WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromosomes human x

  1. The DNA sequence of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Mark T; Grafham, Darren V; Coffey, Alison J; Scherer, Steven; McLay, Kirsten; Muzny, Donna; Platzer, Matthias; Howell, Gareth R; Burrows, Christine; Bird, Christine P; Frankish, Adam; Lovell, Frances L; Howe, Kevin L; Ashurst, Jennifer L; Fulton, Robert S; Sudbrak, Ralf; Wen, Gaiping; Jones, Matthew C; Hurles, Matthew E; Andrews, T Daniel; Scott, Carol E; Searle, Stephen; Ramser, Juliane; Whittaker, Adam; Deadman, Rebecca; Carter, Nigel P; Hunt, Sarah E; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Gunaratne, Preethi; Havlak, Paul; Hodgson, Anne; Metzker, Michael L; Richards, Stephen; Scott, Graham; Steffen, David; Sodergren, Erica; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Ainscough, Rachael; Ambrose, Kerrie D; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Aradhya, Swaroop; Ashwell, Robert I S; Babbage, Anne K; Bagguley, Claire L; Ballabio, Andrea; Banerjee, Ruby; Barker, Gary E; Barlow, Karen F; Barrett, Ian P; Bates, Karen N; Beare, David M; Beasley, Helen; Beasley, Oliver; Beck, Alfred; Bethel, Graeme; Blechschmidt, Karin; Brady, Nicola; Bray-Allen, Sarah; Bridgeman, Anne M; Brown, Andrew J; Brown, Mary J; Bonnin, David; Bruford, Elspeth A; Buhay, Christian; Burch, Paula; Burford, Deborah; Burgess, Joanne; Burrill, Wayne; Burton, John; Bye, Jackie M; Carder, Carol; Carrel, Laura; Chako, Joseph; Chapman, Joanne C; Chavez, Dean; Chen, Ellson; Chen, Guan; Chen, Yuan; Chen, Zhijian; Chinault, Craig; Ciccodicola, Alfredo; Clark, Sue Y; Clarke, Graham; Clee, Chris M; Clegg, Sheila; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin; Clifford, Karen; Cobley, Vicky; Cole, Charlotte G; Conquer, Jen S; Corby, Nicole; Connor, Richard E; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Davis, Clay; Davis, John; Delgado, Oliver; Deshazo, Denise; Dhami, Pawandeep; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen; Dodsworth, Steve; Draper, Heather; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Dunham, Andrew; Dunn, Matthew; Durbin, K James; Dutta, Ireena; Eades, Tamsin; Ellwood, Matthew; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra; Errington, Helen; Evans, Kathryn L; Faulkner, Louisa; Francis, Fiona; Frankland, John; Fraser, Audrey E; Galgoczy, Petra; Gilbert, James; Gill, Rachel; Glöckner, Gernot; Gregory, Simon G; Gribble, Susan; Griffiths, Coline; Grocock, Russell; Gu, Yanghong; Gwilliam, Rhian; Hamilton, Cerissa; Hart, Elizabeth A; Hawes, Alicia; Heath, Paul D; Heitmann, Katja; Hennig, Steffen; Hernandez, Judith; Hinzmann, Bernd; Ho, Sarah; Hoffs, Michael; Howden, Phillip J; Huckle, Elizabeth J; Hume, Jennifer; Hunt, Paul J; Hunt, Adrienne R; Isherwood, Judith; Jacob, Leni; Johnson, David; Jones, Sally; de Jong, Pieter J; Joseph, Shirin S; Keenan, Stephen; Kelly, Susan; Kershaw, Joanne K; Khan, Ziad; Kioschis, Petra; Klages, Sven; Knights, Andrew J; Kosiura, Anna; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Laird, Gavin K; Langford, Cordelia; Lawlor, Stephanie; Leversha, Margaret; Lewis, Lora; Liu, Wen; Lloyd, Christine; Lloyd, David M; Loulseged, Hermela; Loveland, Jane E; Lovell, Jamieson D; Lozado, Ryan; Lu, Jing; Lyne, Rachael; Ma, Jie; Maheshwari, Manjula; Matthews, Lucy H; McDowall, Jennifer; McLaren, Stuart; McMurray, Amanda; Meidl, Patrick; Meitinger, Thomas; Milne, Sarah; Miner, George; Mistry, Shailesh L; Morgan, Margaret; Morris, Sidney; Müller, Ines; Mullikin, James C; Nguyen, Ngoc; Nordsiek, Gabriele; Nyakatura, Gerald; O'Dell, Christopher N; Okwuonu, Geoffery; Palmer, Sophie; Pandian, Richard; Parker, David; Parrish, Julia; Pasternak, Shiran; Patel, Dina; Pearce, Alex V; Pearson, Danita M; Pelan, Sarah E; Perez, Lesette; Porter, Keith M; Ramsey, Yvonne; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rhodes, Susan; Ridler, Kerry A; Schlessinger, David; Schueler, Mary G; Sehra, Harminder K; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Shen, Hua; Sheridan, Elizabeth M; Shownkeen, Ratna; Skuce, Carl D; Smith, Michelle L; Sotheran, Elizabeth C; Steingruber, Helen E; Steward, Charles A; Storey, Roy; Swann, R Mark; Swarbreck, David; Tabor, Paul E; Taudien, Stefan; Taylor, Tineace; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Karen; Thorpe, Andrea; Timms, Kirsten; Tracey, Alan; Trevanion, Steve; Tromans, Anthony C; d'Urso, Michele; Verduzco, Daniel; Villasana, Donna; Waldron, Lenee; Wall, Melanie; Wang, Qiaoyan; Warren, James; Warry, Georgina L; Wei, Xuehong; West, Anthony; Whitehead, Siobhan L; Whiteley, Mathew N; Wilkinson, Jane E; Willey, David L; Williams, Gabrielle; Williams, Leanne; Williamson, Angela; Williamson, Helen; Wilming, Laurens; Woodmansey, Rebecca L; Wray, Paul W; Yen, Jennifer; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Zoghbi, Huda; Zorilla, Sara; Buck, David; Reinhardt, Richard; Poustka, Annemarie; Rosenthal, André; Lehrach, Hans; Meindl, Alfons; Minx, Patrick J; Hillier, Ladeana W; Willard, Huntington F; Wilson, Richard K; Waterston, Robert H; Rice, Catherine M; Vaudin, Mark; Coulson, Alan; Nelson, David L; Weinstock, George; Sulston, John E; Durbin, Richard; Hubbard, Tim; Gibbs, Richard A; Beck, Stephan; Rogers, Jane; Bentley, David R

    2005-03-17

    The human X chromosome has a unique biology that was shaped by its evolution as the sex chromosome shared by males and females. We have determined 99.3% of the euchromatic sequence of the X chromosome. Our analysis illustrates the autosomal origin of the mammalian sex chromosomes, the stepwise process that led to the progressive loss of recombination between X and Y, and the extent of subsequent degradation of the Y chromosome. LINE1 repeat elements cover one-third of the X chromosome, with a distribution that is consistent with their proposed role as way stations in the process of X-chromosome inactivation. We found 1,098 genes in the sequence, of which 99 encode proteins expressed in testis and in various tumour types. A disproportionately high number of mendelian diseases are documented for the X chromosome. Of this number, 168 have been explained by mutations in 113 X-linked genes, which in many cases were characterized with the aid of the DNA sequence.

  2. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  3. A worldwide phylogeography for the human X chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone S Santos-Lopes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We reasoned that by identifying genetic markers on human X chromosome regions where recombination is rare or absent, we should be able to construct X chromosome genealogies analogous to those based on Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms, with the advantage of providing information about both male and female components of the population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a 47 Kb interval containing an Alu insertion polymorphism (DXS225 and four microsatellites in complete linkage disequilibrium in a low recombination rate region of the long arm of the human X chromosome. This haplotype block was studied in 667 males from the HGDP-CEPH Human Genome Diversity Panel. The haplotypic diversity was highest in Africa (0.992+/-0.0025 and lowest in the Americas (0.839+/-0.0378, where no insertion alleles of DXS225 were observed. Africa shared few haplotypes with other geographical areas, while those exhibited significant sharing among themselves. Median joining networks revealed that the African haplotypes were numerous, occupied the periphery of the graph and had low frequency, whereas those from the other continents were few, central and had high frequency. Altogether, our data support a single origin of modern man in Africa and migration to occupy the other continents by serial founder effects. Coalescent analysis permitted estimation of the time of the most recent common ancestor as 182,000 years (56,700-479,000 and the estimated time of the DXS225 Alu insertion of 94,400 years (24,300-310,000. These dates are fully compatible with the current widely accepted scenario of the origin of modern mankind in Africa within the last 195,000 years and migration out-of-Africa circa 55,000-65,000 years ago. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A haplotypic block combining an Alu insertion polymorphism and four microsatellite markers on the human X chromosome is a useful marker to evaluate genetic diversity of human populations and

  4. A first-generation X-inactivation profile of the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, L; Cottle, A A; Goglin, K C; Willard, H F

    1999-12-01

    In females, most genes on the X chromosome are generally assumed to be transcriptionally silenced on the inactive X as a result of X inactivation. However, particularly in humans, an increasing number of genes are known to "escape" X inactivation and are expressed from both the active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes; such genes reflect different molecular and epigenetic responses to X inactivation and are candidates for phenotypes associated with X aneuploidy. To identify genes that escape X inactivation and to generate a first-generation X-inactivation profile of the X, we have evaluated the expression of 224 X-linked genes and expressed sequence tags by reverse-transcription-PCR analysis of a panel of multiple independent mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing a normal human Xi but no Xa. The resulting survey yields an initial X-inactivation profile that is estimated to represent approximately 10% of all X-linked transcripts. Of the 224 transcripts tested here, 34 (three of which are pseudoautosomal) were expressed in as many as nine Xi hybrids and thus appear to escape inactivation. The genes that escape inactivation are distributed nonrandomly along the X; 31 of 34 such transcripts map to Xp, implying that the two arms of the X are epigenetically and/or evolutionarily distinct and suggesting that genetic imbalance of Xp may be more severe clinically than imbalance of Xq. A complete X-inactivation profile will provide information relevant to clinical genetics and genetic counseling and should yield insight into the genomic and epigenetic organization of the X chromosome.

  5. A new region of conservation is defined between human and mouse X chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinulos, M.B.; Disteche, C.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Bassi, M.T. [Univ. of Siena (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Comparative mapping of the X chromosome in eutherian mammals have revealed distinct regions of conservation as well as evolutionary rearrangements between human and mouse. Recently, we and others mapped the murine homologue of CLCN4 (Chloride channel 4) to band F4 of the X chromosome in Mus spretus but to chromosome 7 in laboratory strains. We now report the mapping of the murine homologues of APXL (Apical protein Xenopus laevis-like) and OA1 (Ocular albinism type I), two genes that are located on the human X chromosome at band p22.3 and in close proximity to CLCN4. Interestingly, Oa1 and Apxl map to bands F2-F3 in both M. spretus and the laboratory strain C57BL/6J, defining a new rearrangement between human and mouse X chromosomes. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Abnormal X : autosome ratio, but normal X chromosome inactivation in human triploid cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norwood Thomas H

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X chromosome inactivation (XCI is that aspect of mammalian dosage compensation that brings about equivalence of X-linked gene expression between females and males by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes (Xi in normal female cells, leaving them with a single active X (Xa as in male cells. In cells with more than two X's, but a diploid autosomal complement, all X's but one, Xa, are inactivated. This phenomenon is commonly thought to suggest 1 that normal development requires a ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set, and 2 that an early event in XCI is the marking of one X to be active, with remaining X's becoming inactivated by default. Results Triploids provide a test of these ideas because the ratio of one Xa per diploid autosomal set cannot be achieved, yet this abnormal ratio should not necessarily affect the one-Xa choice mechanism for XCI. Previous studies of XCI patterns in murine triploids support the single-Xa model, but human triploids mostly have two-Xa cells, whether they are XXX or XXY. The XCI patterns we observe in fibroblast cultures from different XXX human triploids suggest that the two-Xa pattern of XCI is selected for, and may have resulted from rare segregation errors or Xi reactivation. Conclusion The initial X inactivation pattern in human triploids, therefore, is likely to resemble the pattern that predominates in murine triploids, i.e., a single Xa, with the remaining X's inactive. Furthermore, our studies of XIST RNA accumulation and promoter methylation suggest that the basic features of XCI are normal in triploids despite the abnormal X:autosome ratio.

  7. Human germ cell formation in xenotransplants of induced pluripotent stem cells carrying X chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Antonia A; Chiang, H Rosaria; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E; Reijo Pera, Renee A

    2014-09-22

    Turner syndrome is caused by complete or partial loss of the second sex chromosome and is characterized by spontaneous fetal loss in >90% of conceptions. Survivors possess an array of somatic and germline clinical characteristics. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offer an opportunity for insight into genetic requirements of the X chromosome linked to Turner syndrome. We derived iPSCs from Turner syndrome and control individuals and examined germ cell development as a function of X chromosome composition. We demonstrate that two X chromosomes are not necessary for reprogramming or maintenance of pluripotency and that there are minimal differences in gene expression, at the single cell level, linked to X chromosome aneuploidies. Formation of germ cells, as assessed in vivo through a murine xenotransplantation model, indicated that undifferentiated iPSCs, independent of X chromosome composition, are capable of forming germ-cell-like cells (GCLCs) in vivo. In combination with clinical data regarding infertility in women with X chromosome aneuploidies, results suggest that two intact X chromosomes are not required for human germ cell formation, qualitatively or quantitatively, but rather are likely to be required for maintenance of human germ cells to adulthood.

  8. A high-resolution interval map of the q21 region of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philippe, C.; Monaco, A.P. [ICRF Laboratories, Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others; Arnould, C. [Laboratoire de Genetique Humaine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)] [and others

    1995-06-10

    In a previous study, we have developed a panel of chromosomal rearrangements for the physical mapping of the q13-q21 region of the human X chromosome. Here, we report the physical localization of 36 additional polymorphic markers by polymerase chain reaction analysis. The high density of chromosomal breakpoints in Xq21 allows us to map 58 DNA loci in 22 intervals. As a result, this segment of the X chromosome is saturated with approximately three sequence tagged sites per megabase of DNA, which will facilitate the construction of a YAC contig of this region. 26 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Genetic Diversity on the Human X Chromosome Does Not Support a Strict Pseudoautosomal Boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Daniel J; Brotman, Sarah M; Wilson Sayres, Melissa A

    2016-05-01

    Unlike the autosomes, recombination between the X chromosome and the Y chromosome is often thought to be constrained to two small pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) at the tips of each sex chromosome. PAR1 spans the first 2.7 Mb of the proximal arm of the human sex chromosomes, whereas the much smaller PAR2 encompasses the distal 320 kb of the long arm of each sex chromosome. In addition to PAR1 and PAR2, there is a human-specific X-transposed region that was duplicated from the X to the Y chromosome. The X-transposed region is often not excluded from X-specific analyses, unlike the PARs, because it is not thought to routinely recombine. Genetic diversity is expected to be higher in recombining regions than in nonrecombining regions because recombination reduces the effect of linked selection. In this study, we investigated patterns of genetic diversity in noncoding regions across the entire X chromosome of a global sample of 26 unrelated genetic females. We found that genetic diversity in PAR1 is significantly greater than in the nonrecombining regions (nonPARs). However, rather than an abrupt drop in diversity at the pseudoautosomal boundary, there is a gradual reduction in diversity from the recombining through the nonrecombining regions, suggesting that recombination between the human sex chromosomes spans across the currently defined pseudoautosomal boundary. A consequence of recombination spanning this boundary potentially includes increasing the rate of sex-linked disorders (e.g., de la Chapelle) and sex chromosome aneuploidies. In contrast, diversity in PAR2 is not significantly elevated compared to the nonPARs, suggesting that recombination is not obligatory in PAR2. Finally, diversity in the X-transposed region is higher than in the surrounding nonPARs, providing evidence that recombination may occur with some frequency between the X and Y chromosomes in the X-transposed region.

  10. Evolution of homologous sequences on the human X and Y chromosomes, outside of the meiotic pairing segment.

    OpenAIRE

    Bickmore, W A; Cooke, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A sequence isolated from the long arm of the human Y chromosome detects a highly homologous locus on the X. This homology extends over at least 50 kb of DNA and is postulated to be the result of a transposition event between the X and Y chromosomes during recent human evolution, since homologous sequences are shown to be present on the X chromosome alone in the chimpanzee and gorilla.

  11. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome. Progress report, September 1991--November 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  12. Fluorescent in-situ hybridization of cattle and sheep chromosomes with cloned human fragile-X DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Ahmd; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl; Babar, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    /CGG(n) trinucleotide repeat sequence was carried out to determine homology between human and bovine fragile-X. The hybridisation results showed only a weak signal on a human chromosome that was not an X with all three fragile site probes. No signals were detected in sheep chromosomes. The signal of all three human...... fragile-X probes on cattle chromosomes was however, medium-prominent sub-centromeric signal on two homologues. BrdU administration in 12 h before harvesting identified these homologues to be chromosome number 5. In addition retrospective slides of cattle and sheep chromosomes used for fragile site studies...... showed no signals whatsoever. It was therefore concluded that no homology existed between human and bovine fragile-X....

  13. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Huntley, Miriam H; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K; Durand, Neva C; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P; Lander, Eric S; Chadwick, Brian P; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-08-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the "Barr body." Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called "superdomains," such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called "superloops." DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4 We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  14. Deletion of DXZ4 on the human inactive X chromosome alters higher-order genome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M.; Huntley, Miriam H.; Dudchenko, Olga; Stamenova, Elena K.; Durand, Neva C.; Sun, Zhuo; Huang, Su-Chen; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Machol, Ido; Shamim, Muhammad; Seberg, Andrew P.; Lander, Eric S.; Chadwick, Brian P.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-01-01

    During interphase, the inactive X chromosome (Xi) is largely transcriptionally silent and adopts an unusual 3D configuration known as the “Barr body.” Despite the importance of X chromosome inactivation, little is known about this 3D conformation. We recently showed that in humans the Xi chromosome exhibits three structural features, two of which are not shared by other chromosomes. First, like the chromosomes of many species, Xi forms compartments. Second, Xi is partitioned into two huge intervals, called “superdomains,” such that pairs of loci in the same superdomain tend to colocalize. The boundary between the superdomains lies near DXZ4, a macrosatellite repeat whose Xi allele extensively binds the protein CCCTC-binding factor. Third, Xi exhibits extremely large loops, up to 77 megabases long, called “superloops.” DXZ4 lies at the anchor of several superloops. Here, we combine 3D mapping, microscopy, and genome editing to study the structure of Xi, focusing on the role of DXZ4. We show that superloops and superdomains are conserved across eutherian mammals. By analyzing ligation events involving three or more loci, we demonstrate that DXZ4 and other superloop anchors tend to colocate simultaneously. Finally, we show that deleting DXZ4 on Xi leads to the disappearance of superdomains and superloops, changes in compartmentalization patterns, and changes in the distribution of chromatin marks. Thus, DXZ4 is essential for proper Xi packaging. PMID:27432957

  15. Dosage regulation of the active X chromosome in human triploid cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxian Deng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In mammals, dosage compensation is achieved by doubling expression of X-linked genes in both sexes, together with X inactivation in females. Up-regulation of the active X chromosome may be controlled by DNA sequence-based and/or epigenetic mechanisms that double the X output potentially in response to autosomal factor(s. To determine whether X expression is adjusted depending on ploidy, we used expression arrays to compare X-linked and autosomal gene expression in human triploid cells. While the average X:autosome expression ratio was about 1 in normal diploid cells, this ratio was lower (0.81-0.84 in triploid cells with one active X and higher (1.32-1.4 in triploid cells with two active X's. Thus, overall X-linked gene expression in triploid cells does not strictly respond to an autosomal factor, nor is it adjusted to achieve a perfect balance. The unbalanced X:autosome expression ratios that we observed could contribute to the abnormal phenotypes associated with triploidy. Absolute autosomal expression levels per gene copy were similar in triploid versus diploid cells, indicating no apparent global effect on autosomal expression. In triploid cells with two active X's our data support a basic doubling of X-linked gene expression. However, in triploid cells with a single active X, X-linked gene expression is adjusted upward presumably by an epigenetic mechanism that senses the ratio between the number of active X chromosomes and autosomal sets. Such a mechanism may act on a subset of genes whose expression dosage in relation to autosomal expression may be critical. Indeed, we found that there was a range of individual X-linked gene expression in relation to ploidy and that a small subset ( approximately 7% of genes had expression levels apparently proportional to the number of autosomal sets.

  16. Enhancement of chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes irradiated with X rays in the presence of iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of chromosomal aberrations resulting from X irradiation of peripheral human blood lymphocytes in the presence or absence of Angioconray-80%, an iodised contrast medium, was investigated. This experiment confirmed an enhanced radiation effect, which is essentially explained by the increase of absorbed dose due to the high photoelectric cross section of iodine for X rays. Nevertheless the cytotoxicity of contrast medium alone cannot be neglected, and at a 0.1 M concentration in unirradiated blood it produced chromosome damage equivalent to 0.5 Gy. The distributions of aberrations among the cells, with and without contrast medium, were analysed using two statistical tests of goodness-of-fit for the Poissonian distribution. The results are discussed mostly in terms of dose enhancement factors. (author)

  17. X-chromosome inactivation in Rett Syndrome human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron YL Cheung

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett Syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects girls due primarily to heterozygous mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2. Random X-chromosome inactivation (XCI results in cellular mosaicism in which some cells express wild-type MECP2 while other cells express mutant MECP2. The generation of patient-specific human induced Pluripotent Stem cells (hiPSCs facilitates the production of RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons in vitro to investigate disease mechanisms and identify novel drug treatments. The generation of RTT-hiPSCs has been reported by many laboratories, however, the XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs has been inconsistent. Some report RTT-hiPSCs retain the inactive X-chromosome (post-XCI of the founder somatic cell allowing isogenic RTT-hiPSCs that express only the wild-type or mutant MECP2 allele to be isolated from the same patient. Post-XCI RTT-hiPSCs-derived neurons retain this allele-specific expression pattern of wild-type or mutant MECP2. Conversely, others report RTT-hiPSCs in which the inactive X-chromosome of the founder somatic cell reactivates (pre-XCI upon reprogramming into RTT-hiPSCs. Pre-XCI RTT-hiPSC-derived neurons exhibit random XCI resulting in cellular mosaicism with respect to wild-type and mutant MECP2 expression. Here we review and attempt to interpret the inconsistencies in XCI status of RTT-hiPSCs generated to date by comparison to other pluripotent systems in vitro and in vivo and the methods used to analyze XCI. Finally, we discuss the relative strengths and weaknesses of post- and pre-XCI hiPSCs in the context of RTT, and other X-linked and autosomal disorders for translational medicine.

  18. Ordered chromatin changes and human X chromosome reactivation by cell fusion-mediated pluripotent reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantone, Irene; Bagci, Hakan; Dormann, Dirk; Dharmalingam, Gopuraja; Nesterova, Tatyana; Brockdorff, Neil; Rougeulle, Claire; Vallot, Celine; Heard, Edith; Chaligne, Ronan; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    Erasure of epigenetic memory is required to convert somatic cells towards pluripotency. Reactivation of the inactive X chromosome (Xi) has been used to model epigenetic reprogramming in mouse, but human studies are hampered by Xi epigenetic instability and difficulties in tracking partially reprogrammed iPSCs. Here we use cell fusion to examine the earliest events in the reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation of human female fibroblasts. We show that a rapid and widespread loss of Xi-associated H3K27me3 and XIST occurs in fused cells and precedes the bi-allelic expression of selected Xi-genes by many heterokaryons (30–50%). After cell division, RNA-FISH and RNA-seq analyses confirm that Xi reactivation remains partial and that induction of human pluripotency-specific XACT transcripts is rare (1%). These data effectively separate pre- and post-mitotic events in reprogramming-induced Xi reactivation and reveal a complex hierarchy of epigenetic changes that are required to reactivate the genes on the human Xi chromosome. PMID:27507283

  19. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  20. The human enamel protein gene amelogenin is expressed from both the X and the Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salido, E.C. (Faculty of Medicine, La Laguna (Spain)); Yen, P.H.; Koprivnikar, K.; Shapiro, L.J. (University of California School of Medicine, Torrence (United States)); Yu, Lohchung (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Amelogenins, a family of extracellular matrix proteins of the dental enamel, are transiently but abundantly expressed by ameloblasts during tooth development. In this paper the authors report the characterization of the AMGX and AMGY genes on the short arms of the human X and Y chromosomes which encode the amelogenins. Their studies on the expression of the amelogenin genes in male developing tooth buds showed that both the AMGX and AMGY genes are transcriptionally active and encode potentially functional proteins. They have isolated genomic and cDNA clones form both the AMGX and AMGY loci and have studied the sequence organization of these two genes. Reverse transcriptase (RT)PCR amplification of the 5[prime] portion of the amelogenin transcripts revealed several alternatively spliced products. This information will be useful for studying the molecular basis of X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, for understanding the evolution and regulation of gene expression on the mammalian sex chromosomes, and for investigating the role of amelogenin genes during tooth development.

  1. Report of the Fourth International Workshop on human X chromosome mapping 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlessinger, D.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Willard, H.F. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    Vigorous interactive efforts by the X chromosome community have led to accelerated mapping in the last six months. Seventy-five participants from 12 countries around the globe contributed progress reports to the Fourth International X Chromosome Workshop, at St. Louis, MO, May 9-12, 1993. It became clear that well over half the chromosome is now covered by YAC contigs that are being extended, verified, and aligned by their content of STSs and other markers placed by cytogenetic or linkage mapping techniques. The major aim of the workshop was to assemble the consensus map that appears in this report, summarizing both consensus order and YAC contig information.

  2. Frequency and distribution analysis of chromosomal translocations induced by x-ray in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic of ionizing radiation suggests that induced chromosomal damage in the form of translocations would appear to be randomly distributed. However, the outcome of tests performed in vitro and in vivo (irradiated individuals) are contradictories. The most translocation-related chromosomes, as far as some studies reveal on one hand, appear to be less involved in accordance with others. These data, together with those related to molecular mechanisms involved in translocations production suggest that in G0 -irradiated cells, the frequency and distribution of this kind of chromosomal rearrangement, does not take place at random. They seem to be affected by in-nucleus chromosome distribution, by each chromosome's DNA length and functional features, by the efficiency of DNA repair mechanisms, and by inter individual differences. The objective of this study was to establish the frequency pattern of each human chromosome involved in radio-induced translocations, as well as to analyze the importance the chromosome length, the activity of DNA polymerase- dependant repair mechanisms, and inter individual differences within the scope of such distribution. To achieve the goals, peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy donors were irradiated in presence and absence of 2'-3' dideoxithimidine (ddThd), a Β - DNA polymerase inhibitor, which takes part in the base repair mechanism (B E R). The results showed that: The presence of ddThd during the irradiation increase the basal frequency of radioinduced translocations in 60 %. This result suggests that ddThd repair synthesis inhibition can be in itself a valid methodology for radiation-induced bases damage assessment, damage which if not BER-repaired may result in translocation-leading double strand breaks. A statistically significant correlation between translocation frequency and chromosome length, in terms of percentage of genome, has been noticed both in (basal) irradiation and in irradiation with ddThd inhibitor

  3. X-chromosome workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, A D

    1998-01-01

    Researchers presented results of ongoing research to the X-chromosome workshop of the Fifth World Congress on Psychiatric Genetics, covering a wide range of disorders: X-linked infantile spasms; a complex phenotype associated with deletions of Xp11; male homosexuality; degree of handedness; bipolar affective disorder; schizophrenia; childhood onset psychosis; and autism. This report summarizes the presentations, as well as reviewing previous studies. The focus of this report is on linkage findings for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from a number of groups. For schizophrenia, low positive lod scores were obtained for markers DXS991 and DXS993 from two studies, although the sharing of alleles was greatest from brother-brother pairs in one study, and sister-sister in the other. Data from the Irish schizophrenia study was also submitted, with no strong evidence for linkage on the X chromosome. For bipolar disease, following the report of a Finnish family linked to Xq24-q27, the Columbia group reported some positive results for this region from 57 families, however, another group found no evidence for linkage to this region. Of interest, is the clustering of low positive linkage results that point to regions for possible further study. PMID:9686435

  4. Report of the fifth international workshop on human X chromosome mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willard, H.F.; Cremers, F.; Mandel, J.L.; Monaco, A.P.; Nelson, D.L.; Schlessinger, D.

    1994-12-31

    A high-quality integrated genetic and physical map of the X chromosome from telomere to telomere, based primarily on YACs formatted with probes and STSs, is increasingly close to reality. At the Fifth International X Chromosome Workshop, organized by A.M. Poustka and D. Schlessinger in Heidelberg, Germany, April 24--27, 1994, substantial progress was recorded on extension and refinement of the physical map, on the integration of genetic and cytogenetic data, on attempts to use the map to direct gene searches, and on nascent large-scale sequencing efforts. This report summarizes physical and genetic mapping information presented at the workshop and/or published since the reports of the fourth International X Chromosome Workshop. The principle aim of the workshop was to derive a consensus map of the chromosome, in terms of physical contigs emphasizing the location of genes and microsatellite markers. The resulting map is presented and updates previous versions. This report also updates the list of highly informative microsatellites. The text highlights the working state of the map, the genes known to reside on the X, and the progress toward integration of various types of data.

  5. Cell death, chromosome damage and mitotic delay in normal human, ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma fibroblasts after x-irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F; Scott, D

    1981-05-01

    We recently showed (Scott and Zampetti-Bosseler 1980) that X-ray sensitive mouse lymphoma cells sustain more chromosome damage, mitotic delay and spindle defects than X-ray resistant cells. We proposed that (a) chromosome aberrations contribute much more to lethality than spindle defects, and (b) that DNA lesions are less effectively repaired in the sensitive cells and give rise to more G2 mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations. Our present results on human fibroblasts with reported differential sensitivity to ionizing radiation (i.e. normal donors and patients with ataxia telangiectasia and retinoblastoma) support the first hypothesis since we observed a positive correlation between chromosome aberration frequencies and cell killing and no induced spindle defects. Our second hypothesis is however not substantiated since X-ray sensitive fibroblasts from the ataxia patient suffered less mitotic delay than cells from normal donors. A common lesion for mitotic delay and chromosome aberrations can still be assumed by adopting the hypothesis of Painter and Young (1981) that the defect in ataxia cells is not in repair but in a failure of DNA damage to initiate mitotic delay. In contrast to other reports, we found the retinoblastoma cells to be of normal radiation sensitivity (cell killing and aberration).

  6. The effect of x-ray induced mitotic delay on chromosome aberration yields in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent to which X-ray induced mitotic delay at 150 and 400 rad influences chromosome aberration yields was examined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The dicentric was used as a marker and aberration yields were obtained for mixed cultures prepared from equal numbers of normal and irradiated cells. The cultures were terminated following incubation times of 36-120 h. Greater mitotic delay of the order of a few hours was observed at the higher dose. However most reduction in the numbers of lymphocytes arriving at metaphase by 48 h may be ascribed to interphase death of failure to transform. Analysis of the dicentric distributions which were expected to follow Poisson statistics indicated that cells containing dicentrics were delayed relative to irradiated but aberration-free cells. Cells with one dicentric moved more easily through the first cell cycle than cells containing two dicentrics. Following accidental partial body irradiation, selection in culture favouring the unirradiated lymphocytes does not distort the aberration yield sufficiently to warrant incubation times in excess of the standard 48-52 h

  7. Variations of X chromosome inactivation occur in early passages of female human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Dvash

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is a dosage compensation mechanism essential for embryonic development and cell physiology. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs derived from inner cell mass (ICM of blastocyst stage embryos have been used as a model system to understand XCI initiation and maintenance. Previous studies of undifferentiated female hESCs at intermediate passages have shown three possible states of XCI; 1 cells in a pre-XCI state, 2 cells that already exhibit XCI, or 3 cells that never undergo XCI even upon differentiation. In this study, XCI status was assayed in ten female hESC lines between passage 5 and 15 to determine whether XCI variations occur in early passages of hESCs. Our results show that three different states of XCI already exist in the early passages of hESC. In addition, we observe one cell line with skewed XCI and preferential expression of X-linked genes from the paternal allele, while another cell line exhibits random XCI. Skewed XCI in undifferentiated hESCs may be due to clonal selection in culture instead of non-random XCI in ICM cells. We also found that XIST promoter methylation is correlated with silencing of XIST transcripts in early passages of hESCs, even in the pre-XCI state. In conclusion, XCI variations already take place in early passages of hESCs, which may be a consequence of in vitro culture selection during the derivation process. Nevertheless, we cannot rule out the possibility that XCI variations in hESCs may reflect heterogeneous XCI states in ICM cells that stochastically give rise to hESCs.

  8. Robustness of the inference of human population structure: A comparison of X-chromosomal and autosomal microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sohini

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, data on 20 X-chromosomal microsatellite polymorphisms from the HGDP-CEPH cell line panel are used to infer human population structure. Inferences from these data are compared to those obtained from autosomal microsatellites. Some of the major features of the structure seen with 377 autosomal markers are generally visible with the X-linked markers, although the latter provide less resolution. Differences between the X-chromosomal and autosomal results can be explained without requiring major differences in demographic parameters between males and females. The dependence of the partitioning on the number of individuals sampled from each region and on the number of markers used is discussed.

  9. X-Chromosome dosage compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Barbara J

    2005-01-01

    In mammals, flies, and worms, sex is determined by distinctive regulatory mechanisms that cause males (XO or XY) and females (XX) to differ in their dose of X chromosomes. In each species, an essential X chromosome-wide process called dosage compensation ensures that somatic cells of either sex express equal levels of X-linked gene products. The strategies used to achieve dosage compensation are diverse, but in all cases, specialized complexes are targeted specifically to the X chromosome(s) of only one sex to regulate transcript levels. In C. elegans, this sex-specific targeting of the dosage compensation complex (DCC) is controlled by the same developmental signal that establishes sex, the ratio of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes (X:A signal). Molecular components of this chromosome counting process have been defined. Following a common step of regulation, sex determination and dosage compensation are controlled by distinct genetic pathways. C. elegans dosage compensation is implemented by a protein complex that binds both X chromosomes of hermaphrodites to reduce transcript levels by one-half. The dosage compensation complex resembles the conserved 13S condensin complex required for both mitotic and meiotic chromosome resolution and condensation, implying the recruitment of ancient proteins to the new task of regulating gene expression. Within each C. elegans somatic cell, one of the DCC components also participates in the separate mitotic/meiotic condensin complex. Other DCC components play pivotal roles in regulating the number and distribution of crossovers during meiosis. The strategy by which C. elegans X chromosomes attract the condensin-like DCC is known. Small, well-dispersed X-recognition elements act as entry sites to recruit the dosage compensation complex and to nucleate spreading of the complex to X regions that lack recruitment sites. In this manner, a repressed chromatin state is spread in cis over short or long distances, thus establishing the

  10. Higher rate of evolution of X chromosome alpha-repeat DNA in human than in the great apes.

    OpenAIRE

    Laursen, H B; Jørgensen, A L; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    The rate of introduction of neutral mutations is lower in man than in other primates, including the chimpanzee. This species is generally regarded as our closest relative among the great apes. We present here an analysis of sequences of X chromosomal alphoid repetitive DNA from man and the great apes, which supports the closer relationship between man and chimpanzee and indicates a considerably increased rate of recombination in the human repeat DNA. These results indicate that the 'molecular...

  11. X chromosome inactivation: Activation of Silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H. Jonkers (Iris)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractX chromosome inactivation is a process that ensures equal expression of the X chromosomes between males, which have one X and one Y chromosome, and females, which have two X chromosomes, in mammals. Females initiate inactivation of one of their two X chromosomes early during embryogenesi

  12. Affected kindred analysis of human X chromosome exomes to identify novel X-linked intellectual disability genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejasvi S Niranjan

    Full Text Available X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders.

  13. A history of the discovery of random x chromosome inactivation in the human female and its significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balderman, Sophia; Lichtman, Marshall A

    2011-07-01

    Genetic determinants of sex in placental mammals developed by the evolution of primordial autosomes into the male and female sex chromosomes. The Y chromosome determines maleness by the action of the gene SRY, which encodes a protein that initiates a sequence of events prompting the embryonic gonads to develop into testes. The X chromosome in the absence of a Y chromosome results in a female by permitting the conversion of the embryonic gonads into ovaries. We trace the historical progress that resulted in the discovery that one X chromosome in the female is randomly inactivated in early embryogenesis, accomplishing approximate equivalency of X chromosome gene dosage in both sexes. This event results in half of the somatic cells in a tissue containing proteins encoded by the genes of the maternal X chromosome and half having proteins encoded by the genes of the paternal X chromosome, on average, accounting for the phenotype of a female heterozygote with an X chromosome mutation. The hypothesis of X chromosome inactivation as a random event early in embryogenesis was first described as a result of studies of variegated coat color in female mice. Similar results were found in women using the X chromosome-linked gene, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, studied in red cells. The random inactivation of the X chromosome-bearing genes for isoenzyme types A and B of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was used to establish the clonal origin of neoplasms in informative women with leiomyomas. Behind these discoveries are the stories of the men and women scientists whose research enlightened these aspects of X chromosome function and their implication for medicine.

  14. A History of the Discovery of Random X Chromosome Inactivation in the Human Female and its Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Balderman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic determinants of sex in placental mammals developed by the evolution of primordial autosomes into the male and female sex chromosomes. The Y chromosome determines maleness by the action of the gene SRY, which encodes a protein that initiates a sequence of events prompting the embryonic gonads to develop into testes. The X chromosome in the absence of a Y chromosome results in a female by permitting the conversion of the embryonic gonads into ovaries. We trace the historical progress that resulted in the discovery that one X chromosome in the female is randomly inactivated in early embryogenesis, accomplishing approximate equivalency of X chromosome gene dosage in both sexes. This event results in half of the somatic cells in a tissue containing proteins encoded by the genes of the maternal X chromosome and half having proteins encoded by the genes of the paternal X chromosome, on average, accounting for the phenotype of a female heterozygote with an X chromosome mutation. The hypothesis of X chromosome inactivation as a random event early in embryogenesis was first described as a result of studies of variegated coat color in female mice. Similar results were found in women using the X chromosome-linked gene, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, studied in red cells. The random inactivation of the X chromosome-bearing genes for isoenzyme types A and B of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was used to establish the clonal origin of neoplasms in informative women with leiomyomas. Behind these discoveries are the stories of the men and women scientists whose research enlightened these aspects of X chromosome function and their implication for medicine.

  15. Study of chromosome aberration repair after acute or fractionated X-irradiation in human peripheral lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure human peripheral blood has been subjected to a single irradiation with the dose of 125 and 250R and by fractions with the doses of 125+125 R in the following periods of the cell cycle: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 16, 24, 30, 40 and 45 hrs. The following types of structural chromosome aberrations are counted on metaphase plates with a good chromosome scattering: dicentrics, rings, interstitial deletions, symmetric translocations, chromatide and chromosome fragments. The data on polycentrics and rings prove to be most characteristic: the frequency of these aberrations in the case of single irradiation for all periods of the ''presynthetic'' Gsub(I) period is stable varying in the range of 17-20% in the case of a 125 R dose and 66-73% in the case of a 250 R dose. Their frequency decreased for both doses of irradiation in later periods and reached 1% by the end of the synthetic period. The fractionated effect of two doses 125 R each gives the following values of polycentric and ring formation: second hour - 44,15%, fourth - 50,82%, sixth - 55,15% eighth -58,32% (maximum), twelfth - 55,48%. The descending tendency is preserved till the end of the presynthetic period and in the synthetic period. The statistic processing of results shows statistically authentic differences between fractionated and single irradiation in the output of polycentrics and rings, as well as other types of aberrations and breaks per cell. The data obtained permit to conclude that repair processes are undulatory and are characterized by maximum intensity in the first hours of presynthetic period which weakens to the 8th hour and then strengthens again almost to the end of the synthetic period

  16. Isoform-Level Gene Expression Profiles of Human Y Chromosome Azoospermia Factor Genes and Their X Chromosome Paralogs in the Testicular Tissue of Non-Obstructive Azoospermia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Rastegar, Diba; Sharifi Tabar, Mehdi; Alikhani, Mehdi; Parsamatin, Pouria; Sahraneshin Samani, Fazel; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Mohammad Ahadi, Ali; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita; Piryaei, Abbas; Ansari-Pour, Naser; Gourabi, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2015-09-01

    The human Y chromosome has an inevitable role in male fertility because it contains many genes critical for spermatogenesis and the development of the male gonads. Any genetic variation or epigenetic modification affecting the expression pattern of Y chromosome genes may thus lead to male infertility. In this study, we performed isoform-level gene expression profiling of Y chromosome genes within the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions, their X chromosome counterparts, and few autosomal paralogues in testicular biopsies of 12 men with preserved spermatogenesis and 68 men with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA) (40 Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) and 28 premiotic maturation arrest (MA)). This was undertaken using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) at the transcript level and Western blotting (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) at the protein level. We profiled the expression of 41 alternative transcripts encoded by 14 AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc region genes (USP9Y, DDX3Y, XKRY, HSFY1, CYORF15A, CYORF15B, KDM5D, EIF1AY, RPS4Y2, RBMY1A1, PRY, BPY2, DAZ1, and CDY1) as well as their X chromosome homologue transcripts and a few autosomal homologues. Of the 41 transcripts, 18 were significantly down-regulated in men with NOA when compared with those of men with complete spermatogenesis. In contrast, the expression of five transcripts increased significantly in NOA patients. Furthermore, to confirm the qPCR results at the protein level, we performed immunoblotting and IHC experiments (based on 24 commercial and homemade antibodies) that detected 10 AZF-encoded proteins. In addition, their localization in testis cell types and organelles was determined. Interestingly, the two missing proteins, XKRY and CYORF15A, were detected for the first time. Finally, we focused on the expression patterns of the significantly altered genes in 12 MA patients with successful sperm retrieval compared to those of 12 MA patients with failed sperm retrieval to predict the success of sperm retrieval in

  17. Inter- and intraspecies phylogenetic analyses reveal extensive X-Y gene conversion in the evolution of gametologous sequences of human sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Beniamino; Sellitto, Daniele; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio

    2014-08-01

    It has long been believed that the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is genetically independent from the X chromosome. This idea has been recently dismissed due to the discovery that X-Y gametologous gene conversion may occur. However, the pervasiveness of this molecular process in the evolution of sex chromosomes has yet to be exhaustively analyzed. In this study, we explored how pervasive X-Y gene conversion has been during the evolution of the youngest stratum of the human sex chromosomes. By comparing about 0.5 Mb of human-chimpanzee gametologous sequences, we identified 19 regions in which extensive gene conversion has occurred. From our analysis, two major features of these emerged: 1) Several of them are evolutionarily conserved between the two species and 2) almost all of the 19 hotspots overlap with regions where X-Y crossing-over has been previously reported to be involved in sex reversal. Furthermore, in order to explore the dynamics of X-Y gametologous conversion in recent human evolution, we resequenced these 19 hotspots in 68 widely divergent Y haplogroups and used publicly available single nucleotide polymorphism data for the X chromosome. We found that at least ten hotspots are still active in humans. Hence, the results of the interspecific analysis are consistent with the hypothesis of widespread reticulate evolution within gametologous sequences in the differentiation of hominini sex chromosomes. In turn, intraspecific analysis demonstrates that X-Y gene conversion may modulate human sex-chromosome-sequence evolution to a greater extent than previously thought. PMID:24817545

  18. Recent insights into the regulation of X-chromosome inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valencia K

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Karmele Valencia, Anton Wutz Department of Biology, Institute of Molecular Health Sciences, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mechanism by which mammals compensate gene dosage differences between males and females. XCI is required for female development and has implications for human disease. As a result, a single X chromosome is transcriptionally active in both male and female cells. Functional hemizygosity of the X chromosomes greatly predisposes to phenotypic consequences of mutations. In females, X chromosomes are randomly chosen to become inactivated leading to a mosaic pattern of cells expressing genes from either chromosome. This facilitates the masking of phenotypic consequences of heterozygous X-linked mutations. Skewing of XCI in favor of one chromosome can result in increased severity of disease symptoms, if the X chromosome with a gene mutation remains preferentially active. In addition, phenotypic masking of X-linked mutations is not always observed. Rett syndrome represents a paradigm of this statement. Dosage compensation can also mask some aspects of sex chromosome aneuploidies. X-chromosome aneuploidies include Klinefelter, Turner, and X-trisomy syndromes. In all these cases, a single active X chromosome is present. However, in those cases with two or more X chromosomes, some genes from the inactivated X chromosome escape from XCI becoming active. Therefore, dose imbalances of escape genes cause pathologies. Defects in the structure and silencing of the inactive X chromosome are further observed in human pluripotent stem cells and in certain tumors. Taken together, these findings suggest that aspects of XCI are relevant for a large number of human diseases. Here we review basic and clinical research on XCI with the aim of illustrating connections and highlighting opportunities for future investigation. Keywords: XCI, X-linked diseases, sex chromosome

  19. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome that spans the human papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated t(X;1) breakpoint in Xp11.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, R F; Meloni, A M; Sinke, R J; de Leeuw, B; Wilbrink, M; Janssen, H A; Geraghty, M T; Monaco, A P; Sandberg, A A; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a specific chromosome abnormality, t(X;1)(p11;q21), was described for a subgroup of human papillary renal cell carcinomas. The translocation breakpoint in Xp11 is located in the same region as that in t(X;18)(p11;q11)-positive synovial sarcoma. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (F

  20. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  1. Induction of chromosome aberration in human lymphocytes and its dependence on X ray energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variations of dose response with X ray energy observed with the human lymphocyte dicentric assay is examined. In order to determine reliably the initial slopes (RBEm) many cells need to be analysed at low doses. Insufficient analysis may explain some reported interlaboratory differences in fitted dose-response coefficients. One such discrepancy at 150 kVp, E(mean) = 70 keV is examined. Data are also presented for an X ray spectrum of 80 kVp, E(mean) = 58 keV. Over the photon energy range 20 keV X rays to 1.25 MeV gamma rays RBEm varies by about a factor of 5, with the lower energies being more effective. This is consistent with microdosimetric theory. By contrast, in radiological protection a radiation weighting factor of 1.0 is assumed for all photons when assessing the risk of inducing cancer at low doses. The measured variations of biological effect with photon energy have led to suggestions that the lower energies, as used for some diagnostic radiology, carry a greater risk per unit dose than is normally assumed by those involved in radiological protection. Interpretation of the data reported in this paper does not support this view. (author)

  2. Chimpanzee chromosome 12 is homologous to human chromosome 2q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Most of the 46 human chromosomes find their counterparts in the 48 chimpanzee chromosomes except for chromosome 2 which has been hypothesized to have been derived from a centric fusion of two chimpanzee acrocentric chromosomes. These two chromosomes correspond to the human chromosomes 2p and 2g. This conclusion is based primarily on chromosome banding techniques, and the somatic cell hybridization technique has also been used. (HLW)

  3. Chromosome aberration yields in human lymphocytes induced by fractionated doses of x-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unstimulated (G0) human peripheral blood lymphocytes were exposed at 37degC to doses of 200 or 500 rad of X-rays delivered in two equal fractions. The dose fractions were separated by intervals of up to 7 h in the 200 rad study and up to 48 h for 500 rad. In both studies the mean levels of dicentrics and total unstable aberrations began to decline when fractions were delivered with intervals of greater than 2 h. With 200 rad the yield had decreased to an additive baseline (i.e. equal to only twice the yield of a single 100-rad fraction) by an interval of 4 h. Following 500 rad the yield declined until 8 h and then remained 20% above the expected additive baseline even when 48 h separated the fractions. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed. In a second experiment PHA stimulated lymphocyte cultures were exposed to 2 doses of 125 rad of X-rays up to 7 h apart in an attempt to demonstrate the late peak in aberration yield originally reported by Lane. Control cultures received unsplit doses of 250 rad at the time of the corresponding second 125-rad fraction. No evidence of a late peak in dicentric yield was observed. The yield remained approximately the same irrespective of the time interval between fractions but these split dose yields were significantly different from the accompanying unsplit controls

  4. High-resolution methylation analysis of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene 5{prime} region on the active and inactive X chromosomes: Correlation with binding sites for transcription factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornstra, I.K.; Yang, T.P. [Univ. of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-02-01

    DNA methylation within GC-rich promoters of constitutively expressed X-linked genes is correlated with transcriptional silencing on the inactive X chromosome in female mammals. For most X-linked genes, X chromosome inactivation results in transcriptionally active and inactive alleles occupying each female nucleus. To examine mechanisms responsible for maintaining this unique system of differential gene expression, we have analyzed the methylation of individual cytosine residues in the 5{prime} CpG island of the human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene on the active and inactive X chromosomes. These studies demonstrate the 5{prime} CpG islands of active and 5-azacytidine-reactivated alleles are essentially unmethylated while the inactive allele is hypermethylated. The inactive allele is completely methylated at nearly all CpG dinucleotides except in a 68-bp region containing four adjacent GC boxes where most CpG dinucleotides are either unmethylated or partially methylated. Curiously, these GC boxes exhibit in vivo footprints only on the active X chromosome, not on the inactive X. The methylation pattern of the inactive HPRT gene is strikingly different from that reported for the inactive X-linked human phosphoglycerate kinase gene which exhibits methylation at all CpG sites in the 5{prime} CpG island. These results suggest that the position of methylated CpG dinucleotides, the density of methylated CpGs, the length of methylated regions, and/or chromatin structure associated with methylated DNA may have a role in repressing the activity of housekeeping promoters on the inactive X chromosome. The pattern of DNA methylation on the inactive human HPRT gene may also provide insight into the process of inactivating the gene early in female embryogenesis. 55 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  6. Isolation of cDNAs from the human X chromosome and derivation of related STSs. Final progress report, April 1992--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.L.

    1995-09-01

    Over the course of this funding period, the number of genes assigned to the human X chromosome has approximately tripled from less than one hundred to nearly three hundred characterized, cloned genes assigned to it. The aims of this project were to develop methods for gene identification and to identify and characterize expressed sequences from the X chromosome. The rapidly changing environment of the human genome project provided abundant resources for gene characterization, and since methods for gene identification became rather robust over this period, these aims were de-emphasized during the project. Among the methods developed was a local one (reciprocal probing) that was developed by Drs. Cheng Chi Lee and C. Thomas Caskey, with emphasis on the human X chromosome. The development of this method offered significant expressed sequence resources for this project, particularly when coupled with the efforts to identify cosmid clones from specific X chromosome locations, as the reciprocal probing process results in paired genomic (cosmid) and cDNA materials. Attention, then has been paid to characterization of genes rather than to their identification.

  7. Chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, N. C.; Sun, C. R.Y.; Ho, T.

    1977-01-01

    Similarities between human and chimpanzee chromosomes are shown by chromosome banding techniques and somatic cell hybridization techniques. Cell hybrids were obtained from the chimpanzee lymphocyte LE-7, and the Chinese hamster mutant cell, Gal-2. Experiments showed that the ACPL, MDHs, and Gal-Act genes could be assigned to chimpanzee chromosome 13, and since these genes have been assigned to human chromosme 2p, it is suggested that chimpanzee chromosome 13 is homologous to human chromosome 2p. (HLW)

  8. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  9. Detailed ordering of markers localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome by the use of an interspecific Mus spretus mouse cross

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five probes localizing to the Xq26-Xqter region of the human X chromosome have been genetically mapped on the mouse X chromosome using an interspecific cross involving Mus spretus to a contiguous region lying proximally to the Tabby (Ta) locus. Pedigree and recombinational analysis establish the marker order as being Hprt-FIX-c11-G6PD-St14-1. The size of this contiguous region is such that the X-linked muscular dystrophy (mdx) mouse mutation probably maps within this segment. This in turn suggests that it is highly improbable that the mouse mdx locus represents a model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It is, however, compatible with the idea that this mutation may correspond in man to Emery Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. The high frequency of restriction fragment length polymorphisms found in this interspecific system for all the human cross-reacting probes examined up until now, using only a limited number of restriction enzymes, suggests that the Mus spretus mapping system may be of great potential value for establishing the linkage relationships existing in man when conserved chromosomal regions are concerned and human/mouse cross-reacting probes are available or can be obtained

  10. Dynamic changes in paternal X-chromosome activity during imprinted X-chromosome inactivation in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Patrat, Catherine; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Vialon, Vivian; Le Baccon, Patricia; Chow, Jennifer; Heard, Edith

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, X-chromosome dosage compensation is achieved by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes in females. In mice, X inactivation is initially imprinted, with inactivation of the paternal X (Xp) chromosome occurring during preimplantation development. One theory is that the Xp is preinactivated in female embryos, because of its previous silence during meiosis in the male germ line. The extent to which the Xp is active after fertilization and the exact time of onset of X-linked gene si...

  11. Dynamic Bcl-xL (S49) and (S62) Phosphorylation/Dephosphorylation during Mitosis Prevents Chromosome Instability and Aneuploidy in Normal Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Prasamit Saurav; Beauchemin, Myriam; Hébert, Josée; Bertrand, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-xL proteins undergo dynamic phosphorylation/dephosphorylation on Ser49 and Ser62 residues during mitosis. The expression of Bcl-xL(S49A), (S62A) and dual (S49/62A) phosphorylation mutants in tumor cells lead to severe mitotic defects associated with multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, and micro-, bi- and multi-nucleated cells. Because the above observations were made in tumor cells which already display genomic instability, we now address the question: will similar effects occur in normal human diploid cells? We studied normal human diploid BJ foreskin fibroblast cells expressing Bcl-xL (wild type), (S49A), (S49D), (S62A), (S62D) and the dual-site (S49/62A) and (S49/62D) mutants. Cells expressing S49 and/or S62 phosphorylation mutants showed reduced kinetics of cell population doubling. These effects on cell population doubling kinetics correlated with early outbreak of senescence with no impact on the cell death rate. Senescent cells displayed typical senescence-associated phenotypes including high-level of senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion, tumor suppressor p53 and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 activation as well as γH2A.X-associated nuclear chromatin foci. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and Giemsa-banded karyotypes revealed that the expression of Bcl-xL phosphorylation mutants in normal diploid BJ cells provoked chromosome instability and aneuploidy. These findings suggest that dynamic Bcl-xL(S49) and (S62) phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycles are important in the maintenance of chromosome integrity during mitosis in normal cells. They could impact future strategies aiming to develop and identify compounds that could target not only the anti-apoptotic domain of Bcl-xL protein, but also its mitotic domain for cancer therapy. PMID:27398719

  12. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Construction of human chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, M K; Shero, J H; Cheung, M C; Kan, Y W; Hieter, P A; Antonarakis, S E

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome 21-specific yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) have been constructed by a method that performs all steps in agarose, allowing size selection by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and the use of nanogram to microgram quantities of DNA. The DNA sources used were hybrid cell line WAV-17, containing chromosome 21 as the only human chromosome and flow-sorted chromosome 21. The transformation efficiency of ligation products was similar to that obtained in aqueous transformations and yielded YACs with sizes ranging from 100 kilobases (kb) to greater than 1 megabase when polyamines were included in the transformation procedure. Twenty-five YACs containing human DNA have been obtained from a mouse-human hybrid, ranging in size from 200 to greater than 1000 kb, with an average size of 410 kb. Ten of these YACs were localized to subregions of chromosome 21 by hybridization of RNA probes (corresponding to the YAC ends recovered in Escherichia coli) to a panel of somatic cell hybrid DNA. Twenty-one human YACs, ranging in size from 100 to 500 kb, with an average size of 150 kb, were obtained from approximately equal to 50 ng of flow-sorted chromosome 21 DNA. Three were localized to subregions of chromosome 21. YACs will aid the construction of a physical map of human chromosome 21 and the study of disorders associated with chromosome 21 such as Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

  14. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility.

  15. Epigenetics and autoimmune diseases: the X chromosome-nucleolus nexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Wesley H; Renaudineau, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur more often in females, suggesting a key role for the X chromosome. X chromosome inactivation, a major epigenetic feature in female cells that provides dosage compensation of X-linked genes to avoid overexpression, presents special vulnerabilities that can contribute to the disease process. Disruption of X inactivation can result in loss of dosage compensation with expression from previously sequestered genes, imbalance of gene products, and altered endogenous material out of normal epigenetic context. In addition, the human X has significant differences compared to other species and these differences can contribute to the frequency and intensity of the autoimmune disease in humans as well as the types of autoantigens encountered. Here a link is demonstrated between autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, and the X chromosome by discussing cases in which typically non-autoimmune disorders complicated with X chromosome abnormalities also present lupus-like symptoms. The discussion is then extended to the reported spatial and temporal associations of the inactive X chromosome with the nucleolus. When frequent episodes of cellular stress occur, the inactive X chromosome may be disrupted and inadvertently become involved in the nucleolar stress response. Development of autoantigens, many of which are at least transiently components of the nucleolus, is then described. Polyamines, which aid in nucleoprotein complex assembly in the nucleolus, increase further during cell stress, and appear to have an important role in the autoimmune disease process. Autoantigenic endogenous material can potentially be stabilized by polyamines. This presents a new paradigm for autoimmune diseases: that many are antigen-driven and the autoantigens originate from altered endogenous material due to episodes of cellular stress that disrupt epigenetic control. This suggests that epigenetics and the X chromosome are important aspects of autoimmune

  16. Localization of the human thyroxine-binding globulin gene to the long arm of the X chromosome (Xq21-22).

    OpenAIRE

    Trent, J M; Flink, I L; Morkin, E; van Tuinen, P; Ledbetter, D H

    1987-01-01

    Thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid-hormone transport protein in the plasma of most vertebrate species. A recombinant phage (lambda cTBG8) containing a cDNA insert of human TBG recently has been described. With the cDNA insert from lambda cTBG8 used as a radiolabeled probe, DNA from a series of somatic-cell hybrids containing deletions of the X chromosome was analyzed by means of blot hybridization. The results indicated that the TBG gene is located in the midportion of the ...

  17. Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Karlins, Eric; Sampson, Joshua N.; Neal D Freedman; Yang, Qi; Hicks, Belynda; Dagnall, Casey; Hautman, Christopher; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Abnet, Christian C.; Aldrich, Melinda C; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Arslan, Alan A.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events. X ...

  18. Multicolor spectral karyotyping of human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröck, E; du Manoir, S; Veldman, T; Schoell, B; Wienberg, J; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Ning, Y; Ledbetter, D H; Bar-Am, I; Soenksen, D; Garini, Y; Ried, T

    1996-07-26

    The simultaneous and unequivocal discernment of all human chromosomes in different colors would be of significant clinical and biologic importance. Whole-genome scanning by spectral karyotyping allowed instantaneous visualization of defined emission spectra for each human chromosome after fluorescence in situ hybridization. By means of computer separation (classification) of spectra, spectrally overlapping chromosome-specific DNA probes could be resolved, and all human chromosomes were simultaneously identified. PMID:8662537

  19. Chromosomal redistribution of male-biased genes in mammalian evolution with two bursts of gene gain on the X chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong E Zhang

    Full Text Available Mammalian X chromosomes evolved under various mechanisms including sexual antagonism, the faster-X process, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI. These forces may contribute to nonrandom chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes. In order to understand the evolution of gene content on the X chromosome and autosome under these forces, we dated human and mouse protein-coding genes and miRNA genes on the vertebrate phylogenetic tree. We found that the X chromosome recently acquired a burst of young male-biased genes, which is consistent with fixation of recessive male-beneficial alleles by sexual antagonism. For genes originating earlier, however, this pattern diminishes and finally reverses with an overrepresentation of the oldest male-biased genes on autosomes. MSCI contributes to this dynamic since it silences X-linked old genes but not X-linked young genes. This demasculinization process seems to be associated with feminization of the X chromosome with more X-linked old genes expressed in ovaries. Moreover, we detected another burst of gene originations after the split of eutherian mammals and opossum, and these genes were quickly incorporated into transcriptional networks of multiple tissues. Preexisting X-linked genes also show significantly higher protein-level evolution during this period compared to autosomal genes, suggesting positive selection accompanied the early evolution of mammalian X chromosomes. These two findings cast new light on the evolutionary history of the mammalian X chromosome in terms of gene gain, sequence, and expressional evolution.

  20. Status of dosage compensation of X chromosome in bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka, Sojeong; Ahn, Hyeonju; Seo, Minseok; Kim, Heebal; Kim, Jin Nam; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Dosage compensation system with X chromosome upregulation and inactivation have evolved to overcome the genetic imbalance between sex chromosomes in both male and female of mammals. Although recent development of chromosome-wide technologies has allowed us to test X upregulation, discrete data processing and analysis methods draw disparate conclusions. A series of expression studies revealed status of dosage compensation in some species belonging to monotremes, marsupials, rodents and primates. However, X upregulation in the Artiodactyla order including cattle have not been studied yet. In this study, we surveyed the genome-wide transcriptional upregulation in X chromosome in cattle RNA-seq data using different gene filtration methods. Overall examination of RNA-seq data revealed that X chromosome in the pituitary gland expressed more genes than in other peripheral tissues, which was consistent with the previous results observed in human and mouse. When analyzed with globally expressed genes, a median X:A expression ratio was 0.94. The ratio of 1-to-1 ortholog genes between chicken and mammals, however, showed considerable reduction to 0.68. These results indicate that status of dosage compensation for cattle is not deviated from those found in rodents and primate, and this is consistent with the evolutionary history of cattle.

  1. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  2. Dynamic changes in paternal X-chromosome activity during imprinted X-chromosome inactivation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrat, Catherine; Okamoto, Ikuhiro; Diabangouaya, Patricia; Vialon, Vivian; Le Baccon, Patricia; Chow, Jennifer; Heard, Edith

    2009-03-31

    In mammals, X-chromosome dosage compensation is achieved by inactivating one of the two X chromosomes in females. In mice, X inactivation is initially imprinted, with inactivation of the paternal X (Xp) chromosome occurring during preimplantation development. One theory is that the Xp is preinactivated in female embryos, because of its previous silence during meiosis in the male germ line. The extent to which the Xp is active after fertilization and the exact time of onset of X-linked gene silencing have been the subject of debate. We performed a systematic, single-cell transcriptional analysis to examine the activity of the Xp chromosome for a panel of X-linked genes throughout early preimplantation development in the mouse. Rather than being preinactivated, we found the Xp to be fully active at the time of zygotic gene activation, with silencing beginning from the 4-cell stage onward. X-inactivation patterns were, however, surprisingly diverse between genes. Some loci showed early onset (4-8-cell stage) of X inactivation, and some showed extremely late onset (postblastocyst stage), whereas others were never fully inactivated. Thus, we show that silencing of some X-chromosomal regions occurs outside of the usual time window and that escape from X inactivation can be highly lineage specific. These results reveal that imprinted X inactivation in mice is far less concerted than previously thought and highlight the epigenetic diversity underlying the dosage compensation process during early mammalian development. PMID:19273861

  3. Female chromosome X mosaicism is age-related and preferentially affects the inactivated X chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Zhou, Weiyin; Karlins, Eric; Sampson, Joshua N.; Freedman, Neal D.; Yang, Qi; Hicks, Belynda; Dagnall, Casey; Hautman, Christopher; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Abnet, Christian C.; Aldrich, Melinda C.; Amos, Christopher; Amundadottir, Laufey T.; Arslan, Alan A.; Beane-Freeman, Laura E.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Black, Amanda; Blot, William J.; Bock, Cathryn H.; Bracci, Paige M.; Brinton, Louise A.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Burdett, Laurie; Buring, Julie E.; Butler, Mary A.; Canzian, Federico; Carreón, Tania; Chaffee, Kari G.; Chang, I-Shou; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Chen, Chu; Chen, Constance; Chen, Kexin; Chung, Charles C.; Cook, Linda S.; Crous Bou, Marta; Cullen, Michael; Davis, Faith G.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Ding, Ti; Doherty, Jennifer; Duell, Eric J.; Epstein, Caroline G.; Fan, Jin-Hu; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Friedenreich, Christine M.; Fuchs, Charles S.; Gallinger, Steven; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giles, Graham G.; Gillanders, Elizabeth M.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Goldin, Lynn; Goldstein, Alisa M.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hallmans, Goran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Harris, Curtis C.; Henriksson, Roger; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hong, Yun-Chul; Hoover, Robert N.; Hsiung, Chao A.; Hu, Nan; Hu, Wei; Hunter, David J.; Hutchinson, Amy; Jenab, Mazda; Johansen, Christoffer; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Hee Nam; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Young Tae; Klein, Alison P.; Klein, Robert; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Krogh, Vittorio; Kurtz, Robert C.; LaCroix, Andrea; Lan, Qing; Landi, Maria Teresa; Marchand, Loic Le; Li, Donghui; Liang, Xiaolin; Liao, Linda M.; Lin, Dongxin; Liu, Jianjun; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Lingeng; Magliocco, Anthony M.; Malats, Nuria; Matsuo, Keitaro; McNeill, Lorna H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Melin, Beatrice S.; Mirabello, Lisa; Moore, Lee; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Park, Jae Yong; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Peplonska, Beata; Peters, Ulrike; Petersen, Gloria M.; Pooler, Loreall; Prescott, Jennifer; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Purdue, Mark P.; Qiao, You-Lin; Rajaraman, Preetha; Real, Francisco X.; Riboli, Elio; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez-Santiago, Benjamin; Ruder, Avima M.; Savage, Sharon A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schwartz, Ann G.; Schwartz, Kendra L.; Seow, Adeline; Wendy Setiawan, Veronica; Severi, Gianluca; Shen, Hongbing; Sheng, Xin; Shin, Min-Ho; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra T.; Spitz, Margaret R.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Stram, Daniel; Tang, Ze-Zhong; Taylor, Philip R.; Teras, Lauren R.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; Van Den Berg, David; Visvanathan, Kala; Wacholder, Sholom; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wheeler, William; White, Emily; Wiencke, John K.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Wong, Maria Pik; Wu, Chen; Wu, Tangchun; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Yi-Long; Wunder, Jay S.; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Hannah P.; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Yu, Kai; Zanetti, Krista A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Zhou, Baosen; Ziegler, Regina G.; Perez-Jurado, Luis A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Tucker, Margaret; Dean, Michael C.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    To investigate large structural clonal mosaicism of chromosome X, we analysed the SNP microarray intensity data of 38,303 women from cancer genome-wide association studies (20,878 cases and 17,425 controls) and detected 124 mosaic X events >2 Mb in 97 (0.25%) women. Here we show rates for X-chromosome mosaicism are four times higher than mean autosomal rates; X mosaic events more often include the entire chromosome and participants with X events more likely harbour autosomal mosaic events. X mosaicism frequency increases with age (0.11% in 50-year olds; 0.45% in 75-year olds), as reported for Y and autosomes. Methylation array analyses of 33 women with X mosaicism indicate events preferentially involve the inactive X chromosome. Our results provide further evidence that the sex chromosomes undergo mosaic events more frequently than autosomes, which could have implications for understanding the underlying mechanisms of mosaic events and their possible contribution to risk for chronic diseases. PMID:27291797

  4. AB048. X-chromosomal SNPs variation in populations of Russia

    OpenAIRE

    Stepanov, Vadim; Vagaitseva, Kseniya; Kharkov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome markers are informative tool for studying a genetic diversity in human populations and have become a useful in DNA identification when certain complex kinship cases need to be unravelled. In this work we present population genetic data on X-chromosome-wide SNPs in North Eurasian populations and report XSNP multiplex system for forensic genetics. A total of 2,867 X-chromosomal SNPs were genotyped in 12 populations using Illumina microarray platform. Twelve populations under study ...

  5. Haploinsufficiency and the sex chromosomes from yeasts to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Stephen G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Haploinsufficient (HI genes are those for which a reduction in copy number in a diploid from two to one results in significantly reduced fitness. Haploinsufficiency is increasingly implicated in human disease, and so predicting this phenotype could provide insights into the genetic mechanisms behind many human diseases, including some cancers. Results In the present work we show that orthologues of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HI genes are preferentially retained across the kingdom Fungi, and that the HI genes of S. cerevisiae can be used to predict haploinsufficiency in humans. Our HI gene predictions confirm known associations between haploinsufficiency and genetic disease, and predict several further disorders in which the phenotype may be relevant. Haploinsufficiency is also clearly relevant to the gene-dosage imbalances inherent in eukaryotic sex-determination systems. In S. cerevisiae, HI genes are over-represented on chromosome III, the chromosome that determines yeast's mating type. This may be a device to select against the loss of one copy of chromosome III from a diploid. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are also over-represented on the mating-type chromosomes of other yeasts and filamentous fungi. In animals with heterogametic sex determination, accumulation of HI genes on the sex chromosomes would compromise fitness in both sexes, given X chromosome inactivation in females. We found that orthologues of S. cerevisiae HI genes are significantly under-represented on the X chromosomes of mammals and of Caenorhabditis elegans. There is no X inactivation in Drosophila melanogaster (increased expression of X in the male is used instead and, in this species, we found no depletion of orthologues to yeast HI genes on the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A special relationship between HI genes and the sex/mating-type chromosome extends from S. cerevisiae to Homo sapiens, with the microbe being a useful model for

  6. The X and Y chromosome in meiosis: how and why they keep silent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Godfried W van der Heijden; Maureen Eijpe; Willy M Baarends

    2011-01-01

    The XX/XY sex chromosomal system of mammals,including human,challenges the chromosome pairing mechanism during male meiosis.Pairing and subsequent separation of homologous chromosomes generates haploid cells from diploid cells during the meiotic divisions.One of the basic requirements for recognition between homologous chromosomes is DNA sequence identity.Since the X and Y chromosome share little homology,their quest for each other is difficult,and has special characteristics.During the lengthy meiotic prophase,all autosomal chromosomes synapse,by forming a special protein structure called the synaptonemal complex,which connects the chromosomal axes.In contrast,the X and Y chromosome synapse only in the short homologous pseudoautosomal regions,and form the so-called XY body.

  7. X-Chromosome Inactivation Counting and Choice: Change or Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Monkhorst (Kim)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractPlacental mammalian female cells have two X chromosomes. One of these chromosomes is randomly inactivated in each nucleus so that females are functionally mosaic for genes expressed from their X chromosomes. The evolutionary basis for this phenomenon is based on the fact that females wou

  8. Transformation with DNA from 5-azacytidine-reactivated X chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Venolia, L; Gartler, S M; Wassman, E R; Yen, P.; Mohandas, T; Shapiro, L J

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown that 5-azacytidine (5-Aza-Cyd) can reactivate genes on the inactive human X chromosome. It is assumed that the 5-Aza-Cyd acts by causing demethylation of the DNA at specific sites, but this cannot be demonstrated directly without a cloned probe. Instead, we have utilized the technique of DNA-mediated transformation to show that the 5-Aza-Cyd-induced reactivation occurs at the DNA level. DNAs from various mouse-human or hamster-human hybrid cell lines, deficient for mouse or ...

  9. The inactive X chromosome in the human female is enriched in 5-methylcytosine to an unusual degree and appears to contain more of this modified nucleotide than the remainder of the genome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepti D. Deobagkar; H. Sharat Chandra

    2003-04-01

    By employing a procedure that combines ELISA and photoacoustic spectroscopy, we have examined the content of 5-methylcytosine (m5C) in DNA of individuals who differed from one another in the number of X chromosomes in their genomes. The results show that the human inactive X chromosome (Xi) contains very high amounts of this modified nucleotide. We estimate that in the 46,XX female there is more m5C in Xi (∼3.6 × 107) than in all the remaining chromosomes put together (∼2.1 × 107). Our results also suggest that nearly one-fifth of all cytosines in Xi are methylated and that, in addition to CpG methylation, there is extensive non-CpG methylation as well.

  10. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromosomes are structures found in the center (nucleus) of cells that carry long pieces of DNA. DNA ... is the building block of the human body. Chromosomes also contain proteins that help DNA exist in ...

  11. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1989-12-31

    The basic aims of this project are the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X and the utilization of these maps for the subsequent isolation of a set of physically overlapping DNA segment clones. The strategy depends on the utilization of chromosome specific libraries of small (1--15 kb) segments from each of the two chromosomes. Since the time of submission of our previous progress report, we have refined the genetic map of markers which we had previously isolated for chromosome 17. We have completed our genetic mapping in CEPH reference and NF1 families of 15 markers in the pericentric region of chromosome 17. Physical mapping results with three probes, were shown be in very close genetic proximity to the NF1 gene, with respect to two translocation breakpoints which disrupt the activity of the gene. All three of the probes were found to lie between the centromere and the most proximal translocation breakpoint, providing important genetic markers proximal to the NF1 gene. Our primary focus has shifted to the X chromosome. We have isolated an additional 30 polymorphic markers, bringing the total number we have isolated to over 80. We have invested substantial effort in characterizing the polymorphisms at each of these loci and constructed plasmid subclones which reveal the polymorphisms for nearly all of the loci. These subclones are of practical value in that they produce simpler and stronger patterns on human genomic Southern blots, thus improving the efficiency of the genetic mapping experiments. These subclones may also be of value for deriving DNA sequence information at each locus, necessary for establishing polymerase chain reaction primers specific for each locus. Such information would allow the use of each locus as a sequence tagged site.

  12. X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome systems in the Neotropical Gymnotiformes electric fish of the genus Brachyhypopomus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adauto Lima Cardoso

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several types of sex chromosome systems have been recorded among Gymnotiformes, including male and female heterogamety, simple and multiple sex chromosomes, and different mechanisms of origin and evolution. The X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y systems identified in three species of this order are considered homoplasic for the group. In the genus Brachyhypopomus, only B. gauderio presented this type of system. Herein we describe the karyotypes of Brachyhypopomus pinnicaudatus and B. n. sp. FLAV, which have an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system that evolved via fusion between an autosome and the Y chromosome. The morphology of the chromosomes and the meiotic pairing suggest that the sex chromosomes of B. gauderio and B. pinnicaudatus have a common origin, whereas in B . n. sp. FLAV the sex chromosome system evolved independently. However, we cannot discard the possibility of common origin followed by distinct processes of differentiation. The identification of two new karyotypes with an X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y sex chromosome system in Gymnotiformes makes it the most common among the karyotyped species of the group. Comparisons of these karyotypes and the evolutionary history of the taxa indicate independent origins for their sex chromosomes systems. The recurrent emergence of the X1X1X2X2/X1X2Y system may represent sex chromosomes turnover events in Gymnotiformes.

  13. Study of 25 X-chromosome SNPs in the Portuguese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Amorim, António;

    2011-01-01

    The importance of X-chromosome markers in individual identifications, population genetics, forensics and kinship testing is getting wide recognition. In this work, we studied the distributions of 25 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (X-SNPs) in population samples from Northern, Central...

  14. Human embryonic stem cells as models for aneuploid chromosomal syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Narwani, Kavita; Buehler, Nicole; Mandefro, Berhan; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Yanuka, Ofra; Clark, Amander; Hill, David; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

    2010-09-01

    Syndromes caused by chromosomal aneuploidies are widely recognized genetic disorders in humans and often lead to spontaneous miscarriage. Preimplantation genetic screening is used to detect chromosomal aneuploidies in early embryos. Our aim was to derive aneuploid human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines that may serve as models for human syndromes caused by aneuploidies. We have established 25 hESC lines from blastocysts diagnosed as aneuploid on day 3 of their in vitro development. The hESC lines exhibited morphology and expressed markers typical of hESCs. They demonstrated long-term proliferation capacity and pluripotent differentiation. Karyotype analysis revealed that two-third of the cell lines carry a normal euploid karyotype, while one-third remained aneuploid throughout the derivation, resulting in eight hESC lines carrying either trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), 16, 17, 21 (Down syndrome), X (Triple X syndrome), or monosomy X (Turner syndrome). On the basis of the level of single nucleotide polymorphism heterozygosity in the aneuploid chromosomes, we determined whether the aneuploidy originated from meiotic or mitotic chromosomal nondisjunction. Gene expression profiles of the trisomic cell lines suggested that all three chromosomes are actively transcribed. Our analysis allowed us to determine which tissues are most affected by the presence of a third copy of either chromosome 13, 16, 17 or 21 and highlighted the effects of trisomies on embryonic development. The results presented here suggest that aneuploid embryos can serve as an alternative source for either normal euploid or aneuploid hESC lines, which represent an invaluable tool to study developmental aspects of chromosomal abnormalities in humans. PMID:20641042

  15. Chimpanzee and human Y chromosomes are remarkably divergent in structure and gene content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Hughes; H. Skaletsky; T. Pyntikova; T.A. Graves; S.K.M. van Daalen; P.J. Minx; R.S. Fulton; S.D. McGrath; D.P. Locke; C. Friedman; B.J. Trask; E.R. Mardis; W.C. Warren; S. Repping; S. Rozen; R.K. Wilson; D.C. Page

    2010-01-01

    The human Y chromosome began to evolve from an autosome hundreds of millions of years ago, acquiring a sex-determining function and undergoing a series of inversions that suppressed crossing over with the X chromosome(1,2). Little is known about the recent evolution of the Y chromosome because only

  16. Effect of post-treatments with caffeine during G2 on the frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations produced by X-rays in human lymphocytes during G0 and G1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human lymphocytes were irradiated with X-rays in G0 and G1, grown in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine, and harvested at different times from 48 to 80 h after stimulation. Some cultures were exposed to 2.5-5 mM caffeine during the last 3 h before harvesting. The frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations were scored in first division (M1) metaphases. The post-treatment with caffeine increased the frequencies of mitoses and chromosome-type aberrations in irradiated cultures. The results suggest that cells carrying chromosome-type aberrations are delayed in G2 and that caffeine increases the frequencies of aberrations in dividing cells by removing this G2-block. (author)

  17. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  18. Evolutionarily conserved sequences on human chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Sheehan, John B.; Stokowski, Renee P.; Chen, Xiyin; Hosseini, Roya; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Fodor, Stephen P.A.; Cox, David R.; Patil, Nila

    2001-09-01

    Comparison of human sequences with the DNA of other mammals is an excellent means of identifying functional elements in the human genome. Here we describe the utility of high-density oligonucleotide arrays as a rapid approach for comparing human sequences with the DNA of multiple species whose sequences are not presently available. High-density arrays representing approximately 22.5 Mb of nonrepetitive human chromosome 21 sequence were synthesized and then hybridized with mouse and dog DNA to identify sequences conserved between humans and mice (human-mouse elements) and between humans and dogs (human-dog elements). Our data show that sequence comparison of multiple species provides a powerful empiric method for identifying actively conserved elements in the human genome. A large fraction of these evolutionarily conserved elements are present in regions on chromosome 21 that do not encode known genes.

  19. Neocentric X-chromosome in a girl with Turner-like syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmat Morteza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neocentromeres are rare human chromosomal aberrations in which a new centromere has formed in a previously non-centromeric location. We report the finding of a structurally abnormal X chromosome with a neocentromere in a 15-year-old girl with clinical features suggestive of Turner syndrome, including short stature and primary amenorrhea. Result G-banded chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic female karyotype involving two abnormal cell lines. One cell line (84% of analyzed metaphases had a structurally abnormal X chromosome (duplication of the long arm and deletion of the short arm and a normal X chromosome. The other cell line (16% of cells exhibited monosomy X. C-banding studies were negative for the abnormal X chromosome. FISH analysis revealed lack of hybridization of the abnormal X chromosome with both the X centromere-specific probe and the “all human centromeres” probe, a pattern consistent with lack of the X chromosome endogenous centromere. A FISH study using an XIST gene probe revealed the presence of two XIST genes, one on each long arm of the iso(Xq, required for inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. R-banding also demonstrated inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. An assay for centromeric protein C (CENP-C was positive on both the normal and the abnormal X chromosomes. The position of CENP-C in the abnormal X chromosome defined a neocentromere, which explains its mitotic stability. The karyotype is thus designated as 46,X,neo(X(qter- > q12::q12- > q21.2- > neo- > q21.2- > qter[42]/45,X[8], which is consistent with stigmata of Turner syndrome. The mother of this patient has a normal karyotype; however, the father was not available for study. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of mosaic Turner syndrome involving an analphoid iso(Xq chromosome with a proven neocentromere among 90 previously described cases with a proven neocentromere.

  20. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  1. Utility of X-chromosome SNPs in relationship testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan Jose; Castro, J.A.;

    2008-01-01

    X-chromosome markers may complement the results obtained from other genetic markers in complex relationship cases. Until now, reports on relationship testing using X-chromosome markers have mainly included data of short tandem repeats (STRs) while little data on single nucleotide polymorphisms (S...

  2. Balancing up and downregulation of the C. elegans X chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Alyssa C; Csankovszki, Györgyi

    2015-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, males have one X chromosome and hermaphrodites have two. Emerging evidence indicates that the male X is transcriptionally more active than autosomes to balance the single X to two sets of autosomes. Because upregulation is not limited to males, hermaphrodites need to strike back and downregulate expression from the two X chromosomes to balance gene expression in their genome. Hermaphrodite-specific downregulation involves binding of the dosage compensation complex t...

  3. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability in human mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Yang, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    Karyotypes of human cells surviving X- and alpha-irradiation have been studied. Human mammary epithelial cells of the immortal, non-tumorigenic cell line H184B5 F5-1 M/10 were irradiated and surviving clones isolated and expanded in culture. Cytogenetic analysis was performed using dedicated software with an image analyzer. We have found that both high- and low-LET radiation induced chromosomal instability in long-term cultures, but with different characteristics. Complex chromosomal rearrangements were observed after X-rays, while chromosome loss predominated after alpha-particles. Deletions were observed in both cases. In clones derived from cells exposed to alpha-particles, some cells showed extensive chromosome breaking and double minutes. Genomic instability was correlated to delayed reproductive death and neoplastic transformation. These results indicate that chromosomal instability is a radiation-quality-dependent effect which could determine late genetic effects, and should therefore be carefully considered in the evaluation of risk for space missions.

  4. Detection of skewed X-chromosome inactivation in Fragile X syndrome and X chromosome aneuploidy using quantitative melt analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godler, David E; Inaba, Yoshimi; Schwartz, Charles E; Bui, Quang M; Shi, Elva Z; Li, Xin; Herlihy, Amy S; Skinner, Cindy; Hagerman, Randi J; Francis, David; Amor, David J; Metcalfe, Sylvia A; Hopper, John L; Slater, Howard R

    2015-07-01

    Methylation of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) exon 1/intron 1 boundary positioned fragile X related epigenetic element 2 (FREE2), reveals skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in fragile X syndrome full mutation (FM: CGG > 200) females. XCI skewing has been also linked to abnormal X-linked gene expression with the broader clinical impact for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). In this study, 10 FREE2 CpG sites were targeted using methylation specific quantitative melt analysis (MS-QMA), including 3 sites that could not be analysed with previously used EpiTYPER system. The method was applied for detection of skewed XCI in FM females and in different types of SCA. We tested venous blood and saliva DNA collected from 107 controls (CGG chromosome test; (ii) locus-specific XCI skewing towards the hypomethylated state in FM females; and (iii) skewed XCI towards the hypermethylated state in SCA with 3 or more X chromosomes, and in 5% of the 47,XXY individuals. MS-QMA output also showed significant correlation with the EpiTYPER reference method in FM males and females (P < 0.0001) and SCAs (P < 0.05). In conclusion, we demonstrate use of MS-QMA to quantify skewed XCI in two applications with diagnostic utility.

  5. The DNA sequence of human chromosome 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ladeana W; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda A; Graves, Tina A; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Wagner-McPherson, Caryn; Layman, Dan; Maas, Jason; Jaeger, Sara; Walker, Rebecca; Wylie, Kristine; Sekhon, Mandeep; Becker, Michael C; O'Laughlin, Michelle D; Schaller, Mark E; Fewell, Ginger A; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Miner, Tracie L; Nash, William E; Cordes, Matt; Du, Hui; Sun, Hui; Edwards, Jennifer; Bradshaw-Cordum, Holland; Ali, Johar; Andrews, Stephanie; Isak, Amber; Vanbrunt, Andrew; Nguyen, Christine; Du, Feiyu; Lamar, Betty; Courtney, Laura; Kalicki, Joelle; Ozersky, Philip; Bielicki, Lauren; Scott, Kelsi; Holmes, Andrea; Harkins, Richard; Harris, Anthony; Strong, Cynthia Madsen; Hou, Shunfang; Tomlinson, Chad; Dauphin-Kohlberg, Sara; Kozlowicz-Reilly, Amy; Leonard, Shawn; Rohlfing, Theresa; Rock, Susan M; Tin-Wollam, Aye-Mon; Abbott, Amanda; Minx, Patrick; Maupin, Rachel; Strowmatt, Catrina; Latreille, Phil; Miller, Nancy; Johnson, Doug; Murray, Jennifer; Woessner, Jeffrey P; Wendl, Michael C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Schultz, Brian R; Wallis, John W; Spieth, John; Bieri, Tamberlyn A; Nelson, Joanne O; Berkowicz, Nicolas; Wohldmann, Patricia E; Cook, Lisa L; Hickenbotham, Matthew T; Eldred, James; Williams, Donald; Bedell, Joseph A; Mardis, Elaine R; Clifton, Sandra W; Chissoe, Stephanie L; Marra, Marco A; Raymond, Christopher; Haugen, Eric; Gillett, Will; Zhou, Yang; James, Rose; Phelps, Karen; Iadanoto, Shawn; Bubb, Kerry; Simms, Elizabeth; Levy, Ruth; Clendenning, James; Kaul, Rajinder; Kent, W James; Furey, Terrence S; Baertsch, Robert A; Brent, Michael R; Keibler, Evan; Flicek, Paul; Bork, Peer; Suyama, Mikita; Bailey, Jeffrey A; Portnoy, Matthew E; Torrents, David; Chinwalla, Asif T; Gish, Warren R; Eddy, Sean R; McPherson, John D; Olson, Maynard V; Eichler, Evan E; Green, Eric D; Waterston, Robert H; Wilson, Richard K

    2003-07-10

    Human chromosome 7 has historically received prominent attention in the human genetics community, primarily related to the search for the cystic fibrosis gene and the frequent cytogenetic changes associated with various forms of cancer. Here we present more than 153 million base pairs representing 99.4% of the euchromatic sequence of chromosome 7, the first metacentric chromosome completed so far. The sequence has excellent concordance with previously established physical and genetic maps, and it exhibits an unusual amount of segmentally duplicated sequence (8.2%), with marked differences between the two arms. Our initial analyses have identified 1,150 protein-coding genes, 605 of which have been confirmed by complementary DNA sequences, and an additional 941 pseudogenes. Of genes confirmed by transcript sequences, some are polymorphic for mutations that disrupt the reading frame. PMID:12853948

  6. Globally Divergent but Locally Convergent X- and Y-Chromosome Influences on Cortical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raznahan, Armin; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Greenstein, Deanna; Wallace, Gregory L; Blumenthal, Jonathan D; Clasen, Liv S; Giedd, Jay N

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their unique evolutionary history, modern mammalian X- and Y-chromosomes have highly divergent gene contents counterbalanced by regulatory features, which preferentially restrict expression of X- and Y-specific genes. These 2 characteristics make opposing predictions regarding the expected dissimilarity of X- vs. Y-chromosome influences on biological structure and function. Here, we quantify this dissimilarity using in vivo neuroimaging within a rare cohort of humans with diverse sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). We show that X- and Y-chromosomes have opposing effects on overall brain size but exert highly convergent influences on local brain anatomy, which manifest across biologically distinct dimensions of the cerebral cortex. Large-scale online meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging data indicates that convergent sex chromosome dosage effects preferentially impact centers for social perception, communication, and decision-making. Thus, despite an almost complete lack of sequence homology, and opposing effects on overall brain size, X- and Y-chromosomes exert congruent effects on the proportional size of cortical systems involved in adaptive social functioning. These convergent X-Y effects (i) track the dosage of those few genes that are still shared by X- and Y-chromosomes, and (ii) may provide a biological substrate for the link between SCA and increased rates of psychopathology.

  7. Linkage Disequilibrium for Two X-Linked Genes in Sardinia and Its Bearing on the Statistical Mapping of the Human X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, G.; Rinaldi, A.; Palmarino, R.; Seravalli, E.; Siniscalco, M.

    1977-01-01

    The distribution of four X-linked mutants (G6PD, Deutan, Protan and Xg) among lowland and once highly malarial populations of Sardinia discloses a clear-cut example of linkage disequilibrium between two of them (G6PD and Protan). In the same populations the distribution of G6PD-deficiency versus colorblindness of the Deutan type and the Xg blood-group is not significantly different from that expected at equilibrium. These data suggest indirectly that the loci for G6PD and Protan may be nearer to one another than those for G6PD and Deutan. PMID:301840

  8. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Guijun Guan; Meisheng Yi; Tohru Kobayashi; Yunhan Hong; Yoshitaka Nagahama

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system), the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its ...

  9. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  10. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropers H Hilger

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling. Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P

  11. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  12. Strategies for sequencing human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1996-06-01

    This project funded for four years (02.92 to 01.96) was a renewal of a project funded for 2.5 years (07.89 to 01.92). This report covers the period 07.89 to 07.94. The original project was entitled {open_quotes}Correlation of physical and genetic maps of Human Chromosome 16{close_quotes}. The aim over this period was to construct a cytogenetic-based physical map of chromosome 16, to enable integration of its physical and genetic maps. This was achieved by collaboration and isolation of new markers until each bin on the physical map contained a polymorphic marker on the linkage map. A further aim was to integrate all mapping data for this chromosome and to achieve contig closure over band q24.

  13. Syntenic conservation between humans and cattle. I. Human chromosome 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threadgill, D W; Womack, J E

    1990-09-01

    Bovine X hamster hybrid somatic cells have been used to investigate the syntenic relationship of nine loci in the bovine that have homologous loci on human chromosome 9. Six loci, ALDH1, ALDOB, C5, GGTB2, GSN, and ITIL, were assigned to the previously identified bovine syntenic group U18 represented by ACO1, whereas the other three loci, ABL, ASS, and GRP78, mapped to a new, previously unidentified autosomal syntenic group. Additionally, a secondary locus, ABLL, which cross-hybridized with the ABL probe, was mapped to bovine syntenic group U1 with the HSA 1 loci PGD and ENO1. The results predict that ACO1 will map proximal to ALDH1; GRP78 distal to ITIL and C5; GSN proximal to AK1, ABL, and ASS on HSA 9; GRP78 to MMU 2; and ITIL and GSN to MMU 4. PMID:2081596

  14. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Chen Chen; Taylor, J.F.; Sanders, J. O. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F{sub 2} full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F{sub 1} parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. All individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is (BM6017-6.1-TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3-BM2713-21.1-BM4604-2.4-BR215-12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321-1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA120-12.5-TGLA325-1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA30), with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA30, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Yp12-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xp14-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC204, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Human Sperm Chromosome Analysis—Study on Human Sperm Chromosome Mutagenesis Induced by Carbon Disulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEJUN-YI; FUXIAO-MIN

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect CS2 of on human sperm chromosomal aberration.The human sperm/hamster egg fusion techniquse was used to analyze 203 human sperm chromosome complement form 9 healthy volunteers.The incidence of numerical aberration was 1.0%,and that of structural chromosome aberration was 5.9% and total abnormalities was 6.9%.Structural aberrations consisted of breaks,deletions, centric rings,fragments,and chromatid exchange.The results from high concentration group(10μmol·L-1 CS2)showed that the incidence of chromosomal aberration rate was significantly higher than that of the control group.The results indicate that high concentration of CS2 might directly cause mutatenesis f the germ cell.

  16. Frequency of Cancer Genes on the Chicken Z Chromosome and Its Human Homologues: Implications for Sex Chromosome Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rami Stiglec

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that there are special evolutionary forces that act on sex chromosomes. Hemizygosity of the X chromosome in male mammals has led to selection for male-advantage genes, and against genes posing extreme risks of tumor development. A similar bias against cancer genes should also apply to the Z chromosome that is present as a single copy in female birds. Using comparative database analysis, we found that there was no significant underrepresentation of cancer genes on the chicken Z, nor on the Z-orthologous regions of human chromosomes 5 and 9. This result does not support the hypothesis that genes involved in cancer are selected against on the sex chromosomes.

  17. 5-Azacytidine-induced reactivation of the human X chromosome-linked PGK1 gene is associated with a large region of cytosine demethylation in the 5 prime CpG island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, R.S.; Gartler, S.M. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Hamster-human cell hybrids containing an inactive human X chromosome were treated with 5-azacytidine and derived clones were examined for phosphoglycerate kinase activity and cytosine methylation in the human PGK1 (X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase) gene. Comparisons between expressing and nonexpressing clones indicated that demethylation of several methylation-sensitive restriction sites outside of the 5{prime} CpG island were unnecessary for expression. High-resolution polyacrylamide gel analysis of 25 Hpa II, Hha I, and Tha I sites revealed that all clones expressing PGK1 were unmethylated in a large region of the CpG island that includes the transcription start site and 400 base pairs upstream. Many nonexpressing clones had discontinuous patterns of demethylation. Remethylation was often observed in subclones of nonexpressing hybrids. These data suggest that a specific zone of methylation-free DNA within the PGK1 promoter is required for transcription. In addition, the presence of neighboring methylcytosines appears to decrease the heritable stability of unmethylated CpGs in this region.

  18. 5-Azacytidine-induced reactivation of the human X chromosome-linked PGK1 gene is associated with a large region of cytosine demethylation in the 5' CpG island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, R S; Gartler, S M

    1990-01-01

    Hamster-human cell hybrids containing an inactive human X chromosome were treated with 5-azacytidine and derived clones were examined for phosphoglycerate kinase activity and cytosine methylation in the human PGK1 (X chromosome-linked phosphoglycerate kinase) gene. Comparisons between expressing and nonexpressing clones indicated that demethylation of several methylation-sensitive restriction sites outside of the 5' CpG island were unnecessary for expression. High-resolution polyacrylamide gel analysis of 25 Hpa II, Hha I, and Tha I sites revealed that all clones expressing PGK1 were unmethylated in a large region of the CpG island that includes the transcription start site and 400 base pairs upstream. Many nonexpressing clones had discontinuous patterns of demethylation. Remethylation was often observed in subclones of nonexpressing hybrids. These data suggest that a specific zone of methylation-free DNA within the PGK1 promoter is required for transcription. In addition, the presence of neighboring methylcytosines appears to decrease the heritable stability of unmethylated CpGs in this region. Images PMID:1693431

  19. Genetic and physical mapping of the bovine X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C C; Taylor, J F; Gallagher, D S; Sanders, J O; Turner, J W; Davis, S K

    1996-03-01

    Three hundred eighty reciprocal backcross and F(2) full sib progeny from 33 families produced by embryo transfer from 77 Angus (Bos taurus), Brahman (Bos indicus), and F1 parents and grandparents were used to construct genetic maps of the bovine X and Y chromosomes. Ml individuals were scored for 15 microsatellite loci, with an average of 608 informative meioses per locus. The length of the bovine X chromosome genetic map was 118.7 cM (female only) and of the pseudoautosomal region was 13.0 cM (male only). The 15-marker framework map in Kosambi centimorgans is [BM6017-6.1 -TGLA89-35.8-TEXAN13-3.4-TGLA128-1.3 -BM2713 -21.1 -BM4604-2.4-BR215 - 12.9-TGLA68-10.0-BM4321 - 1.0-HEL14-4.9-TGLA15-2.3-INRA12O- 12.5-TGLA325- 1.6-MAF45-3.2-INRA3O], with an average interval of 7.91 cM. Clones containing pseudoautosomal or sex-linked microsatellites were isolated from a bovine bacterial artificial chromosome library and were physically mapped to bovine metaphase chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization to orient the X and Y chromosome maps. BAC57, containing the pseudoautosomal microsatellite INRA3O, mapped to the distal end of the long arm of the X chromosome at q42-ter and to the short arm of the Y chromosome at p13-ter. This confirms the published assignment of this region to Ypl2-ter, but challenges the published assignment of Xpl4-ter and thus reorients the X chromosome physical map. BAC2O4, containing the X-linked microsatellite BM4604, mapped to the middle of the long arm of the X chromosome at q26-q31. The position of the physically mapped markers indicates either a lack of microsatellite markers for a large (30 to 50 cM) region of the short arm of the X chromosome or heterogeneity of recombination along the X chromosome. PMID:8833151

  20. Structural organization of the inactive X chromosome in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Luca; Lajoie, Bryan R; Carter, Ava C; Attia, Mikael; Zhan, Ye; Xu, Jin; Chen, Chong Jian; Kaplan, Noam; Chang, Howard Y; Heard, Edith; Dekker, Job

    2016-07-28

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) involves major reorganization of the X chromosome as it becomes silent and heterochromatic. During female mammalian development, XCI is triggered by upregulation of the non-coding Xist RNA from one of the two X chromosomes. Xist coats the chromosome in cis and induces silencing of almost all genes via its A-repeat region, although some genes (constitutive escapees) avoid silencing in most cell types, and others (facultative escapees) escape XCI only in specific contexts. A role for Xist in organizing the inactive X (Xi) chromosome has been proposed. Recent chromosome conformation capture approaches have revealed global loss of local structure on the Xi chromosome and formation of large mega-domains, separated by a region containing the DXZ4 macrosatellite. However, the molecular architecture of the Xi chromosome, in both the silent and expressed regions,remains unclear. Here we investigate the structure, chromatin accessibility and expression status of the mouse Xi chromosome in highly polymorphic clonal neural progenitors (NPCs) and embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate a crucial role for Xist and the DXZ4-containing boundary in shaping Xi chromosome structure using allele-specific genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) analysis, an assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and RNA sequencing. Deletion of the boundary disrupts mega-domain formation, and induction of Xist RNA initiates formation of the boundary and the loss of DNA accessibility. We also show that in NPCs, the Xi chromosome lacks active/inactive compartments and topologically associating domains (TADs), except around genes that escape XCI. Escapee gene clusters display TAD-like structures and retain DNA accessibility at promoter-proximal and CTCF-binding sites. Furthermore, altered patterns of facultative escape genes indifferent neural progenitor clones are associated with the presence of different TAD

  1. Structural organization of the inactive X chromosome in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgetti, Luca; Lajoie, Bryan R; Carter, Ava C; Attia, Mikael; Zhan, Ye; Xu, Jin; Chen, Chong Jian; Kaplan, Noam; Chang, Howard Y; Heard, Edith; Dekker, Job

    2016-07-28

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) involves major reorganization of the X chromosome as it becomes silent and heterochromatic. During female mammalian development, XCI is triggered by upregulation of the non-coding Xist RNA from one of the two X chromosomes. Xist coats the chromosome in cis and induces silencing of almost all genes via its A-repeat region, although some genes (constitutive escapees) avoid silencing in most cell types, and others (facultative escapees) escape XCI only in specific contexts. A role for Xist in organizing the inactive X (Xi) chromosome has been proposed. Recent chromosome conformation capture approaches have revealed global loss of local structure on the Xi chromosome and formation of large mega-domains, separated by a region containing the DXZ4 macrosatellite. However, the molecular architecture of the Xi chromosome, in both the silent and expressed regions,remains unclear. Here we investigate the structure, chromatin accessibility and expression status of the mouse Xi chromosome in highly polymorphic clonal neural progenitors (NPCs) and embryonic stem cells. We demonstrate a crucial role for Xist and the DXZ4-containing boundary in shaping Xi chromosome structure using allele-specific genome-wide chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) analysis, an assay for transposase-accessible chromatin with high throughput sequencing (ATAC-seq) and RNA sequencing. Deletion of the boundary disrupts mega-domain formation, and induction of Xist RNA initiates formation of the boundary and the loss of DNA accessibility. We also show that in NPCs, the Xi chromosome lacks active/inactive compartments and topologically associating domains (TADs), except around genes that escape XCI. Escapee gene clusters display TAD-like structures and retain DNA accessibility at promoter-proximal and CTCF-binding sites. Furthermore, altered patterns of facultative escape genes indifferent neural progenitor clones are associated with the presence of different TAD

  2. Different Probe Combinations for Assessment of Postzygotic Chromosomal Imbalances in Human Embryos

    OpenAIRE

    Bielanska, Magdalena; Tan, Seang Lin; Ao, Asangla

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: We compared three different probe combinations for detection of postzygotic mosaic imbalances in human preimplantation embryos. Methods: Two hundred and two spare cleavage stage embryos were hybridized with fluorescently labelled DNA probe mixtures specific to chromosomes X, Y, 18 (N = 67), chromosomes 2, 7, 18 (N = 71), or chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22 (N = 64). Results: An overall higher incidence of abnormalities was detected using probe mixture for five (69%) or three (72%) auto...

  3. European gene mapping project (EUROGEM) : Breakpoint panels for human chromosomes based on the CEPH reference families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attwood, J; Bryant, SP; Bains, R; Povey, R; Povey, S; Rebello, M; Kapsetaki, M; Moschonas, NK; Grzeschik, KH; Otto, M; Dixon, M; Sudworth, HE; Kooy, RF; Wright, A; Teague, P; Terrenato, L; Vergnaud, G; Monfouilloux, S; Weissenbach, J; Alibert, O; Dib, C; Faure, S; Bakker, E; Pearson, NM; Vossen, RHAM; Gal, A; MuellerMyhsok, B; Cann, HM; Spurr, NK

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic breakpoint panels for human chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 15, 17; 18, 20 and X were constructed from genotypes from the CEPH reference families. Each recombinant chromosome included has a breakpoint well-supported with reference to defined quantitative criteria. The panels

  4. The DNA sequence, annotation and analysis of human chromosome 3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzny, Donna M; Scherer, Steven E; Kaul, Rajinder;

    2006-01-01

    After the completion of a draft human genome sequence, the International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium has proceeded to finish and annotate each of the 24 chromosomes comprising the human genome. Here we describe the sequencing and analysis of human chromosome 3, one of the largest human chr...

  5. Short communication: Imputation of markers on the bovine X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaowei; Johansson, Anna Maria; Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; De Koning, Dirk-Jan

    2016-09-01

    Imputation is a cost-effective approach to augment marker data for genomic selection and genome-wide association studies. However, most imputation studies have focused on autosomes. Here, we assessed the imputation of markers on the X chromosome in Holstein cattle for nongenotyped animals and animals genotyped with low-density (Illumina BovineLD, Illumina Inc., San Diego, CA) chips, using animals genotyped with medium-density (Illumina BovineSNP50) chips. A total of 26,884 genotyped Holstein individuals genotyped with medium-density chips were used in this study. Imputation was carried out using FImpute V2.2. The following parameters were examined: treating the pseudoautosomal region as autosomal or as X specific, different sizes of reference groups, different male/female proportions in the reference group, and cumulated degree of relationship between the reference group and target group. The imputation accuracy of markers on the X chromosome was improved if the pseudoautosomal region was treated as autosomal. Increasing the proportion of females in the reference group improved the imputation accuracy for the X chromosome. Imputation for nongenotyped animals in general had lower accuracy compared with animals genotyped with the low-density single nucleotide polymorphism array. In addition, higher cumulative pedigree relationships between the reference group and the target animal led to higher imputation accuracy. In the future, better marker coverage of the X chromosome should be developed to facilitate genomic studies involving the X chromosome.

  6. A syntenic region conserved from fish to Mammalian x chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Guijun; Yi, Meisheng; Kobayashi, Tohru; Hong, Yunhan; Nagahama, Yoshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system), the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes. PMID:25506037

  7. A Syntenic Region Conserved from Fish to Mammalian X Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guijun Guan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes bearing the sex-determining gene initiate development along the male or female pathway, no matter which sex is determined by XY male or ZW female heterogamety. Sex chromosomes originate from ancient autosomes but evolved rapidly after the acquisition of sex-determining factors which are highly divergent between species. In the heterogametic male system (XY system, the X chromosome is relatively evolutionary silent and maintains most of its ancestral genes, in contrast to its Y counterpart that has evolved rapidly and degenerated. Sex in a teleost fish, the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus, is determined genetically via an XY system, in which an unpaired region is present in the largest chromosome pair. We defined the differences in DNA contents present in this chromosome with a two-color comparative genomic hybridization (CGH and the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD approach in XY males. We further identified a syntenic segment within this region that is well conserved in several teleosts. Through comparative genome analysis, this syntenic segment was also shown to be present in mammalian X chromosomes, suggesting a common ancestral origin of vertebrate sex chromosomes.

  8. Fragile site X chromosomes in mentally retarded boys.

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, H. R.; Moon, S. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome is a common X-linked mental retardation and autism, affecting females as well as males. The fragile site X chromosomes were studied in a series of 153 mentally retarded boys of unknown etiology to determine the frequency of fragile X syndrome, and to assess the feasibility of making a clinical diagnosis of the fragile X syndrome in young boys before cytogenetic results were known. The 10 boys (6.4%) were positive for fra (X) (q27). The phenotype of fra (X) (q27) positiv...

  9. Modeling X Chromosome Data Using Random Forests: Conquering Sex Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winham, Stacey J; Jenkins, Gregory D; Biernacka, Joanna M

    2016-02-01

    Machine learning methods, including Random Forests (RF), are increasingly used for genetic data analysis. However, the standard RF algorithm does not correctly model the effects of X chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), leading to biased estimates of variable importance. We propose extensions of RF to correctly model X SNPs, including a stratified approach and an approach based on the process of X chromosome inactivation. We applied the new and standard RF approaches to case-control alcohol dependence data from the Study of Addiction: Genes and Environment (SAGE), and compared the performance of the alternative approaches via a simulation study. Standard RF applied to a case-control study of alcohol dependence yielded inflated variable importance estimates for X SNPs, even when sex was included as a variable, but the results of the new RF methods were consistent with univariate regression-based approaches that correctly model X chromosome data. Simulations showed that the new RF methods eliminate the bias in standard RF variable importance for X SNPs when sex is associated with the trait, and are able to detect causal autosomal and X SNPs. Even in the absence of sex effects, the new extensions perform similarly to standard RF. Thus, we provide a powerful multimarker approach for genetic analysis that accommodates X chromosome data in an unbiased way. This method is implemented in the freely available R package "snpRF" (http://www.cran.r-project.org/web/packages/snpRF/). PMID:26639183

  10. Mapping genes on human chromosome 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, T.; Phipps, P.; Serino, K. [Collaborative Research, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While a substantial number of genes have been physically localized to human chromosome 20, few have been genetically mapped. In the process of developing a genetic linkage map of chromosome 20, we have mapped microsatellite polymorphisms associated with six genes. Three of these had highly informative polymorphisms (greater than 0.70) that were originally identified by other investigators. These include avian sarcoma oncogene homolog (SRC), ribophorin II (RPN2), and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1). Polymorphisms associated with two genes were determined following a screen of their DNA sequences in GenBank. These include dinucleotide polymorphisms in introl II of cystatin c (CST3) and in the promoter region of neuroendocrine convertase 2 (NEC2) with heterozygosities of 0.52 and 0.54, respectively. A sixth gene, prodynorphin (PDYN) was mapped following the identification of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (heterozygosity of 0.35) in a cosmid subclone from a YAC homologous to the original phage clone. CA-positive cosmid subclones from a YAC for an additional gene, guanine nucleotide binding protein, alpha (GNAS10), have been identified and sequencing is in progress. Similar efforts were utilized to identify a microsatellite polymorphism from a half-YAC cloned by W. Brown and localized by FISH to 20pter. This polymorphism is highly informative, with a heterozygosity of 0.83, and serves to delimit the genetic map of the short arm of this chromosome.

  11. Extreme skewing of X chromosome inactivation in mothers of homosexual men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocklandt, Sven; Horvath, Steve; Vilain, Eric; Hamer, Dean H

    2006-02-01

    Human sexual preference is a sexually dimorphic trait with a substantial genetic component. Linkage of male sexual orientation to markers on the X chromosome has been reported in some families. Here, we measured X chromosome inactivation ratios in 97 mothers of homosexual men and 103 age-matched control women without gay sons. The number of women with extreme skewing of X-inactivation was significantly higher in mothers of gay men (13/97=13%) compared to controls (4/103=4%) and increased in mothers with two or more gay sons (10/44=23%). Our findings support a role for the X chromosome in regulating sexual orientation in a subgroup of gay men. PMID:16369763

  12. Influence of the X-chromosome on neuroanatomy: evidence from Turner and Klinefelter syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, David S; Hoeft, Fumiko; Marzelli, Matthew J; Lepage, Jean-Francois; Roeltgen, David; Ross, Judith; Reiss, Allan L

    2014-03-01

    Studies of sex effects on neurodevelopment have traditionally focused on animal models investigating hormonal influences on brain anatomy. However, more recent evidence suggests that sex chromosomes may also have direct upstream effects that act independently of hormones. Sex chromosome aneuploidies provide ideal models to examine this framework in humans, including Turner syndrome (TS), where females are missing one X-chromosome (45X), and Klinefelter syndrome (KS), where males have an additional X-chromosome (47XXY). As these disorders essentially represent copy number variants of the sex chromosomes, investigation of brain structure across these disorders allows us to determine whether sex chromosome gene dosage effects exist. We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate this hypothesis in a large sample of children in early puberty, to compare regional gray matter volumes among individuals with one (45X), two (typically developing 46XX females and 46XY males), and three (47XXY) sex chromosomes. Between-group contrasts of TS and KS groups relative to respective sex-matched controls demonstrated highly convergent patterns of volumetric differences with the presence of an additional sex chromosome being associated with relatively decreased parieto-occipital gray matter volume and relatively increased temporo-insular gray matter volumes. Furthermore, z-score map comparisons between TS and KS cohorts also suggested that this effect occurs in a linear dose-dependent fashion. We infer that sex chromosome gene expression directly influences brain structure in children during early stages of puberty, extending our understanding of genotype-phenotype mechanisms underlying sex differences in the brain. PMID:24599451

  13. Late-replicating X-chromosome: replication patterns in mammalian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunin Karen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The GTG-banding and 5-BrdU incorporation patterns of the late-replicating X-chromosome were studied in female dogs and cattle, and compared to human female patterns. The replication patterns of the short arm of the X-chromosomes did not show any difference between human, dog and cattle females. As to the long arm, some bands showed differences among the three studied species regarding the replication kinetics pattern. These differences were observed in a restricted region of the X-chromosome, delimited by Xq11 -> q25 in humans, by Xq1 -> q8 in dogs, and by Xq12 -> q32 in cattle. In an attempt to find out if these differences in the replication kinetics could be a reflection of differences in the localization of genes in that region of the X-chromosome, we used the probe for the human androgen receptor gene (AR localized at Xq12, which is in the region where we observed differences among the three studied species. We did not, however, observe hybridization signals. Our study goes on, using other human probes for genes located in the region Xq11 -> Xq25.

  14. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping@ clones from a larger genome.

  15. Biotinylated Y chromosome specific probe for human sexing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human chromosome DNA from WBC or fetus chorion samples were digested with Hae III and hybridized with biotinylated Y chromosome specific probe by Southern blotting, and hybridization signals were developed by the ABC (Avidin-biotin-alkaline phosphatase complex) system. The hybridization signal for 0.1 μg of male DNA could be detected clearly, while the signal for even 5 μg of female DNA could not. Parallel tests showed that the sexing results using 32P-labeled and biotinylated Y probe were identical. This suggests that the biotinylated Y probe can be applied to the determination of X-linked genetic diseases and sex abnormality, forensic analysis, sex determination of sportsmen and women, heterosexual transplanation of bone marrow, etc. It could become a convenient means for genetic diagnosis

  16. The X factor: X chromosome dosage compensation in the evolutionarily divergent monotremes and marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, Deanne J; Pask, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    Marsupials and monotremes represent evolutionarily divergent lineages from the majority of extant mammals which are eutherian, or placental, mammals. Monotremes possess multiple X and Y chromosomes that appear to have arisen independently of eutherian and marsupial sex chromosomes. Dosage compensation of X-linked genes occurs in monotremes on a gene-by-gene basis, rather than through chromosome-wide silencing, as is the case in eutherians and marsupials. Specifically, studies in the platypus have shown that for any given X-linked gene, a specific proportion of nuclei within a cell population will silence one locus, with the percentage of cells undergoing inactivation at that locus being highly gene-specific. Hence, it is perhaps not surprising that the expression level of X-linked genes in female platypus is almost double that in males. This is in contrast to the situation in marsupials where one of the two X chromosomes is inactivated in females by the long non-coding RNA RSX, a functional analogue of the eutherian XIST. However, marsupial X chromosome inactivation differs from that seen in eutherians in that it is exclusively the paternal X chromosome that is silenced. In addition, marsupials appear to have globally upregulated X-linked gene expression in both sexes, thus balancing their expression levels with those of the autosomes, a process initially proposed by Ohno in 1967 as being a fundamental component of the X chromosome dosage compensation mechanism but which may not have evolved in eutherians.

  17. X染色体的DNA序列结构不同于6、7、8、10、11、12号染色体%DNA Sequence Composition on Human X Chromosome Differing from that on Chromosomes 6,7,8,10,11 and 12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕占军; 翟羽; 王秀芳; 宋淑霞

    2003-01-01

    7-nucleotide strings using all possible 7-nucleotide strings (47=16384).70 genes highly expressed in tonsil germinal center B cells were selected for calculating 7 nt frequency values of all introns (intron 7 nt).The binding density of DNA segment and intron 7 nt simulates the sum of binding density of the DNA segment to RNA fragments.It is found that chromosomes X,6 and 8 are more uniform in terms of different 0.5 Mb segments.The simulative binding density to RNAs is significantly lower on X chromosome than on chromosomes 6,7,8 and 12 (P<0.001).The segments that can highly bind RNAs are less on X than those on others,although no significant difference was found in comparison with chromosomes 6 and 11 when 0.5 Mb DNA was considered as a segment.But when 50 kb DNA was considered as a segment,the DNA segments highly binding RNAs on X chromosome were significantly less than those on chromosomes 6 and 11 (P<0.001).The data presented in this paper indicate that the DNA sequence composition of the human X chromosome is fundamentally distinct from that of human autosomes analyzed.This nonrandom property of distribution of RNA highly binding segments between the X chromosome and autosomes provides strong evidence that RNA highly binding segments may serve as DNA signals to propagate activation along a chromosome.It has been proved that RNAs alter chromatin structure and increase its sensitivity to DNaseⅠ.There is plenty of nonprotein-coding RNA in cells,the binding specificity of DNA-RNA is far higher than that of DNA-protein,and the affinity of DNA with RNA is higher as compared with DNA.These facts indicate that the interaction of RNA-DNA in cells may be extensive.The important finding in this study is that the binding ability to RNAs,especially the number of DNA segments highly binding RNAs is significantly lower on X chromosome than on other chromosomes.These facts suggest that if binding of DNA segment to RNAs opens the chromatin,it is easier for DNA segments on

  18. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Chad; Zody, Michael C; Borowsky, Mark L; Kamal, Michael; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Taylor, Todd D; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Bugalter, Boris; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeCaprio, David; Engels, Reinhard; Garber, Manuel; Gnirke, Andreas; Hafez, Nabil; Hall, Jennifer L; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Itoh, Takehiko; Jaffe, David B; Kuroki, Yoko; Lehoczky, Jessica; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; Noguchi, Hideki; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Piqani, Bruno; Smith, Cherylyn L; Talamas, Jessica A; Topham, Kerri; Totoki, Yasushi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Wain, Hester M; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Fujiyama, Asao; Hattori, Masahira; Birren, Bruce W; Sakaki, Yoshiyuki; Lander, Eric S

    2005-09-22

    Chromosome 18 appears to have the lowest gene density of any human chromosome and is one of only three chromosomes for which trisomic individuals survive to term. There are also a number of genetic disorders stemming from chromosome 18 trisomy and aneuploidy. Here we report the finished sequence and gene annotation of human chromosome 18, which will allow a better understanding of the normal and disease biology of this chromosome. Despite the low density of protein-coding genes on chromosome 18, we find that the proportion of non-protein-coding sequences evolutionarily conserved among mammals is close to the genome-wide average. Extending this analysis to the entire human genome, we find that the density of conserved non-protein-coding sequences is largely uncorrelated with gene density. This has important implications for the nature and roles of non-protein-coding sequence elements. PMID:16177791

  19. Multimodality hard-x-ray imaging of a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hanfei; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Lauer, Kenneth; Huang, Xiaojing; Wagner, Ulrich; Rau, Christoph; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Li, Li; Bouet, Nathalie; Zhou, Juan; Conley, Ray; Chu, Yong S.

    2016-02-01

    We developed a scanning hard x-ray microscope using a new class of x-ray nano-focusing optic called a multilayer Laue lens and imaged a chromosome with nanoscale spatial resolution. The combination of the hard x-ray’s superior penetration power, high sensitivity to elemental composition, high spatial-resolution and quantitative analysis creates a unique tool with capabilities that other microscopy techniques cannot provide. Using this microscope, we simultaneously obtained absorption-, phase-, and fluorescence-contrast images of Pt-stained human chromosome samples. The high spatial-resolution of the microscope and its multi-modality imaging capabilities enabled us to observe the internal ultra-structures of a thick chromosome without sectioning it.

  20. Contrasting Levels of Molecular Evolution on the Mouse X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erica L; Vanderpool, Dan; Keeble, Sara; Zhou, Meng; Sarver, Brice A J; Smith, Andrew D; Dean, Matthew D; Good, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian X chromosome has unusual evolutionary dynamics compared to autosomes. Faster-X evolution of spermatogenic protein-coding genes is known to be most pronounced for genes expressed late in spermatogenesis, but it is unclear if these patterns extend to other forms of molecular divergence. We tested for faster-X evolution in mice spanning three different forms of molecular evolution-divergence in protein sequence, gene expression, and DNA methylation-across different developmental stages of spermatogenesis. We used FACS to isolate individual cell populations and then generated cell-specific transcriptome profiles across different stages of spermatogenesis in two subspecies of house mice (Mus musculus), thereby overcoming a fundamental limitation of previous studies on whole tissues. We found faster-X protein evolution at all stages of spermatogenesis and faster-late protein evolution for both X-linked and autosomal genes. In contrast, there was less expression divergence late in spermatogenesis (slower late) on the X chromosome and for autosomal genes expressed primarily in testis (testis-biased). We argue that slower-late expression divergence reflects strong regulatory constraints imposed during this critical stage of sperm development and that these constraints are particularly acute on the tightly regulated sex chromosomes. We also found slower-X DNA methylation divergence based on genome-wide bisulfite sequencing of sperm from two species of mice (M. musculus and M. spretus), although it is unclear whether slower-X DNA methylation reflects development constraints in sperm or other X-linked phenomena. Our study clarifies key differences in patterns of regulatory and protein evolution across spermatogenesis that are likely to have important consequences for mammalian sex chromosome evolution, male fertility, and speciation.

  1. Incidence of X and Y Chromosomal Aneuploidy in a Large Child Bearing Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırkızlar, Eser; Hall, Megan P.; Demko, Zachary; Zneimer, Susan M.; Curnow, Kirsten J.; Gross, Susan; Gropman, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background X&Y chromosomal aneuploidies are among the most common human whole-chromosomal copy number changes, but the population-based incidence and prevalence in the child-bearing population is unclear. Methods This retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data leveraged a routine non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT) using parental genotyping to estimate the population-based incidence of X&Y chromosome variations in this population referred for NIPT (generally due to advanced maternal age). Results From 141,916 women and 29,336 men, 119 X&Y chromosomal abnormalities (prevalence: 1 in 1,439) were identified. Maternal findings include: 43 cases of 45,X (40 mosaic); 30 cases of 47,XXX (12 mosaic); 3 cases of 46,XX uniparental disomy; 2 cases of 46,XY/46,XX; 23 cases of mosaicism of unknown type; 2 cases of 47,XX,i(X)(q10). Paternal findings include: 2 cases of 47,XXY (1 mosaic); 10 cases of 47,XYY (1 mosaic); 4 partial Y deletions. Conclusions Single chromosome aneuploidy was present in one of every 1,439 individuals considered in this study, showing 47,XXX; 47,XX,i(X)(q10); 47,XYY; 47,XXY, partial Y deletions, and a high level of mosaicism for 45,X. This expands significantly our understanding of X&Y chromosomal variations and fertility issues, and is critical for families and adults affected by these disorders. This current and extensive information on fertility will be beneficial for genetic counseling on prenatal diagnoses as well as for newly diagnosed postnatal cases. PMID:27512996

  2. Mapping of human chromosomal regions related to neoplasia: evidence from chromosomes 1 and 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1977-12-01

    In clonal aberrations leading to an excess or partial excess of chromosome I, trisomy for bands 1q25-1q32 was noted in the myeloid cells from all of 34 patients who had various disorders such as acute leukemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis. This was not the result of a particularly fragile site in that region of the chromosome because the break points in reciprocal translocations that involve it occurred almost exclusively in the short arm. Two consistent rearrangements that have been observed in chromosome 17 produced either duplication of the entire long arm or a translocation of the distal portion of the long arm to chromosome 15. The nonrandom chromosomal changes found in hematologic disorders can now be correlated with the gene loci on these chromosomes or chromosomal segments. Seventy-five genes related to various metabolic enzymes have been mapped; it may be significant that chromosomes carrying gene loci related to nucleic acid metabolism are more frequently involved in hematologic disorders (and other malignancies as well) than are gene loci related to intermediary or carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, the known virus-human chromosome associations are closely correlated with the chromosomes affected in hematologic disorders. If one of the effects of carcinogens (including viruses) is to activate genes that regulate host cell DNA synthesis, and if translocations or duplications of specific chromosomal segments produce the same effect, then either of these mechanisms might provide the affected cell with a proliferative advantage.

  3. Mammalian X homolog acts as sex chromosome in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, M; Vukić, J; Kratochvíl, L

    2016-07-01

    Among amniotes, squamate reptiles are especially variable in their mechanisms of sex determination; however, based largely on cytogenetic data, some lineages possess highly evolutionary stable sex chromosomes. The still very limited knowledge of the genetic content of squamate sex chromosomes precludes a reliable reconstruction of the evolutionary history of sex determination in this group and consequently in all amniotes. Female heterogamety with a degenerated W chromosome typifies the lizards of the family Lacertidae, the widely distributed Old World clade including several hundreds of species. From the liver transcriptome of the lacertid Takydromus sexlineatus female, we selected candidates for Z-specific genes as the loci lacking single-nucleotide polymorphisms. We validated the candidate genes through the comparison of the copy numbers in the female and male genomes of T. sexlineatus and another lacertid species, Lacerta agilis, by quantitative PCR that also proved to be a reliable technique for the molecular sexing of the studied species. We suggest that this novel approach is effective for the detection of Z-specific and X-specific genes in lineages with degenerated W, respectively Y chromosomes. The analyzed gene content of the Z chromosome revealed that lacertid sex chromosomes are not homologous with those of other reptiles including birds, but instead the genes have orthologs in the X-conserved region shared by viviparous mammals. It is possible that this part of the vertebrate genome was independently co-opted for the function of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and lacertids because of its content of genes involved in gonad differentiation. PMID:26980341

  4. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations occurring during the first and second mitotic divisions of human lymphocytes after exposure to X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study described elucidates the relationship between the number of chromosome aberrations/cell and the length of the individual culture periods. The BrdUrd staining technique used here permitted separate analyses of the aberration frequencies during the first and second mitotic divisions of lymphocyte chromosomes cultivated for different periods of time. The results thus obtained were subjected to further analysis to quantify errors attributable to non-separate observations of such mitotic processes and to determine the number of surviving cells observed to have dicentric chromosomes during the first mitotic division. An analysis of the results obtained for the first mitotic division alone failed to reveal any connection between the number of chromosome aberrations and the culture periods. The aberration rates established for the second mitotic division were clearly related to the culture periods. A steady state was reached after approx. 54 h, but the values determined here were much lower than those calculated for the first mitotic division. (orig./MG)

  5. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Laurence D; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T; Forrest, Alistair R R; Huminiecki, Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  6. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence D Hurst

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5 project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds, as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased

  7. The Constrained Maximal Expression Level Owing to Haploidy Shapes Gene Content on the Mammalian X Chromosome

    KAUST Repository

    Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-12-18

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functionally biased gene content may more profoundly be shaped by limits imposed on gene expression owing to haploid expression of the X chromosome. Notably, if the X, as in primates, is transcribed at rates comparable to the ancestral rate (per promoter) prior to the X chromosome formation, then the X is not a tolerable environment for genes with very high maximal net levels of expression, owing to transcriptional traffic jams. We test this hypothesis using The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) and data from the Functional Annotation of the Mammalian Genome (FANTOM5) project. As predicted, the maximal expression of human X-linked genes is much lower than that of genes on autosomes: on average, maximal expression is three times lower on the X chromosome than on autosomes. Similarly, autosome-to-X retroposition events are associated with lower maximal expression of retrogenes on the X than seen for X-to-autosome retrogenes on autosomes. Also as expected, X-linked genes have a lesser degree of increase in gene expression than autosomal ones (compared to the human/Chimpanzee common ancestor) if highly expressed, but not if lowly expressed. The traffic jam model also explains the known lower breadth of expression for genes on the X (and the Z of birds), as genes with broad expression are, on average, those with high maximal expression. As then further predicted, highly expressed tissue-specific genes are also rare on the X and broadly expressed genes on the X tend to be lowly expressed, both indicating that the trend is shaped by the maximal expression level not the breadth of expression per se. Importantly, a limit to the maximal expression level explains biased tissue of expression

  8. Localization of the tight junction protein gene TJP1 to human chromosome 15q13, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region, and to mouse chromosome 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohandas, T.K. [Darthmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (United States); Chen, X.N.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-10

    The gene encoding the tight junction (zonula occludens) protein, TJP1, was mapped to human chromosome 15q13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a cDNA probe. The Jackson Laboratory backcross DNA panel derived from the cross (C57BL/6JEi X SPRET/Ei) F1 females X SPRET/Ei males was used to map the mouse Tjp1 to chromosome 7 near position 30 on the Chromosome Committee Map, a region with conserved homology to human chromosome 15q13. FISH studies on metaphases from patients with the Prader-Willi (PWS) or the Angelman syndrome (AS) showed that TJP1 maps close but distal to the PWS/AS chromosome region. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  9. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Monkhorst

    Full Text Available In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this probability, we studied the role of the X to autosome (X ratio A ratio in initiation of XCI, and have used the experimental data in a computer simulation model to study the cellular population dynamics of XCI.To obtain more insight in the role of the XratioA ratio in initiation of XCI, we generated triploid mouse ES cells by fusion of haploid round spermatids with diploid female and male ES cells. These fusion experiments resulted in only XXY triploid ES cells. XYY and XXX ES lines were absent, suggesting cell death related either to insufficient X-chromosomal gene dosage (XYY or to inheritance of an epigenetically modified X chromosome (XXX. Analysis of active (Xa and inactive (Xi X chromosomes in the obtained triploid XXY lines indicated that the initiation frequency of XCI is low, resulting in a mixed population of XaXiY and XaXaY cells, in which the XaXiY cells have a small proliferative advantage. This result, and findings on XCI in diploid and tetraploid ES cell lines with different X ratio A ratios, provides evidence that the X ratio A ratio determines the probability for a given X chromosome to be inactivated. Furthermore, we found that the kinetics of the XCI process can be simulated using a probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated that is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. These simulation studies re-emphasize our hypothesis that the probability is a function of the concentration of an X-encoded activator of XCI, and of X chromosome specific allelic properties determining the threshold for this activator.The present findings reveal that the probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. This finding

  10. A new chromosome x exon-specific microarray platform for screening of patients with X-linked disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashiardes, Stavros; Kousoulidou, Ludmila; van Bokhoven, Hans; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies and advances in high-density oligonucleotide arrays have shown that microdeletions and microduplications occur at a high frequency in the human genome, causing various genetic conditions including mental retardation. Thus far little is known about the pathways leading to this disease, and implementation of microarrays is hampered by their increasing cost and complexity, underlining the need for new diagnostic tools. The aim of this study was to introduce a new targeted platform called "chromosome X exon-specific array" and to apply this new platform to screening of 20 families (including one blind positive control) with suspected X-linked mental retardation, to identify new causative X-linked mental retardation genes. The new microarray contains of 21,939 oligonucleotides covering 92.9% of all exons of all genes on chromosome X. Patient screening resulted in successful identification of the blind positive control included in the sample of 20 families, and one of the remaining 19 families was found to carry a 1.78-kilobase deletion involving all exons of pseudogene BRAF2. The BRAF2 deletion segregated in the family and was not found in 200 normal male samples, and no copy number variations are reported in this region. Further studies and focused investigation of X-linked disorders have the potential to reveal the molecular basis of human genetic pathological conditions that are caused by copy-number changes in chromosome X genes.

  11. Radiation induced chromosome instability in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence has been arising that some biological effects can manifest many cell divisions after irradiation. We have demonstrated that de novo chromosome instability can be detected 10- 15 mean population doubling after heavy ion irradiations. This chromosome instability is characterized by end to end fusions between specific chromosomes. The specificity of the instability may differ from one donor to another but for the same donor, the same instability should be observed after irradiation, during the senescence process and after SV40 transfection (before crisis). In irradiated primary culture fibroblasts, the expression of the delayed chromosomal instability lasts for several cell divisions without inducing cell death. Several rounds of fusions- breakage-fusions can be performed and unbalanced clones emerge (gain or loss of chromosomes with the shorter telomeres would become unstable first.. The difference in the chromosomal instability among donors could be due to a polymorphism in telomere lengths. This could induce large variation in long term response to irradiation among individuals. (author)

  12. X chromosome control of meiotic chromosome synapsis in mouse inter-subspecific hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Bhattacharyya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid sterility (HS belongs to reproductive isolation barriers that safeguard the integrity of species in statu nascendi. Although hybrid sterility occurs almost universally among animal and plant species, most of our current knowledge comes from the classical genetic studies on Drosophila interspecific crosses or introgressions. With the house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus and Mus m. domesticus as a model, new research tools have become available for studies of the molecular mechanisms and genetic networks underlying HS. Here we used QTL analysis and intersubspecific chromosome substitution strains to identify a 4.7 Mb critical region on Chromosome X (Chr X harboring the Hstx2 HS locus, which causes asymmetrical spermatogenic arrest in reciprocal intersubspecific F1 hybrids. Subsequently, we mapped autosomal loci on Chrs 3, 9 and 13 that can abolish this asymmetry. Combination of immunofluorescent visualization of the proteins of synaptonemal complexes with whole-chromosome DNA FISH on pachytene spreads revealed that heterosubspecific, unlike consubspecific, homologous chromosomes are predisposed to asynapsis in F1 hybrid male and female meiosis. The asynapsis is under the trans- control of Hstx2 and Hst1/Prdm9 hybrid sterility genes in pachynemas of male but not female hybrids. The finding concurred with the fertility of intersubpecific F1 hybrid females homozygous for the Hstx2(Mmm allele and resolved the apparent conflict with the dominance theory of Haldane's rule. We propose that meiotic asynapsis in intersubspecific hybrids is a consequence of cis-acting mismatch between homologous chromosomes modulated by the trans-acting Hstx2 and Prdm9 hybrid male sterility genes.

  13. Effects of hepatitis B virus infection on human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Huang; Tian-Hua Huang; Huan-Ying Qiu; Xiao-Wu Fang; Tian-Gang Zhuang; Hong-Xi Liu; Yong-Hua Wang; Li-Zhi Deng; Jie-Wen Qiu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the level of sperm chromosome aberrations in male patients with hepatitis B, and to directly detect whether there are HBV DNA integrations in sperm chromosomes of hepatitis B patients.METHODS: Sperm chromosomes of 14 tested subjects (5healthy controls, 9 patients with HBV infection, including 1with acute hepatitis B, 2 with chronic active hepatitis B, 4with chronic persistent hepatitis B, 2 chronic HBsAg carriers with no clinical symptoms) were prepared using interspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free golden hamster ova and human spermatozoa, and the frequencies of aberration spermatozoa were compared between subjects of HBV infection and controls. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBV DNA probe to detect the specific HBV DNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.RESULTS: The total frequency of sperm chromosome aberrations in HBV infection group (14.8%, 33/223) was significantly higher than that in the control group (4.3%,5/116). Moreover, the sperm chromosomes in HBV infection patients commonly presented stickiness, clumping, failure to staining, etc, which would affect the analysis of sperm chromosomes. Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBV DNA were seen in sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitis. In 9 (9/42) sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots, one presented 5 obvious FISH spots, others presented 2 to 4signals. There was significant difference of fluorescence intensity among the signal spots. The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes was random.CONCLUSION: HBV infection can bring about mutagenic effects on sperm chromosomes. Integrations of viral DNA into sperm chromosomes which are multisites and nonspecific, can further increase the instability of sperm chromosomes. This study suggested that HBV infection can create extensively hereditary effects by alteration genetic constituent and

  14. Genotype/phenotype correlation in women with nonmosaic X chromosome deletions and Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinn, A.R. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a complex human developmental disorder associated with the absence of the second sex chromosome (monosomy X). Cardinal features of the Turner phenotype include high intrauterine lethality, growth retardation, gonadal failure, and the variable presence of specific somatic abnormalities such as webbed neck, lymphedema, and skeletal abnormalities. Recent observations support the hypothesis that the phenotype associated with monosomy X results from haploid dosage of genes common the X and Y chromosomes that escape X-inactivation ({open_quotes}Turner genes{close_quotes}). Apart from a locus causing short stature that maps to the pseudoautosomal region on the distal short arm, the location of X-linked Turner genes is not known. Karyotype/phenotype correlations in women with partial X deletions have been inconsistent. However, previous studies have focused on sporadic sex chromosome aberrations and may have been confounded by occult mosaicism. In addition, mapping of deletions was limited by the resolution of cytogenetic techniques. I am reexamining genotype/phenotype correlations in partial X monosomy, focusing on a subset of cases in which mosaicism is highly unlikely (e.g., unbalanced X-autosome translocations, familial X deletions), and using molecular techniques to map deletions. I have collected eight cases of nonmosaic X deletions in women with varied manifestations of Turner syndrome. Cytogenetic data suggests that genes responsible for Turner anatomic abnormalities may lie within a critical region of the very proximal portion of the short arm (Xp11). Molecular characterization of the deletions is in progress. Methods include (1) fluorescence in situ hybridization of metaphase spreads from patient-derived cell lines, using cosmid probes that map to known locations on Xp, and (2) sequence tagged site (STS) content mapping of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted X chromosomes derived from these cell lines.

  15. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M. [Univ. of Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC in humans; are there B chromosomes hidden among them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Caroline

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC and B-chromosomes represent a heterogeneous collection of chromosomes added to the typical karyotype, and which are both small in size. They may consist of heterochromatic and/or euchromatic material. Also a predominance of maternal transmission was reported for both groups. Even though sSMC and B-chromosomes show some similarity it is still an open question if B-chromosomes are present among the heterogeneous group of sSMC. According to current theories, sSMC would need drive, drift or beneficial effects to increase in frequency in order to become B chromosome. However, up to now no B-chromosomes were described in human. Results Here we provide first evidence and discuss, that among sSMC B-chromosomes might be hidden. We present two potential candidates which may already be, or may in future evolve into B chromosomes in human: (i sSMC cases where the marker is stainable only by DNA derived from itself; and (ii acrocentric-derived inverted duplication sSMC without associated clinical phenotype. Here we report on the second sSMC stainable exclusively by its own DNA and show that for acrocentric derived sSMC 3.9× more are familial cases than reported for other sSMC. Conclusion The majority of sSMC are not to be considered as B-chromosomes. Nonetheless, a minority of sSMC show similarities to B-chromosomes. Further studies are necessary to come to final conclusions for that problem.

  17. Study of ionizing radiation effect on human spermatozoa chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the radio-induced chromosomal aberrations in spermatozoa. After a brief recall on ionizing radiations, the author reviews the radio-induced chromosomal anomalies on somatic cells and on germinal line cells and spermatozoa. The author presents the technical aspects of human spermatozoa karyotype and finally studies the radio induced chromosomal anomalies of sperm to patients undergoing a radiotherapy. 13 tabs., 28 figs., 28 photos

  18. Nonrandom involvement of chromosomal segments in human hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The consistent occurrence of nonrandom chromosome changes in human malignancies suggests that they are not trivial epiphenomena. Whereas we do not understand their significance at present, one possible role which they may fulfill is to provide the chromosomally aberrant cells with a proliferative advantage as the result of alteration of the number and/or location of genes related to nucleic acid biosynthesis. It would be expected that the proliferative advantage provided by various chromosome aberrations differs in patients with different genetic constitutions.

  19. Chromosomal translocation t(X;18) in human synovial sarcomas analyzed by fluorescence in situ hybridization using paraffin-embedded tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagao, K; Ito, H.; Yoshida, H.

    1996-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is characterized cytogenetically by translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2). In this study, 28 cases that had been diagnosed initially as synovial sarcoma, including 2 fibrosarcomas, and 1 leiomyosarcoma were collected and examined for translocation t(X;18) on paraffin-embedded tissues by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Of the synovial sarcomas, 25 showed findings consistent with translocation t(X;18) with an additional copy signal for the total probe of X and 18 chromo...

  20. The finished DNA sequence of human chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Steven E; Muzny, Donna M; Buhay, Christian J; Chen, Rui; Cree, Andrew; Ding, Yan; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Gill, Rachel; Gunaratne, Preethi; Harris, R Alan; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hodgson, Anne V; Hume, Jennifer; Jackson, Andrew; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kovar-Smith, Christie; Lewis, Lora R; Lozado, Ryan J; Metzker, Michael L; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Miner, George R; Montgomery, Kate T; Morgan, Margaret B; Nazareth, Lynne V; Scott, Graham; Sodergren, Erica; Song, Xing-Zhi; Steffen, David; Lovering, Ruth C; Wheeler, David A; Worley, Kim C; Yuan, Yi; Zhang, Zhengdong; Adams, Charles Q; Ansari-Lari, M Ali; Ayele, Mulu; Brown, Mary J; Chen, Guan; Chen, Zhijian; Clerc-Blankenburg, Kerstin P; Davis, Clay; Delgado, Oliver; Dinh, Huyen H; Draper, Heather; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Laronda R; Jacob, Leni S; Kelly, Susan H; Li, Li; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Wen; Lu, Jing; Maheshwari, Manjula; Nguyen, Bao-Viet; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pasternak, Shiran; Perez, Lesette M; Plopper, Farah J H; Santibanez, Jireh; Shen, Hua; Tabor, Paul E; Verduzco, Daniel; Waldron, Lenee; Wang, Qiaoyan; Williams, Gabrielle A; Zhang, Jingkun; Zhou, Jianling; Allen, Carlana C; Amin, Anita G; Anyalebechi, Vivian; Bailey, Michael; Barbaria, Joseph A; Bimage, Kesha E; Bryant, Nathaniel P; Burch, Paula E; Burkett, Carrie E; Burrell, Kevin L; Calderon, Eliana; Cardenas, Veronica; Carter, Kelvin; Casias, Kristal; Cavazos, Iracema; Cavazos, Sandra R; Ceasar, Heather; Chacko, Joseph; Chan, Sheryl N; Chavez, Dean; Christopoulos, Constantine; Chu, Joseph; Cockrell, Raynard; Cox, Caroline D; Dang, Michelle; Dathorne, Stephanie R; David, Robert; Davis, Candi Mon'Et; Davy-Carroll, Latarsha; Deshazo, Denise R; Donlin, Jeremy E; D'Souza, Lisa; Eaves, Kristy A; Egan, Amy; Emery-Cohen, Alexandra J; Escotto, Michael; Flagg, Nicole; Forbes, Lisa D; Gabisi, Abdul M; Garza, Melissa; Hamilton, Cerissa; Henderson, Nicholas; Hernandez, Omar; Hines, Sandra; Hogues, Marilyn E; Huang, Mei; Idlebird, DeVincent G; Johnson, Rudy; Jolivet, Angela; Jones, Sally; Kagan, Ryan; King, Laquisha M; Leal, Belita; Lebow, Heather; Lee, Sandra; LeVan, Jaclyn M; Lewis, Lakeshia C; London, Pamela; Lorensuhewa, Lorna M; Loulseged, Hermela; Lovett, Demetria A; Lucier, Alice; Lucier, Raymond L; Ma, Jie; Madu, Renita C; Mapua, Patricia; Martindale, Ashley D; Martinez, Evangelina; Massey, Elizabeth; Mawhiney, Samantha; Meador, Michael G; Mendez, Sylvia; Mercado, Christian; Mercado, Iracema C; Merritt, Christina E; Miner, Zachary L; Minja, Emmanuel; Mitchell, Teresa; Mohabbat, Farida; Mohabbat, Khatera; Montgomery, Baize; Moore, Niki; Morris, Sidney; Munidasa, Mala; Ngo, Robin N; Nguyen, Ngoc B; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi O; Nwokenkwo, Stanley; Obregon, Melissa; Oguh, Maryann; Oragunye, Njideka; Oviedo, Rodolfo J; Parish, Bridgette J; Parker, David N; Parrish, Julia; Parks, Kenya L; Paul, Heidie A; Payton, Brett A; Perez, Agapito; Perrin, William; Pickens, Adam; Primus, Eltrick L; Pu, Ling-Ling; Puazo, Maria; Quiles, Miyo M; Quiroz, Juana B; Rabata, Dina; Reeves, Kacy; Ruiz, San Juana; Shao, Hongmei; Sisson, Ida; Sonaike, Titilola; Sorelle, Richard P; Sutton, Angelica E; Svatek, Amanda F; Svetz, Leah Anne; Tamerisa, Kavitha S; Taylor, Tineace R; Teague, Brian; Thomas, Nicole; Thorn, Rachel D; Trejos, Zulma Y; Trevino, Brenda K; Ukegbu, Ogechi N; Urban, Jeremy B; Vasquez, Lydia I; Vera, Virginia A; Villasana, Donna M; Wang, Ling; Ward-Moore, Stephanie; Warren, James T; Wei, Xuehong; White, Flower; Williamson, Angela L; Wleczyk, Regina; Wooden, Hailey S; Wooden, Steven H; Yen, Jennifer; Yoon, Lillienne; Yoon, Vivienne; Zorrilla, Sara E; Nelson, David; Kucherlapati, Raju; Weinstock, George; Gibbs, Richard A

    2006-03-16

    Human chromosome 12 contains more than 1,400 coding genes and 487 loci that have been directly implicated in human disease. The q arm of chromosome 12 contains one of the largest blocks of linkage disequilibrium found in the human genome. Here we present the finished sequence of human chromosome 12, which has been finished to high quality and spans approximately 132 megabases, representing approximately 4.5% of the human genome. Alignment of the human chromosome 12 sequence across vertebrates reveals the origin of individual segments in chicken, and a unique history of rearrangement through rodent and primate lineages. The rate of base substitutions in recent evolutionary history shows an overall slowing in hominids compared with primates and rodents.

  1. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Echten-Arends, Jannie; Mastenbroek, Sebastiaan; Sikkema-Raddatz, Birgit; Korevaar, Johanna C.; Heineman, Maas Jan; van der Veen, Fulco; Repping, Sjoerd

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is d

  2. Chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Echten-Arends, J. van; Mastenbroek, S.; Sikkema-Raddatz, B.; Korevaar, J.C.; Heineman, M.J.; Veen, F. van der; Repping, S.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although chromosomal mosaicism in human preimplantation embryos has been described for almost two decades, its exact prevalence is still unknown. The prevalence of mosaicism is important in the context of preimplantation genetic screening in which the chromosomal status of an embryo is d

  3. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage

    OpenAIRE

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J.; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; James R. Lupski; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M.; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K.; Abouelleil, Amr; Van Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome1, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome2,3. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes4. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural ...

  4. Correlation of physical and genetic maps of human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutherland, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    This project aimed to divide chromosome 16 into approximately 50 intervals of {approximately}2Mb in size by constructing a series of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids each containing a rearranged chromosome 16. Using these hybrids, DNA probes would be regionally mapped by Southern blot or PCR analysis. Preference would be given to mapping probes which demonstrated polymorphisms for which the CEPH panel of families had been typed. This would allow a correlation of the physical and linkage maps of this chromosome. The aims have been substantially achieved. 49 somatic cell hybrids have been constructed which have allowed definition of 46, and potentially 57, different physical intervals on the chromosome. 164 loci have been fully mapped into these intervals. A correlation of the physical and genetic maps of the chromosome is in an advanced stage of preparation. The somatic cell hybrids constructed have been widely distributed to groups working on chromosome 16 and other genome projects.

  5. The chromosome damage induced by x-ray radiation doses. Comparison between dicentric chromosomes, micronuclei and Sister Chromatid Exchanges analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionizing radiations is a well-known source of chromosome damage. Here we present a comparison among three different methodologies employed to recognize cytogenetic damage, after an acute exposure of human lymphocytes to 3 Gy of X-rays (100kVp). Scoring of dicentric chromosomes, present in first mitosis ''in vitro'', was the method of preference as dicentrics increased 937.5 times with respect to background. Micronucleus scoring in binucleated-cytokinesis blocked cells showed an increase of 32.5 times, while it was only of 1.46 times when Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCEs) were analyzed. The estimated probability of an acentric fragment becoming a micronucleus was around 0.25. Intercellular distribution of dicentrics agree with Poisson, while micronucleus were overdispersed. When analyzed at second cycle after damage induction, the dicentrics yield as well as the level of cells with unstable cromosome aberrations, decreased around a half. Finally, SCEs level was similar in cells with or without unstable structural chromosome aberrations. (Author)

  6. Disruption of human vigilin impairs chromosome condensation and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ling; Xie, Xiaoyan; Li, Junhong; Li, Ran; Shen, Wenyan; Duan, Shuwang; Zhao, Rongce; Yang, Wenli; Liu, Qiuying; Fu, Qiang; Qin, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Appropriate packaging and condensation are critical for eukaryotic chromatin's accommodation and separation during cell division. Human vigilin, a multi-KH-domain nucleic acid-binding protein, is associated with alpha satellites of centromeres. DDP1, a vigilin's homolog, is implicated with chromatin condensation and segregation. The expression of vigilin was previously reported to elevate in highly proliferating tissues and increased in a subset of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Other studies showed that vigilin interacts with CTCF, contributes to regulation of imprinted genes Igf2/H19, and colocalizes with HP1α on heterochromatic satellite 2 and β-satellite repeats. These studies indicate that human vigilin might be involved in chromatin remodeling and regular cell growth. To investigate the potential role of human vigilin in cell cycle, the correlations between vigilin and chromosomal condensation and segregation were studied. Depletion of human vigilin by RNA interference in HepG2 cells resulted in chromosome undercondensation and various chromosomal defects during mitotic phase, including chromosome misalignments, lagging chromosomes, and chromosome bridges. Aberrant polyploid nucleus in telophase was also observed. Unlike the abnormal staining pattern of chromosomes, the shape of spindle was normal. Furthermore, the chromatin showed a greater sensitivity to MNase digestion. Collectively, our findings show that human vigilin apparently participates in chromatin condensation and segregation. PMID:26032007

  7. Epigenetic Pattern on the Human Y Chromosome Is Evolutionarily Conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minjie; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Agbagwa, Ikechukwu O; Wang, Ling-Xiang; Wang, Yingzhi; Yan, Shi; Ren, Shancheng; Sun, Yinghao; Pei, Gang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Jiang; Jin, Li; Li, Hui; Sun, Yingli

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role for mammalian development. However, it is unclear whether the DNA methylation pattern is evolutionarily conserved. The Y chromosome serves as a powerful tool for the study of human evolution because it is transferred between males. In this study, based on deep-rooted pedigrees and the latest Y chromosome phylogenetic tree, we performed epigenetic pattern analysis of the Y chromosome from 72 donors. By comparing their respective DNA methylation level, we found that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was stable among family members and haplogroups. Interestingly, two haplogroup-specific methylation sites were found, which were both genotype-dependent. Moreover, the African and Asian samples also had similar DNA methylation pattern with a remote divergence time. Our findings indicated that the DNA methylation pattern on the Y chromosome was conservative during human male history. PMID:26760298

  8. Chromosomal localization of the human and mouse hyaluronan synthase genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Seldin, M.F. [Univ. of California Davis, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    We have recently identified a new vertebrate gene family encoding putative hyaluronan (HA) synthases. Three highly conserved related genes have been identified, designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3 in humans and Has1, Has2, and Has3 in the mouse. All three genes encode predicted plasma membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane domains and approximately 25% amino acid sequence identity to the Streptococcus pyogenes HA synthase, HasA. Furthermore, expression of any one HAS gene in transfected mammalian cells leads to high levels of HA biosynthesis. We now report the chromosomal localization of the three HAS genes in human and in mouse. The genes localized to three different positions within both the human and the mouse genomes. HAS1 was localized to the human chromosome 19q13.3-q13.4 boundary and Has1 to mouse Chr 17. HAS2 was localized to human chromosome 8q24.12 and Has2 to mouse Chr 15. HAS3 was localized to human chromosome 16q22.1 and Has3 to mouse Chr 8. The map position for HAS1 reinforces the recently reported relationship between a small region of human chromosome 19q and proximal mouse chromosome 17. HAS2 mapped outside the predicted critical region delineated for the Langer-Giedion syndrome and can thus be excluded as a candidate gene for this genetic syndrome. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Parental origin of the X chromosome in a patient with a Robertsonian translocation and Turner's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Krajinovic, M; Ivanovic, K; Mestroni, L; Diklic, V; Nikolis, J

    1994-01-01

    We report on a proband with both a Robertsonian translocation and Turner's syndrome. Study of the parental origin of the X chromosome performed by microsatellite analysis indicates paternal origin of the X chromosome (Xpat). The occurrence of chromosome aberrations as a consequence of interchromosomal interactions is discussed.

  10. The third international workshop of human chromosome 5. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Third International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Laguna Beach, California, March 5-8, 1994. The pace at which new mapping information has been published in the last year make almost any report outdated before publication. Much of the information in this report and the most recent data from the Human chromosome 5 Genome Center at U.C. Irvine on the physical map of chromosome 5 are accessible via a WWW server. For most loci referred to in this report that can be detected by Polymerase Chain Reaction, the sequences of the oligonucleotide primers are available and some primer sequences are provided in this report.

  11. The role of sex chromosomes in mammalian germ cell differentiation: can the germ cells carrying X and Y chromosomes differentiate into fertile oocytes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruko Taketo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The sexual differentiation of germ cells into spermatozoa or oocytes is strictly regulated by their gonadal environment, testis or ovary, which is determined by the presence or absence of the Y chromosome, respectively. Hence, in normal mammalian development, male germ cells differentiate in the presence of X and Y chromosomes, and female germ cells do so in the presence of two X chromosomes. However, gonadal sex reversal occurs in humans as well as in other mammalian species, and the resultant XX males and XY females can lead healthy lives, except for a complete or partial loss of fertility. Germ cells carrying an abnormal set of sex chromosomes are efficiently eliminated by multilayered surveillance mechanisms in the testis, and also, though more variably, in the ovary. Studying the molecular basis for sex-specific responses to a set of sex chromosomes during gametogenesis will promote our understanding of meiotic processes contributing to the evolution of sex determining mechanisms. This review discusses the fate of germ cells carrying various sex chromosomal compositions in mouse models, the limitation of which may be overcome by recent successes in the differentiation of functional germ cells from embryonic stem cells under experimental conditions.

  12. Radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose-response relationships for unstable chromosome exchange aberrations were obtained after irradiation with 200 kV X-rays and 60Co gamma rays, the doses ranging within 0.05-3.0 Gy. The data points were fitted to the linear quadratic model Y = C + αD + βD2, and after the chromosome hits leading to two-break unstable aberrations were estimated, to the model average x = C +kD. The results fitted the latter model particularly well, the index of determination being 0.988 for gamma rays and 0.997 for X-rays. The RBE of 200 kV X-rays as compared with 60Co gamma radiation was 1.6, when primary chromosome breaks leading to dicentric and centric ring aberrations were used as the biological endpoint. (author)

  13. Fourth international workshop on human chromosome 5. Final progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Fourth International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 was held in Manchester, UK on November 9--10, 1996 and was hosted by the University of Manchester. The major goals of the workshop were: (1) to collate the various genetic, cytogenetic and physical maps of human chromosome 5; (2) to integrate these maps and identify/correct discrepancies between them wherever possible; (3) to catalogue the sequence-ready contigs of the chromosome; (4) to co-ordinate the various sequencing efforts to avoid future duplication; (5) to establish the first (to the author`s knowledge) web site for the human chromosome 5 community which contains the above information in a readily accessible form.

  14. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major pitfalls

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bernd Rosenbusch; Michael Schneider; Hans Wilhelm Michelmann

    2008-08-01

    Human oocytes that remained unfertilized in programmes of assisted reproduction have been analysed cytogenetically for more than 20 years to assess the incidence of aneuploidy in female gametes. However, the results obtained so far are not indisputable as a consequence of difficulties in evaluating oocyte chromosome preparations. Because of the lack of guidelines, we decided to summarize for the first time, the possible pitfalls in human oocyte chromosome analysis. Therefore, we screened the material from our previous studies and compiled representative, complicated cases with recommendations for their cytogenetic classification. We point out that maturity and size of the oocyte are important parameters and that fixation artefacts, as well as the particular structure of oocyte chromosomes, may predispose one to misinterpretations. Moreover, phenomena related to oocyte activation and fertilization are illustrated and explained. This compilation may help to avoid major problems in future studies and contribute to a more precise, and uniform assessment of human oocyte chromosomes.

  15. The DNA sequence and comparative analysis of human chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloukas, P; Earthrowl, M E; Grafham, D V; Rubenfield, M; French, L; Steward, C A; Sims, S K; Jones, M C; Searle, S; Scott, C; Howe, K; Hunt, S E; Andrews, T D; Gilbert, J G R; Swarbreck, D; Ashurst, J L; Taylor, A; Battles, J; Bird, C P; Ainscough, R; Almeida, J P; Ashwell, R I S; Ambrose, K D; Babbage, A K; Bagguley, C L; Bailey, J; Banerjee, R; Bates, K; Beasley, H; Bray-Allen, S; Brown, A J; Brown, J Y; Burford, D C; Burrill, W; Burton, J; Cahill, P; Camire, D; Carter, N P; Chapman, J C; Clark, S Y; Clarke, G; Clee, C M; Clegg, S; Corby, N; Coulson, A; Dhami, P; Dutta, I; Dunn, M; Faulkner, L; Frankish, A; Frankland, J A; Garner, P; Garnett, J; Gribble, S; Griffiths, C; Grocock, R; Gustafson, E; Hammond, S; Harley, J L; Hart, E; Heath, P D; Ho, T P; Hopkins, B; Horne, J; Howden, P J; Huckle, E; Hynds, C; Johnson, C; Johnson, D; Kana, A; Kay, M; Kimberley, A M; Kershaw, J K; Kokkinaki, M; Laird, G K; Lawlor, S; Lee, H M; Leongamornlert, D A; Laird, G; Lloyd, C; Lloyd, D M; Loveland, J; Lovell, J; McLaren, S; McLay, K E; McMurray, A; Mashreghi-Mohammadi, M; Matthews, L; Milne, S; Nickerson, T; Nguyen, M; Overton-Larty, E; Palmer, S A; Pearce, A V; Peck, A I; Pelan, S; Phillimore, B; Porter, K; Rice, C M; Rogosin, A; Ross, M T; Sarafidou, T; Sehra, H K; Shownkeen, R; Skuce, C D; Smith, M; Standring, L; Sycamore, N; Tester, J; Thorpe, A; Torcasso, W; Tracey, A; Tromans, A; Tsolas, J; Wall, M; Walsh, J; Wang, H; Weinstock, K; West, A P; Willey, D L; Whitehead, S L; Wilming, L; Wray, P W; Young, L; Chen, Y; Lovering, R C; Moschonas, N K; Siebert, R; Fechtel, K; Bentley, D; Durbin, R; Hubbard, T; Doucette-Stamm, L; Beck, S; Smith, D R; Rogers, J

    2004-05-27

    The finished sequence of human chromosome 10 comprises a total of 131,666,441 base pairs. It represents 99.4% of the euchromatic DNA and includes one megabase of heterochromatic sequence within the pericentromeric region of the short and long arm of the chromosome. Sequence annotation revealed 1,357 genes, of which 816 are protein coding, and 430 are pseudogenes. We observed widespread occurrence of overlapping coding genes (either strand) and identified 67 antisense transcripts. Our analysis suggests that both inter- and intrachromosomal segmental duplications have impacted on the gene count on chromosome 10. Multispecies comparative analysis indicated that we can readily annotate the protein-coding genes with current resources. We estimate that over 95% of all coding exons were identified in this study. Assessment of single base changes between the human chromosome 10 and chimpanzee sequence revealed nonsense mutations in only 21 coding genes with respect to the human sequence. PMID:15164054

  16. X-chromosome kiss and tell: how the Xs go their separate ways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguera, M C; Sun, B K; Xu, N; Lee, J T

    2006-01-01

    Loci associated with noncoding RNAs have important roles in X-chromosome inactivation (XCI), the dosage compensation mechanism by which one of two X chromosomes in female cells becomes transcriptionally silenced. The Xs start out as epigenetically equivalent chromosomes, but XCI requires a cell to treat two identical X chromosomes in completely different ways: One X chromosome must remain transcriptionally active while the other becomes repressed. In the embryo of eutherian mammals, the choice to inactivate the maternal or paternal X chromosome is random. The fact that the Xs always adopt opposite fates hints at the existence of a trans-sensing mechanism to ensure the mutually exclusive silencing of one of the two Xs. This paper highlights recent evidence supporting a model for mutually exclusive choice that involves homologous chromosome pairing and the placement of asymmetric chromatin marks on the two Xs.

  17. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups.

  18. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  19. Evolutionarily different alphoid repeat DNA on homologous chromosomes in human and chimpanzee.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Laursen, H B; Jones, C; Bak, A L

    1992-01-01

    Centromeric alphoid DNA in primates represents a class of evolving repeat DNA. In humans, chromosomes 13 and 21 share one subfamily of alphoid DNA while chromosomes 14 and 22 share another subfamily. We show that similar pairwise homogenizations occur in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), where chromosomes 14 and 22, homologous to human chromosomes 13 and 21, share one partially homogenized alphoid DNA subfamily and chromosomes 15 and 23, homologous to human chromosomes 14 and 22, share anothe...

  20. Spread of X-chromosome inactivation into chromosome 15 is associated with Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a boy with a t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2) translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakazume, Satoru; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Yuki; Harada, Naoki; Nakanishi, Katsumi; Sato, Hidenori; Emi, Mitsuru; Endoh, Kazushi; Sohma, Ryoichi; Kido, Yasuhiro; Nagai, Toshiro; Kubota, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an essential mechanism in females that compensates for the genome imbalance between females and males. It is known that XCI can spread into an autosome of patients with X;autosome translocations. The subject was a 5-year-old boy with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS)-like features including hypotonia, hypo-genitalism, hypo-pigmentation, and developmental delay. G-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization, BrdU-incorporated replication, human androgen receptor gene locus assay, SNP microarrays, ChIP-on-chip assay, bisulfite sequencing, and real-time RT-PCR were performed. Cytogenetic analyses revealed that the karyotype was 46,XY,der(X)t(X;15)(p21.1;q11.2),-15. In the derivative chromosome, the X and half of the chromosome 15 segments showed late replication. The X segment was maternal, and the chromosome 15 region was paternal, indicating its post-zygotic origin. The two chromosome 15s had a biparental origin. The DNA methylation level was relatively high in the region proximal from the breakpoint, and the level decreased toward the middle of the chromosome 15 region; however, scattered areas of hypermethylation were found in the distal region. The promoter regions of the imprinted SNRPN and the non-imprinted OCA2 genes were completely and half methylated, respectively. However, no methylation was found in the adjacent imprinted gene UBE3A, which contained a lower density of LINE1 repeats. Our findings suggest that XCI spread into the paternal chromosome 15 led to the aberrant hypermethylation of SNRPN and OCA2 and their decreased expression, which contributes to the PWS-like features and hypo-pigmentation of the patient. To our knowledge, this is the first chromosome-wide methylation study in which the DNA methylation level is demonstrated in an autosome subject to XCI.

  1. Transcriptional changes in response to X chromosome dosage in the mouse: implications for X inactivation and the molecular basis of Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargent Carole A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X monosomic mice (39,XO have a remarkably mild phenotype when compared to women with Turner syndrome (45,XO. The generally accepted hypothesis to explain this discrepancy is that the number of genes on the mouse X chromosome which escape X inactivation, and thus are expressed at higher levels in females, is very small. However this hypothesis has never been tested and only a small number of genes have been assayed for their X-inactivation status in the mouse. We performed a global expression analysis in four somatic tissues (brain, liver, kidney and muscle of adult 40,XX and 39,XO mice using the Illumina Mouse WG-6 v1_1 Expression BeadChip and an extensive validation by quantitative real time PCR, in order to identify which genes are expressed from both X chromosomes. Results We identified several genes on the X chromosome which are overexpressed in XX females, including those previously reported as escaping X inactivation, as well as new candidates. However, the results obtained by microarray and qPCR were not fully concordant, illustrating the difficulty in ascertaining modest fold changes, such as those expected for genes escaping X inactivation. Remarkably, considerable variation was observed between tissues, suggesting that inactivation patterns may be tissue-dependent. Our analysis also exposed several autosomal genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism and in protein translation which are differentially expressed between XX and XO mice, revealing secondary transcriptional changes to the alteration in X chromosome dosage. Conclusions Our results support the prediction that the mouse inactive X chromosome is largely silent, while providing a list of the genes potentially escaping X inactivation in rodents. Although the lower expression of X-linked genes in XO mice may not be relevant in the particular tissues/systems which are affected in human X chromosome monosomy, genes deregulated in XO mice are good candidates for

  2. The human chromosome. Electron microscopic observations on chromatin fiber organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, J G; Moore, D E

    1969-04-01

    Human lymphocytes were grown in short-term tissue culture and were arrested in metaphase with Colcemid. Their chromosomes were prepared by the Langmuir trough-critical point drying technique and were examined under the electron microscope. In addition, some chromosomes were digested with trypsin, Pronase, or DNase. The chromosomes consist entirely of tightly packed, 240 +/- 50-A chromatin fibers. Trypsin and Pronase treatments induce relaxation of fiber packing and reveal certain underlying fiber arrangements. Furthermore, trypsin treatment demonstrates that the chromatin fiber has a 25-50 A trypsin-resistant core surrounded by a trypsin-sensitive sheath. DNase digestion suggests that this core contains DNA.

  3. Survey of human chromosomal abnormalities in Iceland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensson, O.; Hauksdottir, H.; Bjarnason, O.; Tulinius, H.

    1976-06-01

    The work of the Chromosome Laboratory of the Genetical Committee of the University of Iceland is reviewed. Initially, the main aim was to carry out cytogenetic typing of all individuals in Iceland with Down's syndrome available for study in institutions and homes, including individuals born in maternity clinics and homes during the eight years of investigation. The results of the chromosome investigation are summarized in Table 1. Lymphocyte cultures were made from a total of 932 individuals from September 1967 to 1975 and 152 individuals with Down's syndrome were cytogenetically typed. Unusual karyotype leading to Down's syndrome was found in 10 cases. Of these six were found to be mosaic, two had D/G and two G/G translocation. By cytogenetic family survey 13 D/G translocation carriers were detected in the family. A separate paper on the cytogenetic survey of Down's syndrome in Iceland is under way.

  4. DNA sequence and analysis of human chromosome 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusbaum, Chad; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Zody, Michael C; Asakawa, Shuichi; Taudien, Stefan; Garber, Manuel; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Schueler, Mary G; Shimizu, Atsushi; Whittaker, Charles A; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Yang, Xiaoping; Allen, Nicole R; Anderson, Scott; Asakawa, Teruyo; Blechschmidt, Karin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dooley, Kathleen T; Dorris, Lester; Engels, Reinhard; Glöckner, Gernot; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Ishikawa, Sabine K; Jaffe, David B; Kamat, Asha; Kudoh, Jun; Lehmann, Rüdiger; Lokitsang, Tashi; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Charles D; Mauceli, Evan; Menzel, Uwe; Mihalev, Atanas H; Minoshima, Shinsei; Murayama, Yuji; Naylor, Jerome W; Nicol, Robert; Nguyen, Cindy; O'Leary, Sinéad B; O'Neill, Keith; Parker, Stephen C J; Polley, Andreas; Raymond, Christina K; Reichwald, Kathrin; Rodriguez, Joseph; Sasaki, Takashi; Schilhabel, Markus; Siddiqui, Roman; Smith, Cherylyn L; Sneddon, Tam P; Talamas, Jessica A; Tenzin, Pema; Topham, Kerri; Venkataraman, Vijay; Wen, Gaiping; Yamazaki, Satoru; Young, Sarah K; Zeng, Qiandong; Zimmer, Andrew R; Rosenthal, Andre; Birren, Bruce W; Platzer, Matthias; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Lander, Eric S

    2006-01-19

    The International Human Genome Sequencing Consortium (IHGSC) recently completed a sequence of the human genome. As part of this project, we have focused on chromosome 8. Although some chromosomes exhibit extreme characteristics in terms of length, gene content, repeat content and fraction segmentally duplicated, chromosome 8 is distinctly typical in character, being very close to the genome median in each of these aspects. This work describes a finished sequence and gene catalogue for the chromosome, which represents just over 5% of the euchromatic human genome. A unique feature of the chromosome is a vast region of approximately 15 megabases on distal 8p that appears to have a strikingly high mutation rate, which has accelerated in the hominids relative to other sequenced mammals. This fast-evolving region contains a number of genes related to innate immunity and the nervous system, including loci that appear to be under positive selection--these include the major defensin (DEF) gene cluster and MCPH1, a gene that may have contributed to the evolution of expanded brain size in the great apes. The data from chromosome 8 should allow a better understanding of both normal and disease biology and genome evolution. PMID:16421571

  5. Cryptic mosaicism involving a second chromosome X in patients with Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Araújo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The high abortion rate of 45,X embryos indicates that patients with Turner syndrome and 45,X karyotype could be mosaics, in at least one phase of embryo development or cellular lineage, due to the need for the other sex chromosome presence for conceptus to be compatible with life. In cases of structural chromosomal aberrations or hidden mosaicism, conventional cytogenetic techniques can be ineffective and molecular investigation is indicated. Two hundred and fifty patients with Turner syndrome stigmata were studied and 36 who had female genitalia and had been cytogenetically diagnosed as having "pure" 45,X karyotype were selected after 100 metaphases were analyzed in order to exclude mosaicism and the presence of genomic Y-specific sequences (SRY, TSPY, and DAZ was excluded by PCR. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and screened by the human androgen receptor (HUMARA assay. The HUMARA gene has a polymorphic CAG repeat and, in the presence of a second chromosome with a different HUMARA allele, a second band will be amplified by PCR. Additionally, the CAG repeats contain two methylation-sensitive HpaII enzyme restriction sites, which can be used to verify skewed inactivation. Twenty-five percent (9/36 of the cases showed a cryptic mosaicism involving a second X and approximately 14% (5/36, or 55% (5/9 of the patients with cryptic mosaicism, also presented skewed inactivation. The laboratory identification of the second X chromosome and its inactivation pattern are important for the clinical management (hormone replacement therapy, and inclusion in an oocyte donation program and prognostic counseling of patients with Turner syndrome.

  6. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, J; Han, C; Gordon, L A; Terry, A; Prabhakar, S; She, X; Xie, G; Hellsten, U; Chan, Y M; Altherr, M; Couronne, O; Aerts, A; Bajorek, E; Black, S; Blumer, H; Branscomb, E; Brown, N; Bruno, W J; Buckingham, J; Callen, D F; Campbell, C S; Campbell, M L; Campbell, E W; Caoile, C; Challacombe, J F; Chasteen, L A; Chertkov, O; Chi, H C; Christensen, M; Clark, L M; Cohn, J D; Denys, M; Detter, J C; Dickson, M; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, M; Escobar, J; Fawcett, J J; Flowers, D; Fotopulos, D; Glavina, T; Gomez, M; Gonzales, E; Goodstein, D; Goodwin, L A; Grady, D L; Grigoriev, I; Groza, M; Hammon, N; Hawkins, T; Haydu, L; Hildebrand, C E; Huang, W; Israni, S; Jett, J; Jewett, P B; Kadner, K; Kimball, H; Kobayashi, A; Krawczyk, M; Leyba, T; Longmire, J L; Lopez, F; Lou, Y; Lowry, S; Ludeman, T; Manohar, C F; Mark, G A; McMurray, K L; Meincke, L J; Morgan, J; Moyzis, R K; Mundt, M O; Munk, A C; Nandkeshwar, R D; Pitluck, S; Pollard, M; Predki, P; Parson-Quintana, B; Ramirez, L; Rash, S; Retterer, J; Ricke, D O; Robinson, D; Rodriguez, A; Salamov, A; Saunders, E H; Scott, D; Shough, T; Stallings, R L; Stalvey, M; Sutherland, R D; Tapia, R; Tesmer, J G; Thayer, N; Thompson, L S; Tice, H; Torney, D C; Tran-Gyamfi, M; Tsai, M; Ulanovsky, L E; Ustaszewska, A; Vo, N; White, P S; Williams, A L; Wills, P L; Wu, J; Wu, K; Yang, J; DeJong, P; Bruce, D; Doggett, N A; Deaven, L; Schmutz, J; Grimwood, J; Richardson, P; Rokhsar, D S; Eichler, E E; Gilna, P; Lucas, S M; Myers, R M; Rubin, E M; Pennacchio, L A

    2005-04-06

    Human chromosome 16 features one of the highest levels of segmentally duplicated sequence among the human autosomes. We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9% of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein-coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes, and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin, and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobase pairs were identified and result in gene content differences among humans. While the segmental duplications of chromosome 16 are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  7. "Micro-deletions" of the human Y chromosome and their relationship with male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Li; Christopher J Haines; Yibing Han

    2008-01-01

    The Y chromosome evolves from an autochromosome and accumulates male-related genes including sex-determining region of Y-chromosome (SRY) and several spermatogenesis-related genes.The human Y chromosome (60 Mb long) is largely composed of repeti-tive sequences that give it a heterochromatic appearance,and it consists of pseudoautosomal,euchromatic,and heterochromatic regions.Located on the two extremities of the Y chromosome,pseudoautosomal regions 1 and 2 (PAR1 and PAR2,2.6 Mb and 320 bp long,re-spectively) are homologs with the termini of the X chromosome.The euchromatic region and some of the repeat-rich heterochromatic parts of the Y chromosome are called "male-specific Y" (MSY),which occupy more than 95% of the whole Y chromosome.After evolu-tion,the Y chromosome becomes the smallest in size with the least number of genes but with the most number of copies of genes that are mostly spermatogenesis-related.The Y chromosome is characterized by highly repetitive sequences (including direct repeats,inverted repeats,and palindromes) and high polymorphism.Several gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome occur during evolution owing to its specific gene structure.The consequences of such rearrangements are not only loss but also gain of specific genes.One hundred and fifty three haplotypes have been discovered in the human Y chromosome.The structure of the Y chromosome in the GenBank belongs to haplotype R1.There are 220 genes (104 coding genes,111 pseudogenes,and 5 other uncategorized genes) according to the most recent count.The 104 coding genes encode a total of about 48 proteins/protein families (including putative proteins/protein families).Among them,16 gene products have been discovered in the azoospermia factor region (AZF) and are related to spermatogenesis.It has been dis-covered that one subset of gene rearrangements on the Y chromosome,"micro-deletions",is a major cause of male infertility in some populations.However,controversies exist about different Y

  8. Lack of global meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, and paucity of tissue-specific gene expression on the Drosophila X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurminsky Dmitry I

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paucity of male-biased genes on the Drosophila X chromosome is a well-established phenomenon, thought to be specifically linked to the role of these genes in reproduction and/or their expression in the meiotic male germline. In particular, meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI has been widely considered a driving force behind depletion of spermatocyte-biased X-linked genes in Drosophila by analogy with mammals, even though the existence of global MCSI in Drosophila has not been proven. Results Microarray-based study and qRT-PCR analyses show that the dynamics of gene expression during testis development are very similar between X-linked and autosomal genes, with both showing transcriptional activation concomitant with meiosis. However, the genes showing at least ten-fold expression bias toward testis are significantly underrepresented on the X chromosome. Intriguingly, the genes with similar expression bias toward tissues other than testis, even those not apparently associated with reproduction, are also strongly underrepresented on the X. Bioinformatics analysis shows that while tissue-specific genes often bind silencing-associated factors in embryonic and cultured cells, this trend is less prominent for the X-linked genes. Conclusions Our data show that the global meiotic inactivation of the X chromosome does not occur in Drosophila. Paucity of testis-biased genes on the X appears not to be linked to reproduction or germline-specific events, but rather reflects a general underrepresentation of tissue-biased genes on this chromosome. Our analyses suggest that the activation/repression switch mechanisms that probably orchestrate the highly-biased expression of tissue-specific genes are generally not efficient on the X chromosome. This effect, probably caused by dosage compensation counteracting repression of the X-linked genes, may be the cause of the exodus of highly tissue-biased genes to the autosomes.

  9. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16

    OpenAIRE

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M.; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N.; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-01-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by b...

  10. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L.; Poznik, G. David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes—including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447–806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7–2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. PMID:27058445

  11. AB048. X-chromosomal SNPs variation in populations of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, Vadim; Vagaitseva, Kseniya; Kharkov, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    X-chromosome markers are informative tool for studying a genetic diversity in human populations and have become a useful in DNA identification when certain complex kinship cases need to be unravelled. In this work we present population genetic data on X-chromosome-wide SNPs in North Eurasian populations and report XSNP multiplex system for forensic genetics. A total of 2,867 X-chromosomal SNPs were genotyped in 12 populations using Illumina microarray platform. Twelve populations under study (Komi, Mordva, Russians, Kirghiz, Kazakh, Uzbek, Buryat, Yakut, Evenk, Tuva, Khanty, Ket) represent various language families and geographic regions of North Eurasia (Eastern Europe, Central Asia, Siberia and North Asia). North Eurasian populations are highly genetically differentiated with respect to XSNPs allele frequencies. Average level of genetic differentiation (Gst) for 12 populations is 6.03% and ranged from 1.05% to 30.05% per individual SNP. Principal component analysis of allele frequencies demonstrated geographic pattern of population clustering, as well as longitudinal gradient in genetic diversity. The 66 XSNPs characterized by high expected heterozygosity and linkage equilibrium in populations under study were selected for constructing a panel for forensic genetic applications. Average heterozygosity of selected SNPs varied from 0.4925 to 0.4958. Overall values of power of discrimination for males and females (PDm and PDf) obtained with these XSNPs set are several magnitude higher than those for standard forensic STR panels. Protocol for multiplex amplification of 66 XSNPs in two separate multiplex PCR reactions and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry genotyping was developed. North Eurasian populations demonstrate high level of genetic diversity and differentiation for X-chromosome-wide SNPs. Based on obtained population genetic data, highly informative multiplex XSNPs panel for forensic genetics was developed.

  12. The WSTF-ISWI chromatin remodeling complex transiently associates with the human inactive X chromosome during late S-phase prior to BRCA1 and γ-H2AX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley E Culver-Cochran

    Full Text Available Replicating the genome prior to each somatic cell division not only requires precise duplication of the genetic information, but also accurately reestablishing the epigenetic signatures that instruct how the genetic material is to be interpreted in the daughter cells. The mammalian inactive X chromosome (Xi, which is faithfully inherited in a silent state in each daughter cell, provides an excellent model of epigenetic regulation. While much is known about the early stages of X chromosome inactivation, much less is understood with regards to retaining the Xi chromatin through somatic cell division. Here we report that the WSTF-ISWI chromatin remodeling complex (WICH associates with the Xi during late S-phase as the Xi DNA is replicated. Elevated levels of WICH at the Xi is restricted to late S-phase and appears before BRCA1 and γ-H2A.X. The sequential appearance of WICH and BRCA1/γ-H2A.X implicate each as performing important but distinct roles in the maturation and maintenance of heterochromatin at the Xi.

  13. X microchromosome with additional chromosome anomalies found in Ullrich-Turner syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.L.; Sciorra, L.J. [Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Singer-Granick, C. [Hahnemann Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-27

    Using standard cytogenetic methods coupled with molecular techniques, the following karyotype mos 45,X/46,XXq+/46,X-mar(X)/47,XXq+, +mar(X), was identified in a patient with Ullrich-Turner syndrome (UTS). High-resolution banding (n = 650) of the metaphase chromosomes yielded a breakpoint at q28 on the Xq+ rearranged chromosome. FISH was used to determine the presence of Y-containing DNA in the Xq+ and the mar(X) chromosomes. The following molecular probes were used: DYZ1, DYZ3, and spectrum orange WCP Y. The lack of specific hybridization of these probes was interpreted as a low risk of gonadoblastoma in this patient. Using X-chromosome- and centromere-specific probes, FISH demonstrated the presence of hybridizing material on both rearranged chromosomes, the Xq+ and mar(X). Finally, we determined that the mar(X) and Xq+ chromosomes contained telomeres in the absence of any interstitial telomeric hybridizing material. A micro-X chromosome is present in this UTS patient. Delineation of events leading toward the mechanisms responsible for the multiple DNA rearrangements required to generate the micro-X and Xq+ chromosomes awaits future studies. 25 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Aberration distribution and chromosomally marked clones in x-irradiated skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of clinically normal human skin were removed from therapeutically X-irradiated areas at intervals of time ranging from one hour to 60 years after completion of radiation treatment. Primary cultures of untransformed fibroblasts from these samples were analysed for surviving chromosomal structural changes using ASG banding techniques. Aberrations of four basic types, reciprocal translocations, terminal deletions, pericentric inversions and paracentric inversions (the last very rare) were found in all samples. Evidence indicates that many of these are secondary aberrations derived from primary chromatid types. Presumptive break points for all aberrations were mapped, and various tests applied to investigate their within-chromosome distributions (the data are unsuitable for valid between-chromosome analysis). For translocations, the within-arm distributions are non-random, principally as the result of a very significant deficiency of break points in terminal segments. Tests for the intrachromosomal changes (pericentric inversions and deletions) are simpler, and in neither case were there significant departure from randomness Two lines of evidence are present in the data for division and migration of chromosomally abnormal cells in vivo: (a) the presence of identical aberrations in cells from different parts of the biopsy; (b) the presence of cells with sequential changes, indicating cell division between the dose fractions of the therapeutic regime. (author)

  15. Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP): Chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyarit, Sakdithep; Singhto, Nilubon; Chen, Yi-Ju; Cheng, Chia-Ying; Chiangjong, Wararat; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Lam, Henry H N; Peerapen, Paleerath; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tipthara, Phornpimon; Pandey, Akhilesh; Poon, Terence C W; Chen, Yu-Ju; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Chung, Maxey C M; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2014-07-01

    Following an official announcement of the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP), the Chromosome 12 (Ch12) Consortium has been established by five representative teams from five Asian countries including Thailand (Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University), Singapore (National University of Singapore), Taiwan (Academia Sinica), Hong Kong (The Chinese University of Hong Kong), and India (Institute of Bioinformatics). We have worked closely together to extensively and systematically analyze all missing and known proteins encoded by Ch12 for their tissue/cellular/subcellular localizations. The target organs/tissues/cells include kidney, brain, gastrointestinal tissues, blood/immune cells, and stem cells. In the later phase, post-translational modifications and functional significance of Ch12-encoded proteins as well as their associations with human diseases (i.e., immune diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancers) will be defined. We have collaborated with other chromosome teams, Human Kidney and Urine Proteome Project (HKUPP), AOHUPO Membrane Proteomics Initiative, and other existing HUPO initiatives in the Biology/Disease-Based Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) to delineate functional roles and medical implications of Ch12-encoded proteins. The data set to be obtained from this multicountry consortium will be an important piece of the jigsaw puzzle to fulfill the missions and goals of the C-HPP and the global Human Proteome Project (HPP). PMID:24831074

  16. A high-resolution comparative map between pig chromosome 17 and human chromosomes 4, 8, and 20: Identification of synteny breakpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahbib-Mansais, Yvette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Mompart, Florence;

    2005-01-01

    We report on the construction of a high-resolution comparative map of porcine chromosome 17 (SSC17) focusing on evolutionary breakpoints with human chromosomes. The comparative map shows high homology with human chromosome 20 but suggests more limited homologies with other human chromosomes. SSC1...... chromosomes (HSA4, HSA8) and the chromosomal breakpoint boundaries were accurately defined. In total 15 breakpoints were identified....

  17. Engineering targeted chromosomal amplifications in human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Simeon; Yi, Kyung H; Park, Jeenah; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Price, Amanda J; Lauring, Josh

    2015-07-01

    Chromosomal amplifications are among the most common genetic alterations found in human cancers. However, experimental systems to study the processes that lead to specific, recurrent amplification events in human cancers are lacking. Moreover, some common amplifications, such as that at 8p11-12 in breast cancer, harbor multiple driver oncogenes, which are poorly modeled by conventional overexpression approaches. We sought to develop an experimental system to model recurrent chromosomal amplification events in human cell lines. Our strategy is to use homologous-recombination-mediated gene targeting to deliver a dominantly selectable, amplifiable marker to a specified chromosomal location. We used adeno-associated virus vectors to target human MCF-7 breast cancer cells at the ZNF703 locus, in the recurrent 8p11-12 amplicon, using the E. coli inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) enzyme as a marker. We applied selective pressure using IMPDH inhibitors. Surviving clones were found to have increased copy number of ZNF703 (average 2.5-fold increase) by droplet digital PCR and FISH. Genome-wide array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed that amplifications had occurred on the short arm of chromosome 8, without changes on 8q or other chromosomes. Patterns of amplification were variable and similar to those seen in primary human breast cancers, including "sawtooth" patterns, distal copy number loss, and large continuous regions of copy number gain. This system will allow study of the cis- and trans-acting factors that are permissive for chromosomal amplification and provide a model to analyze oncogene cooperativity in amplifications harboring multiple candidate driver genes.

  18. Effects of alpha-particles on survival and chromosomal aberrations in human mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Grossi, G. F.; Gialanella, G.; Pugliese, M.; Nappo, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the radiation responses of a human mammary epithelial cell line, H184B5 F5-1 M/10. This cell line was derived from primary mammary cells after treatment with chemicals and heavy ions. The F5-1 M/10 cells are immortal, density-inhibited in growth, and non-tumorigenic in athymic nude mice and represent an in vitro model of the human epithelium for radiation studies. Because epithelial cells are the target of alpha-particles emitted from radon daughters, we concentrated our studies on the efficiency of alpha-particles. Confluent cultures of M/10 cells were exposed to accelerated alpha-particles [beam energy incident at the cell monolayer = 3.85 MeV, incident linear energy transfer (LET) in cell = 109 keV/microns] and, for comparison, to 80 kVp x-rays. The following endpoints were studied: (1) survival, (2) chromosome aberrations at the first postirradiation mitosis, and (3) chromosome alterations at later passages following irradiation. The survival curve was exponential for alpha-particles (D0 = 0.73 +/- 0.04 Gy), while a shoulder was observed for x-rays (alpha/beta = 2.9 Gy; D0 = 2.5 Gy, extrapolation number 1.6). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-LET alpha-particles for human epithelial cell killing was 3.3 at 37% survival. Dose-response curves for the induction of chromosome aberrations were linear for alpha-particles and linearquadratic for x-rays. The RBE for the induction of chromosome aberrations varied with the type of aberration scored and was high (about 5) for chromosome breaks and low (about 2) for chromosome exchanges.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  19. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Primary Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Alice; Bodega, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    3D organization of the genome, its structural and regulatory function of cell identity, is acquiring prominent features in epigenetics studies; more efforts have been done to develop techniques that allow studying nuclear structure. Chromosome conformation capture (3C) has been set up in 2002 from Dekker and from that moment great investments were made to develop genomics variants of 3C technology (4C, 5C, Hi-C) providing new tools to investigate the shape of the genome in a more systematic and unbiased manner. 3C method allows scientists to fix dynamic and variable 3D interactions in nuclear space, and consequently to study which sequences interact, how a gene is regulated by different and distant enhancer, or how a set of enhancer could regulate transcriptional units; to follow the conformation that mediates regulation change in development; and to evaluate if this fine epigenetic mechanism is impaired in disease condition. PMID:27659988

  20. Construction of a chromosome specific library of human MARs and mapping of matrix attachment regions on human chromosome 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, L G; Tsevegiyn, T; Akopov, S B; Ashworth, L K; Sverdlov, E D

    1996-01-01

    Using a novel procedure a representative human chromosome 19-specific library was constructed of short sequences, which bind preferentially to the nuclear matrix (matrix attachment regions, or MARs). Judging by 20 clones sequenced so far, the library contains > 50% of human inserts, about 90% of which are matrix-binding by the in vitro test. Computer analysis of sequences of eight human MARs did not reveal any significant homologies with the EMBL Nucleotide Data Base entries as well as between MARs themselves. Eight MARs were assigned to individual positions on the chromosome 19 physical map. The library constructed can serve as a good source of MAR sequences for comparative analysis and classification and for further chromosome mapping of MARs as well. PMID:8614638

  1. Primary vitreoretinal dysplasia resembling Norrie's disease in a female: association with X autosome chromosomal translocation.

    OpenAIRE

    OHBA, N.; Yamashita, T.

    1986-01-01

    A female infant with the typical clinical and histopathological features of vitreoretinal dysplasia is described. She had an apparently balanced reciprocal chromosomal translocation 46XX,t(X;10) with the X chromosome breakpoint being on the short arm. Since the parents' karyotypes were normal, it is most plausible that a de novo chromosomal translocation disrupted the vitreoretinal dysplasia gene itself. The severe clinical symptoms of this heterozygous female patient were explained by non-ra...

  2. DNA sequence of human chromosome 17 and analysis of rearrangement in the human lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Adams, David J; Sharpe, Ted; Harrow, Jennifer; Lupski, James R; Nicholson, Christine; Searle, Steven M; Wilming, Laurens; Young, Sarah K; Abouelleil, Amr; Allen, Nicole R; Bi, Weimin; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Bugalter, Boris E; Butler, Jonathan; Chang, Jean L; Chen, Chao-Kung; Cook, April; Corum, Benjamin; Cuomo, Christina A; de Jong, Pieter J; DeCaprio, David; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael; Gilbert, James; Gibson, Richard; Gnerre, Sante; Goldstein, Steven; Grafham, Darren V; Grocock, Russell; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel S; Hart, Elizabeth; Norman, Catherine Hosage; Humphray, Sean; Jaffe, David B; Jones, Matt; Kamal, Michael; Khodiyar, Varsha K; LaButti, Kurt; Laird, Gavin; Lehoczky, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Loveland, Jane; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Major, John E; Matthews, Lucy; Mauceli, Evan; McCarroll, Steven A; Mihalev, Atanas H; Mudge, Jonathan; Nguyen, Cindy; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Osoegawa, Kazutoyo; Schwartz, David C; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steward, Charles; Swarbreck, David; Venkataraman, Vijay; Whittaker, Charles A; Yang, Xiaoping; Zimmer, Andrew R; Bradley, Allan; Hubbard, Tim; Birren, Bruce W; Rogers, Jane; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-04-20

    Chromosome 17 is unusual among the human chromosomes in many respects. It is the largest human autosome with orthology to only a single mouse chromosome, mapping entirely to the distal half of mouse chromosome 11. Chromosome 17 is rich in protein-coding genes, having the second highest gene density in the genome. It is also enriched in segmental duplications, ranking third in density among the autosomes. Here we report a finished sequence for human chromosome 17, as well as a structural comparison with the finished sequence for mouse chromosome 11, the first finished mouse chromosome. Comparison of the orthologous regions reveals striking differences. In contrast to the typical pattern seen in mammalian evolution, the human sequence has undergone extensive intrachromosomal rearrangement, whereas the mouse sequence has been remarkably stable. Moreover, although the human sequence has a high density of segmental duplication, the mouse sequence has a very low density. Notably, these segmental duplications correspond closely to the sites of structural rearrangement, demonstrating a link between duplication and rearrangement. Examination of the main classes of duplicated segments provides insight into the dynamics underlying expansion of chromosome-specific, low-copy repeats in the human genome. PMID:16625196

  3. Alteration of chromosome behavior and synchronization of parental chromosomes after successive generations in Brassica napus x Orychophragmus violaceus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Ma, Ni; Li, Zaiyun

    2007-02-01

    In an earlier study, the progenies of intergeneric hybrids Brassica napus (2n = 38) x Orychophragmus violaceus (2n = 24) were investigated in successive generations (F1-F4) for the cytological phenomenon of parental genome separation during mitotic and meiotic division. In the present study, inbred lines (F5-F8) derived from 1 such hybrid were characterized for morphology, chromosome pairing behaviour, and genome composition. One F5 plant (2n = 31) with slightly yellow petals and 12:19 and 15:16 segregation ratios in its pollen mother cells (PMCs) produced F6 plants with distinct morphological characteristics and wide variations in fertility and chromosome numbers (2n = 25-38). F7 and F8 lines with distinctive morphology and wide ranges in chromsome numbers were established. In PMCs of F7 plants from 4 F6 plants, 0-12 labelled chromosomes from O. violaceus, which predominantly appeared as bivalents, were identified by genomic in situ hybridization. They behaved synchronously with B. napus chromosomes during meiotic division. The results provide molecular cytogenetic evidence of the inclusion of O. violaceus chromosomes in the original hybrids and the cytology in the hybrids documented earlier. They also show that chromosome behaviour was altered and the parental chromosomes became synchronized after successive generations.

  4. Culture of human oocytes with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor has no effect on embryonic chromosomal constitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Inge; Loft, Anne; Hald, Finn;

    2010-01-01

    women donating 86 oocytes. The primary endpoint was to investigate the chromosomal constitution of human embryos (fluorescence in-situ hybridization analysis for chromosomes 13, 16, 18, 21, 22, X and Y) cultured with or without GM-CSF. The secondary endpoints were number of top-quality embryos (TQE......) and number of normally developed embryos evaluated morphologically on day 3. The cytogenetic analyses demonstrated non-inferiority and therefore the chromosomal constitution of human embryos cultured in vitro in the presence of 2 ng/ml GM-CSF was no worse than the control group cultured without GM-CSF. In...

  5. Chromosomal and Genetic Analysis of a Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cell Line OM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Wu Li; Lin Bai; Lyu-Xia Dai; Xu He; Xian-Ping Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer has become the leading cause of death in many regions.Carcinogenesis is caused by the stepwise accumulation of genetic and chromosomal changes.The aim of this study was to investigate the chromosome and gene alterations in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.Methods: We used Giemsa banding and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization focusing on the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM to analyze its chromosome alterations.In addition, the gains and losses in the specific chromosome regions were identified by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and the amplifications of cancer-related genes were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Results: We identified a large number of chromosomal numerical alterations on all chromosomes except chromosome X and 19.Chromosome 10 is the most frequently involved in translocations with six different interchromosomal translocations.CGH revealed the gains on chromosome regions of 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, and the losses on 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33 and 17p 13.1-13.3.And PCR showed the amplification of genes: Membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME), sucrase-isomaltase (SI), butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE), and kininogen (KNG).Conclusions: The lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM exhibited multiple complex karyotypes, and chromosome 10 was frequently involved in chromosomal translocation, which may play key roles in tumorigenesis.We speculated that the oncogenes may be located at 3q25.3-28, 5p13, 12q22-23.24, while tumor suppressor genes may exist in 3p25-26, 6p25, 6q26-27, 7q34-36, 8p22-23, 9p21-24, 10q25-26.3, 12p 13.31-13.33, and 17p 13.1-13.3.Moreover, at least four genes (MME, SI, BCHE, and KNG) may be involved in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line OM.

  6. X-chromosome inactivation in female patients with Fabry disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, L; Benistan, K; Toussaint, A; Dubourg, O; Hagege, A A; Eladari, D; Jabbour, F; Beldjord, C; De Mazancourt, P; Germain, D P

    2016-01-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked genetic disorder caused by the deficient activity of lysosomal α-galactosidase (α-Gal). While males are usually severely affected, clinical presentation in female patients may be more variable ranging from asymptomatic to, occasionally, as severely affected as male patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the existence of skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in females with FD, its concordance between tissues, and its contribution to the phenotype. Fifty-six females with FD were enrolled. Clinical and biological work-up included two global scores [Mainz Severity Score Index (MSSI) and DS3], cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, measured glomerular filtration rate, and measurement of α-Gal activity. XCI was analyzed in four tissues using DNA methylation studies. Skewed XCI was found in 29% of the study population. A correlation was found in XCI patterns between blood and the other analyzed tissues although some punctual variability was detected. Significant differences in residual α-Gal levels, severity scores, progression of cardiomyopathy and deterioration of kidney function, depending on the direction and degree of skewing of XCI were evidenced. XCI significantly impacts the phenotype and natural history of FD in females. PMID:25974833

  7. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Yan-jiao Qi; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  8. (Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  9. [Developing a physical map of human chromosome 22]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, M.I.

    1991-12-31

    We have developed bacterial F-factor based systems for cloning large fragments of human DNA in E. coli. In addition to large size, these systems are capable of maintaining human DNA with a high degree of stability. The cosmid size clones are called Fosmids and the clones containing larger inserts (100--200 kb) are called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The ultimate test of the effectiveness of cloning and mapping technology is the degree to which it can be efficiently applied to solve complex mapping problems. We, therefore, plan to use the large fragment cloning procedure as well as a variety of other approaches to generate a complete map of overlapping clones corresponding to human chromosome 22. We have thus far prepared two human chromosome 22 specific Fosmid libraries and we are in the process of constructing a chromosome 22 specific BAC library composed of fragments larger than 100 kb. We will further optimize the technology so that libraries of fragments larger than 200 kb can be readily prepared.

  10. Characterization of human PGD blastocysts with unbalanced chromosomal translocations and human embryonic stem cell line derivation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, N; Féraud, O; Bas, C; Amit, M; Frydman, R; Bennaceur-Griscelli, A; Tachdjian, G

    2009-01-01

    Novel embryonic stem cell lines derived from embryos carrying structural chromosomal abnormalities obtained after preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) are of interest to study in terms of the influence of abnormalities on further development. A total of 22 unbalanced blastocysts obtained after PGD were analysed for structural chromosomal defects. Morphological description and chromosomal status of these blastocysts was established and they were used to derive human embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines. An outgrowth of cells was observed for six blastocysts (6/22; 27%). For two blastocysts, the exact morphology was unknown since they were at early stage, and for four blastocysts, the inner cell mass was clearly visible. Fifteen blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a reciprocal translocation, resulting in a positive outgrowth of cells for five blastocysts. One human ESC line was obtained from a blastocyst carrying a partial chromosome-21 monosomy and a partial chromosome-1 trisomy. Six blastocysts carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to a Robertsonian translocation, and one showed a positive outgrowth of cells. One blastocyst carried an unbalanced chromosomal defect linked to an insertion and no outgrowth was observed. The efficiency of deriving human ESC lines with constitutional chromosomal disorders was low and probably depends on the initial morphological aspect of the blastocysts and/or the type of the chromosomal disorders.

  11. Xist RNA is confined to the nuclear territory of the silenced X chromosome throughout the cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Iris; Monkhorst, Kim; Rentmeester, Eveline; Grootegoed, J Anton; Grosveld, Frank; Gribnau, Joost

    2008-01-01

    In mammalian female cells, one X chromosome is inactivated to prevent a dose difference in the expression of X-encoded proteins between males and females. Xist RNA, required for X chromosome inactivation, is transcribed from the future inactivated X chromosome (Xi), where it spreads in cis, to initi

  12. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  13. The sequence and analysis of duplication rich human chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-08-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  14. The Sequence and Analysis of Duplication Rich Human Chromosome 16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Joel; Han, Cliff; Gordon, Laurie A.; Terry, Astrid; Prabhakar, Shyam; She, Xinwei; Xie, Gary; Hellsten, Uffe; Man Chan, Yee; Altherr, Michael; Couronne, Olivier; Aerts, Andrea; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Blumer, Heather; Branscomb, Elbert; Brown, Nancy C.; Bruno, William J.; Buckingham, Judith M.; Callen, David F.; Campbell, Connie S.; Campbell, Mary L.; Campbell, Evelyn W.; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chasteen, Leslie A.; Chertkov, Olga; Chi, Han C.; Christensen, Mari; Clark, Lynn M.; Cohn, Judith D.; Denys, Mirian; Detter, John C.; Dickson, Mark; Dimitrijevic-Bussod, Mira; Escobar, Julio; Fawcett, Joseph J.; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstein, David; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Grady, Deborah L.; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Hildebrand, Carl E.; Huang, Wayne; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Jewett, Phillip E.; Kadner, Kristen; Kimball, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Krawczyk, Marie-Claude; Leyba, Tina; Longmire, Jonathan L.; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Lowry, Steve; Ludeman, Thom; Mark, Graham A.; Mcmurray, Kimberly L.; Meincke, Linda J.; Morgan, Jenna; Moyzis, Robert K.; Mundt, Mark O.; Munk, A. Christine; Nandkeshwar, Richard D.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Parson-Quintana, Beverly; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Ricke, Darryl O.; Robinson, Donna L.; Rodriguez, Alex; Salamov, Asaf; Saunders, Elizabeth H.; Scott, Duncan; Shough, Timothy; Stallings, Raymond L.; Stalvey, Malinda; Sutherland, Robert D.; Tapia, Roxanne; Tesmer, Judith G.; Thayer, Nina; Thompson, Linda S.; Tice, Hope; Torney, David C.; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; Tsai, Ming; Ulanovsky, Levy E.; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; White, P. Scott; Williams, Albert L.; Wills, Patricia L.; Wu, Jung-Rung; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; DeJong, Pieter; Bruce, David; Doggett, Norman; Deaven, Larry; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Richardson, Paul; et al.

    2004-01-01

    We report here the 78,884,754 base pairs of finished human chromosome 16 sequence, representing over 99.9 percent of its euchromatin. Manual annotation revealed 880 protein coding genes confirmed by 1,637 aligned transcripts, 19 tRNA genes, 341 pseudogenes and 3 RNA pseudogenes. These genes include metallothionein, cadherin and iroquois gene families, as well as the disease genes for polycystic kidney disease and acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Several large-scale structural polymorphisms spanning hundreds of kilobasepairs were identified and result in gene content differences across humans. One of the unique features of chromosome 16 is its high level of segmental duplication, ranked among the highest of the human autosomes. While the segmental duplications are enriched in the relatively gene poor pericentromere of the p-arm, some are involved in recent gene duplication and conversion events which are likely to have had an impact on the evolution of primates and human disease susceptibility.

  15. Report on the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, D.J. [Brigham and Women`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Armour, J. [Univ. of Leicester (England). Dept. of Genetics; Bale, A.E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Genetics] [and others

    1993-12-31

    The Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 9 was held in Chatham, Massachusetts on April 18--20, 1993. Fifty-three abstracts were received and the data presented on posters. The purpose of the meeting was to bring together all interested investigators working on the map of chromosome 9, many of whom had disease-specific interests. After a brief presentation of interests and highlighted results, the meeting broke up into the following subgroups for production of consensus maps: 9p; 9cen-q32; 9q32 ter. A global mapping group also met. Reports of each of these working groups is presented in the summary.

  16. Establishment of X chromosome inactivation and epigenomic features of the inactive X depend on cellular contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallot, Céline; Ouimette, Jean-François; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-09-01

    X chromosome inactivation (XCI) is an essential epigenetic process that ensures X-linked gene dosage equilibrium between sexes in mammals. XCI is dynamically regulated during development in a manner that is intimately linked to differentiation. Numerous studies, which we review here, have explored the dynamics of X inactivation and reactivation in the context of development, differentiation and diseases, and the phenotypic and molecular link between the inactive status, and the cellular context. Here, we also assess whether XCI is a uniform mechanism in mammals by analyzing epigenetic signatures of the inactive X (Xi) in different species and cellular contexts. It appears that the timing of XCI and the epigenetic signature of the inactive X greatly vary between species. Surprisingly, even within a given species, various Xi configurations are found across cellular states. We discuss possible mechanisms underlying these variations, and how they might influence the fate of the Xi.

  17. An investigation of ring and dicentric chromosomes found in three Turner's syndrome patients using DNA analysis and in situ hybridisation with X and Y chromosome specific probes.

    OpenAIRE

    Cooper, C; Crolla, J. A.; Laister, C; Johnston, D I; Cooke, P.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied three patients with features of Turner's syndrome, two with a 45,X/46,X,r(?) and the third with a 45,X/46,X,dic?(Y) karyotype. Because Turner's syndrome patients with a mosaic karyotype containing a Y chromosome are known to have a high risk of developing gonadal tumours, we used DNA analysis and in situ hybridisation with X and Y specific probes to identify the chromosomal origin of the rings and dicentric chromosomes in the three index patients. Both ring chromosomes were sh...

  18. Hexavalent chromium induces chromosome instability in human urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie L; Liou, Louis; Adam, Rosalyn M; Wise, John Pierce

    2016-04-01

    Numerous metals are well-known human bladder carcinogens. Despite the significant occupational and public health concern of metals and bladder cancer, the carcinogenic mechanisms remain largely unknown. Chromium, in particular, is a metal of concern as incidences of bladder cancer have been found elevated in chromate workers, and there is an increasing concern for patients with metal hip implants. However, the impact of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) on bladder cells has not been studied. We compared chromate toxicity in two bladder cell lines; primary human urothelial cells and hTERT-immortalized human urothelial cells. Cr(VI) induced a concentration- and time-dependent increase in chromosome damage in both cell lines, with the hTERT-immortalized cells exhibiting more chromosome damage than the primary cells. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in aneuploid metaphases in both cell lines which was not observed after a 24h exposure. Aneuploidy induction was higher in the hTERT-immortalized cells. When we correct for uptake, Cr(VI) induces a similar amount of chromosome damage and aneuploidy suggesting that the differences in Cr(VI) sensitivity between the two cells lines were due to differences in uptake. The increase in chromosome instability after chronic chromate treatment suggests this may be a mechanism for chromate-induced bladder cancer, specifically, and may be a mechanism for metal-induced bladder cancer, in general. PMID:26908176

  19. Chromosomal Aberrations in Humans Induced by Urban Air Pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Norppa, Hannu; Gamborg, Michael O.;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the influence of individual susceptibility factors on the genotoxic effects of urban air pollution in 106 nonsmoking bus drivers and 101 postal workers in the Copenhagen metropolitan area. We used the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes...... that long-term exposure to urban air pollution (with traffic as the main contributor) induces chromosome damage in human somatic cells. Low DNA repair capacity and GSTM1 and NAT2 variants associated with reduced detoxification ability increase susceptibility to such damage. The effect of the GSTM1 genotype......, which was observed only in the bus drivers, appears to be associated with air pollution, whereas the NAT2 genotype effect, which affected all subjects, may influence the individual response to some other common exposure or the baseline level of chromosomal aberrations....

  20. Enlightening the contribution of the dark matter to the X chromosome inactivation process in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Miguel; Liyakat Ali, Tharvesh Moideen; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-08-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in mammals represents an exceptional example of transcriptional co-regulation occurring at the level of an entire chromosome. XCI is considered as a means to compensate for gene dosage imbalance between sexes, yet the largest part of the chromosome is composed of repeated elements of different nature and origins. Here we consider XCI from a repeat point of view, interrogating the mechanisms for inactivating X chromosome-derived repeated sequences and discussing the contribution of repetitive elements to the silencing process itself and to its evolution.

  1. Enlightening the contribution of the dark matter to the X chromosome inactivation process in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Miguel; Liyakat Ali, Tharvesh Moideen; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-08-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) in mammals represents an exceptional example of transcriptional co-regulation occurring at the level of an entire chromosome. XCI is considered as a means to compensate for gene dosage imbalance between sexes, yet the largest part of the chromosome is composed of repeated elements of different nature and origins. Here we consider XCI from a repeat point of view, interrogating the mechanisms for inactivating X chromosome-derived repeated sequences and discussing the contribution of repetitive elements to the silencing process itself and to its evolution. PMID:27174438

  2. The DNA sequence and biology of human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimwood, J; Gordon, L A; Olsen, A; Terry, A; Schmutz, J; Lamerdin, J; Hellsten, U; Goodstein, D; Couronne, O; Tran-Gyamfi, M

    2004-04-06

    Chromosome 19 has the highest gene density of all human chromosomes, more than double the genome-wide average. The large clustered gene families, corresponding high GC content, CpG islands and density of repetitive DNA indicate a chromosome rich in biological and evolutionary significance. Here we describe 55.8 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence representing 99.9% of the euchromatin portion of the chromosome. Manual curation of gene loci reveals 1,461 protein-coding genes and 321 pseudogenes. Among these are genes directly implicated in Mendelian disorders, including familial hypercholesterolemia and insulin-resistant diabetes. Nearly one quarter of these genes belong to tandemly arranged families, encompassing more than 25% of the chromosome. Comparative analyses show a fascinating picture of conservation and divergence, revealing large blocks of gene orthology with rodents, scattered regions with more recent gene family expansions and deletions, and segments of coding and non-coding conservation with the distant fish species Takifugu.

  3. Chromosomal aberrations related to metastasis of human solid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lun-Xiu Qin

    2002-01-01

    The central role of sequential accumulation of genetic alterations during the development of cancer has been firmly established since the pioneering cytogenetic studies successfully defined recurrent chromosome changes in spedfic types of tumor. In the course of carcinogenesis, cells experience several genetic alterations that are associated with the transition from a preneoplastic lesion to an invasive tumor and finally to the metastatic state. Tumor progression is characterized by stepwise accumulation of genetic alterations.So does the dominant metastatic clone. Modern molecular genetic analyses have clarified that genomic changes accumulate during the development and progression of cancers. In comparison with the corresponding primary tumor,additional events of chromosomal aberrations (including gains or allelic losses) are frequently found in metastases, and the incidence of combined chromosomal alterations in the primary tumor, plus the occurrence of additional aberrations inthe distant metastases, correlated significantly with decreased postmetastatic survival. The deletions at 3p, 4p, 6q, 8p, 10q,11p, 11q, 12p, 13q, 16q, 17p, 18q, 21q, and 22q, as well as the over-representations at 1q, 8q, 9q, 14q and 15q, have been found to associate preferentially with the metastatic phenotype of human cancers. Among of them, the deletions on chromosomes 8p, 17p, 11p and 13p seem to be more significant, and more detail fine regions of them, including 8p11, 8p21-12, 8p22, 8p23, 17p13.3, 11p15.5, and 13q12-13 have been suggested harboring metastasis-suppressor genes.During the past decade, several human chromosomes have been functionally tested through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT), and metastasis-suppressor activities have been reported on chromosomes 1, 6, 7, 8, 10,11, 12, 16, and 17. However, it is not actually known at what stage of the metastatic cascade these alterations have occurred.There is still controversial with the association

  4. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  5. The mapping of novel genes to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buenaventura, J.M. [Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The principle goal of our laboratory is the discovery of new genes on human chromosome 19. One of the strategies to achieve this goal is through the use of cDNA clones known as {open_quotes}expressed sequence tags{close_quotes} (ESTs). ESTs, short segments of sequence from a cDNA clone that correspond to the mRNA, occur as unique regions in the genome and, therefore, can be used as markers for specific positions. In collaboration with researchers from Genethon in France, fifteen cDNA clones from a normalized human infant brain cDNA library were tested and determined to map to chromosome 19. A verification procedure is then followed to confirm assignment to chromosome 19. First, primers for each cDNA clone are developed and then amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA. Next, a {sup 32}P-radiolabeled probe is made by polymerase chain reaction for each clone and then hybridized against filters containing an LLNL chromosome 19-specific cosmid library to find putative locations on the chromosome. The location is then verified by running a polymerase chain reactions from the positive cosmids. With the Browser database at LLNL, additional information about the positive cosmids can be found. Through use of the BLAST database at the National Library of Medicine, homologous sequences to the clones can be found. Among the fifteen cDNA clones received from Genethon, all have been amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Three have turned out as repetitive elements in the genome. Ten have been mapped to specific locations on chromosome 19. Putative locations have been found for the remaining two clones and thus verification testing will proceed.

  6. Androgenetic development of X- and Y-chromosome bearing haploid rainbow trout embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalik, Oliwia; Kowalski, Radosław K; Judycka, Sylwia; Rożyński, Rafał; Dobosz, Stefan; Ocalewicz, Konrad

    2016-09-01

    Haploid fish embryos are important in studies regarding role of the recessive traits during early ontogeny. In fish species with the male heterogamety, androgenetic haploid embryos might be also useful tool in studies concerning role of the sex chromosomes during an embryonic development. Morphologically differentiated X and Y chromosomes have been found in a limited number of fish species including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum 1792). To evaluate role of the sex chromosomes during rainbow trout embryonic development, survival of the androgenetic haploids in the presence of X or Y sex chromosomes has been examined. Androgenetic haploid rainbow trout were produced by fertilization of X-irradiated eggs with spermatozoa derived from the normal males (XY) and neomales, that is, sex-reversed females (XX) to produce X- and Y-bearing haploids, and all X-bearing haploids, respectively. Survival rates of the androgenetic progenies of normal males and neomales examined during embryogenesis and at hatching did not differ significantly. However, all haploids died within next few days after hatching. Cytogenetic analysis of the androgenetic embryos confirmed their haploid status. Moreover, apart from the intact paternal chromosomes, residues of the irradiated maternal chromosomes observed as chromosome fragments were identified in some of the haploids. Provided results suggested that rainbow trout X and Y chromosomes despite morphological and genetic differences are at the early stage of differentiation and still share genetic information responsible for the proper embryonic development. PMID:27125692

  7. Contrasting patterns of X/Y polymorphism distinguish Carica papaya from other sex chromosome systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingartner, Laura A; Moore, Richard C

    2012-12-01

    The sex chromosomes of the tropical crop papaya (Carica papaya) are evolutionarily young and consequently allow for the examination of evolutionary mechanisms that drive early sex chromosome divergence. We conducted a molecular population genetic analysis of four X/Y gene pairs from a collection of 45 wild papaya accessions. These population genetic analyses reveal striking differences in the patterns of polymorphism between the X and Y chromosomes that distinguish them from other sex chromosome systems. In most sex chromosome systems, the Y chromosome displays significantly reduced polymorphism levels, whereas the X chromosome maintains a level of polymorphism that is comparable to autosomal loci. However, the four papaya sex-linked loci that we examined display diversity patterns that are opposite this trend: the papaya X alleles exhibit significantly reduced polymorphism levels, whereas the papaya Y alleles maintain greater than expected levels of diversity. Our analyses suggest that selective sweeps in the regions of the X have contributed to this pattern while also revealing geographically restricted haplogroups on the Y. We discuss the possible role sexual selection and/or genomic conflict have played in shaping the contrasting patterns of polymorphism found for the papaya X and Y chromosomes.

  8. Synteny mapping of five human chromosome 7 genes on bovine chromosomes 4 and 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, E; Womack, J E; Grosz, M D

    1999-01-01

    Five genes on human chromosome 7 (HSA 7) were assigned to bovine chromosome 21 (BTA 21) and 4 (BTA 4) using a bovine-rodent somatic hybrid cell panel. These five genes were alpha-I subunit of adenylate cyclase-inhibiting G-protein (GNAI1), alpha/beta preprotachykinin (TAC1), reelin (RELN), c-AMP dependant protein kinase type II beta regulatory chain (PRKAR2B) and apolipoprotein A1 regulatory protein 1 (TFCOUP2). Four genes mapped to BTA 4 (GNAI1, TAC1, RELN, PRKAR2B) while one gene mapped to BTA 21 (TFCOUP2). This study confirms the synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 4, finely maps the breakpoints of conserved synteny on HSA 7 and defines a new synteny conservation between HSA 7 and BTA 21.

  9. Condensin-driven remodelling of X chromosome topology during dosage compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Emily; Bian, Qian; McCord, Rachel Patton; Lajoie, Bryan R.; Wheeler, Bayly S.; Ralston, Edward J.; Uzawa, Satoru; Dekker, Job; Meyer, Barbara J.

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of a genome plays a critical role in regulating gene expression, yet little is known about the machinery and mechanisms that determine higher-order chromosome structure. Here we perform genome-wide chromosome conformation capture analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and RNA-seq to obtain comprehensive three-dimensional (3D) maps of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome and to dissect X chromosome dosage compensation, which balances gene expression between XX hermaphrodites and XO males. The dosage compensation complex (DCC), a condensin complex, binds to both hermaphrodite X chromosomes via sequence-specific recruitment elements on X (rex sites) to reduce chromosome-wide gene expression by half. Most DCC condensin subunits also act in other condensin complexes to control the compaction and resolution of all mitotic and meiotic chromosomes. By comparing chromosome structure in wild-type and DCC-defective embryos, we show that the DCC remodels hermaphrodite X chromosomes into a sex-specific spatial conformation distinct from autosomes. Dosage-compensated X chromosomes consist of self-interacting domains (~1 Mb) resembling mammalian topologically associating domains (TADs). TADs on X chromosomes have stronger boundaries and more regular spacing than on autosomes. Many TAD boundaries on X chromosomes coincide with the highest-affinity rex sites and become diminished or lost in DCC-defective mutants, thereby converting the topology of X to a conformation resembling autosomes. rex sites engage in DCC-dependent long-range interactions, with the most frequent interactions occurring between rex sites at DCC-dependent TAD boundaries. These results imply that the DCC reshapes the topology of X chromosomes by forming new TAD boundaries and reinforcing weak boundaries through interactions between its highest-affinity binding sites. As this model predicts, deletion of an endogenous rex site at a DCC-dependent TAD boundary using

  10. The Effects of X Chromosome Loss on Neuroanatomical and Cognitive Phenotypes During Adolescence: a Multi-modal Structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Zhang, Zhixin; Zhao, Qiuling; Zhang, Jiaying; Zhong, Suyu; Bi, Yanchao; He, Yong; Pan, Hui; Gong, Gaolang

    2015-09-01

    The absence of all or part of one X chromosome in female humans causes Turner's syndrome (TS), providing a unique "knockout model" to investigate the role of the X chromosome in neuroanatomy and cognition. Previous studies have demonstrated TS-associated brain differences; however, it remains largely unknown 1) how the brain structures are affected by the type of X chromosome loss and 2) how X chromosome loss influences the brain-cognition relationship. Here, we addressed these by investigating gray matter morphology and white matter connectivity using a multimodal MRI dataset from 34 adolescent TS patients (13 mosaic and 21 nonmosaic) and 21 controls. Intriguingly, the 2 TS groups exhibited significant differences in surface area in the right angular gyrus and in white matter integrity of the left tapetum of corpus callosum; these data support a link between these brain phenotypes and the type of X chromosome loss in TS. We further showed that the X chromosome modulates specific brain-cognition relationships: thickness and surface area in multiple cortical regions are positively correlated with working-memory performance in controls but negatively in TS. These findings provide novel insights into the X chromosome effect on neuroanatomical and cognitive phenotypes and highlight the role of genetic factors in brain-cognition relationships. PMID:24770708

  11. Construction and characterization of human chromosome 2-specific cosmid, fosmid, and PAC clone libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingrich, J.C.; Boehrer, D.M.; Garnes, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-15

    This article discusses the construction and characterization of three human chromosome 2-specific clone libraries. A chromosome 2-specific PAC library was also constructed from a hybrid cell line. The chromosome 2 coverage of each of the three libraries was further determined by PCR screening clone pools with 82 chromosome 2-specific STSs. 47 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Clinical and laboratory features of human herpesvirus 6 chromosomal integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D A

    2016-04-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) comprises two separate viruses, HHV-6A and HHV-6B, although this distinction is not commonly made. HHV-6B is ubiquitous in the population with primary infection usually occurring in early childhood, and often resulting in febrile illness. HHV-6B is also recognized as a pathogen in the immunocompromised host, particularly in transplant recipients. HHV-6A is less well characterized and may have a more restricted prevalence. Both viruses are unique among the human herpesviruses in that the entire viral genome can be found integrated into the telomeric regions of host cell chromosomes. Approximately 1% of persons have inherited integrated viral sequences through the germline, and these individuals characteristically have very high viral loads in blood and other sample types. Emerging evidence suggests that HHV-6A and HHV-6B chromosomal integration may not just be an uncommon biological observation, but more likely a characteristic of the replication properties of these viruses. The integrated viral genome appears capable of excision from the chromosomal site and potentially allows viral replication. The clinical consequences of inherited chromosomally integrated HHV-6 have yet to be fully appreciated. PMID:26802216

  13. Mapping the stability of human brain asymmetry across five sex-chromosome aneuploidies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Amy; Clasen, Liv; Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L; Lalonde, Francois; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Giedd, Jay N; Raznahan, Armin

    2015-01-01

    The human brain displays stereotyped and early emerging patterns of cortical asymmetry in health. It is unclear if these asymmetries are highly sensitive to genetic and environmental variation or fundamental features of the brain that can survive severe developmental perturbations. To address this question, we mapped cortical thickness (CT) asymmetry in a group of genetically defined disorders known to impact CT development. Participants included 137 youth with one of five sex-chromosome aneuploidies [SCAs; XXX (n = 28), XXY (n = 58), XYY (n = 26), XXYY (n = 20), and XXXXY (n = 5)], and 169 age-matched typically developing controls (80 female). In controls, we replicated previously reported rightward inferior frontal and leftward lateral parietal CT asymmetry. These opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetries were broadly preserved in all five SCA groups. However, we also detected foci of shifting CT asymmetry with aneuploidy, which fell almost exclusively within regions of significant CT asymmetry in controls. Specifically, X-chromosome aneuploidy accentuated normative rightward inferior frontal asymmetries, while Y-chromosome aneuploidy reversed normative rightward medial prefrontal and lateral temporal asymmetries. These findings indicate that (1) the stereotyped normative pattern of opposing frontoparietal CT asymmetry arises from developmental mechanisms that can withstand gross chromosomal aneuploidy and (2) X and Y chromosomes can exert focal, nonoverlapping and directionally opposed influences on CT asymmetry within cortical regions of significant asymmetry in health. Our study attests to the resilience of developmental mechanisms that support the global patterning of CT asymmetry in humans, and motivates future research into the molecular bases and functional consequences of sex chromosome dosage effects on CT asymmetry.

  14. Different radiosensitization effects of the halogenated compounds on the human chromosome in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis and chromosome aberrations were compared following X- or UV-irradiation or methyl methanesulfonate treatment in cultures of HeLa S3 or KB cells or human and rabbit lymphocytes. The sensitization by incorporation of the halouridines BUdR and IUdR was also investigated. Unscheduled DNA synthesis occurred in two established cell lines after irradiation with 0 to 10 kR of X-rays. The rate of unscheduled synthesis was dose dependent and differed for the two cell lines. The unscheduled synthesis was not correlated with the modal chromosome number nor with the number of aberrations produced. UV-irradiated rabbit lymphocytes exhibited unscheduled DNA synthesis which saturated after a dose of 250 ergs/mm2. In contrast the incorporation of BUdR or IUdR eliminated this saturation and caused an increasing effect with increasing dose up to 1000 ergs/mm2. The degree of sensitization varied between the two halo-uridines, BUdR being more effective at high doses while IUdR was a more potent sensitizer at low doses. Chromosome aberrations were not directly related to unscheduled DNA synthesis but were sensitized by halo-uridine incorporation. In this case IUdR was more potent than BUdR at all doses studied. Methyl methanesulfonate was an effective producer of chromosome aberration in human lymphocytes of both the chromosome and chromatid type. Prior incorporation of BUdR or IUdR did not increase the total aberration produced but did increase the number of chromosome type aberration at the expense of the chromatid type

  15. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings.

  16. An Allometric Analysis of Sex and Sex Chromosome Dosage Effects on Subcortical Anatomy in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Paul Kirkpatrick; Clasen, Liv; Giedd, Jay N; Blumenthal, Jonathan; Lerch, Jason P; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Raznahan, Armin

    2016-02-24

    Structural neuroimaging of humans with typical and atypical sex-chromosome complements has established the marked influence of both Yand X-/Y-chromosome dosage on total brain volume (TBV) and identified potential cortical substrates for the psychiatric phenotypes associated with sex-chromosome aneuploidy (SCA). Here, in a cohort of 354 humans with varying karyotypes (XX, XY, XXX, XXY, XYY, XXYY, XXXXY), we investigate sex and SCA effects on subcortical size and shape; focusing on the striatum, pallidum and thalamus. We find large effect-size differences in the volume and shape of all three structures as a function of sex and SCA. We correct for TBV effects with a novel allometric method harnessing normative scaling rules for subcortical size and shape in humans, which we derive here for the first time. We show that all three subcortical volumes scale sublinearly with TBV among healthy humans, mirroring known relationships between subcortical volume and TBV among species. Traditional TBV correction methods assume linear scaling and can therefore invert or exaggerate sex and SCA effects on subcortical anatomy. Allometric analysis restricts sex-differences to: (1) greater pallidal volume (PV) in males, and (2) relative caudate head expansion and ventral striatum contraction in females. Allometric analysis of SCA reveals that supernumerary X- and Y-chromosomes both cause disproportionate reductions in PV, and coordinated deformations of striatopallidal shape. Our study provides a novel understanding of sex and sex-chromosome dosage effects on subcortical organization, using an allometric approach that can be generalized to other basic and clinical structural neuroimaging settings. PMID:26911691

  17. X chromosome-linked and mitochondrial gene control of Leber hereditary optic neuropathy: Evidence from segregation analysis for dependence on X chromosome inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiangdong Bu; Rotter, J.I. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States) Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-09-15

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) has been shown to involve mutation(s) of mitochondrial DNA, yet there remain several confusing aspects of its inheritance not explained by mitochondrial inheritance alone, including male predominance, reduced penetrance, and a later age of onset in females. By extending segregation analysis methods to disorders that involve both a mitochondrial and a nuclear gene locus, the authors show that the available pedigree data for LHON are most consistent with a two-locus disorder, with one responsible gene being mitochondrial and the other nuclear and X chromosome-linked. Furthermore, they have been able to extend the two-locus analytic method and demonstrate that a proportion of affected females are likely heterozygous at the X chromosome-linked locus and are affected due to unfortunate X chromosome inactivation, thus providing an explanation for the later age of onset in females. The estimated penetrance for a heterozygous female is 0.11{plus minus}0.02. The calculated frequency of the X chromosome-linked gene for LHON is 0.l08. Among affected females, 60% are expected to be heterozygous, and the remainder are expected to be homozygous at the responsible X chromosome-linked locus.

  18. Assignment of the structural gene for the third component of human complement to chromosome 19.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, A. S.; Solomon, E; Chambers, S.; Bodmer, W F; Povey, S; Fey, G

    1982-01-01

    The third component of complement (C3) is synthesized and secreted by cultured human primary fibroblasts. A monoclonal antibody having specificity for an antigenic determinant carried by human but not mouse C3 was used to study the continued expression of human C3 in three panels of independently derived human-mouse somatic cell hybrids. Expression of the human product was shown to segregate with human chromosome 19 and with no other chromosome or group of chromosomes. A unique-sequence human...

  19. Social cognition and underlying cognitive mechanisms in children with an extra X chromosome : a comparison with autism spectrum disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, S.; Stockmann, L.; van Buggenhout, G.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.; Swaab, H.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with an extra X chromosome are at increased risk for autism symptoms. This study is the first to assess theory of mind and facial affect labeling in children with an extra X chromosome. Forty-six children with an extra X chromosome (29 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 17 girls with Tri

  20. X-chromosomal inactivation directly influences the phenotypic manifestation of X-linked protoporphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaleoni, V; Balwani, M; Granata, F; Graziadei, G; Missineo, P; Fiorentino, V; Fustinoni, S; Cappellini, M D; Naik, H; Desnick, R J; Di Pierro, E

    2016-01-01

    X-linked protoporphyria (XLP), a rare erythropoietic porphyria, results from terminal exon gain-of-function mutations in the ALAS2 gene causing increased ALAS2 activity and markedly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels. Patients present with severe cutaneous photosensitivity and may develop liver dysfunction. XLP was originally reported as X-linked dominant with 100% penetrance in males and females. We characterized 11 heterozygous females from six unrelated XLP families and show markedly varying phenotypic and biochemical heterogeneity, reflecting the degree of X-chromosomal inactivation of the mutant gene. ALAS2 sequencing identified the specific mutation and confirmed heterozygosity among the females. Clinical history, plasma and erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels were determined. Methylation assays of the androgen receptor and zinc-finger MYM type 3 short tandem repeat polymorphisms estimated each heterozygotes X-chromosomal inactivation pattern. Heterozygotes with equal or increased skewing, favoring expression of the wild-type allele had no clinical symptoms and only slightly increased erythrocyte protoporphyrin concentrations and/or frequency of protoporphyrin-containing peripheral blood fluorocytes. When the wild-type allele was preferentially inactivated, heterozygous females manifested the disease phenotype and had both higher erythrocyte protoporphyrin levels and circulating fluorocytes. These findings confirm that the previous dominant classification of XLP is inappropriate and genetically misleading, as the disorder is more appropriately designated XLP.

  1. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia

  2. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S. (Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia.

  3. Forensic usefulness of a 25 X-chromosome single-nucleotide polymorphism marker set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J; Castro, Jose Aurelio;

    2010-01-01

    -nucleotide polymorphisms (X-SNPs) is still limited. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: The forensic usefulness of a set of 25 SNPs located across the X-chromosome was analyzed in 13 populations. The applicability of the 25 X-SNPs in kinship testing was illustrated in two immigration cases where the conclusions based....... The usefulness of X-chromosome markers was particularly illustrative in Case 1, where the typing of 25 X-SNPs would have been sufficient to exclude paternity. CONCLUSION: The high level of polymorphism, low degree of linkage disequilibrium, and very low probability of mutation of the 25 X-SNPs makes this set...

  4. Should the markers on X chromosome be used for genomic prediction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Guosheng; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Aamand, Gert Pedersen;

    2013-01-01

    traits based on 54K markerdata, imputed 54K for test animals, and imputed 54K for half of referenceanimals. GBLUP models with or without residual polygenic effect were used forgenomic prediction. For all three data sets, genomic prediction using allmarkers gave slightly higher reliability than prediction...... excluding the X chromosome.Averaged over 15 traits, the gains in reliability from the X chromosome rangedfrom 0.3% to 0.5% points among the three data sets and models. Using a model with a G-matrix accounting for sex-linkedrelationship appropriately or a model which divided genomic breeding value intoan...... autosomal component and an X chromosomal component did not led to betterprediction based on the present data where all animals were bulls. A modelincluding polygenic effect did not recover the loss of prediction accuracy dueto exclusion of the X chromosome. It is recommended using markers on the X...

  5. Chromosome territories, X;Y translocation and Premature Ovarian Failure: is there a relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betri Enrico

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Premature ovarian failure (POF is a secondary hypergonadotrophic amenorrhea occurring before the age of 40 and affecting 1-3% of females. Chromosome anomalies account for 6-8% of POF cases, but only few cases are associated with translocations involving X and Y chromosomes. This study shows the cytogenetic and molecular analysis of a POF patient came to our attention as she developed a left ovary choriocarcinoma at the age of 10 and at 14 years of age she presented secondary amenorrhea with elevated levels of gonadotropins. Results Breakpoint position on X and Y chromosomes was investigated using Fluorescent In Situ Hybridisation (FISH with a panel of specific BAC probes, microsatellite analysis and evaluation of copy number changes and loss of heterozigosity by Affymetrix® GeneChip platform (Santa Clara, CA, USA. Patient's karyotype resulted 46, X, der(Yt(X;Y(q13.1;q11.223. X inactivation study was assessed by RBA banding and showed preferential inactivation of derivative chromosome. The reciprocal spatial disposition of sexual chromosome territories was investigated using whole chromosome painting and centromeres probes: patient's results didn't show a significant difference in comparison to normal controls. Conclusion The peculiar clinical case come to our attention highlighted the complexity of POF aetiology and of the translocation event, even if our results seem to exclude any effect on nuclear organisation. POF phenotype could be partially explained by skewed X chromosome inactivation that influences gene expression.

  6. X-Ray Crystal Structure of Bone Marrow Kinase in the X Chromosome: A Tec Family Kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckelbauer, Jodi; Sack, John S.; Ahmed, Nazia; Burke, James; Chang, ChiehYing Y.; Gao, Mian; Tino, Joseph; Xie, Dianlin; Tebben, Andrew J. (BMS)

    2012-06-27

    Bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome, a member of the Tec family of tyrosine kinases, plays a role in both monocyte/macrophage trafficking as well as cytokine secretion. Although the structures of Tec family kinases Bruton's tyrosine kinase and IL-2-inducible T-cell kinase are known, the crystal structures of other Tec family kinases have remained elusive. We report the X-ray crystal structures of bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in complex with dasatinib at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution and PP2 at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures reveal a typical kinase protein fold; with well-ordered protein conformation that includes an open/extended activation loop and a stabilized DFG-motif rendering the kinase in an inactive conformation. Dasatinib and PP2 bind to bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome in the ATP binding pocket and display similar binding modes to that observed in other Tec and Src protein kinases. The bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome structures identify conformational elements of the DFG-motif that could potentially be utilized to design potent and/or selective bone marrow kinase in the X chromosome inhibitors.

  7. Refined human artificial chromosome vectors for gene therapy and animal transgenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuki, Y.; Hoshiya, H.; Takiguchi, M; Abe, S.; Iida, Y.; Osaki, M.; Katoh, M; Hiratsuka, M; Shirayoshi, Y; HIRAMATSU, K.; Ueno, E; Kajitani, N; Yoshino, T.; Kazuki, K; Ishihara, C.

    2010-01-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages as gene therapy vectors, including stable episomal maintenance, and the ability to carry large gene inserts. We previously developed HAC vectors from the normal human chromosomes using a chromosome engineering technique. However, endogenous genes were remained in these HACs, limiting their therapeutic applications. In this study, we refined a HAC vector without endogenous genes from human chromosome 21 in homologous recombination-pro...

  8. Mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Lieber Michael R; Tsai Albert G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Many human cancers are associated with characteristic chromosomal rearrangements, especially hematopoietic cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas. The first and most critical step in the rearrangement process is the induction of two DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). In all cases, at least one of the two DSBs is generated by a pathologic process, such as (1) randomly-positioned breaks due to ionizing radiation, free radical oxidative damage, or spontaneous hydrolysis; (2) breaks associ...

  9. The large-X effect in plants: increased species divergence and reduced gene flow on the Silene X-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin-Sheng; Filatov, Dmitry A

    2016-06-01

    The disproportionately large involvement of the X-chromosome in the isolation of closely related species (the large-X effect) has been reported for many animals, where X-linked genes are mostly hemizygous in the heterogametic sex. The expression of deleterious recessive mutations is thought to drive the frequent involvement of the X-chromosome in hybrid sterility, as well as to reduce interspecific gene flow for X-linked genes. Here, we evaluate the role of the X-chromosome in the speciation of two closely related plant species - the white and red campions (Silene latifolia and S. dioica) - that hybridize widely across Europe. The two species evolved separate sexes and sex chromosomes relatively recently (~10(7)  years), and unlike most animal species, most X-linked genes have intact Y-linked homologs. We demonstrate that the X-linked genes show a very small and insignificant amount of interspecific gene flow, while gene flow involving autosomal loci is significant and sufficient to homogenize the gene pools of the two species. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis of the large-X effect in Silene and comprise the first report of this effect in plants. Nonhemizygosity of many X-linked genes in Silene males indicates that exposure of recessive mutations to selection may not be essential for the occurrence of the large-X effect. Several possible causes of the large-X effect in Silene are discussed.

  10. Widespread over-expression of the X chromosome in sterile F₁hybrid mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M Good

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The X chromosome often plays a central role in hybrid male sterility between species, but it is unclear if this reflects underlying regulatory incompatibilities. Here we combine phenotypic data with genome-wide expression data to directly associate aberrant expression patterns with hybrid male sterility between two species of mice. We used a reciprocal cross in which F₁ males are sterile in one direction and fertile in the other direction, allowing us to associate expression differences with sterility rather than with other hybrid phenotypes. We found evidence of extensive over-expression of the X chromosome during spermatogenesis in sterile but not in fertile F₁ hybrid males. Over-expression was most pronounced in genes that are normally expressed after meiosis, consistent with an X chromosome-wide disruption of expression during the later stages of spermatogenesis. This pattern was not a simple consequence of faster evolutionary divergence on the X chromosome, because X-linked expression was highly conserved between the two species. Thus, transcriptional regulation of the X chromosome during spermatogenesis appears particularly sensitive to evolutionary divergence between species. Overall, these data provide evidence for an underlying regulatory basis to reproductive isolation in house mice and underscore the importance of transcriptional regulation of the X chromosome to the evolution of hybrid male sterility.

  11. Function and evolution of the long noncoding RNA circuitry orchestrating X-chromosome inactivation in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Giulia; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-09-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is a chromosome-wide regulatory process that ensures dosage compensation for X-linked genes in Theria. XCI is established during early embryogenesis and is developmentally regulated. Different XCI strategies exist in mammalian infraclasses and the regulation of this process varies also among closely related species. In Eutheria, initiation of XCI is orchestrated by a cis-acting locus, the X-inactivation center (Xic), which is particularly enriched in genes producing long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). Among these, Xist generates a master transcript that coats and propagates along the future inactive X-chromosome in cis, establishing X-chromosome wide transcriptional repression through interaction with several protein partners. Other lncRNAs also participate to the regulation of X-inactivation but the extent to which their function has been maintained in evolution is still poorly understood. In Metatheria, Xist is not conserved, but another, evolutionary independent lncRNA with similar properties, Rsx, has been identified, suggesting that lncRNA-mediated XCI represents an evolutionary advantage. Here, we review current knowledge on the interplay of X chromosome-encoded lncRNAs in ensuring proper establishment and maintenance of chromosome-wide silencing, and discuss the evolutionary implications of the emergence of species-specific lncRNAs in the control of XCI within Theria. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:702-722. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1359 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27173581

  12. Have humans lost control: The elusive X-controlling element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Samantha B; Yang, Christine; Brown, Carolyn J

    2016-08-01

    The process of X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) randomly silences one of two X chromosomes in normal female cells. The ability to predict if there is a preference for one of the two Xs to be chosen (and survive) more often as the active X has important repercussions in human health and X-linked disease. Mice have a genetic component that modulates non-random skewing called the X-controlling element (Xce). Although the nature of the locus and its mechanisms of action are still under investigation, it is clear that different mouse strains carry unique Xce alleles on their X chromosomes, resulting in distinct skewing phenotypes in the F1 progeny of hybrid crosses. Whether a similar mechanism exists in humans is unclear, and challenges to identifying such a locus include the complexity and diversity of the human genome, the restricted time points and tissue(s) of examination in human subjects, and the lack of a model system recapitulating XCI in early development. In this review we consider the evidence for such a controlling locus in humans, in addition to discussing if we have the power to recognize it given the contribution of selective growth in causing skewed patterns of XCI.

  13. Chromosome surveys of human populations: between epidemiology and anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chadarevian, Soraya

    2014-09-01

    It is commonly held that after 1945 human genetics turned medical and focussed on the individual rather than on the study of human populations that had become discredited. However, a closer look at the research practices at the time quickly reveals that human population studies, using old and new tools, prospered in this period. The essay focuses on the rise of chromosome analysis as a new tool for the study of human populations. It reviews a broad array of population studies ranging from newborn screening programmes to studies of isolated or 'primitive' people. Throughout, it highlights the continuing role of concerns and opportunities raised by the propagation of atomic energy for civilian and military uses, the collection of large data bases and computers, and the role of international organisations like the World Health Organisation and the International Biological Programme in shaping research agendas and carving out a space for human heredity in the postwar era.

  14. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  15. 3D Chromosome Regulatory Landscape of Human Pluripotent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiong; Dadon, Daniel B; Powell, Benjamin E; Fan, Zi Peng; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Shachar, Sigal; Weintraub, Abraham S; Hnisz, Denes; Pegoraro, Gianluca; Lee, Tong Ihn; Misteli, Tom; Jaenisch, Rudolf; Young, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we describe the 3D chromosome regulatory landscape of human naive and primed embryonic stem cells. To devise this map, we identified transcriptional enhancers and insulators in these cells and placed them within the context of cohesin-associated CTCF-CTCF loops using cohesin ChIA-PET data. The CTCF-CTCF loops we identified form a chromosomal framework of insulated neighborhoods, which in turn form topologically associating domains (TADs) that are largely preserved during the transition between the naive and primed states. Regulatory changes in enhancer-promoter interactions occur within insulated neighborhoods during cell state transition. The CTCF anchor regions we identified are conserved across species, influence gene expression, and are a frequent site of mutations in cancer cells, underscoring their functional importance in cellular regulation. These 3D regulatory maps of human pluripotent cells therefore provide a foundation for future interrogation of the relationships between chromosome structure and gene control in development and disease. PMID:26686465

  16. DNMT3L is a regulator of X chromosome compaction and post-meiotic gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha M Zamudio

    Full Text Available Previous studies on the epigenetic regulator DNA methyltransferase 3-Like (DNMT3L, have demonstrated it is an essential regulator of paternal imprinting and early male meiosis. Dnmt3L is also a paternal effect gene, i.e., wild type offspring of heterozygous mutant sires display abnormal phenotypes suggesting the inheritance of aberrant epigenetic marks on the paternal chromosomes. In order to reveal the mechanisms underlying these paternal effects, we have assessed X chromosome meiotic compaction, XY chromosome aneuploidy rates and global transcription in meiotic and haploid germ cells from male mice heterozygous for Dnmt3L. XY bodies from Dnmt3L heterozygous males were significantly longer than those from wild types, and were associated with a three-fold increase in XY bearing sperm. Loss of a Dnmt3L allele resulted in deregulated expression of a large number of both X-linked and autosomal genes within meiotic cells, but more prominently in haploid germ cells. Data demonstrate that similar to embryonic stem cells, DNMT3L is involved in an auto-regulatory loop in germ cells wherein the loss of a Dnmt3L allele resulted in increased transcription from the remaining wild type allele. In contrast, however, within round spermatids, this auto-regulatory loop incorporated the alternative non-coding alternative transcripts. Consistent with the mRNA data, we have localized DNMT3L within spermatids and sperm and shown that the loss of a Dnmt3L allele results in a decreased DNMT3L content within sperm. These data demonstrate previously unrecognised roles for DNMT3L in late meiosis and in the transcriptional regulation of meiotic and post-meiotic germ cells. These data provide a potential mechanism for some cases of human Klinefelter's and Turner's syndromes.

  17. Dosage Effects of X and Y Chromosomes on Language and Social Functioning in Children with Supernumerary Sex Chromosome Aneuploidies: Implications for Idiopathic Language Impairment and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy Raitano; Wallace, Gregory L.; Adeyemi, Elizabeth I.; Lopez, Katherine C.; Blumenthal, Jonathan D.; Clasen, Liv S.; Giedd, Jay N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Supernumerary sex chromosome aneuploidies (X/Y-aneuploidies), the presence of extra X and/or Y chromosomes, are associated with heightened rates of language impairments and social difficulties. However, no single study has examined different language domains and social functioning in the same sample of children with tri-, tetra-, and…

  18. The human neurofilament gene (NEFL) is located on the short arm of chromosome 8.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Hurst; D. Flavell (David); J-P. Julien (Jean-Pierre); D.N. Meijer (Dies); W. Mushynski (Walter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe have localized the gene coding for the human neurofilament light chain (NEFL) to chromosome band 8p2.1 by Southern blotting of DNA from hybrid cell panels and in situ hybridization to metaphase chromosomes.

  19. HACking the centromere chromatin code: insights from human artificial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Jan H; Martins, Nuno M C; Larionov, Vladimir; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Earnshaw, William C

    2012-07-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromosomal region that serves as the assembly site of the kinetochore. At the centromere, CENP-A nucleosomes form part of a chromatin landscape termed centrochromatin. This chromatin environment conveys epigenetic marks regulating kinetochore formation. Recent work sheds light on the intricate relationship between centrochromatin state, the CENP-A assembly pathway and the maintenance of centromere function. Here, we review the emerging picture of how chromatin affects mammalian kinetochore formation. We place particular emphasis on data obtained from Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) biology and the targeted engineering of centrochromatin using synthetic HACs. We discuss implications of these findings, which indicate that a delicate balance of histone modifications and chromatin state dictates both de novo centromere formation and the maintenance of centromere identity in dividing cell populations.

  20. Mean expression of the X chromosome is associated with neuronal density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Thomas Swingland

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are characterised by neuronal loss. Neuronal loss causes a varying density of neurons across samples which confounds results from gene expression studies. Chromosome X is known to be specifically important in brain. We hypothesised the existence of a chromosomal signature of gene expression associated with the X-chromosome for neurological conditions not normally associated with that chromosome. The hypothesis was investigated using microarray datasets from studies on Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Data were analysed using Chromowave, an analytical tool for detecting spatially extended expression changes across chromosomes. To examine associations with neuronal density, expressions from a set of neuron specific genes were extracted. The association between these genes and the expression patterns extracted by Chromowave was then analyzed. We observed an extended pattern of low expression of ChrX consistent in all the neurodegenerative disease brain datasets. There was a strong correlation between mean ChrX expression and the pattern extracted from the autosomal neuronal specific genes, but no correlation with mean autosomal expression. No chromosomal patterns associated with the neuron specific genes were found on other chromosomes. The chromosomal expression pattern was not present in datasets from blood cells. The ChrX:Autosome expression ratio was also higher in neuronal cells than in tissues with a mix of cell types.The results suggest that a loss of neurons manifests in gene expression experiments primarily as a reduction in mean expression of genes along ChrX. The most likely explanation for this finding relates to the documented general up-regulation of ChrX in brain tissue which, this work suggests, occurs primarily in neurons. The purpose and mechanisms behind this cell specific higher expression warrant further research, which may also help elucidate connectio

  1. Distal 5q trisomy resulting from an X;5 translocation detected by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D N; Ahsanuddin, A N; Mark, H F

    2000-10-23

    We describe the case of a 13-year-old girl with an apparently de novo unbalanced translocation resulting in the presence of additional chromosomal material on the short arm of one X chromosome, which was detected by conventional G-banding studies. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using the Chromoprobe Multiprobe-M protocol confirmed that the additional chromosomal material originated from chromosome 5. The karyotype of this patient is now established to be 46,X,der(X) t(X;5)(p22.3;q33), with a deletion of Xp22.3-pter and partial trisomy of 5q33-qter. The distal 5q trisomy genotype has been associated with clinical signs that include growth and mental retardation, eczema, craniofacial anomalies, and malformations of heart, lungs, abdomen, limbs, and genitalia. Our patient also has short stature, a prominent nasal bridge, a flat philtrum, a thin upper lip, dental caries, and limb and cardiac malformations, but she appears to be mildly affected compared with previously reported cases. This is the first case of distal 5q trisomy arising from a translocation with the X chromosome. Replication studies on this patient show that the derivative t(X;5) chromosome is late replicating in almost all cells examined, which indicates that this chromosome is preferentially inactivated. However, the translocated segment of chromosome 5 appears to be early replicating, which implies that the trisomic 5q segment is transcriptionally active. We cannot determine from these studies whether all or only some genes in this segment are expressed, but this patient's relatively mild clinical signs suggest that the critical region(s) that contribute to the distal 5q trisomy phenotype are at least partly suppressed. A review of other patients with X-chromosome translocations indicates that many but not all of them also have attenuated phenotypes. The mechanism of inactivation of autosomal material attached to the X chromosome is complex, with varying effects on the phenotype of the

  2. Amenorréia e anormalidades do cromossomo X Amenorrhea and X chromosome abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Fabiano Machado Rosa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: correlacionar as manifestações clínicas de pacientes com amenorréia e anormalidades do cromossomo X. MÉTODOS: realizou-se uma análise retrospectiva dos achados clínicos e laboratoriais das pacientes com amenorréia e anormalidades do cromossomo X, atendidas entre janeiro de 1975 e novembro de 2007. Suas medidas antropométricas foram avaliadas através de tabelas de crescimento padrão, sendo que, quando presentes, dismorfias menores e maiores foram anotadas. O estudo dos cromossomos foi realizado através do cariótipo com bandamento GTG. RESULTADOS: do total de 141 pacientes com amenorréia, 16% apresentavam anormalidades numéricas e 13% estruturais do cromossomo X. Destas pacientes com anormalidade do X (n=41, 35 possuíam descrição clínica completa. Todas elas apresentavam hipogonadismo hipergonadotrófico. Amenorréia primária foi observada em 24 pacientes, das quais 91,7% com fenótipo de síndrome de Turner. Com exceção de um caso com deleção Xq22-q28, todas as demais pacientes com este fenótipo apresentavam alterações envolvendo Xp (uma com uma linhagem 46,XY associada. Os dois casos restantes com apenas amenorréia primária possuíam deleções proximais de Xq. Entre as 11 pacientes com amenorréia secundária, 54,5% apresentavam fenótipo de Turner (todas com monossomia do X isolada ou em mosaico. Entre aquelas com fenótipo de falência ovariana isolada observaram-se somente deleções Xq e trissomia do X. CONCLUSÕES: a análise cromossômica deve sempre ser realizada em mulheres com falência ovariana de causa não conhecida, mesmo na ausência de achados dismórficos. Esta também é de extrema importância em pacientes sindrômicas, pois, além de confirmar o diagnóstico, é capaz de identificar pacientes em risco, como nos casos com uma linhagem 46,XY.PURPOSE: to correlate the clinical manifestations of patients with amenorrhea and X chromosome abnormalities. METHODS: a retrospective analysis of the

  3. X chromosome array-CGH for the identification of novel X-linked mental retardation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijke; Van Esch, Hilde; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Array-CGH technology for the detection of submicroscopic copy number changes in the genome has recently been developed for the identification of novel disease-associated genes. It has been estimated that submicroscopic genomic deletions or duplications will be present in 5-7% of patients with idiopathic mental retardation (MR). Since 30% more males than females are diagnosed with MR, we have developed a full coverage X chromosome array-CGH with a theoretical resolution of 82 kb, for the detection of copy number alterations in patients with suspected X-linked mental retardation (XLMR). First, we have validated the genomic location of X-derived clones through male versus female hybridisations. Next, we validated our array for efficient and reproducible detection of known alterations in XLMR patients. In all cases, we were able to detect the deletions and duplications in males as well as females. Due to the high resolution of our X-array, the boundaries of the genomic aberrations could clearly be identified making genotype-phenotype studies more reliable. Here, we describe the production and validation of a full coverage X-array-CGH, which will allow for fast and easy screening of submicroscopic copy number alterations in XLMR patients with the aim to identify novel MR genes or mechanisms involved in a deranged cognitive development.

  4. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34+ cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and ∼40

  5. Transmission of clonal chromosomal abnormalities in human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells surviving radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Daniela, E-mail: d.kraft@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Ritter, Sylvia, E-mail: s.ritter@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco, E-mail: m.durante@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Physics Department, Technical University Darmstadt, Hochschulstraße 6-8, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Seifried, Erhard, E-mail: e.seifried@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Fournier, Claudia, E-mail: c.fournier@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Department of Biophysics, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tonn, Torsten, E-mail: t.tonn@blutspende.de [Institute for Transfusion Medicine und Immunohematology, DRK-Blutspendedienst Baden-Wuerttemberg—Hessen, Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University Hospital, Sandhofstrasse 1, 60528 Frankfurt (Germany); Technische Universität Dresden, Med. Fakultät Carl Gustav Carus, Institute for Transfusion Medicine Dresden, German Red Cross Blood Donation Service North-East, Blasewitzer Straße 68/70, 01307 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiation induced formation and transmission of chromosomal aberrations were assessed. • Cytogenetic analysis was performed in human CD34+ HSPC by mFISH. • We report transmission of stable aberrations in irradiated, clonally expanded HSPC. • Unstable aberrations in clonally expanded HSPC occur independently of irradiation. • Carbon ions and X-rays bear a similar risk for propagation of cytogenetic changes. - Abstract: In radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemia (rAML), clonal chromosomal abnormalities are often observed in bone marrow cells of patients, suggesting that their formation is crucial in the development of the disease. Since rAML is considered to originate from hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC), we investigated the frequency and spectrum of radiation-induced chromosomal abnormalities in human CD34{sup +} cells. We then measured stable chromosomal abnormalities, a possible biomarker of leukemia risk, in clonally expanded cell populations which were grown for 14 days in a 3D-matrix (CFU-assay). We compared two radiation qualities used in radiotherapy, sparsely ionizing X-rays and densely ionizing carbon ions (29 and 60–85 keV/μm, doses between 0.5 and 4 Gy). Only a negligible number of de novo arising, unstable aberrations (≤0.05 aberrations/cell, 97% breaks) were measured in the descendants of irradiated HSPC. However, stable aberrations were detected in colonies formed by irradiated HSPC. All cells of the affected colonies exhibited one or more identical aberrations, indicating their clonal origin. The majority of the clonal rearrangements (92%) were simple exchanges such as translocations (77%) and pericentric inversions (15%), which are known to contribute to the development of rAML. Carbon ions were more efficient in inducing cell killing (maximum of ∼30–35% apoptotic cells for 2 Gy carbon ions compared to ∼25% for X-rays) and chromosomal aberrations in the first cell-cycle after exposure (∼70% and

  6. Unique Case Reports Associated with Ovarian Failure: Necessity of Two Intact X Chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi Rao Kandukuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature ovarian failure is defined as the loss of functional follicles below the age of 40 years and the incidence of this abnormality is 0.1% among the 30–40 years age group. Unexplained POF is clinically recognized as amenorrhoea (>6 months with low level of oestrogen and raised level of Luteinizing Hormone (LH and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH > 20 IU/l occurring before the age of 40. It has been studied earlier that chromosomal defects can impair ovarian development and its function. Since there is paucity of data on chromosomal defects in Indian women, an attempt is made to carry out cytogenetic evaluation in patients with ovarian failure. Cytogenetic analysis of women with ovarian defects revealed the chromosome abnormalities to be associated with 14% of the cases analyzed. Interestingly, majority of the abnormalities involved the X-chromosome and we report two unique abnormalities, (46,XXdel(Xq21-22 and q28 and (mos,45XO/46,X+ringX involving X chromosome in association with ovarian failure. This study revealed novel X chromosome abnormalities associated with ovarian defects and these observations would be helpful in genetic counseling and apart from, infertility clinics using the information to decide suitable strategies to help such patients.

  7. Radiation-induced chromosome damage in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis for chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been developed as an indicator of dose from ionising radiation. An outline is given of the mechanism of production of aberrations, the technique for their analysis and the dose-effect relationships for various types of radiation. During the past ten years the National Radiological Protection Board has developed a service for the UK in which estimates of dose from chromosomes aberration analysis are made on people known or suspected of being accidentally over-exposed. This service can provide estimates where no physical dosemeter was worn and is frequently able to resolve anomalous or disputed data from routine film badges. Several problems in the interpretation of chromosome aberration yields are reviewed. These include the effects of partial body irradiation and the response to variations in dose rate and the intermittent nature of some exposures. The dosimetry service is supported by a research programme which includes surveys of groups of patients irradiated for medical purposes. Two surveys are described. In the first, lymphocyte aberrations were examined in rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving intra-articular injections of colloidal radiogold or radioyttrium. A proportion of the nuclide leaked from the joint into the regional lymphatic system. In the second survey a comparison was made between the cytogenetic and physical estimates of whole body dose in patients receiving iodine 131 for thyroid carcinoma. (author)

  8. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, Fa-Ten.

    1992-08-01

    During the grant period progress has been made in the successful demonstration of regional mapping of microclones derived from microdissection libraries; successful demonstration of the feasibility of converting microclones with short inserts into yeast artificial chromosome clones with very large inserts for high resolution physical mapping of the dissected region; Successful demonstration of the usefulness of region-specific microclones to isolate region-specific cDNA clones as candidate genes to facilitate search for the crucial genes underlying genetic diseases assigned to the dissected region; and the successful construction of four region-specific microdissection libraries for human chromosome 2, including 2q35-q37, 2q33-q35, 2p23-p25 and 2p2l-p23. The 2q35-q37 library has been characterized in detail. The characterization of the other three libraries is in progress. These region-specific microdissection libraries and the unique sequence microclones derived from the libraries will be valuable resources for investigators engaged in high resolution physical mapping and isolation of disease-related genes residing in these chromosomal regions.

  9. Transillumination spatially modulated illumination microscopy for human chromosome imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitris, Costas; Heracleous, Peter; Patsalis, Philippos

    2005-03-01

    Human chromosome analysis is an essential task in cytogenetics, especially in prenatal screening, genetic syndrome diagnosis, cancer pathology research and mutagen dosimetry. Chromosomal analysis begins with the creation of a karyotype, which is a layout of chromosome images organized by decreasing size in pairs. Both manual and automatic classification of chromosomes are limited by the resolution of the microscope and imaging system used. One way to improve the results of classification and even detect subtleties now remaining undetected, is to enhance the resolution of the images. It is possible to achieve lateral resolution beyond the classical limit, by using spatially modulated illumination (SMI) in a wide-field, non-confocal microscope. In this case, the sample is illuminated with spatially modulated light, which makes normally inaccessible high-resolution information visible in the observed image by shifting higher frequencies within the OTF limits of the microscope. Although, SMI microscopes have been reported in the past, this manuscript reports the development of a transillumination microscope for opaque, non-fluorescent samples. The illumination path consisted of a light source illuminating a ruled grating which was subsequently imaged on the sample. The grating was mounted on a rotating and translating stage so that the magnification and rotation of the pattern could be adjusted. The imaging lens was a 1.25 NA oil immersion objective. Test samples showed resolution improvement, as judged from a comparison of the experimentally obtained FWHM. Further studies using smaller fringe distance or laser interference pattern illumination will be evaluated to further optimize the SMI results.

  10. Progress towards construction of a total restriction fragment map of a human chromosome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Vissing; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E. Solomon; G. Moore; N. Lench; N. Shennan; R. Williamson

    1987-01-01

    textabstractWe present an approach to the construction of an overlapping restriction fragment map of a single human chromosome. A genomic cosmid library genome was constructed from a mouse-human hybrid cell line containing chromosome 17 as its only human genetic component. Cosmids containing human i

  11. A Cmv2 QTL on chromosome X affects MCMV resistance in New Zealand male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Marisela R; Lundgren, Alyssa; Sabastian, Pearl; Li, Qian; Churchill, Gary; Brown, Michael G

    2009-07-01

    NK cell-mediated resistance to viruses is subject to genetic control in humans and mice. Here we used classical and quantitative genetic strategies to examine NK-mediated murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) control in genealogically related New Zealand white (NZW) and black (NZB) mice. NZW mice display NK cell-dependent MCMV resistance while NZB NK cells fail to limit viral replication after infection. Unlike Ly49H(+) NK resistance in C57BL/6 mice, NZW NK-mediated MCMV control was Ly49H-independent. Instead, MCMV resistance in NZW (Cmv2) involves multiple genetic factors. To establish the genetic basis of Cmv2 resistance, we further characterized a major chromosome X-linked resistance locus (DXMit216) responsible for innate MCMV control in NZW x NZB crosses. We found that the DXMit216 locus affects early MCMV control in New Zealand F(2) crosses and demonstrate that the NZB-derived DXMit216 allele enhances viral resistance in F(2) males. The evolutionary conservation of the DXMit216 region in mice and humans suggests that a Cmv2-related mechanism may affect human antiviral responses.

  12. Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6: questions and answers

    OpenAIRE

    Pellett, Philip E.; Ablashi, Dharam V.; Ambros, Peter F.; Agut, Henri; Caserta, Mary T.; Descamps, Vincent; Flamand, Louis; Gautheret-Dejean, Agnès; Hall, Caroline B.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Kuehl, Uwe; Lassner, Dirk; Lautenschlager, Irmeli; Loomis, Kristin S.; Luppi, Mario

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus 6 (ciHHV-6) is a condition in which the complete HHV-6 genome is integrated into the host germ line genome and is vertically transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The condition is found in less than 1% of controls in the USA and UK, but has been found at a somewhat higher prevalence in transplant recipients and other patient populations in several small studies. HHV-6 levels in whole blood that exceed 5.5 log10 copies/ml are strongly suggestive ...

  13. Inter- and Intraspecies Phylogenetic Analyses Reveal Extensive X–Y Gene Conversion in the Evolution of Gametologous Sequences of Human Sex Chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Trombetta, Beniamino; Sellitto, Daniele; Scozzari, Rosaria; Cruciani, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    It has long been believed that the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) is genetically independent from the X chromosome. This idea has been recently dismissed due to the discovery that X-Y gametologous gene conversion may occur. However, the pervasiveness of this molecular process in the evolution of sex chromosomes has yet to be exhaustively analyzed. In this study, we explored how pervasive X-Y gene conversion has been during the evolution of the youngest stratum of the hum...

  14. No severe and global X chromosome inactivation in meiotic male germline of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhaylova Lyudmila M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article is a response to Vibranovski et al. See correspondence article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/49 and the original research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/9/29 We have previously reported a high propensity of testis-expressed X-linked genes to activation in meiotic cells, a similarity in global gene expression between the X chromosome and autosomes in meiotic germline, and under-representation of various types of tissue-specific genes on the X chromosome. Based on our findings and a critical review of the current literature, we believe that there is no global and severe silencing of the X chromosome in the meiotic male germline of Drosophila. The term 'meiotic sex chromosome inactivation' (MSCI therefore seems misleading when used to describe the minor underexpression of the X chromosome in the testis of Drosophila, because this term erroneously implies a profound and widespread silencing of the X-linked genes, by analogy to the well-studied MSCI system in mammals, and therefore distracts from identification and analysis of the real mechanisms that orchestrate gene expression and evolution in this species.

  15. Tissue-specific differences in the spatial interposition of X-chromosome and 3R chromosome regions in the malaria mosquito Anopheles messeae Fall.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Artemov

    Full Text Available Spatial organization of a chromosome in a nucleus is very important in biology but many aspects of it are still generally unresolved. We focused on tissue-specific features of chromosome architecture in closely related malaria mosquitoes, which have essential inter-specific differences in polytene chromosome attachments in nurse cells. We showed that the region responsible for X-chromosome attachment interacts with nuclear lamina stronger in nurse cells, then in salivary glands cells in Anopheles messeae Fall. The inter-tissue differences were demonstrated more convincingly in an experiment of two distinct chromosomes interposition in the nucleus space of cells from four tissues. Microdissected DNA-probes from nurse cells X-chromosome (2BC and 3R chromosomes (32D attachment regions were hybridized with intact nuclei of nurse cells, salivary gland cells, follicle epithelium cells and imaginal disсs cells in 3D-FISH experiments. We showed that only salivary gland cells and follicle epithelium cells have no statistical differences in the interposition of 2BC and 32D. Generally, the X-chromosome and 3R chromosome are located closer to each other in cells of the somatic system in comparison with nurse cells on average. The imaginal disсs cell nuclei have an intermediate arrangement of chromosome interposition, similar to other somatic cells and nurse cells. In spite of species-specific chromosome attachments there are no differences in interposition of nurse cells chromosomes in An. messeae and An. atroparvus Thiel. Nurse cells have an unusual chromosome arrangement without a chromocenter, which could be due to the special mission of generative system cells in ontogenesis and evolution.

  16. Cultivation and differentiation change nuclear localization of chromosome centromeres in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana I Voldgorn

    Full Text Available Chromosome arrangement in the interphase nucleus is not accidental. Strong evidences support that nuclear localization is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The purpose of this research was to identify differences in the localization of centromeres of chromosomes 6, 12, 18 and X in human mesenchymal stem cells depending on differentiation and cultivating time. We analyzed centromere positions in more than 4000 nuclei in 19 mesenchymal stem cell cultures before and after prolonged cultivation and after differentiation into osteogenic and adipogenic directions. We found a centromere reposition of HSAX at late passages and after differentiation in osteogenic direction as well as of HSA12 and HSA18 after adipogenic differentiation. The observed changes of the nuclear structure are new nuclear characteristics of the studied cells which may reflect regulatory changes of gene expression during the studied processes.

  17. Quantitative genetics of CTCF binding reveal local sequence effects and different modes of X-chromosome association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihao Ding

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Associating genetic variation with quantitative measures of gene regulation offers a way to bridge the gap between genotype and complex phenotypes. In order to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs that influence the binding of a transcription factor in humans, we measured binding of the multifunctional transcription and chromatin factor CTCF in 51 HapMap cell lines. We identified thousands of QTLs in which genotype differences were associated with differences in CTCF binding strength, hundreds of them confirmed by directly observable allele-specific binding bias. The majority of QTLs were either within 1 kb of the CTCF binding motif, or in linkage disequilibrium with a variant within 1 kb of the motif. On the X chromosome we observed three classes of binding sites: a minority class bound only to the active copy of the X chromosome, the majority class bound to both the active and inactive X, and a small set of female-specific CTCF sites associated with two non-coding RNA genes. In sum, our data reveal extensive genetic effects on CTCF binding, both direct and indirect, and identify a diversity of patterns of CTCF binding on the X chromosome.

  18. The mouse and human excitatory amino acid transporter gene (EAAT1) maps to mouse chromosome 15 and a region of syntenic homology on human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschner, M.A.; Arriza, J.L.; Amara, S.G. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    The gene for human excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT1) was localized to the distal region of human chromosome 5p13 by in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosome spreads. Interspecific backcross analysis identified the mouse Eaat1 locus in a region of 5p13 homology on mouse chromosome 15. Markers that are linked with EAAT1 on both human and mouse chromosomes include the receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, interleukin-7, and prolactin. The Eaat1 locus appears not be linked to the epilepsy mutant stg locus, which is also on chromosome 15. The EAAT1 locus is located in a region of 5p deletions that have been associated with mental retardation and microcephaly. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  19. A molecularly defined duplication set for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venken, Koen J. T.; Popodi, Ellen; Holtzman, Stacy L.; Schulze, Karen L.; Park, Soo; Carlson, Joseph W.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Kaufman, Thomas C.

    2010-07-22

    We describe a molecularly defined duplication kit for the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. A set of 408 overlapping P[acman] BAC clones was used to create small duplications (average length 88 kb) covering the 22-Mb sequenced portion of the chromosome. The BAC clones were inserted into an attP docking site on chromosome 3L using C31 integrase, allowing direct comparison of different transgenes. The insertions complement 92% of the essential and viable mutations and deletions tested, demonstrating that almost all Drosophila genes are compact and that the current annotations of the genome are reasonably accurate. Moreover, almost all genes are tolerated at twice the normal dosage. Finally, we more precisely mapped two regions at which duplications cause diplo-lethality in males. This collection comprises the first molecularly defined duplication set to cover a whole chromosome in a multicellular organism. The work presented removes a long-standing barrier to genetic analysis of the Drosophila X chromosome, will greatly facilitate functional assays of X-linked genes in vivo, and provides a model for functional analyses of entire chromosomes in other species.

  20. Detection of Selection Signatures on the X Chromosome in Three Sheep Breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiye Zhu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Artificial selection has played a critical role in animal breeding. Detection of artificial selection footprints in genomic regions can provide insights for understanding the function of specific phenotypic traits and better guide animal breeding. To more fully understand the relationship between genomic composition and phenotypic diversity arising from breed development, a genome-wide scan was conducted using an OvineSNP50 BeadChip and integrated haplotype score and fixation index analyses to detect selection signatures on the X chromosome in three sheep breeds. We identified 49, 34, and 55 candidate selection regions with lengths of 27.49, 16.47, and 25.42 Mb in German Mutton, Dorper, and Sunit sheep, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that some of the genes in these regions with selection signatures, such as BMP15, were relevant to reproduction. We also identified some selection regions harboring genes that had human orthologs, including BKT, CENPI, GUCY2F, MSN, PCDH11X, PLP1, VSIG4, PAK3, WAS, PCDH19, PDHA1, and SRPX2. The VSIG4 and PCDH11X genes are associated with the immune system and disease, PDHA1 is associated with biosynthetic related pathways, and PCDH19 is expressed in the nervous system and skin. These genes may be useful as candidate genes for molecular breeding.

  1. Detection of Selection Signatures on the X Chromosome in Three Sheep Breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Caiye; Fan, Hongying; Yuan, Zehu; Hu, Shijin; Zhang, Li; Wei, Caihong; Zhang, Qin; Zhao, Fuping; Du, Lixin

    2015-08-28

    Artificial selection has played a critical role in animal breeding. Detection of artificial selection footprints in genomic regions can provide insights for understanding the function of specific phenotypic traits and better guide animal breeding. To more fully understand the relationship between genomic composition and phenotypic diversity arising from breed development, a genome-wide scan was conducted using an OvineSNP50 BeadChip and integrated haplotype score and fixation index analyses to detect selection signatures on the X chromosome in three sheep breeds. We identified 49, 34, and 55 candidate selection regions with lengths of 27.49, 16.47, and 25.42 Mb in German Mutton, Dorper, and Sunit sheep, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis showed that some of the genes in these regions with selection signatures, such as BMP15, were relevant to reproduction. We also identified some selection regions harboring genes that had human orthologs, including BKT, CENPI, GUCY2F, MSN, PCDH11X, PLP1, VSIG4, PAK3, WAS, PCDH19, PDHA1, and SRPX2. The VSIG4 and PCDH11X genes are associated with the immune system and disease, PDHA1 is associated with biosynthetic related pathways, and PCDH19 is expressed in the nervous system and skin. These genes may be useful as candidate genes for molecular breeding.

  2. Tissue- and stage-dependent dosage compensation on the Neo-X chromosome in drosophila pseudoobscura

    KAUST Repository

    Nozawa, Masafumi

    2013-12-03

    Sex chromosome dosage compensation (DC) is widely accepted in various organisms. This concept is mostly supported by comparisons of gene expression between chromosomes and between sexes. However, genes on the X chromosome and autosomes are mostly not homologous, and the average gene expression level on these chromosomes may not be the same even under DC, which complicates comparisons between chromosomes. Many genes with sex-biased expression also make comparisons between sexes difficult. To overcome these issues, we investigated DC by comparing the expression of neo-X-linked genes in Drosophila pseudoobscura with those of their autosomal orthologs in other Drosophila species. The ratio of the former to the latter in males would be 1 under DC, whereas it becomes 0.5 without DC. We found that the ratio was ∼0.85 for adult whole bodies, indicating that the DC is incomplete on the neo-X chromosome in adults as a whole. The ratio (∼0.90) was also significantly less than 1 for adult bodies without gonads, whereas it was ∼1.0 for adult heads. These results indicate that DC varies among tissues. Our sliding-window analysis of the ratio also revealed that the upregulation of neo-X-linked genes in males occurred chromosome wide in all tissues analyzed, indicating global upregulation mechanisms. However, we found that gene functions also affected the levels of DC. Furthermore, most of the genes recently moved to the X were already under DC at the larval stage but not at the adult stage. These results suggest that DC in Drosophila species operates in a tissue/stage-dependent manner. © 2013 The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved.

  3. "Mitochondrial Eve", "Y Chromosome Adam", testosterone, and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    I suggest primate evolution began as a consequence of increased testosterone in males which increased aggression and sexuality, therefore, reproduction and success. With time, negative effects of excessive testosterone reduced spermatogenesis and started a decline of the group. Approximately 30-40 million years ago, the gene DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) appeared on the Y chromosome, increased spermatogenesis, and rescued the early primates from extinction. (Note: DAZ is considered by some to specifically, positively affect spermatogenesis; others suggest it has no effect on spermatogenesis.) Hominid evolution continued with increasing testosterone. The advent of increased testosterone in females of Homo erectus (or Homo ergaster) increased the female-to-male body size ratio, and eventually produced another era of excessive testosterone. Excessive testosterone caused a reduction in population size (bottleneck) that produced the "Mitochondrial Eve" (ME) mechanism. (Only certain females continued during the bottleneck to transmit their mitochondrial DNA.) That is, the ME mechanism culminated, again, in excessive testosterone and reduced spermatogenesis in the hominid line. Approximately 50,000 to 200,000 years ago, a "doubling" of the DAZ gene occurred on the Y chromosome in hominid males which rescued the hominid line with increased spermatogenesis in certain males. This produced the "Y Chromosome Adam" event. The doubling of DAZ allowed further increases in testosterone in hominids that resulted in the increased size and development of the brain. Modern humans periodically fluctuate between the positive and negative consequences of increased levels of testosterone, currently identifiable as the secular trend, increased infections, and reduced spermatogenesis. PMID:12449688

  4. Genetic dosage and position effect of small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) in human sperm nuclei in infertile male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska, Marta; Wanowska, Elzbieta; Kishore, Archana; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Georgiadis, Andrew P; Yatsenko, Alexander N; Mikula, Mariya; Zastavna, Danuta; Wiland, Ewa; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-11-30

    Chromosomes occupy specific distinct areas in the nucleus of the sperm cell that may be altered in males with disrupted spermatogenesis. Here, we present alterations in the positioning of the human chromosomes 15, 18, X and Y between spermatozoa with the small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC; sSMC(+)) and spermatozoa with normal chromosome complement (sSMC(-)), for the first time described in the same ejaculate of an infertile, phenotypically normal male patient. Using classical and confocal fluorescent microscopy, the nuclear colocalization of chromosomes 15 and sSMC was analyzed. The molecular cytogenetic characteristics of sSMC delineated the karyotype as 47,XY,+der(15)(pter->p11.2::q11.1->q11.2::p11.2->pter)mat. Analysis of meiotic segregation showed a 1:1 ratio of sSMC(+) to sSMC(-) spermatozoa, while evaluation of sperm aneuploidy status indicated an increased level of chromosome 13, 18, 21 and 22 disomy, up to 7 × (2.7 - 15.1). Sperm chromatin integrity assessment did not reveal any increase in deprotamination in the patient's sperm chromatin. Importantly, we found significant repositioning of chromosomes X and Y towards the nuclear periphery, where both chromosomes were localized in close proximity to the sSMC. This suggests the possible influence of sSMC/XY colocalization on meiotic chromosome division, resulting in abnormal chromosome segregation, and leading to male infertility in the patient.

  5. Housekeeping gene on the X chromosome encodes a protein similar to ubiquitin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X chromosome gene located 40 kilobases downstream from the G6PD gene, at Xq28, was isolated and sequenced. This gene, which the authors named GdX, spans about 3.5 kilobases of genomic DNA. GdX is a single-copy gene, is conserved in evolution, and has the features of a housekeeping gene. At its 5' end, a cluster of CpG dinucleotides is methylated on the inactive X chromosome and unmethylated on the active X chromosome. The GdX gene can code for a 157 amino acid protein, GdX. Residues 1-74 of GdX show 43% identity to ubiquitin, a highly conserved 76 amino acid protein. The COOH-terminal moiety of GdX is characterized in its central part (residues 110-128) by a sequence homologous to the COOH-terminal hormonogenic site of thyroglobulin. The structural organization of the GdX protein suggests the existence of a family of genes, in addition to the ubiquitin gene, that could play specific roles in key cellular processes, possible through protein-protein recognition

  6. Two progenitor cells for human oogonia inferred from pedigree data and the X-inactivation imprinting model of the fragile-X syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Laird, C D; Lamb, M M; Thorne, J L

    1990-01-01

    Laird has proposed that the human fragile-X syndrome is caused by abnormal chromosome imprinting. The analysis presented here supports and extends this proposal. Using published pedigrees that include DNA polymorphism (RFLP) data, we establish that the states of the fragile-X mutation termed "imprinted" and "nonimprinted" usually can be distinguished by the level of cytogenetic expression of the fragile-X chromosome. This information is then used to assess the state of the fragile-X allele in...

  7. Pattern of X-Y chromosome pairing in the Taiwan vole, Microtus kikuchii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekada, K; Harada, M; Lin, L K; Koyasu, K; Borodin, P M; Oda, S I

    2001-02-01

    Pairing of X and Y chromosomes at meiotic prophase and the G- and C-banding patterns and nucleolar organizer region (NOR) distribution were analyzed in Microtus kikuchii. M. kikuchii is closely related to M. oeconomus and M. montebelli, karyologically and systematically. The formation of a synaptonemal complex between the X and Y chromosomes at pachytene and end-to-end association at diakinesis--metaphase I are only observed in three species in the genus Microtus; M. kikuchii, M. oeconomus, and M. montebelli. All the other species that have been studied so far have had asynaptic X-Y chromosomes. These data confirm that M. kikuchii, M. oeconomus, and M. montebelli are very closely related, and support the separation of asynaptic and synaptic groups on the phylogenetic tree.

  8. High resistance of fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos to cell killing and chromosome aberrations by X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) is known to be one of the most radioresistant animal species. In order to determine whether there is any correlation between mortality of mammals exposed to γ- or X-rays and radiation sensitivity of culture cells derived from different mammalian species, we have examined the X-ray survival curves of normal diploid fibroblasts from Mongolian gerbil embryos and compared with those of other cultured embryo cells from various laboratory animals and normal human. There was a big difference in cell survival to X-rays among different mammalian species. The D0 values of Mongolian gerbil cells ranged from 2.3 to 2.6 Gy which are twice as high as those of human cells. The mean D0 value of human cells was 1.1 Gy. Mouse, rat, Chinese hamster and Syrian/golden hamster cells showed similar D0 values ranging from 1.7 to 2.0 Gy. When cells were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays, three times longer mitotic delay was observed in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells. At this X-ray dose, furthermore, ten times more chromosome aberrations were detected in human cells than in Mongolian gerbil cells, and the frequencies of other rodent cells lay between the values for the two cell strains. These data indicate that the Mongolian gerbil cells are resistant to X-ray-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations, and that radiation sensitivity of primarily cultured mammalian cells may be reflected by their radioresistance in vivo. (author)

  9. Micronuclei versus Chromosomal Aberrations Induced by X-Ray in Radiosensitive Mammalian Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Plamadeala

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was accomplished to compare estimation methods of ionizing radiations genotoxicity in mammalian cell cultures by means of two cytogenetic parameters with focus on aberrant cells characterized by multiple chromosomal damages.In vitro study was carried out on the genotoxicity of low-medium doses of 190 kV X-rays absorbed in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures. Micronuclei and ten types of chromosomal aberrations were identified with Giemsa dying and optical microscope screening.The first parameter consisting in micronuclei relative frequency has led to higher linear correlation coefficient than the second one consistent with chromosomal aberrations relative frequency. However, the latter parameter estimated as the sum of all chromosomal aberrations appeared to be more sensitive to radiation dose increasing in the studied dose range, from 0 to 3 Gy. The number of micronuclei occurring simultaneously in a single cell was not higher than 3, while the number of chromosomal aberrations observed in the same cell reached the value of 5 for doses over 1 Gy.Polynomial dose-response curves were evidenced for cells with Ni micronuclei (i=1,3 while non-monotonic curves were evidenced through detailed analysis of aberrant cells with Ni chromosomal changes [Formula: see text] - in concordance with in vitro studies from literature. The investigation could be important for public health issues where micronucleus screening is routinely applied but also for research purposes where various chromosomal aberrations could be of particular interest.

  10. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Geographic structure in Gran Chaco Amerindians based on five X-chromosome STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanesi, Cecilia I; Martina, Pablo F; Giovambattista, Guillermo; Zukas, Pedro; Vidal-Rioja, Lidia

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the genetic differentiation of five X-chromosome STR markers among five native South American Amerindian populations inhabiting three different areas of the Gran Chaco: Mocoví, Chorote, Wichí, Lengua, and Ayoreo. The observed genetic structure showed correspondence with geographic distribution more clearly than previous information obtained from autosomal STRs for the same samples. On the other hand, X-chromosome STR data did not agree with linguistic affinities. These markers proved to be informative for the study of the native populations of the Gran Chaco region. PMID:18075009

  12. Cell-autonomous correction of ring chromosomes in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershteyn, Marina; Hayashi, Yohei; Desachy, Guillaume; Hsiao, Edward C.; Sami, Salma; Tsang, Kathryn M.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Yamanaka, Shinya; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2014-03-01

    Ring chromosomes are structural aberrations commonly associated with birth defects, mental disabilities and growth retardation. Rings form after fusion of the long and short arms of a chromosome, and are sometimes associated with large terminal deletions. Owing to the severity of these large aberrations that can affect multiple contiguous genes, no possible therapeutic strategies for ring chromosome disorders have been proposed. During cell division, ring chromosomes can exhibit unstable behaviour leading to continuous production of aneuploid progeny with low viability and high cellular death rate. The overall consequences of this chromosomal instability have been largely unexplored in experimental model systems. Here we generated human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from patient fibroblasts containing ring chromosomes with large deletions and found that reprogrammed cells lost the abnormal chromosome and duplicated the wild-type homologue through the compensatory uniparental disomy (UPD) mechanism. The karyotypically normal iPSCs with isodisomy for the corrected chromosome outgrew co-existing aneuploid populations, enabling rapid and efficient isolation of patient-derived iPSCs devoid of the original chromosomal aberration. Our results suggest a fundamentally different function for cellular reprogramming as a means of `chromosome therapy' to reverse combined loss-of-function across many genes in cells with large-scale aberrations involving ring structures. In addition, our work provides an experimentally tractable human cellular system for studying mechanisms of chromosomal number control, which is of critical relevance to human development and disease.

  13. Y chromosome specific probes identify breakpoint in a 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(pter----q11.1:) karyotype of an infertile male.

    OpenAIRE

    Beverstock, G C; Macfarlane, J D; Veenema, H; Hoekman, H; Goodfellow, P J

    1989-01-01

    An infertile male patient with a 45,X peripheral blood karyotype and a 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(pter----q11.1:) mosaic skin fibroblast karyotype is described. Steroid sulphatase (STS) activity was normal. Recombinant DNA studies using Y chromosome specific probes suggest that almost the entire long arm of the Y chromosome is deleted.

  14. Four distinct alpha satellite subfamilies shared by human chromosomes 13, 14 and 21.

    OpenAIRE

    Vissel, B; Choo, K H

    1991-01-01

    We describe the characterisation of four alpha satellite sequences which are found on a subset of the human acrocentric chromosomes. Direct sequence study, and analysis of somatic cell hybrids carrying specific human chromosomes indicate a unique 'higher-order structure' for each of the four sequences, suggesting that they belong to different subfamilies of alpha DNA. Under very high stringency of Southern hybridisation conditions, all four subfamilies were detected on chromosomes 13, 14 and ...

  15. Evaluating the Y chromosomal timescale in human demographic and lineage dating

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chuan-Chao; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Y chromosome is a superb tool for inferring human evolution and recent demographic history from a paternal perspective. However, Y chromosomal substitution rates obtained using different modes of calibration vary considerably, and have produced disparate reconstructions of human history. Here, we discuss how substitution rate and date estimates are affected by the choice of different calibration points. We argue that most Y chromosomal substitution rates calculated to date have shortcomings, ...

  16. Human artificial chromosomes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and beyond: challenges and hopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tedesco, F. S.

    2015-01-01

    Safe and efficacious vectors able to carry large or several transgenes are of key importance for gene therapy. Human artificial chromosomes can fulfil this essential requirement; moreover, they do not integrate into the host genome. However, drawbacks such as the low efficiency of chromosome transfer and their relatively complex engineering still limit their widespread use. In this article, I summarise the key steps that brought human artificial chromosomes into preclinical research for Duche...

  17. Complementation of a DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells by transfer of human chromosome 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complementation of the repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of complementation group A was achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 9. A set of mouse-human hybrid cell lines, each containing a single Ecogpt-marked human chromosome, was used as a source of donor chromosomes. Chromosome transfer to XPTG-1 cells, a hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mutant of simian virus 40-transformed complementation group A cells, was achieved by microcell fusion and selection for Ecogpt. Chromosome-transfer clones of XPTG-1 cells, each containing a different human donor chromosome, were analyzed for complementation of sensitivity to UV irradiation. Among all the clones, increased levels of resistance to UV was observed only in clones containing chromosome 9. Since our recipient cell line XPTG-1 is hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase deficient, cultivation of Ecogpt+ clones in medium containing 6-thioguanine permits selection of cells for loss of the marker and, by inference, transferred chromosome 9. Clones isolated for growth in 6-thioguanine, which have lost the Ecogpt-marked chromosome, exhibited a UV-sensitive phenotype, confirming the presence of the repair gene(s) for complementation group A on chromosome 9

  18. Chromosomal localization of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene to human chromosome 4q13. 1-q21. 1 and mouse chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, U.B.; Dushkin, H.; Beier, D.R.; Chin, W.W. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)); Altherr, M.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1994-04-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GRHR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor on the cell surface of pituitary gonadotropes, where it serves to transduce signals from the extracellular ligand, the hypothalamic factor gonadotropin-releasing hormone, and to modulate the synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. The authors have localized the GRHR gene to the q13.1-q21.1 region of the human chromosome 4 using mapping panels of human/rodent somatic cell hybrids containing different human chromosomes or different regions of human chromosome 4. Furthermore, using linkage analysis of single-strand conformational polymorphisms, the murine GRHR gene was localized to mouse chromosome 5, linked to the endogenous retroviral marker Pmv-11. This is consistent with the evolutionary conservation of homology between these two regions, as has been previously suggested from comparative mapping of several other loci. The localization of the GRHR gene may be useful in the study of disorders of reproduction. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Molecular characterization of X chromosome fragility in idiopathic mental retardation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Alla Hosny Omar

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: A simplified checklist of fragile X should be used for patients with idiopathic MR and those patients above score 3 should be tested for FXS. The diagnostic assay may be used as a screening method for fragile X syndrome being rapid and cost effective compared to other techniques. In addition, screening of all relatives of proven patients should be performed to detect clinically unidentified cases for provision of proper counseling and optimal management of detected cases.

  20. A role for Aurora C in the chromosomal passenger complex during human preimplantation embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santos, Margarida Avo; van de Werken, Christine; de Vries, Marieke; Jahr, Holger; Vromans, Martijn J. M.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Fauser, Bart C.; Kops, Geert J.; Lens, Susanne M.; Baart, Esther B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human embryos generated by IVF demonstrate a high incidence of chromosomal segregation errors during the cleavage divisions. To analyse underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the behaviour of the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC) in human oocytes and embryos. This important m

  1. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    1995-01-01

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  2. Chromosomal clustering of a human transcriptome reveals regulatory background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purmann Antje

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been much evidence recently for a link between transcriptional regulation and chromosomal gene order, but the relationship between genomic organization, regulation and gene function in higher eukaryotes remains to be precisely defined. Results Here, we present evidence for organization of a large proportion of a human transcriptome into gene clusters throughout the genome, which are partly regulated by the same transcription factors, share biological functions and are characterized by non-housekeeping genes. This analysis was based on the cardiac transcriptome identified by our genome-wide array analysis of 55 human heart samples. We found 37% of these genes to be arranged mainly in adjacent pairs or triplets. A significant number of pairs of adjacent genes are putatively regulated by common transcription factors (p = 0.02. Furthermore, these gene pairs share a significant number of GO functional classification terms. We show that the human cardiac transcriptome is organized into many small clusters across the whole genome, rather than being concentrated in a few larger clusters. Conclusion Our findings suggest that genes expressed in concert are organized in a linear arrangement for coordinated regulation. Determining the relationship between gene arrangement, regulation and nuclear organization as well as gene function will have broad biological implications.

  3. Y-chromosome haplotype distribution in Han Chinese populations and modern human origin in East Asians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE; Yuehai

    2001-01-01

    [1]Cann, R. L., Stoneking, M., Wilson, A. C., Mitochondria DNA and human evolution, Nature, 1987, 325: 31-36.[2]Vigilant, L., Stoneking, M., Harpending, H. et al., African populations and the evolution of human mitochondrial DNA, Science, 1997, 253: 1503-1507.[3]Cavalli-Sforza, L. L., Piazza, M. P., The History and Geography of Human Genes, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994.[4]Brooks, A. S., Wood, B., Paleoanthropology, The Chinese side of the story, Nature, 1990, 344: 288-289.[5]Li, T., Etler, D. A., New middle Pleistocene hominid crania from Yunxian in China, Nature, 1992, 357: 404-407.[6]Wu, X. Z., Poirier, F. E., Human Evolution in China, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995.[7]Etler, D. A., The fossil evidence for human evolution in Asia, Annu. Rev. Anthropol., 1996, 25: 275-301.[8]Wolpoff, M. H., Interpretations of multiregional evolution, Science, 1996, 274: 704-707.[9]Stringer, C. B., Andrew, P., Genetic and fossil evidence for the origin of modern humans, Science ,1988, 239: 1263-1268.[10]Wilson, A. C.,Cann, R. L., The recent African genesis of humans, Scientific American, 1992, (4): 68-75.[11]Weng, Z., Yuan, Y., Du, R., Analysis of the genetic structure of human populations in China, Acta Anthropol. Sin. (in Chi-nese)1989, 8: 261-268.[12]Zhao, T., Zhang, G., Zhu, Y. et al., The distribution of immunoglobulin Gm allotypes in forty Chinese populations, Acta Anthropol. Sin. (in Chinese), 1986, 6: 1-8.[13]Chu, J. Y., Huang, W., Kuang, S. Q. et al., Genetic relationship of populations in China, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1998, 95: 11763-11768.[14]Jobling, M. A., Tyler-Smith, C., Fathers and sons: the Y chromosome and human evolution, Trends in Genetics,1995, 11: 449-455.[15]Oefner, P. J., Underhill, P. A., Comparative DNA sequencing by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), Am. J. Hum. Genet., 1995, 57: A266.[16]Oefner, P. J., Underhill, P. A., DNA mutation detection

  4. Genetic polymorphism of human Y chromosome and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: a study in WOBASZ cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kostrzewa

    Full Text Available Genetic variants of Y chromosome predispose to hypertension in rodents, whereas in humans the evidence is conflicting. Our purpose was to study the distribution of a panel of Y chromosome markers in a cohort from a cross-sectional population-based study on the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in Poland (WOBASZ study. The HindIII, YAP Y chromosome variants, previously shown to influence blood pressure, lipid traits or height, as well as SNPs defining main Y chromosome haplogroups, were typed in 3026, 2783 and 2652 samples, respectively. In addition, 4 subgroups (N~100 each representing extremes of LDL concentration or blood pressure (BP were typed for a panel of 17 STRs. The HindIII and YAP polymorphism were not associated with any of the studied traits. Analysis of the haplogroup distribution showed an association between higher HDL level and hg I-M170 (P = 0.02, higher LDL level and hg F*(xI-M170, J2-M172, K-M9 (P = 0.03 and lower BMI and hg N3-Tat (P = 0.04. Analysis of STRs did not show statistically significant differences. Since all these associations lost statistical significance after Bonferroni correction, we conclude that a major role of Y chromosome genetic variation (defined by HindIII, YAP or main Y chromosome haplogroups in determining cardiovascular risk in Poles is unlikely.

  5. Frequency of fragile X chromosome in normal females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, D; Castree, K; Pueschel, S; Padre-Mendoza, T; Zolnierz, K

    1985-08-01

    Because of the ambiguities in diagnosing carriers of the fragile X syndrome, we studied thirty-six normal females to determine whether the fragile site at Xq27 can be seen in noncarrier females and at what frequency. A fragile site at Xq27 was identified in one out of thirty-six females, occurring at a frequency of 0.5% in her peripheral lymphocytes. We conclude that the fragile Xq27 site occurs only rarely in noncarrier females and that each laboratory should determine its own baseline frequencies of fragile X in order to most accurately distinguish between normal and carrier women.

  6. Three new loci for determining x chromosome inactivation patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Tümer, Zeynep; Ravn, Kirstine

    2011-01-01

    on two differentially methylated restriction enzyme sites (HpaII) and a polymorphic repeat located within this locus. Although highly informative, this locus is not always sufficient to evaluate the X-inactivation status in X-linked disorders. We have identified three new loci that can be used...... to determine XCI patterns in a methylation-sensitive PCR-based assay. All three loci contain polymorphic repeats and a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme (HpaII) site, methylation of which was shown to correlate with XCI. DNA from 60 females was used to estimate the heterozygosity of these new loci...

  7. The constrained maximal expression level owing to haploidy shapes gene content on the mammalian X chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurst, Laurence D.; Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Forrest, Alistair R R;

    2015-01-01

    X chromosomes are unusual in many regards, not least of which is their nonrandom gene content. The causes of this bias are commonly discussed in the context of sexual antagonism and the avoidance of activity in the male germline. Here, we examine the notion that, at least in some taxa, functional...

  8. Cytogenetic studies on meiotic chromosome behaviors in sterile Oriental x Trumpet lily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, J.R.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Arens, P.; Niu, L.X.

    2013-01-01

    In order to determine the reasons for pollen sterility in lily hybrids, four diploid sterile Oriental x Trumpet (OT) lily cultivars ('Nymph', 'Gluhwein', 'Yelloween', and 'Shocking') were used to investigate the meiotic chromosome behaviors in pollen mother cells (PMCs), using genomic in situ hybrid

  9. Reactivation of inactive X chromosome in buccal smear of carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natekar Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Buccal mucosal smears of 100 female patients of carcinoma of breast were compared with 100 controls matched accordingly. The frequency of Barr bodies was significantly lower in carcinoma of breast patients (menstruating and menopausal women P < 0.001 when compared with controls indicating reactivation of the inactive X chromosome.

  10. Refining the genetic portrait of Portuguese Roma through X-chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Vania; Gusmão, Leonor; Valente, Cristina;

    2012-01-01

    Due to differences in transmission between X-chromosomal and autosomal DNA, the comparison of data derived from both markers allows deeper insight into the forces that shape the patterns of genetic diversity in populations. In this study, we applied this comparative approach to a sample of Portug...

  11. Strong selective sweeps associated with ampliconic regions in great ape X chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nam, Kiwoong; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger;

    2014-01-01

    The unique inheritance pattern of X chromosomes makes them preferential targets of adaptive evolution. We here investigate natural selection on the X chromosome in all species of great apes. We find that diversity is more strongly reduced around genes on the X compared with autosomes......, and that a higher proportion of substitutions results from positive selection. Strikingly, the X exhibits several megabase long regions where diversity is reduced more than five fold. These regions overlap significantly among species, and have a higher singleton proportion, population differentiation......, and nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution ratio. We rule out background selection and soft selective sweeps as explanations for these observations, and conclude that several strong selective sweeps have occurred independently in similar regions in several species. Since these regions are strongly associated...

  12. Chromosomal aberrations induced by the restriction endonucleases Alu I and Bam HI: comparison with X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose-effect relationships for the frequencies of polycentric chromosomes induced by the restriction endonucleases Alu I and Bam HI and by X-rays in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were analyzed and compared. 1 Gy of X-rays produce the same frequency of polycentric chromosomes as 2 units Alu I and 7.9 units Bam HI. (author)

  13. Jarid2 Is Implicated in the Initial Xist-Induced Targeting of PRC2 to the Inactive X Chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Rocha, Simão Teixeira; Boeva, Valentina; Escamilla-Del-Arenal, Martin;

    2014-01-01

    During X chromosome inactivation (XCI), the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is thought to participate in the early maintenance of the inactive state. Although Xist RNA is essential for the recruitment of PRC2 to the X chromosome, the precise mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate th...

  14. Effect of x-rays on chromosome 21 nondisjunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a series of 156 females and 149 males with a Down syndrome (DS) child, a case-control study was performed to evaluate the effect of abdominal-pelvic exposure to diagnostic x-rays prior to conception on nondisjunction (ND). Cytogenetic analysis using QFQ banding allowed unequivocal identification of ND parents as cases. Partners of ND parents were treated as control group. Odds ratio for the association of x-rays exposure and ND occurrence (stratified for sex and age) was 1.85 (borderline to significance: with a 95% confidence interval 1-3.44). Such an association appeared highly significant in older fathers and borderline to significant in younger mothers, when age groups were analyzed separately. By comparing mean parental ages at birth of the propositus, the prevalence of exposure to x-rays appeared moderately associated with aging in control parents of both sexes. Furthermore, the mean age of unexposed ND parents of paternally derived SD cases was the same as the referent population's, suggesting that age is not a risk factor for ND in the male, except for being associated with increasing exposure risk. Conversely, risk attributable to x-rays exposure in the female appears to be progressively diluted with increasing age, by strongly age-dependent high risk, presumably due to biologic factors that are not affected by environmental exposure

  15. Variation of X-chromosomal microsatellites in Belarus within the context of their genetic diversity in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rębała, Krzysztof; Kotova, Svetlana A; Rybakova, Veranika I; Zabauskaya, Tatsiana V; Shyla, Alena A; Spivak, Alena A; Tsybovsky, Iosif S; Szczerkowska, Zofia

    2015-05-01

    More and more X-STR data are becoming available for worldwide human populations for forensic and anthropological investigations, but the European datasets analysed so far represent mainly the central, northern, western and southern part of the continent with populations of Eastern Europe being practically uninvestigated. In the present study, we assessed genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium of 19 X-chromosomal STR markers (DXS7132, DXS7133, DXS7423, DXS7424, DXS8377, DXS8378, DXS9895, DXS10074, DXS10075, DXS10079, DXS10101, DXS10103, DXS10134, DXS10135, DXS10146, DXS10147, DXS10148, GATA172D05, HPRTB) in four regional populations of an Eastern European state of Belarus, including 12 loci incorporated in the Argus X-12 kit. Our results revealed cumulative power of discrimination of the tested X-STR loci to amount to 0.999999999999996 and 0.999999997 in females and males, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance demonstrated regional stratification within the country, excluding the use of a common X-STR database for Belarus in forensic casework. However, development of a separate X-STR database for the northwestern part of the country or exclusion of four loci displaying regional differences from the dataset were shown to eliminate the observed geographic substructure among Belarusians. Comparison of the Belarusian genotypes with X-STR data from other European populations disclosed a geography-driven northeast-southwest gradient extending from Belarus and Finland to Iberia and Italy. This study is the first extensive report on variation of X-STR markers in populations from Eastern Europe and the first comprehensive analysis of diversity of X-chromosomal microsatellites in Europe.

  16. Chromosome numbers, characterization of chromosomal pairing during meiosis, origin and natural propagation in polyploid cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) of Agrimonia eupatoria L. (Rosaceae) in northwest Himalayas (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Puneet; Rana, Pawan K; Himshikha; Singhal, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, R C

    2014-07-01

    Despite the presence of intraspecific polyploidy (2x, 4x, 5x and 6x) in Agrimonia eupatoria, origin of these cytotypes has never been addressed adequately. The aim of the present study was to record the original chromosome counts and characterize chromosomal pairing during meiosis and microsporogenesis in the 5x cytotype, and discussing the hypothesis regarding the possible origin of polyploid cytotypes (4x, 5x and 6x) in the species. The geographical distribution pattern of cytotypes in the Indian Himalayas and elsewhere has also been analyzed. The present meiotic analysis revealed three chromosomes counts, the tetraploid (2n = 4x = 56), the pentaploid (2n = 5x = 70) and the hexaploid (2n = 6x = 84) cytotypes based on x = 14. Meiotic course was perfectly normal in the 4x and 6x cytotypes resulting into high pollen fertility (94-100 %). Meiotic course in the imbalanced 5x cytotype has been found to be irregular characterized by the presence of high frequency of univalents at diakinesis and metaphase-I. Abnormal meiotic course contributed towards high pollen sterility (74-88 %). Even the apparently fertile/stained pollen grains were of irregular shape and of heterogeneous sizes. Meiotic behaviour of the 5x cytotype is like typical of allopolyploid. Individuals of 5x cytotype did not produce seeds and propagate vegetatively (root suckers) while 4x and 6x cytotypes exploited sexual (seeds) as well as vegetative means for propagation. Chromosomal pairing in pentaploid cytotype is like typical of an allopolyploid and we assume that it might have originated owing to natural inter-cytotype hybridization between 4x and 6x cytotypes in a mixed population. Analysis of geographical distribution pattern of cytotypes shows that Indian Himalayas represent the most cytotype-diverse region for A. eupatoria with the existence of all the four cytotypes (2x, 4x, 5x, 6x). This shows the dynamic nature of the species at chromosomal level in this part of the world.

  17. Influence of DMSO on Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays induced chromosome aberrations in V79 Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrasoft X-rays have been shown to be very efficient in inducing chromosomal aberrations in mammalian cells. The present study was aimed to evaluate the modifying effects of DMSO (a potent scavenger of free radicals) on the frequencies of chromosome aberrations induced by soft X-rays. Confluent held G1 Chinese hamster cells (V79) were irradiated with Carbon K ultrasoft X-rays in the presence and absence of 1 M DMSO and frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the first division cells were determined. DMSO reduced the frequencies of exchange types of aberrations (dicentrics and centric rings) by a factor of 2.1-3.5. The results indicate that free radicals induced by ultrasoft X-rays contribute to a great extent to the induction of chromosome aberrations. The possible implications of these results in interpreting the mechanisms involved in the high efficiency of ultrasoft X-rays in the induction of chromosome aberrations are discussed.

  18. Different subfamilies of alphoid repetitive DNA are present on the human and chimpanzee homologous chromosomes 21 and 22.

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, A L; Jones, C; Bostock, C J; Bak, A L

    1987-01-01

    The alphoid repeat DNA on chimpanzee chromosome 22 was compared with alphoid repeat DNA on its human homologue, chromosome 21. Hybridization of different alphoid probes under various conditions of stringency show that the alphoid repeats of chimpanzee chromosome 22 are not closely related to those of human chromosome 21. Sequence analysis of cloned dimer and tetramer EcoRI fragments from chimpanzee chromosome 22 confirm the low overall level of homology, but reveal the presence of several nuc...

  19. X-linkage in bipolar affective illness. Perspectives on genetic heterogeneity, pedigree analysis and the X-chromosome map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, M; Rainer, J D; Risch, N

    1981-06-01

    The search for genetic markers is a powerful strategy in psychiatric genetics. The present article examines four areas relevant to discrepancies among X-linkage studies in bipolar affective disorder. These are questions of ascertainment, analytic methods, the X-chromosome map and genetic heterogeneity. The following conclusions are reached: (a) Positive linkage findings cannot be attributed to ascertainment bias or association between affective illness and colorblindness. (b) The possibility that falsely positive linkage results were obtained by using inappropriate analytic methods is ruled out. (c) Reported linkages of bipolar illness to colorblind and G6PD loci are compatible with known map distances between X-chromosome loci. Linkage to the Xg antigen remains uncertain. (d) The discrepancy among the various data sets on affective illness and colorblindness is best explained by significant linkage heterogeneity among pedigrees informative for the two traits. PMID:6454708

  20. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  1. Chromosome studies in the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (Platyrrhini, Primates): description of an X1X2Y1Y2/X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome system and karyological comparisons with other subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, M M; Seuánez, H N

    1991-01-01

    In the red howler monkey, Alouatta seniculus stramineus (2n = 47, 48, or 49), variations in diploid chromosome number are due to different numbers of microchromosomes. Males exhibit a Y;autosome translocation involving the short arm of an individual biarmed autosome. Consequently, the sex-chromosome constitution in the male is X1X2Y1Y2, with X1 representing the original X chromosome, X2 the biarmed autosome (No. 7), Y1 the Y;7p translocation product, and Y2 the acrocentric homolog of 7q. In the first meiotic division, a quadrivalent with a chain configuration can be observed in spermatocytes. Females have an X1X1X2X2 sex-chromosome constitution. Chromosome heteromorphisms were observed in pair 13, due to a pericentric inversion, and pair 19, due to the presence of constitutive heterochromatin. Microchromosomes, which varied in number between individuals, were also heterochromatic. NOR-staining was observed at two separate sites on a single chromosome pair (No. 10). A comparison of A.s. stramineus with A.s. macconnelli shows that these two subspecies have identical diploid chromosome numbers (47, 48, or 49), again due to a varying number of microchromosomes, and that they share a similar sex-chromosome constitution. Their karyotypes, however, are not identical, but can be derived from each other by a reciprocal translocation. Further comparisons with other A. seniculus subspecies reported in the literature indicate that this taxon is not karyologically uniform and that substantial chromosome shuffling has occurred between populations that have been considered to be subspecies by taxonomic criteria based on their morphometric attributes. PMID:1914523

  2. The Social Behavioral Phenotype in Boys and Girls with an Extra X Chromosome (Klinefelter Syndrome and Trisomy X) : A Comparison with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Stockmann, Lex; Borghgraef, Martine; Bruining, Hilgo; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Govaerts, Lutgarde; Hansson, Kerstin; Swaab, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to gain more insight in the social behavioral phenotype, and related autistic symptomatology, of children with an extra X chromosome in comparison to children with ASD. Participants included 60 children with an extra X chromosome (34 boys with Klinefelter syndrome and 26 girl

  3. Characterization of cDNAs encoding human leukosialin and localization of the leukosialin gene to chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallant, A.; Eskenazi, A.; Frelinger, J.G. (Univ. of Rochester Medical Center, NY (USA)); Mattei, M.G. (Hopital d' Enfants de la Timone, Marseille (France)); Fournier, R.E.K. (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (USA)); Carlsson, S.R.; Fukuda, M. (La Jolla Center Research Foundation, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01

    The authors describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA clones encoding human leukosialin, a major sialoglycoprotein of human leukocytes. Leukosialin is very closely related or identical to the sialophorin molecule, which is involved in T-cell proliferation and whose expression is altered in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-chromosome-linked immunodeficiency disease. Using a rabbit antiserum to leukosialin, a cDNA clone was isolated from a {lambda}gt11 cDNA library constructed from human peripheral blood cells. The {lambda}gt11 clone was used to isolate longer cDNA clones that correspond to the entire coding sequence of leukosialin. DNA sequence analysis reveals three domains in the predicted mature protein. The extracellular domain is enriched for Ser, Thr, and Pro and contains four contiguous 18-amino acid repeats. The transmembrane and intracellular domains of the human leukosialin molecule are highly homologous to the rat W3/13 molecule. RNA gel blot analysis reveals two polyadenylylated species of 2.3 and 8 kilobases. Southern blot analysis suggests that human leukosialin is a single-copy gene. Analysis of monochromosomal cell hybrids indicates that the leukosialin gene is not X chromosome linked and in situ hybridization shows leukosialin is located on chromosome 16. These findings demonstrate that the primary mutation in WAS is not a defect in the structural gene for leukosialin.

  4. A small supernumerary marker chromosome present in a Turner syndrome patient not derived from X- or Y-chromosome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeesch Joris

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC can be present in numerically abnormal karyotypes like in a 'Turner-syndrome karyotype' mos 45,X/46,X,+mar. Results Here we report the first case of an sSMC found in Turner syndrome karyotypes (sSMCT derived from chromosome 14 in a Turner syndrome patient. According to cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic characterization the karyotype was 46,X,+del(14(q11.1. The present case is the third Turner syndrome case with an sSMCT not derived from the X- or the Y-chromosome. Conclusion More comprehensive characterization of such sSMCT might identify them to be more frequent than only ~0.6% in Turner syndrome cases according to available data.

  5. Drinking beer reduces radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monobe, Manami [Chiba Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Science and Technology; Ando, Koichi [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    We here investigated and reported the effects of beer drinking on radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in blood lymphocytes. Human blood that was collected either before or after drinking a 700 ml beer was in vitro irradiated with 200 kVp X rays or 50 keV/{mu}m carbon ions. The relation between the radiation dose and the aberration frequencies (fragments and dicentrics) was significantly (P<0.05) lower for lymphocytes collected 3 h after beer drinking than those before drinking. Fitting the dose response to a linear quadratic model showed that the alpha term of carbon ions was significantly (P<0.05) decreased by beer drinking. A decrease of dicentric formation was detected as early as 0.5 h after beer drinking, and lasted not shorter than 4.5 h. The mitotic index of lymphocytes was higher after beer drinking than before, indicating that a division delay would not be responsible for the low aberrations induced by beer drinking. An in vitro treatment of normal lymphocytes with 0.1 M ethanol, which corresponded to a concentration of 6-times higher than the maximum ethanol concentration in the blood after beer drinking, reduced the dicentric formation caused by X-ray irradiation, but not by carbon-ion irradiation. The beer-induced reduction of dicentric formation was not affected by serum. It is concluded that beer could contain non-ethanol elements that reduce the chromosome damage of lymphocytes induced by high-LET radiation. (author)

  6. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Balcova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd, it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2 genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  7. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies.

  8. Sexy gene conversions: locating gene conversions on the X-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2009-08-01

    Gene conversion can have a profound impact on both the short- and long-term evolution of genes and genomes. Here, we examined the gene families that are located on the X-chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), mouse (Mus musculus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) for evidence of gene conversion. We identified seven gene families (WD repeat protein family, Ferritin Heavy Chain family, RAS-related Protein RAB-40 family, Diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase family, Transcription Elongation Factor A family, LDOC1-related family, Zinc Finger Protein ZIC, and GLI family) that show evidence of gene conversion. Through phylogenetic analyses and synteny evidence, we show that gene conversion has played an important role in the evolution of these gene families and that gene conversion has occurred independently in both primates and rodents. Comparing the results with those of two gene conversion prediction programs (GENECONV and Partimatrix), we found that both GENECONV and Partimatrix have very high false negative rates (i.e. failed to predict gene conversions), which leads to many undetected gene conversions. The combination of phylogenetic analyses with physical synteny evidence exhibits high resolution in the detection of gene conversions. PMID:19487239

  9. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vitro dose-response curves of unstable chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes have been obtained for neutron spectra of mean energies 0.7, 0.9, 7.6 and 14.7 MeV. The aberration yields have been fitted to the quadratic function Y = αD + βD2, which is consistent with the single-track and two-track model of aberration formation. However with high-LET radiation, the linear component of yield, corresponding to damage caused by single tracks, predominates, and this term becomes more dominant with increasing LET, so that for fission spectrum neutrons the relationship is linear, Y = αD. At low doses, such as those received by radiation workers, limiting r.b.e. values between 13 and 47 were obtained relative to 60Co γ-radiation. At higher doses, as used in radiotherapy, the values were much lower; ranging from 2.7 to 8 at 200 rad of equivalent γ-radiation. Both sets of r.b.e. values correlated well with track-averaged LET but not with dose-averaged LET. When the numbers of cells without aberrations were plotted against radiation dose, curves were obtained which are similar in shape to those for conventional cell-survival experiments with comparable neutron spectra. The D0 values obtained in the present study are close to those from other cell systems. (author)

  10. Chromosomal mapping of the human M6 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olinsky, S.; Loop, B.T.; DeKosky, A. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    M6 is a neuronal membrane glycoprotein that may have an important role in neural development. This molecule was initially defined by a monoclonal antibody that affected the survival of cultured cerebellar neurons and the outgrowth of neurites. The nature of the antigen was discovered by expression cDNA cloning using this monoclonal antibody. Two distinct murine M6 cDNAs (designated M6a and M6b) whose deduced amino acid sequences were remarkably similar to that of the myelin proteolipid protein human cDNA and genomic clones encoding M6a and M6b and have characterized them by restriction mapping, Southern hybridization with cDNA probes, and sequence analysis. We have localized these genes within the human genome by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). The human M6a gene is located at 4q34, and the M6b gene is located at Xp22.2 A number of human neurological disorders have been mapped to the Xp22 region, including Aicardi syndrome (MIM 304050), Rett syndrome (MIM 312750), X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy (MIM 302801), and X-linked mental retardation syndromes (MRX1, MIM 309530). This raises the possibility that a defect in the M6b gene is responsible for one of these neurological disorders. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Report of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, C.A.; Neuman, W.L. [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); McPherson, J.; Wasmuth, J. [California Univ., Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Chemistry; Camper, S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Medical School; Plaetke, R. [Eceles Inst. of Human Genetics, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Human Genetics; Williamson, R. [St. Mary`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics

    1993-12-31

    This report describes the accomplishments of the Second International Workshop on Human Chromosome 5 as was held May 11--13,1992 at the University of Chicago. Included in the report are abstract of individual presentations and a consensus map of the chromosome.

  12. Response of human lymphocyte chromosomes to fractionated neutron irradiation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevan' kaev, A.V.; Nasonova, V.A.; Golovinova, G.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    A comparative study was made of the yield of chromosome aberrations in a human lymphocyte culture after a single and fractionated exposure to neutron radiation at the beginning of the G/sub 1/ phase and during the S phase of the mitotic cycle. It was shown that the degree of the chromosome affection in both phases does not depend upon the irradiation schedules.

  13. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G;

    1992-01-01

    ), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another...

  14. Chromosome Structural Alteration an Unusual Abnormality Characterizing Human Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Movafagh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Ring chromosomes are rare cytogenetic abnormalities that occur in less than 10% of hematopoietic malignancies. They are rare in blood disorder. The present review has focused on the ring chromosome associated with oncology malignancies. Materials and Methods: By reviewing the web-based search for all English scientific peer review articles published, was initiated using Medline/PubMed, Mitelman database (http://cgap.nci.nih.gov/Chromosomes/Mitelman, and other pertinent references on websites about ring chromosomes in Oncology. The software program as End Note was used to handle the proper references for instruction to author. Karyotype descriptions were cited according to ISCN.Conclusion: Ring chromosomes are rare chromosomal aberrations, almost many times are of de novo origin, presenting a different phenotype regarding the loss of genetic material. The karyotype represents the main analysis for detection of ring chromosomes, but other molecular technics are necessary for complete characterization. The information of this review article adds to the spectrum of both morphology and genetic rearrangements in the field of oncology malignancies.

  15. Reactivation of Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus-6 by Telomeric Circle Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Prusty, Bhupesh K.; George Krohne; Thomas Rudel

    2015-01-01

    More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even d...

  16. Mechanisms of chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieber Michael R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many human cancers are associated with characteristic chromosomal rearrangements, especially hematopoietic cancers such as leukemias and lymphomas. The first and most critical step in the rearrangement process is the induction of two DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. In all cases, at least one of the two DSBs is generated by a pathologic process, such as (1 randomly-positioned breaks due to ionizing radiation, free radical oxidative damage, or spontaneous hydrolysis; (2 breaks associated with topoisomerase inhibitor treatment; or (3 breaks at direct or inverted repeat sequences, mediated by unidentified strand breakage mechanisms. In lymphoid cells, one of the two requisite DSBs is often physiologic, the result of V(DJ recombination or class switch recombination (CSR at the lymphoid antigen receptor loci. The RAG complex, which causes the DSBs in V(DJ recombination, can cause (4 sequence-specific, pathologic DSBs at sites that fit the consensus of their normal V(DJ recombination signal targets; or (5 structure-specific, pathologic DSBs at regions of single- to double-strand transition. CSR occurs specifically in the B-cell lineage, and requires (6 activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID action at sites of single-stranded DNA, which may occur pathologically outside of the normal target loci of class switch recombination regions and somatic hypermutation (SHM zones. Recent work proposes a seventh mechanism: the sequential action of AID and the RAG complex at CpG sites provides a coherent model for the pathologic DSBs at some of the most common sites of translocation in human lymphoma – the bcl-2 gene in follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the bcl-1 gene in mantle cell lymphoma.

  17. Molecular analysis of the distribution of chromosomal breakpoints: characterization of a 'hot' region for breaks in human chromosome 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Ionizing radiation randomly damages DNA and chromosomes whereas subsequent chromosome breaks are non-random. Assuming, as an ideal and naive but useful proposition, that breaks are equally likely anywhere in the chromosome and that a deletion always occurs between two breaks, the frequency of fragments would decrease linearly with increasing fragment size. This simple distribution is not, however, observed. To shed light on the 'real' situation of break formation we mapped breakpoints in the human chromosome no. 11 of 353 independent CD59- mutants isolated from human/hamster hybrid AL cells exposed to radiations (high and low dose-rate gamma rays, high LET carbon or nitrogen ions, protons) or chemicals (arsenic or irradiated, mutagenic histidine) or unexposed. The number of breaks per unit length of DNA differed significantly in different regions of chromosome 11.The highest level of breaks (140/mbp) were in the 0.8 mbp segment between CD59 and Catalase (CAT). Finer mapping of break points was carried out using 26 PCR primer pairs spread across this interval in 15 independent mutants. In two mutants, the break point was in a 107 bp fragment; in the other 13 the breaks were in a single 35 mbp fragment, but not all were at exactly the same site; 4 of 13 occurred in 3 different 3 mbp sub-segments. We are sequencing these fragments to look for such features as repeats: 'colder' regions like that between CD59 and WT will also be analyzed. But, since at least some breaks occurred at different sites and the frequency and distribution of breaks was about the same for all treatments, our we postulate that hot (and cold spots) may be due more to structural features or specific repair than to sequence or type of damage

  18. The Relationship Between Spontaneous Telomere Loss and Chromosome Instability in a Human Tumor Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijan Fouladi

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability plays an important role in cancer by promoting the alterations in the genome required for tumor cell progression. The loss of telomeres that protect the ends of chromosomes and prevent chromosome fusion has been proposed as one mechanism for chromosome instability in cancer cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support this hypothesis. To investigate the relationship between spontaneous telomere loss and chromosome instability in human cancer cells, clones of the EJ-30 tumor cell line were isolated in which a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk gene was integrated immediately adjacent to a telomere. Selection for HSV-tkdeficient cells with ganciclovir demonstrated a high rate of loss of the end these "marked" chromosomes (10-4 events/cell per generation. DNA sequence and cytogenetic analysis suggests that the loss of function of the HSV-tk gene most often involves telomere loss, sister chromatid fusion, and prolonged periods of chromosome instability. In some HSV-tk-deficient cells, telomeric repeat sequences were added on to the end of the truncated HSV-tk gene at a new location, whereas in others, no telomere was detected on the end of the marked chromosome. These results suggest that spontaneous telomere loss is a mechanism for chromosome instability in human cancer cells.

  19. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blatt, C.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Cohn, V.H.; Zollman, S.; Fournier, R.E.K.; Mohandas, L.T.; Nesbitt, M.; Lugo, T.; Jones, D.T.; Reed, R.R.; Weiner, L.P.; Sparkes, R.S.; Simon, M.I. (Weizmann Institute, Rehovoth (Israel))

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding {alpha}-subunit proteins, two different {beta} subunits, and one {gamma} subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The {beta} subunits were also assigned-GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extend of the G{alpha} gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases and with genes corresponding to G proteins.

  20. Chromosomal localization of genes encoding guanine nucleotide-binding protein subunits in mouse and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, C; Eversole-Cire, P; Cohn, V H; Zollman, S; Fournier, R E; Mohandas, L T; Nesbitt, M; Lugo, T; Jones, D T; Reed, R R

    1988-10-01

    A variety of genes have been identified that specify the synthesis of the components of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). Eight different guanine nucleotide-binding alpha-subunit proteins, two different beta subunits, and one gamma subunit have been described. Hybridization of cDNA clones with DNA from human-mouse somatic cell hybrids was used to assign many of these genes to human chromosomes. The retinal-specific transducin subunit genes GNAT1 and GNAT2 were on chromosomes 3 and 1; GNAI1, GNAI2, and GNAI3 were assigned to chromosomes 7, 3, and 1, respectively; GNAZ and GNAS were found on chromosomes 22 and 20. The beta subunits were also assigned--GNB1 to chromosome 1 and GNB2 to chromosome 7. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms were used to map the homologues of some of these genes in the mouse. GNAT1 and GNAI2 were found to map adjacent to each other on mouse chromosome 9 and GNAT2 was mapped on chromosome 17. The mouse GNB1 gene was assigned to chromosome 19. These mapping assignments will be useful in defining the extent of the G alpha gene family and may help in attempts to correlate specific genetic diseases with genes corresponding to G proteins. PMID:2902634

  1. Flow analysis of human chromosome sets by means of mixing-stirring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenin, Valeri V.; Aksenov, Nicolay D.; Shatrova, Alla N.; Klopov, Nicolay V.; Cram, L. Scott; Poletaev, Andrey I.

    1997-05-01

    A new mixing and stirring device (MSD) was used to perform flow karyotype analysis of single human mitotic chromosomes analyzed so as to maintain the identity of chromosomes derived from the same cell. An improved method for cell preparation and intracellular staining of chromosomes was developed. The method includes enzyme treatment, incubation with saponin and separation of prestained cells from debris on a sucrose gradient. Mitotic cells are injected one by one in the MSD which is located inside the flow chamber where cells are ruptured, thereby releasing chromosomes. The set of chromosomes proceeds to flow in single file fashion to the point of analysis. The device works in a stepwise manner. The concentration of cells in the sample must be kept low to ensure that only one cell at a time enters the breaking chamber. Time-gated accumulation of data in listmode files makes it possible to separate chromosome sets comprising of single cells. The software that was developed classifies chromosome sets according to different criteria: total number of chromosomes, overall DNA content in the set, and the number of chromosomes of certain types. This approach combines the high performance of flow cytometry with the advantages of image analysis. Examples obtained with different human cell lines are presented.

  2. Evidence for linkage to psychosis and cerebral asymmetry (relative hand skill) on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, S H; Dann, J C; Butler, R J; Loftus, J; Rue, J; Leask, S J; Bass, N; Comazzi, M; Vita, A; Nanko, S; Shaw, S; Peterson, P; Shields, G; Smith, A B; Stewart, J; DeLisi, L E; Crow, T J

    1998-09-01

    The hypothesis that psychosis arises as a part of the genetic diversity associated with the evolution of language generates the prediction that illness will be linked to a gene determining cerebral asymmetry, which, from the evidence of sex chromosome aneuploidies, is present in homologous form on the X and Y chromosomes. We investigated evidence of linkage to markers on the X chromosome in 1) 178 families multiply affected with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder with a series of 16 markers spanning the centromere (study 1), and 2) 180 pairs of left-handed brothers with 14 markers spanning the whole chromosome (study 2). In study 1, excess allele-sharing was observed in brother-brother pairs (but not brother-sister or a small sample of sister-sister pairs) over a region of approximately 20 cM, with a maximum LOD score of 1.5 at DXS991. In study 2, an association between allele-sharing and degree of left-handedness was observed extending over approximately 60 cM, with a maximum lod score of 2.8 at DXS990 (approximately 20 cM from DXS991). Within the overlap of allele-sharing is located a block in Xq21 that transposed to the Y chromosome in recent hominid evolution and is now represented as two segments on Yp. In one of two XX males with psychosis we found that the breakpoint on the Y is located within the distal region of homology to the block in Xq21. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that an X-Y homologous determinant of cerebral asymmetry carries the variation that contributes to the predisposition to psychotic illness.

  3. Fine-Scale Crossover Rate Variation on the Caenorhabditis elegans X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max R.; Rockman, Matthew V.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination creates genotypic diversity within species. Recombination rates vary substantially across taxa, and the distribution of crossovers can differ significantly among populations and between sexes. Crossover locations within species have been found to vary by chromosome and by position within chromosomes, where most crossover events occur in small regions known as recombination hotspots. However, several species appear to lack hotspots despite significant crossover heterogeneity. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was previously found to have the least fine-scale variation in crossover distribution among organisms studied to date. It is unclear whether this pattern extends to the X chromosome given its unique compaction through the pachytene stage of meiotic prophase in hermaphrodites. We generated 798 recombinant nested near-isogenic lines (NILs) with crossovers in a 1.41 Mb region on the left arm of the X chromosome to determine if its recombination landscape is similar to that of the autosomes. We find that the fine-scale variation in crossover rate is lower than that of other model species, and is inconsistent with hotspots. The relationship of genomic features to crossover rate is dependent on scale, with GC content, histone modifications, and nucleosome occupancy being negatively associated with crossovers. We also find that the abundances of 4- to 6-bp DNA motifs significantly explain crossover density. These results are consistent with recombination occurring at unevenly distributed sites of open chromatin. PMID:27172189

  4. Human and mouse mitochondrial orthologs of bacterial ClpX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corydon, T J; Wilsbech, M; Jespersgaard, C;

    2000-01-01

    We have determined the cDNA sequence and exon/intron structure of the human CLPX gene encoding a human ortholog of the E. coli ClpX chaperone and protease subunit. The CLPX gene comprises 14 exons and encodes a 633-amino acid-long precursor polypeptide. The polypeptide contains an N-terminal puta......We have determined the cDNA sequence and exon/intron structure of the human CLPX gene encoding a human ortholog of the E. coli ClpX chaperone and protease subunit. The CLPX gene comprises 14 exons and encodes a 633-amino acid-long precursor polypeptide. The polypeptide contains an N......-terminal putative mitochondrial transit peptide, and expression of a full-length ClpX cDNA tagged at its C-terminus (Myc-His) shows that the polypeptide is transported into mitochondria. FISH analysis localized the CLPX gene to human Chromosome (Chr) 15q22.1-22.32. This localization was refined by radiation hybrid...... variability between mouse ClpX cDNAs from different strains. Alignment of the human and mouse ClpX amino acid sequences with ClpX sequences from other organisms shows that they display the typical modular organization of domains with one AAA(+) domain common to a large group of ATPases and several other...

  5. Dynamic interplay and function of multiple noncoding genes governing X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Minghui; Charles Richard, John Lalith; Ogawa, Yuya

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the emergence of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as important components, especially in the regulation of gene expression. In the event of X chromosome inactivation, robust epigenetic marks are established in a long noncoding Xist RNA-dependent manner, giving rise to a distinct epigenetic landscape on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). The X inactivation center (Xic) is essential for induction of X chromosome inactivation and harbors two topologically associated domains (TADs) to regulate monoallelic Xist expression: one at the noncoding Xist gene and its upstream region, and the other at the antisense Tsix and its upstream region. The monoallelic expression of Xist is tightly regulated by these two functionally distinct TADs as well as their constituting lncRNAs and proteins. In this review, we summarize recent updates in our knowledge of lncRNAs found at the Xic and discuss their overall mechanisms of action. We also discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanism behind Xist RNA-mediated induction of the repressive epigenetic landscape at the Xi. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26260844

  6. Testing for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium at biallelic genetic markers on the X chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graffelman, J; Weir, B S

    2016-01-01

    Testing genetic markers for Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is an important tool for detecting genotyping errors in large-scale genotyping studies. For markers at the X chromosome, typically the χ2 or exact test is applied to the females only, and the hemizygous males are considered to be uninformative. In this paper we show that the males are relevant, because a difference in allele frequency between males and females may indicate HWE not to hold. The testing of markers on the X chromosome has received little attention, and in this paper we lay down the foundation for testing biallelic X-chromosomal markers for HWE. We develop four frequentist statistical test procedures for X-linked markers that take both males and females into account: the χ2 test, likelihood ratio test, exact test and permutation test. Exact tests that include males are shown to have a better Type I error rate. Empirical data from the GENEVA project on venous thromboembolism is used to illustrate the proposed tests. Results obtained with the new tests differ substantially from tests that are based on female genotype counts only. The new tests detect differences in allele frequencies and seem able to uncover additional genotyping error that would have gone unnoticed in HWE tests based on females only. PMID:27071844

  7. X chromosome inactivation and Xist evolution in a rodent lacking LINE-1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Michael A; Carstens, Bryan C; Wichman, Holly A

    2009-07-15

    Dosage compensation in eutherian mammals occurs by inactivation of one X chromosome in females. Silencing of that X chromosome is initiated by Xist, a large non-coding RNA, whose coating of the chromosome extends in cis from the X inactivation center. LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons have been implicated as possible players for propagation of the Xist signal, but it has remained unclear whether they are essential components. We previously identified a group of South American rodents in which L1 retrotransposition ceased over 8 million years ago and have now determined that at least one species of these rodents, Oryzomys palustris, still retains X inactivation. We have also isolated and analyzed the majority of the Xist RNA from O. palustris and a sister species retaining L1 activity, Sigmodon hispidus, to determine if evolution in these sequences has left signatures that might suggest a critical role for L1 elements in Xist function. Comparison of rates of Xist evolution in the two species fails to support L1 involvement, although other explanations are possible. Similarly, comparison of known repeats and potential RNA secondary structures reveals no major differences with the exception of a new repeat in O. palustris that has potential to form new secondary structures.

  8. Molecular analysis of recombination in a family with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a large pericentric X chromosome inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shashi, V.; Golden, W.L.; Allinson, P.S. [Univ. of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    It has been demonstrated in animal studies that, in animals heterozygous for pericentric chromosomal inversions, loop formation is greatly reduced during meiosis. This results in absence of recombination within the inverted segment, with recombination seen only outside the inversion. A recent study in yeast has shown that telomeres, rather than centromeres, lead in chromosome movement just prior to meiosis and may be involved in promoting recombination. We studied by cytogenetic analysis and DNA polymorphisms the nature of meiotic recombination in a three-generation family with a large pericentric X chromosome inversion, inv(X)(p21.1q26), in which Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) was cosegregating with the inversion. On DNA analysis there was no evidence of meiotic recombination between the inverted and normal X chromosomes in the inverted segment. Recombination was seen at the telomeric regions, Xp22 and Xq27-28. No deletion or point mutation was found on analysis of the DMD gene. On the basis of the FISH results, we believe that the X inversion is the mutation responsible for DMD in this family. Our results indicate that (1) pericentric X chromosome inversions result in reduction of recombination between the normal and inverted X chromosomes; (2) meiotic X chromosome pairing in these individuals is likely initiated at the telomeres; and (3) in this family DMD is caused by the pericentric inversion. 50 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effect of aspirin on chromosome aberration and DNA damage induced by X-rays in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niikawa, M.; Chuuriki, K.; Shibuya, K.; Seo, M.; Nagase, H.

    In order to reveal the anticlastogenic potency of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressive ability of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray. Aspirin at doses of 0.5, 5 and 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally or orally at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation. The anticlastogenic activity of aspirin on chromosome aberrations induced by X-ray was determined in the mouse micronucleus test and alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCG) assay in vivo. The frequency by polychromatic erythrocytes with micronuclei (MNPCEs) was decreased by about 19-61% at 0.5 h after and about 23-62% at 0.5 h before the X-ray irradiation. DNA damage by X-ray was significantly decreased by oral administration of aspirin at 0.5 h after or before the X-ray irradiation for the SCG assay. We consider aspirin can be used as preventive agents against exposure of X-ray.

  10. Imprinted X chromosome inactivation: evolution of mechanisms in distantly related mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafagh A. Waters

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI ensures transcriptional silencing of one of the two Xs (either in a random or imprinted fashion in somatic cells. Comparing this silencing between species has offered insight into different mechanisms of X inactivation, providing clues into the evolution of this epigenetic process in mammals. Long-noncoding RNAs have emerged as a common theme in XCI of therian mammals (eutherian and marsupial. Eutherian X inactivation is regulated by the noncoding RNA product of XIST, within a cis-acting master control region called the X inactivation center (XIC. Marsupials XCI is XIST independent. Instead, XCI is controlled by the long-noncoding RNA Rsx, which appears to be a functional analog of the eutherian XIST gene, insofar that its transcript coats the inactive X and represses activity of genes in cis. In this review we discuss XCI in eutherians, and contrast imprinted X inactivation in mouse and marsupials. We provide particular focus on the evolution of genomic elements that confer the unique epigenetic features that characterize the inactive X chromosome.

  11. Search for linkage to schizophrenia on the X and Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devoto, M.; Ott, J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Vita, A. [Univ. of Milan (Italy)] [and others

    1994-06-15

    Markers for X chromosome loci were used in linkage studies of a large group of small families (n = 126) with at least two schizophrenic members in one sibship. Based on the hypothesis that a gene for schizophrenia could be X-Y linked, with homologous loci on both X and Y, our analyses included all families regardless of the pattern of familial inheritance. Lod scores were computed with both standard X-linked and a novel X-Y model, and sib-pair analyses were performed for all markers examining the sharing of maternal alleles. Small positive lod scores were obtained for loci pericentromeric, from Xp11.4 to Xq12. Lod scores were also computed separately in families selected for evidence of maternal inheritance and absence of male to male transmission of psychosis. The lod scores for linkage to the locus DXS7 reached a maximum of 1.83 at 0.08% recombination, assuming dominant inheritance on the X chromosome in these families (n = 34). Further investigation of the X-Y homologous gene hypothesis focussing on this region is warranted. 39 refs. 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  12. Generation of a panel of antibodies against proteins encoded on human chromosome 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiseman Frances K

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS is caused by trisomy of all or part of chromosome 21. To further understanding of DS we are working with a mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries most of human chromosome 21 in addition to the normal mouse chromosome complement. This mouse is a model for human DS and recapitulates many of the features of the human syndrome such as specific heart defects, and cerebellar neuronal loss. The Tc1 mouse is mosaic for the human chromosome such that not all cells in the model carry it. Thus to help our investigations we aimed to develop a method to identify cells that carry human chromosome 21 in the Tc1 mouse. To this end, we have generated a panel of antibodies raised against proteins encoded by genes on human chromosome 21 that are known to be expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice Results We attempted to generate human specific antibodies against proteins encoded by human chromosome 21. We selected proteins that are expressed in the adult brain of Tc1 mice and contain regions of moderate/low homology with the mouse ortholog. We produced antibodies to seven human chromosome 21 encoded proteins. Of these, we successfully generated three antibodies that preferentially recognise human compared with mouse SOD1 and RRP1 proteins on western blots. However, these antibodies did not specifically label cells which carry a freely segregating copy of Hsa21 in the brains of our Tc1 mouse model of DS. Conclusions Although we have successfully isolated new antibodies to SOD1 and RRP1 for use on western blots, in our hands these antibodies have not been successfully used for immunohistochemistry studies. These antibodies are freely available to other researchers. Our data high-light the technical difficulty of producing species-specific antibodies for both western blotting and immunohistochemistry.

  13. Assignment of the human pancreatic regenerating (REG) gene to chromosome 2p12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perfetti, R.; Egan, J.M.; Zenilman, M.E.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Hawkins, A.L.; Griffin, C.A. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1994-03-15

    A cDNA termed reg (for regenerating gene) has been isolated and characterized from a rat pancreatic library. Expression of reg is markedly increased in regenerating islets and decreased when insulin gene expression is inhibited. These findings have led to the hypothesis that reg may be involved in the expansion [beta]-cell function. The human reg gene has a high degree of similarity to the rat reg gene. To determine the chromosomal location of the human reg gene, the authors analyzed two panels of mouse- or hamster-human hybrid cell lines containing a single human chromosome or several different human chromosomes. DNA extracts from these cell lines were analyzed for the presence of the human reg gene by polymerase chain reaction. In addition, human metaphase chromosomes were used for fluorescence in situ hybridization to further confirm the chromosomal assignment and to determine the subchromosomal localization. With these approaches, they show that the human reg gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 2 near the centromere at band 2p12. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Cloning of human centromeres by transformation-associated recombination in yeast and generation of functional human artificial chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Kouprina, N.; Ebersole, T.; Koriabine, M.; Pak, E; Rogozin, I. B.; Katoh, M; Oshimura, M; Ogi, K; Peredelchuk, M.; Solomon, G; Brown, W.; Barrett, J. C.; Larionov, V

    2003-01-01

    Human centromeres remain poorly characterized regions of the human genome despite their importance for the maintenance of chromosomes. In part this is due to the difficulty of cloning of highly repetitive DNA fragments and distinguishing chromosome-specific clones in a genomic library. In this work we report the highly selective isolation of human centromeric DNA using transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning. A TAR vector with alphoid DNA monomers as targeting sequences was used...

  15. Fine mapping of fatness QTL on porcine chromosome X and analyses of three positional candidate genes

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Junwu; Gilbert, Hélène; Iannuccelli, Nathalie; Duan, Yanyu; Guo, Beili; Huang, Weibing; Ma, Huanban; Riquet, Juliette; Bidanel, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Background: Porcine chromosome X harbors four QTL strongly affecting backfat thickness (BFT), ham weight (HW), intramuscular fat content (IMF) and loin eye area (LEA). The confidence intervals (CI) of these QTL overlap and span more than 30 cM, or approximately 80 Mb. This study therefore attempts to fine map these QTL by joint analysis of two large-scale F2 populations (Large White × Meishan and White Duroc × Erhualian constructed by INRA and JXAU respectively) and furthermore, to determine ...

  16. Developmental Genetics of the 2c-D Region of the Drosophila X Chromosome

    OpenAIRE

    Perrimon, Norbert; Engstrom, Lee; Mahowald, Anthony P.

    1985-01-01

    We have conducted a genetic and developmental analysis of genes within the 2C-D area of the X chromosome. Phenotypes of 33 mutations representing nine adjacent complementation groups including eight recessive lethals and one visible homeotic mutation (polyhomeotic) are described. Germline clonal analysis of the eight zygotic lethals has revealed three types of gene requirements: (1) normal activity at two pupal lethal loci (corkscrew and C204) and one larval lethal locus (ultraspiracle) is r...

  17. Recovery of induced mutations for X chromosome-linked muscular dystrophy in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Chapman, V M; Miller, D R; Armstrong, D; Caskey, C. T.

    1989-01-01

    We have used elevated levels of plasma creatine phosphokinase activity to identify muscular dystrophy phenotypes in mice and to screen the progeny of chemical mutagen-treated male mice for X chromosome-linked muscular dystrophy mutations. We were not successful in identifying heterozygous carriers of these induced muscular dystrophy mutations in greater than 8000 progeny. However, we were highly successful in identifying three additional alleles of the characterized mdx locus. These alleles o...

  18. Microcell-mediated transfer of a single human chromosome complements xeroderma pigmentosum group A fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomes from an immortalized aneuploid human fibroblast cell line were randomly tagged with the selectable marker neo by transfection with the plasmid pSV2neo. Somatic cell fusions between transfected human cells and mouse A9 cells generated pools of G418-resistant human-mouse hybrid clones containing various numbers of human chromosomes. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer from the hybrid pools to xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XP-A) cells in culture and selection for G418-resistant colonies resulted in the identification of XP cells with enhanced resistance to ultraviolet radiation. Screening of subclones from selected pools of human-mouse hybrids facilitated the identification of hybrids containing a single neo-tagged human chromosome. Transfer of this chromosome to XP-A cells (but not to XP-F or XP-C cells) results in enhanced resistance to ultraviolet light and enhanced excision repair capacity. The identification of a single human chromosome that complements the phenotype of XP-A cells in culture provides the potential for genetic mapping of the complementing gene and for its isolation by molecular cloning

  19. Human thrombomodulin: complete cDNA sequence and chromosome localization of the gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A human umbilical vein endothelial cell cDNA library in λgt11 was screened for expression of thrombomodulin antigens with affinity-purified rabbit polyclonal anti-thrombomodulin immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mouse monoclonal anti-human thrombomodulin IgG. Among 7 million recombinant clones screened, 12 were recognized by both antibodies. Two of these, λHTm10 and λHTm12, were shown to encode thrombomodulin by comparison of the amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence to the amino acid sequence determined directly from tryptic peptides of thrombomodulin. Thrombomodulin mRNA was estimated to be 3.7 kilobases in length by Northern blot analysis of endothelial cell and placental poly(A) + RNA. Thrombomodulin mRNA was not detected in human brain, HepG2 hepatoma cells, or the monocytic U937 cell line. Additional cDNA clones were selected by hybridization with the 1.2-kilobase insert of λHTm10. One isolate, λHTm15, contained a 3693 base pair cDNA insert with an apparent 5'-noncoding region of 146 base pairs, an open reading frame of 1725 base pairs, a stop codon, a 3'-noncoding region of 1779 base pairs, and a poly(A) tail of 40 base pairs. The cDNA sequence encodes a 60.3-kDa protein of 575 amino acids. The organization of thrombomodulin is similar to that of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, and the protein is homologous to a large number of other proteins that also contain EGF-like domains, including factor VII, factor IX, factor X, factor XII, protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, and urokinase. The gene for thrombomodulin has been localized to chromosome 20 by hybridization of cDNA probes to purified human chromosomes

  20. Sporadic male patients with intellectual disability: contribution of X-chromosome copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isrie, M; Froyen, G; Devriendt, K; de Ravel, T; Fryns, J P; Vermeesch, J R; Van Esch, H

    2012-11-01

    Genome-wide array comparative genome hybridization has become the first in line diagnostic tool in the clinical work-up of patients presenting with intellectual disability. As a result, chromosome X-copy number variations are frequently being detected in routine diagnostics. We retrospectively reviewed genome wide array-CGH data in order to determine the frequency and nature of chromosome X-copy number variations (X-CNV) in a cohort of 2222 sporadic male patients with intellectual disability (ID) referred to us for diagnosis. In this cohort, 68 males were found to have at least one X-CNV (3.1%). However, correct interpretation of causality remains a challenging task, and is essential for proper counseling, especially when the CNV is inherited. On the basis of these data, earlier experience and literature data we designed and propose an algorithm that can be used to evaluate the clinical relevance of X-CNVs detected in sporadic male ID patients. Applied to our cohort, 19 male ID patients (0.85%) were found to carry a (likely) pathogenic X-CNV.

  1. Normal newborn with prenatal suspicion of X chromosome monosomy due to confined placental mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serapinas, Danielius; Bartkeviciene, Daiva; Valantinaviciene, Emilija; Machtejeviene, Egle

    2016-10-01

    The recent introduction of cell-free DNA (cfDNA)-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) offers pregnant women a more accurate method than traditional serum screening methods for detecting fetal aneuploidies. Clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of NIPT for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. However NIPT approaches that take advantage of single-nucelotide polymorphism (SNP) information potentially allow the identification of triploidy, chromosomal microdeletion syndromes and other unusual genetic variants. To highlight this approach of NIPT we present a rare case of confined placental X chromosome monosomy mosaicism that was prenatally suspected with a single-nucleotide polymorphism-based noninvasive prenatal test. The results of invasive tests (amniocentesis) showed small proportion of X chromosome mosaicism (45, X[5]/46, XX[95]). After birth karyotype of the girl revealed no abnormalities (46 XX), confirming that mosaicism was limited to the placenta. These results highlight the need of patient's informed consent and thorough pretest and postest counseling to ensure that they understand the limitations and advantages of the tests and the implications of the resultss. PMID:27606664

  2. cDNA cloning, mRNA distribution and heterogeneity, chromosomal location, and RFLP analysis of human osteopontin (OPN)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, M F; Kerr, J M; Termine, J D;

    1990-01-01

    of the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) cell attachment site. Chromosomal mapping of the osteopontin gene (OPN) using human-rodent cell hybrids demonstrated a location on chromosome 4 in the human genome. In situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes using radiolabeled OP1a as a probe indicated that the gene is located...

  3. Chromosomal localization of murine and human oligodendrocyte-specific protein genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstein, J.M.; Wu, S.; Korenberg, J.R. [UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    Oligodendrocyte-specific protein (OSP) is a recently described protein present only in myelin of the central nervous system. Several inherited disorders of myelin are caused by mutations in myelin genes but the etiology of many remain unknown. We mapped the location of the mouse OSP gene to the proximal region of chromosome 3 using two sets of multilocus crosses and to human chromosome 3 using somatic cell hybrids. Fine mapping with fluorescence in situ hybridization placed the OSP gene at human chromosome 3q26.2-q26.3. To date, there are no known inherited neurological disorders that localize to these regions. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Studies on the integration of hepatitis B virusDNA sequence in human sperm chromosomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-MinHUANG; Tian-HuaHUANG

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the integration of hepatitis Bvirus(HBV)DNAinto sperm chromosomes in hepatitsBpatients and the features of its integration.Methods:Sperm chromosomes of 14subjects(5healthy controls and9HBpatients,including1acute hepatitis B,2chronic active hepatitisB,4chronic persistent hepatitsB,2HBsAg chronic carriers with no clinical symptoms)were prepared using imterspecific in vitro fertilization between zona-free hamster oocytes and human spermatozoa.Fluosescence in situ hybridization(FISH)to sperm chromosome spreads was carried out with biotin-labeled full length HBVDNAprobe to detect the specificHBVDNA sequences in the sperm chromosomes.Results:Specific fluorescent signal spots for HBVDNAwere seen iv sperm chromosomes of one patient with chronic persistent hepatitisB.In9(9/42)sperm chromosome complements containing fluorescent signal spots,one presented5obvious FISHspots and the others2to4signals.The fluorescence intensity showed significant difference among the signal spots.The distribution of signal sites among chromosomes seems to be random.Con clusion:HBV could integrate into human sperm chromosomes.Results suggest that the possibility of vertical transmission of HBVvia the germ line tothe next generation is present.

  5. Telomere shortening correlates with increasing aneuploidy of chromosome 8 in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plentz, Ruben R; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Flemming, Peer; Gebel, Michael; Kreipe, Hans; Manns, Michael P; Rudolph, K Lenhard; Wilkens, Ludwig

    2005-09-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) leads to an increase in aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Telomere shortening appears as one mechanism fostering the development of CIN. Whether telomere shortening correlates to specific genetic changes that characterize a certain type of cancer has yet to be established. In our recent study, we combined on a cellular level the analysis of hepatocellular telomere fluorescent intensity (TFI) and copy number of chromosome 8-one of the hallmark chromosomal alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We investigated 15 cytological fine-needle biopsies of aneuploid HCC and 5 touch prints of cadaver livers without cancer. Hepatocyte-specific TFI and the measurement of centromere-specific probe for chromosome 8 were both performed by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (qFISH) or FISH. Combined analysis of both methods (coFISH) allowed measurement of telomere length and chromosome 8 copy number on a single cell level. We observed that telomere shortening correlates significantly with increasing copy number of chromosome 8 in HCC on the cellular level. Above the level of 5 copies of chromosome 8 per nucleus, no further shortening of telomeres was found, indicating that telomeres had reached a critically short length at this stage of aneuploidy. In conclusion, our study gives direct evidence that telomere shortening is linked to a specific genetic alteration characteristic for human HCC. PMID:16116624

  6. Recombinant chromosome 7 in a mosaic 45,X/47,XXX patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Carlos A; Gotway, Garrett; Torgbe, Emmanuel; Iyer, Santha; Dallaire, Stephanie; Appleberry, Taylor; Suterwala, Mohamed; Garcia, Rolando; Valdez, Federico; Patel, Sangeeta; Koduru, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with pericentric inversions are at risk for producing offspring with chromosomal gains and losses, while those carrying paracentric inversions usually produce unviable gametes [Madan, 1995]. In this current study, we present a newborn with dysmorphic features and malformations, whose karyotype showed an abnormal copy of chromomosome 7 described at first as add(7)(q32) as well as mos 45,X/47,XXX. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed an interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 7 involving bands q35 to q36.3 but retaining the 7q subtelomere. The patient's deletion is believed to be due to meiotic recombination in the inversion loop in the phenotypically normal father who seems to carry two paracentric inversions in the long arm of chromosome 7, which was described as rec(7)(7pter- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter)pat. The abnormal copy of chromosome 7 in the father has been described as: der(7)(7pter- > q22.1::q36.3- > q35::q22.1- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter). This is a unique karyotype that to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature and predisposes to meiotic recombination that can result in deletions or duplications of 7q35-36.

  7. Integration of 28 STSs into the physical map of human chromosome 18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerken, S.; White, R.; Bradley, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-01

    Genes on human chromosome 18 are associated with familial glucocorticoid deficiency (MC2R), pemphigus vulgaris (DSG3) and foliaceus (DSG1), familial amyloidosis (TTR), colorectal carcinoma (DCC), erythropoietic protoporphyria (FECH), follicular lymphoma (BCL2, FVT1), and congenital methemoglobinemia (CYB5). As the resolution of human genetic maps improves, linkage between other diseases and specific regions of chromosome 18 will occur. A physical map of human chromosome 18 will prove useful in identifying candidate genes that are associated with these disorders. Using various physical and genetic mapping techniques, over 35 genes and 19 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are assigned to human chromosome 18. Most of these genes and several of the ESTs were sublocalized using a well-defined panel of somatic cell hybrids that contain different segments of human chromosome 18. Despite recent efforts, progress in mapping human chromosome 18 has lagged behind that achieved for other chromosomes. Thus, the purpose of this study was to integrate 9 new transcriptional tags [8 brain ESTs (8) and the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) (3)] and 19 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) into the physical map of human chromosome 18. The SSRs were isolated by screening genomic DNA libraries constructed in M13mp18 vectors with oligonucleotide probes that detected dinucleotide d(CA)- and tetranucleotide-repeat motifs. DNA sequences of clones that contained microsatellite repeats were obtained by thermal-cycle sequencing, and STSs were developed from clones that contained numerous repeats. STSs that identified highly polymorphic loci in eight unrelated CEPH parents were used for genotyping. Results of linkage analyses and estimates of heterozygosity for these markers will be reported. 9 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Prognostic value of X-chromosome inactivation in symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Mateu Jonàs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between 8% and 22% of female carriers of DMD mutations exhibit clinical symptoms of variable severity. Development of symptoms in DMD mutation carriers without chromosomal rearrangements has been attributed to skewed X-chromosome inactivation (XCI favouring predominant expression of the DMD mutant allele. However the prognostic use of XCI analysis is controversial. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between X-chromosome inactivation and development of clinical symptoms in a series of symptomatic female carriers of dystrophinopathy. Methods We reviewed the clinical, pathological and genetic features of twenty-four symptomatic carriers covering a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. DMD gene analysis was performed using MLPA and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. Blood and muscle DNA was used for X-chromosome inactivation (XCI analysis thought the AR methylation assay in symptomatic carriers and their female relatives, asymptomatic carriers as well as non-carrier females. Results Symptomatic carriers exhibited 49.2% more skewed XCI profiles than asymptomatic carriers. The extent of XCI skewing in blood tended to increase in line with the severity of muscle symptoms. Skewed XCI patterns were found in at least one first-degree female relative in 78.6% of symptomatic carrier families. No mutations altering XCI in the XIST gene promoter were found. Conclusions Skewed XCI is in many cases familial inherited. The extent of XCI skewing is related to phenotype severity. However, the assessment of XCI by means of the AR methylation assay has a poor prognostic value, probably because the methylation status of the AR gene in muscle may not reflect in all cases the methylation status of the DMD gene.

  9. Chromosomal localization of the human gene encoding c-myc promoter-binding protein (MPB1) to chromosome 1p35-pter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R.A.; Dowler, L.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Kansas City, MO (United States); Adkison, L.R. [Mercer Univ. School of Medicine, Macon, GA (United States); Ray, R.B. [St. Louis Univ. Health Sciences Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1997-02-01

    We report the mapping of the human gene MPB1 (c-myc promoter binding protein), a recently identified gene regulatory protein. MPB1 binds to the c-myc P2 promoter and exerts a negative regulatory role on c-myc transcription. Since exogenous expression from transfection of the MPB1 gene suppresses the tumorigenic property of breast cancer cells, there was interest in determining the chromosomal location of this gene. The human MPB1 gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p35-pter using Southern blot analyses of genomic DNAs from rodent-human somatic hybrid cell lines. A specific human genomic fragment was observed only in the somatic cell lines containing human chromosome 1 or the p35-pter region of the chromosome. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  10. An isodicentric X chromosome with gonadal dysgenesis in a lady without prominent somatic features of Turner's syndrome. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tse-Ya; Lin, Huan-Sheng; Chen, Pei-Lung; Huang, Tien-Shang

    2015-01-01

    Isodicentric X chromosomes in general have phenotypes characteristic of the resultant X deletions. Gonadotropin levels in Turner's syndrome (TS) girls are high, but have a normal biphasic pattern. Here, we report a 21-year-old lady with primary amenorrhea. Clinical examination revealed a short neck but no other typical stigmata of Turner's syndrome. The levels of gonadotropin were not raised to post-menopausal levels. A chromosome study showed a 45,X/46,X,idic(X)(q22) karyotype. She was diagnosed as having Turner's syndrome. PMID:25618587

  11. X Chromosomal effects on social cognitive processing and emotion regulation : A study with Klinefelter men (47,XXY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, S; Swaab, H; Aleman, A; Kahn, RS

    2006-01-01

    Studying Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY), a genetically defined disorder characterized by the presence of an additional X chromosome, can reveal insights into genotype-phenotype associations. Increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders characterized by difficulties in social interactions, such as

  12. ALLELE DISTRIBUTION OF FIVE X-CHROMOSOME SHORT TANDEM REPEAT LOCI IN EWENKE POPULATION OF NORTH CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-zhi Gu; Teng Chen; Qing-bo Liu; Bing Yu; Sheng-bin Li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the allele genetic polymorphism of five short tandem repeat (STR) loci on X-chromosome in Ewenke population of north China and to provide basic data for forensic identification.Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from EDTA-whole blood of Ewenke population by Chelex-100. The DNA samples were amplified by PCR and were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The sequence length variations of DXS6799, DXS8378, DXS101, HPRTB, and DXS6789 loci on X-chromosome in 98unrelated Ewenke individuals were investigated.Results All five loci analyzed showed high polymorphism and genetic stability. The data of the five X-chromosome STR loci in Ewenke ethnic group of China was in accordance with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by Chi-square test.Conclusion Allele polymorphism of five X-chromosome STR loci can be used as a genetic marker for forensic identification and population genetic research.

  13. Abundance of female-biased and paucity of male-biased somatically expressed genes on the mouse X-chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinius Björn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Empirical evaluations of sexually dimorphic expression of genes on the mammalian X-chromosome are needed to understand the evolutionary forces and the gene-regulatory mechanisms controlling this chromosome. We performed a large-scale sex-bias expression analysis of genes on the X-chromosome in six different somatic tissues from mouse. Results Our results show that the mouse X-chromosome is enriched with female-biased genes and depleted of male-biased genes. This suggests that feminisation as well as de-masculinisation of the X-chromosome has occurred in terms of gene expression in non-reproductive tissues. Several mechanisms may be responsible for the control of female-biased expression on chromosome X, and escape from X-inactivation is a main candidate. We confirmed escape in case of Tmem29 using RNA-FISH analysis. In addition, we identified novel female-biased non-coding transcripts located in the same female-biased cluster as the well-known coding X-inactivation escapee Kdm5c, likely transcribed from the transition-region between active and silenced domains. We also found that previously known escapees only partially explained the overrepresentation of female-biased X-genes, particularly for tissue-specific female-biased genes. Therefore, the gene set we have identified contains tissue-specific escapees and/or genes controlled by other sexually skewed regulatory mechanisms. Analysis of gene age showed that evolutionarily old X-genes (>100 myr, preceding the radiation of placental mammals are more frequently female-biased than younger genes. Conclusion Altogether, our results have implications for understanding both gene regulation and gene evolution of mammalian X-chromosomes, and suggest that the final result in terms of the X-gene composition (masculinisation versus feminisation is a compromise between different evolutionary forces acting on reproductive and somatic tissues.

  14. Associations of homologous RNA-binding motif gene on the X chromosome (RBMX) and its like sequence on chromosome 9(RBMXL9) with non-obstructive azoospermia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Tsujimura; Masao Ota; Akihiko Okuyama; Kazutoshi Fujita; Kazuhiko Komori; Phanu Tanjapatkul; Yasushi Miyagawa; Shingo Takada; Kiyomi Matsumiya; Masaharu Sada; Yoshihiko Katsuyama

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the associations of autosomal and X-chromosome homologs of the RNA-binding-motif (RNA-binding-motif on the Y chromosome, RBMY) gene with non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA), as genetic factors for NOA may map to chromosomes other than the Y chromosome. Methods: Genomic DNA was extracted using a salting-out procedure after treatment of peripheral blood leukocytes with proteinase K from Japanese patients with NOA (n = 67) and normal fertile volunteers (n = 105). The DNA were analyzed for RBMX by expressed sequence tag (EST) deletion and for the like sequence on chromosome 9 (RBMXL9) by microsatellite polymorphism. Results: We examined six ESTs in and around RBMX and found a deletion of SHGC31764 in one patient with NOA and a deletion of DXS7491 in one other patient with NOA. No deletions were detected in control subjects. The association study with nine microsatellite markers near RBMXL9 revealed that D9S319 was less prevalent in patients than in control subjects, whereas D9S1853 was detected more frequently in patients than that in control subjects. Conclusion: We provide evidence that deletions in or around RBMX may be involved in NOA. In addition, analyses of markers in the vicinity of RBMXL9 on chromosome 9 suggest the possibility that variants of this gene may be associated with NOA.Although further studies are necessary, this is the first report of the association between RBMX and RBMXL9 with NOA.

  15. A Turner Syndrome Patient Carrying a Mosaic Distal X Chromosome Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaschi, Roberto L. P.; Taylor, Juliet; Robertson, Stephen P.; Love, Donald R.; George, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    A skin sample from a 17-year-old female was received for routine karyotyping with a set of clinical features including clonic seizures, cardiomyopathy, hepatic adenomas, and skeletal dysplasia. Conventional karyotyping revealed a mosaic Turner syndrome karyotype with a cell line containing a small marker of X chromosome origin. This was later confirmed on peripheral blood cultures by conventional G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microarray analysis. Similar Turner mosaic marker chromosome cases have been previously reported in the literature, with a variable phenotype ranging from the mild “classic” Turner syndrome to anencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, complex heart malformation, and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. This case report has a phenotype that is largely discordant with previously published cases as it lies at the severe end of the Turner variant phenotype scale. The observed cytogenetic abnormalities in this study may represent a coincidental finding, but we cannot exclude the possibility that the marker has a nonfunctioning X chromosome inactivation locus, leading to functional disomy of those genes carried by the marker. PMID:24778889

  16. A Turner Syndrome Patient Carrying a Mosaic Distal X Chromosome Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto L. P. Mazzaschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A skin sample from a 17-year-old female was received for routine karyotyping with a set of clinical features including clonic seizures, cardiomyopathy, hepatic adenomas, and skeletal dysplasia. Conventional karyotyping revealed a mosaic Turner syndrome karyotype with a cell line containing a small marker of X chromosome origin. This was later confirmed on peripheral blood cultures by conventional G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microarray analysis. Similar Turner mosaic marker chromosome cases have been previously reported in the literature, with a variable phenotype ranging from the mild “classic” Turner syndrome to anencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, complex heart malformation, and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. This case report has a phenotype that is largely discordant with previously published cases as it lies at the severe end of the Turner variant phenotype scale. The observed cytogenetic abnormalities in this study may represent a coincidental finding, but we cannot exclude the possibility that the marker has a nonfunctioning X chromosome inactivation locus, leading to functional disomy of those genes carried by the marker.

  17. Divergence of the genes on human chromosome 21 between human and other hominoids and variation of substitution rates among transcription units

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Jinxiu; Xi, Huifeng; Zhang, Chenghui; Jiang, Zhengwen; Zhang, Kuixing; Shen, Yayun; Jin, Lin; Zhang, Kaiyue; Yuan, Wentao; Ying WANG; Lin, Jie; Hua, Qi; Wang, Fengqing; Xu, Shuhua; Ren, Suangxi

    2003-01-01

    The study of genomic divergence between humans and primates may provide insight into the origins of human beings and the genetic basis of unique human traits and diseases. Chromosome 21 is the smallest chromosome in the human genome, and some of its regions have been implicated in mental retardation and other diseases. In this study, we sequenced the coding and regulatory regions of 127 known genes on human chromosome 21 in DNA samples from human and chimpanzees and a ...

  18. Characterization and evolution of a single-copy sequence from the human Y chromosome.

    OpenAIRE

    Burk, R D; Ma, P.; Smith, K D

    1985-01-01

    To study the evolution and organization of DNA from the human Y chromosome, we constructed a recombinant library of human Y DNA by using a somatic cell hybrid in which the only cytologically detectable human chromosome is the Y. One recombinant (4B2) contained a 3.3-kilobase EcoRI single-copy fragment which was localized to the proximal portion of the Y long arm. Sequences homologous to this human DNA are present in male gorilla, chimpanzee, and orangutan DNAs but not in female ape DNAs. Unde...

  19. Detailed comparative map of human chromosome 19q and related regions of the mouse genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbs, L.; Shannon, M.E.; Kim, Joomyeong [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    One of the larger contiguous blocks of mouse-human genomic homology includes the proximal portion of mouse chromosome 7 and the long arm of human chromosome 19. Previous studies have demonstrated the close relationship between the two regions, but have also indicated significant rearrangements in the relative orders of homologous mouse and human genes. Here we present the genetic locations of the homologs of 42 human chromosome 19q markers in the mouse, with an emphasis on genes also included in the human chromosome 19 physical map. Our results demonstrate that despite an overall inversion of sequences relative to the centromere, apparent {open_quotes}transpositions{close_quotes} of three gene-rich segments, and a local inversion of markers mapping near the 19q telomere, gene content, order, and spacing are remarkably well conserved throughout the lengths of these related mouse and humans regions. Although most human 19q markers have remained genetically linked in mouse, one small human segment forms a separate region of homology between human chromosome 19q and mouse chromosome 17. Three of the four rearrangements of mouse versus human 19q sequences involve segments that are located directly adjacent to each other in 19q13.3-q13.4, suggesting either the coincident occurrence of these events or their common association with unstable DNA sequences. These data permit an unusually in-depth examination of this large region of mouse-human genomic homology and provide an important new tool to aid in the mapping of genes and associated phenotypes in both species. 66 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig encompassing the critical region of the X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanyi, A; Li, B; Li, S; Talmadge, C B; Brichacek, B; Davis, J R; Kozel, B A; Trask, B; van den Engh, G; Uzvolgyi, E; Stanbridge, E J; Nelson, D L; Chinault, C; Heslop, H; Gross, T G; Seemayer, T A; Klein, G; Purtilo, D T; Sumegi, J

    1997-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is characterized by a marked vulnerability to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. Infection of XLP patients with EBV invariably results in fatal mononucleosis, agammaglobulinemia, or malignant lymphoma. Initially the XLP gene was assigned to a 10-cM region in Xq25 between DXS42 and DXS37. Subsequently, an interstitial, cytogenetically visible deletion in Xq25 was identified in one XLP family, 43. In this study we estimated the deletion in XLP patient 43-004 by dual-laser flow karyotyping to involve 2% of the X chromosome, or approximately 3 Mb of DNA sequence. From a human chromosome Xq25-specific yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) sublibrary, five YACs containing DNA sequences deleted in patient 43-004 have been isolated. Sequence-tagged sites (STSs) from these YACs have been used to identify interstitial deletions in unrelated XLP patients. Three more families with interstitial deletions were found. Two of the patients (63-003 and 73-032) carried an interstitial deletion of 3.0 Mb overlapping the 43-004 deletion. In one XLP patient (30-011) who exhibited the characteristic postinfectious mononucleosis phenotype of XLP with hypogammaglobulinemia and malignant lymphoma, a deletion of approximately 250 kb was detected overlapping the deletion detected in patients 43-004, 63-003, and 73-032. A YAC contig of 2.2 Mb spanning the XLP critical region, whose orientation on chromosome X was determined by double-color fluorescence in situ hybridization and which consists of 15 overlapping YAC clones, has been constructed. A detailed restriction enzyme map of the region has been constructed. YAC insert sizes were determined by counter-clamped homogenous electric field gel electrophoresis. Chimerism of YACs was determined by FISH and restriction mapping. On the basis of lambda subclones, YAC end-derived plasmids, and STSs with an average spacing of 100 kb, a long-range physical map was constructed using 5 rare-cutter restriction

  1. Three-dimensional genome architecture influences partner selection for chromosomal translocations in human disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse M Engreitz

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are frequent features of cancer genomes that contribute to disease progression. These rearrangements result from formation and illegitimate repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, a process that requires spatial colocalization of chromosomal breakpoints. The "contact first" hypothesis suggests that translocation partners colocalize in the nuclei of normal cells, prior to rearrangement. It is unclear, however, the extent to which spatial interactions based on three-dimensional genome architecture contribute to chromosomal rearrangements in human disease. Here we intersect Hi-C maps of three-dimensional chromosome conformation with collections of 1,533 chromosomal translocations from cancer and germline genomes. We show that many translocation-prone pairs of regions genome-wide, including the cancer translocation partners BCR-ABL and MYC-IGH, display elevated Hi-C contact frequencies in normal human cells. Considering tissue specificity, we find that translocation breakpoints reported in human hematologic malignancies have higher Hi-C contact frequencies in lymphoid cells than those reported in sarcomas and epithelial tumors. However, translocations from multiple tissue types show significant correlation with Hi-C contact frequencies, suggesting that both tissue-specific and universal features of chromatin structure contribute to chromosomal alterations. Our results demonstrate that three-dimensional genome architecture shapes the landscape of rearrangements directly observed in human disease and establish Hi-C as a key method for dissecting these effects.

  2. Hierarchical multifractal representation of symbolic sequences and application to human chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.

    2010-02-01

    The two-dimensional density correlation matrix is constructed for symbolic sequences using contiguous segments of arbitrary size. The multifractal spectrum obtained from this matrix motif is shown to characterize the correlations in the symbolic sequences. This method is applied to entire human chromosomes, shuffled human chromosomes, reconstructed human genomic sequences and to artificial random sequences. It is shown that all human chromosomes have common characteristics in their multifractal spectrum and deviate substantially from random and uncorrelated sequences of the same size. Small deviations are observed between the longer and the shorter chromosomes, especially for the higher (in absolute values) statistical moments. The correlations are crucial for the form of the multifractal spectrum; surrogate shuffled chromosomes present randomlike spectrum, distinctly different from the actual chromosomes. Analytical approaches based on hierarchical superposition of tensor products show that retaining pair correlations in the sequences leads to a closer representation of the genomic multifractal spectra, especially in the region of negative exponents, due to the underrepresentation of various functional units (such as the cytosine-guanine CG combination and its complementary GC complex). Retaining higher-order correlations in the construction of the tensor products is a way to approach closer the structure of the multifractal spectra of the actual genomic sequences. This hierarchical approach is generic and is applicable to other correlated symbolic sequences.

  3. Chromosome distribution in human sperm – a 3D multicolor banding-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrasek Kristin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear architecture studies in human sperm are sparse. By now performed ones were practically all done on flattened nuclei. Thus, studies close at the in vivo state of sperm, i.e. on three-dimensionally conserved interphase cells, are lacking by now. Only the position of 14 chromosomes in human sperm was studied. Results Here for the first time a combination of multicolor banding (MCB and three-dimensional analysis of interphase cells was used to characterize the position and orientation of all human chromosomes in sperm cells of a healthy donor. The interphase nuclei of human sperm are organized in a non-random way, driven by the gene density and chromosome size. Conclusion Here we present the first comprehensive results on the nuclear architecture of normal human sperm. Future studies in this tissue type, e.g. also in male patients with unexplained fertility problems, may characterize yet unknown mechanisms of infertility.

  4. FISH detection of ribosomal cistrons and assortment-distortion for X and B chromosomes in Dichroplus pratensis (Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidau, C J; Rosato, M; Martí, D A

    2004-01-01

    Assortment-distortion with respect to the X and NOR activity of a rare mitotically stable B chromosome (B(N)), was examined in 16 males of Dichroplus pratensis (Acrididae: Melanoplinae) from Argentine populations. In 1B individuals, the X and B associate preferentially during prophase I reaching a maximum level of association at zygotene. Frequency of X/B association remains relatively high up to diplotene-diakinesis and decreases steeply towards metaphase I. The percent X/B association at each stage is positively influenced by association at the previous stage, and interindividual variability in X/B association decreases as the frequency of association increases. Both chromosomes tended to preferentially orientate toward the same pole at MI (mean ratio of 16 individuals, 1.50:1) which determined an excess of XB and 00 second spermatocytes over X0 and 0B ones (1.39:1). No significant differences occurred between the MI, AI and MII assortment ratios. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) confirmed that the B chromosome carries ribosomal genes and helped to establish that, during spermiogenesis, both the B and the normal NOR-bearing chromosome (S8) are clustered near the centriole adjunct region of spermatids. However, FISH failed to reveal the existence of inactive ribosomal cistrons in the X chromosome, as previously suggested, thus providing no support to a simple origin of the B from the X.

  5. Human chromokinesins promote chromosome congression and spindle microtubule dynamics during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandke, Cornelia; Barisic, Marin; Sigl, Reinhard; Rauch, Veronika; Wolf, Frank; Amaro, Ana C; Tan, Chia H; Pereira, Antonio J; Kutay, Ulrike; Maiato, Helder; Meraldi, Patrick; Geley, Stephan

    2012-09-01

    Chromokinesins are microtubule plus end-directed motor proteins that bind to chromosome arms. In Xenopus egg cell-free extracts, Xkid and Xklp1 are essential for bipolar spindle formation but the functions of the human homologues, hKID (KIF22) and KIF4A, are poorly understood. By using RNAi-mediated protein knockdown in human cells, we find that only co-depletion delayed progression through mitosis in a Mad2-dependent manner. Depletion of hKID caused abnormal chromosome arm orientation, delayed chromosome congression, and sensitized cells to nocodazole. Knockdown of KIF4A increased the number and length of microtubules, altered kinetochore oscillations, and decreased kinetochore microtubule flux. These changes were associated with failures in establishing a tight metaphase plate and an increase in anaphase lagging chromosomes. Co-depletion of both chromokinesins aggravated chromosome attachment failures, which led to mitotic arrest. Thus, hKID and KIF4A contribute independently to the rapid and correct attachment of chromosomes by controlling the positioning of chromosome arms and the dynamics of microtubules, respectively. PMID:22945934

  6. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature.

  7. Chromosome aberrations induced in human lymphocytes by U-235 fission neutrons: I. Irradiation of human blood samples in the "dry cell" of the TRIGA Mark II nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajgelj, A; Lakoski, A; Horvat, D; Remec, I; Skrk, J; Stegnar, P

    1991-11-01

    A set-up for irradiation of biological samples in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor in Ljubljana is described. Threshold activation detectors were used for characterisation of the neutron flux, and the accompanying gamma dose was measured by TLDs. Human peripheral blood samples were irradiated "in vitro" and biological effects evaluated according to the unstable chromosomal aberrations induced. Biological effects of two types of cultivation of irradiated blood samples, the first immediately after irradiation and the second after 96 h storage, were studied. A significant difference in the incidence of chromosomal aberrations between these two types of samples was obtained, while our dose-response curve fitting coefficients alpha 1 = (7.71 +/- 0.09) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (immediate cultivation) and alpha 2 = (11.03 +/- 0.08) x 10(-2) Gy-1 (96 h delayed cultivation) are in both cases lower than could be found in the literature. PMID:1962281

  8. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project seeks to defining the chromosome segments associated with radiation induced leukemogenesis (treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, or t-AML). Towards these goals genetic analysis of human chromosomes 5 and 7 continues to investigate correlation of treatment with balanced and unbalanced chromosomal translocations. Progress is being made in cloning the breakpoints in balanced translocations in t-AML, that is to clone the t(9;11) and t(11;19) breakpoints, to clone the t(3;21)(q26;q22) breakpoints and to determine the relationship of these translocations to prior exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 11 figs. 3 figs

  9. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  10. The gene for calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAMLG) is located on human Chromosome 5q23 and a syntenic region of mouse chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bram, R.J.; Valentine, V.; Shapiro, D.N. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)]|[Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    The CAMLG gene encodes a novel cyclophilin B-binding protein called calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand, which appears to be involved in the regulation of calcium signaling in T lymphocytes and other cells. The murine homolog, Caml, was localized by interspecific backcross analysis in the middle of chromosome 13. By fluorescence in situ hybridization, this gene was localized to human chromosome 5 in a region (q23) known to be syntenic to mouse chromosome 13. These results provide further evidence supporting the extensive homology between human chromosome 5q and mouse chromosome 13. In addition, the results will provide a basis for further evaluation of cytogenetic anomalies that may contribute to inherited defects in calcium signaling or immune system function. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowcock, A.M.; Barnes, R.I. [Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gerken, S.C.; Leppert, M. [Univ. of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shiang, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Jabs, E.W.; Warren, A.C.; Antonarakis, S. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Retief, A.E. [Univ. of Stellenbosch, Tygerberg (South Africa); Vergnaud, G. [Centre d`Etudes du Bouchet, Vert le Petit (France)] [and others

    1993-05-01

    The CEPH consortium map of chromosome 13 is presented. This map contains 59 loci defined by genotypes generated from CEPH family DNAs with 94 different probe and restriction enzyme combinations contributed by 9 laboratories. A total of 25 loci have been placed on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. The map extends from loci in the centromeric region of chromosome 13 to the terminal band of the long arm. Multipoint linkage analyses provided estimates that the male, female, and sex-averaged maps extend for 158, 203, and 178cM respectively. The largest interval is 24 cM and is between D13Z1 (alphaRI) and ATP1AL1. The mean genetic distance between the 25 uniquely placed loci is 7 cM. 76 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  13. A Newborn with Genital Ambiguity, 45,X/46,XY Mosaicism, a Jumping Chromosome Y, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of sex development (DSD, formerly termed “intersex” conditions, arise from numerous causes. CAH secondary to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most common cause of DSD. Sex chromosome disorders, including sex chromosome mosaicism, are the second most common cause of DSD. We discuss a medically complex neonate with DSD presenting with ambiguous genitalia. Hormone levels suggested 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Molecular analysis revealed compound heterozygous mutations in the 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2, confirming the diagnosis of CAH. Chromosome analysis revealed sex chromosome mosaicism with three cell lines: 45,X[8]/45,X,tas(Y;16(p11.32;p13.3[8]/45,X,t(Y;8(p11.32;p23.3[4] with the Y chromosome in telomere association with chromosomes 8p and 16p in different cell lines, a “jumping translocation.” Histologically, the right gonad had irregular, distended seminiferous tubules with hyperplastic germ cells contiguous with ovarian stroma and primordial follicles. The left gonad had scant ovarian stroma and embryonic remnants. Chromosome analyses showed mosaicism in both gonads: 45,X[17]/45,X,tas(Y;8(p11.32;p23.3[3]. This is the first case of coexisting CAH and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism reported in the English literature and the third case of a constitutional chromosome Y “jumping translocation.” Our report documents the medical and genetic complexity of children such as this one with ambiguous genitalia and discusses the need for a multidisciplinary team approach.

  14. Spermatogenesis Drives Rapid Gene Creation and Masculinization of the X Chromosome in Stalk-Eyed Flies (Diopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Richard H; Narechania, Apurva; DeSalle, Rob; Johns, Philip M; Reinhardt, Josephine A; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2016-03-26

    Throughout their evolutionary history, genomes acquire new genetic material that facilitates phenotypic innovation and diversification. Developmental processes associated with reproduction are particularly likely to involve novel genes. Abundant gene creation impacts the evolution of chromosomal gene content and general regulatory mechanisms such as dosage compensation. Numerous studies in model organisms have found complex and, at times contradictory, relationships among these genomic attributes highlighting the need to examine these patterns in other systems characterized by abundant sexual selection. Therefore, we examined the association among novel gene creation, tissue-specific gene expression, and chromosomal gene content within stalk-eyed flies. Flies in this family are characterized by strong sexual selection and the presence of a newly evolved X chromosome. We generated RNA-seq transcriptome data from the testes for three species within the family and from seven additional tissues in the highly dimorphic species,Teleopsis dalmanni Analysis of dipteran gene orthology reveals dramatic testes-specific gene creation in stalk-eyed flies, involving numerous gene families that are highly conserved in other insect groups. Identification of X-linked genes for the three species indicates that the X chromosome arose prior to the diversification of the family. The most striking feature of this X chromosome is that it is highly masculinized, containing nearly twice as many testes-specific genes as expected based on its size. All the major processes that may drive differential sex chromosome gene content-creation of genes with male-specific expression, development of male-specific expression from pre-existing genes, and movement of genes with male-specific expression-are elevated on the X chromosome ofT. dalmanni This masculinization occurs despite evidence that testes expressed genes do not achieve the same levels of gene expression on the X chromosome as they do on

  15. Human Chromosome Y and Haplogroups; introducing YDHS Database

    OpenAIRE

    Tiirikka, Timo; Moilanen, Jukka S

    2015-01-01

    Background As the high throughput sequencing efforts generate more biological information, scientists from different disciplines are interpreting the polymorphisms that make us unique. In addition, there is an increasing trend in general public to research their own genealogy, find distant relatives and to know more about their biological background. Commercial vendors are providing analyses of mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal markers for such purposes. Clearly, an easy-to-use free interface t...

  16. Paternal uniparental isodisomy for human chromosome 20 and absence of external ears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Rand, E.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M. [Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy can cause disease if the involved chromosomal region contains imprinted genes. Uniparental disomy for portions of human chromosomes 6, 7, 9, 11, 14 and 15 have been associated with abnormal phenotypes. We studied a patient with multiple abnormalities including an absent left ear with a small right ear remnant, microcephaly, congenital heart disease and Hirschprung`s disease. Cytogenetics revealed a 45,XY,-20,-20,+ter rea(20;20)(p13;p13) in 10/10 cells from bone marrow and 20/20 cells from peripheral blood. Analysis of a skin culture revealed a second cell line with trisomy 20 resulting from an apparently normal chromosome 20 in addition to the terminally rearranged chromosome, in 8/100 cells studied. The unusual phenotype of our patient was not consistent with previously reported cases of deletions of 20p or mosaic trisomy 20. We hypothesized that the patient`s phenotype could either result from deletion of both copies of a gene near the p arm terminus of chromosome 20 or from uniparental disomy of chromosome 20. There were no alterations or rearrangements of PTP-alpha (which maps to distal 20p) by Southern or Northern blot analysis. A chromosome 20 sub-telomeric probe was found to be present on the rearranged 20 by FISH suggesting that subtelomeric sequences have not been lost as a consequece of this rearrangement. To determine the parental origin of the 2 chromosome 20`s in the terminal rearrangement, we studied the genotypes of the proband and his parents in lymphoblastoid cell lines at 8 polymorphic loci. Genotypes at D20S115, D20S186, and D20S119 indicated that there was paternal isodisomy. Other loci were uninformative. This is the first example of uniparental disomy for chromosome 20. Further studies are warranted to correlate phenotype with uniparental inheritance of this chromosome.

  17. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamai, Yoshitaka; Taketo, Makoto [Banyu Tsukuba Research Institute, Tsukuba (Japan); Nozaki, Masami [Osaka Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. 18 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Mouse Elk oncogene maps to chromosome X and a novel Elk oncogene (Elk3) maps to chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Y; Taketo, M; Nozaki, M; Seldin, M F

    1995-03-20

    The Elk protein is a member of the Ets family found in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Human ELK1 encoded by ELK1 binds alone or together with serum response factor to DNA and regulates gene expression in a variety of biological processes. Using a panel of interspecific backcross mice, we have mapped the Elk oncogene (Elk) and a novel type Elk oncogene (Elk3), closely related to ELK1. Elk maps to Chr X, and Elk3 maps to the proximal region of Chr 10. PMID:7601474

  19. [The dependence of the level of chromosome aberrations in human lymphocytes on the duration of their cultivation under ultraviolet irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushkovskiĭ, S R; Bezrukov, V F; Bariliak, I R

    1998-01-01

    The effect of duration of cultivation of lymphocytes of human UV-irradiated peripheral blood on the chromosomal aberration rate was studied. Under prolonged cultivation the more irradiated blood samples revealed higher level of chromosomal aberrations. The existence of UV-induced delayed chromosomal instability is supposed that may be found under prolonged cultivation. The mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed.

  20. The microcell mediated transfer of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line C5F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liu; Sheng-Long Ye; Jiong Yang; Zhao-You Tang; Yin-Kun Liu; Lun-Xiu Qin; Shuang-Jian Qiu; Rui-Xia Sun

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Our previous research on the surgical samples of primary liver cancer with CGH showed that the loss of human chromosome 8p had correlation with the metastatic phenotype of liver cancer. In order to seek the functional evidence that there could be a metastatsis suppressor gene (s) for liver cancer on human chromosome 8, we tried to transfer normal human chromosome 8 into rat liver cancer cell line C5F, which had high metastatic potential to lung.METHODS: Human chromosome 8 randomly marked with neo gene was introduced into C5F cell line by MMCT and positive microcell hybrids were screened by double selections of G418 and HAT. Single cell isolation cloning was applied to clone microcell hybrids. Finally, STS-PCR and WCP-FISH were used to confirm the introduction.RESULTS: Microcell hybrids resistant to HAT and G418 were obtained and 15 clones were obtained by single-cell isolation cloning. STS-PCR and WCP-FISH proved that human chromosome 8 had been successfully introduced into rat liver cancer cell line C5F. STS-PCR detected a random loss in the chromosome introduced and WCP-FISH found a consistent recombination of the introduced human chromosome with the rat chromosome.CONCLUSION: The successful introduction of human chromosome 8 into highly metastatic rat liver cancer cell line builds the basis for seeking functional evidence of a metastasis suppressor gene for liver cancer harboring on human chromosome 8 and its subsequent cloning.

  1. Refined human artificial chromosome vectors for gene therapy and animal transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuki, Y; Hoshiya, H; Takiguchi, M; Abe, S; Iida, Y; Osaki, M; Katoh, M; Hiratsuka, M; Shirayoshi, Y; Hiramatsu, K; Ueno, E; Kajitani, N; Yoshino, T; Kazuki, K; Ishihara, C; Takehara, S; Tsuji, S; Ejima, F; Toyoda, A; Sakaki, Y; Larionov, V; Kouprina, N; Oshimura, M

    2011-04-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) have several advantages as gene therapy vectors, including stable episomal maintenance, and the ability to carry large gene inserts. We previously developed HAC vectors from the normal human chromosomes using a chromosome engineering technique. However, endogenous genes were remained in these HACs, limiting their therapeutic applications. In this study, we refined a HAC vector without endogenous genes from human chromosome 21 in homologous recombination-proficient chicken DT40 cells. The HAC was physically characterized using a transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning strategy followed by sequencing of TAR-bacterial artificial chromosome clones. No endogenous genes were remained in the HAC. We demonstrated that any desired gene can be cloned into the HAC using the Cre-loxP system in Chinese hamster ovary cells, or a homologous recombination system in DT40 cells. The HAC can be efficiently transferred to other type of cells including mouse ES cells via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. The transferred HAC was stably maintained in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, tumor cells containing a HAC carrying the suicide gene, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK), were selectively killed by ganciclovir in vitro and in vivo. Thus, this novel HAC vector may be useful not only for gene and cell therapy, but also for animal transgenesis.

  2. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) spanning the synovial sarcoma-specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) breakpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, B; Berger, W; Sinke, R J; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Gilgenkrantz, S; Geraghty, M T; Valle, D; Monaco, A P; Lehrach, H; Ropers, H H

    1993-01-01

    A somatic cell hybrid containing the synovial sarcoma-associated t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) derivative (der(X)) chromosome was used to characterize the translocation breakpoint region on the X chromosome. By using Southern hybridization of DNA from this der(X) hybrid in conjunction with Xp-region specific

  3. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-09-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal's sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function.

  4. An improved method for producing radiation hybrids applied to human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    At the initiation of the grant we had just produced radiation hybrids from a monochromosomal microcell hybrid containing human chromosome 19 as its only human component. Radiation hybrids were produced using doses of radiation ranging from 1000--8000 rads. Lethally irradiated cells were then fused to hamster recipients (CHTG49) and selected for growth in histidinol. Approximately 240 clones were isolated and 75 clones were expanded for the isolation of DNA. This report describes in situ hybridization studies and the introduction of markers into human chromosome 19.

  5. Interspecific comparisons of the sensitivity to chromosome aberration production by x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is concluded that arm number probably plays a minor role, if any, in the relative radiosensitivity of a species. Instead the reported differences are probably a reflection of inherent basic biological mechanisms of repair that vary from one order of mammals to the next. It should be added, however, that the ultimate goal of all of these studies is to make a reasonable risk estimate for man. In that context the best approach is that of conservatism and the current data on mouse and man suggest that man has 1.5 to 2.0 times the risk of mice for chromosome rearrangement induction by x rays

  6. Location of the handedness gene on the X and Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corballis, M.C.; Lee, K. [Univ. of Auckland (New Zealand); McManus, I.C. [Univ. College London (United Kingdom); Crow, T.J. [Warneford Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1996-02-16

    Accumulated data from five handedness surveys show that concordance for sex is slightly but reliably higher among siblings of the same handedness than among those of opposite handedness. This is consistent with Crow`s theory that the genetic locus for handedness is in an X-Y homologous region of the sex chromosomes. The small size of the effect is predicted from genetic models in which there is a substantial random component underlying phenotypic left handedness. The findings are relevant to the putative role of cerebral asymmetry in the aetiology of psychosis. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. The single mitochondrial chromosome typical of animals has evolved into 18 minichromosomes in the human body louse, Pediculus humanus

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Renfu; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Barker, Stephen C.

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial (mt) genomes of animals typically consist of a single circular chromosome that is ∼16-kb long and has 37 genes. Our analyses of the sequence reads from the Human Body Louse Genome Project and the patterns of gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization revealed a novel type of mt genome in the sucking louse, Pediculus humanus. Instead of having all mt genes on a single chromosome, the 37 mt genes of this louse are on 18 minicircular chromosomes. Each minicircular chromosom...

  8. Extensive fragmentation of the X chromosome in the bed bug Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 (Heteroptera, Cimicidae: a survey across Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sadílek

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Variation in the number of chromosomes was revealed in 61 samples of Cimex lectularius Linnaeus, 1758 from the Czech Republic and other European countries, hosted on Myotis Kaup, 1829 (4 and Homo sapiens Linnaeus, 1758 (57. The karyotype of all the specimens of C. lectularius analysed contained 26 autosomes and a varying number of the sex chromosomes. The number of sex chromosomes showed extensive variation, and up to 20 fragments were recorded. Altogether, 12 distinct karyotypes were distinguished. The male karyotypes consisted of 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 40, 42 and 47 chromosomes. The females usually exhibited the number of chromosomes which was complementary to the number established in the males from the same sample. However, 11 polymorphic samples were revealed in which the karyotypes of females and males were not complementary each other. The complement with 2n = 26+X1X2Y was found in 44% of the specimens and 57,4% samples of bed bugs studied. The karyotypes with higher chromosome numbers as well as individuals with chromosomal mosaics were usually found within the samples exhibiting particularly extensive variation between individuals, and such complements were not found within samples contaning a few or single specimen. The occurrence of chromosomal mosaics with the karyotype constitution varying between cells of single individual was observed in five specimens (4.3% from five samples. We assume that polymorphism caused by fragmentation of the X chromosome may result in meiotic problems and non-disjunction can produce unbalanced gametes and result in lowered fitness of individuals carrying higher numbers of the X chromosome fragments. This effect should be apparently enhanced with the increasing number of the fragments and this may be the reason for the observed distribution pattern of individual karyotypes in the studied samples and the rarity of individuals with extremely high chromosome numbers. The assumed lowering of the

  9. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes for the analysis of chromosome aberrations in mutagen tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on exposed individuals, and on cultured cells, have shown that the human peripheral blood lymphocyte is an extremely sensitive indicator of both in vivo and in vitro induced chromosome structural change. These changes in chromosome structure offer readily scored morphological evidence of damage to the genetic material. Although problems exist in the extrapolation from in vitro results to the in vivo situation, the lymphocyte offers several advantages as a test system. The types of chromosome damage which can be cytologically distinguished at metaphase can be divided into two main groups: chromosome type and chromatid type. The circulating lymphocyte is in the G/sub 0/ or G/sub 1/ phase of mitosis and exposure to ionising radiations and certain other mutagenic agents during this stage produces chromosome-type damage where the unit of breakage and reunion is the whole chromosome (i.e. both chromatids at the same locus). However, cells exposed to these agents while in the S or G/sub 2/ stages of the cell cycle, after the chromosome has divided into two sister chromatids, yield chromatid-type aberrations and only the single chromatid is involved in breakage or exchange. Other agents (e.g. some of the alkylating agents) will usually produce only chromatid-type aberrations in cells in cycle although the cells are exposed to the mutagen whilst in G/sub 1/

  10. The human and mouse receptors of hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAMM, genes (HMMR) map to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter and mouse chromosome 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spicer, A.P.; McDonald, J.A. [Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Roller, M.L.; Camper, S.A. [Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    The gene for the receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility, RHAAM (designated hyaluronan-mediated motility receptor, HMMR (human) and Hmmr (mouse), for mapping purposes), was localized to human chromosome 5q33.2-qter by somatic cell and radiation hybrid analyses. Investigation of two interspecific back-crosses localized the mouse RHAMM (Hmmr) locus 18 cM from the centromere of mouse chromosome 11 within a region of synteny homology with human chromosome 5q23-q35 genes. The map position of the human RHAMM gene places it in a region comparatively rich in disease-associated genes, including those for low-frequency hearing loss, dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, diastrophic dysplasia, Treacher Collins syndrome, and myeloid disorders associated with the 5q-syndrome. The RHAMM gene location and its ability to transform cells when overexpressed implicate RHAMM as a possible candidate gene in the pathogenesis of the recently described t(5;14)(q33-q34;q11) acute lymphoblastic leukemias. 18 refs., 1 fig.

  11. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  12. A comparison of chromosomal aberrations induced by in vivo radiotherapy in human sperm and lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosomal aberrations in human sperm and lymphocytes were compared before and after in vivo radiation treatment of 13 cancer patients. The times of analyses after radiotherapy (RT) were 1, 3, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months. The median total radiation dose was 30 Gy and the testicular dose varied from 0.4 to 5.0 Gy. Human sperm chromosome complements were analysed after fusion with golden hamster eggs. There were no abnormalities in sperm or lymphocytes before RT. Following RT there was an increase in the frequency of numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities in both lymphocytes and sperm. For structural abnormalities there were more rejoined lesions (dicentrics, rings) in lymphocytes and more unrejoined lesions (chromosome breaks, fragments) in sperm. It appears that the frequency of lymphocyte chromosomal abnormalities had an initial marked increase after RT followed by a gradual decrease with time whereas the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities was elevated when sperm production recovered and remained elevated from 24 to 60 mo. post-RT. This difference in the effect of time makes it very difficult to compare abnormality rates in lymphocytes and sperm and to use analysis of induced damage in somatic cells as surrogates for germ cells since the ratio between sperm and lymphocytes varied from 1:1 (at 24 mo. post-RT) to 5:1 (at 60 mo. post-RT). (author). 14 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  13. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-08-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system.

  14. Protective Effect of Curcumin on γ - radiation Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Blood Lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is aimed at evaluating the radioprotective effect of curcumin on γ radiation induced genetic toxicity. The DNA damage was analyzed by the frequencies of chromosome aberrations assay. Human lymphocytes were treated in vitro with 5.0 γg/ml of curcumin for 30 min at 37 degree C then exposed to 1, 2 and 4 Gy gamma-radiation. The lymphocytes which were pre-treated with curcumin exhibited a significant decrease in the frequency of chromosome aberration at 1 and 2 Gy radiation-induced chromosome damage as compared with the irradiated cells which did not receive the curcumin pretreatment. Thus, pretreatment with curcumin gives protection to lymphocytes against γ-radiation induced chromosome aberration at certain doses. (author)

  15. Multiplex single-nucleotide polymorphism typing of the human Y chromosome using TaqMan probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cruz Begoña

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of human Y-chromosome variation in the context of population genetics and forensics requires the genotyping of dozens to hundreds of selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In the present study, we developed a 121-plex (121 SNPs in a single array TaqMan array capable of distinguishing most haplogroups and subhaplogroups on the Y-chromosome human phylogeny in Europe. Results We present data from 264 samples from several European areas and ethnic groups. The array developed in this study shows >99% accuracy of assignation to the Y human phylogeny (with an average call rate of genotypes >96%. Conclusions We have created and evaluated a robust and accurate Y-chromosome multiplex which minimises the possible errors due to mixup when typing the same sample in several independent reactions.

  16. Evaluating the Y chromosomal timescale in human demographic and lineage dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuan-Chao; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jin, Li; Li, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Y chromosome is a superb tool for inferring human evolution and recent demographic history from a paternal perspective. However, Y chromosomal substitution rates obtained using different modes of calibration vary considerably, and have produced disparate reconstructions of human history. Here, we discuss how substitution rate and date estimates are affected by the choice of different calibration points. We argue that most Y chromosomal substitution rates calculated to date have shortcomings, including a reliance on the ambiguous human-chimpanzee divergence time, insufficient sampling of deep-rooting pedigrees, and using inappropriate founding migrations, although the rates obtained from a single pedigree or calibrated with the peopling of the Americas seem plausible. We highlight the need for using more deep-rooting pedigrees and ancient genomes with reliable dates to improve the rate estimation. PMID:25215184

  17. Structure and chromosomal localization of the gene encoding the human myelin protein zero (MPZ)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro (Akita Univ. School of Medicine, Akita (Japan)); Wang, Yimin; Takata, Mizuho; Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi; Miura, Masayuki; Uyemura, Keiichi (Keio Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human myelin protein zero (MPZ) gene (a structural protein of myelin and an adhesive glycoprotein of the immunoglobulin superfamily). The gene is about 7 kb long and consists of six exons corresponding of the functional domains. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box), two CAAT boxes, and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human MPZ was assigned to chromosome 1q22-q23 by spot blot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The localization of the MPZ gene coincides with the locus for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1B, determined by linkage analysis. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Distribution of Chromosome Breakpoints in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed to Low- and High-LET Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is not only its ability to identify simultaneously both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges, but also the ability to measure the breakpoint location along the length of the chromosome in a precision that is unmatched with other traditional banding techniques. Breakpoints on specific regions of a chromosome have been known to associate with specific cancers. The breakpoint distribution in cells after low- and high-LET radiation exposures will also provide the data for biophysical modeling of the chromatin structure, as well as the data for the modeling the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. In a series of experiments, we studied low- and high-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations using the mBAND technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 different colored bands. Human epithelial cells (CH1 84B5F5/M10) were exposed in vitro to Cs- 137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons with a broad energy spectrum at a low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The data of both inter- and intrachromosome aberrations involving the painted chromosome have been reported previously. Here we present data of the location of the chromosome breaks along the length of chromosome 3 in the cells after exposures to each of the four radiation scenarios. In comparison to the expected breakpoint distribution based on the length of the bands, the observed distribution appeared to be non-random for both the low- and high-LET radiations. In particular, hot spots towards both ends of the chromosome were found after low-LET irradiations of either low or high dose rates. For both high-LET radiation types (Fe ions and neutrons), the breakpoint distributions were similar, and were much smoother than that for low-LET radiation. The dependence of the breakpoint distribution on the radiation quality requires further investigations.

  19. Independent clonal origin of multiple uterine leiomyomas that was determined by X chromosome inactivation and microsatellite analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canevari, Renata A; Pontes, Anaglória; Rosa, Fabíola E;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an attempt to clarify the clonality and genetic relationships that are involved in the tumorigenesis of uterine leiomyomas, we used a total of 43 multiple leiomyomas from 14 patients and analyzed the allelic status with 15 microsatellite markers and X chromosome inactivation analysis....... STUDY DESIGN: We have used a set of 15 microsatellite polymorphism markers mapped on 3q, 7p, 11, and 15q by automated analysis. The X chromosome inactivation was evaluated by the methylation status of the X-linked androgen receptor gene. RESULTS: Loss of heterozygosity analysis showed a different...... pattern in 7 of the 8 cases with allelic loss for at least 1 of 15 microsatellite markers that were analyzed. A similar loss of heterozygosity findings at 7p22-15 was detected in 3 samples from the same patient. X chromosome inactivation analysis demonstrated the same inactivated allele in all tumors...

  20. Structure and chromosomal localization of the human antidiuretic hormone receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seibold, A.; Brabet, P.; Rosenthal, W.; Birnbaumer, M. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Applying a genomic DNA-expression approach, the authors cloned the gene and cDNA coding for the human antidiuretic hormone receptor, also called vasopressin V2 receptor' (V2R). The nucleotide sequence of both cloned DNAs provided the information to elucidate the structure of the isolated transcriptional unit. The structure of this gene is unusual in that it is the first G protein-coupled receptor gene that contains two very small intervening sequences, the second of which separates the region encoding the seventh transmembrane region from the rest of the open reading frame. The sequence information was used to synthesize appropriate oligonucleotides to be used as primers in the PCR. The V2R gene was localized by PCR using DNA from hybrid cells as template. The gene was found to reside in the q28-qter portion of the human X chromosome, a region identified as the locus for congential nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. 27 refs., 4 figs.

  1. The parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome may differentially affect psychopathology in Klinefelter syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, Hilgo; van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Giltay, Jacques; Kates, Wendy; Kas, Martien J H; van Engeland, Herman; de Sonneville, Leo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several genetic mechanisms have been proposed for the variability of the Klinefelter syndrome (KS) phenotype such as the parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome. Parent-of-origin effects on behavior in KS can possibly provide insights into X-linked imprinting effects on psychopatholog

  2. The Parent-of-Origin of the Extra X Chromosome May Differentially Affect Psychopathology in Klinefelter Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, Hilgo; van Rijn, Sophie; Swaab, Hanna; Giltay, Jacques; Kates, Wendy; Kas, Martien J. H.; van Engeland, Herman; de Sonneville, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Several genetic mechanisms have been proposed for the variability of the Klinefelter syndrome (KS) phenotype such as the parent-of-origin of the extra X chromosome. Parent-of-origin effects on behavior in KS can possibly provide insights into X-linked imprinting effects on psychopatholog

  3. A self-enhanced transport mechanism through long noncoding RNAs for X chromosome inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunhe; Hong, Tian; Webb, Chiu-Ho; Karner, Heather; Sun, Sha; Nie, Qing

    2016-08-16

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) is the mammalian dosage compensation strategy for balancing sex chromosome content between females and males. While works exist on initiation of symmetric breaking, the underlying allelic choice mechanisms and dynamic regulation responsible for the asymmetric fate determination of XCI remain elusive. Here we combine mathematical modeling and experimental data to examine the mechanism of XCI fate decision by analyzing the signaling regulatory circuit associated with long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in XCI. We describe three plausible gene network models that incorporate features of lncRNAs in their localized actions and rapid transcriptional turnovers. In particular, we show experimentally that Jpx (a lncRNA) is transcribed biallelically, escapes XCI, and is asymmetrically dispersed between two X's. Subjecting Jpx to our test of model predictions against previous experimental observations, we identify that a self-enhanced transport feedback mechanism is critical to XCI fate decision. In addition, the analysis indicates that an ultrasensitive response of Jpx signal on CTCF is important in this mechanism. Overall, our combined modeling and experimental data suggest that the self-enhanced transport regulation based on allele-specific nature of lncRNAs and their temporal dynamics provides a robust and novel mechanism for bi-directional fate decisions in critical developmental processes.

  4. Effects of arsenic upon the no-disyuntion and X chromosome loss mechanisms in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present investigation we make the analysis of the effect of the sodium arsenite chemistry in concentration 0.2 m M over the events of no-disyuntion and chromosome loss X in germinal cells of Drosophila melanogaster. The Drosophila lineages used for this assay were: females (y2 wa / y2 wa ; e/e) and males (XC2 yf bb- / Bs Y y+). Those lineages were propagated and isolated for to be used after in the assays. Subsequently these, we make some links types with these individuals with the object to observed the effects of the oral administration of sodium arsenite in the adult individuals, in each one, we induce a damage in the sperm of the male with gamma radiation (25 Gy) and was observed immediately the results of the different assay applied in the first generation (F1). Finally, we analyze and compare the results in contrast with and other investigation we find that the chemistry cause a significant increment in the chromosome loss X either the No-disyuntion was not significative. Also, the arsenite sodium increment the male descendant productivity, so, we deduced that the sodium arsenite do not cause an inhibition of the reparation mechanisms present in the Drosophila melanogaster female ovocites, but the chemistry operated like a modulator of this mechanisms, and prevent an increment of the damage provoked for the gamma radiation over the Drosophila melanogaster male sperm. (Author)

  5. Single-cell analyses of X Chromosome inactivation dynamics and pluripotency during differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Geng; Schell, John Paul; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Petropoulos, Sophie; Yilmaz, Marlene; Reinius, Björn; Alekseenko, Zhanna; Shi, Leming; Hedlund, Eva; Lanner, Fredrik; Sandberg, Rickard; Deng, Qiaolin

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotency, differentiation, and X Chromosome inactivation (XCI) are key aspects of embryonic development. However, the underlying relationship and mechanisms among these processes remain unclear. Here, we systematically dissected these features along developmental progression using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and single-cell RNA sequencing with allelic resolution. We found that mESCs grown in a ground state 2i condition displayed transcriptomic profiles diffused from preimplantation mouse embryonic cells, whereas EpiStem cells closely resembled the post-implantation epiblast. Sex-related gene expression varied greatly across distinct developmental states. We also identified novel markers that were highly enriched in each developmental state. Moreover, we revealed that several novel pathways, including PluriNetWork and Focal Adhesion, were responsible for the delayed progression of female EpiStem cells. Importantly, we “digitalized” XCI progression using allelic expression of active and inactive X Chromosomes and surprisingly found that XCI states exhibited profound variability in each developmental state, including the 2i condition. XCI progression was not tightly synchronized with loss of pluripotency and increase of differentiation at the single-cell level, although these processes were globally correlated. In addition, highly expressed genes, including core pluripotency factors, were in general biallelically expressed. Taken together, our study sheds light on the dynamics of XCI progression and the asynchronicity between pluripotency, differentiation, and XCI. PMID:27486082

  6. Cytogenetic analysis of mechanism of formation of radiation-induced chromosome exchanges. [Crepis capillaris, x radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azatyan, R.A.; Akif' ev, A.P.; Shavel' zon, R.A.; Voskanyan, A.Z.; Zakaryan, M.S.

    1977-01-01

    An unusual spectrum of aberrations, characterized by a sharp exchange deficiency, was demonstrated in germinating seeds of Crepis capillaris L. synchronized with 2'-deoxy-5-fluorouridine at the start of the S phase following exposure to 100 R x-rays. The modification of the cytogenetic effect of x-radiation of dry crepis seeds (10 and 15 kR) by 5-aminouracil consisted of a higher yield of aberrations without decrease in share of exchanges of the chromosome type. The obtained data are consistent with the hypothesis that exchange aberrations occur due to interaction between spontaneous single-stranded DNA defects limited to identical or similar repeated nucleotide sequences The exchange interactions are blocked when the cells move into the stage of DNA synthesis.

  7. Allele and haplotype diversity of X-chromosomal STRs in Ivory Coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasino, Serena; Caratti, Stefano; Del Pero, Massimiliano; Santovito, Alfredo; Torre, Carlo; Robino, Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Twenty-one X-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) loci, including the six clusters of linked markers DXS10148-DXS10135-DXS8378 (Xp22), DXS7132-DXS10079-DXS10074 (Xq12), DXS6801-DXS6809-DXS6789 (Xq21), DXS7424-DXS101 (Xq22), DXS10103-HPRTB-DXS10101 (Xq26), DXS8377-DXS10146-DXS10134-DXS7423 (Xq28) and the loci DXS6800, GATA172D05 and DXS10011 were typed in a population sample from Ivory Coast (n=125; 51 men and 74 women). Allele and haplotype frequencies as well as linkage disequilibrium data for kinship calculations are provided. On the whole, no significant differences in the genetic variability of X-STR markers were observed between Ivorians and other sub-Saharan African populations belonging to the Niger-Kordofanian linguistic group.

  8. No influence of parental origin of intact X chromosome and/or Y chromosome sequences on three-year height response to growth hormone therapy in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jin; Jung, Hae Woon; Lee, Gyung Min; Kim, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hyun; Lee, Sun Hee; Kim, Ji Hyun; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whether parental origin of the intact X chromosome and/or the presence of Y chromosome sequences (Yseq) play a role in three-year height response to growth hormone (GH) were investigated. Methods Paternal (Xp) or maternal (Xm) origin of X chromosome was assessed by microsatellite marker analysis and the presence of hidden Yseq was analyzed. The first-, second-, and third-year GH response was measured as a change in height z-score (Z_Ht) in Turner syndrome (TS) patients with 45,Xp (n=10), 45,Xm (n=15), and 45,X/46,X,+mar(Y) (Xm_Yseq) (n=8). Results The mean baseline Z_Ht did not differ according to Xp or Xm origin, however the mean baseline Z_Ht was higher in the Xm_Yseq group than in Xm group, after adjusting for bone age delay and midparental Z_Ht (P=0.04). There was no difference in the height response to GH between the 3 groups. The height response to GH decreased progressively each year (P<0.001), such that the third-year increase in Z_Ht was not significant. This third-year decrease in treatment response was unaffected by Xp, Xm, and Xm_Yseq groups. Increasing GH dosage from the second to third-year of treatment positively correlated with the increase in Z_Ht (P=0.017). Conclusion There was no evidence of X-linked imprinted genes and/or Yseq affecting height response to 3 years of GH therapy. Increasing GH dosages may help attenuate the decrease in third-year GH response in TS patients with 45,X and/or 46,X/+mar(Y). PMID:25346916

  9. Frequency of Chromosomally-Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6 in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Annie Gravel; Daniel Sinnett; Louis Flamand

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous pathogen infecting nearly 100% of the human population. Of these individuals, between 0.2% and 1% of them carry chromosomally-integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6). The biological consequences of chromosomal integration by HHV-6 remain unknown. Objective To determine and compare the frequency of ciHHV-6 in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia to healthy blood donors. Methodology A total of 293 DNA samples from children with pre-B (n = 255), ...

  10. Cloning of a human galactokinase gene (GK2) on chromosome 15 by complementation in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, R T; Peterson, C L; Calman, A F; Herskowitz, I.; O'Donnell, J J

    1992-01-01

    A human cDNA encoding a galactokinase (EC 2.7.1.6) was isolated by complementation of a galactokinase-deficient (gal1-) strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This cDNA encodes a predicted protein of 458 amino acids with 29% identity to galactokinase of Saccharomyces carlsbergensis. Previous studies have mapped a human galactokinase gene (GK1) to chromosome 17q23-25, closely linked to thymidine kinase. The galactokinase gene that we have isolated (GK2) is located on chromosome 15. The relationsh...

  11. Genetic and epigenetic changes of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordiyuk V. V.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous disorders of genes and alterations of their expression are observed on a short arm of human chromosome 3, particularly in 3p14, 3p21, 3p24 compact regions in epithelial tumors. These aberrations affect the key biological processes specific for cancerogenesis. Such genes or their products could be used for diagnostics and prognosis of cancer. Genetical and epigenetical changes of a number of genes on chromosome 3 in human urogenital cancer, their role in cellular processes and signal pathways and perspectives as molecular markers of cancer diseases are analyzed in the review

  12. Chromosomal jumping from the DXS165 locus allows molecular characterization of four microdeletions and a de novo chromosome X/13 translocation associated with choroideremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Cremers, F P; van de Pol, D J; Wieringa, B; Collins, F S; Sankila, E M; Siu, V. M.; Flintoff, W F; Brunsmann, F.; Blonden, L A; Ropers, H H

    1989-01-01

    Choroideremia (tapeto-choroidal dystrophy, TCD), an X chromosome-linked disorder of retina and choroid, causes progressive nightblindness and central blindness in affected males by the third to fourth decade of life. Recently, we have been able to map the TCD gene to a small region of overlap between five different, male-viable Xq21 deletions that were found in patients with TCD and other clinical features. Two families were identified in which classical, nonsyndromic TCD is associated with s...

  13. Final report. Human artificial episomal chromosome (HAEC) for building large genomic libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean-Michael H. Vos

    1999-12-09

    Collections of human DNA fragments are maintained for research purposes as clones in bacterial host cells. However for unknown reasons, some regions of the human genome appear to be unclonable or unstable in bacteria. Their team has developed a system using episomes (extrachromosomal, autonomously replication DNA) that maintains large DNA fragments in human cells. This human artificial episomal chromosomal (HAEC) system may prove useful for coverage of these especially difficult regions. In the broader biomedical community, the HAEC system also shows promise for use in functional genomics and gene therapy. Recent improvements to the HAEC system and its application to mapping, sequencing, and functionally studying human and mouse DNA are summarized. Mapping and sequencing the human genome and model organisms are only the first steps in determining the function of various genetic units critical for gene regulation, DNA replication, chromatin packaging, chromosomal stability, and chromatid segregation. Such studies will require the ability to transfer and manipulate entire functional units into mammalian cells.

  14. Analysis of the DNA sequence and duplication history of human chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zody, Michael C; Garber, Manuel; Sharpe, Ted; Young, Sarah K; Rowen, Lee; O'Neill, Keith; Whittaker, Charles A; Kamal, Michael; Chang, Jean L; Cuomo, Christina A; Dewar, Ken; FitzGerald, Michael G; Kodira, Chinnappa D; Madan, Anup; Qin, Shizhen; Yang, Xiaoping; Abbasi, Nissa; Abouelleil, Amr; Arachchi, Harindra M; Baradarani, Lida; Birditt, Brian; Bloom, Scott; Bloom, Toby; Borowsky, Mark L; Burke, Jeremy; Butler, Jonathan; Cook, April; DeArellano, Kurt; DeCaprio, David; Dorris, Lester; Dors, Monica; Eichler, Evan E; Engels, Reinhard; Fahey, Jessica; Fleetwood, Peter; Friedman, Cynthia; Gearin, Gary; Hall, Jennifer L; Hensley, Grace; Johnson, Ericka; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kaur, Amardeep; Locke, Devin P; Madan, Anuradha; Munson, Glen; Jaffe, David B; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Pendexter; Mauceli, Evan; Naylor, Jerome W; Nesbitt, Ryan; Nicol, Robert; O'Leary, Sinéad B; Ratcliffe, Amber; Rounsley, Steven; She, Xinwei; Sneddon, Katherine M B; Stewart, Sandra; Sougnez, Carrie; Stone, Sabrina M; Topham, Kerri; Vincent, Dascena; Wang, Shunguang; Zimmer, Andrew R; Birren, Bruce W; Hood, Leroy; Lander, Eric S; Nusbaum, Chad

    2006-03-30

    Here we present a finished sequence of human chromosome 15, together with a high-quality gene catalogue. As chromosome 15 is one of seven human chromosomes with a high rate of segmental duplication, we have carried out a detailed analysis of the duplication structure of the chromosome. Segmental duplications in chromosome 15 are largely clustered in two regions, on proximal and distal 15q; the proximal region is notable because recombination among the segmental duplications can result in deletions causing Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. Sequence analysis shows that the proximal and distal regions of 15q share extensive ancient similarity. Using a simple approach, we have been able to reconstruct many of the events by which the current duplication structure arose. We find that most of the intrachromosomal duplications seem to share a common ancestry. Finally, we demonstrate that some remaining gaps in the genome sequence are probably due to structural polymorphisms between haplotypes; this may explain a significant fraction of the gaps remaining in the human genome. PMID:16572171

  15. Identification of human chromosome 22 transcribed sequences with ORF expressed sequence tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Sandro J.; Camargo, Anamaria A.; Briones, Marcelo R. S.; Costa, Fernando F.; Nagai, Maria Aparecida; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Zago, Marco A.; Andrade, Luis Eduardo C.; Carrer, Helaine; El-Dorry, Hamza F. A.; Espreafico, Enilza M.; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Giannella-Neto, Daniel; Goldman, Gustavo H.; Gruber, Arthur; Hackel, Christine; Kimura, Edna T.; Maciel, Rui M. B.; Marie, Suely K. N.; Martins, Elizabeth A. L.; Nóbrega, Marina P.; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa; Pardini, Maria Inês M. C.; Pereira, Gonçalo G.; Pesquero, João Bosco; Rodrigues, Vanderlei; Rogatto, Silvia R.; da Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Sogayar, Mari C.; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Tajara, Eloiza H.; Valentini, Sandro R.; Acencio, Marcio; Alberto, Fernando L.; Amaral, Maria Elisabete J.; Aneas, Ivy; Bengtson, Mário Henrique; Carraro, Dirce M.; Carvalho, Alex F.; Carvalho, Lúcia Helena; Cerutti, Janete M.; Corrêa, Maria Lucia C.; Costa, Maria Cristina R.; Curcio, Cyntia; Gushiken, Tsieko; Ho, Paulo L.; Kimura, Elza; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Maia, Gustavo; Majumder, Paromita; Marins, Mozart; Matsukuma, Adriana; Melo, Analy S. A.; Mestriner, Carlos Alberto; Miracca, Elisabete C.; Miranda, Daniela C.; Nascimento, Ana Lucia T. O.; Nóbrega, Francisco G.; Ojopi, Élida P. B.; Pandolfi, José Rodrigo C.; Pessoa, Luciana Gilbert; Rahal, Paula; Rainho, Claudia A.; da Ro's, Nancy; de Sá, Renata G.; Sales, Magaly M.; da Silva, Neusa P.; Silva, Tereza C.; da Silva, Wilson; Simão, Daniel F.; Sousa, Josane F.; Stecconi, Daniella; Tsukumo, Fernando; Valente, Valéria; Zalcberg, Heloisa; Brentani, Ricardo R.; Reis, Luis F. L.; Dias-Neto, Emmanuel; Simpson, Andrew J. G.

    2000-01-01

    Transcribed sequences in the human genome can be identified with confidence only by alignment with sequences derived from cDNAs synthesized from naturally occurring mRNAs. We constructed a set of 250,000 cDNAs that represent partial expressed gene sequences and that are biased toward the central coding regions of the resulting transcripts. They are termed ORF expressed sequence tags (ORESTES). The 250,000 ORESTES were assembled into 81,429 contigs. Of these, 1,181 (1.45%) were found to match sequences in chromosome 22 with at least one ORESTES contig for 162 (65.6%) of the 247 known genes, for 67 (44.6%) of the 150 related genes, and for 45 of the 148 (30.4%) EST-predicted genes on this chromosome. Using a set of stringent criteria to validate our sequences, we identified a further 219 previously unannotated transcribed sequences on chromosome 22. Of these, 171 were in fact also defined by EST or full length cDNA sequences available in GenBank but not utilized in the initial annotation of the first human chromosome sequence. Thus despite representing less than 15% of all expressed human sequences in the public databases at the time of the present analysis, ORESTES sequences defined 48 transcribed sequences on chromosome 22 not defined by other sequences. All of the transcribed sequences defined by ORESTES coincided with DNA regions predicted as encoding exons by genscan. (http://genes.mit.edu/GENSCAN.html). PMID:11070084

  16. A novel tandem repeat sequence located on human chromosome 4p: isolation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, M; Fukushige, S; Lefevre, C; Hadano, S; Ikeda, J E

    1997-06-01

    In an effort to analyze the genomic region of the distal half of human chromosome 4p, to where Huntington disease and other diseases have been mapped, we have isolated the cosmid clone (CRS447) that was likely to contain a region with specific repeat sequences. Clone CRS447 was subjected to detailed analysis, including chromosome mapping, restriction mapping, and DNA sequencing. Chromosome mapping by both a human-CHO hybrid cell panel and FISH revealed that CRS447 was predominantly located in the 4p15.1-15.3 region. CRS447 was shown to consist of tandem repeats of 4.7-kb units present on chromosome 4p. A single EcoRI unit was subcloned (pRS447), and the complete sequence was determined as 4752 nucleotides. When pRS447 was used as a probe, the number of copies of this repeat per haploid genome was estimated to be 50-70. Sequence analysis revealed that it contained two internal CA repeats and one putative ORF. Database search established that this sequence was unreported. However, two homologous STS markers were found in the database. We concluded that CRS447/pRS447 is a novel tandem repeat sequence that is mainly specific to human chromosome 4p.

  17. Unique genomic sequences in human chromosome 16p are conserved in the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarzami, S T; Kringstein, A M; Conte, R A; Verma, R S

    1997-01-27

    In humans, acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMML) with abnormal bone marrow eosinophilia is diagnosed by the presence of a pericentric inversion in chromosome 16, involving breakpoints p13;q23 [i.e., inv(16)(p13;q23)]. A pericentric inversion involves breaks that have occurred on the p and q arms and the segment in between is rotated 180 degrees and reattaches. The recent development of a "human micro-coatasome" painting probe for 16p contains unique DNA sequences that fluorescently label only the short arm of chromosome 16, which facilitates the identification of such inversions and represents an ideal tool for analyzing the "divergence/convergence" of the equivalent human chromosome 16 (PTR 18, GGO 17 and PPY 19) in the great apes, chimpanzee, gorilla and orangutan. When the probe is used on the type of pericentric inversion characteristic of AMML, signals are observed on the proximal portions (the regions closest to the centromere) of the long and short arms of chromosome 16. The probe hybridized to only the short arm of all three ape chromosomes and signals were not observed on the long arms, suggesting that a pericentric inversion similar to that seen in AMML has not occurred in any of these great apes. PMID:9037113

  18. Constructing chromosome- and region-specific cosmid maps of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrano, A V; de Jong, P J; Branscomb, E; Slezak, T; Watkins, B W

    1989-01-01

    A chromosome-specific ordered set of cosmids would be a significant contribution toward understanding human chromosome structure and function. We are developing two parallel approaches for creating an ordered cosmid library of human chromosome 19 and other selected subregions of the human genome. The "bottom up" approach is used to establish sets of overlapping cosmids as islands or "contigs" along the chromosome, while the "top down" approach, using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and yeast cloning, will establish a large-fragment map and close the inevitable gaps remaining from the "bottom up" approach. Source DNA consists of a single homolog of chromosome 19 from a hamster--human hybrid cell and human fragments cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes. We have constructed cosmid libraries in a vector that facilitates cloning small amounts of DNA, allows transcription of the insert termini, and contains unique sites for partial-digest mapping. Computer simulations of cosmid contig building suggest that near-optimal efficiency can be achieved with high-density restriction fragment digest schemes that can detect 20-30% overlap between cosmids. We developed the chemistry and data analysis tools to compare the ordering efficiencies of several cosmid restriction digest fingerprinting strategies. Restriction fragments from a four-cutter digest are labeled with a fluorochrome, separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and detected after laser excitation as they traverse a fixed point in the gel. We have also developed the software to rapidly process the output signal to define and analyze the fragment peaks. Up to three cosmids (or three different digests of the same cosmid) plus a size standard are analyzed simultaneously in a single gel lane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2698823

  19. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Giorgi, D. [CNRS, Montpelier (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  20. Colocalization of coregulated genes: a steered molecular dynamics study of human chromosome 19.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Di Stefano

    Full Text Available The connection between chromatin nuclear organization and gene activity is vividly illustrated by the observation that transcriptional coregulation of certain genes appears to be directly influenced by their spatial proximity. This fact poses the more general question of whether it is at all feasible that the numerous genes that are coregulated on a given chromosome, especially those at large genomic distances, might become proximate inside the nucleus. This problem is studied here using steered molecular dynamics simulations in order to enforce the colocalization of thousands of knowledge-based gene sequences on a model for the gene-rich human chromosome 19. Remarkably, it is found that most (≈ 88% gene pairs can be brought simultaneously into contact. This is made possible by the low degree of intra-chromosome entanglement and the large number of cliques in the gene coregulatory network. A clique is a set of genes coregulated all together as a group. The constrained conformations for the model chromosome 19 are further shown to be organized in spatial macrodomains that are similar to those inferred from recent HiC measurements. The findings indicate that gene coregulation and colocalization are largely compatible and that this relationship can be exploited to draft the overall spatial organization of the chromosome in vivo. The more general validity and implications of these findings could be investigated by applying to other eukaryotic chromosomes the general and transferable computational strategy introduced here.

  1. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  2. Exploring the applicability of analysing X chromosome STRs in Brazilian admixed population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auler-Bittencourt, Eloisa; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato; Lima, Maria Jenny Mitraud; da Silva, Ismael Dale Cotrim Guerreiro; dos Santos, Sidney Emannuel Batista

    2015-09-01

    Kinship and parentage analyses always involve one sample being compared to another sample or a few samples with a specific relationship question in mind. In most cases, the analysis of autosomal STR markers is sufficient to determine the genetic kinship. However, when genetic profiles are reconstructed from supposed relatives, for whom the family configuration available for analysis is deficient, the examination may be inconclusive. This study reports practical examples of actual cases analysing the efficiency of the chromosome X STR (STR-ChrX) markers. Three cases with different degrees of efficiency and impact were selected as follows: the identification of two charred bodies in a traffic accident, in which the family setting available was not complete, and one filiation analysis resulting from rape. This is the first paper reporting the use of the multiplex STR 12 ChrX in actual cases using the software Familias 1.8 and Brazilian regional frequency data. Our study clarifies the complex analysis using this powerful tool for professionals in the forensic science community, for both civil and criminal justice. We also discuss state-of-the-art ChrX STR markers and its implications and applications for legal procedures. The data presented here should be used in other studies of complex cases to improve the progress of the current justice system. PMID:26385714

  3. Characterization of A-11, a newly discovered X-chromosomal gene that is under both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The A-11 transcript is present in fibroblasts, but is not normally expressed in B- or T-lymphoblastoid cells. The regulation of the A-11 loci on both the active and inactive X chromosomes is very easily perturbed. The A-11 locus on the fibroblast-derived inactive X in a hybrid cell is reactivated at a very high rate by 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, while the A-11 locus on the active X in B-lymphoblastoid cells is derepressed at a very high rate after gamma irradiation. The A-11 gene codes for a mature transcript of about 1.9 kb. The A-11 cDNA clone is incomplete, and contains 753 bases from the 3' end of the gene. A genomic clone that contains about 17 kb of human DNA and hybridizes to the A-11 cDNA was isolated. This clone contains at least the last exon of the A-11 gene, as determined by Northern blotting, nuclease protection experiments, and DNA sequencing. When the genomic clone is transferred into mouse cells. A-11 transcripts of both normal and abnormal sizes are produced, indicating that it is possible that the genomic clone contains the entire locus. However, at this time, the 5' end of the gene has not been located

  4. Multicolor detection of every chromosome as a means of detecting mosaicism and nuclear organization in human embryonic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kara; Fowler, Katie; Fonseka, Gothami; Griffin, Darren; Ioannou, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) revolutionized cytogenetics using fluorescently labelled probes with high affinity with target (nuclear) DNA. By the early 1990s FISH was adopted as a means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) sexing for couples at risk of transmitting X-linked disorders and later for detection of unbalanced translocations. Following a rise in popularity of PGD by FISH for sexing and the availability of multicolor probes (5-8 colors), the use of FISH was expanded to the detection of aneuploidy and selective implantation of embryos more likely to be euploid, the rationale being to increase pregnancy rates (referral categories were typically advanced maternal age, repeated IVF failure, repeated miscarriage or severe male factor infertility). Despite initial reports of an increase in implantation rates, reduction in trisomic offspring and spontaneous abortions criticism centered around experimental design (including lack of randomization), inadequate control groups and lack of report on live births. Eleven randomized control trials (RCTs) (2004-2010) showed that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) with FISH did not increase delivery rates with some demonstrating adverse outcomes. These RCTs, parallel improvements in culturing and cryopreservation and a shift to blastocyst biopsy essentially outdated FISH as a tool for PGS and it has now been replaced by newer technologies (array CGH, SNP arrays, qRT-PCR and NGS). Cell-by-cell follow up analysis of individual blastomeres in non-transferred embryos is however usually prohibitively expensive by these new approaches and thus FISH remains an invaluable resource for the study of mosaicism and nuclear organization. We thus developed the approach described herein for the FISH detection of chromosome copy number of all 24 human chromosomes. This approach involves 4 sequential layers of hybridization, each with 6 spectrally distinct fluorochromes and a bespoke capturing system. Here we report

  5. Induction of chromosome aberrations in rabbit lymphocytes by low doses of X-rays and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The induction of dicentric aberrations has been studied in rabbit lymphocytes after exposure to low doses of X-rays or d(50)+Be neutrons. The aberrations have been analysed in first division cells collected after a 32 h culture time. In both cases, the dose response relationship is best fitted to a linear-quadratic model. Rabbit lymphocytes are less radiosensitive than human lymphocytes and RBE is lower in rabbit than in human cells. These discrepancies could be due to differences in the repair capacities for the lesions induced by X-rays and neutrons in rabbit and human lymphocytes

  6. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  7. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  8. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, D H; Hu, S; Magnuson, V L; Hu, N; Pattatucci, A M

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0 (P = 10(-5), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced. PMID:8332896

  9. A linkage between DNA markers on the X chromosome and male sexual orientation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamer, D.H.; Hu, S.; Magnuson, V.L.; Hu, N.; Pattatucci, A.M.L.

    1993-07-16

    The role of genetics in male sexual orientation was investigated by pedigree and linkage analyses on 114 families of homosexual men. Increased rates of same-sex orientation were found in the maternal uncles and male cousins of these subjects, but not in their fathers or paternal relatives, suggesting the possibility of sex-linked transmission in a portion of the population. DNA linkage analysis of a selected group of 40 families in which there were two gay brothers and no indication of nonmaternal transmission revealed a correlation between homosexual orientation and the inheritance of polymorphic markers on the X chromosome in approximately 64 percent of the sib-pairs tested. The linkage to markers on Xq28, the subtelomeric region of the long arm of the sex chromosome, had a multipoint lod score of 4.0(P = 10[sup [minus]5]), indicating a statistical confidence level of more than 99 percent that at least one subtype of male sexual orientation is genetically influenced.

  10. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF A RECURRING COMPLEX CHROMOSOMAL TRANSLOCATION IN 2 HUMAN EXTRAGONADAL GERM-CELL TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SINKE, RJ; WEGHUIS, DO; SUIJKERBUIJK, RF; TANIGAMI, A; NAKAMURA, Y; LARSSON, C; WEBER, G; DEJONG, B; OOSTERHUIS, JW; MOLENAAR, WM; VANKESSEL, AG

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6p23, and 11q13 in two independent bur similar extragonadal human germ cell rumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  11. Molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation in two human extragonadal germ cell tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinke, R J; Weghuis, D O; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Tanigami, A; Nakamura, Y; Larsson, C; Weber, G; Jong, B de; Oosterhuis, J W; Molenaar, W M

    1994-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a recurring complex chromosomal translocation involving 6p21, 6p22, 6q23, and 11q13 in two independent but similar extragonadal human germ cell tumors was initiated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) techniques

  12. Chromosomal mosaicism : underlying mechanisms and consequences for early human embryo development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    da Avó Ribeiro dos Santos, M.

    2013-01-01

    In humans, reproduction is considered a relatively inefficient process, when compared with other mammalian species and the chance of achieving a spontaneous pregnancy after timed intercourse is at the most 20-30%. Chromosome segregation errors are a well-known inherent feature of cell division in hu

  13. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on human metaphase chromosomes detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moers, M.H.P.; Kalle, W.H.J.; Ruiter, A.G.T.; Wiegant, J.C.A.G.; Raap, A.K.; Greve, J.; Grooth, de B.G.; Hulst, van N.F.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization o­n human metaphase chromosomes is detected by near-field scanning optical microscopy. This combination of cytochemical and scanning probe techniques enables the localization and identification of several fluorescently labelled genomic DNA fragments o­n a single ch

  15. A biophysical model applied to survival of tumor cells and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations on survival of tumor cells E.M.T.6 and chromosomal aberrations in human lymphocytes irradiated in vitro and microdosimetric studies were made using a helion beam. The results obtained were compared in order to see if the Dual Radiation Action Theory of ROSSI and KELLERER can explain these radiobiological phenomena

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of a Human Cytomegalovirus Strain AD169 Bacterial Artificial Chromosome Clone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Eleonore; Spohn, Michael; Indenbirken, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The complete sequence of the human cytomegalovirus strain AD169 (variant ATCC) cloned as a bacterial artificial chromosome (AD169-BAC, also known as HB15 or pHB15) was determined. The viral genome has a length of 230,290 bp and shows 52 nucleotide differences compared to a previously sequenced AD169varATCC clone. PMID:27034483

  17. Domain organization of human chromosomes revealed by mapping of nuclear lamina interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guelen, Lars; Pagie, Ludo; Brasset, Emilie; Meuleman, Wouter; Faza, Marius B; Talhout, Wendy; Eussen, Bert H; de Klein, Annelies; Wessels, Lodewyk; de Laat, Wouter; van Steensel, Bas

    2008-06-12

    The architecture of human chromosomes in interphase nuclei is still largely unknown. Microscopy studies have indicated that specific regions of chromosomes are located in close proximity to the nuclear lamina (NL). This has led to the idea that certain genomic elements may be attached to the NL, which may contribute to the spatial organization of chromosomes inside the nucleus. However, sequences in the human genome that interact with the NL in vivo have not been identified. Here we construct a high-resolution map of the interaction sites of the entire genome with NL components in human fibroblasts. This map shows that genome-lamina interactions occur through more than 1,300 sharply defined large domains 0.1-10 megabases in size. These lamina-associated domains (LADs) are typified by low gene-expression levels, indicating that LADs represent a repressive chromatin environment. The borders of LADs are demarcated by the insulator protein CTCF, by promoters that are oriented away from LADs, or by CpG islands, suggesting possible mechanisms of LAD confinement. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the human genome is divided into large, discrete domains that are units of chromosome organization within the nucleus. PMID:18463634

  18. An integrated physical map covering 25 cM of human chromosome 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, W.; Hou, J.; Wagner, M.J.; Wells, D.E. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-02-15

    This article reports on an integrated physical map of human chromosome 8 using STS content analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC contigs. Such mapping efforts will help to localize genes linked to hereditary diseases. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Gold nanoparticle-assisted primer walking for closing the human chromosomal gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, H; Shi, B; Li, X;

    2013-01-01

    NPs) to improve the efficiency in primer walking amplification. We used this strategy to close a gap in human chromosome 5 containing a DNA stretch composed of the 12SAT repeat. The obtained gap sequence is highly conserved among several mammalian genomes. The demonstrated AuNP-assisted primer walking strategy...

  20. 2-DG induced modulation of chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, mutagenesis and gene conversion in x-irradiated yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of post-irradiation modulation in presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and yeast extract, on chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, reverse mutation (ILV+) and gene conversion (TRP+), were studied in x-irradiated stationary phase yeast cells (diploid strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The damage and repair in chromosomal DNA bands, resolved by using contour clamped homogeneous electric pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique, was estimated by calculating intensity ratio, Ρn (Ρn=In/It; where In is the intensity of nth band in a lane and It is the sum of intensities of all bands and the well in the lane). The data indicate linear correlation between relative compactness (τ) of a chromosome [chromosome size (Kb)/length of synaptonemal complex (μm)[ and DNA damage and repair. The chromosome repair kinetics were biphasic, showing initial decrease followed by an increase in Ρn. Variations were observed among different chromosomes with respect to DNA damage, repair and post-irradiation repair modulation. 2-DG inhibited both components of chromosomal DNA repair and also repair of potentially lethal damage but enhanced frequencies of mutants. Relatively the effects on revertants were greater in cells irradiated with lower doses (50 Gy) of x-rays and post-irradiation incubation in presence of phosphate buffer having 2-DG (50 mM) and glucose (10 mM). Yeast extract increased frequencies of revertants and convertants thus promoting error-prone DNA repair. Yeast extract in combination with 2-DG showed complex effects on chromosomal DNA repair and enhanced mutagenesis further. (author). 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  1. X-chromosome STR markers data in a Cabo Verde immigrant population of Lisboa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso Costa, Heloísa; Morais, Paulo; Vieira da Silva, Cláudia; Matos, Sara; Marques Santos, Rodolfo; Espinheira, Rosa; Costa Santos, Jorge; Amorim, António

    2014-01-01

    Population genetic data of 12 X chromosomal short tandem repeats markers (DXS10074, DXS10079, DXS10101, DXS10103, DXS10134, DXS10135, DXS10146, DXS10148, DXS7132, DXS7423, DXS8378 and HPRTB) were analysed in 54 females and 95 males of an immigrant population from Cabo Verde living in Lisboa. The obtained results for forensic statistical parameters such as observed heterozigosity, polymorphism information content, power of discrimination and mean exclusion chance, based on single allele frequencies, reveal that this multiplex system is highly informative and can represent an important tool for genetic identification purposes in the immigrant population of Cabo Verde. Since the studied short tandem repeats genetic markers are distributed on four linkage groups, that can provide independent genotype information, we studied those groups as haploytes. The forensic efficiency parameters for the linked groups were all higher than 0.97, with linkage group I being the most polymorphic and linkage group III the less informative. PMID:24474659

  2. Variants in HNRNPH2 on the X Chromosome Are Associated with a Neurodevelopmental Disorder in Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Jennifer M; Cho, Megan T; Telegrafi, Aida; Wilson, Ashley; Brooks, Susan; Botti, Christina; Gowans, Gordon; Autullo, Leigh Anne; Krishnamurthy, Vidya; Willing, Marcia C; Toler, Tomi L; Ben-Zev, Bruria; Elpeleg, Orly; Shen, Yufeng; Retterer, Kyle; Monaghan, Kristin G; Chung, Wendy K

    2016-09-01

    Via whole-exome sequencing, we identified six females from independent families with a common neurodevelopmental phenotype including developmental delay, intellectual disability, autism, hypotonia, and seizures, all with de novo predicted deleterious variants in the nuclear localization signal of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein H2, encoded by HNRNPH2, a gene located on the X chromosome. Many of the females also have seizures, psychiatric co-morbidities, and orthopedic, gastrointestinal, and growth problems as well as common dysmorphic facial features. HNRNPs are a large group of ubiquitous proteins that associate with pre-mRNAs in eukaryotic cells to produce a multitude of alternatively spliced mRNA products during development and play an important role in controlling gene expression. The failure to identify affected males, the severity of the neurodevelopmental phenotype in females, and the essential role of this gene suggests that male conceptuses with these variants may not be viable. PMID:27545675

  3. Chromosomal localization of the human apolipoprotein B gene and detection of homologous RNA in monkey intestine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deeb, S.S.; Disteche, C.; Motulsky, A.G.; Lebo, R.V.; Kan, Y.W.

    1986-01-01

    A cDNA clone of the human apolipoprotein B-100 was used as a hybridization probe to detect homologous sequences in both flow-sorted and in situ metaphase chromosomes. The results indicate that the gene encoding this protein is on the distal end of the short arm of chromosome 2 (2p23-2p24). RNA isolated from monkey small intestine contained sequences (6.5 and 18 kilobases) homologous to the cDNA of apolipoprotein B-100. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that one gene codes for both the intestinal (B-48) and the hepatic (B-100) forms.

  4. Chromosomal assignments of the genes coding for human types II, III, and IV collagen: a dispersed gene family.

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, E; Hiorns, L R; Spurr, N; Kurkinen, M.; Barlow, D; Hogan, B L; Dalgleish, R.

    1985-01-01

    The human type II collagen gene, COL2A1, has been assigned to chromosome 12, the type III gene, COL3A1, to chromosome 2, and one of the type IV genes, COL4A1, to chromosome 13. These assignments were made by using cloned genes as probes on Southern blots of DNA from a panel of mouse/human somatic cell hybrids. The two genes of type I collagen, COL1A1 and COL2A1, have been mapped previously to chromosomes 17 and 7, respectively. This family of conserved genes seems therefore to be dispersed th...

  5. Biphasic Effects of Nitric Oxide Radicals on Radiation-Induced Lethality and Chromosome Aberrations in Human Lung Cancer Cells Carrying Different p53 Gene Status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of nitric oxide (NO) on radiation-induced cell killing and chromosome aberrations in two human lung cancer cell lines with a different p53 gene status. Methods and Materials: We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 cell lines that were derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53 null. The wtp53 and mp53 cell lines were generated by transfection of the appropriate p53 constructs into the parental cells. Cells were pretreated with different concentrations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) (an NO donor) and/or 2-(4-Carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO) (an NO scavenger) and then exposed to X-rays. Cell survival, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations were scored by use of a colony-forming assay, Hoechst 33342 staining assay and TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP [deoxyuridine triphosphate] nick end labeling) assay, and chromosomal banding techniques, respectively. Results: In wtp53 cells the induction of radioresistance and the inhibition of apoptosis and chromosome aberrations were observed in the presence of ISDN at low 2- to 10-μmol/L concentrations before X-irradiation. The addition of c-PTIO and ISDN into the culture medium 6 h before irradiation almost completely suppressed these effects. However, at high concentrations of ISDN (100-500 μmol/L), clear evidence of radiosensitization, enhancement of apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations was detected. However, these phenomena were not observed in mp53 cells at either concentration range with ISDN. Conclusions: These results indicate that low and high concentrations of NO radicals can choreograph inverse radiosensitivity, apoptosis, and chromosome aberrations in human lung cancer cells and that NO radicals can affect the fate of wtp53 cells.

  6. Relationship between X-ray irradiation and chromosomal damage in bone marrow tissue of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray induced chromosomal damage in bone-marrow tissue of male mice was studied using micronucleus technique. Dose response relationship was evaluated. Male Swiss mice received whole body x-ray irradiation at different doses from 25-1000 rads. Animals were sacrificed at the end of 24 hours, bone-marrow smears were made and stained in May-Grunwald-Giemsa. The preparatians were scored for the following types of aberrations: micronuclei in young erythocytes-polychromatic cells and in the mature erythrocytes-normechromatic cells. A dose dependent increase in the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic cells up to a dose of 100 rads was observed. In addition the effect of post-irradiation duration on the frequency of micronuclei in polychromatic and normochromatic cells were studied. Male Swiss mice were exposed to 200 rads x-rays and were then sacrificed at different time intervals after irradiation and bone-marrow preparations were made and scored. Maximum polychromatic cells with micronuclei were observed in 24 hours post-irradiated animals, thereafter a decrease in the frequency of polychromatic cells with micronuclei was observed in 40 hours post irradiated animals. (author

  7. Finding genes on the X chromosome by which homo may have become sapiens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, G. [Univ. of Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    1996-06-01

    The map of the X chromosome is now littered, from one telomere to the other, with genes for mental handicap, alone or in combination with other features. In this issue of the journal, report such an entity from the Scottish Highlands, which they give the catchy title of {open_quotes}PPM-X syndrome,{close_quotes} denoting the association of pyramidal tract signs, psychosis, and macroorchidism with mental handicap (XLMR). They have localized this to Xq28 and discuss other genes in the same area, which include L1CAM (associated with MASA [mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs] and X-linked hydrocephalus) and two genes for nonspecific XLMR-MRX3 and MRX25. It is also the localization of the gene for G6PD deficiency, which, in earlier studies, had demonstrated linkage to bipolar affective disorders, although this has been questioned in more recent studies. There may well be other families with this pattern of abnormalities who have remained undescribed because depression is so often not diagnosed in those with moderate mental handicap. The occurrence, in this family, of mental handicap with a bipolar disorder may be the chance association of two common disorders, or it may a significant association; at this stage, one cannot judge. 8 refs.

  8. Efficient manipulation of the human adenovirus genome as an infectious yeast artificial chromosome clone.

    OpenAIRE

    Ketner, G; Spencer, F; Tugendreich, S; C. Connelly; Hieter, P

    1994-01-01

    A yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) containing a complete human adenovirus type 2 genome was constructed, and viral DNA derived from the YAC was shown to be infectious upon introduction into mammalian cells. The adenovirus YAC could be manipulated efficiently using homologous recombination-based methods in the yeast host, and mutant viruses, including a variant that expresses the human analog of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC27 gene, were readily recovered from modified derivatives of the Y...

  9. Specific chromosomal imbalances in human papillomavirus-transfected cells during progression toward immortality

    OpenAIRE

    Solinas-Toldo, Sabina; Dürst, Matthias; Lichter, Peter

    1997-01-01

    High risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) known to be closely associated with cervical cancer, such as HPV16 and HPV18, have the potential to immortalize human epithelial cells in culture. Four lines of HPV-transfected keratinocytes were analyzed by comparative genomic hybridization at different time points after transfection. A number of chromosomal imbalances was found to be highly characteristic for the cultures progressing toward immortality. Whereas several of these were new and previously...

  10. Quantification of the X- and Y-chromosome-bearing spermatozoa of domestic animals by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, D L; Gledhill, B L; Pinkel, D; Lake, S; Stephenson, D; Van Dilla, M A; Johnson, L A

    1983-03-01

    The relative content of DNA in spermatozoa presumed to be the X- and Y-chromosome-bearing gametes from bulls, boars, rams and rabbits and the amount of DNA in spermatozoa of cockerels was determined by flow cytometry. Differences in the relative content of DNA and proportions of the presumed X- and Y-sperm populations in cryopreserved semen from Holstein, Jersey, Angus, Hereford and Brahman bulls were also determined. Spermatozoa were washed by centrifugation using a series of dimethyl sulfoxide solutions made in isotonic sodium citrate, fixed in ethanol, treated with papain and dithioerythritol to loosen the chromatin structure and remove cellular organelles, and stained quantitatively for DNA with the fluorochrome 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Approximately 5000 stained sperm nuclei, which were nonviable due to the removal of other cellular organelles during the washing procedure, were measured for DNA in an epi-illumination flow cytometer. A single distinct peak for cockerel spermatozoa and two symmetrical, overlapping peaks for species with X- and Y-spermatozoa were seen. This and other evidence strongly supports the interpretation that the peaks represent the X- and Y-sperm populations. The content of DNA in sperm nuclei from cockerels, bulls, boars, rams and rabbits, as determined by fluorescence flow cytometry, corresponded to biochemical estimates of DNA per sperm cell. Analyses of the bimodal histograms by computer-fitting two Gaussian distributions to the data showed the means of the peaks differed by 3.9, 3.7, 4.1 and 3.9% for bulls, boars, rams and rabbits, respectively. In four replicate analyses of semen from 25 bulls representing 5 breeds, the average population of sperm nuclei in the Y-peaks ranged from 49.5 to 50.5% for all breeds. The X-Y peak differences did not vary within each breed, but were significantly different when the breeds were compared. Spermatozoa from Jersey bulls had larger X-Y peak differences (P less than 0.001) than

  11. The mechanism of chromosomal translocation t(11;14) involving the T-cell receptor C delta locus on human chromosome 14q11 and a transcribed region of chromosome 11p15.

    OpenAIRE

    Boehm, T.; Baer, R; Lavenir, I; Forster, A; Waters, J J; Nacheva, E; Rabbitts, T H

    1988-01-01

    A chromosomal translocation t(11;14) (p15;q11) is described in a human acute T-cell leukaemia of immature phenotype (CD3-, CD4-, CD8-). The translocation occurs at a T-cell receptor joining J delta segment, 12 kb upstream of the constant C delta gene and 98 kb upstream of the C alpha gene at chromosome band 14q11. Nucleotide sequencing shows that both J delta and C delta are very conserved between mouse and man. The region of chromosome 11 involved in the translocation is transcriptionally ac...

  12. 5meCpG epigenetic marks neighboring a primate-conserved core promoter short tandem repeat indicate X-chromosome inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Brum Machado

    Full Text Available X-chromosome inactivation (XCI is the epigenetic transcriptional silencing of an X-chromosome during the early stages of embryonic development in female eutherian mammals. XCI assures monoallelic expression in each cell and compensation for dosage-sensitive X-linked genes between females (XX and males (XY. DNA methylation at the carbon-5 position of the cytosine pyrimidine ring in the context of a CpG dinucleotide sequence (5meCpG in promoter regions is a key epigenetic marker for transcriptional gene silencing. Using computational analysis, we revealed an extragenic tandem GAAA repeat 230-bp from the landmark CpG island of the human X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 RP2 promoter whose 5meCpG status correlates with XCI. We used this RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat to develop an allele-specific 5meCpG-based PCR assay that is highly concordant with the human androgen receptor (AR exonic tandem CAG repeat-based standard HUMARA assay in discriminating active (Xa from inactive (Xi X-chromosomes. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat contains neutral features that are lacking in the AR disease-linked tandem CAG repeat, is highly polymorphic (heterozygosity rates approximately 0.8 and shows minimal variation in the Xa/Xi ratio. The combined informativeness of RP2/AR is approximately 0.97, and this assay excels at determining the 5meCpG status of alleles at the Xp (RP2 and Xq (AR chromosome arms in a single reaction. These findings are relevant and directly translatable to nonhuman primate models of XCI in which the AR CAG-repeat is monomorphic. We conducted the RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat assay in the naturally occurring chimeric New World monkey marmoset (Callitrichidae and found it to be informative. The RP2 onshore tandem GAAA repeat will facilitate studies on the variable phenotypic expression of dominant and recessive X-linked diseases, epigenetic changes in twins, the physiology of aging hematopoiesis, the pathogenesis of age-related hematopoietic

  13. Reactivation of chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 by telomeric circle formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh K Prusty

    Full Text Available More than 95% of the human population is infected with human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6 during early childhood and maintains latent HHV-6 genomes either in an extra-chromosomal form or as a chromosomally integrated HHV-6 (ciHHV-6. In addition, approximately 1% of humans are born with an inheritable form of ciHHV-6 integrated into the telomeres of chromosomes. Immunosuppression and stress conditions can reactivate latent HHV-6 replication, which is associated with clinical complications and even death. We have previously shown that Chlamydia trachomatis infection reactivates ciHHV-6 and induces the formation of extra-chromosomal viral DNA in ciHHV-6 cells. Here, we propose a model and provide experimental evidence for the mechanism of ciHHV-6 reactivation. Infection with Chlamydia induced a transient shortening of telomeric ends, which subsequently led to increased telomeric circle (t-circle formation and incomplete reconstitution of circular viral genomes containing single viral direct repeat (DR. Correspondingly, short t-circles containing parts of the HHV-6 DR were detected in cells from individuals with genetically inherited ciHHV-6. Furthermore, telomere shortening induced in the absence of Chlamydia infection also caused circularization of ciHHV-6, supporting a t-circle based mechanism for ciHHV-6 reactivation.

  14. Y-chromosome evidence for no independent origin of mod-ern human in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    East Asia is one of the few regions in the world where a large number of human fossils have been unearthed. The continuity of hominid fossils in East Asia, particularly in China has been presented as strong evidence supporting an independent origin of modern humans in this area. To search for such evidence of a possible independent origin of modern humans in China, a total of 9988 male individuals were sam-pled across China. Three Y-chromosome biallelic markers (M89, M130 and YAP), which were located at the non-re- combinant region of Y-chromosome, were typed among the samples. Our result showed that all the individuals carry a mutation at one of the three loci. The three mutations (M89T, M130T, YAP+) coalesce to another mutation (M168T), which was originally derived from Africa about 31000 to 79000 years ago. In other words, all Y-chromosome samples from China, with no exception, were originally derived from a lineage of African origin. Hence, we conclude that even a very minor contribution of in situ hominid origin in China cannot be supported by the Y-chromosome evidence.

  15. Effects of 252Cf neutrons, transmitted through an iron block on human lymphocyte chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to californium-252 (252Cf) neutrons transmitted through a 15 cm thick iron block was analysed. The spectrum of the filtered neutrons ranged from 0.1 to 2MeV with a peak at 0.7 MeV, simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb neutron spectrum as shown in the Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86). Chromosome aberration frequencies after exposure to filtered and unfiltered 252Cf radiation were compared. Acentric ring chromosomes were significantly increased (p 0.1). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the neutrons with respect to the formation of dicentrics and centric rings was 10.9 and 12.3 in the filtered and unfiltered conditions respectively, but the difference was not statistically significant. These results provide useful information for the re-evaluation of the biological effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb radiations. (Author)

  16. Towards single particle imaging of human chromosomes at SACLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Schwenke, Joerg; Yusuf, Mohammed; Estandarte, Ana; Zhang, Fucai; Chen, Bo; Clark, Jesse; Song, Changyong; Nam, Daewoong; Joti, Yasumasa; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Ratnasari, Gina; Kaneyoshi, Kohei; Takata, Hideaki; Fukui, Kiichi

    2015-12-01

    Single particle imaging (SPI) is one of the front-page opportunities which were used to motivate the construction of the first x-ray free electron lasers (XFELs). SPI’s big advantage is that it avoids radiation damage to biological samples because the diffraction takes place in femtosecond single shots before any atomic motion can take place in the sample, hence before the onset of radiation damage. This is the ‘diffract before destruction’ theme, destruction being assured from the high x-ray doses used. This article reports our collaboration’s first attempt at SPI using the SACLA XFEL facility in June 2015. The report is limited to experience with the instrumentation and examples of data because we have not yet had time to invert them to images.

  17. M-BAND Study of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells: Radiation Quality and Dose Rate Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    The advantage of the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique is its ability to identify both inter- (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra- (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome) chromosome aberrations simultaneously. To study the detailed rearrangement of low- and high-LET radiation induced chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10) in vitro, we performed a series of experiments with Cs-137 gamma rays of both low and high dose rates, neutrons of low dose rate and 600 MeV/u Fe ions of high dose rate, with chromosome 3 painted with multi-binding colors. We also compared the chromosome aberrations in both 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures. Results of these experiments revealed the highest chromosome aberration frequencies after low dose rate neutron exposures. However, detailed analysis of the radiation induced inversions revealed that all three radiation types induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intra-chromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by inter-chromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges. The location of the breaks involved in chromosome exchanges was analyzed along the painted chromosome. The breakpoint distribution was found to be randomly localized on chromosome 3 after neutron or Fe ion exposure, whereas non-random distribution with clustering breakpoints was observed after -ray exposure. Our comparison of chromosome aberration yields between 2- and 3-dimensional cell cultures indicated a significant difference for gamma exposures, but not for Fe ion exposures. These experimental results indicated that the track structure of the radiation and the cellular/chromosome structure can both affect radiation-induced chromosome

  18. Dose Assessment using Chromosome Aberration Analyses in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Tae Ho; Kim, Jin-Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The healthy five donors were recruited to establish the dose-response calibration curve for chromosomal aberrations by ionizing radiation exposure. Our cytogenetic results revealed that the mean frequency of chromosome aberration increased with increasing radiation dose. In this study, dicentric assay and CBMN assay were compared considering the sensitivity and accuracy of dose estimation. Therefore, these chromosome aberration analyses will be the foundation for biological dosimetric analysis with additional research methods such as translocation and PCC assay. The conventional analysis of dicentric chromosomes in HPBL was suggested by Bender and Gooch in 1962. This assay has been for many years, the golden standard and the most specific method for ionizing radiation damage. The dicentric assay technique in HPBL has been shown as the most sensitive biological method and reliable bio-indicator of quantifying the radiation dose. In contrast, the micronucleus assay has advantages over the dicentric assay since it is rapid and requires less specialized expertise, and accordingly it can be applied to monitor a big population. The cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is a suitable method for micronuceli measurement in cultured human as well as mammalian cells. The aim of our study was to establish the dose response curve of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations in HPBL by analyzing the frequency of dicentrics and micronuclei.

  19. Karyotyping of Chromosomes in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Transformed by High Energy Fe Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zhang, Ye; Park, Seongmi; Story, Michael D.; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer induced from exposures to space radiation is one of the most significant health risks for long-term space travels. Evidences show that low- and high- Linear energy transfer (LET)-induced transformation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) that are immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT. The cells were exposed to gamma rays and high-energy Fe ions for the selection of transformed clones. Transformed HBEC are identified and analyzed chromosome aberrations (i.e. genomic instability) using the multi-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (mFISH), as well as the multi-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) techniques. Our results show chromosomal translocations between different chromosomes and several of the breaks occurred in the q-arm of chromosome 3. We also identified copy number variations between the transformed and the parental HBEC regardless of the exposure conditions. We observed chromosomal aberrations in the lowand high-LET radiation-induced transformed clones and they are imperfectly different from clones obtain in spontaneous soft agar growth.

  20. Amplification and chromosomal dispersion of human endogenous retroviral sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endogenous retroviral sequences have undergone amplification events involving both viral and flanking cellular sequences. The authors cloned members of an amplified family of full-length endogenous retroviral sequences. Genomic blotting, employing a flanking cellular DNA probe derived from a member of this family, revealed a similar array of reactive bands in both humans and chimpanzees, indicating that an amplification event involving retroviral and associated cellular DNA sequences occurred before the evolutionary separation of these two primates. Southern analyses of restricted somatic cell hybrid DNA preparations suggested that endogenous retroviral segments are widely dispersed in the human genome and that amplification and dispersion events may be linked

  1. Cloning, chromosome localization and features of a novel human gene, MATH2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lingchen Guo; Min Jiang; Yushu Ma; Haipeng Cheng; Xiaohua Ni; Yangsheng Jin; Yi Xie; Yumin Mao

    2002-04-01

    We report cloning and some features of a novel human gene, MATH2, which encodes a protein of 337 amino acid residues with a basic helix–loop–helix domain and exhibits 98% similarity to mouse Math2. Results of Northern blot analysis revealed two transcripts of the MATH2 gene of 1.7 kb and 2.4 kb in human brain. We localized MATH2 to chromosome 7 at 7p14–15 by matching with the Human Genome Sequence Database. Human MATH2 and mouse Math2 may have the same functions in the nervous system.

  2. X-chromosome Forkhead Box P3 polymorphisms associate with atopy in girls in three Dutch birth cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottema, R. W. B.; Kerkhof, M.; Reijmerink, N. E.; Koppelman, G. H.; Thijs, C.; Stelma, F. F.; Smit, H. A.; Brunekreef, B.; van Schayck, C. P.; Postma, D. S.

    2010-01-01

    P>Background: The Forkhead Box P3 (FOXP3) gene, located on the X-chromosome, encodes a transcription factor that directs T cells toward a regulatory phenotype. Regulatory T cells may suppress development of atopy. We evaluated whether single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of FOXP3 are associated wi

  3. Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive cause stable linkage disequilibrium and favour reduced recombination on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewski, W T; Carioscia, S A; Liévano, G; Lynch, V D; Patten, M M

    2016-06-01

    Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive are sex-specific evolutionary forces with the potential to shape genomic architecture. Previous theory has found that pairing two sexually antagonistic loci or combining sexual antagonism with meiotic drive at linked autosomal loci augments genetic variation, produces stable linkage disequilibrium (LD) and favours reduced recombination. However, the influence of these two forces has not been examined on the X chromosome, which is thought to be enriched for sexual antagonism and meiotic drive. We investigate the evolution of the X chromosome under both sexual antagonism and meiotic drive with two models: in one, both loci experience sexual antagonism; in the other, we pair a meiotic drive locus with a sexually antagonistic locus. We find that LD arises between the two loci in both models, even when the two loci freely recombine in females and that driving haplotypes will be enriched for male-beneficial alleles, further skewing sex ratios in these populations. We introduce a new measure of LD, Dz', which accounts for population allele frequencies and is appropriate for instances where these are sex specific. Both models demonstrate that natural selection favours modifiers that reduce the recombination rate. These results inform observed patterns of congealment found on driving X chromosomes and have implications for patterns of natural variation and the evolution of recombination rates on the X chromosome.

  4. Effects of an extra X chromosome on language lateralization : An fMRI study with Klinefelter men (47,XXY)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Sophie; Aleman, Andre; Swaab, Hanna; Vink, Matthijs; Sommer, Iris; Kahn, Rene S.

    2008-01-01

    De novo occurring genetic variations provide an opportunity to study the effects of genes on structure and function of the brain. The presence of an extra X chromosome in men (XXY karyotype) has been associated with language deficits. Recently, schizophrenia spectrum traits have been observed in XXY

  5. Live imaging of X chromosome reactivation dynamics in early mouse development can discriminate naïve from primed pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shin; Hosoi, Yusuke; Shiura, Hirosuke; Yamagata, Kazuo; Takahashi, Saori; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Kohda, Takashi; Okabe, Masaru; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2016-08-15

    Pluripotent stem cells can be classified into two distinct states, naïve and primed, which show different degrees of potency. One difficulty in stem cell research is the inability to distinguish these states in live cells. Studies on female mice have shown that reactivation of inactive X chromosomes occurs in the naïve state, while one of the X chromosomes is inactivated in the primed state. Therefore, we aimed to distinguish the two states by monitoring X chromosome reactivation. Thus far, X chromosome reactivation has been analysed using fixed cells; here, we inserted different fluorescent reporter gene cassettes (mCherry and eGFP) into each X chromosome. Using these knock-in 'Momiji' mice, we detected X chromosome reactivation accurately in live embryos, and confirmed that the pluripotent states of embryos were stable ex vivo, as represented by embryonic and epiblast stem cells in terms of X chromosome reactivation. Thus, Momiji mice provide a simple and accurate method for identifying stem cell status based on X chromosome reactivation.

  6. Is there an influence of X-chromosomal imprinting on the phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome? A clinical and molecular genetic study of 61 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemkens, D; Roza, T; Verrij, L; Swaab, H; van Werkhoven, MK; Alizadeh, BZ; Sinke, RJ; Giltay, JC

    2006-01-01

    Studies on Turner syndrome suggested the presence of X-chromosomal-imprinted genes involved in social and verbal cognition. Imprinted genes on autosomes were shown to affect growth. Could imprinting of such genes on the X chromosome also influence psychomotor development and growth in men with Kline

  7. Chromosomal changes in cultured human epithelial cells transformed by low- and high-LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Tracy Chui-hsu; Craise, L.M; Prioleau, J.C.; Stampfer, M.R.; Rhim, J.S.

    1990-11-01

    For a better assessment of radiation risk in space, an understanding of the responses of human cells, especially the epithelial cells, to low- and high-LET radiation is essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed techniques to study the neoplastic transformation of two human epithelial cell systems by ionizing radiation. These cell systems are human mammary epithelial cells (H184B5) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). Both cell lines are immortal, anchorage dependent for growth, and nontumorigenic in athymic nude nice. Neoplastic transformation was achieved by irradiation cells successively. Our results showed that radiogenic cell transformation is a multistep process and that a single exposure of ionizing radiation can cause only one step of transformation. It requires, therefore, multihits to make human epithelial cells fully tumorigenic. Using a simple karyotyping method, we did chromosome analysis with cells cloned at various stages of transformation. We found no consistent large terminal deletion of chromosomes in radiation-induced transformants. Some changes of total number of chromosomes, however, were observed in the transformed cells. These transformants provide an unique opportunity for further genetic studies at a molecular level. 15 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Linkage localization of TGFB2 and the human homeobox gene GLX1 to chromosome 1q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, D.Y.; Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)); Purchio, A.F. (Oncogen, Seattle, WA (United States))

    1993-02-01

    We have identified genetic variation within two human genes, transforming growth factor-[beta]2 (TGFB2) and the homeobox gene HB24 (HLX1). Reported here are four human RFLPs and SSCPs for TGFB2 in humans and gorillas. In addition, we describe an RFLP and a SSCP for HLX1. We propose that HLX1 is the human homologue of the mouse homeobox gene Hlx based on extensive sequence homology between the genes and the close proximity of both genes to TGFB2 in their respective species. We also report the chromosomal localization of HLX1 to the long arm of human chromosome 1. Finally, utilizing the polymorphisms described for TGFB2 and HLX1, we have been able to localize these genes within a framework map of the distal long arm of chromosome 1 and to study the linkage relationship between these two genes. Pairwise linkage analysis shows that these two genes are linked, with a recombination fraction of 3.1% and a lod score of 14.49. 27 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Chromosomal changes in cultured human epithelial cells transformed by low- and high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craise, L. M.; Prioleau, J. C.; Stampfer, M. R.; Rhim, J. S.; Yang, TC-H (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    For a better assessment of radiation risk in space, an understanding of the responses of human cells, especially the epithelial cells, to low- and high-LET radiation is essential. In our laboratory, we have successfully developed techniques to study the neoplastic transformation of two human epithelial cell systems by ionizing radiation. These cell systems are human mammary epithelial cells (H184B5) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). Both cell lines are immortal, anchorage dependent for growth, and nontumorigenic in athymic nude mice. Neoplastic transformation was achieved by irradiating cells successively. Our results showed that radiogenic cell transformation is a multistep process and that a single exposure of ionizing radiation can cause only one step of transformation. It requires, therefore, multihits to make human epithelial cells fully tumorigenic. Using a simple karyotyping method, we did chromosome analysis with cells cloned at various stages of transformation. We found no consistent large terminal deletion of chromosomes in radiation-induced transformants. Some changes of total number of chromosomes, however, were observed in the transformed cells. These transformants provide an unique opportunity for further genetic studies at a molecular level.

  10. Isolation and chromosomal localization of the human endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, L.J.; Michel, T.; Weremowicz, S.; Morton, C.C. (Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States))

    1994-01-15

    Endothelial NOS activity is a major determinant of vascular tone and blood pressure, and in several important (and sometimes hereditary) disease states, such as hypertension, diabetes, and atherosclerosis, the endothelial NO signaling system appears to be abnormal. To explore the relationship of the endothelial NOS activity, the authors isolated the human gene encoding the endothelial NOS. Genomic clones containing the 5[prime] end of this gene were identified in a human genomic library by applying a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach. Identification of the human gene for endothelial NOS (NOS3) was confirmed by nucleotide sequence analysis of the first coding exon, which was found to be identical to its cognate cDNA. The NOS3 gene spans at least 20 kb and appears to contain multiple introns. The transcription start site and promoter region of the NOS3 gene were identified by primer extension and ribonuclease protection assays. Sequencing of the putative promoter revealed consensus sequences for the shear stress-response element, as well as cytokine-responsive cis regulatory sequences, both possible important to the roles played by NOS3 in the normal and the diseased cardiovascular system. The authors also mapped the chromosomal location of the NOS3 gene. First, a chromosomal panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids was screened using PCR with oligonucleotide primers derived from the NOS3 genomic clone. The specificity of the amplified PCR product was confirmed by human and hamster genomic DNA controls, as well as by Southern blot analysis, using the NOS3 cDNA as probe. Definitive chromosomal assignment of the NOS3 gene to human chromosome 7 was based upon 0% discordancy; fluorescence in situ hybridization sublocalized the NOS3 gene to 7q36. The identification and characterization of the NOS3 gene may lead to further insights into heritable disease states associated with this gene product. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Interspecific comparisons of the sensitivity to chromosome aberration production by x rays. [Comparative in vitro radiosensitivity of leukocyte chromosomes from mice to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brewen, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    It is concluded that arm number probably plays a minor role, if any, in the relative radiosensitivity of a species. Instead the reported differences are probably a reflection of inherent basic biological mechanisms of repair that vary from one order of mammals to the next. It should be added, however, that the ultimate goal of all of these studies is to make a reasonable risk estimate for man. In that context the best approach is that of conservatism and the current data on mouse and man suggest that man has 1.5 to 2.0 times the risk of mice for chromosome rearrangement induction by x rays.

  12. A simple cytogenetic method to detect chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohye, Tamae; Kawamura, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Hidehito; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Ihira, Masaru; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-02-01

    Some healthy individuals carry human herpesvirus-6 (HHV-6) within a host chromosome, which is called inherited chromosomally integrated human herpesvirus-6 (iciHHV-6). Because iciHHV-6 is generally considered a non-pathogenic condition, it is important to distinguish iciHHV-6 from HHV-6 reactivation in immunocompromised hosts because both conditions manifest high copy numbers of the HHV-6 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Although fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a reliable method for the diagnosis of iciHHV-6, HHV-6-specific FISH probes are not commercially available. In our present study, we established a simple PCR-based method for producing FISH probes that can detect the chromosomal integration site of iciHHV-6 at high sensitivity. Using these probes, we confirmed that HHV-6 signals were consistently located at the telomeric region in all of the 13 iciHHV-6 individuals examined. Interestingly, in all seven Japanese iciHHV-6A patients, signals were detected exclusively on chromosome 22q. This method provides a simple and fast approach for iciHHV-6 diagnosis in the clinical laboratory. PMID:26549829

  13. Dataset of target mass spectromic proteome profiling for human chromosome 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgisonis, Ekaterina V; Kopylov, Arthur T; Zgoda, Victor G

    2016-09-01

    Proteome profiling is a type of quantitative analysis that reveals level of protein expression in the sample. Proteome profiling by using selected reaction monitoring is an approach for the Chromosome-centric Human Proteome Project (C-HPP). Here we describe dataset generated in the course of the pilot phase of Russian part of C-HPP, which was focused on human Chr 18 proteins. Proteome profiling was performed using stable isotope-labeled standards (SRM/SIS) for plasma, liver tissue and HepG2 cells. Dataset includes both positive and negative results of protein detection. These data were partly discussed in recent publications, "Chromosome 18 Transcriptome Profiling and Targeted Proteome Mapping in Depleted Plasma, Liver Tissue and HepG2 Cells" [1] and "Chromosome 18 transcriptoproteome of liver tissue and HepG2 Cells and targeted proteome mapping in depleted plasma: Update 2013" [2], supporting the accompanying publication "State of the Chromosome 18-centric HPP in 2016: Transcriptome and Proteome Profiling of Liver Tissue and HepG2 Cells" [3], and are deposited at the ProteomeXchange via the PASSEL repository with the dataset identifier PASSEL: PASS00697 for liver and HepG2 cell line. PMID:27595127

  14. Poor socio-economic status in 47,XXX --an unexpected effect of an extra X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common sex chromosomal abnormalities in females is 47,XXX syndrome, which is characterized by tall stature and reduced IQ, but with a variable phenotype. In order to elaborate on the characteristics of this syndrome, we undertook an investigation in all diagnosed 47,XXX females at risk in Denmark and compared their socio-economic status with an age-matched cohort of the female background population as well as with all Danes diagnosed with Turner syndrome. We focused on cohabitation, motherhoods, income, education, retirement and convictions. Furthermore, we investigated whether some of these parameters influenced the increased mortality identified previously. Thus, socio-economic data were retrieved in 108 47,XXX persons, 10,297 controls, and 831 with Turner syndrome. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with their controls, we identified significantly decreased numbers of first partnership, number of mothers, and number of persons with an education in 47,XXX persons. Significantly more 47,XXX persons retired. In the younger age groups an increased number had income below the median among controls. The increased mortality identified previously was not explained by the reduced number of partnerships or the reduced number of persons with an education. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with Turner syndrome persons, we identified increased number of first partnership, number of mothers, and reduced level of education. We hypothesize that the significantly decreased number of 47,XXX persons becoming mothers could be due to hypogonadism in some. The affected socio-economic status suggests that the presence of an extra X chromosome has more detrimental effects than previously appreciated. PMID:23542668

  15. Poor socio-economic status in 47,XXX --an unexpected effect of an extra X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stochholm, Kirstine; Juul, Svend; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-06-01

    One of the most common sex chromosomal abnormalities in females is 47,XXX syndrome, which is characterized by tall stature and reduced IQ, but with a variable phenotype. In order to elaborate on the characteristics of this syndrome, we undertook an investigation in all diagnosed 47,XXX females at risk in Denmark and compared their socio-economic status with an age-matched cohort of the female background population as well as with all Danes diagnosed with Turner syndrome. We focused on cohabitation, motherhoods, income, education, retirement and convictions. Furthermore, we investigated whether some of these parameters influenced the increased mortality identified previously. Thus, socio-economic data were retrieved in 108 47,XXX persons, 10,297 controls, and 831 with Turner syndrome. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with their controls, we identified significantly decreased numbers of first partnership, number of mothers, and number of persons with an education in 47,XXX persons. Significantly more 47,XXX persons retired. In the younger age groups an increased number had income below the median among controls. The increased mortality identified previously was not explained by the reduced number of partnerships or the reduced number of persons with an education. Comparing the 47,XXX persons with Turner syndrome persons, we identified increased number of first partnership, number of mothers, and reduced level of education. We hypothesize that the significantly decreased number of 47,XXX persons becoming mothers could be due to hypogonadism in some. The affected socio-economic status suggests that the presence of an extra X chromosome has more detrimental effects than previously appreciated.

  16. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  17. Studies of X inactivation and isodisomy in twins provide further evidence that the X chromosomes is not involved in Rett syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migeon, B.R.; Dunn, M.A.; Schmeckpeper, B.J.; Naidu, S. [Johns Hophins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Thomas, G. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Kennedy-Kreiger Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Rett syndrome (RS), a progressive encephalopathy with onset in infancy, has been attributed to an X-linked mutation, mainly on the basis of its occurrence almost exclusively in females and its concordance in female MZ twins. The underlying mechanisms proposed are an X-linked dominant mutation with male lethality, uniparental disomy of the X chromosome, and/or some disturbance in the process of X inactivation leading to unequal distribution of cells expressing maternal or paternal alleles (referred to as a {open_quotes}nonrandom{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}skewed {close_quotes} inactivation). To determine if the X chromosome is in fact involved in RS, we studied a group of affected females including three pairs of MZ twins, two concordant for RS and one uniquely discordant for RS. Analysis of X-inactivation patterns confirms the frequent nonrandom X inactivation previously observed in MZ twins but indicates that this is independent of RS. Analysis of 29 RS females reveals not one instance of uniparental X disomy, extending the observations previously reported. Therefore, our findings contribute no support for the hypothesis that RS is an X-linked disorder. Furthermore, the concordant phenotype in most MZ females twins with RS, which has not been observed in female twins with known X-linked mutations, argues against an X mutation. 41 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Array comparative genomic hybridization analysis of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in human infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guediche, N; Tosca, L; Kara Terki, A; Bas, C; Lecerf, L; Young, J; Briand-Suleau, A; Tou, B; Bouligand, J; Brisset, S; Misrahi, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Goossens, M; Tachdjian, G

    2012-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding cytogenetics. This study describes four patients with sSMC in relation with infertility. Patient 1 had primary infertility. His brother, fertile, carried the same sSMC (patient 2). Patient 3 presented polycystic ovary syndrome and patient 4 primary ovarian insufficiency. Cytogenetic studies, array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and sperm analyses were compared with cases previously reported. sSMC corresponded to the 15q11.2 region (patients 1 and 2), the centromeric chromosome 15 region (patient 3) and the 21p11.2 region (patient 4). Array CGH showed 3.6-Mb gain for patients 1 and 2 and 0.266-Mb gain for patient 4. Sperm fluorescent in-situ hybridization analyses found ratios of 0.37 and 0.30 of sperm nuclei with sSMC(15) for patients 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.001). An increase of sperm nuclei with disomy X, Y and 18 was noted for patient 1 compared with control and patient 2 (P < 0.001). Among the genes mapped in the unbalanced chromosomal regions, POTE B and BAGE are related to the testis and ovary, respectively. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to duplication, but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis.

  19. Chromosome locations of genes encoding human signal transduction adapter proteins, Nck (NCK), Shc (SHC1), and Grb2 (GRB2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huebner, K; Kastury, K; Druck, T;

    1994-01-01

    Abnormalities due to chromosomal aberration or point mutation in gene products of growth factor receptors or in ras gene products, which lie on the same signaling pathway, can cause disease in animals and humans. Thus, it can be important to determine chromosomal map positions of genes encoding "...

  20. 1ST-TRIMESTER MATERNAL SERUM HUMAN CHORIONIC-GONADOTROPIN AS A MARKER FOR FETAL CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLITH, JMM

    1992-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Prenatal Diagnosis has initiated a study on the possibilities of first-trimester screening for fetal chromosomal disorders. We report on maternal serum human chorionic gonadotrophin (MS-hCG) measurements in 1348 pregnancies with a chromosomally normal fetus and 53 pregnanc

  1. Abnormal pairing of X and Y sex chromosomes during meiosis I in interspecific hybrids of Phodopus campbelli and P. sungorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishishita, Satoshi; Tsuboi, Kazuma; Ohishi, Namiko; Tsuchiya, Kimiyuki; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2015-03-24

    Hybrid sterility plays an important role in the maintenance of species identity and promotion of speciation. Male interspecific hybrids from crosses between Campbell's dwarf hamster (Phodopus campbelli) and the Djungarian hamster (P. sungorus) exhibit sterility with abnormal spermatogenesis. However, the meiotic phenotype of these hybrids has not been well described. In the present work, we observed the accumulation of spermatocytes and apoptosis of spermatocyte-like cells in the testes of hybrids between P. campbelli females and P. sungorus males. In hybrid spermatocytes, a high frequency of asynapsis of X and Y chromosomes during the pachytene-like stage and dissociation of these chromosomes during metaphase I (MI) was observed. No autosomal univalency was observed during pachytene-like and MI stages in the hybrids; however, a low frequency of synapsis between autosomes and X or Y chromosomes, interlocking and partial synapsis between autosomal pairs, and γ-H2AFX staining in autosomal chromatin was observed during the pachytene-like stage. Degenerated MI-like nuclei were frequently observed in the hybrids. Most of the spermatozoa in hybrid epididymides exhibited head malformation. These results indicate that the pairing of X and Y chromosomes is more adversely affected than that of autosomes in Phodopus hybrids.

  2. Bicuspid aortic valve and aortic coarctation are linked to deletion of the X chromosome short arm in Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondy, Carolyn; Bakalov, Vladimir K; Cheng, Clara; Olivieri, Laura; Rosing, Douglas R; Arai, Andrew E

    2013-01-01

    Background Con