture. Given these findings, insertional and noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy are not mutually exclusive and impingement might be a subtle, unrecognized cause of Achilles tendinopathy and subsequent rupture. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Neglected rupture of the quadriceps tendon in a patient with chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spontaneous ruptures of the quadriceps tendon are infrequent injuries, it is seen primarily in patients with predisposing diseases such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic renal failure. A 32-year-old man had a history of end stage renal disease and received regular hemodialysis treatment for more than 5 years.

  15. A Reconstructive Stabilization Technique for Nontraumatic or Chronic Traumatic Extensor Tendon Subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hoon; Baek, Jong Hun; Lee, Jung Seok

    2017-01-01

    Subluxation of the extensor tendon results from a disruption to the sagittal band at the metacarpophalangeal joint. When conservative treatment fails to correct the subluxation, surgical treatment may be necessary. Surgical techniques for chronic cases vary in graft source and graft pathway. We present a surgical technique to recentralize and stabilize the extensor tendon using a residual ruptured sagittal band. This technique is simple and effective without donor site morbidity and seems to provide potential biomechanical advantages by restoring nearly normal anatomy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex differences in tendon structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Dylan C; Kharaz, Yalda Ashraf; Sugg, Kristoffer B; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Comerford, Eithne; Mendias, Christopher L

    2017-10-01

    Tendons play a critical role in the transmission of forces between muscles and bones, and chronic tendon injuries and diseases are among the leading causes of musculoskeletal disability. Little is known about sex-based differences in tendon structure and function. Our objective was to evaluate the mechanical properties, biochemical composition, transcriptome, and cellular activity of plantarflexor tendons from 4 month old male and female C57BL/6 mice using in vitro biomechanics, mass spectrometry-based proteomics, genome-wide expression profiling, and cell culture techniques. While the Achilles tendons of male mice were approximately 6% larger than female mice (p  0.05) of plantaris tendons were observed. Mass spectrometry proteomics analysis revealed no significant difference between sexes in the abundance of major extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as collagen types I (p = 0.30) and III (p = 0.68), but female mice had approximately twofold elevations (p tendons differed by only 1%. In vitro, neither the sex of the serum that fibroblasts were cultured in, nor the sex of the ECM in which they were embedded, had profound effects on the expression of collagen and cell proliferation genes. Our results indicate that while male mice expectedly had larger tendons, male and female tendons have very similar mechanical properties and biochemical composition, with small increases in some ECM proteins and proteoglycans evident in female tendons. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:2117-2126, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Preliminary Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy Using Low-Intensity Pulsed Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Andrew R; Holmes, George B

    2016-02-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative process of the tendon associated with diminished vascularity, microtrauma, and aging. Nonoperative treatments such as activity modification, immobilization, night splints, and physical therapy have good outcomes for the majority of patients. However, there are cohorts of patients that remain symptomatic despite use of all nonoperative measures that eventually require surgical intervention. The present study reports the preliminary short-term clinical outcomes of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) for treatment for Achilles tendinopathy. Fourteen patients with clinically diagnosed Achilles tendinopathy who failed previous nonoperative treatments underwent LIPUS stimulation directly over the area of maximum tendon tenderness for 20 min/d for 8 weeks total. No other treatment modalities were used during the period of LIPUS stimulation. All patients had serial clinical exams and evaluations with an average follow-up of 12 months (range, 6-50 months). Excellent clinical outcomes with complete resolution of pain and other symptoms were obtained in 7 patients (50%). Two patients (14%) had good outcomes with mild tendon irritation and stiffness not requiring further intervention. Five patients (36%) had minimal benefit with continued pain, swelling, and tenderness over the Achilles and functional deficits. No patients had worsening pain or progression of disability requiring surgery. LIPUS is an additional noninvasive treatment modality for chronic Achilles tendinopathy that may potentially help improve clinical symptoms and delay and/or prevent the need for surgical intervention. While LIPUS is easy to use, well-tolerated, and has promising early clinical results, further research is needed to determine the long-term benefits, disadvantages, and cost-effectiveness of this alternative treatment for tendinopathy. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case series. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Can chronic stretching change the muscle-tendon mechanical properties? A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, S R; Mendes, B; Le Sant, G; Andrade, R J; Nordez, A; Milanovic, Z

    2018-03-01

    It is recognized that stretching is an effective method to chronically increase the joint range of motion. However, the effects of stretching training on the muscle-tendon structural properties remain unclear. This systematic review with meta-analysis aimed to determine whether chronic stretching alter the muscle-tendon structural properties. Published papers regarding longitudinal stretching (static, dynamic and/or PNF) intervention (either randomized or not) in humans of any age and health status, with more than 2 weeks in duration and at least 2 sessions per week, were searched in PubMed, PEDro, ScienceDirect and ResearchGate databases. Structural or mechanical variables from joint (maximal tolerated passive torque or resistance to stretch) or muscle-tendon unit (muscle architecture, stiffness, extensibility, shear modulus, volume, thickness, cross-sectional area, and slack length) were extracted from those papers. A total of 26 studies were selected, with a duration ranging from 3 to 8 weeks, and an average total time under stretching of 1165 seconds per week. Small effects were seen for maximal tolerated passive torque, but trivial effects were seen for joint resistance to stretch, muscle architecture, muscle stiffness, and tendon stiffness. A large heterogeneity was seen for most of the variables. Stretching interventions with 3- to 8-week duration do not seem to change either the muscle or the tendon properties, although it increases the extensibility and tolerance to a greater tensile force. Adaptations to chronic stretching protocols shorter than 8 weeks seem to mostly occur at a sensory level. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Natri, A

    1997-04-01

    Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were

  20. Functional reconstruction of complex tendo Achilles defect by free latissimus dorsi muscle flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya N Upadhyaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Managing the complex tendo Achilles defect involves reconstructing the Achilles tendon as well as providing soft tissue cover to the heel area. The advent of microsurgery has revolutionised the reconstruction of this difficult defect providing a number of options to the reconstructive surgeon. We present a case of complex tendo Achilles defect reconstructed by the latissimus dorsi free flap.

  1. Pleiotropic roles of the matricellular protein Sparc in tendon maturation and ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Lehner, Christine; Bradshaw, Amy D.; Scharler, Cornelia; Niestrawska, Justyna A.; Holzapfel, Gerhard A.; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Traweger, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic tendinopathies remain clinically challenging and tendons are predisposed to degeneration or injury with age. Despite the high prevalence of tendon disease in the elderly, our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the age-dependent deterioration of tendon function remains very limited. Here, we show that Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (Sparc) expression significantly decreases in healthy-aged mouse Achilles tendons. Loss of Sparc results in tendon collagen fibrillogenesis defects and Sparc−/− tendons are less able to withstand force in comparison with their respective wild type counterparts. On the cellular level, Sparc-null and healthy-aged tendon-derived cells exhibited a more contracted phenotype and an altered actin cytoskeleton. Additionally, an elevated expression of the adipogenic marker genes PPARγ and Cebpα with a concomitant increase in lipid deposits in aged and Sparc−/− tendons was observed. In summary, we propose that Sparc levels in tendons are critical for proper collagen fibril maturation and its age-related decrease, together with a change in ECM properties favors lipid accretion in tendons. PMID:27586416

  2. Stimulation of tendon repair by platelet concentrate, CDMP-2 and mechanical loading in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Virchenko, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Growth factor delivery may be useful to accelerate the rate of tendon healing. We studied Platelet Concentrate, which in effect can be regarded as a cocktail of growth factors relevant for tendon healing. In a rat Achilles tendon transection model, one postoperative injection of Platelet Concentrate resulted in increased strength even 3 weeks later. Mechanical stimulation improves the repair of ruptured tendons. We studied the effects of platelets upon Achilles tendon regenerates in rats 3, 5...

  3. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Recht, Michael P. [Cleveland Clinic, Musculoskeletal Radiology/A21, Division of Radiology, Cleveland, OH (United States); Iannotti, Joseph P. [Cleveland Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2007-06-15

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear. (orig.)

  4. Deltoid muscle and tendon tears in patients with chronic rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Iannotti, Joseph P; Recht, Michael P

    2007-06-01

    To describe the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of tears of the deltoid muscle and tendon in patients with rotator cuff tears and without a prior history of shoulder surgery. Deltoid tears diagnosed on MR examinations were prospectively recorded between February 2003 through June 2004. The images of these patients were then retrospectively reviewed to determine the location of the deltoid tear, the presence of rotator cuff tears, tendon retraction, muscle atrophy, degree of humeral head subluxation, bony erosive changes involving the undersurface of the acromion, and the presence of edema or fluid-like signal intensity in the deltoid muscle and overlying subcutaneous tissues. There were 24 (0.3%) patients with deltoid tears; nine men and 15 women. The age range was 54 to 87 (average 73) years. The right side was involved in 20 cases, and the left in four cases. Fifteen patients had full thickness and nine had partial thickness tears of the deltoid. Shoulder pain was the most common presenting symptom. The physical examination revealed a defect in the region of the deltoid in two patients. Nineteen patients had tears in the muscle belly near the musculotendinous junction, and five had avulsion of the tendon from the acromial origin. Full thickness rotator cuff tears were present in all of the patients, and 22 patients had associated muscle atrophy. Subcutaneous edema and fluid-like signal was present in 15 patients. Tears of the deltoid muscle or tendon is an unusual finding, but they can be seen in patients with chronic massive rotator cuff tears. Partial thickness tears tend to involve the undersurface of the deltoid muscle and tendon. Associated findings such as intramuscular cyst or ganglion in the deltoid muscle belly and subcutaneous edema or fluid-like signal overlying the deltoid in a patient with a rotator cuff tear should raise the suspicion of a deltoid tear.

  5. Investigating Achilles and patellar tendinopathy prevalence in elite athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Ina; van der Worp, Henk; Hensing, Sjoerd; Zwerver, Johannes

    2018-01-01

    Although injury surveillance in athletics is routinely conducted, discipline-specific Achilles and patellar tendinopathy prevalence remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore discipline-specific tendinopathy prevalence and identify whether injury-specific risk factors differed in athletes. Elite athletes were recruited and provided information on their sport training including Achilles and patellar tendon pain history. In order to ascertain whether between-discipline differences existed, data were categorized into discipline groups. Middle-distance athletes reported the highest prevalence of Achilles tendinopathy and the combined athletes reported the highest patellar tendinopathy prevalence. Greater calf stiffness was reported in athletes who experienced Achilles tendinopathy compared to those who did not. A substantial portion of athletes believed their performance decreased as a result of their tendon pain. In order to develop discipline-specific evidence-based injury prevention programmes, further discipline-specific research is required to quantify the mechanism for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy development in elite athletics.

  6. Effects of long-term immobilization and recovery on human triceps surae and collagen turnover in the Achilles tendon in patients with healing ankle fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Britt; Dyrberg, Eva; Aagaard, Per

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze how human tendon connective tissue responds to an approximately 7-wk period of immobilization and a remobilization period of a similar length, in patients with unilateral ankle fracture, which is currently unknown. Calf muscle cross-sectional area (CSA)...

  7. Effect of radiofrequency microtenotomy on degeneration of tendons: an experimental study on rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Taner; Bilgic, Erkal; Erdem, Mehmet; Bostan, Bora; Koseoglu, Resit Dogan; Sahin, Seyyid Ahmet; Sen, Cengiz

    2014-03-01

    Radiofrequency microtenotomy is used to enhance healing by increasing vascularity in the degenerated tendon. In the present study, the effect of radiofrequency microtenotomy (Rf-mt) treatment on tendon degeneration was investigated. A total of 32 New Zealand rabbits were enrolled in the current study. Experimental degeneration was performed by injecting prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) into the bilateral Achilles tendons of rabbits. After excluding 4 rabbits with an infection on the injection site, 4 other rabbits were sacrificed to define the histopathologic changes in the tendons. The remaining 24 rabbits were divided into 2 groups: the control group and the Rf-mt group. In the control group, the Rf-mt device was only applied to the Achilles tendon without running the device. In the Rf-mt group, the Rf-mt device was applied bilaterally at the fourth energy level for 500ms to an area within 2cm proximal to the insertion site at 0.5cm intervals in order to form a grid. Six rabbits from each group were sacrificed at 6 and 12 weeks. The Achilles tendons were evaluated histopathologically by a modified Movin scale and by immunohistopathologic staining for vascular endothelial growth factor and type 4 collagen. After the PGE1 injection, findings similar to chronic degenerative tendinopathy were observed. The Rf-mt group showed significant improvement in vascularity in the histopathological and immunohistochemical examination (P0.05). Rf-mt treatment increases vascularity in degenerated tendons but does not create difference to facilitate the healing process comparing control group. Copyright © 2013 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Return to competition after an Achilles tendon rupture using both on and off the field load monitoring as guidance: A case report of a top-level soccer player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Maurizio; Impellizzeri, Franco M; Silbernagel, Karin Grävare; Combi, Franco; Benazzo, Franco; Bizzini, Mario

    2018-01-01

    To describe the Return to competition after Achilles Tendon rupture (ATR) in an elite soccer player. Case report. Return to sport (RTS) of a professional soccer player who suffered an ATR during a match. The RTS phase started 15 weeks after surgery and specific on-field activities were gradually introduced. Criteria used to monitor the transition through the different phases were strength and endurance of the calf muscle and ability to sustain specific on-field training loads (TL) monitored with Global Positioning System and heart-rate system. TLs were weekly compared to pre-injury values to evaluate recovery and to prescribe future sessions. A 39-year-old (height 178 cm, weight 75 kg) elite soccer defender player, playing in Italian Serie-A league. Days of absence were lower compared to a cohort presented in UEFA study (119 versus 161 ± 65 days, respectively). External-TL and Internal-TL were organized to gradually increase during RTS and resulted in higher values prior to return to competition compared to pre-injury values. Concentric plantar flexion peak torque increased till 9th months after surgery. Monitoring of the field activities allowed comparison with pre-injury values and provided a useful and functional criteria to pass return to team activity and competition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reconstruction of Ligament and Tendon Defects Using Cell Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chailakhyan, R K; Shekhter, A B; Ivannikov, S V; Tel'pukhov, V I; Suslin, D S; Gerasimov, Yu V; Tonenkov, A M; Grosheva, A G; Panyushkin, P V; Moskvina, I L; Vorob'eva, N N; Bagratashvili, V N

    2017-02-01

    We studied the possibility of restoring the integrity of the Achilles tendon in rabbits using autologous multipotent stromal cells. Collagen or gelatin sponges populated with cells were placed in a resorbable Vicryl mesh tube and this tissue-engineered construct was introduced into a defect of the middle part of the Achilles tendon. In 4 months, histological analysis showed complete regeneration of the tendon with the formation of parallel collagen fibers, spindle-shaped tenocytes, and newly formed vessels.

  10. Discriminant validity study of Achilles enthesis ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expósito Molinero, María Rosa; de Miguel Mendieta, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    We want to know if the ultrasound examination of the Achilles tendon in spondyloarthritis is different compared to other rheumatic diseases. We studied 97 patients divided into five groups: rheumatoid arthritis, spondyloarthritis, gout, chondrocalcinosis and osteoarthritis, exploring six elementary lesions in 194 Achilles entheses examined. In our study the total index ultrasonographic Achilles is higher in spondyloarthritis with significant differences. The worst elementary spondyloarthritis lesions for discriminations against other pathologies were calcification. This study aims to demonstrate the discriminant validity of Achilles enthesitis observed by ultrasound in spondyloarthritis compared with other rheumatic diseases that may also have ultrasound abnormalities such enthesis level. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  11. JOINT MOBILIZATION IN THE MANAGEMENT OF PERSISTENT INSERTIONAL ACHILLES TENDINOPATHY: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaseelan, Dhinu J; Post, Andrew A; Mischke, John J; Sault, Josiah D

    2017-02-01

    Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) can be a challenging condition to manage conservatively. Eccentric exercise is commonly used in the management of chronic tendinopathy; however, it may not be as helpful for insertional tendon problems as compared to mid-portion dysfunction. While current evidence describing the physical therapy management of IAT is developing, gaps still exist in descriptions of best practice. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a patient with persistent IAT utilizing impairment-based joint mobilization, self-mobilization, and exercise. A 51-year-old male was seen in physical therapy for complaints of posterior heel pain and reduced running capacity. He was seen by multiple physical therapists previously, but reported continued impairment, and functional restriction. Joint-based non-thrust mobilization and self-mobilization exercise were performed to enhance his ability to run and reduce symptoms. The subject was seen for four visits over the course of two months. He made clinically significant improvements on the Foot and Ankle Activity Measure and Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles tendon outcomes, was asymptomatic, and participated in numerous marathons. Improvements were maintained at one-year follow-up. Mobility deficits can contribute to the development of tendinopathy, and without addressing movement restrictions, symptoms and functional decline related to tendinopathy may persist. Joint-directed manual therapy may be a beneficial intervention in a comprehensive plan of care in allowing patients with chronic tendon changes to optimize function. Therapy, Level 4.

  12. Lateral force transmission between human tendon fascicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, Bjarki T; Aagaard, Per; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Whether adjacent collagen fascicles transmit force in parallel is unknown. The purpose of the present study was to examine the magnitude of lateral force transmission between adjacent collagen fascicles from the human patellar and Achilles tendon. From each sample two adjacent strands of fascicles...... in the patellar and Achilles tendon fascicles, respectively. A decline in stiffness of 39% and 60% from cycle 1 to cycle 2, and of 93% and 100% from cycle 2 to cycle 3 was observed in the patellar and Achilles tendon fascicles, respectively. The present data demonstrate that lateral force transmission between...... adjacent collagen fascicles in human tendons is small or negligible, suggesting that tendon fascicles largely act as independent structures and that force transmission principally takes place within the individual fascicles....

  13. Longitudinal microvascularity in achilles tendinopathy (power doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging time-intensity curves and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire): a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Paula J.; McCall, Iain W.; Day, Christopher; Belcher, John; Maffulli, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the imaging of the natural history of Achilles tendinopathy microvascularisation in comparison with symptoms, using a validated disease-specific questionnaire [the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A)]. A longitudinal prospective pilot study of nine patients with post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), time-intensity curve (TIC) enhancement, ultrasound (US) and power Doppler (PD) evaluation of tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon undergoing conservative management (eccentric exercise) over 1 year. There were five men and four women [mean age 47 (range 30-62) years]. Six asymptomatic tendons with normal US and MRI appearance showed less enhancement than the tibial metaphysis did and showed a flat, constant, but very low rate of enhancement in the bone and Achilles tendon (9-73 arbitrary TIC units). These normal Achilles tendons on imaging showed a constant size throughout the year (mean 4.9 mm). At baseline the TIC enhancement in those with tendinopathy ranged from 90 arbitrary units to 509 arbitrary units. Over time, 11 abnormal Achilles tendons, whose symptoms settled, were associated with a reduction in MRI enhancement mirrored by a reduction in the number of vessels on power Doppler (8.0 to 2.7), with an improvement in morphology and a reduction in tendon size (mean 15-10.6 mm). One tendon did not change its abnormal imaging features, despite improving symptoms. Two patients developed contralateral symptoms and tendinopathy, and one had more abnormal vascularity on power Doppler and higher MRI TIC peaks in the asymptomatic side. In patient with conservatively managed tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon over 1 year there was a reduction of MRI enhancement and number of vessels on power Doppler, followed by morphological improvements and a reduction in size. Vessels per se related to the abnormal morphology and size of the tendon rather than symptoms. Symptoms improve before the Achilles size reduces and the

  14. Longitudinal microvascularity in achilles tendinopathy (power doppler ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging time-intensity curves and the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles questionnaire): a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, Paula J. [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffs. Royal Infirmary, X-ray Department, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); McCall, Iain W. [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); North Staffordshire NHS Trust, Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Day, Christopher [University Hospital of North Staffordshire NHS Trust (UHNS), Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Belcher, John [Cardiff University, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, North Wales Clinical School, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Maffulli, Nicola [Keele University, Keele, Staffordshire (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    To evaluate the imaging of the natural history of Achilles tendinopathy microvascularisation in comparison with symptoms, using a validated disease-specific questionnaire [the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A)]. A longitudinal prospective pilot study of nine patients with post-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), time-intensity curve (TIC) enhancement, ultrasound (US) and power Doppler (PD) evaluation of tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon undergoing conservative management (eccentric exercise) over 1 year. There were five men and four women [mean age 47 (range 30-62) years]. Six asymptomatic tendons with normal US and MRI appearance showed less enhancement than the tibial metaphysis did and showed a flat, constant, but very low rate of enhancement in the bone and Achilles tendon (9-73 arbitrary TIC units). These normal Achilles tendons on imaging showed a constant size throughout the year (mean 4.9 mm). At baseline the TIC enhancement in those with tendinopathy ranged from 90 arbitrary units to 509 arbitrary units. Over time, 11 abnormal Achilles tendons, whose symptoms settled, were associated with a reduction in MRI enhancement mirrored by a reduction in the number of vessels on power Doppler (8.0 to 2.7), with an improvement in morphology and a reduction in tendon size (mean 15-10.6 mm). One tendon did not change its abnormal imaging features, despite improving symptoms. Two patients developed contralateral symptoms and tendinopathy, and one had more abnormal vascularity on power Doppler and higher MRI TIC peaks in the asymptomatic side. In patient with conservatively managed tendinopathy of the mid-Achilles tendon over 1 year there was a reduction of MRI enhancement and number of vessels on power Doppler, followed by morphological improvements and a reduction in size. Vessels per se related to the abnormal morphology and size of the tendon rather than symptoms. Symptoms improve before the Achilles size reduces and the

  15. Novel animal model for Achilles tendinopathy: Controlled experimental study of serial injections of collagenase in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cesar Netto, Cesar; Godoy-Santos, Alexandre Leme; Augusto Pontin, Pedro; Natalino, Renato Jose Mendonça; Pereira, Cesar Augusto Martins; Lima, Francisco Diego de Oliveira; da Fonseca, Lucas Furtado; Staggers, Jackson Rucker; Cavinatto, Leonardo Muntada; Schon, Lew Charles; de Camargo, Olavo Pires; Fernandes, Túlio Diniz

    2018-01-01

    Our goal was to develop a novel technique for inducing Achilles tendinopathy in animal models which more accurately represents the progressive histological and biomechanical characteristic of chronic Achilles tendinopathy in humans. In this animal research study, forty-five rabbits were randomly assigned to three groups and given bilateral Achilles injections. Low dose (LD group) (n = 18) underwent a novel technique with three low-dose (0.1mg) injections of collagenase that were separated by two weeks, the high dose group (HD) (n = 18) underwent traditional single high-dose (0.3mg) injections, and the third group were controls (n = 9). Six rabbits were sacrificed from each experimental group (LD and HD) at 10, 12 and 16 weeks. Control animals were sacrificed after 16 weeks. Histological and biomechanical properties were then compared in all three groups. At 10 weeks, Bonar score and tendon cross sectional area was highest in HD group, with impaired biomechanical properties compared to LD group. At 12 weeks, Bonar score was higher in LD group, with similar biomechanical findings when compared to HD group. After 16 weeks, Bonar score was significantly increased for both LD group (11,8±2,28) and HD group (5,6±2,51), when compared to controls (2±0,76). LD group showed more pronounced histological and biomechanical findings, including cross sectional area of the tendon, Young's modulus, yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. In conclusion, Achilles tendinopathy in animal models that were induced by serial injections of low-dose collagenase showed more pronounced histological and biomechanical findings after 16 weeks than traditional techniques, mimicking better the progressive and chronic characteristic of the tendinopathy in humans.

  16. Successful Treatment of Achilles Tendinopathy with Electroacupuncture: Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawks, Matthew Kendall

    2017-06-01

    Background: Achilles tendinopathy is a common injury for active patient populations and is challenging to treat. Acupuncture tendon-based therapy was first described in the Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal Medicine . In modern times, specific techniques have been described poorly in the literature. The aim of this case report is to describe a new technique of acupuncture for the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy and provide 2 illustrative cases. Cases: Treatments for the 2 patients were performed in a deployed military treatment facility. SERIN® 0.25 mm × 40 mm needles placed at BL 60, BL 61, KI 3, and KI 4, with needles directed into the Achilles tendon of each patient. Needles were inserted until a firm catch of the needle entering the tendon was discerned. Energy was placed from KI 3(-) → KI 4(+) and BL61 (-) → BL 60(+) at 30 Hz for 15 minutes. Results: Both patients reported symptomatic reduction in Achilles tendinopathy pain and functional improvement following the described treatments. Conclusions: This case series describes two cases of successful Achilles tendinopathy therapy using direct tendon needle insertion with electrostimulation. This novel technique may provide an effective adjunct to traditional therapies in the treatment of Achilles tendinopathy.

  17. Transcription factor EGR1 directs tendon differentiation and promotes tendon repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerquin, Marie-Justine; Charvet, Benjamin; Nourissat, Geoffroy; Havis, Emmanuelle; Ronsin, Olivier; Bonnin, Marie-Ange; Ruggiu, Mathilde; Olivera-Martinez, Isabel; Robert, Nicolas; Lu, Yinhui; Kadler, Karl E.; Baumberger, Tristan; Doursounian, Levon; Berenbaum, Francis; Duprez, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Tendon formation and repair rely on specific combinations of transcription factors, growth factors, and mechanical parameters that regulate the production and spatial organization of type I collagen. Here, we investigated the function of the zinc finger transcription factor EGR1 in tendon formation, healing, and repair using rodent animal models and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Adult tendons of Egr1–/– mice displayed a deficiency in the expression of tendon genes, including Scx, Col1a1, and Col1a2, and were mechanically weaker compared with their WT littermates. EGR1 was recruited to the Col1a1 and Col2a1 promoters in postnatal mouse tendons in vivo. Egr1 was required for the normal gene response following tendon injury in a mouse model of Achilles tendon healing. Forced Egr1 expression programmed MSCs toward the tendon lineage and promoted the formation of in vitro–engineered tendons from MSCs. The application of EGR1-producing MSCs increased the formation of tendon-like tissues in a rat model of Achilles tendon injury. We provide evidence that the ability of EGR1 to promote tendon differentiation is partially mediated by TGF-β2. This study demonstrates EGR1 involvement in adult tendon formation, healing, and repair and identifies Egr1 as a putative target in tendon repair strategies. PMID:23863709

  18. Biomechanical and histological effects of augmented soft tissue mobilization therapy on achilles tendinopathy in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Kan; Ikoma, Kazuya; Chen, Qingshan; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Gay, Ralph E

    2015-02-01

    Augmented soft tissue mobilization (ASTM) has been used to treat Achilles tendinopathy and is thought to promote collagen fiber realignment and hasten tendon regeneration. The objective of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical and histological effects of ASTM therapy on rabbit Achilles tendons after enzymatically induced injury. This study was a non-human bench controlled research study using a rabbit model. Both Achilles tendons of 12 rabbits were injected with collagenase to produce tendon injury simulating Achilles tendinopathy. One side was then randomly allocated to receive ASTM, while the other received no treatment (control). ASTM was performed on the Achilles tendon on postoperative days 21, 24, 28, 31, 35, and 38. Tendons were harvested 10 days after treatment and examined with dynamic viscoelasticity and light microscopy. Cross-sectional area in the treated tendons was significantly greater than in controls. Storage modulus tended to be lower in the treated tendons but elasticity was not significantly increased. Loss modulus was significantly lower in the treated tendons. There was no significant difference found in tangent delta (loss modulus/storage modulus). Microscopy of control tendons showed that the tendon fibers were wavy and type III collagen was well stained. The tendon fibers of the augmented soft tissue mobilization treated tendons were not wavy and type III collagen was not prevalent. Biomechanical and histological findings showed that the Achilles tendons treated with ASTM had better recovery of biomechanical function than did control tendons. Copyright © 2015 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The EdUReP approach plus manual therapy for the management of insertional Achilles tendinopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, Francesco; Zanetta, Anna; Ferriero, Giorgio; Bravini, Elisabetta; Vercelli, Stefano

    2017-02-21

    Insertional Achilles tendinopathy (IAT) is a challenging overuse disorder. The aim of this case report was to study the feasibility of a comprehensive rehabilitative approach according to the Education, Unloading, Reloading, and Prevention (EdUReP) framework combined with Instrument-Augmented Soft Tissue Mobilization (I-ASTM). An active 51-year-old man patient with chronic IAT was studied. Clinical assessment battery was composed by visual analogue scale for pain during the Achilles tendon palpation test, passive straight leg raise test, single leg hop test, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and Foot and Ankle Ability Measure. The patient was treated over a 8 weeks period using the EdUReP guidelines plus 8 sessions of I-ASTM, applied with a solid instrument to the Achilles tendon and to the muscle fibrotic areas previously identified during evaluation. Clinically significant improvements were observed in all outcome measures, and a resume of patient's usual sports activities without pain or limitations was possible after treatment. Results lasted over a 6-month follow-up. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study applying a comprehensive approach based on accurate physical assessment, and using the EdUReP theoretical model. The combination of the EdUReP model and manual therapy was effective in resolving the patient's symptoms and restore his usual sport activities. While these results cannot be generalized, the present findings could provide a valuable foundation for future researches.

  20. The tendon-to-bone attachment: Unification through disarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Guy M.; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2017-06-01

    High-resolution imaging, composition analysis and mechanical testing reveal a disordered transitional material within the Achilles tendon-to-bone attachment, structured as a fibrous network to enable force transfer and maximize structural integrity.

  1. Restoration of strength despite low stress and abnormal imaging after Achilles injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Guy; Doherty, Geoffrey P; Koike, Yoichi; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Lecompte, Martin; Dinh, Laurent; Uhthoff, Hans K

    2009-11-01

    To determine the usefulness of clinical imaging in predicting the mechanical properties of rabbit Achilles tendons after acute injury. We created a 2 x 7-mm full-thickness central tendon defect in one Achilles tendon of healthy rabbits. Rabbits in groups of 10 were killed immediately and 4 and 8 wk after surgery (n = 30). We then performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, ultrasonography (US), bone mineral densitometry (BMD), and mechanical testing to failure using a dual-cryofixation assembly on experimental and contralateral tendons. The main outcome measures included tendon dimensions, optical density (OD) of T1-weighted, proton density (PD), and T2-weighted MR sequences, US focal abnormalities, BMD of the calcaneus, and stress and peak load to failure. On MR imaging and US, all dimensions of the injured tendons after 2 wk and more were greater than those of the contralateral tendons (P tendons at both 4 wk (39 +/- 9 vs 77 +/- 16 N x mm(-2)) and 8 wk (58 +/- 6 vs 94 +/- 26 N x mm(-2); P tendons, higher T1-weighted OD correlated with lower peak load (r = -0.46; P tendon of lower stress. These findings support progressive physical loading 4 wk after an Achilles tendon injury. T1-weighted OD constituted a marker of tendon mechanical recovery.

  2. Comparison of the effect of intra-tendon applications of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB, platelet-rich plasma, steroids in a rat achilles tendon collagenase model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solchaga, Luis A; Bendele, Alison; Shah, Vivek; Snel, Leo B; Kestler, Hans K; Dines, Joshua S; Hee, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the effect of intra-tendon (IT) delivery of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB), platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and corticosteroids in a rat tendinopathy model. Seven days after collagenase induction of tendinopathy, a 30-µl IT injection was administered. Treatments included: saline; 3 µg rhPDGF-BB; 10 µg rhPDGF-BB; PRP; and 300 µg triamcinolone acetonide (TCA). Outcomes were assessed 7 and 21 days after treatment. All groups exhibited good to excellent repair. Relative to saline, cell proliferation increased 65% in the 10 µg rhPDGF-BB group and decreased 74% in the TCA group; inflammation decreased 65% in the TCA group. At 7 days, maximum load-to-failure was increased in the 3 µg rhPDGF-BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group relative to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB group compared to saline and TCA (p BB group was increased compared to saline, PRP, and TCA (p BB increased maximum load-to-failure (3 and 10 µg) and stiffness (10 µg) relative to controls and commonly used treatments. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 32:145-150, 2014. © 2013 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wetke, E; Johannsen, F; Langberg, Henning

    2015-01-01

    -based exercises (concentric, eccentric, and stretching) and optional glucocorticosteroid (GCS) injections in patients with (AT) in a usual clinical setting. Patients unable to commence or progress in exercise were offered GCS, hypothesizing that the GCS would facilitate exercise. Ninety-three consecutive patients......In published efficacy studies on Achilles tendinopathy (AT) exercise alone results in improvement in 60-90% of the cases. However, this high success rate cannot be expected in usual clinical practice. We prospectively investigated the effectiveness of a treatment regimen consisting of home...... with AT referred to two outpatient rheumatology clinics were registered, and seen at five visits over a 6-month period. Exercises seemed to have a slow, but long-lasting effect with GCS having a dramatic short-term effect on symptoms. Twenty-six percent of the patients could proceed with training alone...

  4. Platelet-rich plasma injections for the treatment of refractory Achilles tendinopathy: results at 4 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Kon, Elizaveta; Di Matteo, Berardo; Di Martino, Alessandro; Tesei, Giulia; Pelotti, Patrizia; Cenacchi, Annarita; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Achilles tendinopathy is responsible for a severe reduction in physical performance and persistent pain. There is currently a number of therapeutic options and the local administration of growth factors is an emerging treatment strategy. In particular, platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a widely used way to provide a local regenerative stimulus for tendon healing. The aim of this study was to document the mid-term results obtained after treating recalcitrant Achilles tendinopathy with injections of high concentrate, leucocyte-rich PRP. Materials and methods Twenty-seven patients (mean age: 44.6 years; 22 men and 5 women) affected by chronic mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy (7 bilateral, for a total of 34 tendons), refractory to previous treatments, were enrolled. Patients were treated with three ultrasound-guided intra-tendinous injections of PRP at 2-week intervals. Patients were prospectively evaluated at baseline, and then at 2, 6, and up to a mean of 54.1 months of follow-up (minimum 30 months), using the following tools: Blanzina, VISA-A, EQ-VAS for general health, and Tegner scores. Results The VISA-A score showed a significant improvement: the baseline score of 49.9±18.1 increased to 62.9±19.8 at 2 months (p=0.002), with a further improvement at 6 months (84.3±17.1, ptendinopathy with a stable outcome up to a medium-term follow-up. Longer symptom duration was related with a more difficult return to sporting activity. PMID:24960641

  5. Relationship of rotator cuff tendon pathology with obesity, chronic diseases and steroid use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Umul

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: In our study, statistically significant correlation was observed between the supraspinatus tendon pathology with increasing age and increasing BMI. Aging process can not be changed, however prevention of obesity may provide a positive contribution to the conservation of the rotator cuff tendon pathology. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(4.000: 648-652

  6. A Biomechanical Analysis of Interference Screw Versus Bone Tunnel Fixation of Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon Transfers to the Calcaneus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, George T; Balldin, B Christian; Zide, Jacob R; Chen, Christopher T

    The flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer is commonly used to restore function in chronic Achilles tendon ruptures and chronic Achilles tendinopathy. The tendon is often secured to the calcaneus either through a bone tunnel or by an interference screw. We hypothesized that tenodesis using the bone tunnel method would be mechanically superior to interference screw fixation for flexor hallucis longus transfers. Eight matched pairs of cadaveric specimens were assigned randomly to the bone tunnel or interference screw technique and were loaded to failure. Biomechanical analysis was performed to evaluate the ultimate strength, peak stress, Young's modulus, failure strain, and strain energy. Unpaired comparison, paired comparison, and linear regression analyses were used to determine statistical significance. A slight 22% ± 9% decrease in Young's modulus and a 52% ± 18% increase of strain energy were found in the interference screw group. However, no differences in ultimate strength, peak stress, or failure strain were seen between the 2 groups on paired comparison. Our findings suggest that interference screw fixation provides similar spontaneous biomechanical properties to the use of a bone tunnel for flexor hallucis longus transfer to the calcaneus. The interference screw is a practical option for fixation of the flexor hallucis longus tendon to the calcaneus and can be performed through a single incision approach. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Are Sport-Specific Profiles of Tendon Stiffness and Cross-Sectional Area Determined by Structural or Functional Integrity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Wiesinger

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to determine whether distinct sets of tendon properties are seen in athletes engaged in sports with contrasting requirements for tendon function and structural integrity. Patellar and Achilles tendon morphology and force-deformation relation were measured by combining ultrasonography, electromyography and dynamometry in elite ski jumpers, distance runners, water polo players and sedentary individuals. Tendon cross-sectional area normalized to body mass2/3 was smaller in water polo players than in other athletes (patellar and Achilles tendon; -28 to -24% or controls (patellar tendon only; -9%. In contrast, the normalized cross-sectional area was larger in runners (patellar tendon only; +26% and ski jumpers (patellar and Achilles tendon; +21% and +13%, respectively than in controls. Tendon stiffness normalized to body mass2/3 only differed in ski jumpers, compared to controls (patellar and Achilles tendon; +11% and +27%, respectively and to water polo players (Achilles tendon only; +23%. Tendon size appears as an adjusting variable to changes in loading volume and/or intensity, possibly to preserve ultimate strength or fatigue resistance. However, uncoupled morphological and mechanical properties indicate that functional requirements may also influence tendon adaptations.

  8. Ultrasound-Based Tendon Micromorphology Predicts Mechanical Characteristics of Degenerated Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulig, Kornelia; Chang, Yu-Jen; Winiarski, Slawomir; Bashford, Gregory R

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between tendon micro-morphology quantified from a sonogram and tendon mechanical characteristics measured in vivo. Nineteen adults (nine with unilateral Achilles tendinosis) participated. A commercial ultrasound scanner was used to capture longitudinal B-mode ultrasound images from the mid-portion of bilateral Achilles tendons and a custom image analysis program was used to analyze the spatial frequency content of manually defined regions of interest; in particular, the average peak spatial frequency of the regions of interest was acquired. In addition, a dynamometer and a motion analysis system indirectly measured the tendon mechanical (stiffness) and material (elastic modulus) properties. The peak spatial frequency correlated with tendon stiffness (r = 0.74, p = 0.02) and elastic modulus (r = 0.65, p = 0.05) in degenerated tendons, but not healthy tendons. This is the first study relating the mechanical characteristics of degenerated human Achilles tendon using a non-invasive micro-morphology analysis approach. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Anatomic direct repair of chronic distal biceps brachii tendon rupture without interposition graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosman, Hilary A; Fincher, Matthew; Saw, Nicholas

    2012-10-01

    Rupture of the biceps brachii insertion is relatively uncommon and may present late. Chronic ruptures pose a management dilemma, with higher reported complication rates when surgery is delayed, whilst conservatively treated injuries may do badly in active patients. Six consecutive male patients with delayed presentation of biceps rupture were treated operatively using a limited standard anterior approach, a secondary proximal "retrieval" incision, and EndoButton fixation. This modification of the well-described EndoButton technique for distal biceps reconstruction allows passage of the shortened tendon in maximal elbow flexion and a rehabilitation program without immobilization. The mean interval to repair was 79 days (range, 35-116 days). The mean age at presentation was 47.5 years. The injury mechanisms were unexpected loads on a flexed supinated forearm. Patients were assessed at a mean of 20.2 months. Range of motion was restored to 94% in flexion and 95% in prosupination compared with the uninjured limb. Supination endurance was reduced by 9 repetitions/min compared with the contralateral side (mean, 83.4 repetitions/min). Mayo Elbow Performance Scores were universally 100 and the mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 4. Patient satisfaction was high, with visual analog scores of 92 to 100. No major complications occurred, and all repairs were intact at the final follow-up. Our outcomes are comparable to acute repair, with restoration of range of motion and function and few complications. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Tendinography for diagnosing injuries to tendons and ligaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grevsten, S.; Eriksson, K.

    1979-01-01

    A radiographic method of tendinography is described. In rabbits no inflammatory reaction in the Achilles tendon was observed 12 to 15 days after injection of contrast medium. Effects of examination of two healthy subjects and a patient with a traumatic condition are described. Suitable amounts and concentrations of contrast medium for examinations of Achilies tendon and cruciate ligaments are discussed. (Auth.)

  11. Acute achilles tendon rupture in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of AT rupture has increased in recent decades. AT ruptures frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. Ruptures also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT ruptures, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonography versus magnetic resonance imaging in detecting and grading common extensor tendon tear in chronic lateral epicondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Bachta

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic performance and reliability of ultrasonography (US in detecting and grading common extensor tendon (CET tear in patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis (LE, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as the reference standard.The study comprised fifty-eight chronic LE patients. Each patient underwent US and MRI. CET status was classified as: high-grade tear (≥50% thickness, low-grade tear (<50% thickness, suspected tear (possible but not evident tear, no tear. Additionally, the following dichotomous scale was used: confirmed or unconfirmed CET tear. Relative US parameters (versus MRI for detecting CET tear included: sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy. The agreement between US and MRI findings was measured using the weighted Cohen kappa coefficient (κ.US showed moderate agreement with MRI in detecting and grading CET tear (κ = 0.49. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in CET tear detecting by US were 64.52%, 85.19%, and 72.73%, respectively. PPV and NPV of US were 83.33% and 67.65%, respectively. No patient with unconfirmed CET tear on US had high-grade CET tear on MRI.Ultrasonography is a valuable imaging modality that can be used as a screening tool to exclude high-grade CET tear in chronic LE patients. Once a tear is evident on US, MRI should be considered to assess precisely the extent of tendon injury.

  13. The prevalence and clinical significance of sonographic tendon abnormalities in asymptomatic ballet dancers: a 24-month longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comin, Jules; Cook, Jill L; Malliaras, Peter; McCormack, Moira; Calleja, Michelle; Clarke, Andrew; Connell, David

    2013-01-01

    Sonographic abnormalities of the achilles and patellar tendons are common findings in athletes, and tendinopathy is a common cause of pain and disability in athletes. However, it is unclear whether the sonographic changes are pathological or adaptive, or if they predict future injury. We undertook a cohort study to determine what sonographic features of the achilles and patellar tendons are consistent with changes as a result of ballet training, and which may be predictive of future development of disabling tendon symptoms. The achilles and patellar tendons of 79 (35 male, 44 female) professional ballet dancers (members of the English Royal Ballet) were examined with ultrasound, measuring proximal and distal tendon diameters and assessing for the presence of hypoechoic change, intratendon defects, calcification and neovascularity. All subjects were followed for 24 months for the development of patellar tendon or achilles-related pain or injury severe enough to require time off from dancing. Sonographic abnormalities were common among dancers, both male and female, and in both achilles and patellar tendons. Disabling tendon-related symptoms developed in 10 dancers and 14 tendons: 7 achilles (3 right, 4 left) and 7 patellar (2 right, 5 left). The presence of moderate or severe hypoechoic defects was weakly predictive for the development of future disabling tendon symptoms (p=0.0381); there was no correlation between any of the other sonographic abnormalities and the development of symptoms. There was no relationship between achilles or patellar tendons' diameter, either proximal or distal, with an increased likelihood of developing tendon-related disability. The presence of sonographic abnormalities is common in ballet dancers, but only the presence of focal hypoechoic changes predicts the development of future tendon-related disability. This suggests that screening of asymptomatic individuals may be of use in identifying those who are at higher risk of developing

  14. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  15. Pattern of Fascicular Involvement in Midportion Achilles Tendinopathy at Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsel, Peter; Comin, Jules; Davenport, Marcus; Connell, David

    2015-01-01

    The Achilles tendon is composed of fascicles from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, which are identifiable as discrete components at anatomical dissection. The pattern of fascicular involvement in Achilles tendinopathy may be characterized at ultrasound, and this characterization is reliable between different observers. Cross-sectional diagnostic study. Level 3. One hundred cases of Achilles tendinopathy were retrospectively evaluated by 2 blinded musculoskeletal radiologists. Using a short-axis anatomical map, each case was categorized as involving the fascicular territories of the medial head of gastrocnemius, lateral head of gastrocnemius, soleus, or combinations of these, or as indeterminate. Both radiologists agreed on the fascicular involvement pattern in 93 of 100 cases; 20 involved only medial gastrocnemius territories, 8 lateral gastrocnemius, 15 soleus, 3 medial and lateral gastrocnemius, 21 medial gastrocnemius and soleus, 9 soleus and lateral gastrocnemius, and 16 the entire tendon, and 1 case was classified as indeterminate. In 7 cases, the interpretations were discordant. The kappa value was calculated as 0.92 (95% CI, 0.86-0.98) in keeping with a high level of interobserver agreement. As assessed at ultrasound, most cases of Achilles tendinopathy involve the medial head of gastrocnemius and/or soleus fascicles. The provided observational data will increase understanding of patterns of Achilles tendinopathy. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Acute tendon changes in intense CrossFit workout: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisker, F Y; Kildegaard, S; Thygesen, M; Grosen, K; Pfeiffer-Jensen, M

    2017-11-01

    CrossFit is a fitness program that has become increasingly popular in the Western world, but as in other sports, the risk of injury is present. Only a few studies have addressed health benefits and injuries in CrossFit. It is known that chronically overloaded tendons will thicken and increase the risk of tendinopathy. However, it remains unknown whether acute overload caused by strenuous, high-intensity exercise will exert changes in tendons and if these changes can be detected and described by ultrasonography. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of acute overload on tendon thickness using ultrasonography. Standardized ultrasound measurements of the patella, Achilles, and plantaris tendons were performed before and after a specific workout in 34 healthy subjects. Significant increases were observed in patella tendon thickness before (M = 4.5, SD = 0.6) and after (M = 5.0, SD = 0.7) highly intense strenuous exercise, with an estimated mean differences of 0.47 mm (95% CI: 0.35-0.59 mm; P CrossFit exercises. In order to understand the underlying mechanisms of the findings and possibly utilize this to gain a better understanding, further studies must be conducted. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mechanical muscle and tendon properties of the plantar flexors are altered even in highly functional children with spastic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Annika; Schranz, Christian; Svehlik, Martin; Tilp, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Recent ultrasound studies found increased passive muscle stiffness and no difference in tendon stiffness in highly impaired children and young adults with cerebral palsy. However, it is not known if muscle and tendon mechanical properties are already altered in highly functional children with cerebral palsy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the mechanical and material properties of the plantar flexors in highly functional children with cerebral palsy and typically developing children. Besides strength measurements, ultrasonography was used to assess gastrocnemius medialis and Achilles tendon elongation and stiffness, Achilles tendon stress, strain, and Young's modulus in twelve children with cerebral palsy (GMFCS levels I and II) and twelve typically developing peers during passive dorsiflexion rotations as well as maximum voluntary contractions. Despite no difference in ankle joint stiffness (P>0.05) between groups, passive but not active Achilles tendon stiffness was significantly decreased (-39%) and a tendency of increased passive muscle stiffness was observed even in highly functional children with cerebral palsy. However, material properties of the tendon were not altered. Maximum voluntary contraction showed reduced plantar flexor strength (-48%) in the cerebral palsy group. Even in children with mild spastic cerebral palsy, muscle and tendon mechanical properties are altered. However, it appears that the Achilles tendon stiffness is different only when low forces act on the tendon during passive movements. Although maximum voluntary force is already decreased, forces acting on the Achilles tendon during activity appear to be sufficient to maintain typical material properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Eccentric rehabilitation exercise increases peritendinous type I collagen synthesis in humans with Achilles tendinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langberg, Henning; Ellingsgaard, H; Madsen, T

    2007-01-01

    on elite soccer players suffering from chronic Achilles tendinosis on the turnover of the peritendinous connective tissue. Twelve elite male soccer players, of whom six suffered from unilateral tendinosis and six were healthy controls, participated in this study. All participants performed 12 weeks...... of heavy-resistance eccentric training apart from their regular training and soccer activity. Before and after the training period the tissue concentration of indicators of collagen turnover was measured by the use of the microdialysis technique. After training, collagen synthesis was increased...... in the initially injured tendon (n=6; carboxyterminal propeptide of type I collagen (PICP): pre 3.9+/-2.5 microg/L to post 19.7+/-5.4 microg/L, P0.05). Collagen degradation, measured as carboxyterminal telopeptide region of type I collagen (ICTP), was not affected by training neither in the injured nor...

  19. Deformação relativa e frouxidão do tendão calcanear durante mobilização articular passiva através de ultra-sonografia por imagem Strain and slackness of achilles tendon during passive joint mobilization via imaging ultrasonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CC Peixinho

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: O estudo do comportamento das propriedades mecânicas do tendão in vivo pode trazer avanços na avaliação do impacto de programas de intervenção para flexibilidade e força, nas áreas clínica e desportiva. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste trabalho foi quantificar a deformação (strain e a frouxidão (slackness relativas do tendão calcanear, durante mobilização passiva para quatro ângulos articulares do tornozelo e dois do joelho. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O deslocamento da junção miotendínea foi quantificado através de imagens ultra-sonográficas capturadas durante a mobilização passiva do tornozelo, com o auxílio de um eletrogoniômetro e um eletromiógrafo, para garantir as angulações requeridas e a inatividade muscular, respectivamente. RESULTADOS: Os valores de deformação relativa encontrados variaram de 4,28±2,37 a -0,94±1,58% para o joelho estendido e de 2,38±1,63 a -2,32±2,16% para o joelho fletido. CONCLUSÕES: Os valores encontrados ratificam os da literatura, demonstrando a participação do tendão calcanear na variação do comprimento da unidade músculo-tendão, durante movimentação passiva. Estes resultados sugerem que as propriedades mecânicas dos tecidos tendinosos afetam a relação entre o comprimento das fibras e o ângulo articular, até mesmo nesse tipo de movimento.BACKGROUND: In vivo study of the mechanical behavior of tendons may bring advances in evaluating the impact of intervention programs for flexibility and strength, in clinical practice and sports. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to quantify the relative strain and slackness of achilles tendons during passive mobilization, for four ankle joint angles and two knee angles. METHODS: The displacement of the muscle-tendon junction was quantified by means of ultrasound images acquired during passive ankle mobilization, with the aid of an electrogoniometer and an electromyograph to ensure the achievement of the required angles

  20. [Study of the correlation between magnetic resonance imaging and surgery in the diagnosis of chronic Achilles tendinopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husson, J L; De Korvin, B; Polard, J L; Attali, J Y; Duvauferrier, R

    1994-01-01

    Eighteen cases of chronic lesions of the heel cord were evaluated by MRI and operated. The sensitivity of MRI is high in detecting intratendinous lesions (positive predictive value of 0.94); this sensitivity is linked with an unsurpassed anatomical precision. The specificity in the diagnosis of intratendinous lesions is limited as regards partial rupture versus chronic inflammation. This technique can be improved by systematically making fine cuts in the transverse plane, absolutely perpendicular to the heel cord.

  1. Results of operative treatment for recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrer, Heinz; Nauck, Tanja

    2014-08-01

    The results of operative treatment for recalcitrant midportion Achilles tendinopathy and recalcitrant retrocalcaneal bursitis were evaluated using the patient administered, disease specific, and validated VISA-A-G questionnaire. A cohort of 89 patients was prospectively followed. These patients underwent operations for sport induced midportion Achilles tendinopathy (39 procedures) or retrocalcaneal bursitis (55 procedures). Depending on the individual intraoperative findings the patients of either disease were treated with two respective operative modifications (tendon repair or no tendon repair). Preoperative and follow-up status (3, 6, and 12 months) were investigated using the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Preoperatively, the four groups scored from 37.0 ± 17.6 to 45.9 ± 15.2 (p = 0.376-0.993) on the VISA-A-G questionnaire. Six and 12 months postoperatively, the VISA-A-G scores improved significantly (p bursitis and midportion Achilles tendinopathy responded equally well to operative treatment. When repaired, additional tendon lesions did not influence this result. We demand to differentiate not only between midportion Achilles tendinopathy and retrocalcaneal bursitis but also to identify additional Achilles tendon lesions to specifically address these lesions during operative procedures.

  2. p38 MAPK Signaling in Postnatal Tendon Growth and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew J.; Sarver, Dylan C.; Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Dzierzawski, Justin T.; Gumucio, Jonathan P.; Mendias, Christopher L.

    2015-01-01

    Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA) increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo. PMID:25768932

  3. p38 MAPK signaling in postnatal tendon growth and remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Schwartz

    Full Text Available Tendon is a dynamic tissue whose structure and function is influenced by mechanical loading, but little is known about the fundamental mechanisms that regulate tendon growth and remodeling in vivo. Data from cultured tendon fibroblasts indicated that the p38 MAPK pathway plays an important role in tendon fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis in vitro. To gain greater insight into the mechanisms of tendon growth, and explore the role of p38 MAPK signaling in this process, we tested the hypotheses that inducing plantaris tendon growth through the ablation of the synergist Achilles tendon would result in rapid expansion of a neotendon matrix surrounding the original tendon, and that treatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 would prevent this growth. Rats were treated with vehicle or SB203580, and subjected to synergist ablation by bilateral tenectomy of the Achilles tendon. Changes in histological and biochemical properties of plantaris tendons were analyzed 3, 7, or 28 days after overload, and comparisons were made to non-overloaded animals. By 28 days after overload, tendon mass had increased by 30% compared to non-overloaded samples, and cross-sectional area (CSA increased by around 50%, with most of the change occurring in the neotendon. The expansion in CSA initially occurred through the synthesis of a hyaluronic acid rich matrix that was progressively replaced with mature collagen. Pericytes were present in areas of active tendon growth, but never in the original tendon ECM. Inhibition of p38 MAPK resulted in a profound decrease in IL6 expression, and had a modest effect on the expression of other ECM and cell proliferation genes, but had a negligible impact on overall tendon growth. The combined results from this study provided novel insights into tendon mechanobiology, and suggest that p38 MAPK signaling does not appear to be necessary for tendon growth in vivo.

  4. Influence of acute and chronic streptozotocin-induced diabetes on the rat tendon extracellular matrix and mechanical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volper, Brent D; Huynh, Richard T; Arthur, Kathryn A

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor for tendinopathy, and tendon abnormalities are common in diabetic patients. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg)-induced diabetes and insulin therapy on tendon mechanical and cellular properties. Sprague-Dawley rats....... Future studies could attempt to further address the mechanisms contributing to the increase in tendon problems noted in diabetic patients, especially since our data suggest that hyperglycemia per se does not alter tendon mechanical properties....

  5. Influence of repetitive mechanical loading on MMP2 activity in tendon fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huisman, Elise; Lu, Alex; Jamil, Sarwat; Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; McCormack, Robert; Roberts, Clive; Scott, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase2 has been implicated in tendon pathology caused by repetitive movements. However, its activity in the early stages of the tendon's response to overuse, and its presence in the circulation as a possible indicator of tendon degradation, remain unknown. Human tendon cells were repetitively stretched for 5 days, and the rabbit Achilles tendon complex underwent repetitive motion 3× per week for 2 weeks. Quantitative polymer chain reaction analysis was performed to detect matrix metalloproteinase2/14 and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase2 messenger ribonucleic acid of cells and rabbit tissue, and matrix metalloproteinase2 protein levels were determined with an enzyme linked immunoassay. Matrix metalloproteinase2 activity was examined using zymography of the conditioned media, tendon and serum. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize matrix metalloproteinase2 in tendon tissue, and the density of fibrillar collagen in tendons was examined using second harmonic generation microscopy. Tendon cells stretched with high strain or high frequency demonstrated increased matrix metalloproteinase2 messenger ribonucleic acid and protein levels. Matrix metalloproteinase2 activity was increased in the rabbit Achilles tendon tissue at weeks 1 and 2; however, serum activity was only increased at week 1. After 2 weeks of exercise, the collagen density was lower in specific regions of the exercised rabbit Achilles tendon complex. Matrix metalloproteinase2 expression in exercised rabbit Achilles tendons was detected surrounding tendon fibroblasts. Repetitive mechanical stimulation of tendon cells results in a small increase in matrix metalloproteinase2 levels, but it appears unlikely that serum matrix metalloproteinase2 will be a useful indicator of tendon overuse injury. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1991-2000, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. [The Vulnerable Heel of Achilles: Intratendinous Abscess Following a Cat Bite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merschin, David; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Seifert, Julia

    2017-06-01

    An 83-year-old patient suffered a cat bite dorsally to the Achilles tendon. In the further course, he developed an isolated intratendinous abscess of the Achilles tendon, which was surgically revised twice and subsequently healed with antibiotic treatment. In Germany, about 40,000 bite injuries of different origins occur annually. Most of these injuries are cat or dog bites, while human bites are rare. Although the course is often complicated, there are no standard recommendations for treatment. An intratendinous abscess after animal bite injury has not been described in the literature as yet. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON DURABILITY OF THE CALCANEAL TENDON AND THE PATHOMECHANISM OF ITS ATRAUMATIC, SUBCUTANEOUS BREAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Skiba

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The pathology of the calcaneal tendon (Achilles presents a serious medical and social problem. This tendon is the strongest plantar flexor of the foot that plays a fundamental role in the accomplishment of human gait. Although this role has long been recognized, neither in medical nor in biomechanical literature can one find a clear description of subcutaneous break of the Achilles tendon. Its pathomechanism and the causes have not been fully accounted for. Many authors concentrate mainly on medical and biological aspects of the damage of the Achilles tendon.They often claim that the vasculature of the tendon itself plays a significant role in the pathogenesis, because the blood supply to the tendon changes with human age, decreasing substantially after the age of 30, leading both to regressive changes in the tendon as well as to a reduction of the tendon’s mechanical strength. The refore a comprehensive description and explanation of this phenomenon needs an interdisciplinary approach, taking into account not only the medical and biological aspects, but also the mechanics sensu largo. The aim of the paper is to put forward a complete description of the pathomechanism of the Achilles tendon spontaneous break, within the framework of its mechanics. The conclusions are based upon a kinematical analysis of the knee joint, a trajectory determination of the point of origin of the gastrocnemius from the initial position of 90 degrees bent up to the full knee extension, and an experimental examination of uniaxial stretching of the Achilles tendon.

  8. Investigating tendon mineralisation in the avian hindlimb: a model for tendon ageing, injury and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agabalyan, Natacha A; Evans, Darrell J R; Stanley, Rachael L

    2013-01-01

    Mineralisation of the tendon tissue has been described in various models of injury, ageing and disease. Often resulting in painful and debilitating conditions, the processes underlying this mechanism are poorly understood. To elucidate the progression from healthy tendon to mineralised tendon, an appropriate model is required. In this study, we describe the spontaneous and non-pathological ossification and calcification of tendons of the hindlimb of the domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). The appearance of the ossified avian tendon has been described previously, although there have been no studies investigating the developmental processes and underlying mechanisms leading to the ossified avian tendon. The tissue and cells from three tendons – the ossifying extensor and flexor digitorum longus tendons and the non-ossifying Achilles tendon – were analysed for markers of ageing and mineralisation using histology, immunohistochemistry, cytochemistry and molecular analysis. Histologically, the adult tissue showed a loss of healthy tendon crimp morphology as well as markers of calcium deposits and mineralisation. The tissue showed a lowered expression of collagens inherent to the tendon extracellular matrix and presented proteins expressed by bone. The cells from the ossified tendons showed a chondrogenic and osteogenic phenotype as well as tenogenic phenotype and expressed the same markers of ossification and calcification as the tissue. A molecular analysis of the gene expression of the cells confirmed these results. Tendon ossification within the ossified avian tendon seems to be the result of an endochondral process driven by its cells, although the roles of the different cell populations have yet to be elucidated. Understanding the role of the tenocyte within this tissue and the process behind tendon ossification may help us prevent or treat ossification that occurs in injured, ageing or diseased tendon. PMID:23826786

  9. Peritendinous elastase treatment induces tendon degeneration in rats: A potential model of tendinopathy in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yen-Ting; Wu, Po-Ting; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of elastase on tendinopathy, as well as to evaluate the potential for peritendinous injections of elastase into rats to cause tendinopathy. We first investigated the expression of elastase in the tendons of patients with tendinopathy, and then established the effects of elastase injection on the Achilles tendons of rats. Ultrasonographic and incapacitance testing was used to conduct tests for 8 weeks. Tendon tissues were collected for histological observation and protein levels of collagen type I and type III were detected using Western blotting. The percentage of elastase-positive cells increased in human specimens with grades II and III tendinopathy. The rat model demonstrated that the thickness of the tendon increased after elastase injection during Week 2-8. Hypercellularity and focal lesions were detected after Week 2. The expression of elastase was increased and elastin was decreased in Week 8. Collagen type I expression was decreased, but type III was increased in Week 4. These results suggested that elastase may be involved in the development of chronic tendinopathy, and that peritendinous injection of elastase may result in tendinopathy in rats. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Can ultrasound imaging predict the development of Achilles and patellar tendinopathy? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, Seán; McCreesh, Karen; Culloty, Fiona; Purtill, Helen; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) imaging is commonly used to visualise tendon structure. It is not clear whether the presence of structural abnormalities in asymptomatic tendons predicts the development of future tendon symptoms in the Achilles or patellar tendon. To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis investigating the ability of US imaging to predict future symptoms of patellar or Achilles tendinopathy. Prospective studies that performed US imaging of Achilles OR patellar tendon structure among asymptomatic patients at baseline and a clinical measure of pain and/or function at follow-up were included. Study quality was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool by two independent reviewers, and predictive ability of US was assessed using meta-analyses. The majority of participants in the review were from sporting populations. Meta-analysis revealed that tendon abnormalities on US are associated with future symptoms of both patellar and Achilles tendinopathy (RR=4.97, 95% CI 3.20 to 7.73). Subgroup analysis indicated that tendon abnormalities at baseline were associated with an increased risk of both Achilles (RR=7.33, 95% CI 2.95 to 18.24) and patellar (RR=4.35, 95% CI 2.62 to 7.23) tendinopathy. This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that tendon abnormalities visualised using US in asymptomatic tendons are predictive of future tendinopathy and are associated with at least a fourfold increased risk. Identification of at-risk athletes using screening tools such as US may allow preventative programmes to be implemented. However, it is clear that other factors beyond tissue structure are involved in the development of lower limb tendinopathy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. One-year follow-up of platelet-rich plasma treatment in chronic Achilles tendinopathy: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Suzan; de Vos, Robert J.; Weir, Adam; van Schie, Hans T. M.; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M. A.; Verhaar, Jan A. N.; Weinans, Harrie; Tol, Johannes L.

    2011-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a common disease among both athletes and in the general population in which the use of platelet-rich plasma has recently been increasing. Good evidence for the use of this autologous product in tendinopathy is limited, and data on longer-term results are lacking. To study

  12. The effect of acute exercise on collagen turnover in human tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Pingel, Jessica; Boesen, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    and compared to values obtained by 72-h post-exercise. Power Doppler was used to monitor alterations in intratendinous blood flow velocity of the Achilles tendon and MRI used to quantitate changes in tendon cross-section area. Acute loading resulted in an increased collagen synthesis 72 h after the run in both...

  13. Effectiveness of hybridized nano- and microstructure biodegradable, biocompatible, collagen-based, three-dimensional bioimplants in repair of a large tendon-defect model in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshiri, Ali; Oryan, Ahmad; Meimandi-Parizi, Abdulhamid; Silver, Ian A; Tanideh, Nader; Golestani, Navid

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effectiveness of hybridized, three-dimensional (3D) collagen implants in repair of experimentally-induced tendon defects in rabbits. Seventy-five mature New Zealand albino rabbits were divided into treated (n = 50) and control (n = 20) groups. The left Achilles tendon was completely transected and 2 cm excised. In treated animals defects were filled with hybridized collagen implants and repaired with sutures. In control rabbits tendon defects were sutured similarly but the gap was left untreated. Changes in injured and normal contralateral tendons were assessed weekly by ultrasonography. Among the treated animals, small pilot groups were euthanized at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40 (n = 5 at each time interval) and the remainder (n = 20) at 60 days post-injury. All control animals were euthanized at 60 days. Tendon lesions of all animals were examined morphologically and histologically immediately after death. Those of the experimental groups (n = 20 for each) were examined for gross pathological, histopathological and ultrastructural changes together with dry matter content at 60 days post-injury, as were the normal, contralateral tendons of both groups. In comparison with healing lesions of control animals, the treated tendons showed greater numbers of mature tenoblasts and tenocytes, minimal peritendinous adhesions and oedema, together with greater echogenicity, homogeneity and fibril alignment. Fewer chronic inflammatory cells were present in treated than control tendons. Hybridized collagen implants acted as scaffolds for tenoblasts and longitudinally-orientated newly-formed collagen fibrils, which encouraged tendon repair with homogeneous, well-organized highly aligned scar tissue that was histologically and ultrastructurally more mature than in untreated controls. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture ?

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, Jos? Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a s...

  15. Elastographic characteristics of the metacarpal tendons in horses without clinical evidence of tendon injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustgarten, Meghann; Redding, W Rich; Labens, Raphael; Morgan, Michel; Davis, Weston; Seiler, Gabriela S

    2014-01-01

    Tendon and ligament injuries are common causes of impaired performance in equine athletes. Gray-scale ultrasonography is the current standard method for diagnosing and monitoring these injuries, however this modality only provides morphologic information. Elastography is an ultrasound technique that allows detection and measurement of tissue strain, and may provide valuable mechanical information about equine tendon and ligament injuries. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility, reproducibility, and repeatability of elastography; and to describe elastographic characteristics of metacarpal tendons in sound horses. Nineteen legs for 17 clinically sound horses without evidence of musculoskeletal pathology were included. Elastographic images of the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons and the branches of the suspensory ligament (tendon of the interosseous muscle) were described quantitatively and qualitatively. There was no statistically significant difference between operators (P = 0.86) nor within operators (P = 0.93). For qualitative assessments, reproducibility (0.46) was moderate and repeatability (0.78) was good. Similar to human Achilles tendons, equine tendons were classified as predominantly hard using elastography. There was no statistically significant difference in stiffness of the flexor tendons (P = 0.96). No significant difference in stiffness was found with altered leg position during standing (P = 0.84) and while nonweight bearing (P = 0.61). The flexor tendons were softer when imaged in longitudinal versus transverse planes (P tendons and ligaments of the distal forelimb in horses. © 2013 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. An anatomic and clinical study of the adductor magnus tendon-descending genicular artery bone flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dong; Wang, Hai-Wen; Xu, Da-Chuan; Wang, Hong-Gang; Wu, Wei-Zhi; Zhang, Hui-Ru

    2011-01-01

    The composite tissue flap of the descending genicular vessels with the adductor magnus tendon is a newly developed, reliable method to repair the Achilles tendon and relevant skin defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of the adductor magnus tendon-descending genicular artery bone flap, and the feasibility and value for the repair of the Achilles tendon and relevant skin defects. There were 34 adult specimens used for the anatomy of this flap. The descending genicular artery originates 10.5 ± 1.6 cm above the adductor tubercle, with a diameter of 1.8 ± 0.6 mm and a length of 1.2 ± 0.5 cm. Its articular branch is distributed in the adductor magnus tendon and the medial condyle of the femur. The saphenous branch has a diameter of 1.1 ± 0.3 mm and is distributed in the skin of the upper medial calf. A total of 16 cases of trauma-induced Achilles tendon damage and calcaneus and skin defects were repaired with the vascularized adductor magnus tendon bone flap, including the reconstruction of Achilles tendon insertion and repair of relevant skin defects. All of the composite tissue flaps were viable, the skin sensation of the flaps was recovered, and all patients walked with a normal gait. Our results suggested that the adductor magnus tendon-descending genicular artery bone flap is an alternative method to repair composite tissue defects of the Achilles tendon. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Study protocol: a double blind randomised control trial of high volume image guided injections in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy in a young active population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Davies, Robert M; Nicol, Alastair; McCurdie, I; Watson, James; Baker, Polly; Wheeler, Patrick; Fong, Daniel; Lewis, Mark; Bennett, Alexander N

    2017-05-22

    Chronic tendinopathy is a significant problem particularly in active populations limiting sporting and occupational performance. The prevalence of patellar tendinopathy in some sports is near 50% and the incidence of lower limb tendinopathy is 1.4% p.a. in the UK Military. Management includes isometric, eccentric, heavy slow resistance exercises and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). Often these treatments are inadequate yet there is no good evidence for injection therapies and success rates from surgery can be as low as 50%. High Volume Image Guided Injection (HVIGI) proposes to strip away the neovascularity and disrupt the nerve ingrowth seen in chronic cases and has shown promising results in case series. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of HVIGI in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). RCT comparing 40ml HVIGI, with or without corticosteroid, with a 3ml local anaesthetic sham-control injection. Ninety-six participants will be recruited. male, 18-55 years old, chronic Achilles or patellar tendinopathy of at least 6 months, failed conservative management including ESWT, and Ultrasound (US) evidence of neovascularisation, tendon thickening and echogenic changes. Outcome measures will be recorded at baseline, 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measures include The Victoria Institute of Sport Assessments for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy (VISA-A and VISA-P) and VAS pain. Secondary outcome measures include Modified Ohberg score, maximum tendon diameter and assessment of hypoechoic appearance on US, and Functional Activity Assessment. Despite previous interventional trials and reviews there is still insufficient evidence to guide injectable therapy for chronic tendinopathy that has failed conservative treatment. The scant evidence available suggests HVIGI has the greatest potential however there is no level one RCT evidence to support this. Investigating the efficacy of HVIGI against control in a RCT and separating the effect of HVIGI

  18. Tendon balancing in hallux valgus surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Elst, C; Van Riet, A; Vandeputte, G

    2016-09-01

    Recurrent valgus of the hallux after hallux valgus surgery is an unpleasant complication. A possible cause is the imbalance and maltracking of particularly the extensor hallucis longus (EHL) and less frequently the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) or extensor hallucis brevis (EHB) tendon of the hallux. In patients with a tight achilles tendon, the EHL tendon can be recruited to aid dorsiflexion of the foot, creating imbalance. The literature on this subject is very scarce. In 10 patients with severe hallux valgus, a perioperative evaluation after performing the osteotomies and capsular closure showed tight extensor or flexor tendons of the hallux with residual valgus maltracking. A balancing of the tendons was performed with a -realignment -lengthening procedure. A good clinical result was obtained in all patients. No adverse effects were seen after tendon balancing. Strength in all tendons was at least 3+, except in one patient with multiple sclerosis. No weaknesses or -difficulties during walking were reported. Tendon balancing could play a role in prevention of hallux valgus recurrences and can be performed without loss of strength or compromising of walking ability.

  19. IN VITRO TRANSPLANTATION OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED CELLS TO THE TENDON SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    Couvreur, Paulus J. J.; Zhao, Chunfeng; Murphy, Stephen; Amadio, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study in vitro transfection of tendon cells and adherence of transfected cells to different tendon surfaces. Achilles tendon fibroblasts from 2-month-old New Zealand white rabbits were cultured to confluence, after which the cells were transfected by an adenovirus carrying either the β-galactosidase reporter gene or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene at multiplicities of infection (MOIs) of 50, 100, or 500. Two days later, the cells were transplanted o...

  20. Fabrication and characterization of a decellularized bovine tendon sheet for tendon reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Liang-Ju; Jiang, Yan-Lin; Zhang, Cheng-Hao; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jie-Liang; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Yan-Jing; Yao, Xuan; Luo, Jing-Cong; Qin, Ting-Wu

    2017-08-01

    Obtaining a performing decellularized tendon scaffold with proper dimensions and adequate availability is highly desirable. However, the combined study of complete decellularization and detailed characterization of native tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) from large animals is still lacking. In the present study, we developed a new decellularization protocol, including physical methods and enzymatic solutions for processing bovine Achilles tendons, and produced a decellularized bovine tendon sheet (DBTS) scaffold for tendon reconstruction. The decellularization effectiveness was demonstrated by DNA quantification and histological qualification. The removal of the alpha-gal epitopes was confirmed by ELISA analysis and immunohistochemical staining. After decellularization, there were no significant alterations of the native tendon extracellular matrix (ECM) properties, including the internal ultrastructure, biochemical compositions such as collagen, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), fibronectin and decorin, as well as substantial mechanical strength. Furthermore, the DBTS scaffold showed no cytotoxic and promoted the proliferation of NIH-3T3 fibroblasts in vitro. When implanted into rat subcutaneous tissue, the DBTS scaffold displayed excellent histocompatibility in vivo. Our results, while offering a new decellularization protocol for large tendons, can provide a promising biologic scaffold with a combination of mechanical strength and tendon ECM bioactive factors that may have many potential applications in tendon reconstruction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2299-2311, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Desequilíbrios musculares entre flexores dorsais e plantares do tornozelo após tratamento conservador e acelerado da ruptura do tendão calcâneo Muscle imbalance between ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors after conservative and accelerated treatment of Achilles tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mayer

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A ruptura do tendão calcâneo (TC reduz a sobrecarga mecânica dos flexores plantares (FP do tornozelo. Essa alteração muda o equilíbrio natural entre os FP e flexores dorsais (FD do tornozelo. O objetivo do estudo foi avaliar as razões isocinéticas concêntricas convencionais de torque de pacientes submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico de ruptura aguda do TC após dois protocolos diferentes de reabilitação. Após procedimento cirúrgico para reconstrução do TC, a amostra foi dividida de forma intencional em dois grupos: conservador (GC, 11 homens, 41,3±7,9 anos e grupo acelerado (GA, 13 homens, 43,5±13,7 anos. O GC permaneceu com imobilização gessada no tornozelo por seis semanas (tratamento tradicional, enquanto o GA usou uma órtese robofoot em posição neutra e, após duas semanas, iniciou mobilização e apoio precoce do tornozelo, com reabilitação por seis semanas. Após 3 meses de pós-operatório, a razão do torque concêntrico máximo dos FD pelos FP do tornozelo foi avaliada por dinamômetro isocinético. As razões de torque do lado operado se mantiveram superiores às do lado saudável mesmo após 3 meses de pós-operatório (pAchilles tendon rupture reduces ankle plantarflexor (PF muscles mechanical overload. This change in the ankle joint mechanics changes the natural muscle balance between dorsiflexor (DF and PF muscles. The purpose of this study was to assess such imbalance by concentric conventional isokinetic torque ratios of patients who underwent different rehabilitation protocols after surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. After surgery, subjects were assigned to either a conservative or to an accelerated rehabilitation group. The conservative group (11 men, 41.3±7.9 years old remained with a plaster cast for 6 weeks after surgery. The accelerated group (13 men, 43.5±13,7 years old used a"robofoot" cast for 2 weeks and underwent ankle mobilization and early weight bearing for a period of 6 weeks post

  2. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Qian [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Chen Denglong [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China); Yang Zhiming [Division of Stem Cell and Tissue Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li Min, E-mail: mli@fjnu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, Fujian350108 (China)

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  3. In vitro and in vivo research on using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Qian; Chen Denglong; Yang Zhiming; Li Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of using Antheraea pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold was investigated in vitro and in vivo, respectively, utilizing tenocytes and animal model. The animal model used here was an adult New Zealand White rabbit with a 15-mm gap defect in both sides of the Achilles tendon. The Achilles tendon defects in one side of hind legs were repaired using the braided A. pernyi silk fibroin scaffold in experimental group (n = 24), while the other side left untreated as negative group (n = 24). The recovery of the defect tendons were evaluated postoperatively at the 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 16th week using macroscopic, histological, immunohistochemical, scanning electron micrograph and biomechanical test techniques. In vitro results examined by scanning electron micrograph showed that A. pernyi silk fibroin promote the adhesion and propagation of the tenocytes. In vivo, at 16 weeks after implantation, morphological results showed that neo-tendons were formed, and bundles of collagen fibers in the neo-tendons were uniform and well oriented. Immunohistochemical results showed that collagen type in the regenerated tendons was predominantly type I. The maximum load of regenerated tendon at 16 weeks reached 55.46% of the normal tendon values. Preliminary, we concluded that A. pernyi silk fibroin promoted the recovery of Achilles tendon defect of rabbit and the application of A. pernyi silk fibroin as tissue engineering tendon scaffold is feasible.

  4. Biomedical Risk Factors of Achilles Tendinopathy in Physically Active People: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaia, Maria; Vlahovich, Nicole; Ashton, Kevin J; Hughes, David C

    2017-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is the most prevalent tendon disorder in people engaged in running and jumping sports. Aetiology of Achilles tendinopathy is complex and requires comprehensive research of contributing risk factors. There is relatively little research focussing on potential biomedical risk factors for Achilles tendinopathy. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify studies and summarise current knowledge of biomedical risk factors of Achilles tendinopathy in physically active people. Research databases were searched for relevant articles followed by assessment in accordance with PRISMA statement and standards of Cochrane collaboration. Levels of evidence and quality assessment designation were implemented in accordance with OCEBM levels of evidence and Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale, respectively. A systematic review of the literature identified 22 suitable articles. All included studies had moderate level of evidence (2b) with the Newcastle-Ottawa score varying between 6 and 9. The majority (17) investigated genetic polymorphisms involved in tendon structure and homeostasis and apoptosis and inflammation pathways. Overweight as a risk factor of Achilles tendinopathy was described in five included studies that investigated non-genetic factors. COL5A1 genetic variants were the most extensively studied, particularly in association with genetic variants in the genes involved in regulation of cell-matrix interaction in tendon and matrix homeostasis. It is important to investigate connections and pathways whose interactions might be disrupted and therefore alter collagen structure and lead to the development of pathology. Polymorphisms in genes involved in apoptosis and inflammation, and Achilles tendinopathy did not show strong association and, however, should be considered for further investigation. This systematic review suggests that biomedical risk factors are an important consideration in the future study of propensity to the development

  5. Tendon progenitor cells in injured tendons have strong chondrogenic potential: the CD105-negative subpopulation induces chondrogenic degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Shuji; Otsuru, Satoru; Candela, Maria Elena; Cantley, Leslie; Uchibe, Kenta; Hofmann, Ted J; Zhang, Kairui; Wapner, Keith L; Soslowsky, Louis J; Horwitz, Edwin M; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi

    2014-12-01

    To study the cellular mechanism of the tendon repair process, we used a mouse Achilles tendon injury model to focus on the cells recruited to the injured site. The cells isolated from injured tendon 1 week after the surgery and uninjured tendons contained the connective tissue progenitor populations as determined by colony-forming capacity, cell surface markers, and multipotency. When the injured tendon-derived progenitor cells (inTPCs) were transplanted into injured Achilles tendons, they were not only integrated in the regenerating area expressing tenogenic phenotype but also trans-differentiated into chondrogenic cells in the degenerative lesion that underwent ectopic endochondral ossification. Surprisingly, the micromass culture of the inTPCs rapidly underwent chondrogenic differentiation even in the absence of exogenous bone morphogenetic proteins or TGFβs. The cells isolated from human ruptured tendon tissues also showed connective tissue progenitor properties and exhibited stronger chondrogenic ability than bone marrow stromal cells. The mouse inTPCs contained two subpopulations one positive and one negative for CD105, a coreceptor of the TGFβ superfamily. The CD105-negative cells showed superior chondrogenic potential in vitro and induced larger chondroid degenerative lesions in mice as compared to the CD105-positive cells. These findings indicate that tendon progenitor cells are recruited to the injured site of tendons and have a strong chondrogenic potential and that the CD105-negative population of these cells would be the cause for chondroid degeneration in injured tendons. The newly identified cells recruited to the injured tendon may provide novel targets to develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate tendon repair. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  6. triceps tendon avulsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2014-01-01

    Jan 1, 2014 ... trauma. Systemic causes such as chronic renal failure, steriod use, diabetes mellitus, hyperparathyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, osteogensis imperfecta and local causes like local steriod injection, olecranon bursitis and attritional changes due to degenerative arthritis are associated with tendon weakening.

  7. Compromised Neurotrophic and Angiogenic Regenerative Capability during Tendon Healing in a Rat Model of Type-II Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha S Ahmed

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus type-II (DM-II may increase the risk of suffering painful connective tissue disorders and tendon ruptures. The pathomechanisms, however, by which diabetes adversely affects connective tissue matrix metabolism and regeneration, still need better definition. Our aim was to study the effect of DM-II on expressional changes of neuro- and angiotrophic mediators and receptors in intact and healing Achilles tendon. The right Achilles tendon was transected in 5 male DM-II Goto-Kakizaki (GK and 4 age-matched Wistar control rats. The left Achilles tendons were left intact. At week 2 post-injury, NGF, BDNF, TSP, and receptors TrkA, TrkB and Nk1 gene expression was studied by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR and their protein distribution by immunohistochemistry in intact and injured tendons. The expression of tendon-related markers, Scleraxis (SCX and Tenomodulin (TNMD, was evaluated by qRT-PCR in intact and injured tendons. Injured tendons of diabetic GK rats exhibited significantly down-regulated Ngf and Tsp1 mRNA and corresponding protein levels, and down-regulated Trka gene expression compared to injured Wistar controls. Intact tendons of DM-II GK rats displayed reduced mRNA levels for Ngf, Tsp1 and Trkb compared to corresponding intact non-diabetic tendons. Up-regulated Scx and Tnmd gene expression was observed in injured tendons of normal and diabetic GK rats compared to intact Wistar controls. However, these molecules were not up-regulated in injured DM-II GK rats compared to their corresponding controls. Our results suggest that DM-II has detrimental effects on neuro- and angiotrophic pathways, and such effects may reflect the compromised repair seen in diabetic Achilles tendon. Thus, novel approaches for regeneration of injured, including tendinopathic, and surgically repaired diabetic tendons may include therapeutic molecular modulation of neurotrophic pathways such as NGF and its receptors.

  8. Tendon needling for treatment of tendinopathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, David; Borchers, James; McCamey, Kendra

    2015-02-01

    To summarize the best available evidence to determine if tendon needling is an effective treatment for tendinopathy. Data source. Medline and Cochrane Databases through November 2013. Utilizing the search terms tendinopathy, needle, needling, tenotomy, dry needling, needling tendon, needle fenestration, and tendon fenestration, 17 articles were identified through our systematic literature search. Of these, 4 studies met the inclusion criteria. Four independent reviewers reviewed the articles. The study results and generated conclusions were agreed upon. The studies that were included in this review suggest that tendon needling improves patient reported outcomes in patients with tendinopathy. In 2 studies evaluating tendon needling in lateral epicondylosis, one showed an improvement in a subjective visual analogue scale score of 34% (significant change > 25%) from baseline at 6 months. The other showed an improvement of 56.1% in a visual analogue scale score from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in addition to eccentric therapy for Achilles tendinosis, the subjective Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment-Achilles (VISA-A) score improved by 19.9 (significant change > 10) (95% CI, 13.6-26.2) from baseline. In 1 study evaluating tendon needling in rotator cuff tendinosis, the subjective shoulder pain and disability index showed statistical significant improvement from baseline at 6 months (P tendinopathy. There is a trend that shows that the addition of autologous blood products may further improve theses outcomes.

  9. Plantaris excision in the treatment of non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, James D F; Freeman, Richard; Pollock, Noel

    2015-12-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is a serious and frequently occurring problem, especially in elite athletes. Recent research has suggested a role for the plantaris tendon in non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. To assess whether excising the plantaris tendon improved the symptoms of Achilles tendinopathy in elite athletes. This prospective consecutive case series study investigated 32 elite athletes who underwent plantaris tendon excision using a mini-incision technique to treat medially located pain associated with non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. Preoperative and postoperative visual analogue scores (VAS) for pain and the foot and ankle outcome score (FAOS) as well as time to return to sport and satisfaction scores were assessed. At a mean follow-up of 22.4 months (12-48), 29/32 (90%) of athletes were satisfied with the results. Thirty of the 32 athletes (94%) returned to sport at a mean of 10.3 weeks (5-27). The mean VAS score improved from 5.8 to 0.8 (ptendinopathy. Excision carries a low risk of complications and may provide significant improvement in symptoms enabling an early return to elite-level sports. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Human Genetic Variation, Sport and Exercise Medicine, and Achilles Tendinopathy: Role for Angiogenesis-Associated Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Masouda; El Khoury, Louis Y; Raleigh, Stuart M; Ribbans, William J; Posthumus, Michael; Collins, Malcolm; September, Alison V

    2016-09-01

    Sport and Exercise Medicine is one of the important subspecialties of 21st century healthcare contributing to improving the physical function, health, and vitality of populations while reducing the prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases. Moreover, sport and exercise are associated with injuries such as Achilles tendinopathy, which is a common tendon injury. The angiogenesis-associated signaling pathway plays a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling, with increased levels of angiogenic cytokines reported after cyclic stretching of tendon fibroblasts. We investigated the variants in angiogenesis genes in relation to the risk of Achilles tendinopathy in two population samples drawn independently from South Africa (SA) and the United Kingdom (UK). The study sample comprised 120 SA and 130 UK healthy controls, and 108 SA and 87 UK participants with Achilles tendinopathy. All participants were genotyped for five functional polymorphisms in the vascular endothelial growth factor, A isoform (VEGFA) (rs699947, rs1570360, rs2010963) and kinase insert-domain receptor (KDR) genes (rs1870377, rs2071559). The VEGFA A-G-G inferred haplotype was associated with an increased risk of Achilles tendinopathy in the SA group (15% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.048) and the combined SA+UK group (14% in controls vs. 20% in cases, p = 0.009). These new findings implicate the VEGFA gene with Achilles tendinopathy risk, while highlighting the potential biological significance of the angiogenesis signaling pathway in the etiology of Achilles tendinopathy. The evidence suggesting a genetic contribution to the susceptibility of sustaining a tendon injury is growing. We anticipate that high-throughput and multi-omics approaches, building on genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, may soon uncover the pathophysiology of many diseases in the field of Sports and Exercise Medicine, as a new frontier of global precision medicine.

  11. Tendon Injury and Fluoroquinolone Use: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Anne L; Wu, Wei; Cortes, Daniel; Rochon, Paula A

    2013-09-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are commonly used to treat infections and are prescribed by general practitioners, medical specialists and surgeons. Tendon injury has been associated with the use of these medications but the risk associated with newer fluoroquinolones has not been established. The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence from observational studies to determine the strength of the association between fluoroquinolone use and tendinopathy, and to identify risk factors for this complication. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Collaboration from inception through May 2013 to identify observational studies focused on tendon injury and fluoroquinolones. Studies with original data were selected for inclusion following the PRISMA guidelines. Of the 560 abstracts screened, 16 relevant studies were independently rated by three authors (WW, AS, DC) using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale, and assigned a quality score out of 9. High-quality studies (i.e. scored 4.5 or higher) are summarized in detail in this article. Data were independently extracted by two authors (WW, AS). Overall, 16 studies were included in our study. Eight were deemed to be of high quality and five specifically evaluated Achilles tendon rupture. In addition, three studies examined Achilles tendinitis, and three included tendon disorders (including any tendon rupture) as an outcome. Results from these studies suggest that individuals exposed to fluoroquinolones are at increased risk for Achilles tendon rupture, particularly within the first month following exposure to the drug (odds ratios ranged from 1.1 to 7.1). One study showed an increased risk of tendon rupture in those over 60 years of age. Five studies stated that individuals taking fluoroquinolones and oral corticosteroids are at increased risk for tendon injury compared with those taking fluoroquinolones alone. Four studies examined the differential effect of a limited number of fluoroquinolones

  12. Structural adaptations of rat lateral gastrocnemius muscle-tendon complex to a chronic stretching program and their quantification based on ultrasound biomicroscopy and optical microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixinho, Carolina Carneiro; Martins, Natália Santos Fonseca; de Oliveira, Liliam Fernandes; Machado, João Carlos

    2014-01-01

    A chronic regimen of flexibility training can increase range of motion, with the increase mechanisms believed to be a change in the muscle material properties or in the neural components associated with this type of training. This study followed chronic structural adaptations of lateral gastrocnemius muscle of rats submitted to stretching training (3 times a week during 8weeks), based on muscle architecture measurements including pennation angle, muscle thickness and tendon length obtained from ultrasound biomicroscopic images, in vivo. Fiber length and sarcomere number per 100μm were determined in 3 fibers of each muscle (ex vivo and in vitro, respectively), using conventional optical microscopy. Stretching training resulted in a significant pennation angle reduction of the stretched leg after 12 sessions (25%, P=0.002 to 0.024). Muscle thickness and tendon length presented no significant changes. Fiber length presented a significant increase for the stretched leg (8.5%, P=0.00006), with the simultaneous increase in sarcomere length (5%, P=0.041) since the stretched muscles presented less sarcomeres per 100μm. A stretching protocol with characteristics similar to those applied in humans was sufficient to modify muscle architecture of rats with absence of a sarcomerogenesis process. The results indicate that structural adaptations take place in skeletal muscle tissue submitted to moderate-intensity stretching training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterotopic mineralization (ossification or calcification) in tendinopathy or following surgical tendon trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Etienne J O; Frank, Cyril B; Shrive, Nigel G; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt; Hart, David A

    2012-01-01

    Heterotopic tendon mineralization (ossification or calcification), which may be a feature of tendinopathy or which may develop following surgical trauma (repair or graft harvest), has not received much attention. The purpose of this article is to review the prevalence, mechanisms and consequences of heterotopic tendon mineralization and to identify the gaps in our current understanding. We focus on endochondral heterotopic ossification and draw on knowledge of the mechanisms of this process in other tissues and conditions. Finally, we introduce a novel murine Achilles tendon needle injury model, which will enable us to further study the mechanisms and biomechanical consequences of tendon mineralization. PMID:22974213

  14. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Marques, José Pedro; Lucas, Francisco Manuel; Fonseca, Fernando Pereira

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  15. Simultaneous bilateral patellar tendon rupture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Lino Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bilateral patellar tendon rupture is a rare entity, often associated with systemic diseases and patellar tendinopathy. The authors report a rare case of a 34-year-old man with simultaneous bilateral rupture of the patellar tendon caused by minor trauma. The patient is a retired basketball player with no past complaints of chronic knee pain and a history of steroid use. Surgical management consisted in primary end-to-end tendon repair protected temporarily with cerclage wiring, followed by a short immobilization period and intensive rehabilitation program. Five months after surgery, the patient was able to fully participate in sport activities.

  16. [Pathophysiology of overuse tendon injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannus, P; Paavola, M; Paakkala, T; Parkkari, J; Järvinen, T; Järvinen, M

    2002-10-01

    Overuse tendon injury is one of the most common injuries in sports. The etiology as well as the pathophysiological mechanisms leading to tendinopathy are of crucial medical importance. At the moment intrinsic and extrinsic factors are assumed as mechanisms of overuse tendon injury. Except for the acute, extrinsic trauma, the chronic overuse tendon injury is a multifactorial process. There are many other factors, such as local hypoxia, less of nutrition, impaired metabolism and local inflammatory that may also contribute to the development of tissue damage. The exact interaction of these factors cannot be explained entirely at the moment. Further studies will be necessary in order to get more information.

  17. Healing parameters in a rabbit partial tendon defect following tenocyte/biomaterial implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Christiane; John, Thilo; Conrad, Claudia; Lohan, Anke; Hondke, Sylvia; Ertel, Wolfgang; Kaps, Christian; Endres, Michaela; Sittinger, Michael; Ringe, Jochen; Schulze-Tanzil, G

    2011-07-01

    Although rabbits are commonly used as tendon repair model, interpretative tools are divergent and comprehensive scoring systems are lacking. Hence, the aim was to develop a multifaceted scoring system to characterize healing in a partial Achilles tendon defect model. A 3 mm diameter defect was created in the midsubstance of the medial M. gastrocnemius tendon, which remained untreated or was filled with a polyglycolic-acid (PGA) scaffold + fibrin and either left cell-free or seeded with Achilles tenocytes. After 6 and 12 weeks, tendon repair was assessed macroscopically and histologically using self-constructed scores. Macroscopical scoring revealed superior results in the tenocyte seeded PGA + fibrin group compared with the controls at both time points. Histology of all operated tendons after 6 weeks proved extracellular matrix (ECM) disorganization, hypercellularity and occurrence of irregular running elastic fibres with no significance between the groups. Some inflammation was associated with PGA implantation and increased sulphated proteoglycan deposition predominantly with the empty defects. After 12 weeks defect areas became hard to recognize and differences between groups, except for the increased sulphated proteoglycans content in the empty defects, were almost nullified. We describe a partial Achilles tendon defect model and versatile scoring tools applicable for characterizing biomaterial-supported tendon healing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peroneal Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of peroneal tendon injuries are tendonitis, tears and subluxation. Tendonitis is an inflammation of one or both ... An increase in the height of the arch Subluxation means one or both tendons have slipped out ...

  19. In Vivo Measures of Shear Wave Speed as a Predictor of Tendon Elasticity and Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jack A; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Lee, Kenneth S; DeWall, Ryan J; Brounts, Sabrina H; Murphy, William L; Markel, Mark D; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE) to measure tissue elasticity and ultimate stress in both intact and healing tendons. The lateral gastrocnemius (Achilles) tendons of 41 New Zealand white rabbits were surgically severed and repaired with growth factor coated sutures. SWE imaging was used to measure shear wave speed (SWS) in both the medial and lateral tendons pre-surgery, and at 2 and 4 wk post-surgery. Rabbits were euthanized at 4 wk, and both medial and lateral tendons underwent mechanical testing to failure. SWS significantly (p tendons. SWS was significantly (p tendon elastic modulus (r = 0.52) and ultimate stress (r = 0.58). Thus, ultrasound SWE is a potentially promising non-invasive technology for quantitatively assessing the mechanical integrity of pre-operative and post-operative tendons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Surgical treatment for midportion Achilles tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltes, T P A; Zwiers, R; Wiegerinck, J I; van Dijk, C N

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically evaluate the available literature on surgical treatment for midportion Achilles tendinopathy and to provide an overview of the different surgical techniques. A systematic review of the literature available in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane database of controlled trials was performed. The primary outcome measure in terms of patient satisfaction and the secondary outcome measures that consisted of complication rate, pain score, functional outcome score and success rate were evaluated. The Downs & Black checklist and the Coleman methodology scale were used to assess the methodological quality of included articles. Of 1090 reviewed articles, 23 met the inclusion criteria. The included studies reported on the results of 1285 procedures in 1177 patients. The surgical techniques were divided into five categories. Eleven studies evaluated open surgical debridement, seven studies described minimally invasive procedures, three studies evaluated endoscopic procedures, one study evaluated open gastrocnemius lengthening, and one study reported on open autologous tendon transfer. Results regarding patient satisfaction (69-100 %) and complication rate (0-85.7 %) varied widely. This study demonstrates the large variation in surgical techniques available for treatment of midportion Achilles tendinopathy. None of the included studies compared surgical intervention with nonsurgical or placebo intervention. Minimally invasive and endoscopic procedures yield lower complication rates with similar patient satisfaction in comparison with open procedures. Minimally invasive and endoscopic procedures might therefore prove to be the future of surgical treatment of Achilles midportion tendinopathy. IV.

  1. Heavy Slow Resistance Versus Eccentric Training as Treatment for Achilles Tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Rikke; Kongsgaard, Mads; Hougs Kjær, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that eccentric training has a positive effect on Achilles tendinopathy, but few randomized controlled trials have compared it with other loading-based treatment regimens. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effectiveness of eccentric training (ECC) and heavy slow...... resistance training (HSR) among patients with midportion Achilles tendinopathy. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: A total of 58 patients with chronic (>3 months) midportion Achilles tendinopathy were randomized to ECC or HSR for 12 weeks. Function and symptoms...... tendinopathy and that the latter tends to be associated with greater patient satisfaction after 12 weeks but not after 52 weeks....

  2. No inflammatory gene-expression response to acute exercise in human Achilles tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pingel, Jessica; Fredberg, Ulrich; Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer

    2013-01-01

    Although histology data favour the view of a degenerative nature of tendinopathy, indirect support for inflammatory reactions to loading in affected tendons exists. The purpose of the present study was to elucidate whether inflammatory signalling responses after acute mechanical loading were more...... Germany (600 mg) × 3/day/1 week) group (n = 13) in a double-blinded-fashion. Tendon biopsies were taken from the painful and a healthy region of the same tendon 2 h after 1 h running. Gene-expression of several targets was analysed in the sampled Achilles tendon biopsies. The mRNA for TGF-ß, collagen...

  3. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Yun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy. The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  4. Achilles Tendinopathy: Current Concepts about the Basic Science and Clinical Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Yun; Hua, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most frequently ankle and foot overuse injuries, which is a clinical syndrome characterized by the combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The two main categories of Achilles tendinopathy are classified according to anatomical location and broadly include insertional and noninsertional tendinopathy. The etiology of Achilles tendinopathy is multifactorial including both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Failed healing response and degenerative changes were found in the tendon. The failed healing response includes three different and continuous stages (reactive tendinopathy, tendon disrepair, and degenerative tendinopathy). The histological studies have demonstrated an increased number of tenocytes and concentration of glycosaminoglycans in the ground substance, disorganization and fragmentation of the collagen, and neovascularization. There are variable conservative and surgical treatment options for Achilles tendinopathy. However, there has not been a gold standard of these treatments because of the controversial clinical results between various studies. In the future, new level I researches will be needed to prove the effect of these treatment options.

  5. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Christopher J.; Tan, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy is a degenerative condition characterised by pain on activity. Eccentric stretching is the most effective treatment. Surgical treatment is reserved for recalcitrant cases. Minimally-invasive and tendinoscopic treatments are showing promising results. Cite this article: Pearce CJ, Tan A. Non-insertional Achilles tendinopathy. EFORT Open Rev 2016;1:383-390. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.1.160024. PMID:28461917

  6. Combined osteopathy and exercise management of Achilles tendinopathy in an athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Georgia; Macfarlane, Chris; Vaughan, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Mid-portion Achilles tendinopathy is a common injury in sporting populations. There is conflicting evidence about the best approach to conservative management. This report focuses on the rehabilitation of an Achilles tendinopathy utilizing osteopathic manual therapy (OMT) and a structured exercise program in a semi-professional volleyballer. The patient presented with a 4-month history of right mid-portion Achilles tendon pain that began after a lateral inversion sprain of the right ankle. The primary complaint was pain impacting the patients vertical jump performance. The patient complained of pain that was greatest in the morning and at the beginning of a training session prior to warming up. The inventory therapy was a combination of OMT. The manual therapy was complemented with a rehabilitation program. Outcomes were assessed with the Victorian Institute of Sport Assessment - Achilles (VISA-A), visual analogue scales (VAS), painful arc, London Hospital Test, soleus lunge test and maximum vertical jump. This case presented many challenging management options including a resolving right ankle lateral inversion sprain, a past history of contralateral Achilles tendinopathy and a high training load. The case demonstrated the importance of patient-centered practice. It was integral that the patient's role as a semi-professional athlete on the volleyball court was analyzed closely in order to replicate different facets of his game, so that the rehabilitation program could support a return to performance at the highest level. Once the initial deficits in mobility and strength were addressed, the rehabilitation program focus moved to injury prevention.

  7. Bilateral spontaneous rupture of flexor digitorum profundus tendons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, S T

    2012-02-03

    Spontaneous tendon rupture is an unusual condition usually associated with underlying disease processes such as rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal failure or bony abnormalities of the hand. We report a case of spontaneous, non-concurrent bilateral rupture of flexor profundus tendons in an otherwise healthy individual. Treatment was successful and consisted of a two-stage reconstruction of the ruptured tendon.

  8. The Achilles heel of adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerinck, J.I.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the imaging and treatment of the Achilles heel of adults and children. The figurative and literal Achilles heel consists of a number of pathologies: ankle impingement, Achilles tendinopathy, retrocalcaneal bursitis and calcaneal apophysitis. Research as well as diagnosis and

  9. Human multipotent mesenchymal stem cells improve healing after collagenase tendon injury in the rat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machová-Urdzíková, Lucia; Sedláček, R.; Suchý, T.; Amemori, Takashi; Růžička, Jiří; Lesný, P.; Havlas, V.; Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 42 (2014) ISSN 1475-925X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/10/0326; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : Achilles tendon * mesenchymal stromal cells * osteogenesis Subject RIV: FI - Traumatology, Orthopedics Impact factor: 1.427, year: 2014

  10. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Li, Qianqian [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Yang, Jun [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, 421 Hospital of PLA, Guangzhou 510318 (China); Dong, Weiqiang [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Department of Orthopaedics, The First Affiliated Hospital to Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Wang, Qiang, E-mail: 1780468505@qq.com [Department of Orthopaedics, Subei People’s Hospital of Jiangsu Province (Clinical Medical College of Yangzhou University), Yangzhou, Jiangsu Province 225001 (China); Yu, Bin, E-mail: carryzhang1985@live.com [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation.

  11. Effects of celecoxib on proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kairui; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Qianqian; Yang, Jun; Dong, Weiqiang; Wang, Shengnan; Cheng, Yirong; Al-Qwbani, Mohammed; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated transcription factor. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of main tendon associated collagen. • Celecoxib reduced mRNAs levels of tendon associated molecules. - Abstract: NSAIDs are often ingested to reduce the pain and improve regeneration of tendon after tendon injury. Although the effects of NSAIDs in tendon healing have been reported, the data and conclusions are not consistent. Recently, tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) have been isolated from tendon tissues and has been suggested involved in tendon repair. Our study aims to determine the effects of COX-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) on the proliferation and tenocytic differentiation of TDSCs. TDSCs were isolated from mice Achilles tendon and exposed to celecoxib. Cell proliferation rate was investigated at various concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/ml) of celecoxib by using hemocytometer. The mRNA expression of tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules were determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression of Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin were determined by Western blotting. The results showed that celecoxib has no effects on TDSCs cell proliferation in various concentrations (p > 0.05). The levels of most tendon associated transcription factors, tendon associated collagens and tendon associated molecules genes expression were significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). Collagen I, Collagen III, Scleraxis and Tenomodulin protein expression were also significantly decreased in celecoxib (10 μg/ml) treated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, celecoxib inhibits tenocytic differentiation of tendon-derived stem cells but has no effects on cell proliferation

  12. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-08-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments.

  13. Changes of calf muscle-tendon biomechanical properties induced by passive-stretching and active-movement training in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng; Wu, Yi-Ning; Hwang, Miriam; Ren, Yupeng; Gao, Fan; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Biomechanical properties of calf muscles and Achilles tendon may be altered considerably in children with cerebral palsy (CP), contributing to childhood disability. It is unclear how muscle fascicles and tendon respond to rehabilitation and contribute to improvement of ankle-joint properties. Biomechanical properties of the calf muscle fascicles of both gastrocnemius medialis (GM) and soleus (SOL), including the fascicle length and pennation angle in seven children with CP, were evaluated using ultrasonography combined with biomechanical measurements before and after a 6-wk treatment of passive-stretching and active-movement training. The passive force contributions from the GM and SOL muscles were separated using flexed and extended knee positions, and fascicular stiffness was calculated based on the fascicular force-length relation. Biomechanical properties of the Achilles tendon, including resting length, cross-sectional area, and stiffness, were also evaluated. The 6-wk training induced elongation of muscle fascicles (SOL: 8%, P = 0.018; GM: 3%, P = 0.018), reduced pennation angle (SOL: 10%, P = 0.028; GM: 5%, P = 0.028), reduced fascicular stiffness (SOL: 17%, P = 0.128; GM: 21%, P = 0.018), decreased tendon length (6%, P = 0.018), increased Achilles tendon stiffness (32%, P = 0.018), and increased Young's modulus (20%, P = 0.018). In vivo characterizations of calf muscles and Achilles tendon mechanical properties help us better understand treatment-induced changes of calf muscle-tendon and facilitate development of more effective treatments. PMID:21596920

  14. Men with unilateral Achilles tendi