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Sample records for chromosome specific allelic

  1. Allele specific gene expression on chromosome 7 in human tumorigenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, A.

    2017-01-01

    Both copy number losses and homozygosity of chromosome 7 are extremely rare events in many tumor types, indicating that the retention of both the maternal and paternal copies of chromosome 7 is essential for the tumor cells. This thesis compiles our research into the driving force that is behind the

  2. Allele-specific marker generation and linkage mapping on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcock, B; Kazianis, S; Lucito, R; Walter, R B; Kallman, K D; Morizot, D C; Vielkind, J R

    2006-01-01

    There is great interest in the sex chromosomes of Xiphophorus fishes because both WY/YY and XX/XY sex-determining mechanisms function in these species, with at least one taxon possessing all three types of sex chromosomes, and because in certain interspecific hybrids melanoma arises as a consequence of inheritance of the sex-linked macromelanophore determining locus (MDL). Representational difference analysis (RDA) has been used to clone two sequences from the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, including a cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, delta polypeptide (CHRND) orthologue. Allele-specific assays for these sequences, as well as for the sex-linked XMRK1 and XMRK2 genes, were developed to distinguish W, X, and Y chromosomes derived from a X. maculatus (XX/XY) strain and a X. helleri (WY/YY) strain. Linkage mapping localized these markers to linkage group (LG) 24. No recombinants were observed between XMRK2 and MDL, confirming a role for XMRK2 in macromelanophore development. Although the master sex-determining (SD) locus certainly resides on Xiphophorus LG 24, autosomal loci are probably involved in sex determination as well, as indicated by the abnormal sex ratios in the backcross hybrids that contrast theoretical predictions based on LG 24 genotyping. Marker development and allelic discrimination on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes should prove highly useful for studies that utilize this genus as an animal model.

  3. Imprinted chromosomal domains revealed by allele-specific replication timing of the GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaSalle, J.; Flint, A.; Lalande, M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The GABRB3 and GABRA5 genes are organized as a cluster in chromosome 15q11-q13. The genes are separated by around 100 kb and arranged in opposite transcriptional orientations. The GABA{sub A} receptor cluster lies near the Angelman and Prader-Willi loci and displays asynchronous DNA replication, suggesting that this region is subject to parental imprinting. In order to further study the association between DNA replication and imprinting, allele-specific replication was assayed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with {lambda}-phage probes from the GABRB3/A5 region and a D15Z1 satellite probe to identify the parental origin of each chromosome. The replication kinetics of each allele was determined by using a flow sorter to fractionate mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes on the basis of cell cycle progression prior to FISH analysis. These kinetic studies reveal a 50-150 kb chromosomal domain extending from the middle of the GABRB3/A5 intergenic region into the GABRA5 5{prime}-UTR which displays maternal replication in early S with paternal replication delayed until the end of S. In contrast, genomic regions on either side of this maternal early replication domain exhibit the opposite pattern with paternal before maternal replication and both alleles replicating in the latter half of S. These results indicate that the GABRB3/A5 region is divided into domains in which replication timing is determined by parental origin. In addition to a loss of asynchronous replication, organization into replication timing domains is also lost in lymphocytes from maternal and paternal uniparental disomy 15 patients suggesting that a chromosome contribution from both parents is required for the establishment of the imprinted replication domains.

  4. New prediction model for probe specificity in an allele-specific extension reaction for haplotype-specific extraction (HSE of Y chromosome mixtures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rothe

    Full Text Available Allele-specific extension reactions (ASERs use 3' terminus-specific primers for the selective extension of completely annealed matches by polymerase. The ability of the polymerase to extend non-specific 3' terminal mismatches leads to a failure of the reaction, a process that is only partly understood and predictable, and often requires time-consuming assay design. In our studies we investigated haplotype-specific extraction (HSE for the separation of male DNA mixtures. HSE is an ASER and provides the ability to distinguish between diploid chromosomes from one or more individuals. Here, we show that the success of HSE and allele-specific extension depend strongly on the concentration difference between complete match and 3' terminal mismatch. Using the oligonucleotide-modeling platform Visual Omp, we demonstrated the dependency of the discrimination power of the polymerase on match- and mismatch-target hybridization between different probe lengths. Therefore, the probe specificity in HSE could be predicted by performing a relative comparison of different probe designs with their simulated differences between the duplex concentration of target-probe match and mismatches. We tested this new model for probe design in more than 300 HSE reactions with 137 different probes and obtained an accordance of 88%.

  5. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties.

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    Kim Monkhorst

    Full Text Available In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this probability, we studied the role of the X to autosome (X ratio A ratio in initiation of XCI, and have used the experimental data in a computer simulation model to study the cellular population dynamics of XCI.To obtain more insight in the role of the XratioA ratio in initiation of XCI, we generated triploid mouse ES cells by fusion of haploid round spermatids with diploid female and male ES cells. These fusion experiments resulted in only XXY triploid ES cells. XYY and XXX ES lines were absent, suggesting cell death related either to insufficient X-chromosomal gene dosage (XYY or to inheritance of an epigenetically modified X chromosome (XXX. Analysis of active (Xa and inactive (Xi X chromosomes in the obtained triploid XXY lines indicated that the initiation frequency of XCI is low, resulting in a mixed population of XaXiY and XaXaY cells, in which the XaXiY cells have a small proliferative advantage. This result, and findings on XCI in diploid and tetraploid ES cell lines with different X ratio A ratios, provides evidence that the X ratio A ratio determines the probability for a given X chromosome to be inactivated. Furthermore, we found that the kinetics of the XCI process can be simulated using a probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated that is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. These simulation studies re-emphasize our hypothesis that the probability is a function of the concentration of an X-encoded activator of XCI, and of X chromosome specific allelic properties determining the threshold for this activator.The present findings reveal that the probability for an X chromosome to be inactivated is proportional to the X ratio A ratio. This finding

  6. An integrative approach to assess X-chromosome inactivation using allele-specific expression with applications to epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Nicholas B; Fogarty, Zachary C; Larson, Melissa C; Kalli, Kimberly R; Lawrenson, Kate; Gayther, Simon; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J

    2017-12-01

    X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) epigenetically silences transcription of an X chromosome in females; patterns of XCI are thought to be aberrant in women's cancers, but are understudied due to statistical challenges. We develop a two-stage statistical framework to assess skewed XCI and evaluate gene-level patterns of XCI for an individual sample by integration of RNA sequence, copy number alteration, and genotype data. Our method relies on allele-specific expression (ASE) to directly measure XCI and does not rely on male samples or paired normal tissue for comparison. We model ASE using a two-component mixture of beta distributions, allowing estimation for a given sample of the degree of skewness (based on a composite likelihood ratio test) and the posterior probability that a given gene escapes XCI (using a Bayesian beta-binomial mixture model). To illustrate the utility of our approach, we applied these methods to data from tumors of ovarian cancer patients. Among 99 patients, 45 tumors were informative for analysis and showed evidence of XCI skewed toward a particular parental chromosome. For 397 X-linked genes, we observed tumor XCI patterns largely consistent with previously identified consensus states based on multiple normal tissue types. However, 37 genes differed in XCI state between ovarian tumors and the consensus state; 17 genes aberrantly escaped XCI in ovarian tumors (including many oncogenes), whereas 20 genes were unexpectedly inactivated in ovarian tumors (including many tumor suppressor genes). These results provide evidence of the importance of XCI in ovarian cancer and demonstrate the utility of our two-stage analysis. © 2017 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. The probability to initiate X chromosome inactivation is determined by the X to autosomal ratio and X chromosome specific allelic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monkhorst, Kim; de Hoon, Bas; Jonkers, Iris; Mulugeta Achame, Eskeatnaf; Monkhorst, Wouter; Hoogerbrugge, Jos; Rentmeester, Eveline; Westerhoff, Hans V; Grosveld, Frank; Grootegoed, J Anton; Gribnau, Joost

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In female mammalian cells, random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) equalizes the dosage of X-encoded gene products to that in male cells. XCI is a stochastic process, in which each X chromosome has a probability to be inactivated. To obtain more insight in the factors setting up this

  8. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  9. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H

    KAUST Repository

    Saade, Stephanie

    2017-12-07

    Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM) population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh) on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM) with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  10. A donor-specific QTL, exhibiting allelic variation for leaf sheath hairiness in a nested association mapping population, is located on barley chromosome 4H.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Saade

    Full Text Available Leaf sheath hairiness is a morphological trait associated with various advantages, including tolerance to both abiotic and biotic stresses, thereby increasing yield. Understanding the genetic basis of this trait in barley can therefore improve the agronomic performance of this economically important crop. We scored leaf sheath hairiness in a two-year field trial in 1,420 BC1S3 lines from the wild barley nested association mapping (NAM population HEB-25. Leaf sheath hairiness segregated in six out of 25 families with the reference parent Barke being glabrous. We detected the major hairy leaf sheath locus Hs (syn. Hsh on chromosome 4H (111.3 cM with high precision. The effects of the locus varied across the six different wild barley donors, with donor of HEB family 11 conferring the highest score of leaf sheath hairiness. Due to the high mapping resolution present in HEB-25, we were able to discuss physically linked pentatricopeptide repeat genes and subtilisin-like proteases as potential candidate genes underlying this locus. In this study, we proved that HEB-25 provides an appropriate tool to further understand the genetic control of leaf sheath hairiness in barley. Furthermore, our work represents a perfect starting position to clone the gene responsible for the 4H locus observed.

  11. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...

  12. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

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    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  13. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  14. Allele-specific KRT1 expression is a complex trait.

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    Heng Tao

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The differential expression of alleles occurs commonly in humans and is likely an important genetic factor underlying heritable differences in phenotypic traits. Understanding the molecular basis of allelic expression differences is thus an important challenge. Although many genes have been shown to display differential allelic expression, this is the first study to examine in detail the cumulative effects of multiple cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for allele-specific expression differences. We have used a variety of experimental approaches to identify and characterize cis-regulatory polymorphisms responsible for the extreme allele-specific expression differences of keratin-1 (KRT1 in human white blood cells. The combined data from our analyses provide strong evidence that the KRT1 allelic expression differences result from the haplotypic combinations and interactions of five cis-regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose alleles differ in their affinity to bind transcription factors and modulate KRT1 promoter activity. Two of these cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional activators with the alleles on the high-expressing KRT1 haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern. In contrast, the other three cis-regulatory SNPs bind transcriptional inhibitors with the alleles on the low-expressing haplotype pattern having a higher affinity than the alleles on the high-expressing haplotype pattern. Our study provides important new insights into the degree of complexity that the cis-regulatory sequences responsible for allele-specific transcriptional regulation have. These data suggest that allelic expression differences result from the cumulative contribution of multiple DNA sequence polymorphisms, with each having a small effect, and that allele-specific expression can thus be viewed as a complex trait.

  15. Novel method for analysis of allele specific expression in triploid Oryzias latipes reveals consistent pattern of allele exclusion.

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    Tzintzuni I Garcia

    Full Text Available Assessing allele-specific gene expression (ASE on a large scale continues to be a technically challenging problem. Certain biological phenomena, such as X chromosome inactivation and parental imprinting, affect ASE most drastically by completely shutting down the expression of a whole set of alleles. Other more subtle effects on ASE are likely to be much more complex and dependent on the genetic environment and are perhaps more important to understand since they may be responsible for a significant amount of biological diversity. Tools to assess ASE in a diploid biological system are becoming more reliable. Non-diploid systems are, however, not uncommon. In humans full or partial polyploid states are regularly found in both healthy (meiotic cells, polynucleated cell types and diseased tissues (trisomies, non-disjunction events, cancerous tissues. In this work we have studied ASE in the medaka fish model system. We have developed a method for determining ASE in polyploid organisms from RNAseq data and we have implemented this method in a software tool set. As a biological model system we have used nuclear transplantation to experimentally produce artificial triploid medaka composed of three different haplomes. We measured ASE in RNA isolated from the livers of two adult, triploid medaka fish that showed a high degree of similarity. The majority of genes examined (82% shared expression more or less evenly among the three alleles in both triploids. The rest of the genes (18% displayed a wide range of ASE levels. Interestingly the majority of genes (78% displayed generally consistent ASE levels in both triploid individuals. A large contingent of these genes had the same allele entirely suppressed in both triploids. When viewed in a chromosomal context, it is revealed that these genes are from large sections of 4 chromosomes and may be indicative of some broad scale suppression of gene expression.

  16. Frequent Unanticipated Alleles of lethal giant larvae in Drosophila Second Chromosome Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roegiers, Fabrice; Kavaler, Joshua; Tolwinski, Nicholas; Chou, Yu-Ting; Duan, Hong; Bejarano, Fernando; Zitserman, Diana; Lai, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Forty years ago, a high frequency of lethal giant larvae (lgl) alleles in wild populations of Drosophila melanogaster was reported. This locus has been intensively studied for its roles in epithelial polarity, asymmetric neural divisions, and restriction of tissue proliferation. Here, we identify a high frequency of lgl alleles in the Bloomington second chromosome deficiency kit and the University of California at Los Angeles Bruinfly FRT40A-lethal P collection. These unrecognized aberrations confound the use of these workhorse collections for phenotypic screening or genetic mapping. In addition, we determined that independent alleles of insensitive, reported to affect asymmetric cell divisions during sensory organ development, carry lgl deletions that are responsible for the observed phenotypes. Taken together, these results encourage the routine testing of second chromosome stocks for second-site alleles of lgl. PMID:19279324

  17. The fate of chromosomes and alleles in an allohexaploid Brassica population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Annaliese S; Nelson, Matthew N; Takahira, Junko; Cowling, Wallace A; Alves, Gustavo Moreira; Chaudhuri, Arkaprava; Chen, Ning; Ragu, Mohana E; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Coriton, Olivier; Huteau, Virginie; Eber, Frédérique; Chèvre, Anne-Marie; Batley, Jacqueline

    2014-05-01

    Production of allohexaploid Brassica (2n = AABBCC) is a promising goal for plant breeders due to the potential for hybrid heterosis and useful allelic contributions from all three of the Brassica genomes present in the cultivated diploid (2n = AA, 2n = BB, 2n = CC) and allotetraploid (2n = AABB, 2n = AACC, and 2n = BBCC) crop species (canola, cabbages, mustards). We used high-throughput SNP molecular marker assays, flow cytometry, and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize a population of putative allohexaploids derived from self-pollination of a hybrid from the novel cross (B. napus × B. carinata) × B. juncea to investigate whether fertile, stable allohexaploid Brassica can be produced. Allelic segregation in the A and C genomes generally followed Mendelian expectations for an F2 population, with minimal nonhomologous chromosome pairing. However, we detected no strong selection for complete 2n = AABBCC chromosome complements, with weak correlations between DNA content and fertility (r(2) = 0.11) and no correlation between missing chromosomes or chromosome segments and fertility. Investigation of next-generation progeny resulting from one highly fertile F2 plant using FISH revealed general maintenance of high chromosome numbers but severe distortions in karyotype, as evidenced by recombinant chromosomes and putative loss/duplication of A- and C-genome chromosome pairs. Our results show promise for the development of meiotically stable allohexaploid lines, but highlight the necessity of selection for 2n = AABBCC karyotypes.

  18. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

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    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  19. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  20. An X-linked Myh11-CreERT2 mouse line resulting from Y to X chromosome-translocation of the Cre allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Mingmei; Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Fen; Ali, Yasmin H; Chan, Kelvin L; Zou, Fei; Offermanns, Stefan; Jiang, Zhisheng; Jiang, Zhihua

    2017-09-01

    The Myh11-CreER T2 mouse line (Cre + ) has gained increasing application because of its high lineage specificity relative to other Cre drivers targeting smooth muscle cells (SMCs). This Cre allele, however, was initially inserted into the Y chromosome (X/Y Cre+ ), which excluded its application in female mice. Our group established a Cre + colony from male ancestors. Surprisingly, genotype screening identified female carriers that stably transmitted the Cre allele to the following generations. Crossbreeding experiments revealed a pattern of X-linked inheritance for the transgene (k > 1000), indicating that these female carries acquired the Cre allele through a mechanism of Y to X chromosome translocation. Further characterization demonstrated that in hemizygous X/X Cre+ mice Cre activity was restricted to a subset arterial SMCs, with Cre expression in arteries decreased by 50% compared to X/Y Cre+ mice. This mosaicism, however, diminished in homozygous X Cre+ /X Cre+ mice. In a model of aortic aneurysm induced by a SMC-specific Tgfbr1 deletion, the homozygous X Cre+ /X Cre+ Cre driver unmasked the aortic phenotype that is otherwise subclinical when driven by the hemizygous X/X Cre+ Cre line. In conclusion, the Cre allele carried by this female mouse line is located on the X chromosome and subjected to X-inactivation. The homozygous X Cre+ /X Cre+ mice produce uniform Cre activity in arterial SMCs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 delineate new phylogenetic substructure in human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myres, Natalie M; Ritchie, Kathleen H; Lin, Alice A; Hughes, Robert H; Woodward, Scott R; Underhill, Peter A

    2009-06-01

    To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to evaluate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 short tandem repeat loci. DNA sequencing and median-joining network analyses were used to evaluate Y-chromosome lineages displaying intermediate variant alleles. We show that DYS392.2 occurs on a single haplogroup background, specifically I1*-M253, and likely represents a new phylogenetic subdivision in this European haplogroup. Intermediate variants DYS449.2 and DYS385.2 both occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds, and when evaluated within specific haplogroup contexts, delineate new phylogenetic substructure, with DYS449.2 being informative within haplogroup A-P97 and DYS385.2 in haplogroups D-M145, E1b1a-M2, and R1b*-M343. Sequence analysis of variant alleles observed within the various haplogroup backgrounds showed that the nature of the intermediate variant differed, confirming the mutations arose independently. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles, while relatively rare, typically occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds. This distribution indicates that such mutations arise at a rate generally intermediate to those of binary markers and STR loci. As a result, intermediate-sized Y-STR variants can reveal phylogenetic substructure within the Y-chromosome phylogeny not currently detected by either binary or Y-STR markers alone, but only when such variants are evaluated within a haplogroup context.

  2. Allelic loss on chromosomes 8p, 22q and 18q (DCC) in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crundwell, M C; Chughtai, S; Knowles, M; Takle, L; Luscombe, M; Neoptolemos, J P; Morton, D G; Phillips, S M

    1996-08-22

    Previous studies have suggested the involvement of tumour-suppressor genes on chromosomes 8p, 22q and 18q (DCC) in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to further characterize these regions. We investigated 20 polymorphic regions on the 3 chromosome arms in 43 cancers and 10 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Allelic loss was observed in 72% of cancers on 8p, 16% on 22q and 24% at DCC. For BPH, loss was observed in 20% on 8p and in 12% at DCC. The low incidence of LOH on 22q implies that this locus has no significant role in prostate carcinogenesis. At DCC, although the overall incidence was low, tumours with LOH were mostly of high grade or had metastases, suggesting a role for this gene in prostate cancer progression. On chromosome 8p, 29% of cancers had deletions at the LPL locus on 8p22 and 60% had deletions within a region flanked by the markers D8S339 and ANKI on 8p 11.1-p21.1. Within this region, 2 distinct areas of allelic loss were observed, at one or both ANKI and D8S255, and in the region defined by the markers D8S259-D8S505. For the regions 8p22 and ANKI-D8S255, tumours with metastases had a greater frequency of LOH compared to non-metastasizing tumours, suggesting the presence of putative metastasis-suppressor genes in these regions.

  3. A hypervariable STR polymorphism in the CFI gene: southern origin of East Asian-specific group H alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Isao; Jin, Feng; Harihara, Shinji; Matsusue, Aya; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Akane, Atsushi; Umetsu, Kazuo; Saitou, Naruya; Chattopadhyay, Prasanta K

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of four populations revealed that a hypervariable short tandem repeat (iSTR) in intron 7 of the human complement factor I (CFI) gene on chromosome 4q was unique, with 17 possible East Asian-specific group H alleles observed at relatively high frequencies. To develop a deeper anthropological and forensic understanding of iSTR, 1161 additional individuals from 11 Asian populations were investigated. Group H alleles of iSTR and c.1217A allele of a SNP in exon 11 of the CFI gene were associated with each other and were almost entirely confined to East Asian populations. Han Chinese in Changsha, southern China, showed the highest frequency for East Asian-specific group H alleles (0.201) among 15 populations. Group H alleles were observed to decrease gradually from south to north in 11 East Asian populations. This expansion of group H alleles provides evidence that southern China and Southeast Asia are a hotspot of Asian diversity and a genetic reservoir of Asians after they entered East Asia. The expected heterozygosity values of iSTR ranged from 0.927 in Thais to 0.874 in Oroqens, higher than those of an STR in the fibrinogen alpha chain (FGA) gene on chromosome 4q. Thus, iSTR is a useful marker for anthropological and forensic genetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Allele-specific gene expression is widespread across the genome and biological processes.

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    Ricardo Palacios

    Full Text Available Allelic specific gene expression (ASGE appears to be an important factor in human phenotypic variability and as a consequence, for the development of complex traits and diseases. In order to study ASGE across the human genome, we have performed a study in which genotyping was coupled with an analysis of ASGE by screening 11,500 SNPs using the Mapping 10 K Array to identify differential allelic expression. We found that from the 5,133 SNPs that were suitable for analysis (heterozygous in our sample and expressed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, 2,934 (57% SNPs had differential allelic expression. Such SNPs were equally distributed along human chromosomes and biological processes. We validated the presence or absence of ASGE in 18 out 20 SNPs (90% randomly selected by real time PCR in 48 human subjects. In addition, we observed that SNPs close to -but not included in- segmental duplications had increased levels of ASGE. Finally, we found that transcripts of unknown function or non-coding RNAs, also display ASGE: from a total of 2,308 intronic SNPs, 1510 (65% SNPs underwent differential allelic expression. In summary, ASGE is a widespread mechanism in the human genome whose regulation seems to be far more complex than expected.

  5. Identification of internal variation in the pseudoautosomal VNTR DXYS17, with nonrandom distribution of the alleles on the X and the Y chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decorte, R.; Wu, R.; Marynen, P.; Cassiman, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    The PCR technique was used to analyze the DXYS17 locus in the pseudoautosomal region of the X and the Y chromosomes. Analysis on an automated DNA sequencer allowed for sensitive and highly accurate typing of 16 different alleles with a size between 480 and 1,100 bp. Two DXYS17 alleles migrated with the same size on agarose or denaturing polyacrylamide gels but with different mobilities on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels. Sequence analysis showed that, while an identical number of repeats were present in both alleles, differences in the composition of the units were observed. The origin of these differences was found in the 28- and 33-bp units, which only had a specific repeat pattern at the 5' and 3' ends of the region. The genotype distribution for DXYS17 in a Caucasian population did not deviate from the values expected under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. However, the frequency of one allele and one genotype was significantly different between males and females. Segregation analysis showed that this difference was the result of a nonrandom distribution of certain alleles on the sex chromosomes in males. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chromosome-specific PLUG and SCAR markers, and successfully used them to detect the St-chromosome in wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. Materials and methods. Plant materials. Wheat line ML13 was provided by International Maize and.

  7. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  8. Nonrandom duplication of the chromosome bearing a mutated Ha-ras-1 allele in mouse skin tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, A.B.; Aldaz, C.M.; Conti, C.J.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyzed the normal/mutated allelic ratio of the Ha-ras-1 gene in mouse skin squamous cell carcinomas induced by initation with dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and promotion with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. DNA for these studies was obtained from short-term tumor cultures (24-72 hr) to eliminate the contribution of stromal and inflammatory cells to the sample. The alelotypic analysis was performed in 25 squamous cell carcinomas by quantitative radio-analysis of the Xba I restriction fragment length polymorphism as detected by BS9, a v-Ha-ras probe, and rehybridization of the Southern blots with probes for chromosomes 7 and 9. Approximately 85% of the tumors presented overrepresentation of the mutated allele in the form of 1 normal/2 mutated (12 tumors), 0 normal/3 mutated (4 tumors), 0 normal/2 mutated (3 tumors), and gene amplification (3 tumors). No tumor was found with a 2 normal/1 mutated allelic ratio. These results support their previous cytogenetic studies, indicating that trisomy of chromosome 7 is present in themajority of these tumors show that nonrandom duplication of the chromosome carrying the mutated Ha-ras-1 allel appears to be a major mechanism by which the mutated gene is overrepresented

  9. Sex-specific Trans-regulatory Variation on the Drosophila melanogaster X Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Michael; Dean, Rebecca; Rogell, Björn; Friberg, Urban

    2015-01-01

    The X chromosome constitutes a unique genomic environment because it is present in one copy in males, but two copies in females. This simple fact has motivated several theoretical predictions with respect to how standing genetic variation on the X chromosome should differ from the autosomes. Unmasked expression of deleterious mutations in males and a lower census size are expected to reduce variation, while allelic variants with sexually antagonistic effects, and potentially those with a sex-specific effect, could accumulate on the X chromosome and contribute to increased genetic variation. In addition, incomplete dosage compensation of the X chromosome could potentially dampen the male-specific effects of random mutations, and promote the accumulation of X-linked alleles with sexually dimorphic phenotypic effects. Here we test both the amount and the type of genetic variation on the X chromosome within a population of Drosophila melanogaster, by comparing the proportion of X linked and autosomal trans-regulatory SNPs with a sexually concordant and discordant effect on gene expression. We find that the X chromosome is depleted for SNPs with a sexually concordant effect, but hosts comparatively more SNPs with a sexually discordant effect. Interestingly, the contrasting results for SNPs with sexually concordant and discordant effects are driven by SNPs with a larger influence on expression in females than expression in males. Furthermore, the distribution of these SNPs is shifted towards regions where dosage compensation is predicted to be less complete. These results suggest that intrinsic properties of dosage compensation influence either the accumulation of different types of trans-factors and/or their propensity to accumulate mutations. Our findings document a potential mechanistic basis for sex-specific genetic variation, and identify the X as a reservoir for sexually dimorphic phenotypic variation. These results have general implications for X chromosome

  10. Haplotype analysis and a novel allele-sharing method refines a chromosome 4p locus linked to bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hellard, Stephanie; Lee, Andrew J; Underwood, Sarah; Thomson, Pippa A; Morris, Stewart W; Torrance, Helen S; Anderson, Susan M; Adams, Richard R; Navarro, Pau; Christoforou, Andrea; Houlihan, Lorna M; Detera-Wadleigh, Sevilla; Owen, Michael J; Asherson, Philip; Muir, Walter J; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Wray, Naomi R; Porteous, David J; Evans, Kathryn L

    2007-03-15

    Bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) are common conditions. Their causes are unknown, but they include a substantial genetic component. Previously, we described significant linkage of BPAD to a chromosome 4p locus within a large pedigree (F22). Others subsequently have found evidence for linkage of BPAD and SCZ to this region. We constructed high-resolution haplotypes for four linked families, calculated logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores, and developed a novel method to assess the extent of allele sharing within genes between the families. We describe an increase in the F22 LOD score for this region. Definition and comparison of the linked haplotypes allowed us to prioritize two subregions of 3.8 and 4.4 Mb. Analysis of the extent of allele sharing within these subregions identified 200 kb that shows increased allele sharing between families. Linkage of BPAD to chromosome 4p has been strengthened. Haplotype analysis in the additional linked families refined the 20-Mb linkage region. Development of a novel allele-sharing method allowed us to bridge the gap between conventional linkage and association studies. Description of a 200-kb region of increased allele sharing prioritizes this region, which contains two functional candidate genes for BPAD, SLC2A9, and WDR1, for subsequent studies.

  11. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...

  12. Paternal or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 16 resulting in homozygosity of a mutant allele causes Fanconi anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Frank X.; Kimble, Danielle C.; Kim, Yonghwan; Lach, Francis P.; Harper, Ursula; Kamat, Aparna; Jones, MaryPat; Sanborn, Erica M.; Tryon, Rebecca; Wagner, John E.; MacMillan, Margaret L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Smogorzewska, Agata; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C.

    2016-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare inherited disorder caused by pathogenic variants in one of 19 FANC genes. FA patients display congenital abnormalities, and develop bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. We identified homozygous mutations in four FA patients and, in each case, only one parent carried the obligate mutant allele. FANCA and FANCP/SLX4 genes, both located on chromosome 16, were the affected recessive FA genes in three and one family respectively. Genotyping with short tande...

  13. Utilising polymorphisms to achieve allele-specific genome editing in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. Capon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The advent of genome editing has significantly altered genetic research, including research using the zebrafish model. To better understand the selectivity of the commonly used CRISPR/Cas9 system, we investigated single base pair mismatches in target sites and examined how they affect genome editing in the zebrafish model. Using two different zebrafish strains that have been deep sequenced, CRISPR/Cas9 target sites containing polymorphisms between the two strains were identified. These strains were crossed (creating heterozygotes at polymorphic sites and CRISPR/Cas9 complexes that perfectly complement one strain injected. Sequencing of targeted sites showed biased, allele-specific editing for the perfectly complementary sequence in the majority of cases (14/19. To test utility, we examined whether phenotypes generated by F0 injection could be internally controlled with such polymorphisms. Targeting of genes bmp7a and chordin showed reduction in the frequency of phenotypes in injected ‘heterozygotes’ compared with injecting the strain with perfect complementarity. Next, injecting CRISPR/Cas9 complexes targeting two separate sites created deletions, but deletions were biased to selected chromosomes when one CRISPR/Cas9 target contained a polymorphism. Finally, integration of loxP sequences occurred preferentially in alleles with perfect complementarity. These experiments demonstrate that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs present throughout the genome can be utilised to increase the efficiency of in cis genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 in the zebrafish model.

  14. MGMT-Methylated Alleles Are Distributed Heterogeneously Within Glioma Samples Irrespective of IDH Status and Chromosome 10q Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Laura; Tabano, Silvia; Bonaparte, Eleonora; Marfia, Giovanni; Pesenti, Chiara; Falcone, Rossella; Augello, Claudia; Carlessi, Nicole; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Guerneri, Silvana; Campanella, Rolando; Caroli, Manuela; Sirchia, Silvia; Bosari, Silvano; Miozzo, Monica

    2016-06-26

    Several molecular markers drive diagnostic classification, prognostic stratification, and/or prediction of response to therapy in patients with gliomas. Among them, IDH gene mutations are valuable markers for defining subtypes and are strongly associated with epigenetic silencing of the methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. However, little is known about the percentage of MGMT-methylated alleles in IDH-mutated cells or the potential association between MGMT methylation and deletion of chromosome 10q, which encompasses the MGMT locus. Here, we quantitatively assessed MGMT methylation and IDH1 mutation in 208 primary glioma samples to explore possible differences associated with the IDH genotype. We also explored a potential association between MGMT methylation and loss of chromosome 10q. We observed that MGMT methylation was heterogeneously distributed within glioma samples irrespective of IDH status suggesting an incomplete overlap between IDH1-mutated and MGMT-methylated alleles and indicating a partial association between these two events. Moreover, loss of one MGMT allele did not affect the methylation level of the remaining allele. MGMT was methylated in about half of gliomas harboring a 10q deletion; in those cases, loss of heterozygosity might be considered a second hit leading to complete inactivation of MGMT and further contributing to tumor progression. © 2016 American Association of Neuropathologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. MGMT-Methylated Alleles Are Distributed Heterogeneously Within Glioma Samples Irrespective of IDH Status and Chromosome 10q Deletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Laura; Tabano, Silvia; Bonaparte, Eleonora; Marfia, Giovanni; Pesenti, Chiara; Falcone, Rossella; Augello, Claudia; Carlessi, Nicole; Silipigni, Rosamaria; Guerneri, Silvana; Campanella, Rolando; Caroli, Manuela; Maria Sirchia, Silvia; Bosari, Silvano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several molecular markers drive diagnostic classification, prognostic stratification, and/or prediction of response to therapy in patients with gliomas. Among them, IDH gene mutations are valuable markers for defining subtypes and are strongly associated with epigenetic silencing of the methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene. However, little is known about the percentage of MGMT-methylated alleles in IDH-mutated cells or the potential association between MGMT methylation and deletion of chromosome 10q, which encompasses the MGMT locus. Here, we quantitatively assessed MGMT methylation and IDH1 mutation in 208 primary glioma samples to explore possible differences associated with the IDH genotype. We also explored a potential association between MGMT methylation and loss of chromosome 10q. We observed that MGMT methylation was heterogeneously distributed within glioma samples irrespective of IDH status suggesting an incomplete overlap between IDH1-mutated and MGMT-methylated alleles and indicating a partial association between these 2 events. Moreover, loss of one MGMT allele did not affect the methylation level of the remaining allele. MGMT was methylated in about half of gliomas harboring a 10q deletion; in those cases, loss of heterozygosity might be considered a second hit leading to complete inactivation of MGMT and further contributing to tumor progression. PMID:27346749

  16. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    arms. This heteromorphism was restricted to females, suggesting a female heterogametic sex chromosome system of. ZZ/ZW type at a very early step of differentiation. [Odierna G, Aprea G, Capriglione T, Castellano S and Balletto E 2007 Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome heteromorphism.

  17. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harindra E. Amarasinghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  18. Allele-specific enzymatic amplification of. beta. -globin genomic DNA for diagnosis of sickle cell anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, D.Y.; Ugozzoli, L.; Pal, B.K.; Wallace, B. (Beckman Research Institute of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (USA))

    1989-04-01

    A rapid nonradioactive approach to the diagnosis of sickle cell anemia is described based on an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR). This method allows direct detection of the normal or the sickle cell {beta}-globin allele in genomic DNA without additional steps of probe hybridization, ligation, or restriction enzyme cleavage. Two allele-specific oligonucleotide primers, one specific for the sickle cell allele and one specific for the normal allele, together with another primer complementary to both alleles were used in the polymerase chain reaction with genomic DNA templates. The allele-specific primers differed from each other in their terminal 3{prime} nucleotide. Under the proper annealing temperature and polymerase chain reaction conditions, these primers only directed amplification on their complementary allele. In a single blind study of DNA samples from 12 individuals, this method correctly and unambiguously allowed for the determination of the genotypes with no false negatives or positives. If ASPCR is able to discriminate all allelic variation (both transition and transversion mutations), this method has the potential to be a powerful approach for genetic disease diagnosis, carrier screening, HLA typing, human gene mapping, forensics, and paternity testing.

  19. Chromosomal Location by Use of Trisomics and New Alleles of an Endopeptidase in Zea Mays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Gissel; Scandalios, John G.

    1974-01-01

    An association was found earlier between the Ep1 gene locus coding for an endopeptidase and the endosperm color gene Y1 on chromosome 6 of Zea mays. By employing primary trisomics we have unequivocally placed the Ep1 gene on chromosome 6, closely linked to the Y1 locus. Additionally we describe new...

  20. Metastic Progression of Breast Cancer by Allelic Loss on Chromosome 18q21

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thiagalingam, Sam

    2006-01-01

    Genetic and epigenetic inactivation of SMAD4 are rare occurrences in breast tumors despite it is localized to chromosome 18q and serves as a frequent target for inactivation in advanced gastrointestinal cancers...

  1. Chromosome-specific desynapsis in the n = 2 race of Haplopappus gracilis (Compositae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R C; Ngo, Ngan; Ngo, Hao

    2002-05-01

    During cytological screening for pollen sterility in a wild population of Haplopappus gracilis (n = 2), several partially sterile plants were found that had good pachytene pairing but varying numbers of univalents. Some plants had chromosome A bivalents or A univalents, while in the same cells chromosome B had only bivalents. In other plants the reverse condition occurred; the B chromosome had B bivalents or B univalents and only A bivalents. This demonstrates a chromosome-specific effect for the desynapsis genes. Hybridization between the two homozygous mutant genotypes produced only normal bivalents; this indicates the two mutants are not alleles and each is recessive. An F2 generation showed independent assortment of the desynaptic mutations. The chromosome A bivalent is the larger of the two and normally has one or two chiasmata; the B bivalent normally has a single chiasma. Chiasmata distribution was tested in the desynaptic mutant A bivalents and showed an acceptable fit to a binomial distribution. This occurs also in heterozygous, asynaptic pairing control gene mutations. Analysis of the NOR bivalent in two hologenomic desynaptic mutations in tomato also showed a good fit to a binomial distribution of chiasmata. This indicates the same methods are applicable to diverse species.

  2. Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Intermediate Variant Alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 Delineate New Phylogenetic Substructure in Human Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Myres, Natalie M.; Ritchie, Kathleen H.; Lin, Alice A.; Hughes, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to valuate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Methods Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 ...

  3. A four-element based transposon system for allele specific tagging ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    genetics of crop-specific alleles that confer resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. Molecular analysis of such al- leles could be of tremendous significance for stabilization breeding of crop species. Of particular interest are alleles that have been transferred from alien relatives to crop spe- cies (Jiang et al 1994). In many ...

  4. The Charles River "hairless" rat mutation maps to chromosome 1: allelic with fuzzy and a likely orthologue of mouse frizzy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, K; Akkouris, G; Berry, P R; Chrissluis, R R; Crooks, I M; Dull, A K; Grable, S; Jeruzal, J; Lanza, J; Lavoie, C; Maloney, R A; Pitruzzello, M; Sharma, R; Stoklasek, T A; Tweeddale, J; King, T R

    2002-01-01

    Recent evidence has indicated that the recessive mutation affecting hypotrichosis in the Charles River (CR) "hairless" rat does not involve the hairless gene (hr) on rat chromosome 15. To determine if this mutation might be allelic (or orthologous) with any other previously mapped hypotrichosis-generating mutation in mammals, we have produced a panel of backcross rats segregating for the CR hairless rat mutation as well as numerous other markers from throughout the rat genome. Analysis of this panel has located the CR hairless rat's hypotrichosis-generating mutation on chromosome 1, near Myl2, where only the fuzzy mutation in rat (fz) and the frizzy mutation in mouse (fr) have been previously localized. Intercrossing fz/fz and CR hairless rats produced hybrid offspring with abnormal hair, showing that these two rat mutations are allelic. We suggest that the CR hairless rat mutation and fuzzy be renamed frizzy-Charles River (fr(CR)) and frizzy-Harlan (fr(H)), respectively, to reflect their likely orthology with the mouse fr mutation.

  5. New St-chromosome-specific molecular markers for identifying ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    specific marker. St-specific markers for wheat–Th. intermedium introgression lines. An introgression line Z148 was selected from the progeny of hybrid between wheat and wheat–Th. intermedium ssp. trichorophrum partial amphiploid (Yang et al. 2006). The chromosome constitution of Z148 was determined using the.

  6. MICB Allele Genotyping on Microarrays by Improving the Specificity of Extension Primers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Cheol Baek

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I chain-related gene B (MICB encodes a ligand for activating NKG2D that expressed in natural killer cells, γδ T cells, and αβ CD8+ T cells, which is associated with autoimmune diseases, cancer, and infectious diseases. Here, we have established a system for genotyping MICB alleles using allele-specific primer extension (ASPE on microarrays. Thirty-six high quality, allele-specific extension primers were evaluated using strict and reliable cut-off values using mean fluorescence intensity (MFI, whereby an MFI >30,000 represented a positive signal and an MFI <10,000 represented a negative signal. Eight allele-specific extension primers were found to be false positives, five of which were improved by adjusting their length, and three of which were optimized by refractory modification. The MICB alleles (*002:01, *003, *005:02/*010, *005:03, *008, *009N, *018, and *024 present in the quality control panel could be exactly defined by 22 allele-specific extension primers. MICB genotypes that were identified by ASPE on microarrays were in full concordance with those identified by PCR-sequence-based typing. In conclusion, we have developed a method for genotyping MICB alleles using ASPE on microarrays; which can be applicable for large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism typing studies of population and disease associations.

  7. Tracking of wild allele introgressions in a peanut chromosome segment substitution line population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultivated peanut arose from the hybridization of the diploids Arachis duranensis (A genome progenitor) and Arachis ipaensis (B genome progenitor), followed by spontaneous chromosome doubling to yield the current allotetraploid state (AABB; 2n=4x=40). This genetic heritage, short period since polyp...

  8. Use of allele-specific sequencing primers is an efficient alternative to PCR subcloning of low-copy nuclear genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, Anne-Cathrine; Pfeil, Bernard E; Petri, Anna; Heidari, Nahid; Nylinder, Stephan; Oxelman, Bengt

    2012-01-01

    Direct Sanger sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified nuclear genes leads to polymorphic sequences when allelic variation is present. To overcome this problem, most researchers subclone the PCR products to separate alleles. An alternative is to directly sequence the separate alleles using allele-specific primers. We tested two methods to enhance the specificity of allele-specific primers for use in direct sequencing: using short primers and amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) technique. By shortening the allele-specific primer to 15-13 nucleotides, the single mismatch in the ultimate base of the primer is enough to hinder the amplification of the nontarget allele in direct sequencing and recover only the targeted allele at high accuracy. The deliberate addition of a second mismatch, as implemented in the ARMS technique, was less successful and seems better suited for allele-specific amplification in regular PCR rather than in direct sequencing. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. A Multiplex Allele Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MAS-PCR) for the Detection of Factor V Leiden and Prothrombin G20210A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Morteza; Rad, Isa Abdi

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: In order to determine the frequencies of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A point mutations in the Iranian population with Azeri Turkish origin. Material and methods: 120 unrelated individuals from general population randomly selected and were examined for factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations using a multiplex allele specific polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR) assay Outcomes: The frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation was 2.08%, which means 5 chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes had prothrombin G20210A mutation. The distribution of prothrombin 20210 GG, GA, AA genotypes and prothrombin 20210A allele were 37(92.5%), 3(7.5%), 0(0%) and 3(3.75%) in males and 78(97.5%), 2(2.5%), 0(0%) and 2(1.25%) in females, respectively. Factor V Leiden was not found in our tested group (zero chromosomes out of 240 chromosomes). Analysis of the observed frequencies in the studied groups indicates that there is no statistically significant difference between females and males, regarding prothrombin G20210A mutation (p value>0.05). Conclusions: This is the first study in its own kind in this population and implies that the frequency of Factor V Leiden G1691A (R506Q, FV-Leiden) allele is extremely low but the prothrombin G20210A mutation is more frequent in the tested group. PMID:21977183

  10. Assembly of a phased diploid Candida albicans genome facilitates allele-specific measurements and provides a simple model for repeat and indel structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzey, Dale; Schwartz, Katja; Weissman, Jonathan S; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen that afflicts immunocompromised human hosts. With rare and transient exceptions the yeast is diploid, yet despite its clinical relevance the respective sequences of its two homologous chromosomes have not been completely resolved. We construct a phased diploid genome assembly by deep sequencing a standard laboratory wild-type strain and a panel of strains homozygous for particular chromosomes. The assembly has 700-fold coverage on average,allowing extensive revision and expansion of the number of known SNPs and indels. This phased genome significantly enhances the sensitivity and specificity of allele-specific expression measurements by enabling pooling and cross-validation of signal across multiple polymorphic sites. Additionally, the diploid assembly reveals pervasive and unexpected patterns in allelic differences between homologous chromosomes. Firstly, we see striking clustering of indels, concentrated primarily in the repeat sequences in promoters. Secondly, both indels and their repeat-sequence substrate are enriched near replication origins. Finally, we reveal an intimate link between repeat sequences and indels, which argues that repeat length is under selective pressure for most eukaryotes. This connection is described by a concise one-parameter model that explains repeat-sequence abundance in C. albicans as a function of the indel rate,and provides a general framework to interpret repeat abundance in species ranging from bacteria to humans. The phased genome assembly and insights into repeat plasticity will be valuable for better understanding allele-specific phenomena and genome evolution.

  11. p53 mutation, allele loss on chromosome 17p, and DNA content in ovarian carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, D T; Murphy, M; Arthur, K; Hamilton, P W; Russell, S E; Toner, P G

    1996-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the relationships between p53 mutation, DNA aneuploidy, 17p deletions, and clinical stage in ovarian cancer. Nuclear suspensions were obtained by tissue disaggregation, stained with propidium iodide, and analysed on a Coulter EPICS Elite flow cytometer. DNA cell cycle analysis was performed using Multicycle software (Phoenix Flow Systems). DNA extracted from paraffin-embedded archival carcinomas/non-tumour tissue was used as template for PCR amplification of the microsatellite dinucleotide repeat polymorphism D17S513, a locus telomeric to p53 on 17p13.1. Allele loss at D17S513 was detected in 64.5 per cent of carcinomas (20 of 31 informative cases). DNA aneuploidy was detected in 20 of 54 (37 per cent) carcinomas. Eight of ten cases previously shown to harbour p53 mutations showed aneuploid DNA content. Although ten other DNA aneuploid cases had shown no p53 mutations, the results show a statistically significant association between p53 mutation and DNA aneuploidy (P p53 mutant cases compared with those showing no p53 mutation (P = 0.02). There was also a significant association between p53 mutations and stage, between ploidy and stage, and between allelic deletions at D17S513 or p53 and stage, but not between these allelic deletions and ploidy. p53 mutations appear to be associated with DNA aneuploidy in ovarian cancer independently of 17p deletions. p53 mutations, DNA aneuploidy, and 17p deletions are associated with late stage.

  12. Sex-specific chromosome instability in early human development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleva, Natalia V

    2005-08-01

    The predominance of females segregating chromosome aberrations to their offspring has been explained mostly by selection disadvantage of unbalanced products of spermatogenesis. However, analysis of data from the literature supports the idea that somatic cells of early female embryos are similar to female germ cells in that they are prone to malsegregation. The goal of this study was to compare the sex ratio (male to female ratio) of carriers of presumably mitotic-occurring chromosome abnormalities to identify any sex biases. In examining the literature, we found a female prevalence in cases of mosaicism associated with uniparental disomy (UPD) (26 male individuals/conceptions and 45 female individuals/conceptions, sex ratio is 0.58, significantly different from 1.06 in newborn population, P = 0.0292). This predominance was highest at gestational age X mosaics over 46,XY/45,X mosaics in prenatally diagnosed cases, which also suggests a gender-specific postzygotic chromosome loss. The male prevalence in Prader-Willi syndrome with maternal UPD of chromosome 15 also can be explained by sex-specific trisomy correction, with predominant loss of a maternal chromosome causing biparental inheritance and therefore, complete correction of trisomy in females (without UPD). Finally, there is a female predominance in carriers of chromosome rearrangement with pericentromere break (mosaicism for Robertsonian translocation/isochromosome, centric fission, nonacrocentric isochromosome, and whole arm rearrangement), in both prenatal (21 males and 36 females, sex ratio is 0.58, P < 0.0184) and postnatal ill-defined cases (14 males and 35 females, sex ratio is 0.40, P = 0.001). Thus, the findings presented in this paper suggest that, in addition to reduction in male fertility, and to probable selection against abnormal cell line(s), there are two mechanisms that contribute to female preponderance among carriers of mosaicism: sex-specific chromosome loss and sex-specific centromere

  13. Chromosome 22q a frequent site of allele loss in head and neck carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poli-Frederico, R C; Bergamo, N A; Reis, P P

    2000-01-01

    was to evaluate the presence of LOH on chromosome 22q11.2-13 and determine whether there was a relationship between loss in this genomic region and tumor histologic parameters, anatomic site, and survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). METHODS: Fifty matched blood and HNSCC...... tumor samples taken at the time of surgical treatment were evaluated for LOH by use of four microsatellite markers mapping to 22q11.2-q13. Clinical information was available for all patients. The frequency and distribution of LOH was correlated with clinical (age, sex, use of tobacco and alcohol, site...... gene (TSG) and involved in upper aerodigestive tract carcinogenesis. In particular, laryngeal tumors may harbor another putative TSG on 22q11.2-q12.3 that may play a role in aggressive stage III/IV disease....

  14. An extensive polymerase chain reaction-allele-specific polymorphism strategy for clinical ABO blood group genotyping that avoids potential errors caused by null, subgroup, and hybrid alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-Maaf, Bahram; Hellberg, Asa; Chester, M Alan; Olsson, Martin L

    2007-11-01

    ABO genotyping is complicated by the remarkable diversity at the ABO locus. Recombination or gene conversion between common alleles may lead to hybrids resulting in unexpected ABO phenotypes. Furthermore, numerous mutations associated with weak subgroups and nondeletional null alleles should be considered. All known ABO genotyping methods, however, risk incorrect phenotype predictions if any such alleles are present. An extensive set of allele-specific primers was designed to accomplish hybrid-proof multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA fragments for detection of ABO alleles. Results were compared with serologic findings and ABO genotypes defined by previously published PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism/PCR-allele-specific polymorphism (ASP) methods or DNA sequencing. Phenotypically well-characterized samples from blood donors with common blood groups and rare-subgroup families were analyzed. In addition to the commonly encountered alleles (A1, A1(467C>T), A2, B, O1, O1v, and O2), the new method can detect hybrid alleles thanks to long-range amplification across intron 6. Four of 12 PCR-ASP procedures are used to screen for multiple infrequent subgroup and null alleles. This concept allows for a low-resolution typing format in which the presence of, for example, a weak subgroup or cis-AB/B(A) is indicated but not further defined. In an optional high-resolution step, more detailed genotype information is obtained. A new genotyping approach has been developed and evaluated that can correctly identify ABO alleles including nondeletional null alleles, subgroups, and hybrids resulting from recombinational crossing-over events between exons 6 and 7. This approach is clinically applicable and decreases the risk for erroneous ABO phenotype prediction compared to previously published methods.

  15. ACNE: a summarization method to estimate allele-specific copy numbers for Affymetrix SNP arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Bengtsson, Henrik; Rubio, Angel

    2010-08-01

    Current algorithms for estimating DNA copy numbers (CNs) borrow concepts from gene expression analysis methods. However, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays have special characteristics that, if taken into account, can improve the overall performance. For example, cross hybridization between alleles occurs in SNP probe pairs. In addition, most of the current CN methods are focused on total CNs, while it has been shown that allele-specific CNs are of paramount importance for some studies. Therefore, we have developed a summarization method that estimates high-quality allele-specific CNs. The proposed method estimates the allele-specific DNA CNs for all Affymetrix SNP arrays dealing directly with the cross hybridization between probes within SNP probesets. This algorithm outperforms (or at least it performs as well as) other state-of-the-art algorithms for computing DNA CNs. It better discerns an aberration from a normal state and it also gives more precise allele-specific CNs. The method is available in the open-source R package ACNE, which also includes an add on to the aroma.affymetrix framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/).

  16. DNA Methylation Maintains Allele-specific KIR Gene Expression in Human Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Huei-Wei; Kurago, Zoya B.; Stewart, C. Andrew; Wilson, Michael J.; Martin, Maureen P.; Mace, Brian E.; Carrington, Mary; Trowsdale, John; Lutz, Charles T.

    2003-01-01

    Killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) bind self–major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, allowing natural killer (NK) cells to recognize aberrant cells that have down-regulated class I. NK cells express variable numbers and combinations of highly homologous clonally restricted KIR genes, but uniformly express KIR2DL4. We show that NK clones express both 2DL4 alleles and either one or both alleles of the clonally restricted KIR 3DL1 and 3DL2 genes. Despite allele-independent expression, 3DL1 alleles differed in the core promoter by only one or two nucleotides. Allele-specific 3DL1 gene expression correlated with promoter and 5′ gene DNA hypomethylation in NK cells in vitro and in vivo. The DNA methylase inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, induced KIR DNA hypomethylation and heterogeneous expression of multiple KIR genes. Thus, NK cells use DNA methylation to maintain clonally restricted expression of highly homologous KIR genes and alleles. PMID:12538663

  17. Rapid Development and Characterization of Chromosome Specific Translocation Line of Thinopyrum elongatum with Improved Dough Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The protein content and its type are principal factors affecting wheat (Triticum aestivum end product quality. Among the wheat proteins, glutenin proteins, especially, high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS are major determinants of processing quality. Wheat and its primary gene pool have limited variation in terms of HMW-GS alleles. Wild relatives of wheat are an important source of genetic variation. For improvement of wheat processing quality its wild relative Thinopyrum elongatum with significant potential was utilized. An attempt was made to replace Th. elongatum chromosome long arm (1EL carrying HMW-GS genes related to high dough strength with chromosome 1AL of wheat with least or negative effect on dough strength while retaining the chromosomes 1DL and 1BL with a positive effect on bread making quality. To create chromosome specific translocation line [1EL(1AS], double monosomic of chromosomes 1E and 1A were created and further crossed with different cultivars and homoeologous pairing suppressor mutant line PhI. The primary selection was based upon glutenin and gliadin protein profiles, followed by sequential genomic in situ hybridization (GISH and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. These steps significantly reduced time, efforts, and economic cost in the generation of translocation line. In order to assess the effect of translocation on wheat quality, background recovery was carried out by backcrossing with recurrent parent for several generations and then selfing while selecting in each generation. Good recovery of parent background indicated the development of almost near isogenic line (NIL. Morphologically also translocation line was similar to recipient cultivar N61 that was further confirmed by seed storage protein profiles, RP-HPLC and scanning electron microscopy. The processing quality characteristics of translocation line (BC4F6 indicated significant improvement in the gluten performance index (GPI, dough mixing

  18. Loss of RNA expression and allele-specific expression associated with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, David M.; Homsy, Jason; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Patel, Neil; Gorham, Joshua; DePalma, Steven R.; Ware, James S.; Zaidi, Samir; Ma, Wenji; Patel, Nihir; Lifton, Richard P.; Chung, Wendy K.; Kim, Richard; Shen, Yufeng; Brueckner, Martina; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Sharp, Andrew J.; Seidman, Christine E.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Seidman, J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD), a prevalent birth defect occurring in 1% of newborns, likely results from aberrant expression of cardiac developmental genes. Mutations in a variety of cardiac transcription factors, developmental signalling molecules and molecules that modify chromatin cause at least 20% of disease, but most CHD remains unexplained. We employ RNAseq analyses to assess allele-specific expression (ASE) and biallelic loss-of-expression (LOE) in 172 tissue samples from 144 surgically repaired CHD subjects. Here we show that only 5% of known imprinted genes with paternal allele silencing are monoallelic versus 56% with paternal allele expression—this cardiac-specific phenomenon seems unrelated to CHD. Further, compared with control subjects, CHD subjects have a significant burden of both LOE genes and ASE events associated with altered gene expression. These studies identify FGFBP2, LBH, RBFOX2, SGSM1 and ZBTB16 as candidate CHD genes because of significantly altered transcriptional expression. PMID:27670201

  19. Overall and allele-specific expression of the SMC1A gene in female Cornelia de Lange syndrome patients and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Ilaria; Rovina, Davide; Masciadri, Maura; Cereda, Anna; Azzollini, Jacopo; Picinelli, Chiara; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Finelli, Palma; Selicorni, Angelo; Russo, Silvia; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia

    2014-07-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare multisystem disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, limb anomalies, and growth and cognitive deficits. Mutations in genes encoding subunits (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulators (NIPBL, HDAC8) of the cohesin complex account for approximately 65% of clinically diagnosed CdLS cases. The SMC1A gene (Xp11.22), responsible for 5% of CdLS cases, partially escapes X chromosome inactivation in humans and the allele on the inactive X chromosome is variably expressed. In this study, we evaluated overall and allele-specific SMC1A expression. Real-time PCR analysis conducted on 17 controls showed that SMC1A expression in females is 50% higher than in males. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed a 44% higher protein level in healthy females than in males, and showed no significant differences in SMC1A protein levels between controls and patients. Pyrosequencing was used to assess the reciprocal level of allelic expression in six female carriers of different SMC1A mutations and 15 controls who were heterozygous at a polymorphic transcribed SMC1A locus. The two alleles were expressed at a 1:1 ratio in the control group and at a 2:1 ratio in favor of the wild type allele in the test group. Since a dominant negative effect is considered the pathogenic mechanism in SMC1A-defective female patients, the level of allelic preferential expression might be one of the factors contributing to the wide phenotypic variability observed in these patients. An extension of this study to a larger cohort containing mild to borderline cases could enhance our understanding of the clinical spectrum of SMC1A-linked CdLS.

  20. To be or not to be the odd one out - Allele-specific transcription in pentaploid dogroses (Rosa L. sect. Caninae (DC. Ser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theißen Günter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple hybridization events gave rise to pentaploid dogroses which can reproduce sexually despite their uneven ploidy level by the unique canina meiosis. Two homologous chromosome sets are involved in bivalent formation and are transmitted by the haploid pollen grains and the tetraploid egg cells. In addition the egg cells contain three sets of univalent chromosomes which are excluded from recombination. In this study we investigated whether differential behavior of chromosomes as bivalents or univalents is reflected by sequence divergence or transcription intensity between homeologous alleles of two single copy genes (LEAFY, cGAPDH and one ribosomal DNA locus (nrITS. Results We detected a maximum number of four different alleles of all investigated loci in pentaploid dogroses and identified the respective allele with two copies, which is presumably located on bivalent forming chromosomes. For the alleles of the ribosomal DNA locus and cGAPDH only slight, if any, differential transcription was determined, whereas the LEAFY alleles with one copy were found to be significantly stronger expressed than the LEAFY allele with two copies. Moreover, we found for the three marker genes that all alleles have been under similar regimes of purifying selection. Conclusions Analyses of both molecular sequence evolution and expression patterns did not support the hypothesis that unique alleles probably located on non-recombining chromosomes are less functional than duplicate alleles presumably located on recombining chromosomes.

  1. Sex chromosome-specific regulation in the Drosophila male germline but little evidence for chromosomal dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin D Meiklejohn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes (e.g., XY in males or ZW in females has repeatedly elicited the evolution of two kinds of chromosome-specific regulation: dosage compensation--the equalization of X chromosome gene expression in males and females--and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI--the transcriptional silencing and heterochromatinization of the X during meiosis in the male (or Z in the female germline. How the X chromosome is regulated in the Drosophila melanogaster male germline is unclear. Here we report three new findings concerning gene expression from the X in Drosophila testes. First, X chromosome-wide dosage compensation appears to be absent from most of the Drosophila male germline. Second, microarray analysis provides no evidence for X chromosome-specific inactivation during meiosis. Third, we confirm the previous discovery that the expression of transgene reporters driven by autosomal spermatogenesis-specific promoters is strongly reduced when inserted on the X chromosome versus the autosomes; but we show that this chromosomal difference in expression is established in premeiotic cells and persists in meiotic cells. The magnitude of the X-autosome difference in transgene expression cannot be explained by the absence of dosage compensation, suggesting that a previously unrecognized mechanism limits expression from the X during spermatogenesis in Drosophila. These findings help to resolve several previously conflicting reports and have implications for patterns of genome evolution and speciation in Drosophila.

  2. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W [San Francisco, CA; Pinkel, Daniel [Lafayette, CA; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka [Turku, FI; Kallioniemi, Anne [Tampere, FI; Sakamoto, Masaru [Tokyo, JP

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ .[.nudeic.]. .Iadd.nucleic .Iaddend.acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  3. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  4. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Yunyun

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples.

  5. An informational view of accession rarity and allele specificity in germplasm banks for management and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Valdés, M Humberto; Burgueño, Juan; Singh, Sukhwinder; Martínez, Octavio; Sansaloni, Carolina Paola

    2018-01-01

    Germplasm banks are growing in their importance, number of accessions and amount of characterization data, with a large emphasis on molecular genetic markers. In this work, we offer an integrated view of accessions and marker data in an information theory framework. The basis of this development is the mutual information between accessions and allele frequencies for molecular marker loci, which can be decomposed in allele specificities, as well as in rarity and divergence of accessions. In this way, formulas are provided to calculate the specificity of the different marker alleles with reference to their distribution across accessions, accession rarity, defined as the weighted average of the specificity of its alleles, and divergence, defined by the Kullback-Leibler formula. Albeit being different measures, it is demonstrated that average rarity and divergence are equal for any collection. These parameters can contribute to the knowledge of the structure of a germplasm collection and to make decisions about the preservation of rare variants. The concepts herein developed served as the basis for a strategy for core subset selection called HCore, implemented in a publicly available R script. As a proof of concept, the mathematical view and tools developed in this research were applied to a large collection of Mexican wheat accessions, widely characterized by SNP markers. The most specific alleles were found to be private of a single accession, and the distribution of this parameter had its highest frequencies at low levels of specificity. Accession rarity and divergence had largely symmetrical distributions, and had a positive, albeit non-strictly linear relationship. Comparison of the HCore approach for core subset selection, with three state-of-the-art methods, showed it to be superior for average divergence and rarity, mean genetic distance and diversity. The proposed approach can be used for knowledge extraction and decision making in germplasm collections of

  6. Simultaneous SNP identification and assessment of allele-specific bias from ChIP-seq data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with many aspects of human development and disease, and many non-coding SNPs associated with disease risk are presumed to affect gene regulation. We have previously shown that SNPs within transcription factor binding sites can affect transcription factor binding in an allele-specific and heritable manner. However, such analysis has relied on prior whole-genome genotypes provided by large external projects such as HapMap and the 1000 Genomes Project. This requirement limits the study of allele-specific effects of SNPs in primary patient samples from diseases of interest, where complete genotypes are not readily available. Results In this study, we show that we are able to identify SNPs de novo and accurately from ChIP-seq data generated in the ENCODE Project. Our de novo identified SNPs from ChIP-seq data are highly concordant with published genotypes. Independent experimental verification of more than 100 sites estimates our false discovery rate at less than 5%. Analysis of transcription factor binding at de novo identified SNPs revealed widespread heritable allele-specific binding, confirming previous observations. SNPs identified from ChIP-seq datasets were significantly enriched for disease-associated variants, and we identified dozens of allele-specific binding events in non-coding regions that could distinguish between disease and normal haplotypes. Conclusions Our approach combines SNP discovery, genotyping and allele-specific analysis, but is selectively focused on functional regulatory elements occupied by transcription factors or epigenetic marks, and will therefore be valuable for identifying the functional regulatory consequences of non-coding SNPs in primary disease samples. PMID:22950704

  7. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  8. A dominant, recombination-defective allele of Dmc1 causing male-specific sterility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bannister, Laura A.; Pezza, Roberto J.; Donaldson, Janet R.; de Rooij, Dirk G.; Schimenti, Kerry J.; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Schimenti, John C.

    2007-01-01

    DMC1 is a meiosis-specific homolog of bacterial RecA and eukaryotic RAD51 that can catalyze homologous DNA strand invasion and D-loop formation in vitro. DMC1-deficient mice and yeast are sterile due to defective meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis. The authors identified a male dominant

  9. A de novo mosaic mutation in SPAST with two novel alternative alleles and chromosomal copy number variant in a boy with spastic paraplegia and autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, A M; Tarailo-Graovac, M; Price, E M; Blydt-Hansen, I; Ghani, A; Drögemöller, B I; Robinson, W P; Ross, C J; Wasserman, W W; Siden, H; van Karnebeek, C D

    2017-10-01

    Here we report a 12 year old male with an extreme presentation of spastic paraplegia along with autism and dysmorphisms. Whole exome sequencing identified a predicted pathogenic pair of missense variants in SPAST at the same chromosomal location, each with a different alternative allele, while a chromosome microarray identified a 1.73 Mb paternally inherited copy gain of 1q21.1q21.2 resulting in a blended phenotype of both Spastic paraplegia 4 and 1q21.1 microduplication syndrome. We believe that the extreme phenotype observed is likely caused by the presence of cells which contain only mutant SPAST, but that the viability of the patient is possible due mosaicism of mutant alleles observed in different proportions across tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Lack of sex chromosome specific meiotic silencing in platypus reveals origin of MSCI in therian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daish, Tasman J; Casey, Aaron E; Grutzner, Frank

    2015-12-10

    In therian mammals heteromorphic sex chromosomes are subject to meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) during meiotic prophase I while the autosomes maintain transcriptional activity. The evolution of this sex chromosome silencing is thought to result in retroposition of genes required in spermatogenesis from the sex chromosomes to autosomes. In birds sex chromosome specific silencing appears to be absent and global transcriptional reductions occur through pachytene and sex chromosome-derived autosomal retrogenes are lacking. Egg laying monotremes are the most basal mammalian lineage, feature a complex and highly differentiated XY sex chromosome system with homology to the avian sex chromosomes, and also lack autosomal retrogenes. In order to delineate the point of origin of sex chromosome specific silencing in mammals we investigated whether MSCI exists in platypus. Our results show that platypus sex chromosomes display only partial or transient colocalisation with a repressive histone variant linked to therian sex chromosome silencing and surprisingly lack a hallmark MSCI epigenetic signature present in other mammals. Remarkably, platypus instead feature an avian like period of general low level transcription through prophase I with the sex chromosomes and the future mammalian X maintaining association with a nucleolus-like structure. Our work demonstrates for the first time that in mammals meiotic silencing of sex chromosomes evolved after the divergence of monotremes presumably as a result of the differentiation of the therian XY sex chromosomes. We provide a novel evolutionary scenario on how the future therian X chromosome commenced the trajectory toward MSCI.

  11. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas; Westbrook, Carol

    2013-04-09

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  12. Chromosome-specific staining to detect genetic rearrangements associated with chromosome 3 and/or chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Joe W.; Pinkel, Daniel; Kallioniemi, Olli-Pekka; Kallioniemi, Anne; Sakamoto, Masaru

    2009-10-06

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nudeic nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), retinoblastoma, ovarian and uterine cancers, and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Specific human leukocyte antigen class I and II alleles associated with hepatitis C virus viremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniholm, Mark H; Kovacs, Andrea; Gao, Xiaojiang; Xue, Xiaonan; Marti, Darlene; Thio, Chloe L; Peters, Marion G; Terrault, Norah A; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Goedert, James J; Cohen, Mardge H; Minkoff, Howard; Gange, Stephen J; Anastos, Kathryn; Fazzari, Melissa; Harris, Tiffany G; Young, Mary A; Strickler, Howard D; Carrington, Mary

    2010-05-01

    Studies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and their relation with hepatitis C virus (HCV) viremia have had conflicting results. However, these studies have varied in size and methods, and few large studies assessed HLA class I alleles. Only one study conducted high-resolution class I genotyping. The current investigation therefore involved high-resolution HLA class I and II genotyping of a large multiracial cohort of U.S. women with a high prevalence of HCV and HIV. Our primary analyses evaluated associations between 12 HLA alleles identified through a critical review of the literature and HCV viremia in 758 HCV-seropositive women. Other alleles with >5% prevalence were also assessed; previously unreported associations were corrected for multiple comparisons. DRB1*0101 (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1-2.6), B*5701 (PR=2.0; 95% CI = 1.0-3.1), B*5703 (PR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.5), and Cw*0102 (PR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.0-3.0) were associated with the absence of HCV RNA (i.e., HCV clearance), whereas DRB1*0301 (PR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.2-0.7) was associated with HCV RNA positivity. DQB1*0301 was also associated with the absence of HCV RNA but only among HIV-seronegative women (PR = 3.4; 95% CI = 1.2-11.8). Each of these associations was among those predicted. We additionally studied the relation of HLA alleles with HCV infection (serostatus) in women at high risk of HCV from injection drug use (N = 838), but no significant relationships were observed. HLA genotype influences the host capacity to clear HCV viremia. The specific HLA associations observed in the current study are unlikely to be due to chance because they were a priori hypothesized.

  14. Molecular Basis of Allele-Specific Efficacy of a Blood-Stage Malaria Vaccine: Vaccine Development Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, Amed; Takala-Harrison, Shannon; Thera, Mahamadou A.; Coulibaly, Drissa; Niangaly, Amadou; Saye, Renion; Tolo, Youssouf; Dutta, Sheetij; Heppner, D. Gray; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L.; Vekemans, Johan; Cohen, Joe; Blackwelder, William C.; Dube, Tina; Laurens, Matthew B.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Plowe, Christopher V.

    2013-01-01

    The disappointing efficacy of blood-stage malaria vaccines may be explained in part by allele-specific immune responses that are directed against polymorphic epitopes on blood-stage antigens. FMP2.1/AS02A, a blood-stage candidate vaccine based on apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum, had allele-specific efficacy against clinical malaria in a phase II trial in Malian children. We assessed the cross-protective efficacy of the malaria vaccine and inferred which polymorphic amino acid positions in AMA1 were the targets of protective allele-specific immune responses. FMP2.1/AS02A had the highest efficacy against AMA1 alleles that were identical to the 3D7 vaccine-type allele at 8 highly polymorphic amino acid positions in the cluster 1 loop (c1L) but differed from 3D7 elsewhere in the molecule. Comparison of the incidence of vaccine-type alleles before and after vaccination in the malaria vaccine and control groups and examination of the patterns of allele change at polymorphic positions in consecutive malaria episodes suggest that the highly polymorphic amino acid position 197 in c1L was the most critical determinant of allele-specific efficacy. These results indicate that a multivalent AMA1 vaccine with broad efficacy could include only a limited set of key alleles of this extremely polymorphic antigen. PMID:23204168

  15. Origin of specific chromosome aberration in radiation-induced leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban, Nobuhiko; Kai, Michiaki; Masuno, Yoko

    2005-01-01

    The theme in the title is discussed from the four aspects of specific chromosome aberration (sAb) patterns in radiation-induced leukemia (RIL), possibility for radiation to induce the sAb in RIL, any evidence for participation of delayed aberration to form sAb and the proportion of such healthy humans as having the specifically rearranged genome. Data of sAb observed in leukemia of 25 A-bomb survivors and of 38 patients post radiotherapy of cancers give a rather common pattern. However, many inconsistent results are obtained for sAb in patients post radiotherapy, A-bomb survivors, residents living in radio-contaminated houses in Taipei, in vitro exposure, and Chernobyl residents. At present, any clear evidence is available neither for sAb derived from the delayed aberration nor for estimating the proportion with the specifically rearranged gene. As above, it is unlikely that radiation induces such a translocation abnormality as BCR-ABL specifically seen in leukemia, and this aspect will be important for studies on the genesis of RIL and its risk assessment. (S.I.)

  16. Analysis of BDNF Val66Met allele-specific mRNA levels in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Vincenzo; Strauss, John; Semeralul, Mawahib; Huang, Sheeda; Li, Peter P; Warsh, Jerry J; Kennedy, James L; Wong, Albert H C

    2008-08-22

    We have previously reported an association between the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and bipolar disorder (BD). However, the possibility that genomic imprinting in BDNF gene affects risk for BD has not been investigated. To examine the possibility of genomic imprinting in the BDNF gene in BD, we analyzed the parent-of-origin effect (POE) and differential expression of the BDNF Val66Met alleles in BD. We performed a family-based association study and ETDT analyses of the Val66Met polymorphism in 312 BD nuclear families, and compared allele-specific mRNA levels in both post-mortem brain samples and B lymphoblasts from BD patients and controls. The BDNF Val66 allele was transmitted significantly more often to patients with BD (maternal transmissions: 46/22, p=0.003; paternal transmissions: 55/30, p=0.006). There was no significant difference between maternal and paternal transmission ratios. There was no significant difference in the ratio of Val/Met-specific mRNA expression between BD and controls, in either brain or B lymphoblasts. The Val/Met ratio was much lower in the brain vs. B lymphoblasts. These data do not support a role for genomic imprinting as a modifier of the contribution of BDNF gene to risk of susceptibility to BD.

  17. Premature chromosome condensation in human resting peripheral blood lymphocytes without mitogen stimulation for chromosome aberration analysis using specific whole chromosome DNA hybridization probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rupak; Prasanna, Pataje G S

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described a unique, simple, and rapid method for inducing premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in "resting" human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) without mitogen stimulation and an approach for studying numerical changes and/or structural aberrations involving a specific pair of human chromosomes. The current protocol incorporates improvements that provide better PCC, incorporates a high-throughput automated sample preparation unit and metaphase harvester to minimize manual labor and improve quality, and supports simultaneous painting of multiple sets of human autosomes in interphase nuclei. To induce PCC, isolated HPBLs are incubated at 37 °C in cell culture medium supplemented with a phosphatase inhibitor (okadaic acid or calyculin A), adenosine triphosphate, and p34(cdc2)/cyclin B kinase (an essential component of mitosis-promoting factor) for a short period of time. PCC spreads are prepared on glass slides using a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber (an auto-spreader) after a brief hypotonic treatment and fixation. Aberrations involving specific sets of painted human chromosome are analyzed using fluorescence microscopy. Each of the normal (undamaged) painted homologous chromosome pairs displays two fluorescent spots, whereas cells with numerical and/or structural aberration involving specific painted chromosome sets show deviation in the number of fluorescent spots. The identification and quantification of aberration involving specific chromosomes in interphase nuclei have important applications in radiobiology, toxicology, radiation therapeutics, and cancer research.

  18. Identification of transcriptome SNPs for assessing allele-specific gene expression in a super-hybrid rice Xieyou9308.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Zhai

    Full Text Available Hybridization, a common process in nature, can give rise to a vast reservoir of allelic variants. Combination of these allelic variants may result in novel patterns of gene action and is thought to contribute to heterosis. In this study, we analyzed genome-wide allele-specific gene expression (ASGE in the super-hybrid rice variety Xieyou9308 using RNA sequencing technology (RNA-Seq. We identified 9325 reliable single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs distributed throughout the genome. Nearly 68% of the identified polymorphisms were CT and GA SNPs between R9308 and Xieqingzao B, suggesting the existence of DNA methylation, a heritable epigenetic mark, in the parents and their F1 hybrid. Of 2793 identified transcripts with consistent allelic biases, only 480 (17% showed significant allelic biases during tillering and/or heading stages, implying that trans effects may mediate most transcriptional differences in hybrid offspring. Approximately 67% and 62% of the 480 transcripts showed R9308 allelic expression biases at tillering and heading stages, respectively. Transcripts with higher levels of gene expression in R9308 also exhibited R9308 allelic biases in the hybrid. In addition, 125 transcripts were identified with significant allelic expression biases at both stages, of which 74% showed R9308 allelic expression biases. R9308 alleles may tend to preserve their characteristic states of activity in the hybrid and may play important roles in hybrid vigor at both stages. The allelic expression of 355 transcripts was highly stage-specific, with divergent allelic expression patterns observed at different developmental stages. Many transcripts associated with stress resistance were differently regulated in the F1 hybrid. The results of this study may provide valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of heterosis.

  19. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means of standard and various other chromosome banding and staining methods (Ag-NOR-, Q-, CMA3-, late replicating [LR] banding pattern, C- and sequential C-banding + CMA3 + DAPI). This study ...

  20. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  1. Aberrant allele-specific replication, independent of parental origin, in blood cells of cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dotan, Zohar A; Dotan, Aviva; Ramon, Jacob; Avivi, Lydia

    2008-01-01

    Allelic counterparts of biallelically expressed genes display an epigenetic symmetry normally manifested by synchronous replication, different from genes subjected to monoallelic expression, which normally are characterized by an asynchronous mode of replication (well exemplified by the SNRPN imprinted locus). Malignancy was documented to be associated with gross modifications in the inherent replication-timing coordination between allelic counterparts of imprinted genes as well as of biallelically expressed loci. The cancer-related allelic replication timing aberrations are non-disease specific and appear in peripheral blood cells of cancer patients, including those with solid tumors. As such they offer potential blood markers for non-invasive cancer test. The present study was aimed to gain some insight into the mechanism leading to the replication timing alterations of genes in blood lymphocytes of cancer patients. Peripheral blood samples derived from patients with prostate cancer were chosen to represent the cancerous status, and samples taken from patients with no cancer but with benign prostate hyperplasia were used to portray the normal status. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) replication assay, applied to phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated blood lymphocytes, was used to evaluate the temporal order (either synchronous or asynchronous) of genes in the patients' cells. We demonstrated that: (i) the aberrant epigenetic profile, as delineated by the cancer status, is a reversible modification, evidenced by our ability to restore the normal patterns of replication in three unrelated loci (CEN15, SNRPN and RB1) by introducing an archetypical demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine; (ii) following the rehabilitating effect of demethylation, an imprinted gene (SNRPN) retains its original parental imprint; and (iii) the choice of an allele between early or late replication in the aberrant asynchronous replication, delineated by the cancer status, is not

  2. Rapid ABO genotyping by high-speed droplet allele-specific PCR using crude samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Chiaki; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takeichi, Naoya; Furukawa, Satomi; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Uehara, Takeshi; Okumura, Nobuo; Honda, Takayuki

    2018-01-01

    ABO genotyping has common tools for personal identification of forensic and transplantation field. We developed a new method based on a droplet allele-specific PCR (droplet-AS-PCR) that enabled rapid PCR amplification. We attempted rapid ABO genotyping using crude DNA isolated from dried blood and buccal cells. We designed allele-specific primers for three SNPs (at nucleotides 261, 526, and 803) in exons 6 and 7 of the ABO gene. We pretreated dried blood and buccal cells with proteinase K, and obtained crude DNAs without DNA purification. Droplet-AS-PCR allowed specific amplification of the SNPs at the three loci using crude DNA, with results similar to those for DNA extracted from fresh peripheral blood. The sensitivity of the methods was 5%-10%. The genotyping of extracted DNA and crude DNA were completed within 8 and 9 minutes, respectively. The genotypes determined by the droplet-AS-PCR method were always consistent with those obtained by direct sequencing. The droplet-AS-PCR method enabled rapid and specific amplification of three SNPs of the ABO gene from crude DNA treated with proteinase K. ABO genotyping by the droplet-AS-PCR has the potential to be applied to various fields including a forensic medicine and transplantation medical care. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identification of Mitosis-Specific Phosphorylation in Mitotic Chromosome-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Shinya; Kimura, Michiko; Takagi, Shunsuke; Toramoto, Iyo; Ishihama, Yasushi

    2016-09-02

    During mitosis, phosphorylation of chromosome-associated proteins is a key regulatory mechanism. Mass spectrometry has been successfully applied to determine the complete protein composition of mitotic chromosomes, but not to identify post-translational modifications. Here, we quantitatively compared the phosphoproteome of isolated mitotic chromosomes with that of chromosomes in nonsynchronized cells. We identified 4274 total phosphorylation sites and 350 mitosis-specific phosphorylation sites in mitotic chromosome-associated proteins. Significant mitosis-specific phosphorylation in centromere/kinetochore proteins was detected, although the chromosomal association of these proteins did not change throughout the cell cycle. This mitosis-specific phosphorylation might play a key role in regulation of mitosis. Further analysis revealed strong dependency of phosphorylation dynamics on kinase consensus patterns, thus linking the identified phosphorylation sites to known key mitotic kinases. Remarkably, chromosomal axial proteins such as non-SMC subunits of condensin, TopoIIα, and Kif4A, together with the chromosomal periphery protein Ki67 involved in the establishment of the mitotic chromosomal structure, demonstrated high phosphorylation during mitosis. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for regulation of chromosome restructuring in mitosis via protein phosphorylation. Our study generated a large quantitative database on protein phosphorylation in mitotic and nonmitotic chromosomes, thus providing insights into the dynamics of chromatin protein phosphorylation at mitosis onset.

  4. The Identification of a Novel Mutant Allele of topoisomerase II in Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals a Unique Role in Chromosome Segregation During Spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Lambert, Aimee; Fabritius, Amy S; Hansen, Tyler J; Smith, Harold E; Golden, Andy

    2016-12-01

    Topoisomerase II alleviates DNA entanglements that are generated during mitotic DNA replication, transcription, and sister chromatid separation. In contrast to mitosis, meiosis has two rounds of chromosome segregation following one round of DNA replication. In meiosis II, sister chromatids segregate from each other, similar to mitosis. Meiosis I, on the other hand, segregates homologs, which requires pairing, synapsis, and recombination. The exact role that topoisomerase II plays during meiosis is unknown. In a screen reexamining Caenorhabditis elegans legacy mutants isolated 30 years ago, we identified a novel allele of the gene encoding topoisomerase II, top-2(it7). In this study, we demonstrate that top-2(it7) males produce dead embryos, even when fertilizing wild-type oocytes. Characterization of early embryonic events indicates that fertilization is successful and sperm components are transmitted to the embryo. However, sperm chromatin is not detected in these fertilized embryos. Examination of top-2(it7) spermatogenic germ lines reveals that the sperm DNA fails to segregate properly during anaphase I of meiosis, resulting in anucleate sperm. top-2(it7) chromosome-segregation defects observed during anaphase I are not due to residual entanglements incurred during meiotic DNA replication and are not dependent on SPO-11-induced double-strand DNA breaks. Finally, we show that TOP-2 associates with chromosomes in meiotic prophase and that chromosome association is disrupted in the germ lines of top-2(it7) mutants. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  5. High-throughput genotyping with infrared fluorescence allele specific hybridization (iFLASH): a simple, reliable and low-cost alternative.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Himbergen, T. van; Voorbij, H.A.; Barendrecht, A.D.; Rijn, B.B. van; Brambilla, R.; Tits, L.J.H. van; Roest, M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a novel genotyping approach, named infrared Fluorescence Allele Specific Hybridization (iFLASH), which combines the principles of allele specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization with the advanced possibilities of infrared imaging. DESIGN AND METHODS: As an

  6. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  7. Cloning and comparative mapping of a human chromosome 4-specific alpha satellite DNA sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aiuto, L.; Marzella, R.; Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. (Universita di Bari (Italy)); Antonacci, R. (Instituto Anatomia Umana Normale, Modena (Italy))

    1993-11-01

    The authors have isolated and characterized two human alphoid DNA clones: p4n1/4 and pZ4.1. Clone p4n1/4 identifies specifically the centromeric region of chromosome 4; pZ4.1 recognizes a subset of alphoid DNA shared by chromosomes 4 and 9. The specificity was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization experiments on metaphase spreads and Southern blotting analysis of human-hamster somatic cell hybrids. The genomic organization of both subsets was also investigated. Comparative mapping on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes was performed. p4n1/4 hybridizes to chimpanzee chromosomes 11 and 13, homologs of human chromosomes 9 and 2q, respectively. On gorilla metaphase spreads, p4n1/4 hybridizes exclusively to the centromeric region of chromosome 19, partially homologous to human chromosome 17. No hybridization signal was detected on chromosome 3 of both chimpanzee and gorilla, in both species homolog of human chromosome 4. Identical comparative mapping results were obtained using pZ4.1 probe, although the latter recognizes an alphoid subset distinct from the one recognized by p4n1/4. The implications of these results in the evolution of centromeric regions of primate chromosomes are discussed. 33 refs., 4 figs.

  8. CHARACTERIZATION AND CHROMOSOMAL ASSIGNMENT OF YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES CONTAINING HUMAN 3P13-P21-SPECIFIC SEQUENCE-TAGGED SITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MICHAELIS, SC; BARDENHEUER, W; LUX, A; SCHRAMM, A; GOCKEL, A; SIEBERT, R; WILLERS, C; SCHMIDTKE, K; TODT, B; VANDERHOUT, AH; BUYS, CHCM; HEPPELLPARTON, AC; RABBITTS, PH; UNGAR, S; SMITH, D; LEPASLIER, D; COHEN, D; OPALKA, B; SCHUTTE, J

    Human chromosomal region 3p12-p23 is proposed to harbor at least three tumor suppressor genes involved in the development of lung cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and other neoplasias. In order to identify one of these genes we defined sequence tagged sites (STSs) specific for 3p13-p24.2 by analyzing a

  9. Site- and allele-specific polycomb dysregulation in T-cell leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Jean-Marc; Touzart, Aurore; Pradel, Lydie C.; Loosveld, Marie; Koubi, Myriam; Fenouil, Romain; Le Noir, Sandrine; Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Morgado, Ester; Gregoire, Claude; Jaeger, Sebastien; Mamessier, Emilie; Pignon, Charles; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Malissen, Bernard; Gut, Marta; Gut, Ivo G.; Dombret, Hervé; Macintyre, Elizabeth A.; Howe, Steven J.; Gaspar, H. Bobby; Thrasher, Adrian J.; Ifrah, Norbert; Payet-Bornet, Dominique; Duprez, Estelle; Andrau, Jean-Christophe; Asnafi, Vahid; Nadel, Bertrand

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (T-ALL) are aggressive malignant proliferations characterized by high relapse rates and great genetic heterogeneity. TAL1 is amongst the most frequently deregulated oncogenes. Yet, over half of the TAL1+ cases lack TAL1 lesions, suggesting unrecognized (epi)genetic deregulation mechanisms. Here we show that TAL1 is normally silenced in the T-cell lineage, and that the polycomb H3K27me3-repressive mark is focally diminished in TAL1+ T-ALLs. Sequencing reveals that >20% of monoallelic TAL1+ patients without previously known alterations display microinsertions or RAG1/2-mediated episomal reintegration in a single site 5′ to TAL1. Using ‘allelic-ChIP’ and CrispR assays, we demonstrate that such insertions induce a selective switch from H3K27me3 to H3K27ac at the inserted but not the germline allele. We also show that, despite a considerable mechanistic diversity, the mode of oncogenic TAL1 activation, rather than expression levels, impact on clinical outcome. Altogether, these studies establish site-specific epigenetic desilencing as a mechanism of oncogenic activation. PMID:25615415

  10. Hoffman's violet and dahlia as specific stains for animal chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, M K

    1979-03-01

    The paper deals with staining of the chromosomes of animal testicular materials with two basic dyes, Hoffman's violet and dahlia of the triphenylmethane group, following iodine-dye procedure. The important finding, as presented herein, is that iodinated alcohol after staining can be substituted with various acids, both organic as well as inorganic, all of which act as trapping agent preventing leaching of the dye that binds with the chromosomal DNA. It is clear from this study that RNA is not involved by this process of staining, since treatment of stained sections with cold phosphoric acid at 5 degrees C for 20--25 min and then stained also reveals perfect colouration of the chromosomes without any cytoplasmic staining. The in vitro absorption properties of Hoffman's violet have also been presented herein. The probable mechanism of action of these dyes has been suggested.

  11. Chromosomal location and gene paucity of the male specific region on papaya Y chromosome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yu, Q.; Hou, S.; Hobza, Roman; Feltus, F.A.; Wang, X.; Jin, W.; Skelton, R.L.; Blas, A.; Lemke, C.; Saw, J.H.; Moore, P.H.; Alam, M.; Jiang, J.; Paterson, A.H.; Vyskot, Boris; Ming, R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 2 (2007), s. 177-185 ISSN 1617-4615 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA521/06/0056 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : Carica papaya * repetitive sequences * sex chromosome Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.978, year: 2007

  12. Mapping of the human APOB gene to chromosome 2p and demonstration of a two-allele restriction fragment length polymorphism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L.; Miller, D.A.; Bruns, G.A.P.; Breslow, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    ApoB is a large glycoprotein with an apparent molecular mass of 550 kDa on NaDodSO 4 /PAGE. Recently, apoB cDNA clones have been isolated from an expression library made with mRNA from a human hepatoma cell line. These clones, which were all 1.5-1.6 kilobases (kb) long and corresponded to the 3' end of apoB mRNA, were used to demonstrate that hepatic apoB mRNA is ≅ 22 kb long. In the current report, a probe derived from one of these cDNA clones, pB8, was used for in situ hybridization experiments to map the human gene for apoB, APOB, to the distal half of the short arm of chromosome 2. This probe was also used to analyze somatic cell hybrids and, in agreement with the in situ hybridization studies, concordancy was demonstrated with chromosome 2. In addition, two hybrids with chromosome 2 translocations that contain only the short arm reacted with the pB8 probe. A third hybrid with a complex rearrangement of chromosome 2, which deleted an interstitial region and the tip of the short arm of chromosome 2, did not react. These data indicate that APOB maps to either 2p21-p23 or 2p24-pter. In further studies, DNA from normal individuals, digested with the restriction endonuclease EcoRI and subjected to Southern blot analysis with the pB8 probe, revealed a two-allele restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The mapping studies provide the means for understanding the relationship of the APOB locus to others in the human genome, whereas the demonstration of an APOB RFLP increases their ability to assess the role of this locus in determining plasma lipoprotein levels

  13. Radiation hybrids from human chromosome 3: A basis for the construction of region and specific sublibraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, L.; Cosmis, R.L.; Atchison, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors are interested in identifying genes on human chromosome involved in disease processes. To date at least 20 different loci on this chromosome are implicated with various disease states. DNA libraries containing clones derived from a small chromosomal subregion implicated in a particular disease would greatly assist these studies. They have utilized the radiation hybrid (RH) technique to generate a series of somatic cell hybrids that contain small segments of human chromosome 3 as the only human genetic material. A Chinese hamster-human cell hybrid (Q314-2) containing only human chromosome 3 was used to prepare radiation hybrids. Cells were lethally X-irradiated with 6,000 rads and fused to Urd(??) Chinese hamster cells by PEG 1000 treatment. The majority of hybrids (>72%) analyzed retained portions of chromosome 3. The amount of chromosome 3 in each hybrid ranged from nearly all of the chromosome to very little. Currently these hybrids are being further characterized with single copy probes of known map location in order to isolate regions of chromosome 3 that contain specific disease locus. These reduced hybrids can then be used for the construction of region specific libraries and for the generation of new DNA probes from the specific region of interest

  14. The rad52-Y66A allele alters the choice of donor template during spontaneous chromosomal recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mayolo, A.A.; Sunjevaric, I.; Reid, R.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous mitotic recombination is a potential source of genetic changes Such as loss of heterozygosity and chromosome translocations, which may lead to genetic disease. In this study we have used a rad52 hyper-recombination mutant, rad52-Y66A, to investigate the process of spontaneous...... heteroallelic recombination in the yeast Soccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that spontaneous recombination has different genetic requirements, depending on whether the recombination event occurs between chromosomes or between chromosome and plasmid sequences. The hyper-recombination phenotype of the rad52-Y66A...... that spontaneous DNA lesions that require recombinational repair occur at the same frequency in wild-type and rad52-Y66A cells, but that the recombination process is slow in rad52-Y66A cells. Taken together, we propose that the slow recombinational DNA repair in the rad52-Y66A mutant leads to a by...

  15. HLA-B*57 Micropolymorphism shapes HLA allele-specific epitope immunogenicity, selection pressure, and HIV immune control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kløverpris, Henrik Nyhus; Buus, Anette Stryhn; van der Stok, Mary

    2012-01-01

    of HIV, we undertook, in a study of >1,000 C-clade-infected subjects, a comprehensive analysis of the epitopes presented by these 3 alleles and of the selection pressure imposed on HIV by each response. In contrast to previous studies, we show that each of these three HLA alleles is characterized both...... by unique CD8(+) T-cell specificities and by clear-cut differences in selection pressure imposed on the virus by those responses. These studies comprehensively define for the first time the CD8(+) T-cell responses and immune selection pressures for which these protective alleles are responsible....... These findings are consistent with HLA class I alleles mediating effective immune control of HIV through the number of p24 Gag-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses generated that can drive significant selection pressure on the virus....

  16. Maternal age-specific risk of non-chromosomal anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loane, M.; Dolk, H.; Morris, Joan K.

    To determine the excess risk of non-chromosomal congenital anomaly (NCA) among teenage mothers and older mothers. Population-based prevalence study using data from EUROCAT congenital anomaly registers in 23 regions of Europe in 15 countries, covering a total of 1.75 million births from 2000 to 2004.

  17. Cytological evidence for population-specific sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    3Dipartimento di Biologia Animale e dell'Uomo, Università di Torino, Via Accademia Albertina 13, 10123 Turin, Italy. *Corresponding author (Fax, 39 081 679233; Email, gaetano.odierna@unina.it). A chromosome study was carried out on a number of European and Central Asiatic diploid green toad populations by means ...

  18. Mechanisms and Disease Associations of Haplotype-Dependent Allele-Specific DNA Methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Catherine; Lang, Charles F.; Lin, John; Darbary, Huferesh; Krupska, Izabela; Gaba, Aulona; Petukhova, Lynn; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Gallagher, Mary P.; Goland, Robin S.; Clynes, Raphael A.; Dwork, Andrew; Kral, John G.; Monk, Catherine; Christiano, Angela M.; Tycko, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM) can impact disease susceptibility, but maps of this phenomenon using stringent criteria in disease-relevant tissues remain sparse. Here we apply array-based and Methyl-Seq approaches to multiple human tissues and cell types, including brain, purified neurons and glia, T lymphocytes, and placenta, and identify 795 hap-ASM differentially methylated regions (DMRs) and 3,082 strong methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs), most not previously reported. More than half of these DMRs have cell type-restricted ASM, and among them are 188 hap-ASM DMRs and 933 mQTLs located near GWAS signals for immune and neurological disorders. Targeted bis-seq confirmed hap-ASM in 12/13 loci tested, including CCDC155, CD69, FRMD1, IRF1, KBTBD11, and S100A∗-ILF2, associated with immune phenotypes, MYT1L, PTPRN2, CMTM8 and CELF2, associated with neurological disorders, NGFR and HLA-DRB6, associated with both immunological and brain disorders, and ZFP57, a trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting. Polymorphic CTCF and transcription factor (TF) binding sites were over-represented among hap-ASM DMRs and mQTLs, and analysis of the human data, supplemented by cross-species comparisons to macaques, indicated that CTCF and TF binding likelihood predicts the strength and direction of the allelic methylation asymmetry. These results show that hap-ASM is highly tissue specific; an important trans-acting regulator of genomic imprinting is regulated by this phenomenon; and variation in CTCF and TF binding sites is an underlying mechanism, and maps of hap-ASM and mQTLs reveal regulatory sequences underlying supra- and sub-threshold GWAS peaks in immunological and neurological disorders. PMID:27153397

  19. Breast Cancer Family History and Allele-Specific DNA Methylation in the Legacy Girls Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Chen; Do, Catherine; Andrulis, Irene L; John, Esther M; Daly, Mary B; Buys, Saundra S; Chung, Wendy K; Knight, Julia A; Bradbury, Angela R; Keegan, Theresa H M; Schwartz, Lisa; Krupska, Izabela; Miller, Rachel L; Santella, Regina M; Tycko, Benjamin; Terry, Mary Beth

    2018-02-13

    Family history, a well-established risk factor for breast cancer, can have both genetic and environmental contributions. Shared environment in families as well as epigenetic changes that also may be influenced by shared genetics and environment may also explain familial clustering of cancers. Epigenetic regulation, such as DNA methylation, can change the activity of a DNA segment without a change in the sequence; environmental exposures experienced across the life course can induce such changes. However, genetic-epigenetic interactions, detected as methylation quantitative trait loci (mQTLs; a.k.a. meQTLs) and haplotype-dependent allele-specific methylation (hap-ASM), can also contribute to inter-individual differences in DNA methylation patterns. To identify differentially methylated regions (DMRs) associated with breast cancer susceptibility, we examined differences in white blood cell DNA methylation in 29 candidate genes in 426 girls (ages 6-13 years) from the LEGACY Girls Study, 239 with and 187 without a breast cancer family history (BCFH). We measured methylation by targeted massively parallel bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) and observed BCFH DMRs in two genes: ESR1 (Δ 4.9%, P = 0.003) and SEC16B (Δ 3.6%, P = 0.026), each of which has been previously implicated in breast cancer susceptibility and pubertal development. These DMRs showed high inter-individual variability in methylation, suggesting the presence of mQTLs/hap-ASM. Using single nucleotide polymorphisms data in the bis-seq amplicon, we found strong hap-ASM in SEC16B (with allele specific-differences ranging from 42% to 74%). These findings suggest that differential methylation in genes relevant to breast cancer susceptibility may be present early in life, and that inherited genetic factors underlie some of these epigenetic differences.

  20. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO Z. PASSAMANI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS, micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR. Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  1. Protocol for chromosome-specific probe construction using PRINS, micromanipulation and DOP-PCR techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamani, Paulo Z; Carvalho, Carlos R; Soares, Fernanda A F

    2018-01-01

    Chromosome-specific probes have been widely used in molecular cytogenetics, being obtained with different methods. In this study, a reproducible protocol for construction of chromosome-specific probes is proposed which associates in situ amplification (PRINS), micromanipulation and degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). Human lymphocyte cultures were used to obtain metaphases from male and female individuals. The chromosomes were amplified via PRINS, and subcentromeric fragments of the X chromosome were microdissected using microneedles coupled to a phase contrast microscope. The fragments were amplified by DOP-PCR and labeled with tetramethyl-rhodamine-5-dUTP. The probes were used in fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure to highlight these specific regions in the metaphases. The results show one fluorescent red spot in male and two in female X chromosomes and interphase nuclei.

  2. Development of chromosome-arm-specific microsatellite markers in Triticum aestivum (Poaceae) using NGS technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nie, X.; Li, B.; Wang, L.; Liu, P.; Biradar, S. S.; Li, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Edwards, D.; Luo, M.; Weining, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 9 (2012), e369-e371 ISSN 0002-9122 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : chromosome-arm-specific DNA * flow-sorted chromosomes * next-generation sequencing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.586, year: 2012

  3. Allelic loss of the short arm of chromosome 4 in neuroblastoma suggests a novel tumour suppressor gene locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caron, H.; van Sluis, P.; Buschman, R.; Pereira do Tanque, R.; Maes, P.; Beks, L.; de Kraker, J.; Voûte, P. A.; Vergnaud, G.; Westerveld, A.; Slater, R.; Versteeg, R.

    1996-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood neural crest tumour, genetically characterized by frequent deletions of the short arm of chromosome 1 and amplification of N-myc. Here we report the first evidence for a neuroblastoma tumour suppressor locus on 4pter. Cytogenetically we demonstrated rearrangements of 4p

  4. WaveCNV: allele-specific copy number alterations in primary tumors and xenograft models from next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Losic, Bojan; Pai, Deepa; Zhao, Zhen; Trinh, Quang; Syam, Sujata; Arshadi, Niloofar; Jang, Gun Ho; Ali, Johar; Beck, Tim; McPherson, John; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B

    2014-03-15

    Copy number variations (CNVs) are a major source of genomic variability and are especially significant in cancer. Until recently microarray technologies have been used to characterize CNVs in genomes. However, advances in next-generation sequencing technology offer significant opportunities to deduce copy number directly from genome sequencing data. Unfortunately cancer genomes differ from normal genomes in several aspects that make them far less amenable to copy number detection. For example, cancer genomes are often aneuploid and an admixture of diploid/non-tumor cell fractions. Also patient-derived xenograft models can be laden with mouse contamination that strongly affects accurate assignment of copy number. Hence, there is a need to develop analytical tools that can take into account cancer-specific parameters for detecting CNVs directly from genome sequencing data. We have developed WaveCNV, a software package to identify copy number alterations by detecting breakpoints of CNVs using translation-invariant discrete wavelet transforms and assign digitized copy numbers to each event using next-generation sequencing data. We also assign alleles specifying the chromosomal ratio following duplication/loss. We verified copy number calls using both microarray (correlation coefficient 0.97) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (correlation coefficient 0.94) and found them to be highly concordant. We demonstrate its utility in pancreatic primary and xenograft sequencing data. Source code and executables are available at https://github.com/WaveCNV. The segmentation algorithm is implemented in MATLAB, and copy number assignment is implemented Perl. lakshmi.muthuswamy@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  5. Typing for HLA-DPB1*03 and HLA-DPB1*06 using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of "new" DPB1*06 variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1989-01-01

    DP gene typing using in vitro DNA amplification combined with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes has recently been reported. The resulting DNA amplification was specific for the HLA-DPB locus. Typing for the individual DPB alleles was exclusively dependent on the hybridizations of the probe...

  6. Genotype-based test in mapping cis-regulatory variants from allele-specific expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Francois Lefebvre

    Full Text Available Identifying and understanding the impact of gene regulatory variation is of considerable importance in evolutionary and medical genetics; such variants are thought to be responsible for human-specific adaptation and to have an important role in genetic disease. Regulatory variation in cis is readily detected in individuals showing uneven expression of a transcript from its two allelic copies, an observation referred to as allelic imbalance (AI. Identifying individuals exhibiting AI allows mapping of regulatory DNA regions and the potential to identify the underlying causal genetic variant(s. However, existing mapping methods require knowledge of the haplotypes, which make them sensitive to phasing errors. In this study, we introduce a genotype-based mapping test that does not require haplotype-phase inference to locate regulatory regions. The test relies on partitioning genotypes of individuals exhibiting AI and those not expressing AI in a 2×3 contingency table. The performance of this test to detect linkage disequilibrium (LD between a potential regulatory site and a SNP located in this region was examined by analyzing the simulated and the empirical AI datasets. In simulation experiments, the genotype-based test outperforms the haplotype-based tests with the increasing distance separating the regulatory region from its regulated transcript. The genotype-based test performed equally well with the experimental AI datasets, either from genome-wide cDNA hybridization arrays or from RNA sequencing. By avoiding the need of haplotype inference, the genotype-based test will suit AI analyses in population samples of unknown haplotype structure and will additionally facilitate the identification of cis-regulatory variants that are located far away from the regulated transcript.

  7. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  8. Physical and transcript map of the region between D6S264 and D6S149 on chromosome 6q27, the minimal region of allele loss in sporadic epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Ying; Emilion, Gracy; Mungall, Andrew J

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown a high frequency of allele loss at D6S193 (62%) on chromosomal arm 6q27 in ovarian tumours and mapped the minimal region of allele loss between D6S297 and D6S264 (3 cM). We isolated and mapped a single non-chimaeric YAC (17IA12, 260-280 kb) containing D6S193 and D6S297...

  9. Assignment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar linkage groups to specific chromosomes: Conservation of large syntenic blocks corresponding to whole chromosome arms in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koop Ben F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most teleost species, especially freshwater groups such as the Esocidae which are the closest relatives of salmonids, have a karyotype comprising 25 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes and 48–52 chromosome arms. After the common ancestor of salmonids underwent a whole genome duplication, its karyotype would have 100 chromosome arms, and this is reflected in the modal range of 96–104 seen in extant salmonids (e.g., rainbow trout. The Atlantic salmon is an exception among the salmonids as it has 72–74 chromosome arms and its karyotype includes 12 pairs of large acrocentric chromosomes, which appear to be the result of tandem fusions. The purpose of this study was to integrate the Atlantic salmon's linkage map and karyotype and to compare the chromosome map with that of rainbow trout. Results The Atlantic salmon genetic linkage groups were assigned to specific chromosomes in the European subspecies using fluorescence in situ hybridization with BAC probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group. The genetic linkage groups were larger for metacentric chromosomes compared to acrocentric chromosomes of similar size. Comparison of the Atlantic salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout. Conclusion It had been suggested that some of the large acrocentric chromosomes in Atlantic salmon are the result of tandem fusions, and that the small blocks of repetitive DNA in the middle of the arms represent the sites of chromosome fusions. The finding that the chromosomal regions on either side of the blocks of repetitive DNA within the larger acrocentric chromosomes correspond to different rainbow trout chromosome arms provides support for this hypothesis.

  10. An AFLP marker linked to the leaf rust resistance gene LrBi16 and test of allelism with Lr14a on chromosome arm 7BL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peipei Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Leaf rust (LR, caused by Puccinia triticina, is one of the most widespread diseases of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. worldwide. The LR resistance gene LrBi16 has been mapped on chromosome arm 7BL in Chinese wheat cultivar Bimai 16 and was closely linked to SSR loci Xcfa2257 and Xgwm344 with genetic distances of 2.8 cM and 2.9 cM, respectively. In the present study, a total of 304 AFLP primer pairs were used to screen Bimai 16 and Thatcher and resistant and susceptible DNA bulks. The polymorphic AFLP marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was used to genotype F2 and F3 populations to identify markers more closely linked to LrBi16. Marker P-ATT/M-CGC173 bp was tightly linked to LrBi16 with a genetic distance of 0.5 cM. As LrBi16 was mapped near the Lr14a locus, 809 F2 plants from the Bimai 16/RL6013 (Lr14a cross were inoculated with the Pt pathotype FHNQ to test the allelism of Lr14a and LrBi16. All of the F2 plants were resistant to FHNQ (IT between; and 2, suggesting that Lr14a and LrBi16 are allelic.

  11. The use of laser microdissection for the preparation of chromosome-specific painting probes in farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Musilova, Petra; Rubes, Jiri

    2002-01-01

    Laser microbeam microdissection and laser pressure catapulting procedure were used for the construction of chromosome-specific painting probes, arm-specific probes and probes for chromosomal subfragments. We report on a method for generation of fluorescence in-situ hybridization probes from laser dissected chromosomes of farm animals. So far, using the described method, a set of chromosome-specific painting probes has been obtained for all porcine chromosomes, 17 chromosomes of cattle and selected equine chromosomes. It is concluded that the laser technology appears to be a useful and powerful tool for the construction of chromosome-specifi c painting probes. Its main advantage is the fast non-contact collection of chromosomes.

  12. Technical aspects of typing for HLA-DP alleles using allele-specific DNA in vitro amplification and sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. Detection of single base mismatches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, L; Morling, N; Ryder, L P

    1990-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an effective method for in vitro DNA amplification which combined with probing with synthetic oligonucleotides can be used for, e.g., HLA-typing. We have studied the technical aspects of HLA-DP typing with the technique. DNA from mononuclear nucleated cells...... was extracted with either a simple salting out method or phenol/chloroform. Both DNAs could be readily used for PCR. The MgC2 concentration of the PCR buffer and the annealing temperature of the thermal cycle of the PCR were the two most important variables. The MgCl2 concentration and the temperature must...... be carefully titrated for each primer pair in the PCR. The influence of mismatches between the primer and the DNA template were studied and we found that, by using primers differing only from each other at the 3' end, cross-amplification of closely homologous alleles could be avoided. Thus, single base...

  13. Microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-globin locus control region-hypersensitive Site 2: SPECIFICITY of Tunisian βs chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mustapha, Maha; Moumni, Imen; Zorai, Amine; Douzi, Kaïs; Ghanem, Abderraouf; Abbes, Salem

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of sickle cell disease severity is attributed to several cis acting factors, among them the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and (AT) rich region in the β-locus control region (β-LCR). This contains five DNase I hypersensitive sites (HS) located 6 to 22 kb upstream to the ϵ gene. The most important of these is the HS2 (5' β-LCR-HS2), characterized by the presence of three different SNPs and a microsatellite region known to be in association with β(S) chromosomes in various populations. The aim of this study was to present the molecular investigation of the 5' β-LCR-HS2 site in normal and sickle cell disease individuals in order to determine if there is any correlation or specificity between these molecular markers, the β(S) Tunisian chromosomes and phenotypical expression of sickle cell disease. One hundred and twenty-four chromosomes from Tunisian individuals (49 β(S) carriers and 13 normal individuals) were screened by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing for the polymorphic short tandem microsatellite repeats (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(Y) and the three SNPs (rs7119428, rs9736333 and rs60240093) of the 5' β-LCR-HS2. Twelve configurations of the microsatellite motif were found with an ancestral configuration elaborated by ClustalW software. Normal and mutated alleles were observed at the homozygous and heterozygous states for the three SNPs. Correlation between microsatellites and SNPs suggests that mutant SNP alleles were mainly associated, in the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, with the (AT)(8)N(12)GT(AT)(7) configuration, whereas, normal SNP alleles were associated with the (AT)(X)N(12)(AT)(11) configurations in normal β(A) chromosomes. The correlation of these various configurations with Hb F expression was also investigated. The principal component analysis (PCA) showed the correlation between the homozygous sickle cell disease phenotype, mutated SNP alleles and the Benin microsatellite configuration (AT)(8)N(12)GT

  14. Novel system for efficient isolation of Clostridium double-crossover allelic exchange mutants enabling markerless chromosomal gene deletions and DNA integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hinai, Mohab A; Fast, Alan G; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2012-11-01

    Isolation of Clostridium mutants based on gene replacement via allelic exchange remains a major limitation for this important genus. Use of a heterologous counterselection marker can facilitate the identification of the generally rare allelic exchange events. We report on the development of an inducible counterselection marker and describe its utility and broad potential in quickly and efficiently generating markerless DNA deletions and integrations at any genomic locus without the need for auxotrophic mutants or the use of the mobile group II introns. This system is based on a codon-optimized mazF toxin gene from Escherichia coli under the control of a lactose-inducible promoter from Clostridium perfringens. This system is potentially applicable to almost all members of the genus Clostridium due to their similarly low genomic GC content and comparable codon usage. We isolated all allelic-exchange-based gene deletions (ca_p0167, sigF, and sigK) or disruptions (ca_p0157 and sigF) we attempted and integrated a 3.6-kb heterologous DNA sequence (made up of a Clostridium ljungdahlii 2.1-kb formate dehydrogenase [fdh] gene plus a FLP recombination target [FRT]-flanked thiamphenicol resistance marker) into the Clostridium acetobutylicum chromosome. Furthermore, we report on the development of a plasmid system with inducible segregational instability, thus enabling efficient deployment of the FLP-FRT system to generate markerless deletion or integration mutants. This enabled expeditious deletion of the thiamphenicol resistance marker from the fdh integrant strain as well as the sigK deletion strain. More generally, our system can potentially be applied to other organisms with underdeveloped genetic tools.

  15. The neurological mouse mutations jittery and hesitant are allelic and map to the region of mouse chromosome 10 homologous to 19p13.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapfhamer, D.; Sufalko, D.; Warren, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    Jittery (ji) is a recessive mouse mutation on Chromosome 10 characterized by progressive ataxic gait, dystonic movements, spontaneus seizures, and death by dehydration/starvation before fertility. Recently, a viable neurological recessive mutation, hesitant, was discovered. It is characterized by hesitant, uncoordinated movements, exaggerated stepping of the hind limbs, and reduced fertility in males. In a complementation test and by genetic mapping we have shown here that hesitant and jittery are allelic. Using several large intersubspecific backcrosses and intercrosses we have genetically mapped ji near the marker Amh and microsatellite markers D10Mit7, D10Mit21, and D10Mit23. The linked region of mouse Chromosome 10 is homologous to human 19p13.3, to which several human ataxia loci have recently been mapped. By excluding genes that map to human 21q22.3 (Pfkl) and 12q23 (Nfyb), we conclude that jittery is not likely to be a genetic mouse model for human Unverricht-Lundborg progressive myoclonus epilepsy (EPM1) on 21q22.3 nor for spinocerebellar ataxia II (SCA2) on 12q22-q24. The closely linked markers presented here will facilitate positional cloning of the ji gene. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Allele-Specific HLA Loss and Immune Escape in Lung Cancer Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Rosenthal, Rachel; Hiley, Crispin T; Rowan, Andrew J; Watkins, Thomas B K; Wilson, Gareth A; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Veeriah, Selvaraju; Van Loo, Peter; Herrero, Javier; Swanton, Charles

    2017-11-30

    Immune evasion is a hallmark of cancer. Losing the ability to present neoantigens through human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loss may facilitate immune evasion. However, the polymorphic nature of the locus has precluded accurate HLA copy-number analysis. Here, we present loss of heterozygosity in human leukocyte antigen (LOHHLA), a computational tool to determine HLA allele-specific copy number from sequencing data. Using LOHHLA, we find that HLA LOH occurs in 40% of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) and is associated with a high subclonal neoantigen burden, APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis, upregulation of cytolytic activity, and PD-L1 positivity. The focal nature of HLA LOH alterations, their subclonal frequencies, enrichment in metastatic sites, and occurrence as parallel events suggests that HLA LOH is an immune escape mechanism that is subject to strong microenvironmental selection pressures later in tumor evolution. Characterizing HLA LOH with LOHHLA refines neoantigen prediction and may have implications for our understanding of resistance mechanisms and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting neoantigens. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 The Francis Crick Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of common mitochondrial DNA mutations by allele-specific oligonucleotide and Southern blot hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sha; Halberg, Michelle C; Floyd, Kristen C; Wang, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are clinically and genetically heterogeneous. There are a set of recurrent point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) that are responsible for common mitochondrial diseases, including MELAS (mitochondrial encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, stroke-like episodes), MERRF (myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers), LHON (Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy), NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa), and Leigh syndrome. Most of the pathogenic mtDNA point mutations are present in the heteroplasmic state, meaning that the wild-type and mutant-containing mtDNA molecules are coexisting. Clinical heterogeneity may be due to the degree of mutant load (heteroplasmy) and distribution of heteroplasmic mutations in affected tissues. Additionally, Kearns-Sayre syndrome and Pearson syndrome are caused by large mtDNA deletions. In this chapter, we describe a multiplex PCR/allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridization method for the screening of 13 common point mutations. This method allows the detection of low percentage of mutant heteroplasmy. In addition, a nonradioactive Southern blot hybridization protocol for the analysis of mtDNA large deletions is also described.

  18. Allele specific LAMP- gold nanoparticle for characterization of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ferreira Carlos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to their relevance as disease biomarkers and for diagnostics, screening of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs requires simple and straightforward strategies capable to provide results in medium throughput settings. Suitable approaches relying on isothermal amplification techniques have been evolving to substitute the cumbersome and highly specialized PCR amplification detection schemes. Nonetheless, identification of an individual’s genotype still requires sophisticated equipment and laborious methods.Here, we present a low-cost and reliable approach based on the allele specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (AS-LAMP coupled to ssDNA functionalized gold nanoparticle (Au-nanoprobe colorimetric sequence discrimination. The Au-nanoprobe integration allows for the colorimetric detection of AS-LAMP amplification product that can be easily interpreted in less than 15 min. We targeted a clinical relevant SNP responsible for lactose intolerance (-13910C/T dbSNP rs#: 4988235 to demonstrate its proof of concept and full potential of this novel approach. Keywords: SNP, Isothermal amplification, Gold nanoparticles, Gold nanoprobes, Lactose intolerance

  19. Quantification of classical HLA class I mRNA by allele-specific, real-time polymerase chain reaction for most Han individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, N; Lu, S; Wang, W; Miao, F; Sun, H; Wu, S; Nan, D; Qiu, J; Xu, J; Zhang, J

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that expression levels of different alleles at the same HLA class I locus can vary dramatically, which might have a broad influence on human disease. However, precise quantification of the relative expression level of each HLA allele is challenging, because distinguishing different alleles on the same locus is difficult. Here, we developed a series of allele-specific, real-time polymerase chain reaction assays for quantifying HLA class I allele mRNA in most Han individuals. The alleles of almost all heterozygous genotypes with a frequency higher than 0.5% in our population (78 alleles on HLA-A locus, 124 alleles on HLA-B locus, and 74 alleles on HLA-C locus) were specifically amplified. The specificity of the amplification was strictly validated by setting the corresponding negative control for each allele of each genotype. The amplification efficiency of each reaction was determined, and the slopes of the reactions were compared. This study provides a tool for detecting the comprehensive expression profile of HLA class I alleles and will be useful not only for the investigation of the molecular mechanism underlying HLA allele expression regulation but also for exploration of immunological mechanisms involving HLA expression in the fields of tumour immune evasion, viral infection, auto-immune disorders, and graft vs host disease after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimada Yukinori

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus using microsatellite markers. Results A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. Conclusions High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution.

  1. High degree of sex chromosome differentiation in stickleback fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikano, Takahito; Natri, Heini M; Shimada, Yukinori; Merilä, Juha

    2011-09-29

    Studies of closely related species with different sex chromosome systems can provide insights into the processes of sex chromosome differentiation and evolution. To investigate the potential utility of molecular markers in studying sex chromosome differentiation at early stages of their divergence, we examined the levels and patterns of genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in nine-spined (Pungitius pungitius) and three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) using microsatellite markers. A set of novel microsatellite markers spanning the entire length of the sex chromosomes were developed for nine-spined sticklebacks using the sequenced genomes of other fish species. Sex-specific patterns of genetic variability and male-specific alleles were identified at most of these loci, indicating a high degree of differentiation between the X and Y chromosomes in nine-spined sticklebacks. In three-spined sticklebacks, male-specific alleles were detected at some loci confined to two chromosomal regions. In addition, male-specific null alleles were identified at several other loci, implying the absence of Y chromosomal alleles at these loci. Overall, male-specific alleles and null alleles were found over a region spanning 81% of the sex chromosomes in three-spined sticklebacks. High levels but distinct patterns of sex chromosome differentiation were uncovered in the stickleback species that diverged 13 million years ago. Our results suggest that the Y chromosome is highly degenerate in three-spined sticklebacks, but not in nine-spined sticklebacks. In general, the results demonstrate that microsatellites can be useful in identifying the degree and patterns of sex chromosome differentiation in species at initial stages of sex chromosome evolution. © 2011 Shikano et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  2. Gender-specific gene expression in post-mortem human brain: localization to sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P; Evans, Simon; Choudary, Prabhakara; Tomita, Hiroaki; Meador-Woodruff, Jim; Molnar, Margherita; Li, Jun; Lopez, Juan F; Myers, Rick; Cox, David; Watson, Stanley J; Akil, Huda; Jones, Edward G; Bunney, William E

    2004-02-01

    Gender differences in brain development and in the prevalence of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression have been reported. Gender differences in human brain might be related to patterns of gene expression. Microarray technology is one useful method for investigation of gene expression in brain. We investigated gene expression, cell types, and regional expression patterns of differentially expressed sex chromosome genes in brain. We profiled gene expression in male and female dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and cerebellum using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platform. Differentially expressed genes between males and females on the Y chromosome (DBY, SMCY, UTY, RPS4Y, and USP9Y) and X chromosome (XIST) were confirmed using real-time PCR measurements. In situ hybridization confirmed the differential expression of gender-specific genes and neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY in three brain regions examined. The XIST gene, which silences gene expression on regions of the X chromosome, is expressed in a subset of neurons. Since a subset of neurons express gender-specific genes, neural subpopulations may exhibit a subtle sexual dimorphism at the level of differences in gene regulation and function. The distinctive pattern of neuronal expression of XIST, RPS4Y, SMCY, and UTY and other sex chromosome genes in neuronal subpopulations may possibly contribute to gender differences in prevalence noted for some neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of the protein expression of these sex-chromosome-linked genes in brain tissue are required to address the functional consequences of the observed gene expression differences.

  3. Rh E/e genotyping by allele-specific primer amplification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, B. H.; Simsek, S.; Bleeker, P. M.; Overbeeke, M. A.; Cuijpers, H. T.; von dem Borne, A. E.; van der Schoot, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that the Rhesus (Rh) blood group antigens are encoded by two homologous genes: the Rh D gene and the Rh CcEe gene. The Rh CcEe gene encodes different peptides: the Rh C, c, E, and e polypeptides. Only one nucleotide difference has been found between the alleles encoding the Rh E

  4. Specific alleles of bitter receptor genes influence human sensitivity to the bitterness of aloin and saccharin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronin, Alexey N; Xu, Hong; Tang, Huixian; Zhang, Lan; Li, Qing; Li, Xiaodong

    2007-08-21

    Variation in human taste is a well-known phenomenon. However, little is known about the molecular basis for it. Bitter taste in humans is believed to be mediated by a family of 25 G protein-coupled receptors (hT2Rs, or TAS2Rs). Despite recent progress in the functional expression of hT2Rs in vitro, up until now, hT2R38, a receptor for phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), was the only gene directly linked to variations in human bitter taste. Here we report that polymorphism in two hT2R genes results in different receptor activities and different taste sensitivities to three bitter molecules. The hT2R43 gene allele, which encodes a protein with tryptophan in position 35, makes people very sensitive to the bitterness of the natural plant compounds aloin and aristolochic acid. People who do not possess this allele do not taste these compounds at low concentrations. The same hT2R43 gene allele makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of an artificial sweetener, saccharin. In addition, a closely related gene's (hT2R44's) allele also makes people more sensitive to the bitterness of saccharin. We also demonstrated that some people do not possess certain hT2R genes, contributing to taste variation between individuals. Our findings thus reveal new examples of variations in human taste and provide a molecular basis for them.

  5. Lateral flow strip for visual detection of K-ras mutations based on allele-specific PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Chen, Xiaomin; Wu, Yuying; Li, Hao; Wang, Yu; Pan, Xiaofu; Tang, Tingting; Liu, Ziying; Li, Xiaokun

    2016-10-01

    To develop a convenient and sensitive point-of-care test for detecting gene mutations based on allele-specific PCR. To develop a lateral flow strip for visual detection of K-ras mutations based on a modified PCR, a specific DNA tag was covalently linked to the 5'-end of each primer by a nine-carbon linker to produce a sticky end. One of the sticky ends of the PCR products bound to gold nano-particles, while the other sticky end was captured onto a nitrocellulose membrane of lateral flow strips. The lateral flow strip showed a great sensitivity, which detected mutations in as low as 10 tumor cells. The positive rate and accuracy of the lateral flow strip for blood samples were over 92 and 96 %, respectively. The lateral flow strip provides an easy method for sensitive detection of gene mutations based on allele specific-PCR.

  6. Dyslexia risk variant rs600753 is linked with dyslexia-specific differential allelic expression of DYX1C1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Müller

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An increasing number of genetic variants involved in dyslexia development were discovered during the last years, yet little is known about the molecular functional mechanisms of these SNPs. In this study we investigated whether dyslexia candidate SNPs have a direct, disease-specific effect on local expression levels of the assumed target gene by using a differential allelic expression assay. In total, 12 SNPs previously associated with dyslexia and related phenotypes were suitable for analysis. Transcripts corresponding to four SNPs were sufficiently expressed in 28 cell lines originating from controls and a family affected by dyslexia. We observed a significant effect of rs600753 on expression levels of DYX1C1 in forward and reverse sequencing approaches. The expression level of the rs600753 risk allele was increased in the respective seven cell lines from members of the dyslexia family which might be due to a disturbed transcription factor binding sites. When considering our results in the context of neuroanatomical dyslexia-specific findings, we speculate that this mechanism may be part of the pathomechanisms underlying the dyslexia-specific brain phenotype. Our results suggest that allele-specific DYX1C1 expression levels depend on genetic variants of rs600753 and contribute to dyslexia. However, these results are preliminary and need replication.

  7. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

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    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  8. Dyslexia risk variant rs600753 is linked with dyslexia-specific differential allelic expression of DYX1C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bent; Boltze, Johannes; Czepezauer, Ivonne; Hesse, Volker; Wilcke, Arndt; Kirsten, Holger

    2018-02-19

    An increasing number of genetic variants involved in dyslexia development were discovered during the last years, yet little is known about the molecular functional mechanisms of these SNPs. In this study we investigated whether dyslexia candidate SNPs have a direct, disease-specific effect on local expression levels of the assumed target gene by using a differential allelic expression assay. In total, 12 SNPs previously associated with dyslexia and related phenotypes were suitable for analysis. Transcripts corresponding to four SNPs were sufficiently expressed in 28 cell lines originating from controls and a family affected by dyslexia. We observed a significant effect of rs600753 on expression levels of DYX1C1 in forward and reverse sequencing approaches. The expression level of the rs600753 risk allele was increased in the respective seven cell lines from members of the dyslexia family which might be due to a disturbed transcription factor binding sites. When considering our results in the context of neuroanatomical dyslexia-specific findings, we speculate that this mechanism may be part of the pathomechanisms underlying the dyslexia-specific brain phenotype. Our results suggest that allele-specific DYX1C1 expression levels depend on genetic variants of rs600753 and contribute to dyslexia. However, these results are preliminary and need replication.

  9. Genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis using Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) reveals cis- and trans-effects on gene expression in maize hybrid meristem tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei; Yang, Sean; Rupe, Mary; Hu, Bin; Bickel, David R; Arthur, Lane; Smith, Oscar

    2008-03-01

    Allelic differences in expression are important genetic factors contributing to quantitative trait variation in various organisms. However, the extent of genome-wide allele-specific expression by different modes of gene regulation has not been well characterized in plants. In this study we developed a new methodology for allele-specific expression analysis by applying Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS), an open ended and sequencing based mRNA profiling technology. This methodology enabled a genome-wide evaluation of cis- and trans-effects on allelic expression in six meristem stages of the maize hybrid. Summarization of data from nearly 400 pairs of MPSS allelic signature tags showed that 60% of the genes in the hybrid meristems exhibited differential allelic expression. Because both alleles are subjected to the same trans-acting factors in the hybrid, the data suggest the abundance of cis-regulatory differences in the genome. Comparing the same allele expressed in the hybrid versus its inbred parents showed that 40% of the genes were differentially expressed, suggesting different trans-acting effects present in different genotypes. Such trans-acting effects may result in gene expression in the hybrid different from allelic additive expression. With this approach we quantified gene expression in the hybrid relative to its inbred parents at the allele-specific level. As compared to measuring total transcript levels, this study provides a new level of understanding of different modes of gene regulation in the hybrid and the molecular basis of heterosis.

  10. An examination of clinical differences between carriers and non-carriers of chromosome 8q24 risk alleles in a New Zealand Caucasian population with prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S. Bishop

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prostate cancer makes up approximately 15% of all cancers diagnosed in men in developed nations and approximately 4% of cases in developing nations. Although it is clear that prostate cancer has a genetic component and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs can contribute to prostate cancer risk, detecting associations is difficult in multi-factorial diseases, as environmental and lifestyle factors also play a role. In this study, specific clinical characteristics, environmental factors and genetic risk factors were assessed for interaction with prostate cancer. Methods. A total of 489 prostate cancer cases and 427 healthy controls were genotyped for SNPs found on chromosome 8q24 and a genetic risk score was calculated. In addition the SNPs were tested for an association with a number of clinical and environmental factors. Results. Age and tobacco use were positively associated, whilst alcohol consumption was negatively associated with prostate cancer risk. The following SNPs found on chromosome 8q24 were statistically significantly associated with prostate cancer: rs10086908, rs16901979; rs1447295and rs4242382. No association between Gleason score and smoking status, or between Gleason score and genotype were detected. Conclusion. A genetic risk score was calculated based on the 15 SNPs tested and found to be significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. Smoking significantly contributed to the risk of developing prostate cancer, and this risk was further increased by the presence of four SNPs in the 8q24 chromosomal region.

  11. Ploidy mosaicism and allele-specific gene expression differences in the allopolyploid Squalius alburnoides

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    Matos Isa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Squalius alburnoides is an Iberian cyprinid fish resulting from an interspecific hybridisation between Squalius pyrenaicus females (P genome and males of an unknown Anaecypris hispanica-like species (A genome. S. alburnoides is an allopolyploid hybridogenetic complex, which makes it a likely candidate for ploidy mosaicism occurrence, and is also an interesting model to address questions about gene expression regulation and genomic interactions. Indeed, it was previously suggested that in S. alburnoides triploids (PAA composition silencing of one of the three alleles (mainly of the P allele occurs. However, not a whole haplome is inactivated but a more or less random inactivation of alleles varying between individuals and even between organs of the same fish was seen. In this work we intended to correlate expression differences between individuals and/or between organs to the occurrence of mosaicism, evaluating if mosaics could explain previous observations and its impact on the assessment of gene expression patterns. Results To achieve our goal, we developed flow cytometry and cell sorting protocols for this system generating more homogenous cellular and transcriptional samples. With this set-up we detected 10% ploidy mosaicism within the S. alburnoides complex, and determined the allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of mosaic and non-mosaic individuals coming from different rivers over a wide geographic range. Conclusions Ploidy mosaicism occurs sporadically within the S. alburnoides complex, but in a frequency significantly higher than reported for other organisms. Moreover, we could exclude the influence of this phenomenon on the detection of variable allelic expression profiles of ubiquitously expressed genes (rpl8; gapdh and β-actin in cells from liver and kidney of triploid individuals. Finally, we determined that the expression patterns

  12. Allele-specific suppression of mutant huntingtin using antisense oligonucleotides: providing a therapeutic option for all Huntington disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skotte, Niels H; Southwell, Amber L; Østergaard, Michael E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Warby, Simon C; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Vaid, Kuljeet; Kordasiewicz, Holly; Watt, Andrew T; Freier, Susan M; Hung, Gene; Seth, Punit P; Bennett, C Frank; Swayze, Eric E; Hayden, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an inherited, fatal neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The mutant protein causes neuronal dysfunction and degeneration resulting in motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbances. Currently, there is no disease altering treatment, and symptomatic therapy has limited benefit. The pathogenesis of HD is complicated and multiple pathways are compromised. Addressing the problem at its genetic root by suppressing mutant huntingtin expression is a promising therapeutic strategy for HD. We have developed and evaluated antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) targeting single nucleotide polymorphisms that are significantly enriched on HD alleles (HD-SNPs). We describe our structure-activity relationship studies for ASO design and find that adjusting the SNP position within the gap, chemical modifications of the wings, and shortening the unmodified gap are critical for potent, specific, and well tolerated silencing of mutant huntingtin. Finally, we show that using two distinct ASO drugs targeting the two allelic variants of an HD-SNP could provide a therapeutic option for all persons with HD; allele-specifically for roughly half, and non-specifically for the remainder.

  13. Genetic prevention of hepatitis C virus-induced liver fibrosis by allele-specific downregulation of MERTK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Marco; Pan, Gang; Nord, Helena; Wallén Arzt, Emelie; Wallerman, Ola; Wadelius, Claes

    2017-07-01

    Infection by hepatitis C virus (HCV) can result in the development of liver fibrosis and may eventually progress into cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the molecular mechanisms for this process are not fully known. Several genome-wide association studies have been carried out to pinpoint causative variants in HCV-infected patient cohorts, but these variants are usually not the functional ones. The aim of this study was to identify the regulatory single nucleotide polymorphism associated with the risk of HCV-induced liver fibrosis and elucidate its molecular mechanism. We utilized a bioinformatics approach to identify a non-coding regulatory variant, located in an intron of the MERTK gene, based on differential transcription factor binding between the alleles. We validated the results using expression reporter assays and electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing indicated that transcription factor(s) bind stronger to the A allele of rs6726639. Electrophoresis mobility shift assays supported these findings and suggested that the transcription factor is interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1). Luciferase report assays showed lower enhancer activity from the A allele and that IRF1 may act as a repressor. Treatment of hepatitis C with interferon-α results in increased IRF1 levels and our data suggest that this leads to an allele-specific downregulation of MERTK mediated by an allelic effect on the regulatory element containing the functional rs6726639. This variant also shows the hallmarks for being the driver of the genome-wide association studies for reduced risk of liver fibrosis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease at MERTK. © 2016 The Authors. Hepatology Research published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japan Society of Hepatology.

  14. Paternal-specific S-allele transmission in sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.): the potential for sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedhly, A; Wünsch, A; Kartal, Ö; Herrero, M; Hormaza, J I

    2016-03-01

    Homomorphic self-incompatibility is a well-studied example of a physiological process that is thought to increase population diversity and reduce the expression of inbreeding depression. Whereas theoretical models predict the presence of a large number of S-haplotypes with equal frequencies at equilibrium, unequal allele frequencies have been repeatedly reported and attributed to sampling effects, population structure, demographic perturbation, sheltered deleterious mutations or selection pressure on linked genes. However, it is unclear to what extent unequal segregations are the results of gametophytic or sexual selection. Although these two forces are difficult to disentangle, testing S-alleles in the offspring of controlled crosses provides an opportunity to separate these two phenomena. In this work, segregation and transmission of S-alleles have been characterized in progenies of mixed donors and fully compatible pollinations under field conditions in Prunus avium. Seed set patterns and pollen performance have also been characterized. The results reveal paternal-specific distorted transmission of S-alleles in most of the crosses. Interestingly, S-allele segregation within any given paternal or maternal S-locus was random. Observations on pollen germination, pollen tube growth rate, pollen tube cohort size, seed set dynamics and transmission patterns strongly suggest post-pollination, prezygotic sexual selection, with male-male competition as the most likely mechanism. According to these results, post-pollination sexual selection takes precedence over frequency-dependent selection in explaining unequal S-haplotype frequencies. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. Effect of read-mapping biases on detecting allele-specific expression from RNA-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degner, Jacob F; Marioni, John C; Pai, Athma A; Pickrell, Joseph K; Nkadori, Everlyne; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-12-15

    Next-generation sequencing has become an important tool for genome-wide quantification of DNA and RNA. However, a major technical hurdle lies in the need to map short sequence reads back to their correct locations in a reference genome. Here, we investigate the impact of SNP variation on the reliability of read-mapping in the context of detecting allele-specific expression (ASE). We generated 16 million 35 bp reads from mRNA of each of two HapMap Yoruba individuals. When we mapped these reads to the human genome we found that, at heterozygous SNPs, there was a significant bias toward higher mapping rates of the allele in the reference sequence, compared with the alternative allele. Masking known SNP positions in the genome sequence eliminated the reference bias but, surprisingly, did not lead to more reliable results overall. We find that even after masking, approximately 5-10% of SNPs still have an inherent bias toward more effective mapping of one allele. Filtering out inherently biased SNPs removes 40% of the top signals of ASE. The remaining SNPs showing ASE are enriched in genes previously known to harbor cis-regulatory variation or known to show uniparental imprinting. Our results have implications for a variety of applications involving detection of alternate alleles from short-read sequence data. Scripts, written in Perl and R, for simulating short reads, masking SNP variation in a reference genome and analyzing the simulation output are available upon request from JFD. Raw short read data were deposited in GEO (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/) under accession number GSE18156. jdegner@uchicago.edu; marioni@uchicago.edu; gilad@uchicago.edu; pritch@uchicago.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  17. Domain Specific Attentional Impairments in Children with Chromosome 22Q11.2 Deletion Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Joel P.; Chiodo, Renee; Mattei, Victoria; Simon, Tony J.

    2007-01-01

    One of the defining cognitive characteristics of the chromosome 22q deletion syndrome (DS22q11.2) is visuospatial processing impairments. The purpose of this study was to investigate and extend the specific attentional profile of children with this disorder using both an object-based attention task and an inhibition of return task. A group of…

  18. Assignment of Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Linkage Groups to Specific Chromosomes Reveals a Karyotype with Multiple Rearrangements of the Chromosome Arms of Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Ruth B.; Park, Linda K.; Naish, Kerry A.

    2013-01-01

    The Chinook salmon genetic linkage groups have been assigned to specific chromosomes using fluorescence in situ hybridization with bacterial artificial chromosome probes containing genetic markers mapped to each linkage group in Chinook salmon and rainbow trout. Comparison of the Chinook salmon chromosome map with that of rainbow trout provides strong evidence for conservation of large syntenic blocks in these species, corresponding to entire chromosome arms in the rainbow trout as expected. In almost every case, the markers were found at approximately the same location on the chromosome arm in each species, suggesting conservation of marker order on the chromosome arms of the two species in most cases. Although theoretically a few centric fissions could convert the karyotype of rainbow trout (2N = 58–64) into that of Chinook salmon (2N = 68) or vice versa, our data suggest that chromosome arms underwent multiple centric fissions and subsequent new centric fusions to form the current karyotypes. The morphology of only approximately one-third of the chromosome pairs have been conserved between the two species. PMID:24170739

  19. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O' Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  20. Fine mapping of a region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p in human glioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesten, A. M.; Bijleveld, E. H.; Westerveld, A.; Hulsebos, T. J.

    1997-01-01

    Allelic loss on chromosome 10 is a frequent event in high grade gliomas. Earlier studies have shown that in most cases a complete copy of chromosome 10 is lost in the tumor. To define more accurately and specifically the region of common deletion on chromosome arm 10p, we have screened a large

  1. Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive subtractive hybridization

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    Redkar Rajendra

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives.

  2. Y-chromosome-specific microsatellite mutation rates re-examined using a minisatellite, MSY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobling, M A; Heyer, E; Dieltjes, P; de Knijff, P

    1999-10-01

    Polymorphic Y-chromosome-specific microsatellites are becoming increasingly used in evolutionary and forensic studies and, in particular, in dating the origins of Y-chromosomal lineages. Previously, haplotyping of Y chromosomes from males belonging to a set of deep-rooting pedigrees was used to estimate a conservative average Y-chromosomal microsatellite mutation rate of 2.1 x 10(-3)per locus per generation. A number of males showed multiple differences in haplotypes compared with other males within their pedigrees, and these were excluded from the calculation of this estimate, on the grounds that non-paternity was a more probable explanation than multiple mutation within a lineage. Here we reanalyse the pedigrees using an independent highly polymorphic system, the Y-specific minisatellite, MSY1. This supports the hypothesis of non-paternity where more than one microsatellite difference was observed, provides further support for the previously deduced microsatellite mutation rate and throws light on the mutation dynamics of MSY1 itself, suggesting that single-step changes are not the only mode of mutation.

  3. Impact of pre-existing MSP142-allele specific immunity on potency of an erythrocytic Plasmodium falciparum vaccine

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    Bergmann-Leitner Elke S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MSP1 is the major surface protein on merozoites and a prime candidate for a blood stage malaria vaccine. Preclinical and seroepidemiological studies have implicated antibodies to MSP1 in protection against blood stage parasitaemia and/or reduced parasite densities, respectively. Malaria endemic areas have multiple strains of Plasmodium falciparum circulating at any given time, giving rise to complex immune responses, an issue which is generally not addressed in clinical trials conducted in non-endemic areas. A lack of understanding of the effect of pre-existing immunity to heterologous parasite strains may significantly contribute to vaccine failure in the field. The purpose of this study was to model the effect of pre-existing immunity to MSP142 on the immunogenicity of blood-stage malaria vaccines based on alternative MSP1 alleles. Methods Inbred and outbred mice were immunized with various recombinant P. falciparum MSP142 proteins that represent the two major alleles of MSP142, MAD20 (3D7 and Wellcome (K1, FVO. Humoral immune responses were analysed by ELISA and LuminexTM, and functional activity of induced MSP142-specific antibodies was assessed by growth inhibition assays. T-cell responses were characterized using ex vivo ELISpot assays. Results Analysis of the immune responses induced by various immunization regimens demonstrated a strong allele-specific response at the T cell level in both inbred and outbred mice. The success of heterologous regimens depended on the degree of homology of the N-terminal p33 portion of the MSP142, likely due to the fact that most T cell epitopes reside in this part of the molecule. Analysis of humoral immune responses revealed a marked cross-reactivity between the alleles. Functional analyses showed that some of the heterologous regimens induced antibodies with improved growth inhibitory activities. Conclusion The development of a more broadly efficacious MSP1 based vaccine may be

  4. Effect of read-mapping biases on detecting allele-specific expression from RNA-sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Degner, Jacob F.; Marioni, John C.; Pai, Athma A.; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Nkadori, Everlyne; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Next-generation sequencing has become an important tool for genome-wide quantification of DNA and RNA. However, a major technical hurdle lies in the need to map short sequence reads back to their correct locations in a reference genome. Here, we investigate the impact of SNP variation on the reliability of read-mapping in the context of detecting allele-specific expression (ASE). Results: We generated 16 million 35 bp reads from mRNA of each of two HapMap Yoruba individuals. When ...

  5. Karyotypic relationships among Equus grevyi, Equus burchelli and domestic horse defined using horse chromosome arm-specific probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, P; Kubickova, S; Zrnova, E; Horin, P; Vahala, J; Rubes, J

    2007-01-01

    Using laser microdissection we prepared a set of horse chromosome arm-specific probes. Most of the probes were generated from horse chromosomes, some of them were derived from Equus zebra hartmannae. The set of probes were hybridized onto E. grevyi chromosomes in order to establish a genome-wide chromosomal correspondence between this zebra and horse. The use of arm-specific probes provided us with more information on the mutual arrangement of the genomes than we could obtain by means of whole-chromosome paints generated by flow sorting, even if we used reciprocal painting with probe sets from both species. By comparison of our results and results of comparative mapping in E. burchelli, we also established the chromosomal correspondence between E. grevyi and E. burchelli, providing evidence for a very close karyotypic relationship between these two zebra species. Establishment of the comparative map for E. grevyi contributes to the knowledge of the karyotypic phylogeny in the Equidae family.

  6. Identifying breast cancer risk loci by global differential allele-specific expression (DASE analysis in mammary epithelial transcriptome

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    Gao Chuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The significant mortality associated with breast cancer (BCa suggests a need to improve current research strategies to identify new genes that predispose women to breast cancer. Differential allele-specific expression (DASE has been shown to contribute to phenotypic variables in humans and recently to the pathogenesis of cancer. We previously reported that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD could lead to DASE of BRCA1/2, which is associated with elevated susceptibility to breast cancer. In addition to truncation mutations, multiple genetic and epigenetic factors can contribute to DASE, and we propose that DASE is a functional index for cis-acting regulatory variants and pathogenic mutations, and that global analysis of DASE in breast cancer precursor tissues can be used to identify novel causative alleles for breast cancer susceptibility. Results To test our hypothesis, we employed the Illumina® Omni1-Quad BeadChip in paired genomic DNA (gDNA and double-stranded cDNA (ds-cDNA samples prepared from eight BCa patient-derived normal mammary epithelial lines (HMEC. We filtered original array data according to heterozygous genotype calls and calculated DASE values using the Log ratio of cDNA allele intensity, which was normalized to the corresponding gDNA. We developed two statistical methods, SNP- and gene-based approaches, which allowed us to identify a list of 60 candidate DASE loci (DASE ≥ 2.00, P ≤ 0.01, FDR ≤ 0.05 by both methods. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of DASE loci revealed one major breast cancer-relevant interaction network, which includes two known cancer causative genes, ZNF331 (DASE = 2.31, P = 0.0018, FDR = 0.040 and USP6 (DASE = 4.80, P = 0.0013, FDR = 0.013, and a breast cancer causative gene, DMBT1 (DASE=2.03, P = 0.0017, FDR = 0.014. Sequence analysis of a 5′ RACE product of DMBT1 demonstrated that rs2981745, a putative breast cancer risk locus, appears to be one of the causal variants leading to DASE

  7. A mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway promotes faithful chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeche, Lilian; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Buisson, Rémi; Zou, Lee

    2018-01-05

    The ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase is crucial for DNA damage and replication stress responses. Here, we describe an unexpected role of ATR in mitosis. Acute inhibition or degradation of ATR in mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation. The effect of ATR ablation is not due to altered cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity, DNA damage responses, or unscheduled DNA synthesis but to loss of an ATR function at centromeres. In mitosis, ATR localizes to centromeres through Aurora A-regulated association with centromere protein F (CENP-F), allowing ATR to engage replication protein A (RPA)-coated centromeric R loops. As ATR is activated at centromeres, it stimulates Aurora B through Chk1, preventing formation of lagging chromosomes. Thus, a mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway acts at centromeres to promote faithful chromosome segregation, revealing functions of R loops and ATR in suppressing chromosome instability. Copyright © 2018, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Identification of ovule transcripts from the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome

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    Ozias-Akins Peggy

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apomixis, asexual seed production in plants, holds great potential for agriculture as a means to fix hybrid vigor. Apospory is a form of apomixis where the embryo develops from an unreduced egg that is derived from a somatic nucellar cell, the aposporous initial, via mitosis. Understanding the molecular mechanism regulating aposporous initial specification will be a critical step toward elucidation of apomixis and also provide insight into developmental regulation and downstream signaling that results in apomixis. To discover candidate transcripts for regulating aposporous initial specification in P. squamulatum, we compared two transcriptomes derived from microdissected ovules at the stage of aposporous initial formation between the apomictic donor parent, P. squamulatum (accession PS26, and an apomictic derived backcross 8 (BC8 line containing only the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region (ASGR-carrier chromosome from P. squamulatum. Toward this end, two transcriptomes derived from ovules of an apomictic donor parent and its apomictic backcross derivative at the stage of apospory initiation, were sequenced using 454-FLX technology. Results Using 454-FLX technology, we generated 332,567 reads with an average read length of 147 base pairs (bp for the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 363,637 reads with an average read length of 142 bp for the BC8 ovule transcriptome library. A total of 33,977 contigs from the PS26 ovule transcriptome library and 26,576 contigs from the BC8 ovule transcriptome library were assembled using the Multifunctional Inertial Reference Assembly program. Using stringent in silico parameters, 61 transcripts were predicted to map to the ASGR-carrier chromosome, of which 49 transcripts were verified as ASGR-carrier chromosome specific. One of the alien expressed genes could be assigned as tightly linked to the ASGR by screening of apomictic and sexual F1s. Only one transcript, which did not map to the ASGR

  9. Allele-specific up-regulation of FGFR2 increases susceptibility to breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin B Meyer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The recent whole-genome scan for breast cancer has revealed the FGFR2 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene as a locus associated with a small, but highly significant, increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Using fine-scale genetic mapping of the region, it has been possible to narrow the causative locus to a haplotype of eight strongly linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs spanning a region of 7.5 kilobases (kb in the second intron of the FGFR2 gene. Here we describe a functional analysis to define the causative SNP, and we propose a model for a disease mechanism. Using gene expression microarray data, we observed a trend of increased FGFR2 expression in the rare homozygotes. This trend was confirmed using real-time (RT PCR, with the difference between the rare and the common homozygotes yielding a Wilcox p-value of 0.028. To elucidate which SNPs might be responsible for this difference, we examined protein-DNA interactions for the eight most strongly disease-associated SNPs in different breast cell lines. We identify two cis-regulatory SNPs that alter binding affinity for transcription factors Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta, and we demonstrate that both sites are occupied in vivo. In transient transfection experiments, the two SNPs can synergize giving rise to increased FGFR2 expression. We propose a model in which the Oct-1/Runx2 and C/EBPbeta binding sites in the disease-associated allele are able to lead to an increase in FGFR2 gene expression, thereby increasing the propensity for tumour formation.

  10. Human Platelet Antigen Alleles in 998 Taiwanese Blood Donors Determined by Sequence-Specific Primer Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Chung Pai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphism of human platelet antigens (HPAs leads to alloimmunizations and immune-mediated platelet disorders including fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT, posttransfusion purpura (PTP, and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR. HPA typing and knowledge of antigen frequency in a population are important in particular for the provision of HPA-matched blood components for patients with PTR. We have performed allele genotyping for HPA-1 through -6 and -15 among 998 platelet donors from 6 blood centers in Taiwan using sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction. The HPA allele frequency was 99.55, and 0.45% for HPA-1a and -1b; 96.49, and 3.51% for HPA-2a and -2b; 55.81, and 44.19% for HPA-3a and -3b; 99.75, and 0.25% for HPA-4a and -4b; 98.50, and 1.50% for HPA-5a and -5b; 97.75 and 2.25% for HPA-6a and -6b; 53.71 and 46.29% for HPA-15a and -15b. HPA-15b and HPA-3a, may be considered the most important, followed by HPA-2, -6, -1, -5, and -4 systems, as a cause of FNAIT, PTP, and PTR based on allele frequency. HPA-4b and HPA-5b role cannot be excluded based on their immunogenicity. A larger-scale study will now be conducted to confirm these hypotheses and to establish an apheresis donor database for the procurement of HPA-matched apheresis platelets for patients with PTR.

  11. Human platelet antigen alleles in 998 Taiwanese blood donors determined by sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Shun-Chung; Burnouf, Thierry; Chen, Jen-Wei; Lin, Liang-In

    2013-01-01

    Polymorphism of human platelet antigens (HPAs) leads to alloimmunizations and immune-mediated platelet disorders including fetal-neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT), posttransfusion purpura (PTP), and platelet transfusion refractoriness (PTR). HPA typing and knowledge of antigen frequency in a population are important in particular for the provision of HPA-matched blood components for patients with PTR. We have performed allele genotyping for HPA-1 through -6 and -15 among 998 platelet donors from 6 blood centers in Taiwan using sequence-specific primer polymerase chain reaction. The HPA allele frequency was 99.55, and 0.45% for HPA-1a and -1b; 96.49, and 3.51% for HPA-2a and -2b; 55.81, and 44.19% for HPA-3a and -3b; 99.75, and 0.25% for HPA-4a and -4b; 98.50, and 1.50% for HPA-5a and -5b; 97.75 and 2.25% for HPA-6a and -6b; 53.71 and 46.29% for HPA-15a and -15b. HPA-15b and HPA-3a, may be considered the most important, followed by HPA-2, -6, -1, -5, and -4 systems, as a cause of FNAIT, PTP, and PTR based on allele frequency. HPA-4b and HPA-5b role cannot be excluded based on their immunogenicity. A larger-scale study will now be conducted to confirm these hypotheses and to establish an apheresis donor database for the procurement of HPA-matched apheresis platelets for patients with PTR.

  12. Detection of Turner syndrome using X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Guo, Xiaohong; Tian, Tian; Wang, Teng; Li, Qiaoli; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yun; Xing, Qinghe; He, Lin; Zhao, Xinzhi

    2017-05-01

    Early diagnosis of Turner syndrome (TS) may improve preventive measures and treatment. X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated CpG sites (XIDMSs) that are high methylated in inactive X chromosomes (Xi) and unmethylated in active X chromosomes (Xa) may be potential makers for TS detection. The candidate XIDMSs were screened from 9 male and 12 female DNA samples with normal karyotypes using the Illumina 450k array and validated by bisulfite sequencing PCR and pyrosequencing assay. X chromosome dosage was calculated according to the methylation level of multiple XIDMSs. Overall, 108 candidate XIDMSs were screened by the 450k array. Validations indicated that XIDMSs gathered and formed the X-chromosome inactivation specific differentially methylated regions (XIDMRs). Using 3 XIDMRs at SAT1, UXT and UTP14A loci, 36 TS, 22 normal female and 6 male samples were analyzed. Methylation levels of the 20 XIDMSs in the XIDMRs could distinguish between TS and normal female DNA samples, the X chromosome dosage was consistent with karyotyping data. Analyzing samples of 2 triple X syndrome and 3 Klinefelter syndrome patients suggested that this method could be used to detect X chromosome aneuploids other than TS. XIDMSs are widely spread along the X chromosome and might be effective markers for detection of TS and other X chromosome aneuploids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  14. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger-Lise Mero

    Full Text Available The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS. We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS to search for genetic differences in MS relating to OCB status. GWAS data was compared in 1367 OCB positive and 161 OCB negative Scandinavian MS patients, and nine of the most associated SNPs were genotyped for replication in 3403 Scandinavian MS patients. HLA-DRB1 genotypes were analyzed in a subset of the OCB positive (n = 2781 and OCB negative (n = 292 MS patients and compared to 890 healthy controls. Results from the genome-wide analyses showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from the HLA complex and six other loci were associated to OCB status. In SNPs selected for replication, combined analyses showed genome-wide significant association for two SNPs in the HLA complex; rs3129871 (p = 5.7×10(-15 and rs3817963 (p = 5.7×10(-10 correlating with the HLA-DRB1*15 and the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles, respectively. We also found suggestive association to one SNP in the Calsyntenin-2 gene (p = 8.83×10(-7. In HLA-DRB1 analyses HLA-DRB1*15∶01 was a stronger risk factor for OCB positive than OCB negative MS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04∶04 was associated with increased risk of OCB negative MS and reduced risk of OCB positive MS. Protective effects of HLA-DRB1*01∶01 and HLA-DRB1*07∶01 were detected in both groups. The groups were different with regard to age at onset (AAO, MS outcome measures and gender. This study confirms both shared and distinct genetic risk for MS subtypes in the Scandinavian population defined by OCB status and indicates different clinical characteristics between the groups. This suggests differences in disease mechanisms between OCB negative and OCB positive MS with implications for patient management, which need to be further studied.

  15. Oligoclonal band status in Scandinavian multiple sclerosis patients is associated with specific genetic risk alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mero, Inger-Lise; Gustavsen, Marte W; Sæther, Hanne S; Flåm, Siri T; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Søndergaard, Helle B; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Berge, Tone; Bjølgerud, Anja; Muggerud, Aslaug; Aarseth, Jan H; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Celius, Elisabeth G; Sellebjerg, Finn; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Olsson, Tomas; Oturai, Annette Bang; Kockum, Ingrid; Lie, Benedicte A; Andreassen, Bettina Kulle; Harbo, Hanne F

    2013-01-01

    The presence of oligoclonal bands (OCB) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a typical finding in multiple sclerosis (MS). We applied data from Norwegian, Swedish and Danish (i.e. Scandinavian) MS patients from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to search for genetic differences in MS relating to OCB status. GWAS data was compared in 1367 OCB positive and 161 OCB negative Scandinavian MS patients, and nine of the most associated SNPs were genotyped for replication in 3403 Scandinavian MS patients. HLA-DRB1 genotypes were analyzed in a subset of the OCB positive (n = 2781) and OCB negative (n = 292) MS patients and compared to 890 healthy controls. Results from the genome-wide analyses showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from the HLA complex and six other loci were associated to OCB status. In SNPs selected for replication, combined analyses showed genome-wide significant association for two SNPs in the HLA complex; rs3129871 (p = 5.7×10(-15)) and rs3817963 (p = 5.7×10(-10)) correlating with the HLA-DRB1*15 and the HLA-DRB1*04 alleles, respectively. We also found suggestive association to one SNP in the Calsyntenin-2 gene (p = 8.83×10(-7)). In HLA-DRB1 analyses HLA-DRB1*15∶01 was a stronger risk factor for OCB positive than OCB negative MS, whereas HLA-DRB1*04∶04 was associated with increased risk of OCB negative MS and reduced risk of OCB positive MS. Protective effects of HLA-DRB1*01∶01 and HLA-DRB1*07∶01 were detected in both groups. The groups were different with regard to age at onset (AAO), MS outcome measures and gender. This study confirms both shared and distinct genetic risk for MS subtypes in the Scandinavian population defined by OCB status and indicates different clinical characteristics between the groups. This suggests differences in disease mechanisms between OCB negative and OCB positive MS with implications for patient management, which need to be further studied.

  16. Allele-specific primer polymerase chain reaction for a single nucleotide polymorphism (C1205T) of swine Toll-like receptor 5 and comparison of the allelic frequency among several pig breeds in Japan and the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muneta, Y.; Minagawa, Y.; Kusumoto, M.; Shinkai, H.; Uenishi, H.; Šplíchal, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2012), s. 385-391 ISSN 0385-5600 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/09/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : allele-specific PCR * Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis * single nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.545, year: 2012

  17. Bookmarking by specific and nonspecific binding of FoxA1 pioneer factor to mitotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Donahue, Greg; Becker, Justin S; He, Ximiao; Vinson, Charles; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2013-02-01

    While most transcription factors exit the chromatin during mitosis and the genome becomes silent, a subset of factors remains and "bookmarks" genes for rapid reactivation as cells progress through the cell cycle. However, it is unknown whether such bookmarking factors bind to chromatin similarly in mitosis and how different binding capacities among them relate to function. We compared a diverse set of transcription factors involved in liver differentiation and found markedly different extents of mitotic chromosome binding. Among them, the pioneer factor FoxA1 exhibits the greatest extent of mitotic chromosome binding. Genomically, ~15% of the FoxA1 interphase target sites are bound in mitosis, including at genes that are important for liver differentiation. Biophysical, genome mapping, and mutagenesis studies of FoxA1 reveals two different modes of binding to mitotic chromatin. Specific binding in mitosis occurs at sites that continue to be bound from interphase. Nonspecific binding in mitosis occurs across the chromosome due to the intrinsic chromatin affinity of FoxA1. Both specific and nonspecific binding contribute to timely reactivation of target genes post-mitosis. These studies reveal an unexpected diversity in the mechanisms by which transcription factors help retain cell identity during mitosis.

  18. Specific gene expression profiles and chromosomal abnormalities are associated with infant disseminated neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushner Brian

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroblastoma (NB tumours have the highest incidence of spontaneous remission, especially among the stage 4s NB subgroup affecting infants. Clinical distinction of stage 4s from lethal stage 4 can be difficult, but critical for therapeutic decisions. The aim of this study was to investigate chromosomal alterations and differential gene expression amongst infant disseminated NB subgroups. Methods Thirty-five NB tumours from patients diagnosed at Results All stage 4s patients underwent spontaneous remission, only 48% stage 4 patients survived despite combined modality therapy. Stage 4 tumours were 90% near-diploid/tetraploid, 44% MYCN amplified, 77% had 1p LOH (50% 1p36, 23% 11q and/or 14q LOH (27% and 47% had 17q gain. Stage 4s were 90% near-triploid, none MYCN amplified and LOH was restricted to 11q. Initial comparison analyses between stage 4s and 4 P P = 0.0054, 91% with higher expression in stage 4. Less definite expression profiles were observed between stage 4s and 4 P P = 0.005 was maintained. Distinct gene expression profiles but no significant association with specific chromosomal region localization was observed between stage 4s and stage 4 Conclusion Specific chromosomal aberrations are associated with distinct gene expression profiles which characterize spontaneously regressing or aggressive infant NB, providing the biological basis for the distinct clinical behaviour.

  19. Chromosome-Specific DNA Repeats: Rapid Identification in Silico and Validation Using Fluorescence in Situ Hybridization

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    Heinz-Ulrich G. Weier

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome enumeration in interphase and metaphase cells using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH is an established procedure for the rapid and accurate cytogenetic analysis of cell nuclei and polar bodies, the unambiguous gender determination, as well as the definition of tumor-specific signatures. Present bottlenecks in the procedure are a limited number of commercial, non-isotopically labeled probes that can be combined in multiplex FISH assays and the relatively high price and effort to develop additional probes. We describe a streamlined approach for rapid probe definition, synthesis and validation, which is based on the analysis of publicly available DNA sequence information, also known as “database mining”. Examples of probe preparation for the human gonosomes and chromosome 16 as a selected autosome outline the probe selection strategy, define a timeline for expedited probe production and compare this novel selection strategy to more conventional probe cloning protocols.

  20. Specific cytogenetic labeling of bovine spermatozoa bearing X or Y chromosomes using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribiu Edmond-Paul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract X and Y specific probes were identified in order to apply the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH technique to bovine spermatozoa. For Y chromosome detection, the BRY4a repetitive probe, covering three quarters of the chromosome, was used. For X chromosome detection, a goat Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC specific to the X chromosome of bovine and goats and giving a strong FISH signal was used. Each probe labeled roughly 45% of sperm cells. The hybridization method will be useful for evaluating the ratio of X- and Y- bearing spermatozoa in a sperm sample and consequently can be used to evaluate the efficiency of sperm sorting by different techniques such as flow cytometry.

  1. DEK binding to class II MHC Y-box sequences is gene- and allele-specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Barbara S; Cha, Hyuk C; Cleary, Joanne; Haiying, Tan; Wang, Hongling; Sitwala, Kajal; Markovitz, David M

    2003-01-01

    Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we examined sequence-specific binding of DEK, a potential autoantigen in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, to conserved Y-box regulatory sequences in class II MHC gene promoters. Nuclear extracts from several cell lines of different phenotypes contained sequence-specific binding activity recognizing DRA, DQA1*0101, and DQA1*0501 Y-box sequences. Participation of both DEK and NF-Y in the DQA1 Y-box binding complex was confirmed by 'supershifting' with anti-DEK and anti-NF-Y antibodies. Recombinant DEK also bound specifically to the DQA1*0101 Y box and to the polymorphic DQA1*0501 Y box, but not to the consensus DRA Y box. Measurement of the apparent dissociation constants demonstrated a two- to fivefold difference in DEK binding to the DQA1 Y-box sequence in comparison with other class II MHC Y-box sequences. Residues that are crucial for DEK binding to the DQA1*0101 Y box were identified by DNase I footprinting. The specific characteristics of DEK binding to these related sequences suggests a potential role for DEK in differential regulation of class II MHC expression, and thus in the pathogenesis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:12823858

  2. Directed microspore-specific recombination of transgenic alleles to prevent pollen-mediated transmission of transgenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mlynarova, L.; Conner, A.J.; Nap, J.P.H.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge for future genetically modified (GM) crops is to prevent undesired gene flow of transgenes to plant material intended for another use. Recombinase-mediated auto excision of transgenes directed by a tightly controlled microspore-specific promoter allows efficient removal of either

  3. Cytogenetic studies in 32 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: insights to specific chromosomal abnormalities and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniwaki, M; Horiike, S; Inazawa, J; Nishida, K; Misawa, S; Takino, T; Abe, T

    1987-06-01

    Cytogenetic studies were performed on a group of 32 patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Five patients had refractory anemia (RA), four RA with ring sideroblasts (RARS), nine RA with excess blasts (RAEB), eight RAEB 'in transformation' (RAEB-T), three chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) and three secondary MDS (SMDS). Two patients in the SMDS group had been treated with alkylating agents for lung cancer and polycythemia vera, respectively. The other had been exposed to thorotrast. Chromosome analyses were performed with Q and G bandings on bone marrow cells incubated for 24 hr. A clonal chromosomal abnormality was observed in the marrow cells from 19 of the 32 patients (59%). Chromosomal abnormalities of nos. 5 and/or 7 were found in five patients, and were probably specific for RAEB-T and SMDS. Among the twelve patients with solely abnormal metaphases (AA), eight (67%) progressed to acute leukemia, a higher proportion than the three from the 13 patients (23%) with solely normal metaphases (NN) (P less than 0.05). One of the seven patients (14%) with both normal and abnormal metaphases (AN) developed acute leukemia (AA v. AN, P less than 0.03). In only two of the 12 patients who progressed to acute leukemia (17%), was complete remission achieved. The median survival time was only 4.0 months for patients with karyotype AA compared with 18.0 months for AN and 24.0 months for NN (AA v. AN, P less than 0.05, AA v. NN, P less than 0.05). The absence of cytogenetically normal cells indicated a poor prognosis with frequent progression to acute leukemia which is resistant to chemotherapy. Progression to acute leukemia depended not only on chromosomal abnormalities but also on morphological subtype classified according to French-American-British co-operative group criteria. Morphological findings and karyotype combined gave a good indication of the outcome for patients with MDS.

  4. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8 - associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Des C.; Hewitt, Colin R.A.; L?pez-?lvarez, Mar?a R.; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I.; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R.Z.; Trowsdale, John

    2016-01-01

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the...

  5. [Identification of Panax ginseng, P. notoginseng and P. quinquefolius admixture by multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chao; Luo, Yu-Qing; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Jin, Yan; Zhao, Yu-Yang

    2017-04-01

    To achieve a molecular method to identify Panax ginseng, P. notoginseng,P. quinquefolius and their admixture. The ITS,18S and matK sequences of Panax genus were analyzed to develop species-specific SNP marker. Three pairs of species-specific primers were designed to establish a multiplex allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (MAS-PCR) and the samples from different region were tested. The results showed that when the annealing temperature was 60 ℃ and the cycle number was 35, approximately 250, 500,1 000 bp specific band were obtained from P. ginseng, P. notoginseng and P. quinquefolius obtain, respectively. This method could also be used to authentificate admixture samples and could detect 0.5% percent of P. notoginseng or P. quinquefolius adulterated in P. ginseng, or 0.5% percent of P. ginseng or P. quinquefolius adulterated in P. notoginseng. The detect limit of P. ginseng in P. quinquefolius was 0.5% and P. notoginseng in P. quinquefolius was 1%. This results showed that the present method could be used as a promise method to identify Panax ginseng, P. notoginseng, P. quinquefolius and their admixture. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Binding of doa kinase to specific loci in polytene chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kováčiková, M.; Raška, Ivan; Mateášik, A.; Chase, B. A.; Farkaš, R.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2006), s. 21-27 ISSN 1210-0668 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC535; GA ČR(CZ) GA304/02/0342 Grant - others:VEGA(SK) 2/3025/23; SAV(SK) APVT-51-027402; NSF(US) IBN-97-24006; US-SK(SK) 13/029/01 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : specific protein kinases * DOA * polytene chromosomes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Germplasm Architecture Revealed through Chromosomal Effects for Quantitative Traits in Maize

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    Rex Bernardo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Germplasm architecture refers to how favorable alleles for a given trait are distributed across the genome in a germplasm collection. Our objective was to assess germplasm architecture for quantitative traits among US maize ( L. inbreds. A total of 271 inbreds were genotyped at 28,626 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci and phenotyped for anthesis date, plant height, starch and protein concentration, and resistance to northern corn leaf blight (NCLB, caused by . Chromosomal effects were calculated as the sum of the trait effects of SNP alleles carried on a specific chromosome by an inbred. The chromosomal effects were further decomposed into the mean effects of chromosomes, mean effects of inbreds, and chromosome × inbred effects. On average, none of the 10 maize chromosomes was particularly rich or poor in favorable quantitative trait locus (QTL alleles. However, extreme values of chromosome × inbred effects often involved chromosomes 5 and 8 for anthesis date, chromosomes 1 and 5 for plant height, and chromosome 9 for protein concentration. Inbreds with one or two chromosomes deficient in favorable alleles were candidates for improvement via chromosome-substitution lines. Specific chromosomes for which each of five genetic backgrounds (B73, Mo17, Oh43, A321, and PH207 were rich or poor for unknown favorable alleles were also identified. Chromosomal effects varied widely even when prior association mapping in the same germplasm collection had failed to identify any QTL. Genomewide marker effects, particularly when partitioned into chromosomal effects, provide a simple way to dissect germplasm architecture for quantitative traits.

  8. Rapid identification of capybara (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris through allele-specific PCR

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    Flávio Henrique-Silva

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The capybara is the largest rodent in the world and is widely distributed throughout Central and South America.  It is an animal of economic interest due to the pleasant flavor of its meat and higher protein content in comparison  to beef and pork meat.  The hide, hair and fat also have economic advantages. Thus,  as an animal with such high economic potential, it is the target of hunters, even though  hunting capybara is prohibited by law in Brazil.   Due to their  similarities,  capybara meat  is easily confused with  pork  meat.   This  occurs  upon  the apprehension of the  meat  from hunters, as well as in some restaurants that serve capybara meat that was slaughtered clandestinely. In both cases, when the meat is confiscated, those responsible for the crimes claim it is pork meat,  hindering  the enforcement of the law. A practical  course was ministered  to undergraduate biology students enrolled in the elective course Introduction to Genetic  Engineering  at Federal  University  of Sao Carlos (UFSCar, Sao Paulo  State, Brazil.  The  objective  of the  course was to establish  and  apply  a Polymerase  Chain  Reaction  (PCR assay to identify capybara meat and discriminate it in relation  to other types of meat,  including pork. Primers  were designed based  on 12S rRNA,  transthyretin and  growth  hormone  receptor  genes.  The primers generated  capybara specific fragments  of approximately 220, 290 and 330 bp for transthyretin,12S rRNA  and  growth  hormone  receptor,  respectively.   The  duplexes  developed  in the  present work can be used effectively to discriminate capybara meat  from other  animals,  contributing to combating predatory capybara hunting. The results were extensively discussed and the students have contributed to written a paper  to be submitted to a publication.

  9. Simple and sensitive method for identification of human DNA by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction of FOXP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroshige, Kenichi; Soejima, Mikiko; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kamimura, Shigeo; Koda, Yoshiro

    2009-07-01

    The forkhead box P2 (FOXP2) gene is specifically involved in speech and language development in humans. The sequence is well conserved among many vertebrate species but has accumulated amino acid changes in the human lineage. The aim of this study was to develop a simple method to discriminate between human and nonhuman vertebrate DNA in forensic specimens by amplification of a human-specific genomic region. In the present study, we designed an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers to amplify smaller than 70-bp regions of FOXP2 to identify DNA as being of human or nonhuman, including ape, origin. PCR amplification was also successfully performed using fluorescence-labeled primers, and this method allows a single PCR reaction with a genomic DNA sample as small as 0.01 ng. This system also identified the presence of human DNA in two blood stains stored for 20 and 38 years. The results suggested the potential usefulness of FOXP2 as an identifier of human DNA in forensic samples.

  10. Variants of a Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase with increased selectivity for applications in allele- and methylation-specific amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Drum

    Full Text Available The selectivity of DNA polymerases is crucial for many applications. For example, high discrimination between the extension of matched versus mismatched primer termini is desired for the detection of a single nucleotide variation at a particular locus within the genome. Here we describe the generation of thermostable mutants of the large fragment of Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (KlenTaq with increased mismatch extension selectivity. In contrast to previously reported much less active KlenTaq mutants with mismatch discrimination abilities, many of the herein discovered mutants show conserved wild-type-like high activities. We demonstrate for one mutant containing the single amino acid exchange R660V the suitability for application in allele-specific amplifications directly from whole blood without prior sample purification. Also the suitability of the mutant for methylation specific amplification in the diagnostics of 5-methyl cytosines is demonstrated. Furthermore, the identified mutant supersedes other commercially available enzymes in human leukocyte antigen (HLA analysis by sequence-specific primed polymerase chain reactions (PCRs.

  11. Next Generation Sequencing of Chromosome-Specific Libraries Sheds Light on Genome Evolution in Paleotetraploid Sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreyushkova, Daria A; Makunin, Alexey I; Beklemisheva, Violetta R; Romanenko, Svetlana A; Druzhkova, Anna S; Biltueva, Larisa B; Serdyukova, Natalya A; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2017-11-10

    Several whole genome duplication (WGD) events followed by rediploidization took place in the evolutionary history of vertebrates. Acipenserids represent a convenient model group for investigation of the consequences of WGD as their representatives underwent additional WGD events in different lineages resulting in ploidy level variation between species, and these processes are still ongoing. Earlier, we obtained a set of sterlet (Acipenser ruthenus) chromosome-specific libraries by microdissection and revealed that they painted two or four pairs of whole sterlet chromosomes, as well as additional chromosomal regions, depending on rediploidization status and chromosomal rearrangements after genome duplication. In this study, we employed next generation sequencing to estimate the content of libraries derived from different paralogous chromosomes of sterlet. For this purpose, we aligned the obtained reads to the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus) reference genome to reveal syntenic regions between these two species having diverged 360 Mya. We also showed that the approach is effective for synteny prediction at various evolutionary distances and allows one to clearly distinguish paralogous chromosomes in polyploid genomes. We postulated that after the acipenserid-specific WGD sterlet karyotype underwent multiple interchromosomal rearrangements, but different chromosomes were involved in this process unequally.

  12. Appearance and evolution of the specific chromosomal rearrangements associated with malignant transformation of mouse m5S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, S.; Okumura, Y.; Komatsu, K.; Sasaki, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    Chromosomal alterations were studied during the acquisition of malignant phenotypes in two karyotypically distinct cells isolated from transformed foci induced by x-irradiation in mouse m5S cells. Because the transformants, despite foci origin, showed low ability to grow in agar, they were cultured in vitro with serial transfer schedules to allow further cell generations and assayed for anchorage independence (AI) at each passage level. The AI frequency increased with the cell doubling numbers. Chromosome analysis showed that a focus was one cell origin, but the transformants showed karyotypic instability during cell proliferation, giving rise to the rearrangements clustered in the distal region of the specific chromosomes. These rearrangements appeared to be directed toward the acquisition of malignant phenotypes. Analysis of the types and sites of rearrangements indicated that a mechanism exists that induces frequent rearrangements of the specific region of a chromosome during the process of transformation into the malignant state

  13. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-10-31

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs.

  14. TumorBoost: Normalization of allele-specific tumor copy numbers from a single pair of tumor-normal genotyping microarrays

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    Neuvial Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput genotyping microarrays assess both total DNA copy number and allelic composition, which makes them a tool of choice for copy number studies in cancer, including total copy number and loss of heterozygosity (LOH analyses. Even after state of the art preprocessing methods, allelic signal estimates from genotyping arrays still suffer from systematic effects that make them difficult to use effectively for such downstream analyses. Results We propose a method, TumorBoost, for normalizing allelic estimates of one tumor sample based on estimates from a single matched normal. The method applies to any paired tumor-normal estimates from any microarray-based technology, combined with any preprocessing method. We demonstrate that it increases the signal-to-noise ratio of allelic signals, making it significantly easier to detect allelic imbalances. Conclusions TumorBoost increases the power to detect somatic copy-number events (including copy-neutral LOH in the tumor from allelic signals of Affymetrix or Illumina origin. We also conclude that high-precision allelic estimates can be obtained from a single pair of tumor-normal hybridizations, if TumorBoost is combined with single-array preprocessing methods such as (allele-specific CRMA v2 for Affymetrix or BeadStudio's (proprietary XY-normalization method for Illumina. A bounded-memory implementation is available in the open-source and cross-platform R package aroma.cn, which is part of the Aroma Project (http://www.aroma-project.org/.

  15. Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Louis J; Muhle, Rebecca A; Moura, Pedro A; Ghosh, Pallavi; Hatfull, Graham F; Jacobs, William R; Fidock, David A

    2006-08-01

    Here we report an efficient, site-specific system of genetic integration into Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite chromosomes. This is mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase, which catalyzes recombination between an incoming attP and a chromosomal attB site. We developed P. falciparum lines with the attB site integrated into the glutaredoxin-like cg6 gene. Transfection of these attB(+) lines with a dual-plasmid system, expressing a transgene on an attP-containing plasmid together with a drug resistance gene and the integrase on a separate plasmid, produced recombinant parasites within 2 to 4 weeks that were genetically uniform for single-copy plasmid integration. Integrase-mediated recombination resulted in proper targeting of parasite proteins to intra-erythrocytic compartments, including the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. Recombinant attB x attP parasites were genetically stable in the absence of drug and were phenotypically homogeneous. This system can be exploited for rapid genetic integration and complementation analyses at any stage of the P. falciparum life cycle, and it illustrates the utility of Bxb1-based integrative recombination for genetic studies of intracellular eukaryotic organisms.

  16. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and the identification of commonly expressed haplotypes using sequence specific low- and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Jungersen, Gregers

    The genomic region (SLA) of the swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which bind and present endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system, is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many of which encode a distinct MHC class I molecule. Each SLA...... expressed SLA class I alleles in Danish outbred swine. A total of 108 animals from eight different production herds were tested, and with low resolution sequence specific primer (SSP)-PCR typing the top five most commonly expressed SLA class I allele groups were found to be SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-1...... molecule is only able to bind a restricted number of peptides with specific biochemical characteristics matching important anchor positions in the peptide binding groove. Although the diversity of T cells is vast, the individual MHC make-up thus limits the range of potential T cell epitopes for any given...

  17. Endochondral ossification pathway genes and postmenopausal osteoporosis: Association and specific allele related serum bone sialoprotein levels in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunzhi; Liu, Haiyan; Zhang, Chen; Zhang, Tianxiao; Zhang, Bo; Li, Lu; Chen, Gang; Fu, Dongke; Wang, KunZheng

    2015-11-16

    Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disorder characterized by reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and disrupted bone architecture, predisposing the patient to increased fracture risk. Evidence from early genetic epidemiological studies has indicated a major role for genetics in the development of osteoporosis and the variation in BMD. In this study, we focused on two key genes in the endochondral ossification pathway, IBSP and PTHLH. Over 9,000 postmenopausal Han Chinese women were recruited, and 54 SNPs were genotyped. Two significant SNPs within IBSP, rs1054627 and rs17013181, were associated with BMD and postmenopausal osteoporosis by the two-stage strategy, and rs17013181 was also significantly associated with serum IBSP levels. Moreover, one haplotype (rs12425376-rs10843047-rs42294) covering the 5' end of PTHLH was associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our results provide evidence for the association of these two key endochondral ossification pathway genes with BMD and osteoporosis in postmenopausal Han Chinese women. Combined with previous findings, we provide evidence that a particular SNP in IBSP has an allele-specific effect on mRNA levels, which would, in turn, reflect serum IBSP levels.

  18. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  19. DETECTION OF SPECIFIC CHROMOSOMAL REARRANGEMENT IN LEUKEMIA PATIENTS BY mDx HEMAVISION KIT

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    Tadej Pajič

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The mDx HemaVision kit is a qualitative multiplex and nested Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR test designed to detect 28 different translocations or chromosomal rearrangement, found to be specific for particular subtypes of leukemia. The presence or absence of the specific mRNA transcripts or cDNA segments after the reverse transcription of the fusion or abnormal genes, appeared after chromosomal rearrangements, could be determined by the kit.Patients and methods. The usefulness of the kit was tested on the 26 RNA samples of patients with acute leukemia and seven patients with chronic mieloproliferative diseases and by comparison of the results between mDx HemaVision kit and standardized RT-PCR protocol for the specific mRNA transcripts of the t(9;22(q34;q11, t(8;21(q22;q22, t(15;17(q21;q21 and t(4;11(q21;q23. The RNA samples were isolated from mononuclear cells of the bone marrow after Ficoll-Paque density gradient centrifugation and with a High Pure RNA isolation kit. The cDNA synthesis and Polymerase Chain Reaction were performed as described in mDx HemaVisoin’s or standardized RT-PCR’s protocols. The PCR products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, by staining with etidium bromide and by visualization under UV light.Results. We obtained 100% concordance of the results by both methods. Specific BCR-ABL mRNA transcripts were found in four chronic myeloid leukemia patients, one in B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL and one with bifenotipic leukemia (BAL patient. AML1-ETO mRNA transcript of the t(8;21(q22;q22 was identified in two patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The CBF β /MYH11 mRNA transcript specific for inv16(p13;q22 was obtained in AML patient with abnormal eozinofiles in bone marrow. MLL/AF4 mRNA transcript of the t(4;11(q21;q23 was found in the girl with B-ALL and in patient with B-ALL after treatment. In patients with B-ALL we found MLL/AF10 cDNA segment specific for t(10

  20. Allele-specific gene expression patterns in primary leukemic cells reveal regulation of gene expression by CpG site methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milani, Lili; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    To identify genes that are regulated by cis-acting functional elements in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we determined the allele-specific expression (ASE) levels of 2, 529 genes by genotyping a genome-wide panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms in RNA and DNA from bone marrow and blood...

  1. Development of Allele-Specific Primer PCR for a Swine TLR2 SNP and Comparison of the Frequency among Several Pig Breeds of Japan and the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muneta, Y.; Minagawa, Y.; Kusumoto, M.; Shinkai, H.; Uenishi, H.; Šplíchal, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 5 (2012), s. 553-559 ISSN 0916-7250 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/09/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : allele-specific PCR * Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae * single nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 0.876, year: 2012

  2. Species-Specific Chromosome Engineering Greatly Improves Fully Human Polyclonal Antibody Production Profile in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Hiroaki; Sano, Akiko; Wu, Hua; Wang, Zhongde; Jiao, Jin-An; Kasinathan, Poothappillai; Sullivan, Eddie J; Kuroiwa, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale production of fully human IgG (hIgG) or human polyclonal antibodies (hpAbs) by transgenic animals could be useful for human therapy. However, production level of hpAbs in transgenic animals is generally very low, probably due to the fact that evolutionarily unique interspecies-incompatible genomic sequences between human and non-human host species may impede high production of fully hIgG in the non-human environment. To address this issue, we performed species-specific human artificial chromosome (HAC) engineering and tested these engineered HAC in cattle. Our previous study has demonstrated that site-specific genomic chimerization of pre-B cell receptor/B cell receptor (pre-BCR/BCR) components on HAC vectors significantly improves human IgG expression in cattle where the endogenous bovine immunoglobulin genes were knocked out. In this report, hIgG1 class switch regulatory elements were subjected to site-specific genomic chimerization on HAC vectors to further enhance hIgG expression and improve hIgG subclass distribution in cattle. These species-specific modifications in a chromosome scale resulted in much higher production levels of fully hIgG of up to 15 g/L in sera or plasma, the highest ever reported for a transgenic animal system. Transchromosomic (Tc) cattle containing engineered HAC vectors generated hpAbs with high titers against human-origin antigens following immunization. This study clearly demonstrates that species-specific sequence differences in pre-BCR/BCR components and IgG1 class switch regulatory elements between human and bovine are indeed functionally distinct across the two species, and therefore, are responsible for low production of fully hIgG in our early versions of Tc cattle. The high production levels of fully hIgG with hIgG1 subclass dominancy in a large farm animal species achieved here is an important milestone towards broad therapeutic applications of hpAbs.

  3. Inter- and intra-individual variation in allele-specific DNA methylation and gene expression in children conceived using assisted reproductive technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Turan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have reported a higher incidence of rare disorders involving imprinted genes among children conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART, suggesting that ART procedures may be disruptive to imprinted gene methylation patterns. We examined intra- and inter-individual variation in DNA methylation at the differentially methylated regions (DMRs of the IGF2/H19 and IGF2R loci in a population of children conceived in vitro or in vivo. We found substantial variation in allele-specific methylation at both loci in both groups. Aberrant methylation of the maternal IGF2/H19 DMR was more common in the in vitro group, and the overall variance was also significantly greater in the in vitro group. We estimated the number of trophoblast stem cells in each group based on approximation of the variance of the binomial distribution of IGF2/H19 methylation ratios, as well as the distribution of X chromosome inactivation scores in placenta. Both of these independent measures indicated that placentas of the in vitro group were derived from fewer stem cells than the in vivo conceived group. Both IGF2 and H19 mRNAs were significantly lower in placenta from the in vitro group. Although average birth weight was lower in the in vitro group, we found no correlation between birth weight and IGF2 or IGF2R transcript levels or the ratio of IGF2/IGF2R transcript levels. Our results show that in vitro conception is associated with aberrant methylation patterns at the IGF2/H19 locus. However, very little of the inter- or intra-individual variation in H19 or IGF2 mRNA levels can be explained by differences in maternal DMR DNA methylation, in contrast to the expectations of current transcriptional imprinting models. Extraembryonic tissues of embryos cultured in vitro appear to be derived from fewer trophoblast stem cells. It is possible that this developmental difference has an effect on placental and fetal growth.

  4. Bamgineer: Introduction of simulated allele-specific copy number variants into exome and targeted sequence data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadian, Soroush; Bruce, Jeff P; Pugh, Trevor J

    2018-03-01

    Somatic copy number variations (CNVs) play a crucial role in development of many human cancers. The broad availability of next-generation sequencing data has enabled the development of algorithms to computationally infer CNV profiles from a variety of data types including exome and targeted sequence data; currently the most prevalent types of cancer genomics data. However, systemic evaluation and comparison of these tools remains challenging due to a lack of ground truth reference sets. To address this need, we have developed Bamgineer, a tool written in Python to introduce user-defined haplotype-phased allele-specific copy number events into an existing Binary Alignment Mapping (BAM) file, with a focus on targeted and exome sequencing experiments. As input, this tool requires a read alignment file (BAM format), lists of non-overlapping genome coordinates for introduction of gains and losses (bed file), and an optional file defining known haplotypes (vcf format). To improve runtime performance, Bamgineer introduces the desired CNVs in parallel using queuing and parallel processing on a local machine or on a high-performance computing cluster. As proof-of-principle, we applied Bamgineer to a single high-coverage (mean: 220X) exome sequence file from a blood sample to simulate copy number profiles of 3 exemplar tumors from each of 10 tumor types at 5 tumor cellularity levels (20-100%, 150 BAM files in total). To demonstrate feasibility beyond exome data, we introduced read alignments to a targeted 5-gene cell-free DNA sequencing library to simulate EGFR amplifications at frequencies consistent with circulating tumor DNA (10, 1, 0.1 and 0.01%) while retaining the multimodal insert size distribution of the original data. We expect Bamgineer to be of use for development and systematic benchmarking of CNV calling algorithms by users using locally-generated data for a variety of applications. The source code is freely available at http://github.com/pughlab/bamgineer.

  5. Simultaneous detection of major drug resistance mutations in the protease and reverse transcriptase genes for HIV-1 subtype C by use of a multiplex allele-specific assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqing; Cai, Fangping; Zhou, Zhiyong; DeVos, Joshua; Wagar, Nick; Diallo, Karidia; Zulu, Isaac; Wadonda-Kabondo, Nellie; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Weidle, Paul J; Ndongmo, Clement B; Sikazwe, Izukanji; Sarr, Abdoulaye; Kagoli, Matthew; Nkengasong, John; Gao, Feng; Yang, Chunfu

    2013-11-01

    High-throughput, sensitive, and cost-effective HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) detection assays are needed for large-scale monitoring of the emergence and transmission of HIVDR in resource-limited settings. Using suspension array technology, we have developed a multiplex allele-specific (MAS) assay that can simultaneously detect major HIVDR mutations at 20 loci. Forty-five allele-specific primers tagged with unique 24-base oligonucleotides at the 5' end were designed to detect wild-type and mutant alleles at the 20 loci of HIV-1 subtype C. The MAS assay was first established and optimized with three plasmid templates (C-wt, C-mut1, and C-mut2) and then evaluated using 148 plasma specimens from HIV-1 subtype C-infected individuals. All the wild-type and mutant alleles were unequivocally distinguished with plasmid templates, and the limits of detection were 1.56% for K219Q and K219E, 3.13% for L76V, 6.25% for K65R, K70R, L74V, L100I, K103N, K103R, Q151M, Y181C, and I47V, and 12.5% for M41L, K101P, K101E, V106A, V106M, Y115F, M184V, Y188L, G190A, V32I, I47A, I84V, and L90M. Analyses of 148 plasma specimens revealed that the MAS assay gave 100% concordance with conventional sequencing at eight loci and >95% (range, 95.21% to 99.32%) concordance at the remaining 12 loci. The differences observed were caused mainly by 24 additional low-abundance alleles detected by the MAS assay. Ultradeep sequencing analysis confirmed 15 of the 16 low-abundance alleles. This multiplex, sensitive, and straightforward result-reporting assay represents a new efficient genotyping tool for HIVDR surveillance and monitoring.

  6. WASP: a Web-based Allele-Specific PCR assay designing tool for detecting SNPs and mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assawamakin Anunchai

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele-specific (AS Polymerase Chain Reaction is a convenient and inexpensive method for genotyping Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs and mutations. It is applied in many recent studies including population genetics, molecular genetics and pharmacogenomics. Using known AS primer design tools to create primers leads to cumbersome process to inexperience users since information about SNP/mutation must be acquired from public databases prior to the design. Furthermore, most of these tools do not offer the mismatch enhancement to designed primers. The available web applications do not provide user-friendly graphical input interface and intuitive visualization of their primer results. Results This work presents a web-based AS primer design application called WASP. This tool can efficiently design AS primers for human SNPs as well as mutations. To assist scientists with collecting necessary information about target polymorphisms, this tool provides a local SNP database containing over 10 million SNPs of various populations from public domain databases, namely NCBI dbSNP, HapMap and JSNP respectively. This database is tightly integrated with the tool so that users can perform the design for existing SNPs without going off the site. To guarantee specificity of AS primers, the proposed system incorporates a primer specificity enhancement technique widely used in experiment protocol. In particular, WASP makes use of different destabilizing effects by introducing one deliberate 'mismatch' at the penultimate (second to last of the 3'-end base of AS primers to improve the resulting AS primers. Furthermore, WASP offers graphical user interface through scalable vector graphic (SVG draw that allow users to select SNPs and graphically visualize designed primers and their conditions. Conclusion WASP offers a tool for designing AS primers for both SNPs and mutations. By integrating the database for known SNPs (using gene ID or rs number

  7. siRNA-mediated Allele-specific Silencing of a COL6A3 Mutation in a Cellular Model of Dominant Ullrich Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Bolduc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy type Ullrich (UCMD is a severe disorder of early childhood onset for which currently there is no effective treatment. UCMD commonly is caused by dominant-negative mutations in the genes coding for collagen type VI, a major microfibrillar component of the extracellular matrix surrounding the muscle fibers. To explore RNA interference (RNAi as a potential therapy for UCMD, we designed a series of small interfering RNA (siRNA oligos that specifically target the most common mutations resulting in skipping of exon 16 in the COL6A3 gene and tested them in UCMD-derived dermal fibroblasts. Transcript analysis by semiquantitative and quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that two of these siRNAs were the most allele-specific, i.e., they efficiently knocked down the expression from the mutant allele, without affecting the normal allele. In HEK293T cells, these siRNAs selectively suppressed protein expression from a reporter construct carrying the mutation, with no or minimal suppression of the wild-type (WT construct, suggesting that collagen VI protein levels are as also reduced in an allele-specific manner. Furthermore, we found that treating UCMD fibroblasts with these siRNAs considerably improved the quantity and quality of the collagen VI matrix, as assessed by confocal microscopy. Our current study establishes RNAi as a promising molecular approach for treating dominant COL6-related dystrophies.

  8. Nonfluorescent denaturing HPLC-based primer-extension method for allele-specific expression: application to analysis of mismatch repair genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Gitana M; De Lellis, Laura; Catalano, Teresa; Veschi, Serena; Radice, Paolo; Di Iorio, Angelo; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Cama, Alessandro; Curia, Maria Cristina

    2009-09-01

    Altered germline expression of genes may represent a powerful marker of genetic or epigenetic predisposition to cancer or other diseases. We developed and validated a method of nonfluorescent primer extension that uses a single dideoxynucleotide and denaturing HPLC (DHPLC) to analyze the relative allele expression. We devised 5 independent assays for measuring allele-specific expression (ASE) to exploit different markers of mismatch repair genes MLH1 [mutL homolog 1, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 2 (E. coli)] and MSH2 [mutS homolog 2, colon cancer, nonpolyposis type 1 (E. coli)]. We initially confirmed method reproducibility with genomic DNA (gDNA) from individuals heterozygous for a frequent single-nucleotide polymorphism in the MLH1 gene. After this preliminary validation with gDNA, we confirmed assay reproducibility with cDNA templates from control individuals. Relative allele expression was estimated by comparing the heights of the peaks corresponding to the 2 alleles. Results obtained with gDNA templates were used to normalize cDNA results. With these DHPLC-based primer-extension assays, we detected and confirmed a 5-fold imbalance in MLH1 allele expression in a mutation-negative patient with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and in another patient with a modest degree of imbalance in MLH1 expression. Among control individuals, the relative expression of MLH1 alleles displayed a narrow range of variation. Independent DHPLC-based primer-extension assays for measuring and confirming ASE can be developed for different sequence variants of interest. This DHPLC application provides a cost-effective method for detecting ASE in cases for which conventional screening fails to detect pathogenic mutations in candidate genes and may be applicable for confirming ASE revealed by other methods, such as those used for transcriptome-wide analyses. .

  9. An HLA-B7-specific antibody in an HLA-B*07 positive patient explained by a nonexpressed allele (HLA-B*07:181N).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenda, S; Faé, I; Fischer, G F

    2017-07-01

    Antibody identification by a bead array assay in a kidney patient revealed several HLA-specific antibodies including one directed against the HLA-B7 antigen. Low-resolution typing of the patient indicated the presence of an HLA-B*07 allele. To rule out an HLA-specific autoantibody the HLA-typing of the patient was further refined by nucleotide sequencing on a next-generation sequencing platform and eventually showed an HLA-B*39:01:01:03 and HLA-B*07:181N genotype. Thereby the allospecific nature of the antibody was proven. The HLA-B7-specific antibody could be explained by an immunization during the first kidney-transplantation in 1996 with an HLA-B*07 positive donor. When assessing the plausibility of antibodies, the presence of nonexpressed alleles should be taken into consideration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach for fetal trisomy 21 detection using an autosomal genetic reference marker.

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    Yu K Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The putative promoter of the holocarboxylase synthetase (HLCS gene on chromosome 21 is hypermethylated in placental tissues and could be detected as a fetal-specific DNA marker in maternal plasma. Detection of fetal trisomy 21 (T21 has been demonstrated by an epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach where the amount of hypermethylated HLCS in maternal plasma is normalized using a fetal genetic marker on the Y chromosome as a chromosome dosage reference marker. We explore if this method can be applied on both male and female fetuses with the use of a paternally-inherited fetal single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP allele on a reference chromosome for chromosome dosage normalization. METHODOLOGY: We quantified hypermethylated HLCS molecules using methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease digestion followed by real-time or digital PCR analyses. For chromosome dosage analysis, we compared the amount of digestion-resistant HLCS to that of a SNP allele (rs6636, a C/G SNP that the fetus has inherited from the father but absent in the pregnant mother. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a fetal-specific SNP allele on a reference chromosome, we analyzed 20 euploid and nine T21 placental tissue samples. All samples with the fetal-specific C allele were correctly classified. One sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were misclassified when the fetal-specific G allele was used as the reference marker. We then analyzed 33 euploid and 14 T21 maternal plasma samples. All but one sample from each of the euploid and T21 groups were correctly classified using the fetal-specific C allele, while correct classification was achieved for all samples using the fetal-specific G allele as the reference marker. CONCLUSIONS: As a proof-of-concept study, we have demonstrated that the epigenetic-genetic chromosome dosage approach can be applied to the prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21 for both male and female fetuses.

  11. Development of a Set of Chromosome-Specific Cytogenetic DNA Markers in Sunflower Using BAC-FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    In diploid sunflower (2n=34), conventional karyotypes and various genetic linkage maps have been established. However, the relationship between genetic linkage groups and individual chromosomes of sunflower remains unknown. Recently, a set of linkage group-specific BAC and BIBAC clones were identifi...

  12. Genome-wide association study of subtype-specific epithelial ovarian cancer risk alleles using pooled DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Madalene A; Kelemen, Linda E; Magliocco, Anthony M; Swenerton, Kenneth D; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Lu, Yi; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Fasching, Peter A; Lambrechts, Diether; Despierre, Evelyn; Vergote, Ignace; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Doherty, Jennifer A; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Friel, Grace; Moysich, Kirsten B; Odunsi, Kunle; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Lurie, Galina; Goodman, Marc T; Carney, Michael E; Thompson, Pamela J; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Dürst, Matthias; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pelttari, Liisa M; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Modugno, Francesmary; Edwards, Robert P; Ness, Roberta B; du Bois, Andreas; Heitz, Florian; Schwaab, Ira; Harter, Philipp; Karlan, Beth Y; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Jensen, Allan; Kjær, Susanne K; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Lundvall, Lene; Sellers, Thomas A; Fridley, Brooke L; Goode, Ellen L; Cunningham, Julie M; Vierkant, Robert A; Giles, Graham G; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; Southey, Melissa C; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Levine, Douglas A; Bisogna, Maria; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Iversen, Edwin S; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Berchuck, Andrew; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Orlow, Irene; Olson, Sara H; Wik, Elisabeth; Salvesen, Helga B; Bjorge, Line; Halle, Mari K; van Altena, Anne M; Aben, Katja K H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Massuger, Leon F A G; Pejovic, Tanja; Bean, Yukie T; Cybulski, Cezary; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Brinton, Louise A; Lissowska, Jolanta; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Dicks, Ed; Dennis, Joe; Easton, Douglas F; Song, Honglin; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eccles, Diana; Campbell, Ian G; Whittemore, Alice S; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph H; Flanagan, James M; Paul, James; Brown, Robert; Phelan, Catherine M; Risch, Harvey A; McLaughlin, John R; Narod, Steven A; Ziogas, Argyrios; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm C; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Szafron, Lukasz M; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Cook, Linda S; Le, Nhu D; Brooks-Wilson, Angela

    2014-05-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is a heterogeneous cancer with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Variants influencing the risk of developing the less-common EOC subtypes have not been fully investigated. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of EOC according to subtype by pooling genomic DNA from 545 cases and 398 controls of European descent, and testing for allelic associations. We evaluated for replication 188 variants from the GWAS [56 variants for mucinous, 55 for endometrioid and clear cell, 53 for low-malignant potential (LMP) serous, and 24 for invasive serous EOC], selected using pre-defined criteria. Genotypes from 13,188 cases and 23,164 controls of European descent were used to perform unconditional logistic regression under the log-additive genetic model; odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals are reported. Nine variants tagging six loci were associated with subtype-specific EOC risk at P < 0.05, and had an OR that agreed in direction of effect with the GWAS results. Several of these variants are in or near genes with a biological rationale for conferring EOC risk, including ZFP36L1 and RAD51B for mucinous EOC (rs17106154, OR = 1.17, P = 0.029, n = 1,483 cases), GRB10 for endometrioid and clear cell EOC (rs2190503, P = 0.014, n = 2,903 cases), and C22orf26/BPIL2 for LMP serous EOC (rs9609538, OR = 0.86, P = 0.0043, n = 892 cases). In analyses that included the 75 GWAS samples, the association between rs9609538 (OR = 0.84, P = 0.0007) and LMP serous EOC risk remained statistically significant at P < 0.0012 adjusted for multiple testing. Replication in additional samples will be important to verify these results for the less-common EOC subtypes.

  13. Divergence of gene regulation through chromosomal rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messing Joachim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The molecular mechanisms that modify genome structures to give birth and death to alleles are still not well understood. To investigate the causative chromosomal rearrangements, we took advantage of the allelic diversity of the duplicated p1 and p2 genes in maize. Both genes encode a transcription factor involved in maysin synthesis, which confers resistance to corn earworm. However, p1 also controls accumulation of reddish pigments in floral tissues and has therefore acquired a new function after gene duplication. p1 alleles vary in their tissue-specific expression, which is indicated in their allele designation: the first suffix refers to red or white pericarp pigmentation and the second to red or white glume pigmentation. Results Comparing chromosomal regions comprising p1-ww[4Co63], P1-rw1077 and P1-rr4B2 alleles with that of the reference genome, P1-wr[B73], enabled us to reconstruct additive events of transposition, chromosome breaks and repairs, and recombination that resulted in phenotypic variation and chimeric regulatory signals. The p1-ww[4Co63] null allele is probably derived from P1-wr[B73] by unequal crossover between large flanking sequences. A transposon insertion in a P1-wr-like allele and NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining could have resulted in the formation of the P1-rw1077 allele. A second NHEJ event, followed by unequal crossover, probably led to the duplication of an enhancer region, creating the P1-rr4B2 allele. Moreover, a rather dynamic picture emerged in the use of polyadenylation signals by different p1 alleles. Interestingly, p1 alleles can be placed on both sides of a large retrotransposon cluster through recombination, while functional p2 alleles have only been found proximal to the cluster. Conclusions Allelic diversity of the p locus exemplifies how gene duplications promote phenotypic variability through composite regulatory signals. Transposition events increase the level of genomic complexity

  14. Long-range chromosome organization in E. coli: a site-specific system isolates the Ter macrodomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Axel; Valens, Michèle; Vallet-Gely, Isabelle; Espéli, Olivier; Boccard, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The organization of the Escherichia coli chromosome into a ring composed of four macrodomains and two less-structured regions influences the segregation of sister chromatids and the mobility of chromosomal DNA. The structuring of the terminus region (Ter) into a macrodomain relies on the interaction of the protein MatP with a 13-bp target called matS repeated 23 times in the 800-kb-long domain. Here, by using a new method that allows the transposition of any chromosomal segment at a defined position on the genetic map, we reveal a site-specific system that restricts to the Ter region a constraining process that reduces DNA mobility and delays loci segregation. Remarkably, the constraining process is regulated during the cell cycle and occurs only when the Ter MD is associated with the division machinery at mid-cell. The change of DNA properties does not rely on the presence of a trans-acting mechanism but rather involves a cis-effect acting at a long distance from the Ter region. Two specific 12-bp sequences located in the flanking Left and Right macrodomains and a newly identified protein designated YfbV conserved with MatP through evolution are required to impede the spreading of the constraining process to the rest of the chromosome. Our results unravel a site-specific system required to restrict to the Ter region the consequences of anchoring the Ter MD to the division machinery.

  15. Saitohin, which is nested within the tau gene, interacts with tau and Abl and its human-specific allele influences Abl phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Gao, Lei; Conrad, Christopher G.; Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Saitohin (STH) is a gene unique to humans and their closest relatives whose function is not yet known. STH contains a single polymorphism (Q7R); the Q allele is human-specific and confers susceptibility to several neurodegenerative diseases. In previous work, we discovered that STH interacts with Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), a unique member of that family which is bifunctional and whose levels increase in Pick’s disease. In this study, we report that STH also interacts with tau and the non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl (Abl). Furthermore, Abl phosphorylates STH on its single tyrosine residue and STH increases tyrosine phosphorylation by Abl. The effect of Saitohin on Abl-mediated phosphorylation appears to be allele-specific, providing evidence for a new cellular function for STH. PMID:21769920

  16. Detection of „Hotspot Mutations in Catalytic Subunit of Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (Pik3ca by Allele-Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mendelova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3Ks are a family of proteins involved in the regulation of cell survival, growth, metabolism, and glucose homeostasis. Increased PI3K activity is associated with many cancers. PIK3CA gene (encoding p110 , the catalytic subunit of PI3K is commonly mutated in breast cancer. In our study we focused on the detection of “hotspot” mutations in exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene in paraffin-embedded tissue of patients with breast cancer. We optimized conditions of allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR and we used direct sequencing to verify our results. Overall, three “hotspot” mutations in PIK3CA gene in paraffin-embadded tissue from breast cancer were detected by allele-specific PCR. All results were verified by direct sequencing of PCR products and we observed 100% agreement between those two methods. We confirmed that allele-specific PCR assay is low cost method usefull for accurate detection of PIK3CA mutations.

  17. Systematic evaluation of the impact of ChIP-seq read designs on genome coverage, peak identification, and allele-specific binding detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Xin; Younkin, Sam; Kawli, Trupti; Snyder, Michael P; Keleş, Sündüz

    2016-02-24

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments revolutionized genome-wide profiling of transcription factors and histone modifications. Although maturing sequencing technologies allow these experiments to be carried out with short (36-50 bps), long (75-100 bps), single-end, or paired-end reads, the impact of these read parameters on the downstream data analysis are not well understood. In this paper, we evaluate the effects of different read parameters on genome sequence alignment, coverage of different classes of genomic features, peak identification, and allele-specific binding detection. We generated 101 bps paired-end ChIP-seq data for many transcription factors from human GM12878 and MCF7 cell lines. Systematic evaluations using in silico variations of these data as well as fully simulated data, revealed complex interplay between the sequencing parameters and analysis tools, and indicated clear advantages of paired-end designs in several aspects such as alignment accuracy, peak resolution, and most notably, allele-specific binding detection. Our work elucidates the effect of design on the downstream analysis and provides insights to investigators in deciding sequencing parameters in ChIP-seq experiments. We present the first systematic evaluation of the impact of ChIP-seq designs on allele-specific binding detection and highlights the power of pair-end designs in such studies.

  18. Characterization of the peptide binding specificity of the HLA class I alleles B*38:01 and B*39:06.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidney, John; Schloss, Jennifer; Moore, Carrie; Lindvall, Mikaela; Wriston, Amanda; Hunt, Donald F; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; DiLorenzo, Teresa P; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    B*38:01 and B*39:06 are present with phenotypic frequencies 39:06 is the B allele most associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility and 38:01 is most protective. A previous study derived putative main anchor motifs for both alleles based on peptide elution data. The present study has utilized panels of single amino acid substitution peptide libraries to derive detailed quantitative motifs accounting for both primary and secondary influences on peptide binding. From these analyses, both alleles were confirmed to utilize the canonical position 2/C-terminus main anchor spacing. B*38:01 preferentially bound peptides with the positively charged or polar residues H, R, and Q in position 2 and the large hydrophobic residues I, F, L, W, and M at the C-terminus. B*39:06 had a similar preference for R in position 2, but also well-tolerated M, Q, and K. A more dramatic contrast between the two alleles was noted at the C-terminus, where the specificity of B*39:06 was clearly for small residues, with A as most preferred, followed by G, V, S, T, and I. Detailed position-by-position and residue-by-residue coefficient values were generated from the panels to provide detailed quantitative B*38:01 and B*39:06 motifs. It is hoped that these detailed motifs will facilitate the identification of T cell epitopes recognized in the context of two class I alleles associated with dramatically different dispositions towards type 1 diabetes, offering potential avenues for the investigation of the role of CD8 T cells in this disease.

  19. Tumor-specific chromosome mis-segregation controls cancer plasticity by maintaining tumor heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjie Hu

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy with chromosome instability is a cancer hallmark. We studied chromosome 7 (Chr7 copy number variation (CNV in gliomas and in primary cultures derived from them. We found tumor heterogeneity with cells having Chr7-CNV commonly occurs in gliomas, with a higher percentage of cells in high-grade gliomas carrying more than 2 copies of Chr7, as compared to low-grade gliomas. Interestingly, all Chr7-aneuploid cell types in the parental culture of established glioma cell lines reappeared in single-cell-derived subcultures. We then characterized the biology of three syngeneic glioma cultures dominated by different Chr7-aneuploid cell types. We found phenotypic divergence for cells following Chr7 mis-segregation, which benefited overall tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Mathematical modeling suggested the involvement of chromosome instability and interactions among cell subpopulations in restoring the optimal equilibrium of tumor cell types. Both our experimental data and mathematical modeling demonstrated that the complexity of tumor heterogeneity could be enhanced by the existence of chromosomes with structural abnormality, in addition to their mis-segregations. Overall, our findings show, for the first time, the involvement of chromosome instability in maintaining tumor heterogeneity, which underlies the enhanced growth, persistence and treatment resistance of cancers.

  20. Effect of metallothionein 2A gene polymorphism on allele-specific gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Chwatko, Grażyna [Department of Environmental Chemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 163, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Jóźwiak, Paweł; Szymczyk, Agnieszka [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Wilkosz, Jacek; Różański, Waldemar [2nd Department of Urology, Medical University of Łódź, Pabianicka 62, 93-513 Łódź (Poland); Bryś, Magdalena, E-mail: zreg@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 141/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are highly conserved, small molecular weight, cysteine rich proteins. The major physiological functions of metallothioneins include homeostasis of essential metals Zn and Cu and protection against cytotoxicity of heavy metals. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between the − 5 A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs28366003) in core promoter region and expression of metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene and metal concentration in prostate cancer tissues. MT2A polymorphism was determined by the polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism technique (PCR–RFLP) using 412 prostate cancer tissue samples. MT2A gene expression analysis was performed by real-time RT-PCR method. A significant association between rs28366003 genotype and MT2A expression level was found. The average mRNA level was found to be lower among minor allele carriers (the risk allele) than average expression among homozygotes for the major allele. Metal levels were analyzed by flamed atomic absorption spectrometer system. Highly statistically significant associations were detected between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels. The results of Spearman's rank correlation showed that the expressions of MT2A and Cu, Pb and Ni concentrations were negatively correlated. On the basis of the results obtained in this study, we suggest that SNP polymorphism may affect the MT2A gene expression in prostate and this is associated with some metal accumulation. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in prostate cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn, Cu and Pb levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cu, Pb and Ni levels.

  1. Cardiac troponin T mutations result in allele-specific phenotypes in a mouse model for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Tardiff, Jil C.; Hewett, Timothy E.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Olsson, Charlotte; Factor, Stephen M.; Moore, Russell L.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    1999-01-01

    Multiple mutations in cardiac troponin T (cTnT) can cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). Patients with cTnT mutations generally exhibit mild or no ventricular hypertrophy, yet demonstrate a high frequency of early sudden death. To understand the functional basis of these phenotypes, we created transgenic mouse lines expressing 30%, 67%, and 92% of their total cTnT as a missense (R92Q) allele analogous to one found in FHC. Similar to a mouse FHC model expressing a truncated cTnT p...

  2. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    Full Text Available The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure.To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study.Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil.Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test.Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of

  3. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Alexandra; Hildur, Kristin; Barberà, Joan Albert; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Monyarch, Gemma; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Emma; de Castro Reis, Fernanda; Souto, Ana; Gómez, Federico P; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Templado, Cristina; Fuster, Carme

    2016-01-01

    The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31) were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure. To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study. Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill. Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages. Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil. Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length) were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test. Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of 251

  4. Integration of hepatitis B virus DNA in chromosome-specific satellite sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaul, Y.; Garcia, P.D.; Schonberg, S.; Rutter, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    The authors previously reported the cloning and detailed analysis of the integrated hepatitis B virus sequences in a human hepatoma cell line. They report here the integration of at least one of hepatitis B virus at human satellite DNA sequences. The majority of the cellular sequences identified by this satellite were organized as a multimeric composition of a 0.6-kilobase EcoRI fragment. This clone hybridized in situ almost exclusively to the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosomes 1 and 16 and to a lower extent to chromosome 2 and to the heterochromatic region of the Y chromosome. The immediate flanking host sequence appeared as a hierarchy of repeating units which were almost identical to a previously reported human satellite III DNA sequence

  5. The development of 7E chromosome-specific molecular markers for Thinopyrum elongatum based on SLAF-seq technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqiang Chen

    Full Text Available Thinopyrum elongatum is an important relative of wheat, it is favored by many researchers for the disease resistant genes that exist in its E genome. Some studies have showed that the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum contains resistance genes related to Fusarium head blight and wheat rust. Therefore, developing 7E chromosome-specific molecular markers linked to resistance genes will provide an important tool for exploring and using the resistant genes of Th. elongatum. In addition, it would greatly contribute in the effort to cultivate disease-resistant wheat varieties. Featured in high throughput, high-accuracy and low-cost, SLAF-seq technology has been widely used in molecular breeding, system evolution, and germplasm resource detection. Based on SLAF-seq, 518 specific fragments on the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum were successfully amplified. A total of 135 primers were designed according to 135 randomly selected fragments, and 89 specific molecular markers of Th. elongatum were developed, with efficiencies up to 65.9%. These markers were all detected in a variety of materials, and they are all proved to be specific and stable. These markers can be used not only for detecting the 7E chromosome of Th. elongatum but also for providing an important theoretical and practical basis for wheat breeding by marker-assisted selection (MAS. This paper reports the first application of SLAF-seq technology with a high success rate in developing specific molecular markers for Th. elongatum, providing a strong case for the application of this new technology.

  6. Chromosomal rearrangements formed by rrn recombination do not improve replichore balance in host-specific Salmonella enterica serovars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T David Matthews

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Most of the ∼2,600 serovars of Salmonella enterica have a broad host range as well as a conserved gene order. In contrast, some Salmonella serovars are host-specific and frequently exhibit large chromosomal rearrangements from recombination between rrn operons. One hypothesis explaining these rearrangements suggests that replichore imbalance introduced from horizontal transfer of pathogenicity islands and prophages drives chromosomal rearrangements in an attempt to improve balance.This hypothesis was directly tested by comparing the naturally-occurring chromosomal arrangement types to the theoretically possible arrangement types, and estimating their replichore balance using a calculator. In addition to previously characterized strains belonging to host-specific serovars, the arrangement types of 22 serovar Gallinarum strains was also determined. Only 48 out of 1,440 possible arrangement types were identified in 212 host-specific strains. While the replichores of most naturally-occurring arrangement types were well-balanced, most theoretical arrangement types had imbalanced replichores. Furthermore, the most common types of rearrangements did not change replichore balance.The results did not support the hypothesis that replichore imbalance causes these rearrangements, and suggest that the rearrangements could be explained by aspects of a host-specific lifestyle.

  7. Inter-chromosomal gene regulation in the mammalian cell nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Wouter; Grosveld, Frank

    2007-10-01

    Cellular phenotypes can critically rely on mono-allelic gene expression. Recent studies suggest that in mammalian cells inter-chromosomal DNA interactions may mediate the decision which allele to activate and which to silence. Here, these findings are discussed in the context of knowledge on gene competition, chromatin dynamics, and nuclear organization. We argue that data obtained by 4C technology strongly support the idea that chromatin folds according to self-organizing principles. In this concept, the nuclear positioning of a given locus is probabilistic as it also depends on the properties of neighbouring DNA segments and, by extrapolation, the whole chromosome. The linear distribution of repetitive DNA sequences and of active and inactive DNA regions is important for the folding and relative positioning of chromosomes. This stochastic concept of nuclear organization predicts that tissue-specific interactions between two selected loci present on different chromosomes will be rare.

  8. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG]n and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder.

    OpenAIRE

    Puers, C; Hammond, H A; Jin, L; Caskey, C T; Schumm, J W

    1993-01-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alleles are designated "5" through "11," according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of t...

  9. Fluorescent duplex allele-specific PCR and amplicon melting for rapid homogeneous mtDNA haplogroup H screening and sensitive mixture detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Niederstätter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For large scale studies aiming at a better understanding of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA, sequence variation in particular mt haplogroups (hgs and population structure, reliable low-cost high-throughput genotyping assays are needed. Furthermore, methods facilitating sensitive mixture detection and relative quantification of allele proportions are indispensable for the study of heteroplasmy, mitochondrial sequence evolution, and mitochondrial disorders. Here the properties of a homogeneous competitive duplex allele specific PCR (ARMS assay were scrutinized in the light of these requirements. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A duplex ARMS assay amplifying either the ancestral mtDNA 2706G allele (non-hg H samples or the derived 7028C allele (hg H samples in the presence of SYBR Green fluorescent reporter dye was developed and characterized. Product detection, allele calling, and hg inference were based on the amplicon-characteristic melting-point temperatures obtained with on-line post-PCR fluorescent dissociation curve analysis (DCA. The analytical window of the assay covered at least 5 orders of magnitude of template DNA input with a detection limit in the low picogram range of genomic DNA. A set of forensically relevant test specimens was analyzed successfully. The presence of mtDNA mixtures was detected over a broad range of input DNA amounts and mixture ratios, and the estimation of allele proportions in samples with known total mtDNA content was feasible with limitations. A qualified DNA analyst successfully analyzed approximately 2,200 DNA extracts within three regular working days, without using robotic lab-equipment. By performing the amplification on-line, the assay also facilitated absolute mtDNA quantification. CONCLUSIONS: Although this assay was developed just for a particular purpose, the approach is general in that it is potentially suitable in a broad variety of assay-layouts for many other applications, including the

  10. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  11. Screening of 20 patients with X-linked mental retardation using chromosome X-specific array-MAPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousoulidou, Ludmila; Parkel, Sven; Zilina, Olga; Palta, Priit; Puusepp, Helen; Remm, Maido; Turner, Gillian; Boyle, Jackie; van Bokhoven, Hans; de Brouwer, Arjan; Van Esch, Hilde; Froyen, Guy; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Chelly, Jamel; Moraine, Claude; Gecz, Jozef; Kurg, Ants; Patsalis, Philippos C

    2007-01-01

    The rapid advancement of high-resolution DNA copy number assessment methods revealed the significant contribution of submicroscopic genetic imbalances to abnormal phenotypes, including mental retardation. In order to detect submicroscopic genetic imbalances, we have screened 20 families with X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) using a chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform with median resolution of 238kb. Among the 20 families, 18 were experimental, as they were not previously screened with any microarray method, and two were blind controls with known aberrations, as they were previously screened by array-CGH. This study presents the first clinical application of chromosome X-specific array-MAPH methodology. The screening of 20 affected males from 20 unrelated XLMR families resulted in the detection of an unknown deletion, spanning a region of 7-23kb. Family studies and population screening demonstrated that the detected deletion is an unknown rare copy number variant. One of the control samples, carrying approximately 6-Mb duplication was correctly identified, moreover it was found to be interrupted by a previously unknown 19kb region of normal copy number. The second control 50kb deletion was not identified, as this particular region was not covered by array-MAPH probes. This study demonstrates that the chromosome X-specific array-MAPH platform is a valuable tool for screening patients with XLMR, or other X-linked disorders, and emerges the need for introducing new high-resolution screening methods for the detection of genetic imbalances.

  12. Allele-specific recognition by LILRB3 and LILRA6 of a cytokeratin 8-associated ligand on necrotic glandular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Des C; Hewitt, Colin R A; López-Álvarez, María R; Jahnke, Martin; Russell, Alasdair I; Radjabova, Valeria; Trowsdale, Alice R Z; Trowsdale, John

    2016-03-29

    The LILRs are a family of receptors that regulate the activities of myelomonocytic cells. We found that specific allelic variants of two related members of the LILR family, LILRB3 and LILRA6, interact with a ligand exposed on necrotic glandular epithelial cells. The extracellular domains of LILRB3 and LILRA6 are very similar and their genes are highly polymorphic. A commonly occurring allele, LILRB3*12, displayed particularly strong binding of these necrotic cells and further screening of the products of LILRB3 alleles identified motifs that correlated with binding. Immunoprecipitation of the ligand from epithelial cell lysates using recombinant LILRB3*12, identified cytokeratins 8, 18 and 19. Purified proteins obtained from epithelial cell lysates, using anti-cytokeratin 8 antibodies, were able to activate LILRB3*12 reporter cells. Knock-down of cytokeratin 8 in epithelial cells abrogated expression of the LILRB3 ligand, while staining with recombinant LILRB3*12 showed co-localisation with cytokeratin 8 and 18 in permeabilised breast cancer cells. Necrosis is a common feature of tumours. The finding of a necrosis-associated ligand for these two receptors raises the possibility of a novel interaction that alters immune responses within the tumour microenvironment. Since LILRB3 and LILRA6 genes are highly polymorphic the interaction may influence an individual's immune response to tumours.

  13. Allele specific CAPS marker development and characterization of chalcone synthase gene in Indian mulberry (Morus spp., family Moraceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Vivek; Ghosh, M K; Pal, Soumili; Gangopadhyay, Gaurab

    2017-01-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) is an essential enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway that catalyzes the first step in flavonoid biosynthesis in plants under diverse environmental stress. We have used CHS as a candidate gene in mulberry and developed Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based co-dominant Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (CAPS) marker associated with the CHS locus. The segregation pattern of the marker was studied in an F1 population derived from a hybridization program between two mulberry genotypes showing polymorphism for the CHS locus. Differential CHS activity of the recombinants has been correlated with the segregation pattern of the marker. Homology modelling and docking studies are performed for both the identified CHS alleles and correlated with respective CHS activity. Phenotyping of Powdery Mildew infected F1 population indicated a probable association with the CAPS marker.

  14. Allele specific CAPS marker development and characterization of chalcone synthase gene in Indian mulberry (Morus spp., family Moraceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    Full Text Available Chalcone synthase (CHS is an essential enzyme in the phenylpropanoid pathway that catalyzes the first step in flavonoid biosynthesis in plants under diverse environmental stress. We have used CHS as a candidate gene in mulberry and developed Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP based co-dominant Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence (CAPS marker associated with the CHS locus. The segregation pattern of the marker was studied in an F1 population derived from a hybridization program between two mulberry genotypes showing polymorphism for the CHS locus. Differential CHS activity of the recombinants has been correlated with the segregation pattern of the marker. Homology modelling and docking studies are performed for both the identified CHS alleles and correlated with respective CHS activity. Phenotyping of Powdery Mildew infected F1 population indicated a probable association with the CAPS marker.

  15. Use of an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assay to genotype pyrethroid resistant strains of Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, F D; Davey, R B; Miller, R J

    2001-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based assay was developed to detect the presence of a pyrethroid resistance-associated amino acid substitution in Boophilus microplus (Canestrini). The assay uses a simple method for the extraction of genomic DNA from individual larvae and genotypes individuals for the presence of a Phe-->Ile amino acid substitution in the S6 transmembrane segment of domain III of the para-like sodium channel, clearly distinguishing heterozygotes from homozygotes. High frequencies for this amino acid substitution were found in the Corrales and San Felipe strains, which have target site insensitivity mechanisms for pyrethroid resistance. The Caporal resistant strain contained lower yet substantial numbers of amino acid-substituted alleles. Low amino acid substitution frequencies were found in the susceptible reference Gonzales strain and the Coatzacoalcos strain, which has metabolic esterase-mediated pyrethroid resistance. The amino acid substitution was not found in six other strains that were susceptible to pyrethroids.

  16. Untangling the Contributions of Sex-Specific Gene Regulation and X-Chromosome Dosage to Sex-Biased Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Maxwell; Rao, Prashant; Ercan, Sevinc

    2016-01-01

    Dosage compensation mechanisms equalize the level of X chromosome expression between sexes. Yet the X chromosome is often enriched for genes exhibiting sex-biased, i.e., imbalanced expression. The relationship between X chromosome dosage compensation and sex-biased gene expression remains largely unexplored. Most studies determine sex-biased gene expression without distinguishing between contributions from X chromosome copy number (dose) and the animal’s sex. Here, we uncoupled X chromosome dose from sex-specific gene regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans to determine the effect of each on X expression. In early embryogenesis, when dosage compensation is not yet fully active, X chromosome dose drives the hermaphrodite-biased expression of many X-linked genes, including several genes that were shown to be responsible for hermaphrodite fate. A similar effect is seen in the C. elegans germline, where X chromosome dose contributes to higher hermaphrodite X expression, suggesting that lack of dosage compensation in the germline may have a role in supporting higher expression of X chromosomal genes with female-biased functions in the gonad. In the soma, dosage compensation effectively balances X expression between the sexes. As a result, somatic sex-biased expression is almost entirely due to sex-specific gene regulation. These results suggest that lack of dosage compensation in different tissues and developmental stages allow X chromosome copy number to contribute to sex-biased gene expression and function. PMID:27356611

  17. Over-representation of specific regions of chromosome 22 in cells from human glioma correlate with resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheck Adrienne C

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant form of brain tumor. Despite treatment including surgical resection, adjuvant chemotherapy, and radiation, these tumors typically recur. The recurrent tumor is often resistant to further therapy with the same agent, suggesting that the surviving cells that repopulate the tumor mass have an intrinsic genetic advantage. We previously demonstrated that cells selected for resistance to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU are near-diploid, with over-representation of part or all of chromosomes 7 and 22. While cells from untreated gliomas often have over-representation of chromosome 7, chromosome 22 is typically under-represented. Methods We have analyzed cells from primary and recurrent tumors from the same patient before and after in vitro selection for resistance to clinically relevant doses of BCNU. Karyotypic analyses were done to demonstrate the genetic makeup of these cells, and fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses have defined the region(s of chromosome 22 retained in these BCNU-resistant cells. Results Karyotypic analyses demonstrated that cells selected for BCNU resistance were near-diploid with over-representation of chromosomes 7 and 22. In cells where whole copies of chromosome 22 were not identified, numerous fragments of this chromosome were retained and inserted into several marker and derivative chromosomes. Fluorescent in situ hybridization analyses using whole chromosome paints confirmed this finding. Additional FISH analysis using bacterial artificial chromosome probes spanning the length of chromosome 22 have allowed us to map the over-represented region to 22q12.3–13.32. Conclusion Cells selected for BCNU resistance either in vivo or in vitro retain sequences mapped to chromosome 22. The specific over-representation of sequences mapped to 22q12.3–13.32 suggest the presence of a DNA sequence important to BCNU survival and/or resistance located in

  18. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) spanning the synovial sarcoma-specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) breakpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, B; Berger, W; Sinke, R J; Suijkerbuijk, R F; Gilgenkrantz, S; Geraghty, M T; Valle, D; Monaco, A P; Lehrach, H; Ropers, H H

    A somatic cell hybrid containing the synovial sarcoma-associated t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) derivative (der(X)) chromosome was used to characterize the translocation breakpoint region on the X chromosome. By using Southern hybridization of DNA from this der(X) hybrid in conjunction with Xp-region specific

  19. Contrasting origin of B chromosomes in two cervids (Siberian roe deer and grey brocket deer) unravelled by chromosome-specific DNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makunin, Alexey I; Kichigin, Ilya G; Larkin, Denis M; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Proskuryakova, Anastasiya A; Vorobieva, Nadezhda V; Chernyaeva, Ekaterina N; O'Brien, Stephen J; Graphodatsky, Alexander S; Trifonov, Vladimir A

    2016-08-11

    B chromosomes are dispensable and variable karyotypic elements found in some species of animals, plants and fungi. They often originate from duplications and translocations of host genomic regions or result from hybridization. In most species, little is known about their DNA content. Here we perform high-throughput sequencing and analysis of B chromosomes of roe deer and brocket deer, the only representatives of Cetartiodactyla known to have B chromosomes. In this study we developed an approach to identify genomic regions present on chromosomes by high-throughput sequencing of DNA generated from flow-sorted chromosomes using degenerate-oligonucleotide-primed PCR. Application of this method on small cattle autosomes revealed a previously described KIT gene region translocation associated with colour sidedness. Implementing this approach to B chromosomes from two cervid species, Siberian roe deer (Capreolus pygargus) and grey brocket deer (Mazama gouazoubira), revealed dramatically different genetic content: roe deer B chromosomes consisted of two duplicated genomic regions (a total of 1.42-1.98 Mbp) involving three genes, while grey brocket deer B chromosomes contained 26 duplicated regions (a total of 8.28-9.31 Mbp) with 34 complete and 21 partial genes, including KIT and RET protooncogenes, previously found on supernumerary chromosomes in canids. Sequence variation analysis of roe deer B chromosomes revealed a high frequency of mutations and increased heterozygosity due to either amplification within B chromosomes or divergence between different Bs. In contrast, grey brocket deer B chromosomes were found to be more homogeneous and resembled autosomes in patterns of sequence variation. Similar tendencies were observed in repetitive DNA composition. Our data demonstrate independent origins of B chromosomes in the grey brocket and roe deer. We hypothesize that the B chromosomes of these two cervid species represent different stages of B chromosome sequences evolution

  20. Saitohin, which is nested within the tau gene, interacts with tau and Abl and its human-specific allele influences Abl phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Gao, Lei; Conrad, Christopher G.; Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Saitohin (STH) is a gene unique to humans and their closest relatives whose function is not yet known. STH contains a single polymorphism (Q7R); the Q allele is human-specific and confers susceptibility to several neurodegenerative diseases. In previous work, we discovered that STH interacts with Peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6), a unique member of that family which is bifunctional and whose levels increase in Pick’s disease. In this study, we report that STH also interacts with tau and the non-recept...

  1. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and identification of commonly occurring haplotypes using sequence specific low and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Maria Rathmann

    2014-01-01

    of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) naïve T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens. Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly...... occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular...

  2. Development of Chromosome-Specific BAC Resources for Genomics of Bread Wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Bartoš, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 129, 1-3 (2010), s. 211-223 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Grant - others:European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme(XE) FP7/2007–2013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome * DNA markers Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding Impact factor: 1.783, year: 2010

  3. Genome-wide identification and quantification of cis- and trans-regulated genes responding to Marek’s disease virus infection via analysis of allele-specific expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eMaceachern

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Marek’s disease (MD is a commercially important neoplastic disease of chickens caused by Marek’s disease virus (MDV, an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus. Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment vaccinal control measures. To identify high-confidence candidate MD resistance genes, we conducted a genome-wide screen for allele-specific expression (ASE amongst F1 progeny of two inbred chicken lines that differ in MD resistance. High throughput sequencing was used to profile transcriptomes from pools of uninfected and infected individuals at 4 days post-infection to identify any genes showing ASE in response to MDV infection. RNA sequencing identified 22,655 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of which 5,360 in 3,773 genes exhibited significant allelic imbalance. Illumina GoldenGate assays were subsequently used to quantify regulatory variation controlled at the gene (cis and elsewhere in the genome (trans by examining differences in expression between F1 individuals and artificial F1 RNA pools over 6 time periods in 1,536 of the most significant SNPs identified by RNA sequencing. Allelic imbalance as a result of cis-regulatory changes was confirmed in 861 of the 1,233 GoldenGate assays successfully examined. Furthermore we have identified 7 genes that display trans-regulation only in infected animals and approximately 500 SNP that show a complex interaction between cis- and trans-regulatory changes. Our results indicate ASE analyses are a powerful approach to identify regulatory variation responsible for differences in transcript abundance in genes underlying complex traits. And the genes with SNPs exhibiting ASE provide a strong foundation to further investigate the causative polymorphisms and genetic mechanisms for MD resistance. Finally, the methods used here for identifying specific genes and SNPs may have practical implications for applying marker-assisted selection to complex traits that are

  4. Frequencies of X-ray induced pericentric inversions and centric rings in human blood lymphocytes detected by FISH using chromosome arm specific DNA libraries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Boei, J.J.W.A.; Vermeulen, S.; Balajee, A.S.

    1996-01-01

    Frequencies of intra-chromosomal exchanges (pericentric inversions and centric rings) and inter-chromosomal exchanges (dicentrics and translocations) in X-irradiated (2.5 Gy) human lymphocytes have been estimated. To detect these events we employed FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) technique and arm specific painting probes for chromosomes no.1 and no.3. The ratio between centric rings and pericentric inversions was found to be about 1. For intra-changes to inter-changes, the ratio (F) was between 6 and 9. Based on the total number of colour junctions involving chromosomes no.1 and no.3 it was found that exchanges between the arms of the same chromosome occur about 8.7 times more than inter-chromosomal exchanges calculated on the basis of the DNA content of the chromosomes and random induction of aberrations in the total genome. Chromosomal organization in interphase nucleus appears to promote the formation of more intra-changes than inter-changes following X-irradiation, most probably due to close proximity of the two arms of a chromosome

  5. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hsin-Chou; Lin, Hsin-Chi; Huang, Mei-Chu; Li, Ling-Hui; Pan, Wen-Harn; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Yuan-Tsong

    2010-07-05

    Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA), and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance). This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and can be downloaded at http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/aloha/ALOHA.htm.

  6. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  7. Allele-specific wild-type TP53 expression in the unaffected carrier parent of children with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzby, Jeffrey S; Williams, Shirley A; Schaffer, Lana; Head, Steven R; Nugent, Diane J

    2017-02-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is an autosomal dominant disorder where an oncogenic TP53 germline mutation is passed from parent to child. Tumor protein p53 is a key tumor suppressor regulating cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. Paradoxically, some mutant TP53 carriers remain unaffected, while their children develop cancer within the first few years of life. To address this paradox, response to UV stress was compared in dermal fibroblasts (dFb) from an affected LFS patient vs. their unaffected carrier parent. UV induction of CDKN1A/p21, a regulatory target of p53, in LFS patient dFb was significantly reduced compared to the unaffected parent. UV exposure also induced significantly greater p53[Ser15]-phosphorylation in LFS patient dFb, a reported property of some mutant p53 variants. Taken together, these results suggested that unaffected parental dFb may express an increased proportion of wild-type vs. mutant p53. Indeed, a significantly increased ratio of wild-type to mutant TP53 allele-specific expression in the unaffected parent dFb was confirmed by RT-PCR-RFLP and RNA-seq analysis. Hence, allele-specific expression of wild-type TP53 may allow an unaffected parent to mount a response to genotoxic stress more characteristic of homozygous wild-type TP53 individuals than their affected offspring, providing protection from the oncogenesis associated with LFS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification of a Novel Retrotransposon with Sex Chromosome-Specific Distribution in Silene latifolia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Králová, Tereza; Čegan, Radim; Kubát, Zdeněk; Vrána, Jan; Vyskot, Boris; Vogel, Ivan; Kejnovský, Eduard; Hobza, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 143, 1-3 (2014), s. 87-95 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0102; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2220; GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/10/0930; GA ČR(CZ) GA522/09/0083; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Microdissection * Sex chromosomes * Silene latifolia (white campion) Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; EF - Botanics (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 1.561, year: 2014

  9. Correction of Mutant p63 in EEC Syndrome Using siRNA Mediated Allele-Specific Silencing Restores Defective Stem Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Vanessa; Nasti, Annamaria A; Del Vecchio, Claudia; Ferrari, Stefano; Migliorati, Angelo; Raffa, Paolo; Lariccia, Vincenzo; Nespeca, Patrizia; Biasolo, Mariangela; Willoughby, Colin E; Ponzin, Diego; Palù, Giorgio; Parolin, Cristina; Di Iorio, Enzo

    2016-06-01

    Ectrodactyly-Ectodermal dysplasia-Clefting (EEC) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease caused by heterozygous mutations in the p63 gene and characterized by limb defects, orofacial clefting, ectodermal dysplasia, and ocular defects. Patients develop progressive total bilateral limbal stem cell deficiency, which eventually results in corneal blindness. Medical and surgical treatments are ineffective and of limited benefit. Oral mucosa epithelial stem cells (OMESCs) represent an alternative source of stem cells capable of regenerating the corneal epithelium and, combined with gene therapy, could provide an attractive therapeutic avenue. OMESCs from EEC patients carrying the most severe p63 mutations (p.R279H and p.R304Q) were characterized and the genetic defect of p.R279H silenced using allele-specific (AS) small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Systematic screening of locked nucleic acid (LNA)-siRNAs against R279H-p63 allele in (i) stable WT-ΔNp63α-RFP and R279H-ΔNp63α-EGFP cell lines, (ii) transient doubly transfected cell lines, and (iii) p.R279H OMESCs, identified a number of potent siRNA inhibitors for the mutant allele, which had no effect on wild-type p63. In addition, siRNA treatment led to longer acquired life span of mutated stem cells compared to controls, less accelerated stem cell differentiation in vitro, reduced proliferation properties, and effective ability in correcting the epithelial hypoplasia, thus giving rise to full thickness stratified and differentiated epithelia. This study demonstrates the phenotypic correction of mutant stem cells (OMESCs) in EEC syndrome by means of siRNA mediated AS silencing with restoration of function. The application of siRNA, alone or in combination with cell-based therapies, offers a therapeutic strategy for corneal blindness in EEC syndrome. Stem Cells 2016;34:1588-1600. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Duplications of the Y-chromosome specific loci P25 and 92R7 and forensic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Brión, Maria; Parson, Walther

    2004-01-01

    methodologies were used in order to detect the SNP alleles and the PSVs of the loci. All results obtained with the various typing techniques supported the conclusion. The allele distributions of the binary markers were analysed in more than 600 males with seven different haplogroups. For P25, the ancestral...... allele C was found in several samples from different haplogroups. The derived allele A was always present with an additional C variant. Haplogroup P was defined by the derived allele A at the 92R7 locus. However, the ancestral allele G was always associated with an A variant due to the duplication....

  11. SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques express specific MHC class I alleles in either elite controllers or normal progressors

    OpenAIRE

    Wambua, Daniel; Henderson, Ryan; Solomon, Christopher; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized twelve SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques for their entire MHC class I allele composition. Several MHC class I alleles were present in animals with varying outcomes of infections, either elite control or normal progression to AIDS disease. These MHC class I alleles may prove interesting targets for additional characterization.

  12. SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques express specific MHC class I alleles in either elite controllers or normal progressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambua, Daniel; Henderson, Ryan; Solomon, Christopher; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized twelve SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques for their entire MHC class I allele composition. Several MHC class I alleles were present in animals with varying outcomes of infections, either elite control or normal progression to AIDS disease. These MHC class I alleles may prove interesting targets for additional characterization. PMID:21781132

  13. Utilization of a ts-sacB selection system for the generation of a Mycobacterium avium serovar-8 specific glycopeptidolipid allelic exchange mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Vida R; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Eckstein, Torsten M; Inamine, Julia M; Belisle, John T; Maslow, Joel N

    2004-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium avium are ubiquitous environmental organisms and a cause of disseminated infection in patients with end-stage AIDS. The glycopeptidolipids (GPL) of M. avium are proposed to participate in the pathogenesis of this organism, however, establishment of a clear role for GPL in disease production has been limited by the inability to genetically manipulate M. avium. Methods To be able to study the role of the GPL in M. avium pathogenesis, a ts-sacB selection system, not previously used in M. avium, was employed as a means to achieve homologous recombination for the rhamnosyltransferase (rtfA) gene of a pathogenic serovar 8 strain of M. avium to prevent addition of serovar-specific sugars to rhamnose of the fatty acyl-peptide backbone of GPL. The genotype of the resultant rtfA mutant was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and southern hybridization. Disruption in the proximal sugar of the haptenic oligosaccharide resulted in the loss of serovar specific GPL with no change in the pattern of non-serovar specific GPL moieties as shown by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Complementation of wild type (wt) rtfA in trans through an integrative plasmid restored serovar-8 specific GPL expression identical to wt serovar 8 parent strain. Results In this study, we affirm our results that rtfA encodes an enzyme responsible for the transfer of Rha to 6d-Tal and provide evidence of a second allelic exchange mutagenesis system suitable for M. avium. Conclusion We report the second allelic exchange system for M. avium utilizing ts-sacB as double-negative and xylE as positive counter-selection markers, respectively. This system of allelic exchange would be especially useful for M. avium strains that demonstrate significant isoniazid (INH) resistance despite transformation with katG. Through the construction of mutants in GPL or other mycobacterial components, their roles in M. avium pathogenesis, biosynthesis, or drug

  14. Utilization of a ts-sacB selection system for the generation of a Mycobacterium avium serovar-8 specific glycopeptidolipid allelic exchange mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belisle John T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium avium are ubiquitous environmental organisms and a cause of disseminated infection in patients with end-stage AIDS. The glycopeptidolipids (GPL of M. avium are proposed to participate in the pathogenesis of this organism, however, establishment of a clear role for GPL in disease production has been limited by the inability to genetically manipulate M. avium. Methods To be able to study the role of the GPL in M. avium pathogenesis, a ts-sacB selection system, not previously used in M. avium, was employed as a means to achieve homologous recombination for the rhamnosyltransferase (rtfA gene of a pathogenic serovar 8 strain of M. avium to prevent addition of serovar-specific sugars to rhamnose of the fatty acyl-peptide backbone of GPL. The genotype of the resultant rtfA mutant was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction and southern hybridization. Disruption in the proximal sugar of the haptenic oligosaccharide resulted in the loss of serovar specific GPL with no change in the pattern of non-serovar specific GPL moieties as shown by thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Complementation of wild type (wt rtfA in trans through an integrative plasmid restored serovar-8 specific GPL expression identical to wt serovar 8 parent strain. Results In this study, we affirm our results that rtfA encodes an enzyme responsible for the transfer of Rha to 6d-Tal and provide evidence of a second allelic exchange mutagenesis system suitable for M. avium. Conclusion We report the second allelic exchange system for M. avium utilizing ts-sacB as double-negative and xylE as positive counter-selection markers, respectively. This system of allelic exchange would be especially useful for M. avium strains that demonstrate significant isoniazid (INH resistance despite transformation with katG. Through the construction of mutants in GPL or other mycobacterial components, their roles in M. avium pathogenesis

  15. Localization of a female-specific marker on the chromosomes of the brown seaweed Saccharina japonica using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    Full Text Available There is a heteromorphic alternative life in the brown seaweed, Saccharina japonica (Aresch. C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders ( = Laminaria japonica Aresch., with macroscopic monoecious sporophytes and microscopic diecious gametophytes. Female gametophytes are genetically different from males. It is very difficult to identify the parent of a sporophyte using only routine cytological techniques due to homomorphic chromosomes. A sex-specific marker is one of the best ways to make this determination.To obtain clear images, chromosome preparation was improved using maceration enzymes and fluorochrome 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI. The chromosome number of both male and female haploid gametophytes was 31, and there were 62 chromosomes in diploid sporophytes. Although the female chromosomes ranged from 0.77 µm to 2.61 µm in size and were larger than the corresponding ones in the males (from 0.57 µm to 2.16 µm, there was not a very large X chromosome in the females. Based on the known female-related FRML-494 marker, co-electrophoresis and Southern blot profiles demonstrated that it was inheritable and specific to female gametophytes. Using modified fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, this marker could be localized on one unique chromosome of the female gametophytes as well as the sporophytes, whereas no hybridization signal was detected in the male gametophytes.Our data suggest that this marker was a female chromosome-specific DNA sequence. This is the first report of molecular marker localization on algal chromosomes. This research provides evidence for the benefit of using FISH for identifying molecular markers for sex identification, isolation of specific genes linked to this marker in the females, and sex determination of S. japonica gametophytes in the future.

  16. A Generalized Linear Model for Decomposing Cis-regulatory, Parent-of-Origin, and Maternal Effects on Allele-Specific Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuaki Takada

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Joint quantification of genetic and epigenetic effects on gene expression is important for understanding the establishment of complex gene regulation systems in living organisms. In particular, genomic imprinting and maternal effects play important roles in the developmental process of mammals and flowering plants. However, the influence of these effects on gene expression are difficult to quantify because they act simultaneously with cis-regulatory mutations. Here we propose a simple method to decompose cis-regulatory (i.e., allelic genotype, genomic imprinting [i.e., parent-of-origin (PO], and maternal [i.e., maternal genotype (MG] effects on allele-specific gene expression using RNA-seq data obtained from reciprocal crosses. We evaluated the efficiency of method using a simulated dataset and applied the method to whole-body Drosophila and mouse trophoblast stem cell (TSC and liver RNA-seq data. Consistent with previous studies, we found little evidence of PO and MG effects in adult Drosophila samples. In contrast, we identified dozens and hundreds of mouse genes with significant PO and MG effects, respectively. Interestingly, a similar number of genes with significant PO effect were detect in mouse TSCs and livers, whereas more genes with significant MG effect were observed in livers. Further application of this method will clarify how these three effects influence gene expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, and provide novel insight into the evolution of gene expression regulation.

  17. Concordance of the ForenSeq™ system and characterisation of sequence-specific autosomal STR alleles across two major population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devesse, Laurence; Ballard, David; Davenport, Lucinda; Riethorst, Immy; Mason-Buck, Gabriella; Syndercombe Court, Denise

    2018-05-01

    By using sequencing technology to genotype loci of forensic interest it is possible to simultaneously target autosomal, X and Y STRs as well as identity, ancestry and phenotypic informative SNPs, resulting in a breadth of data obtained from a single run that is considerable when compared to that generated with standard technologies. It is important however that this information aligns with the genotype data currently obtained using commercially available kits for CE-based investigations such that results are compatible with existing databases and hence can be of use to the forensic community. In this work, 400 samples were typed using commercially available STR kits and CE, as well as using the Ilumina ForenSeq™ DNA Signature Prep Kit and MiSeq ® FGx to assess concordance of autosomal STRs and population variability. Results show a concordance rate between the two technologies exceeding 99.98% while numerous novel sequence based alleles are described. In order to make use of the sequence variation observed, sequence specific allele frequencies were generated for White British and British Chinese populations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Generalized Linear Model for DecomposingCis-regulatory, Parent-of-Origin, and Maternal Effects on Allele-Specific Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasuaki; Miyagi, Ryutaro; Takahashi, Aya; Endo, Toshinori; Osada, Naoki

    2017-07-05

    Joint quantification of genetic and epigenetic effects on gene expression is important for understanding the establishment of complex gene regulation systems in living organisms. In particular, genomic imprinting and maternal effects play important roles in the developmental process of mammals and flowering plants. However, the influence of these effects on gene expression are difficult to quantify because they act simultaneously with cis -regulatory mutations. Here we propose a simple method to decompose cis -regulatory ( i.e. , allelic genotype), genomic imprinting [ i.e. , parent-of-origin (PO)], and maternal [ i.e. , maternal genotype (MG)] effects on allele-specific gene expression using RNA-seq data obtained from reciprocal crosses. We evaluated the efficiency of method using a simulated dataset and applied the method to whole-body Drosophila and mouse trophoblast stem cell (TSC) and liver RNA-seq data. Consistent with previous studies, we found little evidence of PO and MG effects in adult Drosophila samples. In contrast, we identified dozens and hundreds of mouse genes with significant PO and MG effects, respectively. Interestingly, a similar number of genes with significant PO effect were detect in mouse TSCs and livers, whereas more genes with significant MG effect were observed in livers. Further application of this method will clarify how these three effects influence gene expression levels in different tissues and developmental stages, and provide novel insight into the evolution of gene expression regulation. Copyright © 2017 Takada et al.

  19. Prenatal diagnosis of a Japanese family at risk for Tay-Sachs disease. Application of a fluorescent competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamasu, S; Nishio, H; Ayaki, H; Lee, M J; Mizutori, M; Takeshima, Y; Nakamura, H; Matsuo, M; Maruo, T; Sumino, K

    1999-12-01

    Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) is caused by mutation of the HEXA gene, which results in a deficiency of the alpha-subunit of hexosaminidase A. The major mutation in Japanese TSD is a G-to-T transversion at the 3'-splice site of intron 5. We established a fluorescent competitive allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (FCAS-PCR) method for detection of the mutation and applied it to prenatal diagnosis of a Japanese TSD family. FCAS-PCR distinguished the wild and mutant alleles clearly, with broad ranges in the amount of template DNA, the dNTP concentration, the MgCl2 concentration and the number of PCR cycles. After obtaining ethics committee approval and informed consent from the parents in the index family, chorionic villus sampling was performed. FCAS-PCR analysis using chorionic villus DNA disclosed that the fetus was homozygous for the mutation. To confirm the diagnosis, direct sequencing analysis of the genomic PCR fragment was performed, and showed the same results as those of the FCAS-PCR analysis. FCAS-PCR proved to be helpful for carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis in TSD families in the Japanese population. It would also be a useful DNA-diagnostic method for many other inherited disorders.

  20. A rapid molecular approach for chromosomal phasing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Regan

    Full Text Available Determining the chromosomal phase of pairs of sequence variants - the arrangement of specific alleles as haplotypes - is a routine challenge in molecular genetics. Here we describe Drop-Phase, a molecular method for quickly ascertaining the phase of pairs of DNA sequence variants (separated by 1-200 kb without cloning or manual single-molecule dilution. In each Drop-Phase reaction, genomic DNA segments are isolated in tens of thousands of nanoliter-sized droplets together with allele-specific fluorescence probes, in a single reaction well. Physically linked alleles partition into the same droplets, revealing their chromosomal phase in the co-distribution of fluorophores across droplets. We demonstrated the accuracy of this method by phasing members of trios (revealing 100% concordance with inheritance information, and demonstrate a common clinical application by phasing CFTR alleles at genomic distances of 11-116 kb in the genomes of cystic fibrosis patients. Drop-Phase is rapid (requiring less than 4 hours, scalable (to hundreds of samples, and effective at long genomic distances (200 kb.

  1. Lack of satellite DNA species-specific homogenization and relationship to chromosomal rearrangements in monitor lizards (Varanidae, Squamata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakhongcheep, Ornjira; Thapana, Watcharaporn; Suntronpong, Aorarat; Singchat, Worapong; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Phatcharakullawarawat, Rattanin; Muangmai, Narongrit; Peyachoknagul, Surin; Matsubara, Kazumi; Ezaz, Tariq; Srikulnath, Kornsorn

    2017-08-16

    Satellite DNAs (stDNAs) are highly repeated sequences that constitute large portions of any genome. The evolutionary dynamics of stDNA (e.g. copy number, nucleotide sequence, location) can, therefore, provide an insight into genome organization and evolution. We investigated the evolutionary origin of VSAREP stDNA in 17 monitor lizards (seven Asian, five Australian, and five African) at molecular and cytogenetic level. Results revealed that VSAREP is conserved in the genome of Asian and Australian varanids, but not in African varanids, suggesting that these sequences are either differentiated or lost in the African varanids. Phylogenetic and arrangement network analyses revealed the existence of at least four VSAREP subfamilies. The similarity of each sequence unit within the same VSAREP subfamily from different species was higher than those of other VSAREP subfamilies belonging to the same species. Additionally, all VSAREP subfamilies isolated from the three Australian species (Varanus rosenbergi, V. gouldii, and V. acanthurus) were co-localized near the centromeric or pericentromeric regions of the macrochromosomes, except for chromosomes 3 and 4 in each Australian varanid. However, their chromosomal arrangements were different among species. The VSAREP stDNA family lack homogenized species-specific nucleotide positions in varanid lineage. Most VSAREP sequences were shared among varanids within the four VSAREP subfamilies. This suggests that nucleotide substitutions in each varanid species accumulated more slowly than homogenization rates in each VSAREP subfamily, resulting in non-species-specific evolution of stDNA profiles. Moreover, changes in location of VSAREP stDNA in each Australian varanid suggests a correlation with chromosomal rearrangements, leading to karyotypic differences among these species.

  2. Development of chromosome-specific markers with high polymorphism for allotetraploid cotton based on genome-wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in diploid cottons (Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cairui; Zou, Changsong; Zhang, Youping; Yu, Daoqian; Cheng, Hailiang; Jiang, Pengfei; Yang, Wencui; Wang, Qiaolian; Feng, Xiaoxu; Prosper, Mtawa Andrew; Guo, Xiaoping; Song, Guoli

    2015-02-06

    Tetraploid cotton contains two sets of homologous chromosomes, the At- and Dt-subgenomes. Consequently, many markers in cotton were mapped to multiple positions during linkage genetic map construction, posing a challenge to anchoring linkage groups and mapping economically-important genes to particular chromosomes. Chromosome-specific markers could solve this problem. Recently, the genomes of two diploid species were sequenced whose progenitors were putative contributors of the At- and Dt-subgenomes to tetraploid cotton. These sequences provide a powerful tool for developing chromosome-specific markers given the high level of synteny among tetraploid and diploid cotton genomes. In this study, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) on each chromosome in the two diploid genomes were characterized. Chromosome-specific SSRs were developed by comparative analysis and proved to distinguish chromosomes. A total of 200,744 and 142,409 SSRs were detected on the 13 chromosomes of Gossypium arboreum L. and Gossypium raimondii Ulbrich, respectively. Chromosome-specific SSRs were obtained by comparing SSR flanking sequences from each chromosome with those from the other 25 chromosomes. The average was 7,996 per chromosome. To confirm their chromosome specificity, these SSRs were used to distinguish two homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton through linkage group construction. The chromosome-specific SSRs and previously-reported chromosome markers were grouped together, and no marker mapped to another homologous chromosome, proving that the chromosome-specific SSRs were unique and could distinguish homologous chromosomes in tetraploid cotton. Because longer dinucleotide AT-rich repeats were the most polymorphic in previous reports, the SSRs on each chromosome were sorted by motif type and repeat length for convenient selection. The primer sequences of all chromosome-specific SSRs were also made publicly available. Chromosome-specific SSRs are efficient tools for chromosome

  3. Structural basis of human PR/SET domain 9 (PRDM9) allele C-specific recognition of its cognate DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anamika; Zhang, Xing; Blumenthal, Robert M; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2017-09-29

    PRDM9 is the only mammalian gene that has been associated with speciation. The PR/SET domain 9 (PRDM9) protein is a major determinant of meiotic recombination hot spots and acts through sequence-specific DNA binding via its C2H2 zinc finger (ZF) tandem array, which is highly polymorphic within and between species. The most common human variant, PRDM9 allele A (PRDM9a), contains 13 fingers (ZF1-13). Allele C (PRDM9c) is the second-most common among African populations and differs from PRDM9a by an arginine-to-serine change (R764S) in ZF9 and by replacement of ZF11 with two other fingers, yielding 14 fingers in PRDM9c. Here we co-crystallized the six-finger fragment ZF8-13 of PRDM9c, in complex with an oligonucleotide representing a known PRDM9c-specific hot spot sequence, and compared the structure with that of a characterized PRDM9a-specific complex. There are three major differences. First, Ser 764 in ZF9 allows PRDM9c to accommodate a variable base, whereas PRDM9a Arg 764 recognizes a conserved guanine. Second, the two-finger expansion of ZF11 allows PRDM9c to recognize three-base-pair-longer sequences. A tryptophan in the additional ZF interacts with a conserved thymine methyl group. Third, an Arg-Asp dipeptide immediately preceding the ZF helix, conserved in two PRDM9a fingers and three PRDM9c fingers, permits adaptability to variations from a C:G base pair (G-Arg interaction) to a G:C base pair (C-Asp interaction). This Arg-Asp conformational switch allows identical ZF modules to recognize different sequences. Our findings illuminate the molecular mechanisms for flexible and conserved binding of human PRDM9 alleles to their cognate DNA sequences. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Detection of disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms in pemphigus vulgaris linked to the DQwl and DQw3 alleles of the HLA-D region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szafer, F.; Brautbar, C.; Tzfoni, E.

    1987-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris in Israeli Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews and in Austrian non-Jewish patients is strongly associated with the DR4 and DRw6 alleles of the HLA-D region class II genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was undertaken with DQβ, DQα, and DRβ cDNA probes. Hybridization with the DQβ probe identifies Pvu II, BamHI, and EcoRV fragments that absolutely discriminate pemphigus vulgaris patients from healthy DR-, DQ-, and ethnic-matched controls. In contrast the DQα and DRβ probes failed to identify disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism fragments. These studies indicate that DQw1 and DQw3 polymorphisms carried by pemphigus vulgaris patients may be directly involved in predisposition to the disease or may be tightly linked to the susceptibility gene itself. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an HLA restriction fragment length polymorphism that is highly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease

  5. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  6. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  7. Multiple opposing constraints govern chromosome interactions during meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Y Lui

    Full Text Available Homolog pairing and crossing over during meiosis I prophase is required for accurate chromosome segregation to form euploid gametes. The repair of Spo11-induced double-strand breaks (DSB using a homologous chromosome template is a major driver of pairing in many species, including fungi, plants, and mammals. Inappropriate pairing and crossing over at ectopic loci can lead to chromosome rearrangements and aneuploidy. How (or if inappropriate ectopic interactions are disrupted in favor of allelic interactions is not clear. Here we used an in vivo "collision" assay in budding yeast to test the contributions of cohesion and the organization and motion of chromosomes in the nucleus on promoting or antagonizing interactions between allelic and ectopic loci at interstitial chromosome sites. We found that deletion of the cohesin subunit Rec8, but not other chromosome axis proteins (e.g. Red1, Hop1, or Mek1, caused an increase in homolog-nonspecific chromosome interaction, even in the absence of Spo11. This effect was partially suppressed by expression of the mitotic cohesin paralog Scc1/Mdc1, implicating Rec8's role in cohesion rather than axis integrity in preventing nonspecific chromosome interactions. Disruption of telomere-led motion by treating cells with the actin polymerization inhibitor Latrunculin B (Lat B elevated nonspecific collisions in rec8Δ spo11Δ. Next, using a visual homolog-pairing assay, we found that the delay in homolog pairing in mutants defective for telomere-led chromosome motion (ndj1Δ or csm4Δ is enhanced in Lat B-treated cells, implicating actin in more than one process promoting homolog juxtaposition. We suggest that multiple, independent contributions of actin, cohesin, and telomere function are integrated to promote stable homolog-specific interactions and to destabilize weak nonspecific interactions by modulating the elastic spring-like properties of chromosomes.

  8. CGmapTools improves the precision of heterozygous SNV calls and supports allele-specific methylation detection and visualization in bisulfite-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weilong; Zhu, Ping; Pellegrini, Matteo; Zhang, Michael Q; Wang, Xiangfeng; Ni, Zhongfu

    2018-02-01

    DNA methylation is important for gene silencing and imprinting in both plants and animals. Recent advances in bisulfite sequencing allow detection of single nucleotide variations (SNVs) achieving high sensitivity, but accurately identifying heterozygous SNVs from partially C-to-T converted sequences remains challenging. We designed two methods, BayesWC and BinomWC, that substantially improved the precision of heterozygous SNV calls from ∼80% to 99% while retaining comparable recalls. With these SNV calls, we provided functions for allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) analysis and visualizing the methylation status on reads. Applying ASM analysis to a previous dataset, we found that an average of 1.5% of investigated regions showed allelic methylation, which were significantly enriched in transposon elements and likely to be shared by the same cell-type. A dynamic fragment strategy was utilized for DMR analysis in low-coverage data and was able to find differentially methylated regions (DMRs) related to key genes involved in tumorigenesis using a public cancer dataset. Finally, we integrated 40 applications into the software package CGmapTools to analyze DNA methylomes. This package uses CGmap as the format interface, and designs binary formats to reduce the file size and support fast data retrieval, and can be applied for context-wise, gene-wise, bin-wise, region-wise and sample-wise analyses and visualizations. The CGmapTools software is freely available at https://cgmaptools.github.io/. guoweilong@cau.edu.cn. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Analysis of plant meiotic chromosomes by chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Martin A; Mandáková, Terezie

    2013-01-01

    Chromosome painting (CP) refers to visualization of large chromosome regions, entire chromosome arms, or entire chromosomes via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). For CP in plants, contigs of chromosome-specific bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from the target species or from a closely related species (comparative chromosome painting, CCP) are typically applied as painting probes. Extended pachytene chromosomes provide the highest resolution of CP in plants. CP enables identification and tracing of particular chromosome regions and/or entire chromosomes throughout all meiotic stages as well as corresponding chromosome territories in premeiotic interphase nuclei. Meiotic pairing and structural chromosome rearrangements (typically inversions and translocations) can be identified by CP. Here, we describe step-by-step protocols of CP and CCP in plant species including chromosome preparation, BAC DNA labeling, and multicolor FISH.

  10. Rapid divergence and expansion of the X chromosome in papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwend, Andrea R.; Yu, Qingyi; Tong, Eric J.; Zeng, Fanchang; Han, Jennifer; VanBuren, Robert; Aryal, Rishi; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Paterson, Andrew H.; Ming, Ray

    2012-01-01

    X chromosomes have long been thought to conserve the structure and gene content of the ancestral autosome from which the sex chromosomes evolved. We compared the recently evolved papaya sex chromosomes with a homologous autosome of a close relative, the monoecious Vasconcellea monoica, to infer changes since recombination stopped between the papaya sex chromosomes. We sequenced 12 V. monoica bacterial artificial chromosomes, 11 corresponding to the papaya X-specific region, and 1 to a papaya autosomal region. The combined V. monoica X-orthologous sequences are much shorter (1.10 Mb) than the corresponding papaya region (2.56 Mb). Given that the V. monoica genome is 41% larger than that of papaya, this finding suggests considerable expansion of the papaya X; expansion is supported by a higher repetitive sequence content of the X compared with the papaya autosomal sequence. The alignable regions include 27 transcript-encoding sequences, only 6 of which are functional X/V. monoica gene pairs. Sequence divergence from the V. monoica orthologs is almost identical for papaya X and Y alleles; the Carica-Vasconcellea split therefore occurred before the papaya sex chromosomes stopped recombining, making V. monoica a suitable outgroup for inferring changes in papaya sex chromosomes. The papaya X and the hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome and V. monoica have all gained and lost genes, including a surprising amount of changes in the X. PMID:22869742

  11. Reliable allele detection using SNP-based PCR primers containing Locked Nucleic Acid: application in genetic mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trognitz Friederike

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diploid, Solanum caripense, a wild relative of potato and tomato, possesses valuable resistance to potato late blight and we are interested in the genetic base of this resistance. Due to extremely low levels of genetic variation within the S. caripense genome it proved impossible to generate a dense genetic map and to assign individual Solanum chromosomes through the use of conventional chromosome-specific SSR, RFLP, AFLP, as well as gene- or locus-specific markers. The ease of detection of DNA polymorphisms depends on both frequency and form of sequence variation. The narrow genetic background of close relatives and inbreds complicates the detection of persisting, reduced polymorphism and is a challenge to the development of reliable molecular markers. Nonetheless, monomorphic DNA fragments representing not directly usable conventional markers can contain considerable variation at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. This can be used for the design of allele-specific molecular markers. The reproducible detection of allele-specific markers based on SNPs has been a technical challenge. Results We present a fast and cost-effective protocol for the detection of allele-specific SNPs by applying Sequence Polymorphism-Derived (SPD markers. These markers proved highly efficient for fingerprinting of individuals possessing a homogeneous genetic background. SPD markers are obtained from within non-informative, conventional molecular marker fragments that are screened for SNPs to design allele-specific PCR primers. The method makes use of primers containing a single, 3'-terminal Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA base. We demonstrate the applicability of the technique by successful genetic mapping of allele-specific SNP markers derived from monomorphic Conserved Ortholog Set II (COSII markers mapped to Solanum chromosomes, in S. caripense. By using SPD markers it was possible for the first time to map the S. caripense alleles

  12. Novel alleles of 31-bp VNTR polymorphism in the human ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We report here for the first time, the detection of allele 20, which was absent in Caucasian and Indo–Caucasoid populations, as a common allele present in Singaporean Chinese (6.25%), Indians (11.7%), and Malays (11.5%). Hence, allele 20 might be a specific allele for Asian populations. A relatively common allele 19 ...

  13. Trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal aberration in myelocytic malignancies: a multicolor and locus-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Fioretos, Thoas; Strömbeck, Bodil; Mauritzson, Nils; Tanke, Hans J; Johansson, Bertil

    2003-01-01

    Trisomy 8 is the most common chromosomal aberration in myelocytic malignancies, occurring both as a sole change as well as in addition to other abnormalities. In spite of this, next to nothing is known about its pathogenetic importance or its molecular genetic consequences. Possible mechanisms involved in the transformation process include dosage effects of genes mapping to chromosome 8 and presence of specific mutations or cryptic fusion genes on the duplicated chromosome. In the latter case, +8 would be secondary to a cryptic primary rearrangement and not involved in leukemogenesis as such, but rather in tumor evolution. Although hidden genetic changes have been found in some trisomies, for example, mutations in KIT in acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) with +4 and in MET in hereditary papillary kidney carcinoma with trisomy 7, none associated with +8 have so far been discovered. To address this issue, we have investigated a total of 13 cases of AML, myelodysplastic syndromes, and chronic myeloproliferative disorders with trisomy 8 as the sole chromosomal anomaly. All cases were studied by combined binary ratio multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and with FISH using locus-specific probes for both arms of chromosome 8, the subtelomeric regions of 8p and 8q, and the leukemia-associated genes FGFR1, MOZ, ETO, and MYC. No cryptic changes were detected, thus excluding the possibility of gross genetic rearrangements or aberrations involving these loci on chromosome 8.

  14. The association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*39:01 and B*39:06 alleles with type 1 diabetes is restricted to specific HLA-DR/DQ haplotypes in Finns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, M-L; Heikkinen, T; El-Amir, M I; Kiviniemi, M; Laine, A-P; Härkönen, T; Veijola, R; Toppari, J; Knip, M; Ilonen, J

    2017-04-01

    We analysed the previously reported association of the HLA-A*24:02, B*18 and B*39 alleles with type 1 diabetes and diabetes associated autoimmunity in the Finnish population applying HLA-DR/DQ stratification. Haplotype transmission was analysed in 2424 nuclear families from the Finnish Paediatric Diabetes Register. Survival analysis was applied to study the development of islet autoantibodies and further progression to clinical diabetes in the prospective follow-up cohort from the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The subjects were genotyped for specific HLA class I alleles by sequence-specific hybridization using lanthanide labelled nucleotide probes. The HLA-B*39:06 allele was found almost exclusively on the (DR8)-DQB1*04 haplotype in which its presence changed the disease risk status of the whole haplotype from neutral to predisposing. The HLA-A*24:02 and the B*39:01 alleles increased the diabetes-associated risk of the DRB1*04:04-DQA1*03-DQB1*03:02 haplotype but the alleles were in linkage disequilibrium and no independent effect could be detected. Within the DIPP cohort, neither the A*24:02 nor the B*39:01 allele were associated with seroconversion but were in contrast associated with increased progression from seroconversion to clinical disease. The independent predisposing effect of the HLA-B*39:06 allele with type 1 diabetes was confirmed in the Finnish population but the association of the A*24:02 and B*39:01 alleles remained inconclusive whilst both A*24:02 and B*39:01 affected the progression rate from seroconversion to autoantibody positivity to overt type 1 diabetes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The Precarious Prokaryotic Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionary selection for optimal genome preservation, replication, and expression should yield similar chromosome organizations in any type of cells. And yet, the chromosome organization is surprisingly different between eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The nuclear versus cytoplasmic accommodation of genetic material accounts for the distinct eukaryotic and prokaryotic modes of genome evolution, but it falls short of explaining the differences in the chromosome organization. I propose that the two distinct ways to organize chromosomes are driven by the differences between the global-consecutive chromosome cycle of eukaryotes and the local-concurrent chromosome cycle of prokaryotes. Specifically, progressive chromosome segregation in prokaryotes demands a single duplicon per chromosome, while other “precarious” features of the prokaryotic chromosomes can be viewed as compensations for this severe restriction. PMID:24633873

  16. Construction of a DNA library representing 15q11-13 by subtraction of two flow sorted marker chromosome-specific libraries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blennow, E.; Werelius, B.; Nordenskjoeld, M. [Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Constitutional extra {open_quotes}marker chromosomes{close_quotes} are found in {approx}0.5/1000 of newborns. Of these, 50% are inverted duplications of the pericentromeric region of chromosome 15, including two variants; (1) inv dup(15)(pter{yields}q11:q11{yields}pter) and (2) inv dup(15) (pter{yields}q12-13::q12-13{yields}pter). Variant (1) is found in phenotypically normal individuals, whereas variant (2) will produce a typical clinical picture including mental retardation, autism, hyperactivity and discrete dysmorphic features. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using single copy probes from the Prader-Willi region confirms these observations as well as chromosome painting using a flow-sorted marker chromosome-specific library from a variant (1) marker, hybridized to the chromosomes of a patient with a variant (2) marker chromosome. Followingly, a flow-sorted biotinylated variant (1) library was subtracted from a non-labeled variant (2) library using magnetic beads and subsequent amplification by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR (DOP-PCR). The successful result was demonstrated by using the amplified material for chromosome painting on chromosome slides from variant (1) and variant (2) patients. We have constructed a library from 15q11-13. This region contains genes producing a specific abnormal phenotype when found in a tri- or tetrasomic state. The region also contains the genes responsible for the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes when the paternal/maternal copy is missing, respectively. It is therefore a region where parental imprinting plays an important role. The isolated library may be used to isolate single copy clones which will allow further investigations of this region.

  17. Detection of allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. using molecular markers - microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kačavenda Dragana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium head blight (FHB, caused primarily by Fusarium graminearum, is one of the most important fungal diseases of wheat. It may cause severe yield and quality losses in humid and warm conditions. However, the most important concern is the mycotoxin contamination of grain. Breeding of cultivars resistant to FHB is the best way to control the disease. In order to examine possibilities for application molecular markers - microsatellites in selecting for resistance to FHB, allelic variability at wheat loci associated with resistance to Fusarium ssp. was saidied using two microsatellite markers: GWM533 (chromosome 3B and GWM156 (chromosome 5A. Detection of the allelic polymorphism was conducted compared to the cultivars Sumai 3, Frontana and Amigo which are widely used as FHB resistance sources. In 23 French genotypes and 25 genotypes developed at the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, 5 alleles (GWM533 and 6 alleles (GWM156 were detected. In 15 genotypes at loci GWM533 and 10 genotypes at loci GWM156 same allele was detected as in some of standard cultivars. Obtained results should be evaluated at field experiments in order to confirm corelation between presence of specific allele and resistance to fusarium head blight and in order to examine importance of alleles that are not detected in standard cultivars.

  18. Tumor-specific loss of 11p15.5 alleles in del11p13 Wilms tumor and in familial adrenocortical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, I.; Grandjouan, S.; Couillin, P.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have compared constitutional and tumor genotypes in nine cases of hereditary Wilms tumor (WT) and in three unrelated cases of familial adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC). Since susceptibility to these tumors can be observed in malformation syndromes associated with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13 (WT) and with a constitutional duplication of band 11p15.5 (WT, ADCC), they investigated these two candidate regions by using 11p polymorphic markers. As expected, somatic chromosomal events, resulting in a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5, were observed in the tumor of two familial cases of adrenocortical carcinoma. Surprisingly, however, analysis of the WT of two patients with a constitutional deletion of band 11p13, associated with aniridia, genitourinary abnormalities, and mental retardation (WAGR syndrome), revealed a loss of heterozygosity limited to region 11p15.5. These data therefore suggest that observation of a specific loss of heterozygosity may not necessarily point to the site of the initial germinal mutation. Together with previous similar observations of a loss of heterozygosity limited to 11p15.5 in breast cancer and in rhabdomyosarcoma, the data suggest that region 11p15.5 may carry a non-tissue-specific gene that could be involved in genetic predisposition, in tumor progression, or in both

  19. Long-distance interaction of the integrated HPV fragment with MYC gene and 8q24.22 region upregulating the allele-specific MYC expression in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Congle; Liu, Yongzhen; Shi, Shu; Zhang, Ruiyang; Zhang, Ting; Xu, Qiang; Zhu, Pengfei; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2017-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most important risk factor for cervical cancer development. In HeLa cell line, the HPV viral genome is integrated at 8q24 in one allele of chromosome 8. It has been reported that the HPV fragment integrated in HeLa genome can cis-activate the expression of proto-oncogene MYC, which is located at 500 kb downstream of the integrated site. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of this regulation is unknown. A recent study reported that MYC was highly expressed exclusively from the HPV-integrated haplotype, and a long-range chromatin interaction between the integrated HPV fragment and MYC gene has been hypothesized. In this study, we provided the experimental evidences supporting this long-range chromatin interaction in HeLa cells by using Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C) method. We found that the integrated HPV fragment, MYC and 8q24.22 was close to each other and might form a trimer in spatial location. When knocking out the integrated HPV fragment or 8q24.22 region from chromosome 8 by CRISPR/Cas9 system, the expression of MYC reduced dramatically in HeLa cells. Interestingly, decreased expression was only observed in three from eight cell clones, when only one 8q24.22 allele was knocked out. Functionally, HPV knockout caused senescence-associated acidic β-gal activity in HeLa cells. These data indicate a long-distance interaction of the integrated HPV fragment with MYC gene and 8q24.22 region, providing an alternative mechanism relevant to the carcinogenicity of HPV integration. © 2017 The Authors International Journal of Cancer published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of UICC.

  20. Detection of disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphisms in pemphigus vulgaris linked to the DQwl and DQw3 alleles of the HLA-D region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szafer, F.; Brautbar, C.; Tzfoni, E.; Frankel, G.; Sherman, L.; Cohen, I.; Hacham-Zadeh, S.; Aberer, W.; Tappeiner, G.; Holubar, K.; Steinman, L.

    1987-09-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris in Israeli Ashkenazi and non-Ashkenazi Jews and in Austrian non-Jewish patients is strongly associated with the DR4 and DRw6 alleles of the HLA-D region class II genes. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was undertaken with DQ..beta.., DQ..cap alpha.., and DR..beta.. cDNA probes. Hybridization with the DQ..beta.. probe identifies Pvu II, BamHI, and EcoRV fragments that absolutely discriminate pemphigus vulgaris patients from healthy DR-, DQ-, and ethnic-matched controls. In contrast the DQ..cap alpha.. and DR..beta.. probes failed to identify disease-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism fragments. These studies indicate that DQw1 and DQw3 polymorphisms carried by pemphigus vulgaris patients may be directly involved in predisposition to the disease or may be tightly linked to the susceptibility gene itself. To our knowledge, this is the first example of an HLA restriction fragment length polymorphism that is highly associated with susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

  1. The evaluation of histo-blood group ABO typing by flow cytometric and PCR-amplification of specific alleles analyses and their application in clinical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aki, Kensaku; Izumi, Azusa; Hosoi, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    ABO antigens are oligosaccharide antigens, and are widely distributed on red blood and tissue cells as well as in saliva and body fluid. Therefore, these antigens are important not only for blood transfusion, but also for tissue cell and organ transplantations. Also, blood, hair, and seminal fluid are important sources of evidence at crime scenes, and these antigens are some of the most important markers for personal identification in forensic investigations. Here, we describe the development and use of quantitative analysis of A, B, and H antigens on red blood cells by employing flow cytometric analysis and the ABO genotyping method based on PCR-amplification of specific alleles (PASA) within DNA, especially from blood and saliva. In this study, flow cytometric analysis could be used to compare the differences between the expression of A and/or B and H antigens on red blood cells with various phenotypes, and the PASA method was able to determine the genotype of the type cisA(2)B(3) pedigree using only DNA extracted from saliva. These analysis methods are simple and useful for judging the ABO blood group system and genotyping, and are used widely throughout research and clinical laboratories and forensic fields.

  2. A Family of Zinc Finger Proteins Is Required forChromosome-specific Pairing and Synapsis during Meiosis in C.elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2006-06-07

    Homologous chromosome pairing and synapsis are prerequisitefor accurate chromosome segregation during meiosis. Here, we show that afamily of four related C2H2 zinc-finger proteins plays a central role inthese events in C. elegans. These proteins are encoded within a tandemgene cluster. In addition to the X-specific HIM-8 protein, threeadditional paralogs collectively mediate the behavior of the fiveautosomes. Each chromosome relies on a specific member of the family topair and synapse with its homolog. These "ZIM" proteins concentrate atspecial regions called meiotic pairing centers on the correspondingchromosomes. These sites are dispersed along the nuclear envelope duringearly meiotic prophase, suggesting a role analogous to thetelomere-mediated meiotic bouquet in other organisms. To gain insightinto the evolution of these components, wecharacterized homologs in C.briggsae and C. remanei, which revealed changes in copy number of thisgene family within the nematode lineage.

  3. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L. chromosome 1R (1RS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Číhalíková Jarmila

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomics of rye (Secale cereale L. is impeded by its large nuclear genome (1C~7,900 Mbp with prevalence of DNA repeats (> 90%. An attractive possibility is to dissect the genome to small parts after flow sorting particular chromosomes and chromosome arms. To test this approach, we have chosen 1RS chromosome arm, which represents only 5.6% of the total rye genome. The 1RS arm is an attractive target as it carries many important genes and because it became part of the wheat gene pool as the 1BL.1RS translocation. Results We demonstrate that it is possible to sort 1RS arm from wheat-rye ditelosomic addition line. Using this approach, we isolated over 10 million of 1RS arms using flow sorting and used their DNA to construct a 1RS-specific BAC library, which comprises 103,680 clones with average insert size of 73 kb. The library comprises two sublibraries constructed using HindIII and EcoRI and provides a deep coverage of about 14-fold of the 1RS arm (442 Mbp. We present preliminary results obtained during positional cloning of the stem rust resistance gene SrR, which confirm a potential of the library to speed up isolation of agronomically important genes by map-based cloning. Conclusion We present a strategy that enables sorting short arms of several chromosomes of rye. Using flow-sorted chromosomes, we have constructed a deep coverage BAC library specific for the short arm of chromosome 1R (1RS. This is the first subgenomic BAC library available for rye and we demonstrate its potential for positional gene cloning. We expect that the library will facilitate development of a physical contig map of 1RS and comparative genomics of the homoeologous chromosome group 1 of wheat, barley and rye.

  4. Asynchronous Replication, Mono-Allelic Expression, and Long Range Cis-Effects of ASAR6

    OpenAIRE

    Donley, Nathan; Stoffregen, Eric P.; Smith, Leslie; Montagna, Christina; Thayer, Mathew J.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encod...

  5. Asynchronous replication, mono-allelic expression, and long range Cis-effects of ASAR6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donley, Nathan; Stoffregen, Eric P; Smith, Leslie; Montagna, Christina; Thayer, Mathew J

    2013-04-01

    Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encodes a large intergenic non-coding RNA gene named Asynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, or ASAR6. Disruption of ASAR6 results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic chromosome condensation, and activation of the previously silent alleles of mono-allelic genes on chromosome 6. The ASAR6 gene resides within an ∼1.2 megabase domain of asynchronously replicating DNA that is coordinated with other random asynchronously replicating loci along chromosome 6. In contrast to other nearby mono-allelic genes, ASAR6 RNA is expressed from the later-replicating allele. ASAR6 RNA is synthesized by RNA Polymerase II, is not polyadenlyated, is restricted to the nucleus, and is subject to random mono-allelic expression. Disruption of ASAR6 leads to the formation of bridged chromosomes, micronuclei, and structural instability of chromosome 6. Finally, ectopic integration of cloned genomic DNA containing ASAR6 causes delayed replication of entire mouse chromosomes.

  6. Asynchronous replication, mono-allelic expression, and long range Cis-effects of ASAR6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian chromosomes initiate DNA replication at multiple sites along their length during each S phase following a temporal replication program. The majority of genes on homologous chromosomes replicate synchronously. However, mono-allelically expressed genes such as imprinted genes, allelically excluded genes, and genes on female X chromosomes replicate asynchronously. We have identified a cis-acting locus on human chromosome 6 that controls this replication-timing program. This locus encodes a large intergenic non-coding RNA gene named Asynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 6, or ASAR6. Disruption of ASAR6 results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic chromosome condensation, and activation of the previously silent alleles of mono-allelic genes on chromosome 6. The ASAR6 gene resides within an ∼1.2 megabase domain of asynchronously replicating DNA that is coordinated with other random asynchronously replicating loci along chromosome 6. In contrast to other nearby mono-allelic genes, ASAR6 RNA is expressed from the later-replicating allele. ASAR6 RNA is synthesized by RNA Polymerase II, is not polyadenlyated, is restricted to the nucleus, and is subject to random mono-allelic expression. Disruption of ASAR6 leads to the formation of bridged chromosomes, micronuclei, and structural instability of chromosome 6. Finally, ectopic integration of cloned genomic DNA containing ASAR6 causes delayed replication of entire mouse chromosomes.

  7. The expansion ability but not the quality of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells is associated with protective human leucocyte antigen class I alleles in long-term non-progressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Mariola; Peris, Alejandra; Soriano, Vincent; Lozano, Sara; Vicario, José Luis; Rallón, Norma I; Restrepo, Clara; Benito, José M

    2011-11-01

    Studies in long-term non-progressors (LTNP) have suggested that the quality of the CD8(+) response may involve protective human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles. However, studies examining the expansion ability of different functional CD8(+) T cells and their association with HLA class I alleles are lacking. LTNP, untreated typical progressors (TP) and patients successfully on highly active retroviral therapy (HAART) during 1 year (HP) were included. HLA class I typing was performed using a sequence-specific primer assay. Functional subsets of Gag- and Nef-specific CD8(+) cells were analysed based on the production of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1β, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-2. Their expansion abilities were evaluated after 10-day culture in the presence of Gag and Nef human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) peptides. No differences were seen when comparing quantitative and qualitative HIV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses according to the presence/absence of protective HLA alleles (B*58 and B*27 supertypes) in each group. However, LTNP with protective HLA alleles showed a higher expansion ability of Gag-specific MIP(+) TNF(+) IL-2(+) T cells and Nef-specific MIP(+) TNF(+) IL-2(+) . HLA-B*5701+LTNP displayed a higher expansion ability of Gag and Nef-specific MIP(+) TNF(-) IL-2(+) T cells than HLA-B*5701-LTNP. This was not so for HLA-B*2705. No differences were seen in the expansion ability according to the presence/absence of protective HLA alleles in TP and HP. The expansion ability of polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells is modulated by HLA class I alleles and targeted protein. LTNP with HLA class I protective alleles (mainly B*5701) display better expansion ability of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells than the rest, suggesting that factors other than HLA-B*5701 must contribute to the control of viral replication in other LTNP. Furthermore, these attributes of HIV-specific CD8(+) T are not restored by HAART; thus, adjuvant

  8. Sensitive mutant detection by concentrating mutant DNA with allele-specific capture and its application to analysis of contaminated grains in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohata, Ryuya; Koitabashi, Kosuke; Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Nishio, Takeshi

    2018-03-12

    We developed a method for detection of mutants in a large number of plants, and found this method to be applicable to detection of a mutant allele at a concentration of 1/1000. Many techniques for SNP analysis have been developed, but most of these techniques are not so sensitive to be used for detection of mutants in a large number of plants. Although some highly sensitive methods of SNP analysis have been reported, they are costly. In the present study, a method for concentrating mutant DNA was examined for sensitive detection of an SNP allele in a bulked DNA sample. PCR products of mutant alleles were captured by biotin-labeled oligonucleotide conjugated with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. By repeated captures of each strand and combining both strands, mutant alleles with a concentration of 1/1000 in wild-type alleles were detectable by CAPS or dCAPS analysis. Indirect capture of a mutant allele was possible, but efficiency was slightly lower than that of the direct capture. The developed method was applied to detection of contamination of rice grains by grains of a different cultivar. Possible applications of this method are discussed.

  9. Female site-specific transposase-induced recombination: a high-efficiency method for fine mapping mutations on the X chromosome in Drosophila.

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus, Jeffrey M

    2003-01-01

    P-element transposons in the Drosophila germline mobilize only in the presence of the appropriate transposase enzyme. Sometimes, instead of mobilizing completely, P elements will undergo site-specific recombination with the homologous chromosome. Site-specific recombination is the basis for male recombination mapping, since the male germline does not normally undergo recombination. Site-specific recombination also takes place in females, but this has been difficult to study because of the obs...

  10. Trans-ethnic fine-mapping of lipid loci identifies population-specific signals and allelic heterogeneity that increases the trait variance explained.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified ~100 loci associated with blood lipid levels, but much of the trait heritability remains unexplained, and at most loci the identities of the trait-influencing variants remain unknown. We conducted a trans-ethnic fine-mapping study at 18, 22, and 18 GWAS loci on the Metabochip for their association with triglycerides (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, respectively, in individuals of African American (n = 6,832, East Asian (n = 9,449, and European (n = 10,829 ancestry. We aimed to identify the variants with strongest association at each locus, identify additional and population-specific signals, refine association signals, and assess the relative significance of previously described functional variants. Among the 58 loci, 33 exhibited evidence of association at P<1 × 10(-4 in at least one ancestry group. Sequential conditional analyses revealed that ten, nine, and four loci in African Americans, Europeans, and East Asians, respectively, exhibited two or more signals. At these loci, accounting for all signals led to a 1.3- to 1.8-fold increase in the explained phenotypic variance compared to the strongest signals. Distinct signals across ancestry groups were identified at PCSK9 and APOA5. Trans-ethnic analyses narrowed the signals to smaller sets of variants at GCKR, PPP1R3B, ABO, LCAT, and ABCA1. Of 27 variants reported previously to have functional effects, 74% exhibited the strongest association at the respective signal. In conclusion, trans-ethnic high-density genotyping and analysis confirm the presence of allelic heterogeneity, allow the identification of population-specific variants, and limit the number of candidate SNPs for functional studies.

  11. Human chromosome-specific changes in a human-hamster hybrid cell line (AL) assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (fish)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geard, Charles R.; Jenkins, Gloria

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess all gamma-ray induced chromosomal changes confined to one human chromosome using fluorescence microscopy and in situ hybridization with a fluorescently labeled human chromosome specific nucleic acid probe. Methods and Materials: Synchronized human-hamster hybrid cells containing human chromosome 11 were obtained by a modified mitotic shake-off procedure. G1 phase cells (> 95%) were irradiated with 137 Cs gamma rays (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 Gy) at a dose rate of 1.1 Gy/min and mitotic cells collected 16-20 h later; chromosomal spreads were prepared, denatured, and hybridized with a fluorescein-tagged nucleic acid probe against total human DNA. Chromosomes were examined by fluorescence microscopy and all categories of change involving the human chromosome 11 as target, recorded. Results: Overall, of the 3104 human-hamster hybrid cells examined, 82.1% were euploid, of which 88.6% contained one copy of human chromosome 11, 6.2% contained two copies, and 5.2% contained 0 copies. This is compatible with mitotic nondisjunction in a small fraction of cells. Of the remaining 17.9% of cells, 85.2% were tetraploid cells with two copies of human chromosome 11. For all aberrations involving human chromosome 11 there was a linear relationship between yield and absorbed dose of 0.1 aberrations per chromosome per Gy. The yield of dicentrics, translocations, and terminal deletions that involve one lesion on the human chromosome was linear, while the yield of interstitial deletions that arise from two interacting lesions on the human chromosome was curvilinear. The frequencies of dicentrics and translocations were about equal, while there was a high (40-60%) incidence of incomplete exchanges between human and hamster chromosomes. Conclusions: Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) procedures allow for the efficient detection of a broad range of induced changes in target chromosomes. Symmetrical exchanges induced in G1

  12. CARAT: A novel method for allelic detection of DNA copy number changes using high density oligonucleotide arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishikawa Shumpei

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA copy number alterations are one of the main characteristics of the cancer cell karyotype and can contribute to the complex phenotype of these cells. These alterations can lead to gains in cellular oncogenes as well as losses in tumor suppressor genes and can span small intervals as well as involve entire chromosomes. The ability to accurately detect these changes is central to understanding how they impact the biology of the cell. Results We describe a novel algorithm called CARAT (Copy Number Analysis with Regression And Tree that uses probe intensity information to infer copy number in an allele-specific manner from high density DNA oligonuceotide arrays designed to genotype over 100, 000 SNPs. Total and allele-specific copy number estimations using CARAT are independently evaluated for a subset of SNPs using quantitative PCR and allelic TaqMan reactions with several human breast cancer cell lines. The sensitivity and specificity of the algorithm are characterized using DNA samples containing differing numbers of X chromosomes as well as a test set of normal individuals. Results from the algorithm show a high degree of agreement with results from independent verification methods. Conclusion Overall, CARAT automatically detects regions with copy number variations and assigns a significance score to each alteration as well as generating allele-specific output. When coupled with SNP genotype calls from the same array, CARAT provides additional detail into the structure of genome wide alterations that can contribute to allelic imbalance.

  13. Allele-specific marker development and selection efficiencies for both flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase genes in soybean subgenus soja.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-06-01

    Color is one of the phenotypic markers mostly used to study soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) genetic, molecular and biochemical processes. Two P450-dependent mono-oxygenases, flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H; EC1.14.3.21) and flavonoid 3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H, EC1.14.13.88), both catalyzing the hydroxylation of the B-ring in flavonoids, play an important role in coloration. Previous studies showed that the T locus was a gene encoding F3'H and the W1 locus co-segregated with a gene encoding F3'5'H in soybean. These two genetic loci have identified to control seed coat, flower and pubescence colors. However, the allelic distributions of both F3'H and F3'5'H genes in soybean were unknown. In this study, three novel alleles were identified (two of four alleles for GmF3'H and one of three alleles for GmF3'5'H). A set of gene-tagged markers was developed and verified based on the sequence diversity of all seven alleles. Furthermore, the markers were used to analyze soybean accessions including 170 cultivated soybeans (G. max) from a mini core collection and 102 wild soybeans (G. soja). For both F3'H and F3'5'H, the marker selection efficiencies for pubescence color and flower color were determined. The results showed that one GmF3'H allele explained 92.2 % of the variation in tawny and two gmf3'h alleles explained 63.8 % of the variation in gray pubescence colors. In addition, two GmF3'5'H alleles and one gmF3'5'h allele explained 94.0 % of the variation in purple and 75.3 % in white flowers, respectively. By the combination of the two loci, seed coat color was determined. In total, 90.9 % of accessions possessing both the gmf3'h-b and gmf3'5'h alleles had yellow seed coats. Therefore, seed coat colors are controlled by more than two loci.

  14. Ten alien chromosome additions of Gossypium hirsutum-Gossypium bickii developed by integrative uses of GISH and species-specific SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dong; Feng, Shouli; Li, Sai; Chen, Yu; Zhou, Baoliang

    2018-03-27

    Gossypium bickii: (2n = 26, G 1 G 1 ), a wild diploid cotton, carries many favourable traits. However, these favourable traits cannot be directly transferred into G. hirsutum (2n = 52, AADD) cultivars due to the differences in genomes. Monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) are considered an invaluable tool for the introgression of genes of interest from wild relatives into cultivated crops. In this study, the G. hirsutum-G. bickii amphidiploid (2n = 78, AADDG 1 G 1 ) was backcrossed with G. hirsutum to develop alien additions containing individual G. bickii chromosomes in a G. hirsutum background. Genomic in situ hybridization was employed to detect the number of alien chromosomes added to the backcross progenies. A total of 183 G. bickii-specific DNA markers were developed to discriminate the identities of the G. bickii chromosomes added to G. hirsutum and assess the alien chromosome transmissibility. Chromosomes 4G b and 13G b showed the highest transmissibility, while chromosomes 1G b , 7G b and 11G b showed the lowest. Ten of the 13 possible G. hirsutum-G. bickii MAALs were isolated and characterized, which will lay the foundation for transferring resistance genes of G. bickii into G. hirsutum, as well as for gene assignment, physical mapping, and selective isolation and mapping of cDNAs for particular G. bickii chromosomes. The strategies of how to use MAALs to develop varieties with the trait of interest from wild species (such as glanded plant-glandless seed) were proposed and discussed.

  15. The Non-coding Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility Locus, Mcs5c, Regulates Pappa Expression via Age-Specific Chromatin Folding and Allele-Dependent DNA Methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda N Henning

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In understanding the etiology of breast cancer, the contributions of both genetic and environmental risk factors are further complicated by the impact of breast developmental stage. Specifically, the time period ranging from childhood to young adulthood represents a critical developmental window in a woman's life when she is more susceptible to environmental hazards that may affect future breast cancer risk. Although the effects of environmental exposures during particular developmental Windows of Susceptibility (WOS are well documented, the genetic mechanisms governing these interactions are largely unknown. Functional characterization of the Mammary Carcinoma Susceptibility 5c, Mcs5c, congenic rat model of breast cancer at various stages of mammary gland development was conducted to gain insight into the interplay between genetic risk factors and WOS. Using quantitative real-time PCR, chromosome conformation capture, and bisulfite pyrosequencing we have found that Mcs5c acts within the mammary gland to regulate expression of the neighboring gene Pappa during a critical mammary developmental time period in the rat, corresponding to the human young adult WOS. Pappa has been shown to positively regulate the IGF signaling pathway, which is required for proper mammary gland/breast development and is of increasing interest in breast cancer pathogenesis. Mcs5c-mediated regulation of Pappa appears to occur through age-dependent and mammary gland-specific chromatin looping, as well as genotype-dependent CpG island shore methylation. This represents, to our knowledge, the first insight into cellular mechanisms underlying the WOS phenomenon and demonstrates the influence developmental stage can have on risk locus functionality. Additionally, this work represents a novel model for further investigation into how environmental factors, together with genetic factors, modulate breast cancer risk in the context of breast developmental stage.

  16. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The genome of spinach single chromosome complement is about 1000 Mbp, which is the model material to study the molecular mechanisms of plant sex differentiation. The cytological study showed that the biggest spinach chromosome (chromosome 1) was taken as spinach sex chromosome. It had three alleles of ...

  17. Emergence of a Homo sapiens-specific gene family and chromosome 16p11.2 CNV susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttle, Xander; Giannuzzi, Giuliana; Duyzend, Michael H; Schraiber, Joshua G; Narvaiza, Iñigo; Sudmant, Peter H; Penn, Osnat; Chiatante, Giorgia; Malig, Maika; Huddleston, John; Benner, Chris; Camponeschi, Francesca; Ciofi-Baffoni, Simone; Stessman, Holly A F; Marchetto, Maria C N; Denman, Laura; Harshman, Lana; Baker, Carl; Raja, Archana; Penewit, Kelsi; Janke, Nicolette; Tang, W Joyce; Ventura, Mario; Banci, Lucia; Antonacci, Francesca; Akey, Joshua M; Amemiya, Chris T; Gage, Fred H; Reymond, Alexandre; Eichler, Evan E

    2016-08-11

    Genetic differences that specify unique aspects of human evolution have typically been identified by comparative analyses between the genomes of humans and closely related primates, including more recently the genomes of archaic hominins. Not all regions of the genome, however, are equally amenable to such study. Recurrent copy number variation (CNV) at chromosome 16p11.2 accounts for approximately 1% of cases of autism and is mediated by a complex set of segmental duplications, many of which arose recently during human evolution. Here we reconstruct the evolutionary history of the locus and identify bolA family member 2 (BOLA2) as a gene duplicated exclusively in Homo sapiens. We estimate that a 95-kilobase-pair segment containing BOLA2 duplicated across the critical region approximately 282 thousand years ago (ka), one of the latest among a series of genomic changes that dramatically restructured the locus during hominid evolution. All humans examined carried one or more copies of the duplication, which nearly fixed early in the human lineage--a pattern unlikely to have arisen so rapidly in the absence of selection (P sapiens-specific duplication. In summary, the duplicative transposition of BOLA2 at the root of the H. sapiens lineage about 282 ka simultaneously increased copy number of a gene associated with iron homeostasis and predisposed our species to recurrent rearrangements associated with disease.

  18. Contribution of allelic variability in prostate specific antigen (PSA) & androgen receptor (AR) genes to serum PSA levels in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Sushant V; Maitra, Anurupa; Roy, Nobhojit; Chavan, Padma R

    2014-03-01

    Wide variability in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels exists in malignant conditions of the prostate. PSA is expressed in normal range in 20 to 25 per cent of prostate cancer cases even in presence of high grade Gleason score. This study was aimed to assess the influence of genetic variants exhibited by PSA and androgen receptor (AR) genes towards the variable expression of PSA in prostate cancer. Pre-treatment serum PSA levels from 101 prostate cancer cases were retrieved from medical record. PSA genotype analysis in promoter region and AR gene microsatellite Cytosine/Adenine/Guanine (CAG) repeat analysis in exon 1 region was performed using DNA sequencing and fragment analysis techniques. A total of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PSA promoter region were noted. Only two SNPs viz., 158G/A (PPSA levels. The carriers of homozygous GG genotype (PPSA whereas homozygous AA genotype (PPSA levels. The combination effect of PSA genotypes along with stratified AR CAG repeats lengths (long, intermediate and short) was also studied. The homozygous GG genotype along with AR long CAG repeats and homozygous AA genotype along with AR short CAG repeats at position -3845 and -158 showed strong interaction and thus influenced serum PSA levels. The genetic variants exhibited by PSA gene at positions -3845G/A and -158G/A may be accountable towards wide variability of serum PSA levels in prostate cancer. Also the preferential binding of G and A alleles at these polymorphic sites along with AR long and short CAG repeats may contribute towards PSA expression.

  19. Minority drug-resistant HIV-1 variants in treatment naïve East-African and Caucasian patients detected by allele-specific real-time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halime Ekici

    Full Text Available To assess the presence of two major non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI drug resistance mutations (DRMs, Y181C and K103N, in minor viral quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected East-African and Swedish patients by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR.Treatment naïve adults (n=191 with three epidemiological backgrounds were included: 92 Ethiopians living in Ethiopia; 55 East-Africans who had migrated to Sweden; and 44 Caucasians living in Sweden. The pol gene was analysed by standard population sequencing and by AS-PCR for the detection of Y181C and K103N.The Y181C was detected in the minority quasispecies of six Ethiopians (6.5%, in two Caucasians (4.5%, and in one East-African (1.8%. The K103N was detected in one East- African (1.8%, by both methods. The proportion of mutants ranged from 0.25% to 17.5%. Additional DRMs were found in all three treatment naïve patient groups by population sequencing.Major NNRTI mutations can be found by AS-PCR in minor quasispecies of treatment naïve HIV-1 infected Ethiopians living in Ethiopia, in East-African and Caucasian patients living in Sweden in whom population sequencing reveal wild-type virus only. Surveys with standard sequencing are likely to underestimate transmitted drug resistance and the presence of resistant minor quasispecies in treatment naïve patients should be topic for future large scale studies.

  20. X- and Y-chromosome specific variants of the amelogenin gene allow sex determination in sheep (Ovis aries and European red deer (Cervus elaphus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenig B

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple and precise methods for sex determination in animals are a pre-requisite for a number of applications in animal production and forensics. However, some of the existing methods depend only on the detection of Y-chromosome specific sequences. Therefore, the abscence of a signal does not necessarily mean that the sample is of female origin, because experimental errors can also lead to negative results. Thus, the detection of Y- and X-chromosome specific sequences is advantageous. Results A novel method for sex identification in mammals (sheep, Ovis aries and European red deer, Cervus elaphus is described, using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing of a part of the amelogenin gene. A partial sequence of the amelogenin gene of sheep and red deer was obtained, which exists on both X and Y chromosomes with a deletion region on the Y chromosome. With a specific pair of primers a DNA fragment of different length between the male and female mammal was amplified. Conclusion PCR amplification using the amelogenin gene primers is useful in sex identification of samples from sheep and red deer and can be applied to DNA analysis of micro samples with small amounts of DNA such as hair roots as well as bones or embryo biopsies.

  1. Site-specific antibodies distinguish single amino acid substitutions in position 57 in HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles associated with insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, D; Dyrberg, T; Michelsen, Birgitte

    1989-01-01

    The HLA-DQ beta-chain gene shows a close association with susceptibility or resistance to autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and it has been suggested that the amino acid in position 57 may be of pathogenetic importance. To study the expression of the IDDM associated HLA-DQ beta......-chain alleles, we immunized rabbits with 12 to 13 amino acid long peptides representing HLA-DQw7 and -DQw8 allelic sequences, differing only by one amino acid in position 57 being aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala), respectively. Immunoblot analysis of lymphoblastoid cells showed that several antisera...... amino acid substitutions in predetermined positions of allelic HLA-DQ beta-chain gene products. Such sera should become useful to detect and investigate HLA associated susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in man....

  2. Stage-specific damage to synaptonemal complexes and metaphase chromosomes induced by X rays in male mouse germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backer, L.C.; Sontag, M.R.; Allen, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Synaptonemal complexes (SCs) reveal mutagen-induced effects in germ cell meiotic chromosomes. The study was aimed at characterizing relationships between SC and metaphase I chromosome damage following radiation exposure at various stages of spermatogenesis. Male mice were irradiated with doses of 0, 2, or 4 Gy, and spermatocytes were harvested at times consistent with earlier exposures as spermatogonial stem cells, preleptotene cells (premeiotic DNA synthesis), or meiotic prophase cells. After stem-cell exposure, twice as many rearrangements were observed in SCs as in metaphase I chromosomes. Irradiation during premeiotic DNA synthesis resulted in dose-related increases in SC breakage and rearrangements (including novel forms) and in metaphase chromosomal aberrations. Following prophase exposure, various types and levels of SC and metaphase damage were observed. Irradiation of zygotene cells led to high frequencies of chromosome multivalents in metaphase I without a correspondingly high level of damage in preceding prophase SCs. Thus, irradiation of premeiotic and meiotic cells results in variable relationships between SC and metaphase chromosome damage

  3. Establishment of real time allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR for detection of HBV YIDD (ATT mutation and evaluation of its application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Long-term use of nucleos(tide analogues can increase risk of HBV drug-resistance mutations. The rtM204I (ATT coding for isoleucine is one of the most important resistance mutation sites. Establishing a simple, rapid, reliable and highly sensitive assay to detect the resistant mutants as early as possible is of great clinical significance. METHODS: Recombinant plasmids for HBV YMDD (tyrosine-methionine-aspartate-aspartate and YIDD (tyrosine-isoleucine-aspartate-aspartate were constructed by TA cloning. Real time allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR (RT-AS-LNA-qPCR with SYBR Green I was established by LNA-modified primers and evaluated with standard recombinant plasmids, clinical templates (the clinical wild type and mutant HBV DNA mixture and 102 serum samples from nucleos(tide analogues-experienced patients. The serum samples from a chronic hepatitis B (CHB patient firstly received LMV mono therapy and then switched to LMV + ADV combined therapy were also dynamically analyzed for 10 times. RESULTS: The linear range of the assay was between 1×10(9 copies/μl and 1 × 10(2 copies/μl. The low detection limit was 1 × 10(1 copies/μl. Sensitivity of the assay were 10(-6, 10(-4 and 10(-2 in the wild-type background of 1 × 10(9 copies/μl, 1 × 10(7 copies/μl and 1 × 10(5 copies/μl, respectively. The sensitivity of the assay in detection of clinical samples was 0.03%. The complete coincidence rate between RT-AS-LNA-qPCR and direct sequencing was 91.2% (93/102, partial coincidence rate was 8.8% (9/102, and no complete discordance was observed. The two assays showed a high concordance (Kappa = 0.676, P = 0.000. Minor variants can be detected 18 weeks earlier than the rebound of HBV DNA load and alanine aminotransferase level. CONCLUSIONS: A rapid, cost-effective, high sensitive, specific and reliable method of RT-AS-LNA-qPCR with SYBR Green I for early and absolute quantification of HBV YIDD (ATT coding for isoleucine

  4. A Sensitive and Specific Diagnostic Panel to Distinguish Diffuse Astrocytoma from Astrocytosis: Chromosome 7 Gain with Mutant Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 1 and p53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Jansen, Michael; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Kim, J. ChulMin; Cosper, Arjola K.; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Nutt, Catherine L.; Iafrate, A. John; Louis, David N.

    2011-01-01

    One of the major challenges of surgical neuropathology is the distinction of diffuse astrocytoma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade II) from astrocytosis. The most commonly used ancillary tool to solve this problem is p53 immunohistochemistry (IHC), but this is neither sensitive nor specific. Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations are common in lower grade gliomas, with most causing a specific amino acid change (R132H) that can be detected with a monoclonal antibody. IDH2 mutations are rare, but also occur in gliomas. In addition, gains of chromosome 7 are common in gliomas. In this study we assessed the status of p53, IDH1/2 and chromosome 7 to determine the most useful panel to distinguish astrocytoma from astrocytosis. We studied biopsy specimens from 21 WHO grade II diffuse astrocytomas and 20 reactive conditions. The single most sensitive test to identify astrocytoma is fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosome 7 gain (76.2%). The combination of p53 and mutant IDH1 IHC provides a higher sensitivity (71.4%) than either test alone (47.8%); this combination offers a practical initial approach for the surgical pathologist. The best overall sensitivity (95%) is achieved when FISH for chromosome 7 gain is added to the p53-mutant IDH1 IHC panel. PMID:21343879

  5. V-src oncogene-specific carboxy-terminal peptide is immunoprotective against Rous sarcoma growth in chickens with MHC class I allele B-F12

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofmann, A.; Plachý, Jiří; Hunt, L.; Kaufman, J.; Hála, K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 2003, č. 21 (2003), s. 4694-4699 ISSN 0264-410X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : Rous sarcoma * v-src peptide * chicken MHC class I allele Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.007, year: 2003

  6. Assembly of a phased diploid Candida albicans genome facilitates allele-specific measurements and provides a simple model for repeat and indel structure

    OpenAIRE

    Muzzey, Dale; Schwartz, Katja; Weissman, Jonathan S; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Candida albicans is a ubiquitous opportunistic fungal pathogen that afflicts immunocompromised human hosts. With rare and transient exceptions the yeast is diploid, yet despite its clinical relevance the respective sequences of its two homologous chromosomes have not been completely resolved. Results We construct a phased diploid genome assembly by deep sequencing a standard labor...

  7. The genetic content of chromosomal inversions across a wide latitudinal gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Simões

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence regarding the role of chromosomal inversions in relevant biological processes such as local adaptation and speciation. A classic example of the adaptive role of chromosomal polymorphisms is given by the clines of inversion frequencies in Drosophila subobscura, repeatable across continents. Nevertheless, not much is known about the molecular variation associated with these polymorphisms. We characterized the genetic content of ca. 600 individuals from nine European populations following a latitudinal gradient by analysing 19 microsatellite loci from two autosomes (J and U and the sex chromosome (A, taking into account their chromosomal inversions. Our results clearly demonstrate the molecular genetic uniformity within a given chromosomal inversion across a large latitudinal gradient, particularly from Groningen (Netherlands in the north to Málaga (Spain in the south, experiencing highly diverse environmental conditions. This low genetic differentiation within the same gene arrangement across the nine European populations is consistent with the local adaptation hypothesis for th evolutionof chromosomal polymorphisms. We also show the effective role of chromosomal inversions in maintaining different genetic pools within these inverted genomic regions even in the presence of high gene flow. Inversions represent thus an important barrier to gene flux and can help maintain specific allelic combinations with positive effects on fitness. Consistent patterns of microsatellite allele-inversion linkage disequilibrium particularly in loci within inversions were also observed. Finally, we identified areas within inversions presenting clinal variation that might be under selection.

  8. The status of dosage compensation in the multiple X chromosomes of the platypus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine E Deakin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Dosage compensation has been thought to be a ubiquitous property of sex chromosomes that are represented differently in males and females. The expression of most X-borne genes is equalized between XX females and XY males in therian mammals (marsupials and "placentals" by inactivating one X chromosome in female somatic cells. However, compensation seems not to be strictly required to equalize the expression of most Z-borne genes between ZZ male and ZW female birds. Whether dosage compensation operates in the third mammal lineage, the egg-laying monotremes, is of considerable interest, since the platypus has a complex sex chromosome system in which five X and five Y chromosomes share considerable genetic homology with the chicken ZW sex chromosome pair, but not with therian XY chromosomes. The assignment of genes to four platypus X chromosomes allowed us to examine X dosage compensation in this unique species. Quantitative PCR showed a range of compensation, but SNP analysis of several X-borne genes showed that both alleles are transcribed in a heterozygous female. Transcription of 14 BACs representing 19 X-borne genes was examined by RNA-FISH in female and male fibroblasts. An autosomal control gene was expressed from both alleles in nearly all nuclei, and four pseudoautosomal BACs were usually expressed from both alleles in male as well as female nuclei, showing that their Y loci are active. However, nine X-specific BACs were usually transcribed from only one allele. This suggests that while some genes on the platypus X are not dosage compensated, other genes do show some form of compensation via stochastic transcriptional inhibition, perhaps representing an ancestral system that evolved to be more tightly controlled in placental mammals such as human and mouse.

  9. The status of dosage compensation in the multiple X chromosomes of the platypus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deakin, Janine E; Hore, Timothy A; Koina, Edda; Marshall Graves, Jennifer A

    2008-07-25

    Dosage compensation has been thought to be a ubiquitous property of sex chromosomes that are represented differently in males and females. The expression of most X-borne genes is equalized between XX females and XY males in therian mammals (marsupials and "placentals") by inactivating one X chromosome in female somatic cells. However, compensation seems not to be strictly required to equalize the expression of most Z-borne genes between ZZ male and ZW female birds. Whether dosage compensation operates in the third mammal lineage, the egg-laying monotremes, is of considerable interest, since the platypus has a complex sex chromosome system in which five X and five Y chromosomes share considerable genetic homology with the chicken ZW sex chromosome pair, but not with therian XY chromosomes. The assignment of genes to four platypus X chromosomes allowed us to examine X dosage compensation in this unique species. Quantitative PCR showed a range of compensation, but SNP analysis of several X-borne genes showed that both alleles are transcribed in a heterozygous female. Transcription of 14 BACs representing 19 X-borne genes was examined by RNA-FISH in female and male fibroblasts. An autosomal control gene was expressed from both alleles in nearly all nuclei, and four pseudoautosomal BACs were usually expressed from both alleles in male as well as female nuclei, showing that their Y loci are active. However, nine X-specific BACs were usually transcribed from only one allele. This suggests that while some genes on the platypus X are not dosage compensated, other genes do show some form of compensation via stochastic transcriptional inhibition, perhaps representing an ancestral system that evolved to be more tightly controlled in placental mammals such as human and mouse.

  10. Group-specific amplification of HLA-DQA1 revealed a number of genomic full-length sequences including the novel HLA alleles DQA1*01:10 and DQA1*01:11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, K; Halliwell, J A; Mautner, J; Jolesch, A; von Welser, G; Rampp, I; Spannagl, M; Kauke, T; Dick, A

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a subgroup-specific amplification assay for HLA-DQA1 that encompasses the whole coding region and allows us to sequence full-length HLA-DQA1 genes. We introduce the novel alleles HLA-DQA1*01:10 and HLA-DQA1*01:11. Moreover, we were able to confirm the full-length genomic sequence data of the alleles HLA-DQA1*01:07, HLA-DQA1*03:01:01, HLA-DQA1*03:02, HLA-DQA1*04:01:02, HLA-DQA1*04:02, HLA-DQA1*05:03, HLA-DQA1*05:05:01:02 and HLA-DQA1*06:01:01. A complete genomic overview of all six HLA-DQA1 allele groups is now available from the submission of our data to the IMGT/HLA database. Because our approach facilitates the analysis of all HLA-DQA1 allele sequences, HLA-DQA1 may become the first HLA locus from which all subgroup members will be known in detail in the near future. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly...... of the parA expression system suggested that just a few molecules of the resolvase are required to achieve the site-specific recombination event, Transient expression of parA from a plasmid unable to replicate in the target bacterium was instrumental to effect differential deletions within complex hybrid...... transposons inserted in the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, This strategy permits the stable inheritance of heterologous DNA segments virtually devoid of the sequences used initially to select their insertion....

  12. A set of simple PCR markers converted from sequence specific RFLP markers on tomato Chromosomes 9 to 12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Feng, X.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Lindhout, W.H.

    2004-01-01

    A set of 24 simple PCR markers was generated for tomato chromosomes 9, 10, 11 and 12. Polymorphism was sought for between Lycopersicon esculentum and one of six other Lycopersicon species (L. parviflorum, L. cheesmanii, L. hirsutum, L. pennellii, L. peruvianum, and L. chilense). PCR primers, which

  13. Monosomic analysis reveals duplicated chromosomal segments in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    g bg. GGg or. Golden plant. –. bGg, GGGg. –, Indicates the absence of dominant allele (due to nondisjunction of chromosome carrying dominant allele) in the egg cell (female gamete) and consequently creating hemizygous condition in the embryos of monosomic plants. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 88, No. 3, December 2009.

  14. Sex Chromosome Evolution, Heterochiasmy, and Physiological QTL in the Salmonid Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben J.G. Sutherland

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Whole-genome duplication (WGD can have large impacts on genome evolution, and much remains unknown about these impacts. This includes the mechanisms of coping with a duplicated sex determination system and whether this has an impact on increasing the diversity of sex determination mechanisms. Other impacts include sexual conflict, where alleles having different optimums in each sex can result in sequestration of genes into nonrecombining sex chromosomes. Sex chromosome development itself may involve sex-specific recombination rate (i.e., heterochiasmy, which is also poorly understood. The family Salmonidae is a model system for these phenomena, having undergone autotetraploidization and subsequent rediploidization in most of the genome at the base of the lineage. The salmonid master sex determining gene is known, and many species have nonhomologous sex chromosomes, putatively due to transposition of this gene. In this study, we identify the sex chromosome of Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis and compare sex chromosome identities across the lineage (eight species and four genera. Although nonhomology is frequent, homologous sex chromosomes and other consistencies are present in distantly related species, indicating probable convergence on specific sex and neo-sex chromosomes. We also characterize strong heterochiasmy with 2.7-fold more crossovers in maternal than paternal haplotypes with paternal crossovers biased to chromosome ends. When considering only rediploidized chromosomes, the overall heterochiasmy trend remains, although with only 1.9-fold more recombination in the female than the male. Y chromosome crossovers are restricted to a single end of the chromosome, and this chromosome contains a large interspecific inversion, although its status between males and females remains unknown. Finally, we identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for 21 unique growth, reproductive, and stress-related phenotypes to improve knowledge of the genetic

  15. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In each of our cells there is about 6 feet long DNA packed. Into 46 units called chromosomes. Chromosome: is a long thread of DNA wrapped around proteins. ... application of. Mendel's 'gene' concept to a human trait was' by the physician A. Garrod. He described the genetic disease alkaptonuria as an alteration In specific.

  16. Preferential expression of mutant ABCD1 allele is common in adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers but unrelated to clinical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salsano Ettore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 20% of adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD female carriers may develop clinical manifestations, typically consisting of progressive spastic gait, sensory deficits and bladder dysfunctions. A skewing in X Chromosome Inactivation (XCI, leading to the preferential expression of the X chromosome carrying the mutant ABCD1 allele, has been proposed as a mechanism influencing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD carrier phenotype, but reported data so far are conflicting. Methods To shed light into this topic we assessed the XCI pattern in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of 30 X-ALD carriers. Since a frequent problem with XCI studies is the underestimation of skewing due to an incomplete sample digestion by restriction enzymes, leading to variable results, we developed a pyrosequencing assay to identify samples completely digested, on which to perform the XCI assay. Pyrosequencing was also used to quantify ABCD1 allele-specific expression. Moreover, very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA levels were determined in the same patients. Results We found severely (≥90:10 or moderately (≥75:25 skewed XCI in 23 out of 30 (77% X-ALD carriers and proved that preferential XCI is mainly associated with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, irrespective of the manifestation of symptoms. The expression of mutant ABCD1 allele also correlates with plasma VLCFA concentrations. Conclusions Our results indicate that preferential XCI leads to the favored expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele. This emerges as a general phenomenon in X-ALD carriers not related to the presence of symptoms. Our data support the postulated growth advantage of cells with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, but argue against the use of XCI pattern, ABCD1 allele-specific expression pattern and VLCFA plasma concentration as biomarkers to predict the development of symptoms in X-ALD carriers.

  17. Preferential expression of mutant ABCD1 allele is common in adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers but unrelated to clinical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsano, Ettore; Tabano, Silvia; Sirchia, Silvia M; Colapietro, Patrizia; Castellotti, Barbara; Gellera, Cinzia; Rimoldi, Marco; Pensato, Viviana; Mariotti, Caterina; Pareyson, Davide; Miozzo, Monica; Uziel, Graziella

    2012-01-26

    Approximately 20% of adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) female carriers may develop clinical manifestations, typically consisting of progressive spastic gait, sensory deficits and bladder dysfunctions. A skewing in X Chromosome Inactivation (XCI), leading to the preferential expression of the X chromosome carrying the mutant ABCD1 allele, has been proposed as a mechanism influencing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) carrier phenotype, but reported data so far are conflicting. To shed light into this topic we assessed the XCI pattern in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 30 X-ALD carriers. Since a frequent problem with XCI studies is the underestimation of skewing due to an incomplete sample digestion by restriction enzymes, leading to variable results, we developed a pyrosequencing assay to identify samples completely digested, on which to perform the XCI assay. Pyrosequencing was also used to quantify ABCD1 allele-specific expression. Moreover, very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels were determined in the same patients. We found severely (≥90:10) or moderately (≥75:25) skewed XCI in 23 out of 30 (77%) X-ALD carriers and proved that preferential XCI is mainly associated with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, irrespective of the manifestation of symptoms. The expression of mutant ABCD1 allele also correlates with plasma VLCFA concentrations. Our results indicate that preferential XCI leads to the favored expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele. This emerges as a general phenomenon in X-ALD carriers not related to the presence of symptoms. Our data support the postulated growth advantage of cells with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, but argue against the use of XCI pattern, ABCD1 allele-specific expression pattern and VLCFA plasma concentration as biomarkers to predict the development of symptoms in X-ALD carriers.

  18. Preferential expression of mutant ABCD1 allele is common in adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers but unrelated to clinical symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 20% of adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) female carriers may develop clinical manifestations, typically consisting of progressive spastic gait, sensory deficits and bladder dysfunctions. A skewing in X Chromosome Inactivation (XCI), leading to the preferential expression of the X chromosome carrying the mutant ABCD1 allele, has been proposed as a mechanism influencing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) carrier phenotype, but reported data so far are conflicting. Methods To shed light into this topic we assessed the XCI pattern in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 30 X-ALD carriers. Since a frequent problem with XCI studies is the underestimation of skewing due to an incomplete sample digestion by restriction enzymes, leading to variable results, we developed a pyrosequencing assay to identify samples completely digested, on which to perform the XCI assay. Pyrosequencing was also used to quantify ABCD1 allele-specific expression. Moreover, very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) levels were determined in the same patients. Results We found severely (≥90:10) or moderately (≥75:25) skewed XCI in 23 out of 30 (77%) X-ALD carriers and proved that preferential XCI is mainly associated with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, irrespective of the manifestation of symptoms. The expression of mutant ABCD1 allele also correlates with plasma VLCFA concentrations. Conclusions Our results indicate that preferential XCI leads to the favored expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele. This emerges as a general phenomenon in X-ALD carriers not related to the presence of symptoms. Our data support the postulated growth advantage of cells with the preferential expression of the mutant ABCD1 allele, but argue against the use of XCI pattern, ABCD1 allele-specific expression pattern and VLCFA plasma concentration as biomarkers to predict the development of symptoms in X-ALD carriers. PMID:22280810

  19. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children with a 7-repeat allele of the dopamine recepter D4 gene have extreme behavior but normal performance on critical neuropsychological tests of attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanson, J.; Oosterlaan, J.; Murias, M.; Schuck, S.; Flodman, P.; Spence, M.A.; Wasdell, M.; Ding, Y.; Chi, H-C.; Smith, M.; Mann, M.; Carlson, C.; Kennedy, J.L.; Sergeant, J.A.; Leung, P.; Zhang, Y-P.; Sadeh, A.; Chan, C.; Whalen, C.K.; Babb, K.; Moyzis, R.; Posner, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    An association of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene located on chromosome 11p15.5 and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been demonstrated and replicated by multiple investigators. A specific allele [the 7-repeat of a 48-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in exon 3] has

  20. Generating resources for genomics of wheat homoeologous chromosome group 3: 3AS- and 3DS-specific BAC libraries

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šafář, Jan; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Suchánková, Pavla; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Bartoš, Jan; Fiocchetti, F.; Roselli, M.; Gill, B. S.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lucretti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 61, 1-2 (2009), s. 151-160 ISSN 0394-9257 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA ČR GA521/06/1723; GA ČR GA521/07/1573; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004; GA MŠk OC08025 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : BAC library * Flow sorting * Homoeologous chromosomes Subject RIV: GE - Plant Breeding

  1. Molecular characterization and chromosomal distribution of a species-specific transcribed centromeric satellite repeat from the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Satellite repetitive sequences that accumulate in the heterochromatin consist a large fraction of a genome and due to their properties are suggested to be implicated in centromere function. Current knowledge of heterochromatic regions of Bactrocera oleae genome, the major pest of the olive tree, is practically nonexistent. In our effort to explore the repetitive DNA portion of B. oleae genome, a novel satellite sequence designated BoR300 was isolated and cloned. The present study describes the genomic organization, abundance and chromosomal distribution of BoR300 which is organized in tandem, forming arrays of 298 bp-long monomers. Sequence analysis showed an AT content of 60.4%, a CENP-B like-motif and a high curvature value based on predictive models. Comparative analysis among randomly selected monomers demonstrated a high degree of sequence homogeneity (88%-97% of BoR300 repeats, which are present at approximately 3,000 copies per haploid genome accounting for about 0.28% of the total genomic DNA, based on two independent qPCR approaches. In addition, expression of the repeat was also confirmed through RT-PCR, by which BoR300 transcripts were detected in both sexes. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH of BoR300 on mitotic metaphases and polytene chromosomes revealed signals to the centromeres of two out of the six chromosomes which indicated a chromosome-specific centromeric localization. Moreover, BoR300 is not conserved in the closely related Bactrocera species tested and it is also absent in other dipterans, but it's rather restricted to the B. oleae genome. This feature of species-specificity attributed to BoR300 satellite makes it a good candidate as an identification probe of the insect among its relatives at early development stages.

  2. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A.

    1991-01-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products

  3. Isolation of probes specific to human chromosomal region 6p21 from immunoselected irradiation-fusion gene transfer hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragoussis, J.; Jones, T.A.; Sheer, D.; Shrimpton, A.E.; Goodfellow, P.N.; Trowsdale, J.; Ziegler, A. (ICRF Human Immunogenetics, London (England))

    1991-07-01

    A hybrid cell line (R21/B1) containing a truncated human chromosome 6 (6pter-6q21) and a human Y chromosome on a hamster background was irradiated and fused to A23 (TK-) or W3GH (HPRT-) hamster cells. Clones containing expressed HLA class I genes (4/40) were selected using monoclonal antibodies. These clones were recloned and analyzed with a panel of probes from the HLA region. One hybrid (4G6) contained the entire HLA complex. Two other hybrids (4J4 and 4H2) contained only the HLA class I region, while the fourth hybrid (5P9) contained HLA class I and III genes in addition to other genes located in the 6p21 chromosomal region. In situ hybridization showed that the hybrid cells contained more than one fragment of human DNA. Alu and LINE PCR products were derived from these cells and compared to each other as well as to products from two somatic cell hybrids having the 6p21 region in common. The PCR fragments were then screened on conventional Southern blots of the somatic cell hybrids to select a panel of novel probes encompassing the 6p21 region. In addition, the origin of the human DNA fragments in hybrid 4J4 was determined by regional mapping of PCR products.

  4. Lipoprotein(a) and HIV: Allele-Specific Apolipoprotein(a) Levels Predict Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in HIV-Infected Young Women in the Women's Interagency HIV Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkhmaa, Byambaa; Anuurad, Erdembileg; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chin-Shang; Kaplan, Robert; Lazar, Jason; Merenstein, Dan; Karim, Roksana; Aouizerat, Brad; Cohen, Mardge; Butler, Kenneth; Pahwa, Savita; Ofotokun, Igho; Adimora, Adaora A; Golub, Elizabeth; Berglund, Lars

    2017-05-01

    In the general population, lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] has been established as an independent causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lp(a) levels are to a major extent regulated by a size polymorphism in the apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)] gene. The roles of Lp(a)/apo(a) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related elevated cardiovascular disease risk remain unclear. The associations between total plasma Lp(a) level, allele-specific apo(a) level, an Lp(a) level carried by individual apo(a) alleles, and common carotid artery intima-media thickness were assessed in 150 HIV-infected and 100 HIV-uninfected women in the WIHS (Women's Interagency HIV Study). Linear regression analyses with and without adjustments were used. The cohort was young (mean age, ≈31 years), with the majority being Blacks (≈70%). The prevalence of a small size apo(a) (≤22 Kringle repeats) or a high Lp(a) level (≥30 mg/dL) was similar by HIV status. Total plasma Lp(a) level ( P =0.029) and allele-specific apo(a) level carried by the smaller apo(a) sizes ( P =0.022) were significantly associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness in the HIV-infected women only. After accounting for confounders (age, race, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, hepatitis C virus coinfection, menopause, plasma lipids, treatment status, CD4 + T cell count, and HIV/RNA viral load), the association remained significant for both Lp(a) ( P =0.035) and allele-specific apo(a) level carried by the smaller apo(a) sizes ( P =0.010) in the HIV-infected women. Notably, none of the other lipids/lipoproteins was associated with carotid artery intima-media thickness. Lp(a) and allele-specific apo(a) levels predict carotid artery intima-media thickness in HIV-infected young women. Further research is needed to identify underlying mechanisms of an increased Lp(a) atherogenicity in HIV infection. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The association between male infertility and sperm disomy: Evidence for variation in disomy levels among individuals and a correlation between particular semen parameters and disomy of specific chromosome pairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wright David

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between infertility and sperm disomy is well documented. Results vary but most report that men with severely compromised semen parameters have a significantly elevated proportion of disomic sperm. The relationship between individual semen parameters and segregation of specific chromosome pairs is however less well reported as is the variation of disomy levels in individual men. Methods In order to address these questions the technique of fluorescent in-situ hybridisation (FISH was utilised to determine the disomy levels of chromosomes X, Y and 21 in 43 sperm samples from 19 infertile males. The results generated from this study were analysed using logistic regression. Results In this study we compared levels of sperm concentration, motility and morphology with levels of sperm disomy for chromosome 21 and the sex chromosomes. Our results suggest that there is considerable variation in disomy levels for certain men. They also suggest that oligozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of sex chromosome disomy but not disomy 21; they suggest that severe asthenozoospermic males have significantly elevated levels of disomy 21 but not sex chromosome disomy. Surprisingly, severe teratozoopsermic males appeared to have significantly lower levels of sperm disomy for both the sex chromosomes and chromosome 21. Conclusion We suggest that the association between sex chromosome disomy and oligozoospermia may be due to reduced recombination in the XY pairing region and discuss the relevance of our findings for the correlations between sperm disomy and sperm motility and morphology.

  6. The inter-specific hybrid Silene latifolia x S. viscosa reveals early events of sex chromosome evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žlůvová, Jitka; Lengerová, Martina; Marková, Michaela; Hobza, Roman; Nicolas, Michael; Vyskot, Boris; Charlesworth, Deborah; Negrutiu, Ioan; Janoušek, Bohuslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 4 (2005), s. 327-336 ISSN 1520-541X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA522/02/1485; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/05/2076; GA ČR(CZ) GD204/05/H505; GA ČR(CZ) GP204/05/P505 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : interspecific hybrid * sex chromosomes * Silene latifolia Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.390, year: 2005

  7. Detailed analysis of X chromosome inactivation in a 49,XXXXX pentasomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menezes Albert N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pentasomy X (49,XXXXX has been associated with a severe clinical condition, presumably resulting from failure or disruption of X chromosome inactivation. Here we report that some human X chromosomes from a patient with 49,XXXXX pentasomy were functionally active following isolation in inter-specific (human-rodent cell hybrids. A comparison with cytogenetic and molecular findings provided evidence that more than one active X chromosome was likely to be present in the cells of this patient, accounting for her abnormal phenotype. Results 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU-pulsed cultures showed different patterns among late replicating X chromosomes suggesting that their replication was asynchronic and likely to result in irregular inactivation. Genotyping of the proband and her mother identified four maternal and one paternal X chromosomes in the proband. It also identified the paternal X chromosome haplotype (P, indicating that origin of this X pentasomy resulted from two maternal, meiotic non-disjunctions. Analysis of the HUMANDREC region of the androgen receptor (AR gene in the patient's mother showed a skewed inactivation pattern, while a similar analysis in the proband showed an active paternal X chromosome and preferentially inactivated X chromosomes carrying the 173 AR allele. Analyses of 33 cell hybrid cell lines selected in medium containing hypoxanthine, aminopterin and thymidine (HAT allowed for the identification of three maternal X haplotypes (M1, M2 and MR and showed that X chromosomes with the M1, M2 and P haplotypes were functionally active. In 27 cell hybrids in which more than one X haplotype were detected, analysis of X inactivation patterns provided evidence of preferential inactivation. Conclusion Our findings indicated that 12% of X chromosomes with the M1 haplotype, 43.5% of X chromosomes with the M2 haplotype, and 100% of the paternal X chromosome (with the P haplotype were likely to be functionally active in the

  8. Development of an allele-specific PCR assay for simultaneous sero-typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli predominant O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaohui; Meng, Qingmei; Dai, Jianjun; Han, Xiangan; Han, Yue; Ding, Chan; Liu, Haiwen; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. E. coli strains belonging to serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 are preferentially associated with avian colibacillosis. The rfb gene cluster controlling O antigen synthesis is usually various among different E. coli serotypes. In present study, the rfb gene clusters of E. coli serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 were characterized and compared. Based on the serotype-specific genes in rfb gene cluster, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed. This PCR assay was highly specific and reliable for sero-typing of APEC O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains. The sensitivity of the assay was determined as 10 pg DNA or 10 colony forming units (CFUs) bacteria for serotypes O2 and O18 strains, and 500 pg DNA or 1,000 CFUs bacteria for serotypes O1 and O78 strains. Using this PCR system, APEC isolates and the infected tissue samples were categorized successfully. Furthermore, it was able to differentiate the serotypes for the samples with multi-agglutination in the traditional serum agglutination assay. Therefore, the allele-specific PCR is more simple, rapid and accurate assay for APEC diagnosis, epidemiologic study and vaccine development.

  9. Development of an allele-specific PCR assay for simultaneous sero-typing of avian pathogenic Escherichia coli predominant O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaohui Wang

    Full Text Available Systemic infections by avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC are economically devastating to poultry industries worldwide. E. coli strains belonging to serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 are preferentially associated with avian colibacillosis. The rfb gene cluster controlling O antigen synthesis is usually various among different E. coli serotypes. In present study, the rfb gene clusters of E. coli serotypes O1, O2, O18 and O78 were characterized and compared. Based on the serotype-specific genes in rfb gene cluster, an allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was developed. This PCR assay was highly specific and reliable for sero-typing of APEC O1, O2, O18 and O78 strains. The sensitivity of the assay was determined as 10 pg DNA or 10 colony forming units (CFUs bacteria for serotypes O2 and O18 strains, and 500 pg DNA or 1,000 CFUs bacteria for serotypes O1 and O78 strains. Using this PCR system, APEC isolates and the infected tissue samples were categorized successfully. Furthermore, it was able to differentiate the serotypes for the samples with multi-agglutination in the traditional serum agglutination assay. Therefore, the allele-specific PCR is more simple, rapid and accurate assay for APEC diagnosis, epidemiologic study and vaccine development.

  10. Chromosomal Abnormalties with Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The correlation between specific chromosome abnormalties and various epilepsies was investigated by a study of 76 patients’ records obtained by questionnaires distributed to members of Kyoto Multi-institutional Study Group of Pediatric Neurology.

  11. The nuclear protein encoded by the Drosophila neurogenic gene mastermind is widely expressed and associates with specific chromosomal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettler, D.; Pearson, S.; Yedvobnick, B. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The Drosophila neurogenic loci encode a diverse group of proteins that comprise an inhibitory signal transduction pathway. The pathway is used throughout development in numerous contexts. We have examined the distribution of the neurogenic locus mastermind protein (Mam). Mam is expressed through all germlayers during early embryogenesis, including ectodermal precursors to both neuroblasts and epidermoblasts. Mam is subsequently down-regulated within the nervous system and then reexpressed. It persists in the nervous system through late embryogenesis and postembryonically. Mam is ubiquitously expressed in wing and leg imaginal discs and is not down-regulated in sensory organ precursor cells of the wing margin or notum. In the eye disc, Mam shows most prominent expression posterior to the morphogenetic furrow. Expression of the protein during oogenesis appears limited to follicle cells. Immunohistochemical detection of Mam on polytene chromosomes revealed binding at >100 sites. Chromosome colocalization studies with RNA polymerase and the groucho corepressor protein implicate Mam in transcriptional regulation. 94 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Mesenchymal stem cells with high telomerase expression do not actively restore their chromosome arm specific telomere length pattern after exposure to ionizing radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graakjaer, Jesper; Christensen, Rikke; Kølvrå, Steen

    2007-01-01

    were measured using Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (Q-FISH). RESULTS: A telomere length pattern was found to exist in primary hMSC's as well as in hMSC-telo1. This pattern is similar to what was previously found in lymphocytes and fibroblasts. The cells were then exposed to a high dose of ionizing...... radiation. Irradiation caused profound changes in chromosome specific telomere lengths, effectively destroying the telomere length pattern. Following long term culturing after irradiation, a telomere length pattern was found to re-emerge. However, the new telomere length pattern did not resemble...

  13. Analysis of ParB-centromere interactions by multiplex SPR imaging reveals specific patterns for binding ParB in six centromeres of Burkholderiales chromosomes and plasmids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien Pillet

    Full Text Available Bacterial centromeres-also called parS, are cis-acting DNA sequences which, together with the proteins ParA and ParB, are involved in the segregation of chromosomes and plasmids. The specific binding of ParB to parS nucleates the assembly of a large ParB/DNA complex from which ParA-the motor protein, segregates the sister replicons. Closely related families of partition systems, called Bsr, were identified on the chromosomes and large plasmids of the multi-chromosomal bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia and other species from the order Burkholeriales. The centromeres of the Bsr partition families are 16 bp palindromes, displaying similar base compositions, notably a central CG dinucleotide. Despite centromeres bind the cognate ParB with a narrow specificity, weak ParB-parS non cognate interactions were nevertheless detected between few Bsr partition systems of replicons not belonging to the same genome. These observations suggested that Bsr partition systems could have a common ancestry but that evolution mostly erased the possibilities of cross-reactions between them, in particular to prevent replicon incompatibility. To detect novel similarities between Bsr partition systems, we have analyzed the binding of six Bsr parS sequences and a wide collection of modified derivatives, to their cognate ParB. The study was carried out by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging (SPRi mulitplex analysis enabling a systematic survey of each nucleotide position within the centromere. We found that in each parS some positions could be changed while maintaining binding to ParB. Each centromere displays its own pattern of changes, but some positions are shared more or less widely. In addition from these changes we could speculate evolutionary links between these centromeres.

  14. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J L; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-03-29

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic.

  15. Mouse model of chromosome mosaicism reveals lineage-specific depletion of aneuploid cells and normal developmental potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Helen; Graham, Sarah J. L.; Van der Aa, Niels; Kumar, Parveen; Theunis, Koen; Fernandez Gallardo, Elia; Voet, Thierry; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Most human pre-implantation embryos are mosaics of euploid and aneuploid cells. To determine the fate of aneuploid cells and the developmental potential of mosaic embryos, here we generate a mouse model of chromosome mosaicism. By treating embryos with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor during the four- to eight-cell division, we efficiently generate aneuploid cells, resulting in embryo death during peri-implantation development. Live-embryo imaging and single-cell tracking in chimeric embryos, containing aneuploid and euploid cells, reveal that the fate of aneuploid cells depends on lineage: aneuploid cells in the fetal lineage are eliminated by apoptosis, whereas those in the placental lineage show severe proliferative defects. Overall, the proportion of aneuploid cells is progressively depleted from the blastocyst stage onwards. Finally, we show that mosaic embryos have full developmental potential, provided they contain sufficient euploid cells, a finding of significance for the assessment of embryo vitality in the clinic. PMID:27021558

  16. MRPS18CP2 alleles and DEFA3 absence as putative chromosome 8p23.1 modifiers of hearing loss due to mtDNA mutation A1555G in the 12S rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischel-Ghodsian Nathan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations account for at least 5% of cases of postlingual, nonsyndromic hearing impairment. Among them, mutation A1555G is frequently found associated with aminoglycoside-induced and/or nonsyndromic hearing loss in families presenting with extremely variable clinical phenotypes. Biochemical and genetic data have suggested that nuclear background is the main factor involved in modulating the phenotypic expression of mutation A1555G. However, although a major nuclear modifying locus was located on chromosome 8p23.1 and regardless intensive screening of the region, the gene involved has not been identified. Methods With the aim to gain insights into the factors that determine the phenotypic expression of A1555G mutation, we have analysed in detail different genetic and genomic elements on 8p23.1 region (DEFA3 gene absence, CLDN23 gene and MRPS18CP2 pseudogene in a group of 213 A1555G carriers. Results Family based association studies identified a positive association for a polymorphism on MRPS18CP2 and an overrepresentation of DEFA3 gene absence in the deaf group of A1555G carriers. Conclusion Although none of the factors analysed seem to have a major contribution to the phenotype, our findings provide further evidences of the involvement of 8p23.1 region as a modifying locus for A1555G 12S rRNA gene mutation.

  17. Chromosome 11 loss from thymic lymphomas induced in heterozygous Trp53 mice by phenolphthalein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulla, J E; French, J E; Dunnick, J K

    2001-04-01

    C57BL/6 p53 (+/-) N5 mice heterozygous for a null p53 allele were given phenolphthalein to learn more about mechanisms of carcinogenesis and to evaluate the p53-deficient mouse as a tool for identifying potential human carcinogens. DNA samples isolated from 10 phenolphthalein-induced thymic lymphomas were analyzed for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the Trp53 locus and simple sequence length polymorphic (SSLP) loci. The initial screening revealed remarkable results from only chromosome 11. Allelotyping at approximately five centiMorgan intervals, we found SSLP heterozygosity for C57BL/6 and 129Sv over much of chromosome 11. In the tumors, treatment-related LOH was apparent on chromosome 11 at each of the 28 informative loci examined. The strain-specific polymorphism lost from individual tumors allowed us to deduce the distribution of alleles along the length of the maternal and paternal chromosomes 11. The allelic patterns indicate that mitotic homologous recombination occurred during embryogenesis if breeding protocols were carried out as described. The mitotic recombination observed may be attributable to p53 haploinsufficiency for normal suppression of mitotic recombination.

  18. Association of HLA class II alleles and CTLA-4 polymorphism with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana J EI Wafai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is a progressive complex autoimmune disease in which combinations of environmental as well as genetic factors contribute to T-cell mediated destruction of insulin-secreting β-cells of the pancreas. HLA class II alleles on chromosome 6p21 [insulin dependent diabetes mellitus 1 (IDDM1], especially DR and DQ, show strong association with T1DM. In addition, several studies have suggested that polymorphisms in the CTLA-4 gene (IDDM12 on chromosome 2q33 form part of the genetic susceptibility for type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to analyze HLA alleles of the DQB1 and DRB1 genes using polymerase chain reaction using sequence specific primers (PCR-SSP technique and to investigate the asso-ciation of the A49G CTLA-4 polymorphism using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP analysis in Lebanese T1DM patients. The study was conduc-ted on 39 Lebanese T1DM patients. Results of HLA typing showed an increased frequency of the HLA-DQB1FNx010201, HLA-DQB1FNx010302, HLA-DRB1FNx010301 and HLA-DRB1FNx010401 alleles, sugges-ting risk association and thus can be considered as susceptibility alleles. On the other hand, strong protection against the disease was conferred by the HLA-DRB1FNx01110101, HLA-DQB1FNx010301 and HLADQB1FNx010601 alleles. RFLP analysis of the A49G polymorphism showed a significant increase in the G allele and GG genotype frequencies in patients, suggesting that CTLA-4 may be considered as a susceptibility gene for the development of T1DM in the Lebanese population. Analysis of the two polymorphisms showed no detectable association between the two genes. However, a significant negative association of the G allele with the DQB1FNx010201 allele was ob-served. This might indicate that the two genetic risk factors, namely HLA and CTLA-4, act independently of each other with no additive effect.

  19. The − 5 A/G single-nucleotide polymorphism in the core promoter region of MT2A and its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels in laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starska, Katarzyna, E-mail: katarzyna.starska@umed.lodz.pl [I Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153 Łódź (Poland); Krześlak, Anna; Forma, Ewa [Department of Cytobiochemistry, University of Łódź, Pomorska 142/143, 90-236 Łódź (Poland); Olszewski, Jurek [II Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Łódź, Żeromskiego 113, 90-549 Łódź (Poland); Morawiec-Sztandera, Alina [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Medical University of Łódź, Paderewskiego 4, 93-509 Łódź (Poland); Aleksandrowicz, Paweł [Department of Otolaryngology and Laryngological Oncology, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 8, 20-954 Lublin (Poland); Lewy-Trenda, Iwona [Department of Pathology, Medical University of Łódź, Pomorska 251, 92-213 Łódź (Poland); and others

    2014-10-15

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight, cysteine-rich heavy metal-binding proteins which participate in the mechanisms of Zn homeostasis, and protect against toxic metals. MTs contain metal-thiolate cluster groups and suppress metal toxicity by binding to them. The aim of this study was to determine the − 5 A/G (rs28366003) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the core promoter region of the MT2A gene and to investigate its effect on allele-specific gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu content in squamous cell laryngeal cancer (SCC) and non-cancerous laryngeal mucosa (NCM) as a control. The MT2A promoter region − 5 A/G SNP was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism using 323 SCC and 116 NCM. MT2A gene analysis was performed by quantitative real-time PCR. The frequency of A allele carriage was 94.2% and 91.8% in SCC and NCM, respectively, while G allele carriage was detected in 5.8% and 8.2% of SCC and NCM samples, respectively. As a result, a significant association was identified between the − 5 A/G SNP in the MT2A gene with mRNA expression in both groups. Metal levels were analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The significant differences were identified between A/A and both the A/G and G/G genotypes, with regard to the concentration of the contaminating metal. The Spearman rank correlation results showed that the MT2A expression and Cd, Zn, Cu levels were negatively correlated. Results obtained in this study suggest that − 5 A/G SNP in MT2A gene may have an effect on allele-specific gene expression and accumulation of metal levels in laryngeal cancer. - Highlights: • MT2A gene expression and metal content in laryngeal cancer tissues • Association between SNP (rs28366003) and expression of MT2A • Significant associations between the SNP and Cd, Zn and Cu levels • Negative correlation between MT2A gene expression and Cd, Zn and Cu levels.

  20. Tissue-specific expression of the human laminin alpha5-chain, and mapping of the gene to human chromosome 20q13.2-13.3 and to distal mouse chromosome 2 near the locus for the ragged (Ra) mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durkin, M E; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1997-01-01

    , heart, lung, skeletal muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The human laminin alpha5-chain gene (LAMA5) was assigned to chromosome 20q13.2-q13.3 by in situ hybridization, and the mouse gene (Lama5) was mapped by linkage analysis to a syntonic region of distal chromosome 2, close to the locus for the ragged (Ra...

  1. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previo...

  2. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Identification of VPA0451 as the specific chaperone for the Vibrio parahaemolyticus chromosome 1 type III-secreted effector VPA0450.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Barbara; Southward, Carolyn M; McKenna, Neil; Devinney, Rebekah

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is an important cause of gastroenteritis resulting from the consumption of raw or undercooked shellfish. The V. parahaemolyticus genome revealed the presence of two type III secretion systems (T3SS); one on each of the two chromosomes. To date, four effectors have been identified as secreted by the chromosome 1 T3SS (T3SS1). For some effectors, efficient secretion requires a cytosolic chaperone that is often encoded in close proximity to its cognate effector. In this study, we identified VPA0451 as the specific chaperone for the T3SS1 effector, VPA0450. VPA0451 is structurally similar to known T3SS chaperones. It is required for efficient VPA0450 secretion while not affecting the secretion of other T3SS1 effectors, suggesting it is a class 1A single cargo chaperone. VPA0450 translocation into the host cell membrane requires VPA0451. VPA0451 binds directly to VPA0450, and amino acids 25-100 contribute to this activity. Taken together, we conclude that VPA0451 is the cognate chaperone for the effector VPA0450 and is the second T3SS1 chaperone identified to date. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. X chromosome-linked CNVs in male infertility: discovery of overall duplication load and recurrent, patient-specific gains with potential clinical relevance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Chianese

    Full Text Available Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving several thousand genes, only a minority of which have been studied in infertile men. In a previous study, we identified a number of Copy Number Variants (CNVs by high-resolution array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (a-CGH analysis of the X chromosome, including 16 patient-specific X chromosome-linked gains. Of these, five gains (DUP1A, DUP5, DUP20, DUP26 and DUP40 were selected for further analysis to evaluate their clinical significance.The copy number state of the five selected loci was analyzed by quantitative-PCR on a total of 276 idiopathic infertile patients and 327 controls in a conventional case-control setting (199 subjects belonged to the previous a-CGH study. For one interesting locus (intersecting DUP1A additional 338 subjects were analyzed.All gains were confirmed as patient-specific and the difference in duplication load between patients and controls is significant (p = 1.65 × 10(-4. Two of the CNVs are private variants, whereas 3 are found recurrently in patients and none of the controls. These CNVs include, or are in close proximity to, genes with testis-specific expression. DUP1A, mapping to the PAR1, is found at the highest frequency (1.4% that was significantly different from controls (0% (p = 0.047 after Bonferroni correction. Two mechanisms are proposed by which DUP1A may cause spermatogenic failure: i by affecting the correct regulation of a gene with potential role in spermatogenesis; ii by disturbing recombination between PAR1 regions during meiosis. This study allowed the identification of novel spermatogenesis candidate genes linked to the 5 CNVs and the discovery of the first recurrent, X-linked gain with potential clinical relevance.

  5. High-resolution physical mapping reveals that the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) in Cenchrus ciliaris is located on a heterochromatic and hemizygous region of a single chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yukio; Hanna, Wayne W; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2005-10-01

    An apomictic mode of reproduction known as apospory is displayed by most buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris) genotypes, but rare sexual individuals have been identified. Previously, intraspecific crosses between sexual and aposporous genotypes allowed linkage to be discovered between the aposporous mode of reproduction and nine molecular markers that had been isolated from an aposporous relative, Pennisetum squamulatum. This region was described as the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR). We now show an ideogram of the chromosome complement for aposporous tetraploid buffelgrass accession B-12-9 including the ASGR-carrier chromosome. The ASGR-carrier chromosome has a region of hemizygosity, as determined by in situ hybridization of BAC clones and unique morphological characteristics when compared with other chromosomes in the genome. In spite of its unique morphology, the ASGR-carrier chromosome could be identified as one of the chromosomes of a meiosis I quadrivalent. A similar partially hemizygous segment was also detected in the ASGR-carrier chromosome of the aposporous buffelgrass genotype, Higgins, but not in the sexual accession B-2S. Two non-recombining BACs linked to apospory were physically mapped on a highly condensed chromatin region of the short arm of B-12-9, and the distance between the BACs was estimated to be approximately 11 Mbp, a distance similar to what previously has been shown in P. squamulatum. The short arm of the ASGR-carrier chromosome was highly condensed at pachytene and extended only 1.7-2.7 fold that of mitotic chromosomes. Low recombination in the ASGR may partially be due to its localization in heterochromatin.

  6. Two sex-chromosome-linked microsatellite loci show geographic variance among North American Ostrinia nubilalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad S. Coates

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available PCR-based O. nubilalis population and pedigree analysis indicated female specificity of a (GAAAATn microsatellite, and male specificity of a CAYCARCGTCACTAA repeat unit marker. These loci were respectively named Ostrinia nubilalis W-chromosome 1 (ONW1 and O. nubilalis Z-chromosome 1 (ONZ1. Intact repeats of three, four, or five GAAAAT units are present among ONW1 alleles, and biallelic variation exists at the ONZ1 locus. Screening of 493 male at ONZ1 and 448 heterogametic females at ONZ1 and ONW1 loci from eleven North American sample sites was used to construct genotypic data. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and F-statistics indicated no female haplotype or male ONZ1 allele frequency differentiation between voltinism ecotypes. Four subpopulations from northern latitudes, Minnesota and South Dakota, showed the absence of a single female haplotype, a significant deviation of ONZ1 data from Hardy-Weinberg expectation, and low-level geographic divergence from other subpopulations. Low ONZ1 and ONW1 allele diversity could be attributed either to large repeat unit sizes, low repeat number, reduced effective population (Ne size of sex chromosomes, or the result of recent O. nubilalis introduction and population expansion, but likely could not be due to inbreeding. These sequences have been deposited in GenBank AF442958, and AY102618 to AY102620.

  7. Allele-Specific Droplet Digital PCR Combined with a Next-Generation Sequencing-Based Algorithm for Diagnostic Copy Number Analysis in Genes with High Homology: Proof of Concept Using Stereocilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amr, Sami S; Murphy, Elissa; Duffy, Elizabeth; Niazi, Rojeen; Balciuniene, Jorune; Luo, Minjie; Rehm, Heidi L; Abou Tayoun, Ahmad N

    2018-04-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) can substantially contribute to the pathogenic variant spectrum in several disease genes. The detection of this type of variant is complicated in genes with high homology to other genomic sequences, yet such genomics regions are more likely to lead to CNVs, making it critical to address detection in these settings. We developed a copy number analysis approach for high homology genes/regions that consisted of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based dosage analysis accompanied by allele-specific droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) confirmatory testing. We applied this approach to copy number analysis in STRC , a gene with 98.9% homology to a nonfunctional pseudogene, pSTRC , and characterized its accuracy in detecting different copy number states by use of known samples. Using a cohort of 517 patients with hearing loss, we prospectively demonstrated the clinical utility of the approach, which contributed 30 of the 122 total positives (6%) to the diagnostic yield, increasing the overall yield from 17.6% to 23.6%. Positive STRC genotypes included homozygous (n = 15) or compound heterozygous (n = 8) deletions, or heterozygous deletions in trans with pathogenic sequence variants (n = 7). Finally, this approach limited ddPCR testing to cases with NGS copy number findings, thus markedly reducing the number of costly and laborious, albeit specific, ddPCR tests. NGS-based CNV detection followed by allele-specific ddPCR confirmatory testing is a reliable and affordable approach for copy number analysis in medically relevant genes with homology issues. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  8. A dense SNP-based linkage map for Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar reveals extended chromosome homeologies and striking differences in sex-specific recombination patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Sigbjørn

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Atlantic salmon genome is in the process of returning to a diploid state after undergoing a whole genome duplication (WGD event between 25 and100 million years ago. Existing data on the proportion of paralogous sequence variants (PSVs, multisite variants (MSVs and other types of complex sequence variation suggest that the rediplodization phase is far from over. The aims of this study were to construct a high density linkage map for Atlantic salmon, to characterize the extent of rediploidization and to improve our understanding of genetic differences between sexes in this species. Results A linkage map for Atlantic salmon comprising 29 chromosomes and 5650 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was constructed using genotyping data from 3297 fish belonging to 143 families. Of these, 2696 SNPs were generated from ESTs or other gene associated sequences. Homeologous chromosomal regions were identified through the mapping of duplicated SNPs and through the investigation of syntenic relationships between Atlantic salmon and the reference genome sequence of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus. The sex-specific linkage maps spanned a total of 2402.3 cM in females and 1746.2 cM in males, highlighting a difference in sex specific recombination rate (1.38:1 which is much lower than previously reported in Atlantic salmon. The sexes, however, displayed striking differences in the distribution of recombination sites within linkage groups, with males showing recombination strongly localized to telomeres. Conclusion The map presented here represents a valuable resource for addressing important questions of interest to evolution (the process of re-diploidization, aquaculture and salmonid life history biology and not least as a resource to aid the assembly of the forthcoming Atlantic salmon reference genome sequence.

  9. Large-scale polymorphism near the ends of several human chromosomes analyzed by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trask, B.J.; Friedman, C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Giorgi, D. [CNRS, Montpelier (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    We have discovered a large DNA segment that is polymorphically present at the ends of several human chromosomes. The segment, f7501, was originally derived form a human chromosome 19-specific cosmid library. FISH was used to determine the cosmid`s chromosomal distribution on 44 unrelated humans and several closely related primates. The human subjects represent a diversity of reproductively isolated ethnic populations. FISH analysis revealed that sequences highly homologous to the cosmid`s insert are present on both homologs at 3q, 15q,. and 19p in almost all individuals (88, 85, and 87 of 88 homologs, respectively). Other chromosomes sites were labeled much more rarely in the sampled individuals. For example, 56 of the 88 analyzed chromosomes 11 were labeled (18+/+, 6-/-, and 20+/- individuals). In contrast, 2q was labeled on only 1/88 sampled chromosomes. The termini of 2q, 5q, 6p, 6q, 7p, 8p, 9p, 9q, 11p, 12q, 16p, 19q, and 20q and an interstitial site at 2q13-14 were labeled in at least one individual of the set. EcoR1-fragments derived from the cosmid showed the same hybridization pattern as the entire cosmid, indicating that at least 40 kbp is shared by these chromosome ends. Ethnic differences in the allele frequency of these polymorphic variants was observed. For example, signals were observed on 8/10 and 7/10 of the chromosomes 7p and 16q, respectively, derived form Biakan Pygmies, but these sites were infrequently labeled in non-Pygmy human populations (2/68, respectively). This region has undergone significant changes in chromosome location during human evolution. Strong signal was seen on chimpanzee and gorilla chromosome 3, which is homologous to human chromosome 4, a chromosome unlabeled in any of the humans we have analyzed.

  10. A new imprinted cluster on the human chromosome 7q21-q31, identified by human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Chiga; Meguro, Makiko; Hoshiya, Hidetoshi; Haruta, Masayuki; Sakamoto, Yu-ki; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2003-06-01

    We have previously established a series of human monochromosomal hybrids containing a single human chromosome of defined parental origin as an in vitro resource for the investigation of human imprinted loci. Using the hybrids with a paternal or maternal human chromosome 7, we determined the allelic expression profiles of 76 ESTs mapped to the human chromosome 7q21-q31. Seven genes/transcripts, including PEG10 which has previously been reported to be imprinted, showed parent-of-origin-specific expression in monochromosomal hybrids. One of the 6 candidate genes/transcripts, i.e., DLX5 was confirmed to be imprinted in normal human lymphoblasts and brain tissues by a polymorphic analysis. Thus, an imprinted domain has been newly defined in the region of human chromosome 7q21-q31 using human-mouse monochromosomal hybrids.

  11. Alleles of Ppd-D1 gene in the collection of Aegilops tauschii accessions and bread wheat varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babenko D. O.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Light period significantly influences on the growth and development of plants. One of the major genes of photoperiod sensitivity is Ppd-D1, located on the chromosome 2D. The aim of the work was to determine the alleles and molecular structure of Ppd-D1 gene in samples from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions, which have different flowering periods, and in 29 Ukrainian wheat varieties. Methods. We used methods of allele-specific PCR with primers to the Ppd-D1 gene, sequencing and Blast-analysis. Results. The collection of Ae. tauschii accessions and several varieties of winter and spring wheat was studied. The molecular structure of the allelic variants (414, 429 and 453 b. p. of Ppd-D1b gene was determined in the collection of Aegilops. tauschii accessions. Conclusions. The Ppd-D1a allele was present in all studied varieties of winter wheat. 60 % of spring wheat is characterized by Ppd-D1b allele (size of amplification products 414 b. p.. Blast-analysis of the sequence data banks on the basis of the reference sequence of sample k-1322 from the collection of Ae. tauschii accessions has shown a high homology (80 to 100 % between the nucleotide sequences of PRR genes, that characterize the A and D genomes of representatives of the genera Triticum and Aegilops.

  12. 454 next generation-sequencing outperforms allele-specific PCR, Sanger sequencing, and pyrosequencing for routine KRAS mutation analysis of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altimari A

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Annalisa Altimari,1,* Dario de Biase,2,* Giovanna De Maglio,3 Elisa Gruppioni,1 Elisa Capizzi,1 Alessio Degiovanni,1 Antonia D'Errico,1 Annalisa Pession,2 Stefano Pizzolitto,3 Michelangelo Fiorentino,1,# Giovanni Tallini2,#1Laboratory of Molecular Oncologic and Transplantation Pathology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Anatomic Pathology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, 3Department of Pathology, S. Maria della Misericordia Hospital, Udine, Italy*These authors contributed equally to this work #These authors share senior authorshipAbstract: Detection of KRAS mutations in archival pathology samples is critical for therapeutic appropriateness of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies in colorectal cancer. We compared the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of Sanger sequencing, ARMS-Scorpion (TheraScreen® real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, pyrosequencing, chip array hybridization, and 454 next-generation sequencing to assess KRAS codon 12 and 13 mutations in 60 nonconsecutive selected cases of colorectal cancer. Twenty of the 60 cases were detected as wild-type KRAS by all methods with 100% specificity. Among the 40 mutated cases, 13 were discrepant with at least one method. The sensitivity was 85%, 90%, 93%, and 92%, and the accuracy was 90%, 93%, 95%, and 95% for Sanger sequencing, TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization, respectively. The main limitation of Sanger sequencing was its low analytical sensitivity, whereas TheraScreen real-time PCR, pyrosequencing, and chip array hybridization showed higher sensitivity but suffered from the limitations of predesigned assays. Concordance between the methods was k = 0.79 for Sanger sequencing and k > 0.85 for the other techniques. Tumor cell enrichment correlated significantly with the abundance of KRAS-mutated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA, evaluated as ΔCt for TheraScreen real-time PCR (P = 0.03, percentage of mutation for

  13. A group of grapevine MYBA transcription factors located in chromosome 14 control anthocyanin synthesis in vegetative organs with different specificities compared with the berry color locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, José Tomás; Cavallini, Erika; Loyola, Rodrigo; Höll, Janine; Finezzo, Laura; Dal Santo, Silvia; Vialet, Sandrine; Commisso, Mauro; Roman, Federica; Schubert, Andrea; Alcalde, José Antonio; Bogs, Jochen; Ageorges, Agnès; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2017-07-01

    Grapevine organs accumulate anthocyanins in a cultivar-specific and environmentally induced manner. The MYBA1-A2 genes within the berry color locus in chromosome 2 represent the major genetic determinants of fruit color. The simultaneous occurrence of transposon insertions and point mutations in these genes is responsible for most white-skinned phenotypes; however, the red pigmentation found in vegetative organs suggests the presence of additional regulators. This work describes a genomic region of chromosome 14 containing three closely related R2R3-MYB genes, named MYBA5, MYBA6 and MYBA7. Ectopic expression of the latter two genes in grapevine hairy roots promoted anthocyanin accumulation without affecting other phenylpropanoids. Transcriptomic profiling of hairy roots expressing MYBA1, MYBA6 and MYBA7 showed that these regulators share the activation of late biosynthetic and modification/transport-related genes, but differ in the activation of the FLAVONOID-3'5'-HYDROXYLASE (F3'5'H) family. An alternatively spliced MYBA6 variant was incapable of activating anthocyanin synthesis, however, because of the lack of an MYC1 interaction domain. MYBA1, MYBA6.1 and MYBA7 activated the promoters of UDP-GLUCOSE:FLAVONOID 3-O-GLUCOSYLTRANSFERASE (UFGT) and ANTHOCYANIN 3-O-GLUCOSIDE-6″-O-ACYLTRANSFERASE (3AT), but only MYBA1 induced F3'5'H in concordance with the low proportion of tri-hydroxylated anthocyanins found in MYBA6-A7 hairy roots. This putative new color locus is related to the red/cyanidic pigmentation of vegetative organs in black- and white-skinned cultivars, and forms part of the UV-B radiation response pathway orchestrated by ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5). These results demonstrate the involvement of additional anthocyanin regulators in grapevine and suggest an evolutionary divergence between the two grape color loci for controlling additional targets of the flavonoid pathway. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  15. Repetitive, Marker-Free, Site-Specific Integration as a Novel Tool for Multiple Chromosomal Integration of DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kia Vest; Martinussen, Jan; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2013-01-01

    of a minimal bacterial attachment site (attBmin), two mutated loxP sequences (lox66 and lox71) allowing for removal of undesirable vector elements (antibiotic resistance marker), and a counterselection marker (oroP) for selection of loxP recombination on the pKV6 vector. When transformed into L. lactis......We present a tool for repetitive, marker-free, site-specific integration in Lactococcus lactis, in which a nonreplicating plasmid vector (pKV6) carrying a phage attachment site (attP) can be integrated into a bacterial attachment site (attB). The novelty of the tool described here is the inclusion...

  16. Analysis of the Arabidopsis superman allelic series and the interactions with other genes demonstrate developmental robustness and joint specification of male–female boundary, flower meristem termination and carpel compartmentalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuil-Broyer, Stéphanie; Trehin, Christophe; Morel, Patrice; Boltz, Véronique; Sun, Bo; Chambrier, Pierre; Ito, Toshiro; Negrutiu, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims SUPERMAN is a cadastral gene controlling the sexual boundary in the flower. The gene’s functions and role in flower development and evolution have remained elusive. The analysis of a contrasting SUP allelic series (for which the names superman, superwoman and supersex have been coined) makes it possible to distinguish early vs. late regulatory processes at the flower meristem centre to which SUP is an important contributor. Their understanding is essential in further addressing evolutionary questions linking bisexuality and flower meristem homeostasis. Methods Inter-allelic comparisons were carried out and SUP interactions with other boundary factors and flower meristem patterning and homeostasis regulators (such as CLV, WUS, PAN, CUC, KNU, AG, AP3/PI, CRC and SPT) have been evaluated at genetic, molecular, morphological and histological levels. Key Results Early SUP functions include mechanisms of male–female (sexual) boundary specification, flower mersitem termination and control of stamen number. A SUP-dependent flower meristem termination pathway is identified and analysed. Late SUP functions play a role in organ morphogenesis by controlling intra-whorl organ separation and carpel medial region formation. By integrating early and late SUP functions, and by analyzing in one single experiment a series of SUP genetic interactions, the concept of meristematic ‘transference’ (cascade) – a regulatory bridging process redundantly and sequentially co-ordinating the triggering and completion of flower meristem termination, and carpel margin meristem and placenta patterning – is proposed. Conclusions Taken together, the results strongly support the view that SUP(-type) function(s) have been instrumental in resolving male/female gradients into sharp male and female identities (whorls, organs) and in enforcing flower homeostasis during evolution. This has probably been achieved by incorporating the meristem patterning system of the floral

  17. Analysis of the Arabidopsis superman allelic series and the interactions with other genes demonstrate developmental robustness and joint specification of male-female boundary, flower meristem termination and carpel compartmentalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuil-Broyer, Stéphanie; Trehin, Christophe; Morel, Patrice; Boltz, Véronique; Sun, Bo; Chambrier, Pierre; Ito, Toshiro; Negrutiu, Ioan

    2016-04-01

    SUPERMAN is a cadastral gene controlling the sexual boundary in the flower. The gene's functions and role in flower development and evolution have remained elusive. The analysis of a contrasting SUP allelic series (for which the names superman, superwoman and supersex have been coined) makes it possible to distinguish early vs. late regulatory processes at the flower meristem centre to which SUP is an important contributor. Their understanding is essential in further addressing evolutionary questions linking bisexuality and flower meristem homeostasis. Inter-allelic comparisons were carried out and SUP interactions with other boundary factors and flower meristem patterning and homeostasis regulators (such as CLV, WUS, PAN, CUC, KNU, AG, AP3/PI, CRC and SPT) have been evaluated at genetic, molecular, morphological and histological levels. Early SUP functions include mechanisms of male-female (sexual) boundary specification, flower mersitem termination and control of stamen number. A SUP-dependent flower meristem termination pathway is identified and analysed. Late SUP functions play a role in organ morphogenesis by controlling intra-whorl organ separation and carpel medial region formation. By integrating early and late SUP functions, and by analyzing in one single experiment a series of SUP genetic interactions, the concept of meristematic 'transference' (cascade) - a regulatory bridging process redundantly and sequentially co-ordinating the triggering and completion of flower meristem termination, and carpel margin meristem and placenta patterning - is proposed. Taken together, the results strongly support the view that SUP(-type) function(s) have been instrumental in resolving male/female gradients into sharp male and female identities (whorls, organs) and in enforcing flower homeostasis during evolution. This has probably been achieved by incorporating the meristem patterning system of the floral axis into the female/carpel programme. © The Author 2016

  18. Identification of the third/extra allele for forensic application in cases with TPOX tri-allelic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picanço, Juliane Bentes; Raimann, Paulo Eduardo; Motta, Carlos Henrique Ares Silveira da; Rodenbusch, Rodrigo; Gusmão, Leonor; Alho, Clarice Sampaio

    2015-05-01

    Genotyping of polymorphic short tandem repeats (STRs) loci is widely used in forensic DNA analysis. STR loci eventually present tri-allelic pattern as a genotyping irregularity and, in that situation, the doubt about the tri-allele locus frequency calculation can reduce the analysis strength. In the TPOX human STR locus, tri-allelic genotypes have been reported with a widely varied frequency among human populations. We investigate whether there is a single extra allele (the third allele) in the TPOX tri-allelic pattern, what it is, and where it is, aiming to understand its genomic anatomy and to propose the knowledge of this TPOX extra allele from genetic profile, thus preserving the two standard TPOX alleles in forensic analyses. We looked for TPOX tri-allelic subjects in 75,113 Brazilian families. Considering only the parental generation (mother+father) we had 150,226 unrelated subjects evaluated. From this total, we found 88 unrelated subjects with tri-allelic pattern in the TPOX locus (0.06%; 88/150,226). Seventy three of these 88 subjects (73/88; 83%) had the Clayton's original Type 2 tri-allelic pattern (three peaks of even intensity). The remaining 17% (15/88) show a new Type 2 derived category with heterozygote peak imbalance (one double dose peak plus one regular sized peak). In this paper we present detailed data from 66 trios (mother+father+child) with true biological relationships. In 39 of these families (39/66; 59%) the extra TPOX allele was transmitted either from the mother or from the father to the child. Evidences indicated the allele 10 as the extra TPOX allele, and it is on the X chromosome. The present data, which support the previous Lane hypothesis, improve the knowledge about tri-allelic pattern of TPOX CODIS' locus allowing the use of TPOX profile in forensic analyses even when with tri-allelic pattern. This evaluation is now available for different forensic applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinane, Caitriona M; Kent, Robert M; Norberg, Sarah; Hill, Colin; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Stanton, Catherine; Ross, R Paul

    2011-04-20

    Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp) and GC content (34.8%) to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  20. Host specific diversity in Lactobacillus johnsonii as evidenced by a major chromosomal inversion and phage resistance mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitriona M Guinane

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity and genomic rearrangements are a driving force in bacterial evolution and niche adaptation. We sequenced and annotated the genome of Lactobacillus johnsonii DPC6026, a strain isolated from the porcine intestinal tract. Although the genome of DPC6026 is similar in size (1.97 mbp and GC content (34.8% to the sequenced human isolate L. johnsonii NCC 533, a large symmetrical inversion of approximately 750 kb differentiated the two strains. Comparative analysis among 12 other strains of L. johnsonii including 8 porcine, 3 human and 1 poultry isolate indicated that the genome architecture found in DPC6026 is more common within the species than that of NCC 533. Furthermore a number of unique features were annotated in DPC6026, some of which are likely to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT and contribute to protection against phage infection. A putative type III restriction-modification system was identified, as were novel Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR elements. Interestingly, these particular elements are not widely distributed among L. johnsonii strains. Taken together these data suggest intra-species genomic rearrangements and significant genetic diversity within the L. johnsonii species and indicate towards a host-specific divergence of L. johnsonii strains with respect to genome inversion and phage exposure.

  1. Chromosomal rearrangements occurred repeatedly and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, molecular and/or chromosomal data indicate that Paroedura is a monophyletic genus, in which chromosome rearrangements occurred repeatedly and independently during the specific diversification. Moreover both P. bastardi and P. gracilis in current definitions are paraphyletic assemblages of several ...

  2. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system

  3. Microsatellite and Chromosomal Instability in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baranovskaya, Svetlana

    2004-01-01

    ... in the pathogenesis of several types of human cancers. They found that 22% of all breast cancer cases have allelic imbalances in one or more of 14 microsatellite markers, which covered a region of 21MB of chromosome 7 around the EGFR gene...

  4. Fine mapping of dominant X-linked incompatibility alleles in Drosophila hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Daniel R; Gavin-Smyth, Jackie

    2014-04-01

    Sex chromosomes have a large effect on reproductive isolation and play an important role in hybrid inviability. In Drosophila hybrids, X-linked genes have pronounced deleterious effects on fitness in male hybrids, which have only one X chromosome. Several studies have succeeded at locating and identifying recessive X-linked alleles involved in hybrid inviability. Nonetheless, the density of dominant X-linked alleles involved in interspecific hybrid viability remains largely unknown. In this report, we study the effects of a panel of small fragments of the D. melanogaster X-chromosome carried on the D. melanogaster Y-chromosome in three kinds of hybrid males: D. melanogaster/D. santomea, D. melanogaster/D. simulans and D. melanogaster/D. mauritiana. D. santomea and D. melanogaster diverged over 10 million years ago, while D. simulans (and D. mauritiana) diverged from D. melanogaster over 3 million years ago. We find that the X-chromosome from D. melanogaster carries dominant alleles that are lethal in mel/san, mel/sim, and mel/mau hybrids, and more of these alleles are revealed in the most divergent cross. We then compare these effects on hybrid viability with two D. melanogaster intraspecific crosses. Unlike the interspecific crosses, we found no X-linked alleles that cause lethality in intraspecific crosses. Our results reveal the existence of dominant alleles on the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster which cause lethality in three different interspecific hybrids. These alleles only cause inviability in hybrid males, yet have little effect in hybrid females. This suggests that X-linked elements that cause hybrid inviability in males might not do so in hybrid females due to differing sex chromosome interactions.

  5. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  6. Simultaneous inference of haplotypes and alleles at a causal gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eLarribe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new methodology which jointly infers haplotypes and the causal alleles at a gene influencing a given trait. Often in human genetic studies, the available data consists of genotypes (series of genetic markers along the chromosomes and a phenotype. However, for many genetic analyses, one needs haplotypes instead of genotypes. Our methodology is not only able to estimate haplotypes conditionally on the disease status, but is also able to infer the alleles at the unknown disease locus. Some applications of our methodology are in genetic mapping and in genetic counselling.

  7. The endocrine stress response is linked to one specific locus on chromosome 3 in a mouse model based on extremes in trait anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonik Mariya

    2012-10-01

    epistasis (p-adjusted Conclusion The very prominent effect on stress-induced corticosterone secretion of the genomic locus on chromosome 3 and its involvement in epistasis highlights the critical role of this specific locus in the regulation of the HPA axis.

  8. VNTR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin locus are haplotype and population related

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinson, J.J.; Clegg, J.B.; Boyce, A.J. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    The human {alpha}-globin complex contains several polymorphic restriction-enzyme sites (i.e., RFLPs) linked to form haplotypes and is flanked by two hypervariable VNTR loci, the 5{prime} hypervariable region (HVR) and the more highly polymorphic 3{prime}HVR. Using a combination of RFLP analysis and PCR, the authors have characterized the 5{prime}HVR and 3{prime}HVR alleles associated with the {alpha}-globin haplotypes of 133 chromosomes, and they here show that specific {alpha}-globin haplotypes are each associated with discrete subsets of the alleles observed at these two VNTR loci. This statistically highly significant association is observed over a region spanning {approximately} 100 kb. With the exception of closely related haplotypes, different haplotypes do not share identically sized 3{prime}HVR alleles. Earlier studies have shown that {alpha}-globin haplotype distributions differ between populations; the current findings also reveal extensive population substructure in the repertoire of {alpha}-globin VNTRs. If similar features are characteristic of other VNTR loci, this will have important implications for forensic and anthropological studies. 42 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Cloning and chromosomal assignment of a human cDNA encoding a T cell- and natural killer cell-specific trypsin-like serine protease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenfeld, H.K.; Hershberger, R.J.; Shows, T.B.; Weissman, I.L.

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human T cell- and natural killer cell-specific serine protease was obtained by screening a phage λgt10 cDNA library from phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes with the mouse Hanukah factor cDNA clone. In an RNA blot-hybridization analysis, this human Hanukah factor cDNA hybridized with a 1.3-kilobase band in allogeneic-stimulated cytotoxic T cells and the Jurkat cell line, but this transcript was not detectable in normal muscle, liver, tonsil, or thymus. By dot-blot hybridization, this cDNA hybridized with RNA from three cytolytic T-cell clones and three noncytolytic T-cell clones grown in vitro as well as with purified CD16 + natural killer cells and CD3 + , CD16 - T-cell large granular lymphocytes from peripheral blood lymphocytes (CD = cluster designation). The nucleotide sequence of this cDNA clone encodes a predicted serine protease of 262 amino acids. The active enzyme is 71% and 77% similar to the mouse sequence at the amino acid and DNA level, respectively. The human and mouse sequences conserve the active site residues of serine proteases--the trypsin-specific Asp-189 and all 10 cysteine residues. The gene for the human Hanukah factor serine protease is located on human chromosome 5. The authors propose that this trypsin-like serine protease may function as a common component necessary for lysis of target cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells

  10. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  11. Extensive Genetic Differentiation between Homomorphic Sex Chromosomes in the Mosquito Vector, Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Albin; Filipović, Igor; Fansiri, Thanyalak; Hoffmann, Ary A.; Cheng, Changde; Kirkpatrick, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Mechanisms and evolutionary dynamics of sex-determination systems are of particular interest in insect vectors of human pathogens like mosquitoes because novel control strategies aim to convert pathogen-transmitting females into nonbiting males, or rely on accurate sexing for the release of sterile males. In Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue and Zika viruses, sex determination is governed by a dominant male-determining locus, previously thought to reside within a small, nonrecombining, sex-determining region (SDR) of an otherwise homomorphic sex chromosome. Here, we provide evidence that sex chromosomes in Ae. aegypti are genetically differentiated between males and females over a region much larger than the SDR. Our linkage mapping intercrosses failed to detect recombination between X and Y chromosomes over a 123-Mbp region (40% of their physical length) containing the SDR. This region of reduced male recombination overlapped with a smaller 63-Mbp region (20% of the physical length of the sex chromosomes) displaying high male–female genetic differentiation in unrelated wild populations from Brazil and Australia and in a reference laboratory strain originating from Africa. In addition, the sex-differentiated genomic region was associated with a significant excess of male-to-female heterozygosity and contained a small cluster of loci consistent with Y-specific null alleles. We demonstrate that genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes is sufficient to assign individuals to their correct sex with high accuracy. We also show how data on allele frequency differences between sexes can be used to estimate linkage disequilibrium between loci and the sex-determining locus. Our discovery of large-scale genetic differentiation between sex chromosomes in Ae. aegypti lays a new foundation for mapping and population genomic studies, as well as for mosquito control strategies targeting the sex-determination pathway. PMID:28945882

  12. Expression of human PTPN22 alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Barington, T; Husby, S

    2007-01-01

    Considering the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620 variant and the complexity by which this variant influences immunologic tolerance, the objective of this study was to ascertain if the allele-specific expression of the disease...... and 72 h of activation, respectively, the expression of PTPN22 1858C- and T-alleles increased to the same extent (P=0.64). The present result essentially excludes such phenomena as a partial explanation for the female predominance in most of the autoimmune disorders that associate with the PTPN22 Trp620...

  13. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  14. Flip-Flop HSV-BAC: bacterial artificial chromosome based system for rapid generation of recombinant herpes simplex virus vectors using two independent site-specific recombinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todo Tomoki

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV vectors that specifically replicate in and kill tumor cells sparing normal cells are a promising cancer therapy. Traditionally, recombinant HSV vectors have been generated through homologous recombination between the HSV genome and a recombination plasmid, which usually requires laborious screening or selection and can take several months. Recent advances in bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology have enabled cloning of the whole HSV genome as a BAC plasmid and subsequent manipulation in E. coli. Thus, we sought a method to generate recombinant oncolytic HSV vectors more easily and quickly using BAC technology. Results We have developed an HSV-BAC system, termed the Flip-Flop HSV-BAC system, for the rapid generation of oncolytic HSV vectors. This system has the following features: (i two site-specific recombinases, Cre and FLPe, are used sequentially to integrate desired sequences and to excise the BAC sequences, respectively; and (ii the size of the HSV-BAC-insert genome exceeds the packaging limit of HSV so only correctly recombined virus grows efficiently. We applied this to the construction of an HSV-BAC plasmid that can be used for the generation of transcriptionally-targeted HSV vectors. BAC sequences were recombined into the UL39 gene of HSV ICP4-deletion mutant d120 to generate M24-BAC virus, from which HSV-BAC plasmid pM24-BAC was isolated. An ICP4 expression cassette driven by an exogenous promoter was re-introduced to pM24-BAC by Cre-mediated recombination and nearly pure preparations of recombinant virus were obtained typically in two weeks. Insertion of the ICP4 coding sequence alone did not restore viral replication and was only minimally better than an ICP4-null construct, whereas insertion of a CMVIE promoter-ICP4 transgene (bM24-CMV efficiently drove viral replication. The levels of bM24-CMV replication in tumor cells varied considerably compared to hrR3 (UL39

  15. Common alleles in candidate susceptibility genes associated with risk and development of epithelial ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notaridou, Maria; Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Jones, Chris; Song, Honglin; Høgdall, Estrid; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Christensen, Lise; Høgdall, Claus; Blaakaer, Jan; McGuire, Valerie; Wu, Anna H.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Wozniak, Eva; Sher, Tanya; Jacobs, Ian J.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Moorman, Patricia G.; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Mędrek, Krzysztof; Lubiński, Jan; Ness, Roberta B.; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Lurie, Galina; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Carney, Michael E.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Thiel, Falk C.; Ekici, Arif B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Beesley, Jonathan; Gronwald, Jacek; Fasching, Peter A.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goodman, Marc T.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Berchuck, Andrew; Pearce, C. Leigh; Whittemore, Alice S.; Menon, Usha; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Gayther, Simon A.; Ramus, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation in the population is associated with susceptibility to epithelial ovarian cancer. Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and expression microarray analysis identified nine genes associated with functional suppression of tumorogenicity in ovarian cancer cell lines; AIFM2, AKTIP, AXIN2, CASP5, FILIP1L, RBBP8, RGC32, RUVBL1 and STAG3. Sixty-three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) in these genes were genotyped in 1,799 invasive ovarian cancer cases and 3,045 controls to look for associations with disease risk. Two SNPs in RUVBL1, rs13063604 and rs7650365, were associated with increased risk of serous ovarian cancer [HetOR = 1.42 (1.15–1.74) and the HomOR = 1.63 (1.10–1.42), p-trend = 0.0002] and [HetOR = 0.97 (0.80–1.17), HomOR = 0.74 (0.58–0.93), p-trend = 0.009], respectively. We genotyped rs13063604 and rs7650365 in an additional 4,590 cases and 6,031 controls from ten sites from the United States, Europe and Australia; however, neither SNP was significant in Stage 2. We also evaluated the potential role of tSNPs in these nine genes in ovarian cancer development by testing for allele-specific loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in 286 primary ovarian tumours. We found frequent LOH for tSNPs in AXIN2, AKTIP and RGC32 (64, 46 and 34%, respectively) and one SNP, rs1637001, in STAG3 showed significant allele-specific LOH with loss of the common allele in 94% of informative tumours (p = 0.015). Array comparative genomic hybridisation indicated that this nonrandom allelic imbalance was due to amplification of the rare allele. In conclusion, we show evidence for the involvement of a common allele of STAG3 in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:20635389

  16. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  17. Leptin receptor interacts with rat chromosome 1 to regulate renal disease traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gularte-Mérida, Rodrigo; Fisler, Janis S.; Hansen, Susan; Shibata, Noreene; Le, Anh; Medrano, Juan F.; Stern, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Linkage mapping in a backcross of {Brown Norway [BN/Crl (BN)] × ZUC-Lepr faSte (ZUC)} × ZUC identified a male-specific quantitative trait locus (QTL) for urinary albumin excretion (UAE) on rat chromosome 1. A homozygous ZUC.BN-(D1Rat42-D1Rat90)/Ste congenic was produced containing BN donor alleles from 135 to 276 Mb from chromosome 1 on the ZUC background. We observed threefold higher urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratios (ACR) in 15-wk-old Zucker background strain males than in same sex and age congenic animals when both strains are also homozygous for the ZUC leptin receptor fatty mutation (Lepr faSte) (P < 0.0001). We then linkage mapped within the donor region without confounded effects from other chromosomes. Phenotypes were collected in 248 F2 male rats in a population made by crossing parents heterozygous for both the BN donor region and ZUC Lepr faSte. Significant interactions were observed between the Lepr genotype and chromosome 1 QTL for six renal traits: urine volume, UAE at 10 and 15 wk, ACR, right kidney weight, and plasma urea nitrogen. A few traits, such as UAE and ACR, exhibit a second peak at the distal end of the chromosome. Hydronephrosis exhibited one or two QTLs contingent on adjustment for body weight. The results now demonstrate at least two sets of coincident traits with different correlations to kidney function. PMID:22968639

  18. A genetic model of melanoma tumorigenesis based on allelic losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, N.K.; Palmer, J.M.; Walters, M.K. [Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previous karyotypic studies have indicated a possible series of non-random chromosomal events involved in the progression of melanoma. We sought to define a model of melanocyte tumorigenesis by studying allelic deletions of polymorphic simple tandem repeat markers mapping to chromosome 1, 6q, 7, 9p, 10, 11, 17, and 21 in thirty matched pairs of melanoma and constitutional DNAs. The most frequent and earliest deletions were found on 9p (57%) and 10q (32%) and with the exception of one case, no sample has loss of markers on another chromosome without concomitant loss of markers on 9p and/or 10q. Losses on 6q were also a frequent (32%) event that sometimes occurred in primary melanomas, whereas losses of loci on distal 1p (26%) or 11q (26%) occurred only in metastic melanomas. A background rate (0-17%) of allele loss was seen on chromosomes 7, 17, and 21. Homozygous deletions in a panel of 31 melanoma cell lines were only detected for markers on 9p (4 cases). These data strongly support the previous model of melanoma tumorigenesis based primarily on karyotypic findings in melanocytic lesions. However, we have been able to further augment the model by delimiting the regions of loss on 10q to a region distal to D10S254, and on 1p, to between D1S243 and D1S160.

  19. Next-generation sequencing of flow-sorted wheat chromosome 5D reveals lineage-specific translocations and widespread gene duplications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lucas, S. J.; Akpinar, B. A.; Šimková, Hana; Kubaláková, Marie; Doležel, Jaroslav; Budak, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, DEC 9 2014 (2014) ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP501/12/G090 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Wheat genome * Chromosome sorting * Triticum aestivum Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.986, year: 2014

  20. An anther- and petal-specific gene SlMF1 is a multicopy gene with homologous sequences on sex chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matsunaga, S.; Lebel-Hardenack, S.; Kejnovský, Eduard; Vyskot, Boris; Grant, Sarah R.; Kawano, S.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 80, - (2005), s. 395-401 ISSN 1341-7568 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/05/2097 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : dioecious plant * male flower * sex chromosomes Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.081, year: 2005

  1. Stage-specific expression profiling of Drosophila spermatogenesis suggests that meiotic sex chromosome inactivation drives genomic relocation of testis-expressed genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D Vibranovski

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, genes expressed in males tend to accumulate on autosomes and are underrepresented on the X chromosome. In particular, genes expressed in testis have been observed to frequently relocate from the X chromosome to the autosomes. The inactivation of X-linked genes during male meiosis (i.e., meiotic sex chromosome inactivation-MSCI was first proposed to explain male sterility caused by X-autosomal translocation in Drosophila, and more recently it was suggested that MSCI might provide the conditions under which selection would favor the accumulation of testis-expressed genes on autosomes. In order to investigate the impact of MSCI on Drosophila testis-expressed genes, we performed a global gene expression analysis of the three major phases of D. melanogaster spermatogenesis: mitosis, meiosis, and post-meiosis. First, we found evidence supporting the existence of MSCI by comparing the expression levels of X- and autosome-linked genes, finding the former to be significantly reduced in meiosis. Second, we observed that the paucity of X-linked testis-expressed genes was restricted to those genes highly expressed in meiosis. Third, we found that autosomal genes relocated through retroposition from the X chromosome were more often highly expressed in meiosis in contrast to their X-linked parents. These results suggest MSCI as a general mechanism affecting the evolution of some testis-expressed genes.

  2. Conversion of chromosome-specific RAPDs into SCAR-based anchor markers for onion linkage maps and its application to genetic analyses inother Allium species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masuzaki, S.; Miyazaki, T.; McCallum, J.; Heusden, van A.W.; Kik, C.; Yamashita, K.; Tashiro, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of previously developed Allium cepa linkage maps requires the availability of anchor markers for each of the eight chromosomes of shallot (A. cepa L. common group Aggregatum). To this end, eight RAPD markers originating from our previous research were converted into SCAR markers via

  3. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  4. Stringent and reproducible tetracycline-regulated transgene expression by site-specific insertion at chromosomal loci with pre-characterised induction characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papanastasiou Antigoni M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to regulate transgene expression has many applications, mostly concerning the analysis of gene function. Desirable induction characteristics, such as low un-induced expression, high induced expression and limited cellular heterogeneity, can be seriously impaired by chromosomal position effects at the site of transgene integration. Many clones may therefore need to be screened before one with optimal induction characteristics is identified. Furthermore, such screens must be repeated for each new transgene investigated, and comparisons between clones with different transgenes is complicated by their different integration sites. Results To circumvent these problems we have developed a "screen and insert" strategy in which clones carrying a transgene for a fluorescent reporter are first screened for those with optimal induction characteristics. Site-specific recombination (SSR is then be used repeatedly to insert any new transgene at the reporter transgene locus of such clones so that optimal induction characteristics are conferred upon it. Here we have tested in a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080 two of many possible implementations of this approach. Clones (e.g. Rht14-10 in which a GFP reporter gene is very stringently regulated by the tetracycline (tet transactivator (tTA protein were first identified flow-cytometrically. Transgenes encoding luciferase, I-SceI endonuclease or Rad52 were then inserted by SSR at a LoxP site adjacent to the GFP gene resulting stringent tet-regulated transgene expression. In clone Rht14-10, increases in expression from essentially background levels (+tet to more than 104-fold above background (-tet were reproducibly detected after Cre-mediated insertion of either the luciferase or the I-SceI transgenes. Conclusion Although previous methods have made use of SSR to integrate transgenes at defined sites, none has effectively combined this with a pre-selection step to identify

  5. Precision-engineering the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome with two-step allelic exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hmelo, Laura R; Borlee, Bradley R; Almblad, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Allelic exchange is an efficient method of bacterial genome engineering. This protocol describes the use of this technique to make gene knockouts and knock-ins, as well as single-nucleotide insertions, deletions and substitutions, in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Unlike other approaches to allelic...... exchange, this protocol does not require heterologous recombinases to insert or excise selective markers from the target chromosome. Rather, positive and negative selections are enabled solely by suicide vector-encoded functions and host cell proteins. Here, mutant alleles, which are flanked by regions...... of homology to the recipient chromosome, are synthesized in vitro and then cloned into allelic exchange vectors using standard procedures. These suicide vectors are then introduced into recipient cells by conjugation. Homologous recombination then results in antibiotic-resistant single-crossover mutants...

  6. Imprinting on distal chromosome 7 in the placenta involves repressive histone methylation independent of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Annabelle; Mitsuya, Kohzoh; Umlauf, David; Smith, Paul; Dean, Wendy; Walter, Joern; Higgins, Michael; Feil, Robert; Reik, Wolf

    2004-12-01

    Imprinted genes are expressed from only one of the parental chromosomes and are marked epigenetically by DNA methylation and histone modifications. The imprinting center 2 (IC2) on mouse distal chromosome 7 is flanked by several paternally repressed genes, with the more distant ones imprinted exclusively in the placenta. We found that most of these genes lack parent-specific DNA methylation, and genetic ablation of methylation does not lead to loss of their imprinting in the trophoblast (placenta). The silent paternal alleles of the genes are marked in the trophoblast by repressive histone modifications (dimethylation at Lys9 of histone H3 and trimethylation at Lys27 of histone H3), which are disrupted when IC2 is deleted, leading to reactivation of the paternal alleles. Thus, repressive histone methylation is recruited by IC2 (potentially through a noncoding antisense RNA) to the paternal chromosome in a region of at least 700 kb and maintains imprinting in this cluster in the placenta, independently of DNA methylation. We propose that an evolutionarily older imprinting mechanism limited to extraembryonic tissues was based on histone modifications, and that this mechanism was subsequently made more stable for use in embryonic lineages by the recruitment of DNA methylation.

  7. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  8. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Ouchari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D- from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C ce s and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population.

  9. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Andrea; Kuecherer, Claudia; Kunz, Andrea; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Radonić, Aleksandar; Nitsche, Andreas; Theuring, Stefanie; Bannert, Norbert; Sewangi, Julius; Mbezi, Paulina; Dugange, Festo; Harms, Gundel; Meixenberger, Karolin

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS) and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR) for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F). In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System. Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29) of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29) by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24). By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41). The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml), resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage. Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  10. Comparison of 454 Ultra-Deep Sequencing and Allele-Specific Real-Time PCR with Regard to the Detection of Emerging Drug-Resistant Minor HIV-1 Variants after Antiretroviral Prophylaxis for Vertical Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Hauser

    Full Text Available Pregnant HIV-infected women were screened for the development of HIV-1 drug resistance after implementation of a triple-antiretroviral transmission prophylaxis as recommended by the WHO in 2006. The study offered the opportunity to compare amplicon-based 454 ultra-deep sequencing (UDS and allele-specific real-time PCR (ASPCR for the detection of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT.Plasma samples from 34 Tanzanian women were previously analysed by ASPCR for key resistance mutations in the viral RT selected by AZT, 3TC, and NVP (K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, T215Y/F. In this study, the RT region of the same samples was investigated by amplicon-based UDS for resistance mutations using the 454 GS FLX System.Drug-resistant HIV-variants were identified in 69% (20/29 of women by UDS and in 45% (13/29 by ASPCR. The absolute number of resistance mutations identified by UDS was twice that identified by ASPCR (45 vs 24. By UDS 14 of 24 ASPCR-detected resistance mutations were identified at the same position. The overall concordance between UDS and ASPCR was 61.0% (25/41. The proportions of variants quantified by UDS were approximately 2-3 times lower than by ASPCR. Amplicon generation from samples with viral loads below 20,000 copies/ml failed more frequently by UDS compared to ASPCR (limit of detection = 650 copies/ml, resulting in missing or insufficient sequence coverage.Both methods can provide useful information about drug-resistant minor HIV-1 variants. ASPCR has a higher sensitivity than UDS, but is restricted to single resistance mutations. In contrast, UDS is limited by its requirement for high viral loads to achieve sufficient sequence coverage, but the sequence information reveals the complete resistance patterns within the genomic region analysed. Improvements to the UDS limit of detection are in progress, and UDS could then facilitate monitoring of drug-resistant minor variants in the HIV-1 quasispecies.

  11. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  12. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  13. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. \\paragraph*{Results:} Theoretical derivations showed that parameter...

  14. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  15. Effects of chromosomal rearrangements on the zeste-white interaction in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolik-Utlaut, S.M.; Gelbart, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    Three gene systems have been shown to exhibit proximity-dependent phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster; bithorax (BX-C), decapentaplegic (DPP-C) and white (w). In structurally homozygous genotypes, specific allelic combinations at these loci exhibit one phenotype, while in certain rearrangement heterozygotes the same allelic combinations exhibit dramatically different phenotypes. The genetic properties of the proximity-dependent allelic complementation (termed transvection effects) at the BX-C and DPP-C, are quite similar. As determined by cytogenetic analysis of transvection-disrupting rearrangements, the critical regions for the BX-C and DDP-C transvection effects extend proximally from these loci for several hundred polytene chromosome bands. The interaction between the zeste and white loci appears to depend upon the proximity of the two w + alleles. By use of insertional duplications, displacement of w + homologues has been shown to interfere with the zeste-white interaction. In this report, the authors investigate the basis for the difference in the size of the BX-C and DPP-C critical regions from that of white using a 137 Cs-mutagenesis procedure. The authors test and eliminate the possibility that the difference is due to evidence strongly suggests that the zeste-white interaction is, at the phenotypic level, much less sensitive to displacement of the homologous genes than is transvection at either the BX-C or DPP-C. Given these results, they suggest that the zeste-white interaction and transvection are two different proximity-dependent phenomena

  16. International, collaborative assessment of limitations of chromosome-specific probes (CSP) and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH): Analysis of expected detections in 73,000 prenatal cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, M.I.; Henry, G.P.; Miller, W.A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    FISH and CSP have been proposed to reduce karyotyping need. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential efficacy of CSP-FISH using currently available probes (13, 18, 21, X, & Y) in large, prenatal diagnostic centers. Results (1990-1993) from 7 centers in 4 countries were divided by those expected to be detectable by currently available probes, and those which would be missed assuming 10% probe efficacy. 72,994 karyotypes included 699 trisomy 21`s, 352 trisomy 18`s, 136 trisomy 13`s, 358 sex chromosome aneuploidies, 70 triploidies, and 855 others (translocations, inversions, deletions, markers). Of 2,613 abnormalities, 1,745 would be detectable (66.8%). [Detroit 55.7%, Stockholm 68.3%, Boston 52.6%, Denver 61.3%, Muenster 77.0%, London 84.5%, Philadelphia 69.4%]. Centers with high proportions of referrals for ultrasound anomalies had the highest CSP-FISH positives secondary to increased T 18 & 13. We conclude: (1) 73,000 karyotypes show relatively consistent incidences of the common trisomies, sex chromosome abnormalities, and other chromosome abnormalities among the centers. (2) The proportion expected detectable by FISH-CSP technology varies from 52.6% to 84.5%, averaging 66.8%. (3) 1/3 of the karyotypic abnormalities would be missed, and therefore, replacement of complete karyotyping with FISH would have unacceptably high false-negative rates for routine evaluation. (4) FISH-CSP, while useful when positive for anomalies, is not sufficient when negative to obviate the need for a complete karyotype.

  17. Establishment of a 10-Plex Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR Assay for rapid diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingmei Xie

    Full Text Available Sex chromosome aneuploidies occur commonly in the general population, with an incidence of 1 in 400 newborns. However, no tests specifically targeting sex chromosomes have been carried out in prenatal diagnosis or newborn screening, resulting in late recognition of these diseases. In this study, a rapid diagnostic method for sex chromosome aneuploidies was established using Quantitative Fluorescent-PCR (QF-PCR. Ten markers were included in one multiplex QF-PCR assay, including two sex determination genes (AMXY and SRY, five X-linked short tandem repeats (STRs; DXS1053, DXS981, DXS6809, DXS1187, and DXS8377, one X/Y-common STR (X22, and two autosomal STRs (D13S305 and D21S11. Retrospective tests of 70 cases with known cytogenetic results indicated that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could well determine sex chromosome copy numbers by both allelic peak numbers and a sex chromosome dosage calculation with the autosomal STRs as internal controls. Prospective comparison with cytogenetic karyotyping on 534 cases confirmed that the 10-plex QF-PCR assay could be well employed for sex chromosome aneuploidy diagnosis in at least the Chinese Han population. This is the first QF-PCR test for the diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidies in the Chinese population. This test is superior to previous designs by including up to 8 sex-linked markers covering different parts of sex chromosomes as well as employing internal controls for copy number dosage calculation in a single PCR reaction. Due to simple technique and data analysis, as well as easy implementation within routine clinical services, this method is of great clinical application value and could be widely applied.

  18. Neo-sex chromosomes in the black muntjac recapitulate incipient evolution of mammalian sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qi; Wang, Jun; Huang, Ling

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The regular mammalian X and Y chromosomes diverged from each other at least 166 to 148 million years ago, leaving few traces of their early evolution, including degeneration of the Y chromosome and evolution of dosage compensation. RESULTS: We studied the intriguing case of black...... muntjac, in which a recent X-autosome fusion and a subsequent large autosomal inversion within just the past 0.5 million years have led to inheritance patterns identical to the traditional X-Y (neo-sex chromosomes). We compared patterns of genome evolution in 35-kilobase noncoding regions and 23 gene...... pairs on the homologous neo-sex chromosomes. We found that neo-Y alleles have accumulated more mutations, comprising a wide variety of mutation types, which indicates cessation of recombination and is consistent with an ongoing neo-Y degeneration process. Putative deleterious mutations were observed...

  19. A novel resource for genomics of Triticeae: BAC library specific for the short arm of rye (Secale cereale L.) chromosome 1R (1RS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimková, Hana; Šafář, Jan; Suchánková, Pavla; Kovářová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Jan; Kubaláková, Marie; Janda, Jaroslav; Čihalíková, Jarmila; Mago, R.; Lelley, T.; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 237 (2008), s. 101-109 ISSN 1471-2164 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/04/0607; GA ČR GP521/05/P257; GA ČR GD521/05/H013; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : flow cytometry * flow-sorted chromosomes * BAC library Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.926, year: 2008

  20. Forensic potential of the STR DXYS156 in Mexican populations: inference of X-linked allele null.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rodríguez, M; Martínez-Cortes, G; Páez-Riberos, L A; Sandoval, L; Muñoz-Valle, J F; Ceballos-Quintal, J M; Pinto-Escalante, D; Rangel-Villalobos, H

    2006-01-01

    The pentanucleotide STR (TAAAA)n DXYS156 offers advantages for genetic identity testing. In addition to establish the gender, DXYS156 expands the DNA profile and is able to indicate the possible geographic origin of the individual. We analyzed DXYS156 in 757 individuals of both sexes from Mexican populations. We studied the cosmopolitan Mestizo population and six Mexican ethnic groups: Tarahumaras, Purépechas, Nahuas, Mayas, Huicholes and Mezcala Indians. The six shorter (4-10) and the three larger alleles (11-13) were specific for the X and Y-chromosomes, respectively. A random distribution of alleles into genotypes was observed in males and females from each population. We estimated the power of exclusion for paternity testing according to the son's gender, and the power of discrimination in forensic casework. In addition, we detected a relatively high frequency of an X-linked allele null, principally in Mexican-Mestizos (3.6%), which must be considered when DXYS156 be applied for identification purposes.

  1. Combined fluorescent-chromogenic in situ hybridization for identification and laser microdissection of interphase chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerea Paz

    Full Text Available Chromosome territories constitute the most conspicuous feature of nuclear architecture, and they exhibit non-random distribution patterns in the interphase nucleus. We observed that in cell nuclei from humans with Down Syndrome two chromosomes 21 frequently localize proximal to one another and distant from the third chromosome. To systematically investigate whether the proximally positioned chromosomes were always the same in all cells, we developed an approach consisting of sequential FISH and CISH combined with laser-microdissection of chromosomes from the interphase nucleus and followed by subsequent chromosome identification by microsatellite allele genotyping. This approach identified proximally positioned chromosomes from cultured cells, and the analysis showed that the identity of the chromosomes proximally positioned varies. However, the data suggest that there may be a tendency of the same chromosomes to be positioned close to each other in the interphase nucleus of trisomic cells. The protocol described here represents a powerful new method for genome analysis.

  2. Frequent gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous chromosomal regions in primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai Hirohisa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sex-chromosomes originated from a pair of autosomes. A step-wise cessation of recombination is necessary for the proper maintenance of sex-determination and, consequently, generates a four strata structure on the X chromosome. Each stratum shows a specific per-site nucleotide sequence difference (p-distance between the X and Y chromosomes, depending on the time of recombination arrest. Stratum 4 covers the distal half of the human X chromosome short arm and the p-distance of the stratum is ~10%, on average. However, a 100-kb region, which includes KALX and VCX, in the middle of stratum 4 shows a significantly lower p-distance (1-5%, suggesting frequent sequence exchanges or gene conversions between the X and Y chromosomes in humans. To examine the evolutionary mechanism for this low p-distance region, sequences of a corresponding region including KALX/Y from seven species of non-human primates were analyzed. Results Phylogenetic analysis of this low p-distance region in humans and non-human primate species revealed that gene conversion like events have taken place at least ten times after the divergence of New World monkeys and Catarrhini (i.e., Old World monkeys and hominoids. A KALY-converted KALX allele in white-handed gibbons also suggests a possible recent gene conversion between the X and Y chromosomes. In these primate sequences, the proximal boundary of this low p-distance region is located in a LINE element shared between the X and Y chromosomes, suggesting the involvement of this element in frequent gene conversions. Together with a palindrome on the Y chromosome, a segmental palindrome structure on the X chromosome at the distal boundary near VCX, in humans and chimpanzees, may mediate frequent sequence exchanges between X and Y chromosomes. Conclusion Gene conversion events between the X and Y homologous regions have been suggested, mainly in humans. Here, we found frequent gene conversions in the

  3. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop......-out when the amount of DNA was greater than 125 pg for 29 cycles of PCR and greater than 62 pg for 30 cycles of PCR. With the use of a logistic regression model, we estimated the allele specific probability of drop-out in heterozygote systems based on the signal strength of the observed allele...

  4. Mapping and ordered cloning of the human X chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, C.T.; Nelson, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Progress is reported on gathering X chromosome specific libraries and integrating those with the library produced in this project. Further studies on understanding Fragile X Syndrome and other hereditary diseases related to the X chromosome are described. (DT)

  5. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  6. Chromosomal painting and ZW sex chromosomes differentiation in Characidium (Characiformes, Crenuchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artoni Roberto F

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Characidium (a Neotropical fish group have a conserved diploid number (2n = 50, but show remarkable differences among species and populations in relation to sex chromosome systems and location of nucleolus organizer regions (NOR. In this study, we isolated a W-specific probe for the Characidium and characterized six Characidium species/populations using cytogenetic procedures. We analyzed the origin and differentiation of sex and NOR-bearing chromosomes by chromosome painting in populations of Characidium to reveal their evolution, phylogeny, and biogeography. Results A W-specific probe for efficient chromosome painting was isolated by microdissection and degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR amplification of W chromosomes from C. gomesi. The W probe generated weak signals dispersed on the proto sex chromosomes in C. zebra, dispersed signals in both W and Z chromosomes in C. lauroi and, in C. gomesi populations revealed a proximal site on the long arms of the Z chromosome and the entire W chromosome. All populations showed small terminal W probe sites in some autosomes. The 18S rDNA revealed distinctive patterns for each analyzed species/population with regard to proto sex chromosome, sex chromosome pair, and autosome location. Conclusions The results from dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (dual-color FISH using W and 18S rDNA probes allowed us to infer the putative evolutionary pathways for the differentiation of sex chromosomes and NORs, from structural rearrangements in a sex proto-chromosome, followed by gene erosion and heterochromatin amplification, morphological differentiation of the sex chromosomal pair, and NOR transposition, giving rise to the distinctive patterns observed among species/populations of Characidium. Biogeographic isolation and differentiation of sex chromosomes seem to have played a major role in the speciation process in this group of fish.

  7. Polymorphic haplotypes on R408BW PKU and normal PAH chromosomes in Quebec and European populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byck, S.; Morgan, K.; Scriver, C.R. [McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The R408W mutation in the phenylalanine hydroxylase gene (PAH) is associated with haplotype 2.3 (RFLP haplotype 2, VNTR 3 of the HindIII system) in most European populations. Another chromosome, first observed in Quebec and then in northwest Europe, carries R408W on haplotype 1.8. The occurrence of the R408W mutation on two different PKU chromosomes could be the result of intragenic recombination, recurrent mutation or gene conversion. In this study, we analyzed both normal and R408W chromosomes carrying 1.8 and 2.3 haplotypes in Quebec and European populations; we used the TCTA{sub (n)} short tandem repeat sequence (STR) at the 5{prime} end of the PAH gene and the HindIII VNTR system at the 3{prime} end of the PAH gene to characterize chromosomes. Fourteen of sixteen R408W chromosomes from {open_quotes}Celtic{close_quotes} families in Quebec and the United Kingdom (UK) harbor a 244 bp STR allele; the remaining two chromosomes, carry a 240 bp or 248bp STR allele. Normal chromosomes (n=18) carry the 240 bp STR allele. R408W chromosomes are different from mutant H1.8 chromosomes; mutant H2.3 carries the 240 bp STR allele (14 of 16 chromosomes) or the 236 allele (2 of 16 chromosomes). The HindIII VNTR comprises variable numbers of 30 bp repeats (cassettes); the repeats also vary in nucleotide sequence. Variation clusters toward the 3{prime} end of cassettes and VNTRs. VNTR 3 alleles on normal H2 (n=9) and mutant R408W H2 (n=19) chromosomes were identical. VNTR 8 alleles on normal H1 chromosomes (n=9) and on R408W H1 chromosomes (n=15) differ by 1 bp substitution near the 3{prime} end of the 6th cassette. In summary, the mutant H1.8 chromosome harboring the R408W mutation has unique features at both the 5{prime} and 3{prime} end of the gene that distinguish it from the mutant H2.3 and normal H1.8 and H2.3 counterparts. The explanation for the occurrence of R408W on two different PAH haplotypes is recurrent mutation affecting the CpG dinucleotide in PAH codon 408.

  8. Allele frequency present within the DYS635, DYS437, DYS448 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ejiro

    2015-03-11

    Mar 11, 2015 ... institute and courts of law. Key words: Allele ... individual identification and relatedness testing polymor- phic (Yamamoto et al. ... haplogroup an individual matches, STR analysis typically provides a person haplotype. Most tests on the Y chromosome examine between 12 and 67 STR markers. (Jobling et al.

  9. Possible phenotypic dosage effect in patients compound heterozygous for FSHD-sized 4q35 alleles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wohlgemuth, M.; Lemmers, R.J.L.F.; Kooi, E.L. van der; Wielen, M.J.R. van der; Overveld, P.G; Dauwerse, H.G.; Bakker, E.; Frants, R.R.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Autosomal dominant facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with a contraction of the D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4. So far, homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for FSHD alleles has not been described, and it has been debated whether the absence of such subjects

  10. allele of the noncoding hsrω gene of Drosophila melanogaster is not ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Drosophila melanogaster is not responsible for male sterility as reported earlier ... gene, the pl alleles were brought in trans with hsrω05241 or with the ... The progeny hsrω05241/ry. − females were crossed with TM3/TM6B males (for details of the var- ious mutant genes and balancer chromosomes, see Lindslay and Zimm ...

  11. Sex-specific effects on spatial learning and memory, and sex-independent effects on blood pressure of a <3.3 Mbp rat chromosome 2 QTL region in Dahl salt-sensitive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have consistently found that hypertension is associated with poor cognitive performance. We hypothesize that a putative causal mechanism underlying this association is due to genetic loci affecting both blood pressure and cognition. Consistent with this notion, we reported several blood pressure (BP quantitative trait loci (QTLs that co-localized with navigational performance (Nav-QTLs influencing spatial learning and memory in Dahl rats. The present study investigates a chromosome 2 region harboring BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. We developed two congenic strains, S.R2A and S.R2B introgressing Dahl R-chromosome 2 segments into Dahl S chromosome 2 region spanning BP-f4 and Nav-8 QTLs. Radiotelemetric blood pressure analysis identified only S.R2A congenic rats with lower systolic blood pressure (females: -26.0 mmHg, P = 0.003; males: -30.9 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, diastolic blood pressure (females: -21.2 mmHg, P = 0.01; males: -25.7 mmHg, P<1×10(-5, and mean arterial pressure (females: -23.9 mmHg, P = 0.004; males: -28.0 mmHg, P<1×10(-5 compared with corresponding Dahl S controls, confirming the presence of BP-f4 QTL on rat chromosome 2. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect blood pressure. Testing of S.R2A, S.R2B, and Dahl S male rats in the Morris water maze (MWM task revealed significantly decreased spatial navigation performance in S.R2A male congenic rats when compared with Dahl S male controls (P<0.05. The S.R2B congenic segment did not affect performance of the MWM task in males. The S.R2A female rats did not differ in spatial navigation when compared with Dahl S female controls, indicating that the Nav-8 effect on spatial navigation is male-specific. Our results suggest the existence of a single QTL on chromosome 2 176.6-179.9 Mbp region which affects blood pressure in both males and females and cognition solely in males.

  12. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  13. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  14. A Marfan syndrome-like phenotype caused by a neocentromeric supernumerary ring chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Shane C; Gelehrter, Thomas D; Uhlmann, Wendy R

    2017-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized by standard banding cytogenetic techniques. A minority of sSMC contain a neocentromere, which is an ectopic centromere lacking the characteristic alpha-satellite DNA. The phenotypic manifestations of sSMC and neocentromeric sSMC are variable and range from severe intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies to a normal phenotype. Here we report a patient with a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and infertility found to have an abnormal karyotype consisting of a chromosome 15 deletion and a ring-type sSMC likely stabilized by a neocentromere derived via a mechanism initially described by Barbara McClintock in 1938. Analysis of the sSMC identified that it contained the deleted chromosome 15 material and also one copy of FBN1, the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome. We propose that the patient's diagnosis arose from disruption of the FBN1 allele on the sSMC. To date, a total of 29 patients have been reported with an sSMC derived from a chromosomal deletion. We review these cases with a specific focus on the resultant phenotypes and note significant difference between this class of sSMC and other types of sSMC. Through this review we also identified a patient with a clinical diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 who lacked a family history of the condition but was found to have a chromosome 17-derived sSMC that likely contained NF1 and caused the patient's disorder. We also review the genetic counseling implications and recommendations for a patient or family harboring an sSMC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular diagnostic testing for Klinefelter syndrome and other male sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Karl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sex chromosome aneuploidies are underdiagnosed despite concomitant physical and behavioral manifestations. Objective To develop a non-invasive, rapid and high-throughput molecular diagnostic assay for detection of male sex chromosome aneuploidies, including 47,XXY (Klinefelter, 47,XYY, 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY syndromes. Methods The assay utilizes three XYM and four XA markers to interrogate Y:X and X:autosome ratios, respectively. The seven markers were PCR amplified using genomic DNA isolated from a cohort of 323 males with aneuploid (n = 117 and 46,XY (n = 206 karyotypes. The resulting PCR products were subjected to Pyrosequencing, a quantitative DNA sequencing method. Results Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves were used to establish thresholds for the discrimination of aneuploid from normal samples. The XYM markers permitted the identification of 47,XXY, 48,XXXY and 47,XYY syndromes with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both purified DNA and buccal swab samples. The 48,XXYY karyotype was delineated by XA marker data from 46,XY; an X allele threshold of 43% also permitted detection of 48,XXYY with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of X chromosome-specific biallelic SNPs demonstrated that 43 of 45 individuals (96% with 48,XXYY karyotype had two distinct X chromosomes, while 2 (4% had a duplicate X, providing evidence that 48,XXYY may result from nondisjunction during early mitotic divisions of a 46,XY embryo. Conclusions Quantitative Pyrosequencing, with high-throughput potential, can detect male sex chromosome aneuploidies with 100% sensitivity.

  16. Micromechanical study of mitotic chromosome structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko, John

    2011-03-01

    Our group has developed micromanipulation techniques for study of the highly compacted mitotic form of chromosome found in eukaryote cells during cell division. Each metaphase chromosome contains two duplicate centimeter-long DNA molecules, folded up by proteins into cylindrical structures several microns in length. Native chromosomes display linear and reversible stretching behavior over a wide range of extensions (up to 5x native length for amphibian chromosomes), described by a Young modulus of about 300 Pa. Studies using DNA-cutting and protein-cutting enzymes have revealed that metaphase chromosomes behave as a network of chromatin fibers held together by protein-based isolated crosslinks. Our results are not consistent with the more classical model of loops of chromatin attached to a protein-based structural organizer or ``scaffold". In short, our experiments indicate that metaphase chromosomes can be considered to be ``gels" of chromatin; the stretching modulus of a whole chromosome is consistent with stretching of the chromatin fibers contained within it. Experiments using topoisomerases suggest that topological constraints may play an appreciable role in confining chromatin in the metaphase chromosome. Finally, recent experiments on human chromosomes will be reviewed, including results of experiments where chromosome-folding proteins are specifically depleted using siRNA methods. Supported by NSF-MCB-1022117, DMR-0715099, PHY-0852130, DMR-0520513, NCI 1U54CA143869-01 (NU-PS-OC), and the American Heart Association.

  17. Characterization of X chromosome inactivation using integrated analysis of whole-exome and mRNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Szelinger

    Full Text Available In females, X chromosome inactivation (XCI is an epigenetic, gene dosage compensatory mechanism by inactivation of one copy of X in cells. Random XCI of one of the parental chromosomes results in an approximately equal proportion of cells expressing alleles from either the maternally or paternally inherited active X, and is defined by the XCI ratio. Skewed XCI ratio is suggestive of non-random inactivation, which can play an important role in X-linked genetic conditions. Current methods rely on indirect, semi-quantitative DNA methylation-based assay to estimate XCI ratio. Here we report a direct approach to estimate XCI ratio by integrated, family-trio based whole-exome and mRNA sequencing using phase-by-transmission of alleles coupled with allele-specific expression analysis. We applied this method to in silico data and to a clinical patient with mild cognitive impairment but no clear diagnosis or understanding molecular mechanism underlying the phenotype. Simulation showed that phased and unphased heterozygous allele expression can be used to estimate XCI ratio. Segregation analysis of the patient's exome uncovered a de novo, interstitial, 1.7 Mb deletion on Xp22.31 that originated on the paternally inherited X and previously been associated with heterogeneous, neurological phenotype. Phased, allelic expression data suggested an 83∶20 moderately skewed XCI that favored the expression of the maternally inherited, cytogenetically normal X and suggested that the deleterious affect of the de novo event on the paternal copy may be offset by skewed XCI that favors expression of the wild-type X. This study shows the utility of integrated sequencing approach in XCI ratio estimation.

  18. X-Chromosomal short tandem repeat loci in the Turkish population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the importance and utility of polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) found on the human X chromosome and to provide the first allelic frequency data of X-STR (X chromosomal) loci in the Turkish population. Blood samples were taken from unrelated individuals (135 males and 129 ...

  19. Identification of the sex-determining locus in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles) provides evidence for sex-chromosome turnover in a subset of Takifugu species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsumi, Kazufumi; Kamiya, Takashi; Nozawa, Aoi; Aoki, Yuma; Tasumi, Satoshi; Koyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Osamu; Suzuki, Yuzuru

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for frequent turnover in sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Yet experimental systems suitable for tracing the detailed process of turnover are rare. In theory, homologous turnover is possible if the new sex-determining locus is established on the existing sex-chromosome. However, there is no empirical evidence for such an event. The genus Takifugu includes fugu (Takifugu rubripes) and its two closely-related species whose sex is most likely determined by a SNP at the Amhr2 locus. In these species, males are heterozygous, with G and C alleles at the SNP site, while females are homozygous for the C allele. To determine if a shift in the sex-determining locus occurred in another member of this genus, we used genetic mapping to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of Takifugu niphobles. We found that the G allele of Amhr2 is absent in T. niphobles. Nevertheless, our initial mapping suggests a linkage between the phenotypic sex and the chromosome 19, which harbors the Amhr2 locus. Subsequent high-resolution analysis using a sex-reversed fish demonstrated that the sex-determining locus maps to the proximal end of chromosome 19, far from the Amhr2 locus. Thus, it is likely that homologous turnover involving these species has occurred. The data also showed that there is a male-specific reduction of recombination around the sex-determining locus. Nevertheless, no evidence for sex-chromosome differentiation was detected: the reduced recombination depended on phenotypic sex rather than genotypic sex; no X- or Y-specific maker was obtained; the YY individual was viable. Furthermore, fine-scale mapping narrowed down the new sex-determining locus to the interval corresponding to approximately 300-kb of sequence in the fugu genome. Thus, T. niphobles is determined to have a young and small sex-determining region that is suitable for studying an early phase of sex-chromosome evolution and the mechanisms underlying turnover of sex chromosome. PMID

  20. Identification of the sex-determining locus in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles) provides evidence for sex-chromosome turnover in a subset of Takifugu species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieda, Risa; Hosoya, Sho; Tajima, Shota; Atsumi, Kazufumi; Kamiya, Takashi; Nozawa, Aoi; Aoki, Yuma; Tasumi, Satoshi; Koyama, Takashi; Nakamura, Osamu; Suzuki, Yuzuru; Kikuchi, Kiyoshi

    2018-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for frequent turnover in sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Yet experimental systems suitable for tracing the detailed process of turnover are rare. In theory, homologous turnover is possible if the new sex-determining locus is established on the existing sex-chromosome. However, there is no empirical evidence for such an event. The genus Takifugu includes fugu (Takifugu rubripes) and its two closely-related species whose sex is most likely determined by a SNP at the Amhr2 locus. In these species, males are heterozygous, with G and C alleles at the SNP site, while females are homozygous for the C allele. To determine if a shift in the sex-determining locus occurred in another member of this genus, we used genetic mapping to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of Takifugu niphobles. We found that the G allele of Amhr2 is absent in T. niphobles. Nevertheless, our initial mapping suggests a linkage between the phenotypic sex and the chromosome 19, which harbors the Amhr2 locus. Subsequent high-resolution analysis using a sex-reversed fish demonstrated that the sex-determining locus maps to the proximal end of chromosome 19, far from the Amhr2 locus. Thus, it is likely that homologous turnover involving these species has occurred. The data also showed that there is a male-specific reduction of recombination around the sex-determining locus. Nevertheless, no evidence for sex-chromosome differentiation was detected: the reduced recombination depended on phenotypic sex rather than genotypic sex; no X- or Y-specific maker was obtained; the YY individual was viable. Furthermore, fine-scale mapping narrowed down the new sex-determining locus to the interval corresponding to approximately 300-kb of sequence in the fugu genome. Thus, T. niphobles is determined to have a young and small sex-determining region that is suitable for studying an early phase of sex-chromosome evolution and the mechanisms underlying turnover of sex chromosome.

  1. Identification of the sex-determining locus in grass puffer (Takifugu niphobles provides evidence for sex-chromosome turnover in a subset of Takifugu species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Ieda

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for frequent turnover in sex chromosomes in vertebrates. Yet experimental systems suitable for tracing the detailed process of turnover are rare. In theory, homologous turnover is possible if the new sex-determining locus is established on the existing sex-chromosome. However, there is no empirical evidence for such an event. The genus Takifugu includes fugu (Takifugu rubripes and its two closely-related species whose sex is most likely determined by a SNP at the Amhr2 locus. In these species, males are heterozygous, with G and C alleles at the SNP site, while females are homozygous for the C allele. To determine if a shift in the sex-determining locus occurred in another member of this genus, we used genetic mapping to characterize the sex-chromosome systems of Takifugu niphobles. We found that the G allele of Amhr2 is absent in T. niphobles. Nevertheless, our initial mapping suggests a linkage between the phenotypic sex and the chromosome 19, which harbors the Amhr2 locus. Subsequent high-resolution analysis using a sex-reversed fish demonstrated that the sex-determining locus maps to the proximal end of chromosome 19, far from the Amhr2 locus. Thus, it is likely that homologous turnover involving these species has occurred. The data also showed that there is a male-specific reduction of recombination around the sex-determining locus. Nevertheless, no evidence for sex-chromosome differentiation was detected: the reduced recombination depended on phenotypic sex rather than genotypic sex; no X- or Y-specific maker was obtained; the YY individual was viable. Furthermore, fine-scale mapping narrowed down the new sex-determining locus to the interval corresponding to approximately 300-kb of sequence in the fugu genome. Thus, T. niphobles is determined to have a young and small sex-determining region that is suitable for studying an early phase of sex-chromosome evolution and the mechanisms underlying turnover of sex

  2. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  3. Using Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis to AnalyzeSchizosaccharomyces pombeChromosomes and Chromosomal Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Chen-Chun; Walker, Carol; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2018-04-02

    Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) uses alternatively oriented pulsed electrical fields to separate large DNA molecules. Here, we describe PFGE protocols and conditions for separating and visualizing chromosomes between 0.5 and 6 Mb (optimal for analyzing the endogenous fission yeast chromosomes of 5.7, 4.6, and 3.5 Mb), and for shorter chromosomal elements of between 50 and 600 kb, such as the 530 kb Ch 16 minichromosome. In addition to determining chromosome size, this technique has a wide range of applications, including determining whether DNA replication or repair is complete, defining the molecular karyotype of cells, analyzing chromosomal rearrangements, assigning genes or constructs to particular chromosomes, and isolating DNA from specific chromosomes. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Lee, Jong-Min; Alonso, Isabel; Gusella, James F; Smoller, Jordan W; Sklar, Pamela; MacDonald, Marcy E; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that are caused by huntingtin gene (HTT) CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles of 36 or more units. A greater than expected prevalence of incompletely penetrant HTT CAG repeat alleles observed among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder raises the possibility that another mood disorder, bipolar disorder, could likewise be associated with Huntington's disease. We assessed the distribution of HTT CAG repeat alleles in a cohort of individuals with bipolar disorder. HTT CAG allele sizes from 2,229 Caucasian individuals diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were compared to allele sizes in 1,828 control individuals from multiple cohorts. We found that HTT CAG repeat alleles > 35 units were observed in only one of 4,458 chromosomes from individuals with bipolar disorder, compared to three of 3,656 chromosomes from control subjects. These findings do not support an association between bipolar disorder and Huntington's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Eight X-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    X-Chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) typing can complement existing DNA profiling protocols and can also offer useful information in cases of complex kinship analysis. This is the first population study of 8 X-linked STRs in Iraq. The purpose of this work was to provide a basic data of allele and haplotype frequency for ...

  6. A Segment of the Apospory-Specific Genomic Region Is Highly Microsyntenic Not Only between the Apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and Buffelgrass, But Also with a Rice Chromosome 11 Centromeric-Proximal Genomic Region1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A.; Morishige, Daryl T.; Moore, L. David; Mullet, John E.; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory. PMID:16415213

  7. A segment of the apospory-specific genomic region is highly microsyntenic not only between the apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass, but also with a rice chromosome 11 centromeric-proximal genomic region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, Gustavo; Conner, Joann A; Morishige, Daryl T; Moore, L David; Mullet, John E; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2006-03-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones from apomicts Pennisetum squamulatum and buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), isolated with the apospory-specific genomic region (ASGR) marker ugt197, were assembled into contigs that were extended by chromosome walking. Gene-like sequences from contigs were identified by shotgun sequencing and BLAST searches, and used to isolate orthologous rice contigs. Additional gene-like sequences in the apomicts' contigs were identified by bioinformatics using fully sequenced BACs from orthologous rice contigs as templates, as well as by interspecies, whole-contig cross-hybridizations. Hierarchical contig orthology was rapidly assessed by constructing detailed long-range contig molecular maps showing the distribution of gene-like sequences and markers, and searching for microsyntenic patterns of sequence identity and spatial distribution within and across species contigs. We found microsynteny between P. squamulatum and buffelgrass contigs. Importantly, this approach also enabled us to isolate from within the rice (Oryza sativa) genome contig Rice A, which shows the highest microsynteny and is most orthologous to the ugt197-containing C1C buffelgrass contig. Contig Rice A belongs to the rice genome database contig 77 (according to the current September 12, 2003, rice fingerprint contig build) that maps proximal to the chromosome 11 centromere, a feature that interestingly correlates with the mapping of ASGR-linked BACs proximal to the centromere or centromere-like sequences. Thus, relatedness between these two orthologous contigs is supported both by their molecular microstructure and by their centromeric-proximal location. Our discoveries promote the use of a microsynteny-based positional-cloning approach using the rice genome as a template to aid in constructing the ASGR toward the isolation of genes underlying apospory.

  8. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  9. MixHMM: inferring copy number variation and allelic imbalance using SNP arrays and tumor samples mixed with stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zongzhi; Li, Ao; Schulz, Vincent; Chen, Min; Tuck, David

    2010-06-01

    Genotyping platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays are powerful tools to study genomic aberrations in cancer samples. Allele specific information from SNP arrays provides valuable information for interpreting copy number variation (CNV) and allelic imbalance including loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) beyond that obtained from the total DNA signal available from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) platforms. Several algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs) have been designed to detect copy number changes and copy-neutral LOH making use of the allele information on SNP arrays. However heterogeneity in clinical samples, due to stromal contamination and somatic alterations, complicates analysis and interpretation of these data. We have developed MixHMM, a novel hidden Markov model using hidden states based on chromosomal structural aberrations. MixHMM allows CNV detection for copy numbers up to 7 and allows more complete and accurate description of other forms of allelic imbalance, such as increased copy number LOH or imbalanced amplifications. MixHMM also incorporates a novel sample mixing model that allows detection of tumor CNV events in heterogeneous tumor samples, where cancer cells are mixed with a proportion of stromal cells. We validate MixHMM and demonstrate its advantages with simulated samples, clinical tumor samples and a dilution series of mixed samples. We have shown that the CNVs of cancer cells in a tumor sample contaminated with up to 80% of stromal cells can be detected accurately using Illumina BeadChip and MixHMM. The MixHMM is available as a Python package provided with some other useful tools at http://genecube.med.yale.edu:8080/MixHMM.

  10. MixHMM: inferring copy number variation and allelic imbalance using SNP arrays and tumor samples mixed with stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongzhi Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genotyping platforms such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays are powerful tools to study genomic aberrations in cancer samples. Allele specific information from SNP arrays provides valuable information for interpreting copy number variation (CNV and allelic imbalance including loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH beyond that obtained from the total DNA signal available from array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH platforms. Several algorithms based on hidden Markov models (HMMs have been designed to detect copy number changes and copy-neutral LOH making use of the allele information on SNP arrays. However heterogeneity in clinical samples, due to stromal contamination and somatic alterations, complicates analysis and interpretation of these data. METHODS: We have developed MixHMM, a novel hidden Markov model using hidden states based on chromosomal structural aberrations. MixHMM allows CNV detection for copy numbers up to 7 and allows more complete and accurate description of other forms of allelic imbalance, such as increased copy number LOH or imbalanced amplifications. MixHMM also incorporates a novel sample mixing model that allows detection of tumor CNV events in heterogeneous tumor samples, where cancer cells are mixed with a proportion of stromal cells. CONCLUSIONS: We validate MixHMM and demonstrate its advantages with simulated samples, clinical tumor samples and a dilution series of mixed samples. We have shown that the CNVs of cancer cells in a tumor sample contaminated with up to 80% of stromal cells can be detected accurately using Illumina BeadChip and MixHMM. AVAILABILITY: The MixHMM is available as a Python package provided with some other useful tools at http://genecube.med.yale.edu:8080/MixHMM.

  11. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  12. Multiplex PCR for 17 Y-Chromosome Specific Short Tandem Repeats (STR to Enhance the Reliability of Fetal Sex Determination in Maternal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zheng

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to demonstrate the influence of target gene and amplification product length on the performance of fetal gender determination systems using maternal plasma. A total of 40 pairs of plasma DNA samples from pregnant women and genomic DNA samples from maternal blood, amniotic fluid and paternal blood were isolated for gender determination by amplification of the amelogenin gene and 17 Y-chromosome STR loci, using three different commercial kits. The gender of the fetuses was confirmed by cytogenetic analysis or phenotype at birth. Both the AmpFℓSTR-Identifiler amplification kit and the Mini-STR Amplification kit for amelogenin gene detection were reliable in determining fetal gender (92.0% and 96.0%, respectively, but false negatives were present in both systems. AmpFℓSTR-Yfiler was found to be fully reliable as it amplified Y-STR in all cases of pregnancies with male fetuses and thus was 100% correct in determining fetal gender. The results demonstrated that multiple fluorescent PCR for 17 Y-STR loci was more reliable than AMELY gene testing in fetal sex determination with maternal plasma. We also found that the shorter amplification products could improve the performance of fetal gender determination systems.

  13. Characterization of A-11, a newly discovered X-chromosomal gene that is under both single-active-X control and tissue-specific control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadon, N.L.

    1987-01-01

    The A-11 transcript is present in fibroblasts, but is not normally expressed in B- or T-lymphoblastoid cells. The regulation of the A-11 loci on both the active and inactive X chromosomes is very easily perturbed. The A-11 locus on the fibroblast-derived inactive X in a hybrid cell is reactivated at a very high rate by 5-azacytidine, an inhibitor of DNA methylation, while the A-11 locus on the active X in B-lymphoblastoid cells is derepressed at a very high rate after gamma irradiation. The A-11 gene codes for a mature transcript of about 1.9 kb. The A-11 cDNA clone is incomplete, and contains 753 bases from the 3' end of the gene. A genomic clone that contains about 17 kb of human DNA and hybridizes to the A-11 cDNA was isolated. This clone contains at least the last exon of the A-11 gene, as determined by Northern blotting, nuclease protection experiments, and DNA sequencing. When the genomic clone is transferred into mouse cells. A-11 transcripts of both normal and abnormal sizes are produced, indicating that it is possible that the genomic clone contains the entire locus. However, at this time, the 5' end of the gene has not been located

  14. Shared peptide binding of HLA Class I and II alleles associate with cutaneous nevirapine hypersensitivity and identify novel risk alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlos, Rebecca; McKinnon, Elizabeth J.; Ostrov, David A.

    2017-01-01

    specificities and binding pocket structure. We demonstrate that primary predisposition to cutaneous NVP HSR, seen across ancestral groups, can be attributed to a cluster of HLA-C alleles sharing a common binding groove F pocket with HLA-C*04:01. An independent association with a group of class II alleles which......Genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system encode cell-surface proteins involved in regulation of immune responses, and the way drugs interact with the HLA peptide binding groove is important in the immunopathogenesis of T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity syndromes. Nevirapine (NVP......), is an HIV-1 antiretroviral with treatment-limiting hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) associated with multiple class I and II HLA alleles. Here we utilize a novel analytical approach to explore these multi-allelic associations by systematically examining HLA molecules for similarities in peptide binding...

  15. Semi-automatic laser beam microdissection of the Y chromosome and analysis of Y chromosome DNA in a dioecious plant, Silene latifolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, S.; Kawano, S.; Michimoto, T.; Higashiyama, T.; Nakao, S.; Sakai, A.; Kuroiwa, T.

    1999-01-01

    Silene latifolia has heteromorphic sex chromosomes, the X and Y chromosomes. The Y chromosome, which is thought to carry the male determining gene, was isolated by UV laser microdissection and amplified by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR. In situ chromosome suppression of the amplified Y chromosome DNA in the presence of female genomic DNA as a competitor showed that the microdissected Y chromosome DNA did not specifically hybridize to the Y chromosome, but-hybridized to all chromosomes. This result suggests that the Y chromosome does not contain Y chromosome-enriched repetitive sequences. A repetitive sequence in the microdissected Y chromosome, RMY1, was isolated while screening repetitive sequences in the amplified Y chromosome. Part of the nucleotide sequence shared a similarity to that of X-43.1, which was isolated from microdissected X chromosomes. Since fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis with RMY1 demonstrated that RMY1 was localized at the ends of the chromosome, RMY1 may be a subtelomeric repetitive sequence. Regarding the sex chromosomes, RMY1 was detected at both ends of the X chromosome and at one end near the pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome. The different localization of RMY1 on the sex chromosomes provides a clue to the problem of how the sex chromosomes arose from autosomes

  16. Isolation of anonymous, polymorphic DNA fragments from human chromosome 22q12-qter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Dumanski (Jan); A.H.M. Geurts van Kessel (Ad); M. Ruttledge (Martin); A. Wladis (Andreas); N. Sugawa (Noriaki); V.P. Collins (Peter); M. Nordenskjöld

    1990-01-01

    textabstractA series of 195 random chromosome 22-specific probes, equivalent to approximately 1% of the size of this chromosome, have been isolated from a chromosome 22-specific bacteriophage lambda genomic library. These probes were mapped to four different regions of chromosome 22 on a panel of

  17. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    other human chromosomes. The presence of abnormal chromosomal number described in general as aneuploidy, here trisomy, is observed in certain other syndromes too. Trisomies of chromosome 18, 13,22,8,9 and X are known. Children with these 'numerical' anomalies have severe and complex malformations. Mental ...

  18. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  19. ZEBRAFISH CHROMOSOME-BANDING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PIJNACKER, LP; FERWERDA, MA

    1995-01-01

    Banding techniques were carried out on metaphase chromosomes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The karyotypes with the longest chromosomes consist of 12 metacentrics, 26 submetacentrics, and 12 subtelocentrics (2n = 50). All centromeres are C-band positive. Eight chromosomes have a pericentric

  20. Liver-Specific Deletion of Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 Significantly Ameliorates Chronic EtOH-Induced Increases in Hepatocellular Damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin T Shearn

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease is a significant contributor to global liver failure. In murine models, chronic ethanol consumption dysregulates PTEN/Akt signaling. Hepatospecific deletion of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTENLKO mice possess constitutive activation of Akt(s and increased de novo lipogenesis resulting in increased hepatocellular steatosis. This makes PTENLKO a viable model to examine the effects of ethanol in an environment of preexisting steatosis. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of chronic ethanol consumption and the absence of PTEN (PTENLKO compared to Alb-Cre control mice (PTENf/f on hepatocellular damage as evidenced by changes in lipid accumulation, protein carbonylation and alanine amino transferase (ALT. In the control PTENf/f animals, ethanol significantly increased ALT, liver triglycerides and steatosis. In contrast, chronic ethanol consumption in PTENLKO mice decreased hepatocellular damage when compared to PTENLKO pair-fed controls. Consumption of ethanol elevated protein carbonylation in PTENf/f animals but had no effect in PTENLKO animals. In PTENLKO mice, overall hepatic mRNA expression of genes that contribute to GSH homeostasis as well as reduced glutathione (GSH and oxidized glutathione (GSSG concentrations were significantly elevated compared to respective PTENf/f counterparts. These data indicate that during conditions of constitutive Akt activation and steatosis, increased GSH homeostasis assists in mitigation of ethanol-dependent induction of oxidative stress and hepatocellular damage. Furthermore, data herein suggest a divergence in EtOH-induced hepatocellular damage and increases in steatosis due to polyunsaturated fatty acids downstream of PTEN.

  1. Allelic diversity of S-RNase alleles in diploid potato species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzidzienyo, Daniel K; Bryan, Glenn J; Wilde, Gail; Robbins, Timothy P

    2016-10-01

    The S-ribonuclease sequences of 16 S-alleles derived from diploid types of Solanum are presented. A phylogenetic analysis and partial phenotypic analysis support the conclusion that these are functional S-alleles. S-Ribonucleases (S-RNases) control the pistil specificity of the self-incompatibility (SI) response in the genus Solanum and several other members of the Solanaceae. The nucleotide sequences of S-RNases corresponding to a large number of S-alleles or S-haplotypes have been characterised. However, surprisingly, few S-RNase sequences are available for potato species. The identification of new S-alleles in diploid potato species is desirable as these stocks are important sources of traits such as biotic and abiotic resistance. S-RNase sequences are reported here from three distinct diploid types of potato: cultivated Solanum tuberosum Group Phureja, S. tuberosum Group Stenotomum, and the wild species Solanum okadae. Partial S-RNase sequences were obtained from pistil RNA by RT-PCR or 3'RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends) using a degenerate primer. Full-length sequences were obtained for two alleles by 5'RACE. Database searches with these sequences identified 16 S-RNases in total, all of which are novel. The sequence analysis revealed all the expected features of functional S-RNases. Phylogenetic analysis with selected published S-RNase and S-like-RNase sequences from the Solanaceae revealed extensive trans-generic evolution of the S-RNases and a clear distinction from S-like-RNases. Pollination tests were used to confirm the self-incompatibility status and cross-compatibility relationships of the S. okadae accessions. All the S. okadae accessions were found to be self-incompatible as expected with crosses amongst them exhibiting both cross-compatibility and semi-compatibility consistent with the S-genotypes determined from the S-RNase sequence data. The progeny analysis of four semi-compatible crosses examined by allele-specific PCR provided further

  2. Painting of fourth and chromosome-wide regulation of the 4th chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Bernhardsson, Carolina; Larsson, Jan

    2007-05-02

    Drosophila melanogaster exhibits two expression-regulating systems that target whole, specific chromosomes: the dosage compensation system whereby the male-specific lethal complex doubles transcription of genes on the male X-chromosome and the chromosome 4-specific protein Painting of fourth, POF. POF is the first example of an autosome-specific protein and its presence raises the question of the universality of chromosome-specific regulation. Here we show that POF and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) are involved in the global regulation of the 4th chromosome. Contrary to previous conclusions, Pof is not essential for survival of diplo-4th karyotype flies. However, Pof is essential for survival of haplo-4th individuals and expression of chromosome 4 genes in diplo-4th individuals is decreased in the absence of Pof. Mapping of POF using chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that it binds within genes. Furthermore, we show that POF binding is dependent on heterochromatin and that POF and HP1 bind interdependently to the 4th chromosome. We propose a balancing mechanism involving POF and HP1 that provides a feedback system for fine-tuning expression status of genes on the 4th chromosome.

  3. Karyotypic Determinants of Chromosome Instability in Aneuploid Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, William D.; Li, Rong

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies in cancer cells and budding yeast demonstrated that aneuploidy, the state of having abnormal chromosome numbers, correlates with elevated chromosome instability (CIN), i.e. the propensity of gaining and losing chromosomes at a high frequency. Here we have investigated ploidy- and chromosome-specific determinants underlying aneuploidy-induced CIN by observing karyotype dynamics in fully isogenic aneuploid yeast strains with ploidies between 1N and 2N obtained through a random meiotic process. The aneuploid strains exhibited various levels of whole-chromosome instability (i.e. chromosome gains and losses). CIN correlates with cellular ploidy in an unexpected way: cells with a chromosomal content close to the haploid state are significantly more stable than cells displaying an apparent ploidy between 1.5 and 2N. We propose that the capacity for accurate chromosome segregation by the mitotic system does not scale continuously with an increasing number of chromosomes, but may occur via discrete steps each time a full set of chromosomes is added to the genome. On top of such general ploidy-related effect, CIN is also associated with the presence of specific aneuploid chromosomes as well as dosage imbalance between specific chromosome pairs. Our findings potentially help reconcile the divide between gene-centric versus genome-centric theories in cancer evolution. PMID:22615582

  4. Dynamic sex chromosomes in Old World chameleons (Squamata: Chamaeleonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S V; Banks, J L; Diaz, R E; Trainor, P A; Gamble, T

    2018-01-18

    Much of our current state of knowledge concerning sex chromosome evolution is based on a handful of 'exceptional' taxa with heteromorphic sex chromosomes. However, classifying the sex chromosome systems of additional species lacking easily identifiable, heteromorphic sex chromosomes is indispensable if we wish to fully understand the genesis, degeneration and turnover of vertebrate sex chromosomes. Squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) are a potential model clade for studying sex chromosome evolution as they exhibit a suite of sex-determining modes yet most species lack heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Only three (of 203) chameleon species have identified sex chromosome systems (all with female heterogamety, ZZ/ZW). This study uses a recently developed method to identify sex-specific genetic markers from restriction site-associated DNA sequence (RADseq) data, which enables the identification of sex chromosome systems in species lacking heteromorphic sex chromosomes. We used RADseq and subsequent PCR validation to identify an XX/XY sex chromosome system in the veiled chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus), revealing a novel transition in sex chromosome systems within the Chamaeleonidae. The sex-specific genetic markers identified here will be essential in research focused on sex-specific, comparative, functional and developmental evolutionary questions, further promoting C. calyptratus' utility as an emerging model organism. © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2018 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. Preferential expression of mutant ABCD1 allele is common in adrenoleukodystrophy female carriers but unrelated to clinical symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Salsano, Ettore; Tabano, Silvia; Sirchia, Silvia M; Colapietro, Patrizia; Castellotti, Barbara; Gellera, Cinzia; Rimoldi, Marco; Pensato, Viviana; Mariotti, Caterina; Pareyson, Davide; Miozzo, Monica; Uziel, Graziella

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Approximately 20% of adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) female carriers may develop clinical manifestations, typically consisting of progressive spastic gait, sensory deficits and bladder dysfunctions. A skewing in X Chromosome Inactivation (XCI), leading to the preferential expression of the X chromosome carrying the mutant ABCD1 allele, has been proposed as a mechanism influencing X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) carrier phenotype, but reported data so far are conflicting...

  6. Establishment of a mouse model with misregulated chromosome condensation due to defective Mcph1 function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Trimborn

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human gene MCPH1 cause primary microcephaly associated with a unique cellular phenotype with premature chromosome condensation (PCC in early G2 phase and delayed decondensation post-mitosis (PCC syndrome. The gene encodes the BRCT-domain containing protein microcephalin/BRIT1. Apart from its role in the regulation of chromosome condensation, the protein is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage. We report here on the first mouse model of impaired Mcph1-function. The model was established based on an embryonic stem cell line from BayGenomics (RR0608 containing a gene trap in intron 12 of the Mcph1 gene deleting the C-terminal BRCT-domain of the protein. Although residual wild type allele can be detected by quantitative real-time PCR cell cultures generated from mouse tissues bearing the homozygous gene trap mutation display the cellular phenotype of misregulated chromosome condensation that is characteristic for the human disorder, confirming defective Mcph1 function due to the gene trap mutation. While surprisingly the DNA damage response (formation of repair foci, chromosomal breakage, and G2/M checkpoint function after irradiation appears to be largely normal in cell cultures derived from Mcph1(gt/gt mice, the overall survival rates of the Mcph1(gt/gt animals are significantly reduced compared to wild type and heterozygous mice. However, we could not detect clear signs of premature malignant disease development due to the perturbed Mcph1 function. Moreover, the animals show no obvious physical phenotype and no reduced fertility. Body and brain size are within the range of wild type controls. Gene expression on RNA and protein level did not reveal any specific pattern of differentially regulated genes. To the best of our knowledge this represents the first mammalian transgenic model displaying a defect in mitotic chromosome condensation and is also the first mouse model for impaired Mcph1-function.

  7. Chromosome Aberrations by Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    It is well known that mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation can show different types of chromosome aberrations (CAs) including dicentrics, translocations, rings, deletions and complex exchanges. Chromosome aberrations are a particularly relevant endpoint in radiobiology, because they play a fundamental role in the pathways leading either to cell death, or to cell conversion to malignancy. In particular, reciprocal translocations involving pairs of specific genes are strongly correlated (and probably also causally-related) with specific tumour types; a typical example is the BCR-ABL translocation for Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia. Furthermore, aberrations can be used for applications in biodosimetry and more generally as biomarkers of exposure and risk, that is the case for cancer patients monitored during Carbon-ion therapy and astronauts exposed to space radiation. Indeed hadron therapy and astronauts' exposure to space radiation represent two of the few scenarios where human beings can be exposed to heavy ions. After a brief introduction on the main general features of chromosome aberrations, in this work we will address key aspects of the current knowledge on chromosome aberration induction, both from an experimental and from a theoretical point of view. More specifically, in vitro data will be summarized and discussed, outlining important issues such as the role of interphase death/mitotic delay and that of complex-exchange scoring. Some available in vivo data on cancer patients and astronauts will be also reported, together with possible interpretation problems. Finally, two of the few available models of chromosome aberration induction by ionizing radiation (including heavy ions) will be described and compared, focusing on the different assumptions adopted by the authors and on how these models can deal with heavy ions.

  8. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    with women without elevated risk. Spontaneous abortion rate and prematurity rate did not differ from rates expected without amniocentesis. It is concluded that current indications may be characterized as a mixture of evident high risk factors and factors with only a minor influence on risk. Indications......The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...

  9. Allelic loss and prognosis in carcinoma of the uterine cervix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersemaekers, A. M.; Kenter, G. G.; Hermans, J.; Fleuren, G. J.; van de Vijver, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas develop as a result of multiple genetic alterations. As the genetic alterations are the cause of malignant transformation, it is likely that specific genetic alterations lead to specific clinical behaviour. The aim of this study was (i) to localise chromosome arms that harbour

  10. Progressive recombination suppression and differentiation in recently evolved neo-sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natri, Heini M; Shikano, Takahito; Merilä, Juha

    2013-05-01

    Recombination suppression leads to the structural and functional differentiation of sex chromosomes and is thus a crucial step in the process of sex chromosome evolution. Despite extensive theoretical work, the exact processes and mechanisms of recombination suppression and differentiation are not well understood. In threespine sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a different sex chromosome system has recently evolved by a fusion between the Y chromosome and an autosome in the Japan Sea lineage, which diverged from the ancestor of other lineages approximately 2 Ma. We investigated the evolutionary dynamics and differentiation processes of sex chromosomes based on comparative analyses of these divergent lineages using 63 microsatellite loci. Both chromosome-wide differentiation patterns and phylogenetic inferences with X and Y alleles indicated that the ancestral sex chromosomes were extensively differentiated before the divergence of these lineages. In contrast, genetic differentiation appeared to have proceeded only in a small region of the neo-sex chromosomes. The recombination maps constructed for the Japan Sea lineage indicated that recombination has been suppressed or reduced over a large region spanning the ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes. Chromosomal regions exhibiting genetic differentiation and suppressed or reduced recombination were detected continuously and sequentially in the neo-sex chromosomes, suggesting that differentiation has gradually spread from the fusion point following the extension of recombination suppression. Our study illustrates an ongoing process of sex chromosome differentiation, providing empirical support for the theoretical model postulating that recombination suppression and differentiation proceed in a gradual manner in the very early stage of sex chromosome evolution.

  11. Demarcation of informative chromosomes in tropical sweet corn inbred lines using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedram Kashiani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of genetic variation among 10 pairs of chromosomes extracted from 13 tropical sweet corn inbred lines, using 99 microsatellite markers, revealed a wide range of genetic diversity. Allelic richness and the number of effective alleles per chromosome ranged from 2.78 to 4.33 and 1.96 to 3.47, respectively, with respective mean values of 3.62 and 2.73. According to the Shannon's information index (I and Nei's gene diversity coefficient (Nei, Chromosome 10 was the most informative chromosome (I = 1.311 and Nei = 0.703, while Chromosome 2 possessed the least (I = 0.762 and Nei = 0.456. Based on linkage disequilibrium (LD measurements for loci less than 50 cM apart on the same chromosome, all loci on Chromosomes 1, 6 and 7 were in equilibrium. Even so, there was a high proportion of genetic variation in Chromosomes 4, 5, 8, 9 and 10, thereby revealing their appropriateness for use in the genetic diversity investigations among tropical sweet corn lines. Chromosome 4, with the highest number of loci in linkage disequilibrium, was considered the best for marker-phenotype association and QTL mapping, followed by Chromosomes 5, 8, 9 and 10.

  12. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Saundra L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors

  13. Genome structure and primitive sex chromosome revealed in Populus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Blaudez, D [UMR, France

    2008-01-01

    We constructed a comprehensive genetic map for Populus and ordered 332 Mb of sequence scaffolds along the 19 haploid chromosomes in order to compare chromosomal regions among diverse members of the genus. These efforts lead us to conclude that chromosome XIX in Populus is evolving into a sex chromosome. Consistent segregation distortion in favor of the sub-genera Tacamahaca alleles provided evidence of divergent selection among species, particularly at the proximal end of chromosome XIX. A large microsatellite marker (SSR) cluster was detected in the distorted region even though the genome-wide distribute SSR sites was uniform across the physical map. The differences between the genetic map and physical sequence data suggested recombination suppression was occurring in the distorted region. A gender-determination locus and an overabundance of NBS-LRR genes were also co-located to the distorted region and were put forth as the cause for divergent selection and recombination suppression. This hypothesis was verified by using fine-scale mapping of an integrated scaffold in the vicinity of the gender-determination locus. As such it appears that chromosome XIX in Populus is in the process of evolving from an autosome into a sex chromosome and that NBS-LRR genes may play important role in the chromosomal diversification process in Populus.

  14. Demography can favour female-advantageous alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harts, Anna M. F.; Schwanz, Lisa E.; Kokko, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    When female fecundity is relatively independent of male abundance, while male reproduction is proportional to female abundance, females have a larger effect on population dynamics than males (i.e. female demographic dominance). This population dynamic phenomenon might not appear to influence evolution, because male and female genomes still contribute equally much to the next generation. However, here we examine two evolutionary scenarios to provide a proof of principle that spatial structure can make female demographic dominance matter. Our two simulation models combine dispersal evolution with local adaptation subjected to intralocus sexual conflict and environmentally driven sex ratio biases, respectively. Both models have equilibria where one environment (without being intrinsically poorer) has so few reproductive females that trait evolution becomes disproportionately determined by those environments where females survive better (intralocus sexual conflict model), or where daughters are overproduced (environmental sex determination model). Surprisingly, however, the two facts that selection favours alleles that benefit females, and population growth is improved when female fitness is high, together do not imply that all measures of population performance are improved. The sex-specificity of the source–sink dynamics predicts that populations can evolve to fail to persist in habitats where alleles do poorly when expressed in females. PMID:25056617

  15. Not all hypochondroplasia families are linked to chromosome 4p16.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, F.; Munnich, A.; Merrer, M.Le. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH, MIM 100800) and hypochondroplasia (HCH, MIM 146000) are short limb dwarfism with enlarged head sharing some specific radiological features. Inter- and intrafamilial clinical variability and histolopathological aspects of the growth cartilage suggested that ACH and HCH are allelic disorders. Recently, the gene for achondroplasia was mapped to chromosome 4p and no recombinants were found in 9 families with hypochondroplasia between D4S111 and the telomere (Zmax=1.70, {theta}=0). By using an additional polymorphic DNA marker which detects VNTR-like polymorphism at the D4S227 locus and a new microsatellite at locus D4S? (AFM163yc1), we observed recombinant events with markers of the chromosome 4p16.3 in 3/10 hypochondroplasia families, indicating that not all hypochondroplasia families are linked to chromosome 4p. A fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR3) expressed in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification which is located in the 2.5 Mb candidate region for achondroplasia was regarded as a good candidate gene. No major rearrangement of the FGFR3 gene was detected by Southern blot analysis using an FGFR3 cDNA probe. Further investigations will be required to conclude as to the possible involvement of this gene in ACH.

  16. Why genes evolve faster on secondary chromosomes in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaughn S Cooper

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In bacterial genomes composed of more than one chromosome, one replicon is typically larger, harbors more essential genes than the others, and is considered primary. The greater variability of secondary chromosomes among related taxa has led to the theory that they serve as an accessory genome for specific niches or conditions. By this rationale, purifying selection should be weaker on genes on secondary chromosomes because of their reduced necessity or usage. To test this hypothesis we selected bacterial genomes composed of multiple chromosomes from two genera, Burkholderia and Vibrio, and quantified the evolutionary rates (dN and dS of all orthologs within each genus. Both evolutionary rate parameters were faster among orthologs found on secondary chromosomes than those on the primary chromosome. Further, in every bacterial genome with multiple chromosomes that we studied, genes on secondary chromosomes exhibited significantly weaker codon usage bias than those on primary chromosomes. Faster evolution and reduced codon bias could in turn result from global effects of chromosome position, as genes on secondary chromosomes experience reduced dosage and expression due to their delayed replication, or selection on specific gene attributes. These alternatives were evaluated using orthologs common to genomes with multiple chromosomes and genomes with single chromosomes. Analysis of these ortholog sets suggested that inherently fast-evolving genes tend to be sorted to secondary chromosomes when they arise; however, prolonged evolution on a secondary chromosome further accelerated substitution rates. In summary, secondary chromosomes in bacteria are evolutionary test beds where genes are weakly preserved and evolve more rapidly, likely because they are used less frequently.

  17. Genetic variation of 12 X-chromosomal STR loci in an East Timor sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Costa, Helena; Tavares, Filipa; Souto, Luís

    2015-03-01

    East Timor (República Democrática de Timor Leste) is a country with a population around 1 million inhabitants located in Southeast Asia and composed of 13 districts, including the eastern half of the Timor Island, Ataúro and Jaco islands, and the coastal enclave of Oecusse-Ambeno located in West Timor. Examples of the importance of X-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) analysis include parentage identification, namely in cases involving father/daughter relationships, paternity in close relative deficiency cases without access to the putative father, maternity testing, and in rape or incest cases. In this study, 149 saliva samples were collected from unrelated individuals from East Timor and 12 X-chromosomal STRs genotyped using Investigator® Argus X-12 kit (Qiagen). A total of 13 alleles not included in Investigator Argus X-12 allelic ladder (off-ladder alleles) were found, four of which never reported (alleles 34.1 and 38.1 at DXS10134, allele 17.2 at DXS10074, and allele 28.1 at DXS10146). Allele 27.3 at DXS10101 and alleles 26, 28, and 29 at DXS10148 have already been observed in other populations but their frequencies are considerably higher in East Timor population. Allele frequencies and population statistic parameters were calculated for East Timor population and data contextualized in Southeast Asia/Pacific Region.

  18. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal trisomy 21 by allelic ratio analysis using targeted massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary J W Liao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasma DNA obtained from a pregnant woman contains a mixture of maternal and fetal DNA. The fetal DNA proportion in maternal plasma is relatively consistent as determined using polymorphic genetic markers across different chromosomes in euploid pregnancies. For aneuploid pregnancies, the observed fetal DNA proportion measured using polymorphic genetic markers for the aneuploid chromosome would be perturbed. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of analyzing single nucleotide polymorphisms using targeted massively parallel sequencing to detect such perturbations in mothers carrying trisomy 21 fetuses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: DNA was extracted from plasma samples collected from fourteen pregnant women carrying singleton fetuses. Hybridization-based targeted sequencing was used to enrich 2 906 single nucleotide polymorphism loci on chr7, chr13, chr18 and chr21. Plasma DNA libraries with and without target enrichment were analyzed by massively parallel sequencing. Genomic DNA samples of both the mother and fetus for each case were genotyped by single nucleotide polymorphism microarray analysis. For the targeted regions, the mean sequencing depth of the enriched samples was 225-fold higher than that of the non-enriched samples. From the targeted sequencing data, the ratio between fetus-specific and shared alleles increased by approximately 2-fold on chr21 in the paternally-derived trisomy 21 case. In comparison, the ratio is decreased by approximately 11% on chr21 in the maternally-derived trisomy 21 cases but with much overlap with the ratio of the euploid cases. Computer simulation revealed the relationship between the fetal DNA proportion, the number of informative alleles and the depth of sequencing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Targeted massively parallel sequencing of single nucleotide polymorphism loci in maternal plasma DNA is a potential approach for trisomy 21 detection. However, the method appears to be less

  19. Increased disomic homozygosity in the telomeric region of chromosome 21 among Down Syndrome individuals with duodenal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Feingold, E.; Sherman, S.L. [Emory Univ., Altanta, GA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Although duodenal atresia (DA) is present in only 4-7% of all Down Syndrome (DS) individuals, 30-50% of all congenital duodenal atresias occur in the DS population, suggesting the presence of gene(s) on chromosome 21 that play an important role in intestinal development. We recently proposed a chromosome 21 gene dosage model to explain the phenotypic variance seen among DS individuals and presented a strategy to map genes involved in these phenotypic traits. We suggest that {open_quote}hyper-dosage{close_quote} resulting from normal allelic differences explains the phenotypic variation. A proportion of trisomic genotypes would exceed some activity threshold and express the trait. In affected individuals, this increase in expression is due to the presence of two identical copies of {open_quote}susceptibility{close_quote} allele, inherited from a heterozygous parent of origin. Individuals with trisomy 21 and a specific phenotypic defect should exhibit increased levels of disomic homozygosity in the region containing the gene involved in the defect`s etiology. These data can be used to map these genes. Using this approach, we have examined markers along the long arm of chromosome 21 among DS individuals with DA and determined the degree of disomic homozygosity at each marker. This frequency was compared to the level of disomic homozygosity among our entire DS study population consisting of approximately 380 DS families to test for linkage between DA and each marker. Preliminary analysis of 13 DS cases with DA indicates an increase in disomic homozygosity along the distal region of the chromosome, from HMG14 to D21S171, the most telomeric marker analyzed. An additional 15 cases are currently being analyzed to confirm and better define this candidate region.

  20. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89,. 307–313]. Introduction. Sex-chromosome ..... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well- aerated population cages, linkage group I-Y chromosomes.

  1. Defining the anatomy of the Rangifer tarandus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C; Griffin, D K; O'Brien, P C; Yang, F; Lin, C C; Ferguson-Smith, M A

    1998-03-01

    A comprehensive cytogenetic characterization of the unusally large reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) sex chromosomes is presented for the purpose of studying the evolution of these atypical gonosomes. Sex chromosome idiograms were constructed from G-banded and C-banded chromosomes to illustrate the relative amounts and locations of euchromatin and heterochromatin. Hybridization with a Mazama gouazoubira X whole-chromosome paint revealed that essentially all reindeer X-linked euchromatin and most reindeer Y-linked euchromatin is conserved interspecifically. Subsequently, painting probes were generated from flow-sorted reindeer X chromosomes, flow-sorted reindeer Y chromosomes, and from microdissections of specific gonosomal regions to establish specific segment-to-segment homologies between these gonosomes. In particular, one microdissection-generated paint demonstrated that certain constituent repetitive DNAs, found in C-band region Xq31, were also present in essentially all heterochromatin blocks of the Y chromosome. Microdissection-generated paints from other X-linked heterochromatin blocks revealed the presence of DNA sequences that lacked homologous sequences on the Y chromosomes and were more specific for their region of origin. These characteristics of the reindeer sex chromosomes are consistent with the notion that mammalian sex chromosomes were derived from homologous progenitor chromosome pairs and provide insights into the evolution of these atypical mammalian gonosomes.

  2. Sex Chromosome Drive

    OpenAIRE

    Helleu, Quentin; Gérard, Pierre R.; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sex chromosome drivers are selfish elements that subvert Mendel's first law of segregation and therefore are overrepresented among the products of meiosis. The sex-biased progeny produced then fuels an extended genetic conflict between the driver and the rest of the genome. Many examples of sex chromosome drive are known, but the occurrence of this phenomenon is probably largely underestimated because of the difficulty to detect it. Remarkably, nearly all sex chromosome drivers are found in t...

  3. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  4. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  5. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  6. Whole chromosome gain does not in itself confer cancer-like chromosomal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valind, Anders; Jin, Yuesheng; Baldetorp, Bo; Gisselsson, David

    2013-12-24

    Constitutional aneuploidy is typically caused by a single-event meiotic or early mitotic error. In contrast, somatic aneuploidy, found mainly in neoplastic tissue, is attributed to continuous chromosomal instability. More debated as a cause of aneuploidy is aneuploidy itself; that is, whether aneuploidy per se causes chromosomal instability, for example, in patients with inborn aneuploidy. We have addressed this issue by quantifying the level of somatic mosaicism, a proxy marker of chromosomal instability, in patients with constitutional aneuploidy by precise background-filtered dual-color FISH. In contrast to previous studies that used less precise methods, we find that constitutional trisomy, even for large chromosomes that are often trisomic in cancer, does not confer a significantly elevated rate of somatic chromosomal mosaicism in individual cases. Constitutional triploidy was associated with an increased level of somatic mosaicism, but this consisted mostly of reversion from trisomy to disomy and did not correspond to a proportionally elevated level of chromosome mis-segregation in triploids, indicating that the observed mosaicism resulted from a specific accumulation of cells with a hypotriploid chromosome number. In no case did the rate of somatic mosaicism in constitutional aneuploidy exceed that of "chromosomally stable" cancer cells. Our findings show that even though constitutional aneuploidy was in some cases associated with low-level somatic mosaicism, it was insufficient to generate the cancer-like levels expected if aneuploidy single-handedly triggered cancer-like chromosomal instability.

  7. Molecular studies of translocations and trisomy involving chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Dutly, F.; Schinzel, A.A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1996-01-11

    Twenty-four cases of trisomy 13 and one case with disomy 13, but a de novo dic(13,13)(p12p12) chromosome, were examined with molecular markers to determine the origin of the extra (or rearranged) chromosome. Twenty-one of 23 informative patients were consistent with a maternal origin of the extra chromosome. Lack of a third allele at any locus in both paternal origin cases indicate a somatic duplication of the paternal chromosome occurred. Five cases had translocation trisomy. The patient with a paternal rob(13q14q) had a maternal meiotic origin of the trisomy; thus, the paternal inheritance of the translocation chromosome was purely coincidental. Since there is not a significantly increased risk for unbalanced offspring of a t(13q14q) carrier and most trisomies are maternal in origin, this result should not be surprising; however, it illustrates that one cannot infer the origin of translocation trisomy based on parental origin of the translocation. Lack of a third allele at any locus in one of the three t(13q13q) cases indicates that it was most likely an isochromosome of postmeiotic origin, whereas the other two cases showed evidence of recombination. One balanced (nontrisomic) case with a nonmosaic 45, -13, -13, +t(13;13) karyotype was also investigated and was determined to be a somatic Robertsonian translocation between the maternal and paternal homologues, as has been found for all balanced homologous Robertsonian translocations so far investigated. Thus, it is also incorrect to assume in de novo translocation cases that the two involved chromosomes are even from the same parent. Despite a maternal origin of the trisomy, we cannot therefore infer anything about the parental origin of the chromosomes 13 and 14 involved in the translocation in the de novo t(13q14q) case nor for the two t(13;13) chromosomes showing a meiotic origin of the trisomy. 30 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  9. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences

  10. The architecture of chicken chromosome territories changes during differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Sonja

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Between cell divisions the chromatin fiber of each chromosome is restricted to a subvolume of the interphase cell nucleus called chromosome territory. The internal organization of these chromosome territories is still largely unknown. Results We compared the large-scale chromatin structure of chromosome territories between several hematopoietic chicken cell types at various differentiation stages. Chromosome territories were labeled by fluorescence in situ hybridization in structurally preserved nuclei, recorded by confocal microscopy and evaluated visually and by quantitative image analysis. Chromosome territories in multipotent myeloid precursor cells appeared homogeneously stained and compact. The inactive lysozyme gene as well as the centromere of the lysozyme gene harboring chromosome located to the interior of the chromosome territory. In further differentiated cell types such as myeloblasts, macrophages and erythroblasts chromosome territories appeared increasingly diffuse, disaggregating to separable substructures. The lysozyme gene, which is gradually activated during the differentiation to activated macrophages, as well as the centromere were relocated increasingly to more external positions. Conclusions Our results reveal a cell type specific constitution of chromosome territories. The data suggest that a repositioning of chromosomal loci during differentiation may be a consequence of general changes in chromosome territory morphology, not necessarily related to transcriptional changes.

  11. Mosaicism for a chromosome 8-derived minute marker chromosome in a patient with manifestations of trisomy 8 mosaicism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, N.B.; Grace, K.R.; Owens, N.L. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    We describe a patient with manifestations of the mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome and mosaicism for a minute marker chromosome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a chromosome 8 probe confirmed that the marker was derived from chromosome 8. This is the smallest piece of chromosome 8 to be reported in a patient with mosaic trisomy 8 syndrome. When the clinical picture is strongly suggestive of trisomy for a specific chromosome region, we believe that FISH can be used to test markers in a guided, rather than random, fashion. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  12. The DNA damage response pathway contributes to the stability of chromosome III derivatives lacking efficient replicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Theis

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic chromosomes, DNA replication initiates at multiple origins. Large inter-origin gaps arise when several adjacent origins fail to fire. Little is known about how cells cope with this situation. We created a derivative of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome III lacking all efficient origins, the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, as a model for chromosomes with large inter-origin gaps. We used this construct in a modified synthetic genetic array screen to identify genes whose products facilitate replication of long inter-origin gaps. Genes identified are enriched in components of the DNA damage and replication stress signaling pathways. Mrc1p is activated by replication stress and mediates transduction of the replication stress signal to downstream proteins; however, the response-defective mrc1(AQ allele did not affect 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment maintenance, indicating that this pathway does not contribute to its stability. Deletions of genes encoding the DNA-damage-specific mediator, Rad9p, and several components shared between the two signaling pathways preferentially destabilized the 5ORIΔ-ΔR fragment, implicating the DNA damage response pathway in its maintenance. We found unexpected differences between contributions of components of the DNA damage response pathway to maintenance of ORIΔ chromosome derivatives and their contributions to DNA repair. Of the effector kinases encoded by RAD53 and CHK1, Chk1p appears to be more important in wild-type cells for reducing chromosomal instability caused by origin depletion, while Rad53p becomes important in the absence of Chk1p. In contrast, RAD53 plays a more important role than CHK1 in cell survival and replication fork stability following treatment with DNA damaging agents and hydroxyurea. Maintenance of ORIΔ chromosomes does not depend on homologous recombination. These observations suggest that a DNA-damage-independent mechanism enhances ORIΔ chromosome stability. Thus, components of the DNA damage

  13. Nuclear Envelope-Associated Chromosome Dynamics during Meiotic Prophase I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Zeng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome dynamics during meiotic prophase I are associated with a series of major events such as chromosomal reorganization and condensation, pairing/synapsis and recombination of the homologs, and chromosome movements at the nuclear envelope (NE. The NE is the barrier separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm and thus plays a central role in NE-associated chromosomal movements during meiosis. Previous studies have shown in various species that NE-linked chromosome dynamics are actually driven by the cytoskeleton. The linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC complexes are important constituents of the NE that facilitate in the transfer of cytoskeletal forces across the NE to individual chromosomes. The LINCs consist of the inner and outer NE proteins Sad1/UNC-84 (SUN, and Klarsicht/Anc-1/Syne (KASH domain proteins. Meiosis-specific adaptations of the LINC components and unique modifications of the NE are required during chromosomal movements. Nonetheless, the actual role of the NE in chromosomic dynamic movements in plants remains elusive. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on meiosis-specific constituents and modifications of the NE and corresponding nucleoplasmic/cytoplasmic adaptors being involved in NE-associated movement of meiotic chromosomes, as well as describes the potential molecular network of transferring cytoplasm-derived forces into meiotic chromosomes in model organisms. It helps to gain a better understanding of the NE-associated meiotic chromosomal movements in plants.

  14. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  15. Haplotype-based allele mining in the Japan-MAGIC rice population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Ohtani, Toshikazu; Kanno, Noriko; Tsunematsu, Hiroshi; Nonoue, Yasunori; Yano, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Toshio; Yonemaru, Jun-Ichi

    2018-03-12

    Multi-parent advanced generation inter-cross (MAGIC) lines have broader genetic variation than bi-parental recombinant inbred lines. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) using high number of DNA polymorphisms such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is a popular tool for allele mining in MAGIC populations, in which the associations of phenotypes with SNPs are investigated; however, the effects of haplotypes from multiple founders on phenotypes are not considered. Here, we describe an improved method of allele mining using the newly developed Japan-MAGIC (JAM) population, which is derived from eight high-yielding rice cultivars in Japan. To obtain information on the haplotypes in the JAM lines, we predicted the haplotype blocks in the whole chromosomes using 16,345 SNPs identified via genotyping-by-sequencing analysis. Using haplotype-based GWAS, we clearly detected the loci controlling the glutinous endosperm and culm length traits. Information on the alleles of the eight founders, which was based on the effects of mutations revealed by the analysis of next-generation sequencing data, was used to narrow down the candidate genes and reveal the associations between alleles and phenotypes. The haplotype-based allele mining (HAM) proposed in this study is a promising approach to the detection of allelic variation in genes controlling agronomic traits in MAGIC populations.

  16. Chromosome Painting by GISH and Multicolor FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Steven S; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Qijun; Niu, Zhixia; Jan, Chao-Chien; Cai, Xiwen

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful cytogenetic technique for identifying chromosomes and mapping specific genes and DNA sequences on individual chromosomes. Genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) and multicolor FISH (mc-FISH) represent two special types of FISH techniques. Both GISH and mc-FISH experiments have general steps and features