WorldWideScience

Sample records for chromosome banding

  1. Bands and chromosome arrangement in interphase nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, N.O.; Bianchi, M.A.; Matayoshi, T.

    1977-01-01

    Chromosomes from the vole mouse Akodon dolores and from laboratory mouse showed the presence of G-bands after 3 minutes digestion with trypsin and Giemsa stain. Simultaneously, 30- to 40% of the interphase nuclei exhibited a dark ring parallel to the nuclear contour and a radial array of the chromatin in the internal and external regions of the ring. The origin and meaning of this ring image was analyzed by combining progressive trypsinizations with other methods such as C-banding procedures, autoradiography with 3 HTdR, staining with quinacrine mustard and 33258 Hoechst fluorochromes. Moreover, the presence of the dark ring was also investigated in cells treated with actinomycin and in control cells not subjected to any treatment. The results obtained allowed to assume that in interphase nuclei the chromosomes have chromatin bridges which connect the dark G-bands and that these bridges are probably involved in maintaining an ordered architecture of the nucleus with fixed chromosome positions in regard to the nuclear envelope and in regard to other chromosomes. Trypsinization produces a disruption of the interphase chromatin arrangement and the subsequent appearance of a dark ring formed by the combination of constitutive heterochromatin and dark G-bands. (auth.)

  2. The hierarchically organized splitting of chromosome bands into sub-bands analyzed by multicolor banding (MCB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, H; Weise, A; Michel, S; Starke, H; Mrasek, K; Heller, A; Kuechler, A; Claussen, U; Liehr, T

    2004-01-01

    To clarify the nature of chromosome sub-bands in more detail, the multicolor banding (MCB) probe-set for chromosome 5 was hybridized to normal metaphase spreads of GTG band levels at approximately 850, approximately 550, approximately 400 and approximately 300. It could be observed that as the chromosomes became shorter, more of the initial 39 MCB pseudo-colors disappeared, ending with 18 MCB pseudo-colored bands at the approximately 300-band level. The hierarchically organized splitting of bands into sub-bands was analyzed by comparing the disappearance or appearance of pseudo-color bands of the four different band levels. The regions to split first are telomere-near, centromere-near and in 5q23-->q31, followed by 5p15, 5p14, and all GTG dark bands in 5q apart from 5q12 and 5q32 and finalized by sub-band building in 5p15.2, 5q21.2-->q21.3, 5q23.1 and 5q34. The direction of band splitting towards the centromere or the telomere could be assigned to each band separately. Pseudo-colors assigned to GTG-light bands were resistant to band splitting. These observations are in concordance with the recently proposed concept of chromosome region-specific protein swelling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Chromosome Banding in Amphibia. XXXII. The Genus Xenopus (Anura, Pipidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic chromosomes of 16 species of the frog genus Xenopus were prepared from kidney and lung cell cultures. In the chromosomes of 7 species, high-resolution replication banding patterns could be induced by treating the cultures with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and deoxythymidine (dT) in succession, and in 6 of these species the BrdU/dT-banded chromosomes could be arranged into karyotypes. In the 3 species of the clade with 2n = 20 and 4n = 40 chromosomes (X. tropicalis, X. epitropicalis, X. new tetraploid 1), as well as in the 3 species with 4n = 36 chromosomes (X. laevis, X. borealis, X. muelleri), the BrdU/dT-banded karyotypes show a high degree of homoeology, though differences were detected between these groups. Translocations, inversions, insertions or sex-specific replication bands were not observed. Minor replication asynchronies found between chromosomes probably involve heterochromatic regions. BrdU/dT replication banding of Xenopus chromosomes provides the landmarks necessary for the exact physical mapping of genes and repetitive sequences. FISH with an X. laevis 5S rDNA probe detected multiple hybridization sites at or near the long-arm telomeric regions in most chromosomes of X. laevis and X. borealis, whereas in X. muelleri, the 5S rDNA sequences are located exclusively at the long-arm telomeres of a single chromosome pair. Staining with the AT base pair-specific fluorochrome quinacrine mustard revealed brightly fluorescing heterochromatic regions in the majority of X. borealis chromosomes which are absent in other Xenopus species.

  4. Drosophila polytene chromosome bands formed by gene introns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, I F; Boldyreva, L V; Demakova, O V; Poholkova, G V; Khoroshko, V A; Zykova, T Yu; Lavrov, S A; Belyaeva, E S

    2016-01-01

    Genetic organization of bands and interbands in polytene chromosomes has long remained a puzzle for geneticists. It has been recently demonstrated that interbands typically correspond to the 5'-ends of house-keeping genes, whereas adjacent loose bands tend to be composed of coding sequences of the genes. In the present work, we made one important step further and mapped two large introns of ubiquitously active genes on the polytene chromosome map. We show that alternative promoter regions of these genes map to interbands, whereas introns and coding sequences found between those promoters correspond to loose grey bands. Thus, a gene having its long intron "sandwiched" between to alternative promoters and a common coding sequence may occupy two interbands and one band in the context of polytene chromosomes. Loose, partially decompacted bands appear to host large introns.

  5. Giemsa C-banding of Barley Chromosomes. IV. Chromosomal Constitution of Autotetraploid Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    The progeny of an autotetraploid barley plant (C1) consisted of 45 tetraploids and 33 aneuploids. Giemsa C-banding was used to identify each of the chromosomes in 20 euploid and 31 aneuploid C2--seedlings, and in 11 C3--offspring of aneuploid C2--plants. The euploid C2--seedlings all had four...... homologues of each of the chromosomes. The aneuploid C2--seedlings were fairly equally distributed on hypo-and hyperploids, and on the seven chromosome groups. This suggests that a particular chromosome is lost or gained at random in gametes and embryos. The 11 C3--seedlings comprised seven true euploids......, one seedling with 2n=28 having an extra chromosome 6 and missing one chromosome 3, and three seedlings with 2n=29. The chromosomal composition of aneuploid C3--seedlings did not reflect that of their aneuploid C2--parents with respect to missing or extra chromosomes. Two hypohexaploid C2--seedlings...

  6. Interphase Chromosome Profiling: A Method for Conventional Banded Chromosome Analysis Using Interphase Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Ramesh; Van Dyke, Daniel L; Dev, Vaithilingam G; Koduru, Prasad; Rao, Nagesh; Mitter, Navnit S; Liu, Mingya; Fuentes, Ernesto; Fuentes, Sarah; Papa, Stephen

    2018-02-01

    - Chromosome analysis on bone marrow or peripheral blood samples fails in a small proportion of attempts. A method that is more reliable, with similar or better resolution, would be a welcome addition to the armamentarium of the cytogenetics laboratory. - To develop a method similar to banded metaphase chromosome analysis that relies only on interphase nuclei. - To label multiple targets in an equidistant fashion along the entire length of each chromosome, including landmark subtelomere and centromere regions. Each label so generated by using cloned bacterial artificial chromosome probes is molecularly distinct with unique spectral characteristics, so the number and position of the labels can be tracked to identify chromosome abnormalities. - Interphase chromosome profiling (ICP) demonstrated results similar to conventional chromosome analysis and fluorescence in situ hybridization in 55 previously studied cases and obtained useful ICP chromosome analysis results on another 29 cases in which conventional methods failed. - ICP is a new and powerful method to karyotype peripheral blood and bone marrow aspirate preparations without reliance on metaphase chromosome preparations. It will be of particular value for cases with a failed conventional analysis or when a fast turnaround time is required.

  7. Experimental observation of G banding verifying X-ray workers' chromosome translocation detected by FISH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuanming; Li Jin; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: FISH is the most effective way of detecting chromosome aberration and many factors affect its accuracy. G-banding is used to verify the results of early X-ray workers' chromosome translocation examined by FISH. Methods: The chromosome translocations of early X-ray workers have been analysed by FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and G-banding, yields of translocation treated with statistics. Results: The chromosome aberrations frequencies by tow methods are closely related. Conclusion: FISH is a feasible way to analyse chromosome aberrations of X-ray workers and reconstruct dose

  8. Border Structure of Intercalary Heterochromatin Bands of Drosophila melanogaster Polytene Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroshko, V A; Zykova, T Yu; Popova, O O; Zhimulev, I F

    2018-03-01

    The precise genomic localization of the borders of 62 intercalary heterochromatin bands in Drosophila polytene chromosomes was determined. A new type of bands containing chromatin of different states was identified. This type is a combination of the gray band and the intercalary heterochromatin band, creating a genetic structure that with a light microscope is identified as a continuous band. The border structure of such bands includes the coding regions of genes with ubiquitous activity.

  9. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-01-01

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase

  10. Chromosome Banding in Amphibia. XXXVI. Multimorphic Sex Chromosomes and an Enigmatic Sex Determination in Eleutherodactylus johnstonei (Anura, Eleutherodactylidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Michael; Steinlein, Claus

    2018-01-01

    A detailed cytogenetic study on the leaf litter frog Eleutherodactylus johnstonei from 14 different Caribbean islands and the mainlands of Venezuela and Guyana revealed the existence of multimorphic XY♂/XX♀ sex chromosomes 14. Their male sex determination and development depends either on the presence of 2 telocentric chromosomes 14 (XtYt), or on 1 submetacentric chromosome 14 (Xsm) plus 1 telocentric chromosome 14 (Yt), or on the presence of 2 submetacentric chromosomes 14 (XsmYsm). The female sex determination and development requires either the presence of 2 telocentric chromosomes 14 (XtXt) or 2 submetacentric chromosomes 14 (XsmXsm). In all individuals analyzed, the sex chromosomes 14 carry a prominent nucleolus organizer region in their long arms. An explanation is given for the origin of the (XtYt)♂, (XsmYt)♂, (XsmYsm)♂, (XtXt)♀, and (XsmXsm)♀ in the different populations of E. johnstonei. Furthermore, the present study gives detailed data on the chromosome banding patterns, in situ hybridization experiments, and the genome size of E. johnstonei. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Karyotype analysis of Lilium longiflorum and Lilium rubellum by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Wennekes, J.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Detailed karyotypes of Lilium longiflorum and L. rubellum were constructed on the basis of chromosome arm lengths, C-banding, AgNO3 staining, and PI-DAPI banding, together with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) with the 5S and 45S rDNA sequences as probes. The C-banding patterns that were

  12. Stabilization of chromosomes by DNA intercalators for flow karyotyping and identification by banding of isolated chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aten, J. A.; Buys, C. H.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Mesa, J. R.; Yu, L. C.; Gray, J. W.; Osinga, J.; Stap, J.

    1987-01-01

    A number of structurally unrelated DNA intercalators have been studied as stabilizers of mitotic chromosomes during isolation from rodent and human metaphase cells. Seven out of the nine intercalators tested were found to be useful as chromosome stabilizing agents. Chromosome suspensions prepared in

  13. Persistence of Breakage in Specific Chromosome Bands 6 Years after Acute Exposure to Oil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Francés

    Full Text Available The identification of breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage could help to detect genes involved in genetic disorders, most notably cancer. Until now, only one published study, carried out by our group, has identified chromosome bands affected by exposure to oil from an oil spill. In that study, which was performed two years after the initial oil exposure in individuals who had participated in clean-up tasks following the wreck of the Prestige, three chromosomal bands (2q21, 3q27, 5q31 were found to be especially prone to breakage. A recent follow-up study, performed on the same individuals, revealed that the genotoxic damage had persisted six years after oil exposure.To determine whether there exist chromosome bands which are especially prone to breakages and to know if there is some correlation with those detected in the previous study. In addition, to investigate if the DNA repair problems detected previously persist in the present study.Follow-up study performed six years after the Prestige oil spill.Fishermen cooperatives in coastal villages.Fishermen highly exposed to oil spill who participated in previous genotoxic study six years after the oil.Chromosome damage in peripheral lymphocytes. For accurate identification of the breakpoints involved in chromosome damage of circulating lymphocytes, a sequential stain/G-banding technique was employed. To determine the most break-prone chromosome bands, two statistical methods, the Fragile Site Multinomial and the chi-square tests (where the bands were corrected by their length were used. To compare the chromosome lesions, structural chromosome alterations and gaps/breaks between two groups of individuals we used the GEE test which takes into account a possible within-individual correlation. Dysfunctions in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosome damage, were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin by the GEE test.Cytogenetic analyses were performed in 47 exposed individuals. A total of

  14. Karyotype and C-banding analyses of haploid male chromosomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior to the swarming season, drone-brood cells were added adjoining to the lower rows of the worker-brood cells. Testes from young larvae were removed, fixed in acetic acid methanol (1:3), and stored at -20°C. The slides pretreatment were made by usual air dry method. C-banding and staining was carried out by barium ...

  15. Chromosomal aberrations induced by low-dose γ-irradiation: Study of R-banded chromosomes of human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Achkar, W.; Lefrancois, D.; Aurias, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of low-dose (0-0.5 Gy) γ-radiations was studied on R-banded chromosomes from lymphocytes of healthy donors of various ages. In cells from newborns, an increase of chromosome damage roughly proportional to the dose was found. In lymphocytes from young adults chromosomal aberrations were not detected at doses of 0.05 and 0.1 Gy, and in lymphocytes from old adults not even at 0.2 Gy. The difficulty in detecting aberrations in lymphocytes from adults is largely due to a considerable background of chromosomal anomalies which should be borne in mind in dosimetry studies. The rate of induction largely depends on the types of rearrangements. One-break terminal deletions are efficiently induced at 0.1 and 0.2 Gy and are the best indicators of exposure at these doses. At 0.5 Gy, the frequencies of 2-break lesions, i.e., dicentrics and reciprocal translocations, increase, whereas the of deletions decreases. (author). 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Biological dosimetry of absorbed radiation by C-banding of interphase chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelias, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    In the present report a C-banding procedure, refined to avoid swelling and chromosome distortion of freshly prepared prematurely condensed chromosomes (PCCs) spreads, is used to identify aberrations in non-stimulated human lymphocytes. The method allows immediate banding of the centromeric regions and enables scoring of aberrations within a time interval (3-4h after blood sample withdrawal) that is only a fraction of that normally required when cells stimulated to proliferate are analysed at metaphase. The dose-response for dicentrics and centric rings measured in interphase lymphocytes was found to be similar to that obtained at metaphase. Measurement of dicentrics and centric rings in prematurely condensed chromosomes of human lymphocytes would provide valuable information on radiation dose estimates, especially in cases of extreme urgency. (Author)

  17. Chromosomal Bands Affected by Acute Oil Exposure and DNA Repair Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zock, Jan-Paul; Giraldo, Jesús; Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; Espinosa, Ana; Rodríguez-Trigo, Gema; Verea, Hector; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Gómez, Federico P.; Antó, Josep M.; Coll, Maria Dolors; Barberà, Joan Albert; Fuster, Carme

    2013-01-01

    Background In a previous study, we showed that individuals who had participated in oil clean-up tasks after the wreckage of the Prestige presented an increase of structural chromosomal alterations two years after the acute exposure had occurred. Other studies have also reported the presence of DNA damage during acute oil exposure, but little is known about the long term persistence of chromosomal alterations, which can be considered as a marker of cancer risk. Objectives We analyzed whether the breakpoints involved in chromosomal damage can help to assess the risk of cancer as well as to investigate their possible association with DNA repair efficiency. Methods Cytogenetic analyses were carried out on the same individuals of our previous study and DNA repair errors were assessed in cultures with aphidicolin. Results Three chromosomal bands, 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31, were most affected by acute oil exposure. The dysfunction in DNA repair mechanisms, expressed as chromosomal damage, was significantly higher in exposed-oil participants than in those not exposed (p= 0.016). Conclusion The present study shows that breaks in 2q21, 3q27 and 5q31 chromosomal bands, which are commonly involved in hematological cancer, could be considered useful genotoxic oil biomarkers. Moreover, breakages in these bands could induce chromosomal instability, which can explain the increased risk of cancer (leukemia and lymphomas) reported in chronically benzene-exposed individuals. In addition, it has been determined that the individuals who participated in clean-up of the oil spill presented an alteration of their DNA repair mechanisms two years after exposure. PMID:24303039

  18. Epigenetic basis of neuronal plasticity: Association with R/G-band boundaries on human chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Watanabe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms have been suggested to have roles in neuroplasticity, in particular with regard to learning and memory formation, and in a range of neural diseases. In addition to epigenetic marks, the human genome also contains large-scale compartmentalized structures that might also influence neuroplasticity and neural disease. These structures result from variations in the amounts of GC% and in the timing of DNA replication and give rise to longitudinal differentiation (light and dark bands along chromosomes after the appropriate staining. Here we describe our current understanding of the biological importance of the boundaries between these light and dark bands (the so-called R/G boundaries. We propose that the R/G-band boundaries on human chromosomes can be altered by epigenetic mechanisms, and that these changes may affect neuroplasticity, which is important to memory and learning, and may also have a role in the development of neural diseases associated with genomic instability.

  19. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of old G-banded and mounted chromosome preparations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, A M; Pandis, N; Bomme, L

    1997-01-01

    the coverslips detach spontaneously; any mechanical manipulation will jeopardize the results. The success of chromosome painting is improved by excluding the regular RNase treatment step prior to hybridization. Additional changes compared with standard FISH protocols are that the 2 x SSC step is omitted......An improved method for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) investigation of old, previously G-banded, mounted chromosome preparations with chromosome specific painting probes and centromere-specific probes is described. Before hybridization, the slides are incubated in xylene until......, that the amount of added probe is increased approximately 2.5 times, and that the amplification of signals is performed twice. The applicability of the method, which allows double painting with two differently labeled probes using two differently fluorescing colors, was tested on 11 cases involving different...

  20. Karyotypic variation between wood mouse species: banded chromosomes of Apodemus alpicola and A. microps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reutter, B. A.; Nová, P.; Vogel, P.; Zima, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 4 (2001), s. 353-362 ISSN 0001-7051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk VS97102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6093917 Keywords : Apodemus * Sylvaemus * chromosomal banding Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.652, year: 2001 http://acta.zbs.bialowieza.pl/contents/? art =2001-046-4-0353

  1. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhimulev, Igor F; Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Goncharov, Fyodor P; Khoroshko, Varvara A; Demakova, Olga V; Semeshin, Valeriy F; Pokholkova, Galina V; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Demidova, Darya S; Babenko, Vladimir N; Demakov, Sergey A; Belyaeva, Elena S

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase) indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  2. Genetic organization of interphase chromosome bands and interbands in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor F Zhimulev

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes display specific banding pattern; the underlying genetic organization of this pattern has remained elusive for many years. In the present paper, we analyze 32 cytology-mapped polytene chromosome interbands. We estimated molecular locations of these interbands, described their molecular and genetic organization and demonstrate that polytene chromosome interbands contain the 5' ends of housekeeping genes. As a rule, interbands display preferential "head-to-head" orientation of genes. They are enriched for "broad" class promoters characteristic of housekeeping genes and associate with open chromatin proteins and Origin Recognition Complex (ORC components. In two regions, 10A and 100B, coding sequences of genes whose 5'-ends reside in interbands map to constantly loosely compacted, early-replicating, so-called "grey" bands. Comparison of expression patterns of genes mapping to late-replicating dense bands vs genes whose promoter regions map to interbands shows that the former are generally tissue-specific, whereas the latter are represented by ubiquitously active genes. Analysis of RNA-seq data (modENCODE-FlyBase indicates that transcripts from interband-mapping genes are present in most tissues and cell lines studied, across most developmental stages and upon various treatment conditions. We developed a special algorithm to computationally process protein localization data generated by the modENCODE project and show that Drosophila genome has about 5700 sites that demonstrate all the features shared by the interbands cytologically mapped to date.

  3. Distamycin A/DAPI bands and the effects of 5-azacytidine on the chromosomes of the chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, M; Haaf, T

    1984-01-01

    The chromosomes of the chimpanzee were stained with distamycin A/DAPI, which labels specific C-bands. Bright distamycin A/DAPI fluorescence was found in the heterochromatic regions of chromosomes 6, 11, 14 to 16, 18 to 20, and 23 and the Y. Lymphocyte cultures from chimpanzees were treated with low doses of 5-azacytidine during the last hours of culture. This cytosine analog induces highly distinct undercondensations in 28 heterochromatic regions of 19 chromosomes. These 5-azacytidine-sensitive regions are predominantly located in the terminal C-bands of the chromosomes. In vitro treatment with 5-azacytidine also preserves into the metaphase stage somatic pairings between the 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatic regions in interphase nuclei. The homologies and differences regarding the chromosomal localization of distamycin A/DAPI-bright C-bands, 5-azacytidine-sensitive heterochromatin, 5-methylcytosine-rich DNA sequences, and satellite DNAs in the chimpanzee and man are discussed.

  4. Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... St Louis, MO: Elsevier; 2017:chap 69. Taber's Medical Dictionary Online. Chromosome. www.tabers.com/tabersonline/view/Tabers-Dictionary/753321/all/chromosome?q=Chromosome&ti=0 . Accessed June 11, 2017.

  5. Karyotypic evolution in family Hipposideridae (Chiroptera, Mammalia) revealed by comparative chromosome painting, G- and C-banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiu-Guang; Wang, Jin-Huan; Su, Wei-Ting; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Yang, Feng-Tang; Nie, Wen-Hui

    2010-10-01

    Comparing to its sister-family (Rhinolophidae), Hipposideridae was less studied by cytogenetic approaches. Only a few high-resolution G-banded karyotypes have been reported so far, and most of the conclusions on the karyotypic evolution in Hipposideridae were based on conventional Giemsa-staining. In this study, we applied comparative chromosome painting, a method of choice for genome-wide comparison at the molecular level, and G- and C-banding to establish comparative map between five hipposiderid species from China, using a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from one of them (Aselliscus stoliczkanus). G-band and C-band comparisons between homologous segments defined by chromosome painting revealed that Robertsonian translocations, paracentric inversions and heterochromatin addition could be the main mechanism of chromosome evolution in Hipposideridae. Comparative analysis of the conserved chromosomal segments among five hipposiderid species and outgroup species suggests that bi-armed chromosomes should be included into the ancestral karyotype of Hipposideridae, which was previously believed to be exclusively composed of acrocentric chromosomes.

  6. Comparative cytogenetics of six Indo-Pacific moray eels (Anguilliformes: Muraenidae) by chromosomal banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, E; Deidda, F; Cannas, R; Lobina, C; Cuccu, D; Deiana, A M; Salvadori, S

    2015-09-01

    A comparative cytogenetic analysis, using both conventional staining techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization, of six Indo-Pacific moray eels from three different genera (Gymnothorax fimbriatus, Gymnothorax flavimarginatus, Gymnothorax javanicus, Gymnothorax undulatus, Echidna nebulosa and Gymnomuraena zebra), was carried out to investigate the chromosomal differentiation in the family Muraenidae. Four species displayed a diploid chromosome number 2n = 42, which is common among the Muraenidae. Two other species, G. javanicus and G. flavimarginatus, were characterized by different chromosome numbers (2n = 40 and 2n = 36). For most species, a large amount of constitutive heterochromatin was detected in the chromosomes, with species-specific C-banding patterns that enabled pairing of the homologous chromosomes. In all species, the major ribosomal genes were localized in the guanine-cytosine-rich region of one chromosome pair, but in different chromosomal locations. The (TTAGGG)n telomeric sequences were mapped onto chromosomal ends in all muraenid species studied. The comparison of the results derived from this study with those available in the literature confirms a substantial conservation of the diploid chromosome number in the Muraenidae and supports the hypothesis that rearrangements have occurred that have diversified their karyotypes. Furthermore, the finding of two species with different diploid chromosome numbers suggests that additional chromosomal rearrangements, such as Robertsonian fusions, have occurred in the karyotype evolution of the Muraenidae. © 2015 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  7. Banding patterns and chromosomal evolution in five species of neotropical Teiinae lizards (Squamata: Teiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Marques Lima; Pellegrino, Katia Cristina Machado; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo

    2007-11-01

    Karyotypes of five species of South American teiid lizards from subfamily Teiinae: Ameiva ameiva, Kentropyx calcarata, K. paulensis, K. vanzoi (2n = 50, all acrocentric), and Cnemidophorus ocellifer (2n = 50, all biarmed), are herein described and compared on the basis of conventional and silver staining, and CBG and RBG banding patterns. Meiotic data are also included. Karyotypes of K. paulensis, K. vanzoi, and C. ocellifer are reported here for the first time. Inter-generic variability in Ag-NORs location was detected with NORs occurring at the end of long arm of pair 1 in K. calcarata, K. paulensis, and K. vanzoi; pair 5 in C. ocellifer and pair 7 in A. ameiva. The location of NORs, along with the karyological differences between A. ameiva and the Central American species (A. auberi), corroboretes the molecular-based hypothesis that the genus Ameiva is paraphyletic. Inter-populational heteromorphism in Ag-NORs size was detected between populations of C. ocellifer. RBG and CBG banding data demonstrated that the biarmed condition of the C. ocellifer chromosomes is due to multiple pericentric inversion events instead of addition of constitutive heterochromatin. Differential-staining techniques used here revealed valuable information about Teiinae karyotypic diversity and made it possible to compare these species, contributing to both the better comprehension of their chromosomal evolution and issues on taxa systematics.

  8. Abnormally banded chromosomal regions in doxorubicin-resistant B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, M L; Hoeltge, G A; Ganapathi, R

    1986-08-01

    B16-BL6 murine melanoma cells were selected for cytogenetic evaluation during the stepwise development of increasing resistance in vitro to the antitumor antibiotic, doxorubicin (DOX). Karyotypic studies demonstrated extensive heteroploidy with both numerical and structural abnormalities which were not present in the parental DOX-sensitive B16-BL6 cells. Trypsin-Giemsa banding revealed the presence of several marker chromosomes containing abnormally banding regions (ABRs) in the 44-fold B16-BL6 DOX-resistant subline. These ABRs appeared to be more homogeneously staining at the higher DOX concentrations. Length measurements (ABR index) in seven banded metaphases indicated a direct correlation with increasing DOX concentration. When the DOX-resistant cells were grown in drug-free medium for 1 yr, the drug-resistant phenotype gradually declined in parallel with the level of resistance and the ABR index. DOX-induced cytogenetic damage examined by sister chromatid exchange methodology in parental B16-BL6 cells indicated a linear sister chromatid exchange:DOX dose-response relationship. However, after continuous treatment of parental B16-BL6 cells with DOX (0.01 microgram/ml) for 30 days, sister chromatid exchange scores were found to return to base-line values. The B16-BL6 resistant cells demonstrated a cross-resistant phenotype with N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-valerate, actinomycin D, and the Vinca alkaloids but not with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine. The results suggest that ABR-containing chromosomes in DOX-resistant sublines may represent cytogenetic alterations of specific amplified genes involved in the expression of DOX resistance. Further studies are required to identify and define the possible gene products and to correlate their relationship to the cytotoxic action of doxorubicin.

  9. A comparison of the chromosome G-banding pattern in two Sorex species, S. satunini and S. araneus (Mammalia, Insectivora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Borisov

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The G-banded karyotype of S. satunini was compared with the karyotype of Sorex araneus. Extensive homology was revealed. The major chromosomal rearrangements involved in the evolutionary divergence of these species have been identified as centric fusions and centromeric shifts. From the known palaeontological age of S. satunini it is obvious that the vast chromosomal polymorphism of the S. araneus group originated during the middle Pleistocene.

  10. Karyotype evolution in Rhinolophus bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera) illuminated by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Ao, Lei; Feng, Qing; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) is the second most speciose genus in Chiroptera and has extensively diversified diploid chromosome numbers (from 2n = 28 to 62). In spite of many attempts to explore the karyotypic evolution of this genus, most studies have been based on conventional Giemsa staining rather than G-banding. Here we have made a whole set of chromosome-specific painting probes from flow-sorted chromosomes of Aselliscus stoliczkanus (Hipposideridae). These probes have been utilized to establish the first genome-wide homology maps among six Rhinolophus species with four different diploid chromosome numbers (2n = 36, 44, 58, and 62) and three species from other families: Rousettus leschenaulti (2n = 36, Pteropodidae), Hipposideros larvatus (2n = 32, Hipposideridae), and Myotis altarium (2n = 44, Vespertilionidae) by fluorescence in situ hybridization. To facilitate integration with published maps, human paints were also hybridized to A. stoliczkanus chromosomes. Our painting results substantiate the wide occurrence of whole-chromosome arm conservation in Rhinolophus bats and suggest that Robertsonian translocations of different combinations account for their karyotype differences. Parsimony analysis using chromosomal characters has provided some new insights into the Rhinolophus ancestral karyotype and phylogenetic relationships among these Rhinolophus species so far studied. In addition to Robertsonian translocations, our results suggest that whole-arm (reciprocal) translocations involving multiple non-homologous chromosomes as well could have been involved in the karyotypic evolution within Rhinolophus, in particular those bats with low and medium diploid numbers.

  11. Chromosome banding pattern retrieves an independent origin of 2n = 50 chromosome populations of Nannospalax xanthodon from Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Zima, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 80, č. 5 (2015), s. 440-445 ISSN 1616-5047 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Karyotype * Chromosomal races * Mole rats * Anatolia Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.595, year: 2015

  12. The human thyroglobulin gene: a polymorphic marker localized distal to C-MYC on chromosome 8 band q24

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, F.; Bikker, H.; Geurts van Kessel, A.; Melsert, R.; Pearson, P. L.; de Vijlder, J. J.; van Ommen, G. J.

    1985-01-01

    The human thyroglobulin (Tg) gene is localized to chromosome 8 and regionally to band q24 as shown independently by both in situ hybridization techniques and Southern blot analysis of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Analysis of hybrids derived from a Burkitt lymphoma, with a translocation

  13. Chromatin Structure in Bands and Interbands of Polytene Chromosomes Imaged by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Grauw, C.J.; de Grauw, C.J.; Avogadro, A.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van den Heuvel, D.J.; van der Werf, Kees; Otto, Cornelis; Kraan, Yvonne M.; van Hulst, N.F.; Greve, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Polytene chromosomes from Drosophila melanogaster, observed from squash preparations, and chromosomes from Chironomus thummi thummi, investigated under physiological conditions, are imaged using an Atomic Force Microscope. Various chromatin fiber structures can be observed with high detail in fixed

  14. Karyotypic evolution and phylogenetic relationships in the order Chiroptera as revealed by G-banding comparison and chromosome painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Lei; Mao, Xiuguang; Nie, Wenhui; Gu, Xiaoming; Feng, Qing; Wang, Jinhuan; Su, Weiting; Wang, Yingxiang; Volleth, Marianne; Yang, Fengtang

    2007-01-01

    Bats are a unique but enigmatic group of mammals and have a world-wide distribution. The phylogenetic relationships of extant bats are far from being resolved. Here, we investigated the karyotypic relationships of representative species from four families of the order Chiroptera by comparative chromosome painting and banding. A complete set of painting probes derived from flow-sorted chromosomes of Myotis myotis (family Vespertilionidae) were hybridized onto metaphases of Cynopterus sphinx (2n = 34, family Pteropodidae), Rhinolophus sinicus (2n=36, family Rhinolophidae) and Aselliscus stoliczkanus (2n=30, family Hipposideridae) and delimited 27, 30 and 25 conserved chromosomal segments in the three genomes, respectively. The results substantiate that Robertsonian translocation is the main mode of chromosome evolution in the order Chiroptera, with extensive conservation of whole chromosomal arms. The use of M. myotis (2n=44) probes has enabled the integration of C. sphinx, R. sinicus and A. stoliczkanus chromosomes into the previously established comparative maps between human and Eonycteris spelaea (2n=36), Rhinolophus mehelyi (2n=58), Hipposideros larvatus (2n=32), and M. myotis. Our results provide the first cytogenetic signature rearrangement that supports the grouping of Pteropodidae and Rhinolophoidea in a common clade (i.e. Pteropodiformes or Yinpterochiroptera) and thus improve our understanding on the karyotypic relationships and genome phylogeny of these bat species.

  15. Karyotype evolution and phylogenetic relationships of hamsters (Cricetidae, Muroidea, Rodentia) inferred from chromosomal painting and banding comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanenko, Svetlana A; Volobouev, Vitaly T; Perelman, Polina L; Lebedev, Vladimir S; Serdukova, Natalya A; Trifonov, Vladimir A; Biltueva, Larisa S; Nie, Wenhui; O'Brien, Patricia C M; Bulatova, Nina Sh; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Yang, Fengtang; Graphodatsky, Alexander S

    2007-01-01

    The evolutionary success of rodents of the superfamily Muroidea makes this taxon the most interesting for evolution studies, including study at the chromosomal level. Chromosome-specific painting probes from the Chinese hamster and the Syrian (golden) hamster were used to delimit homologous chromosomal segments among 15 hamster species from eight genera: Allocricetulus, Calomyscus, Cricetulus, Cricetus, Mesocricetus, Peromyscus, Phodopus and Tscherskia (Cricetidae, Muroidea, Rodentia). Based on results of chromosome painting and G-banding, comparative maps between 20 rodent species have been established. The integrated maps demonstrate a high level of karyotype conservation among species in the Cricetus group (Cricetus, Cricetulus, Allocricetulus) with Tscherskia as its sister group. Species within the genera Mesocricetus and Phodopus also show a high degree of chromosomal conservation. Our results substantiate many of the conclusions suggested by other data and strengthen the topology of the Muroidea phylogenetic tree through the inclusion of genome-wide chromosome rearrangements. The derivation of the muroids karyotypes from the putative ancestral state involved centric fusions, fissions, addition of heterochromatic arms and a great number of inversions. Our results provide further insights into the karyotype relationships of all species investigated.

  16. mBAND analysis for high- and low-LET radiation-induced chromosome aberrations: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hada, Megumi, E-mail: megumi.hada-1@nasa.gov [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Universities Space Research Association, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Wu Honglu; Cucinotta, Francis A. [NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 77058 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    During long-term space travel or cancer therapy, humans are exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) energetic heavy ions. High-LET radiation is much more effective than low-LET radiation in causing various biological effects, including cell inactivation, genetic mutations, cataracts and cancer induction. Most of these biological endpoints are closely related to chromosomal damage, and cytogenetic damage can be utilized as a biomarker for radiation insults. Epidemiological data, mainly from survivors of the atomic bomb detonations in Japan, have enabled risk estimation from low-LET radiation exposures. The identification of a cytogenetic signature that distinguishes high- from low-LET exposure remains a long-term goal in radiobiology. Recently developed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-painting methodologies have revealed unique endpoints related to radiation quality. Heavy-ions induce a high fraction of complex-type exchanges, and possibly unique chromosome rearrangements. This review will concentrate on recent data obtained with multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) methods in mammalian cells exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. Chromosome analysis with mBAND technique allows detection of both inter- and intrachromosomal exchanges, and also distribution of the breakpoints of aberrations.

  17. G-banding analysis of radiation-induced chromosome damage in lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Nakashima, Eiji.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the G-banding analysis of somatic chromosomes in lymphocytes from 63 atomic-bomb survivors in Hiroshima to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Summary findings are as follows: (1) The cells with stable-type chromosome aberrations (Cs cells) predominated among the aberrant cells and showed a dose-dependent increase. All stable chromosome aberrations were classified into 9 types: reciprocal translocations (t), translocations of complex type (t-cx), insertions (ins), complex exchanges (e-cx), peri- and paracentric inversions (inv-peri, inv-para), terminal and interstitial deletions (del-ter, del-int), and unidentified rearrangements. Aberration frequencies increased with increasing dose for all aberration categories. Among the chromosome aberrations classified, reciprocal translocations predominated in all dose ranges. The frequencies of complex aberrations were low at the low-dose level but increased sharply as dose increased. (2) The linear model was fitted to test the dose-response relationship for Cs-cell frequencies. With a constant neutron relative biological effectiveness of 10, an estimated linear slope of 15.2%/Sv was obtained for Dosimetry System 1986 bone-marrow dose with an intercept of 2.9% at dose 0. The present observation confirmed a wide variability of Cs-cell frequencies among individual survivors in every dose category.(3) Statistical analysis of data on 3370 break sites showed good correlations between relative DNA content and the distribution of chromosome breaks involved in translocations, although the involvement of chromosome 1 is significantly higher, for as-yet-unknown reasons. (J.P.N.)

  18. Myeloid- and lymphoid-specific breakpoint cluster regions in chromosome band 13q14 in acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coignet, L J; Lima, C S; Min, T; Streubel, B; Swansbury, J; Telford, N; Swanton, S; Bowen, A; Nagai, M; Catovsky, D; Fonatsch, C; Dyer, M J

    1999-07-01

    Abnormalities of chromosome band 13q14 occur in hematologic malignancies of all lineages and at all stages of differentiation. Unlike other chromosomal translocations, which are usually specific for a given lineage, the chromosomal translocation t(12;13)(p12;q14) has been observed in both B-cell and T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-, TCP-ALL), in differentiated and undifferentiated acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), and in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) at progression to blast crisis. The nature of these translocations and their pathologic consequences remain unknown. To begin to define the gene(s) involved on chromosome 13, we have performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a panel of YACs from the region, on a series of 10 cases of acute leukemia with t(12;13)(p12;q14) and 1 case each with "variant" translocations including t(12;13)(q21;q14), t(10;13)(q24;q14) and t(9;13)(p21;q14). In 8/13 cases/cell lines, the 13q14 break fell within a single 1.4 Mb CEPH MegaYAC. This YAC fell immediately telomeric of the forkhead (FKHR) gene, which is disrupted in the t(2;13)(q35;q14) seen in pediatric alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. Seven of the 8 cases with breaks in this YAC were AML. In 4/13 cases, the 13q14 break fell within a 1.7-Mb YAC located about 3 Mb telomeric of the retinoblastoma (RB1) gene: all 4 cases were ALL. One case of myelodysplastic syndrome exhibited a break within 13q12, adjacent to the BRCA2 gene. These data indicate the presence of myeloid- and lymphoid-specific breakpoint cluster regions within chromosome band 13q14 in acute leukemia.

  19. Chromosome intra- and inter-changes determined by G-banding in radiation workers with in vivo exposure to plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawn, E Janet; Whitehouse, Caroline A

    2005-01-01

    Suggestions that exposure to intakes of alpha-emitting radionuclides such as plutonium could result in a specific profile of chromosome damage distinguishable from that of low LET irradiation have led to the re-analysis of the different types of chromosome aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes determined by G-banding in a group of 20 plutonium workers from the British Nuclear Fuels plc facility at Sellafield, UK. Comparisons were made with a group of workers with negligible plutonium intakes but similar external gamma doses and with an unexposed control group. Examination of simple translocation frequencies in the three groups indicated a significant difference (P = 0.033), with the higher frequency in the plutonium workers indicating that exposure from plutonium was contributing to the aberration yield. Slightly raised frequencies of both intra-chromosomal and complex aberrations were observed in the plutonium workers in comparison with the comparable external exposure group and the control group but the difference did not reach significance at the P = 0.05 level and there was no variation in the relative frequencies of the different aberration types between the three groups. There was, therefore, no firm indication from this study that either intra-chromosomal or complex aberrations could be used as a specific marker of high LET exposure in workers with historical intakes of plutonium

  20. Evolutionary trends in the family Curimatidae (Characiformes): inferences from chromosome banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Tatiane Ramos; Pires, Larissa Bettin; Venturelli, Natália Bortolazzi; Usso, Mariana Campaner; da Rosa, Renata; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    The family Curimatidae is a fish group usually considered chromosomally conserved in their diploid number. However, some studies show small changes in the karyotype microstructure, and the presence of B chromosomes, indicating a chromosomal diversification within the group, even if structural changes in the karyotypes are not visible. Few studies associate this trait with an evolutionary pattern within the family. This study aimed to characterize the karyotype, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), and heterochromatin distribution of six species of Curimatidae of the genera Cyphocharax Fowler, 1906 and Steindachnerina Fowler, 1906: Cyphocharax voga (Hensel, 1870), Cyphocharax spilotus (Vari, 1987), Cyphocharax saladensis (Meinken, 1933), Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948), Steindachnerina biornata (Braga et Azpelicueta, 1987) and Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernández-Yépez, 1948) and contribute data to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the chromosomal evolution of this group of fish. All specimens had 2n=54, m-sm, and B microchromosomes. Five species exhibited single NORs, except for Steindachnerina biornata, which showed a multiple pattern of ribosomal sites. NORs were chromomycin A3 positive (CMA3 (+)) and 4'-6-diamino-2-phenylindole (DAPI(-)) negative, exhibiting differences in the pair and chromosomal location of each individual of the species. FISH with 5S rDNA probe revealed sites in the pericentrometic position of a pair of chromosomes of five species. However, another site was detected on a metacentric chromosome of Cyphocharax spilotus. Heterochromatin distributed both in the pericentromeric and some terminal regions was revealed to be CMA3 (+)/DAPI(-). These data associated with the previously existing ones confirm that, although Curimatidae have a very conservative karyotype macrostructure, NORs and heterochromatin variability are caused by mechanisms of chromosome alterations, such as translocations and/or inversions

  1. [Combined G-banded karyotyping and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with congenital heart defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Xie, Jiansheng; Geng, Qian; Xu, Zhiyong; Wu, Weiqin; Luo, Fuwei; Li, Suli; Wang, Qin; Chen, Wubin; Tan, Hongxi; Zhang, Hu

    2017-02-10

    To assess the value of G-banded karyotyping in combination with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) as a tool for the detection of chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with congenital heart defects. The combined method was used to analyze 104 fetuses with heart malformations identified by ultrasonography. Abnormal findings were confirmed with chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA). Nineteen (18%) fetuses were found to harbor chromosomal aberrations by G-banded karyotyping and MLPA. For 93 cases, CMA has detected abnormalities in 14 cases including 10 pathogenic copy number variations (CNVs) and 4 CNVs of uncertain significance (VOUS). MLPA was able to detect all of the pathogenic CNVs and 1 VOUS CNV. Combined use of G-banded karyotyping and MLPA is a rapid, low-cost and effective method to detect chromosomal abnormalities in fetuses with various heart malformations.

  2. Karyotype and chromosome banding of endangered crucian carp, carassius carassius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Teleostei, Cyprinidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knytl, M.; Kalous, L.; Ráb, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2013), s. 205-215 ISSN 1993-0771 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP506/11/P596 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : fish cytogenetics * paleotetraploid * heterochromatin * metaphase chromosomes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2013

  3. [Utility of chromosome banding with ALU I enzyme for identifying methylated areas in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Atencio, Alicia; Yamarte, Leonard; Urdaneta, Karelis; Soto-Alvarez, Marisol; Alvarez Nava, Francisco; Cañizalez, Jenny; Quintero, Maribel; Atencio, Raquel; González, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Cancer is a group of disorders characterized by uncontrolled cell growth which is produced by two successive events: increased cell proliferation (tumor or neoplasia) and the invasive capacity of these cells (metastasis). DNA methylation is an epigenetic process which has been involved as an important pathogenic factor of cancer. DNA methylation participates in the regulation of gene expression, directly, by preventing the union of transcription factors, and indirectly, by promoting the "closed" structure of the chromatine. The objectives of this study were to identify hypermethyled chromosomal regions through the use of restriction Alu I endonuclease, and to relate cytogenetically these regions with tumor suppressive gene loci. Sixty peripheral blood samples of females with breast cancer were analyzed. Cell cultures were performed and cytogenetic spreads, previously digested with Alu I enzyme, were stained with Giemsa. Chromosomal centromeric and not centromeric regions were stained in 37% of cases. About 96% of stained hypermethyled chromosomal regions (1q, 2q, 6q) were linked with methylated genes associated with breast cancer. In addition, centromeric regions in chromosomes 3, 4, 8, 13, 14, 15 and 17, usually unstained, were found positive to digestion with Alu I enzime and Giemsa staining. We suggest the importance of this technique for the global visualization of the genome which can find methylated genes related to breast cancer, and thus lead to a specific therapy, and therefore a better therapeutic response.

  4. Polytene chromosomes of monogenic and amphogenic Chrysomya species (Calliphoridae, Diptera): analysis of banding patterns and in situ hybridization with Drosophila sex determining gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalla, S

    1994-03-01

    Standard maps for the five banded polytene chromosomes found in trichogen cell nuclei of the monogenic blowfly Chrysomya rufifacies and the amphogenic Chrysomya pinguis are presented. The chromosomes are highly homologous in the two species; differences in banding patterns are predominantly caused by one pericentric and ten paracentric inversions. In chromosome 5 of the amphogenic Chrysomya phaonis, also analysed in this paper, an additional paracentric inversion was observed. The distribution of species specific inversions indicates that the monogenic C. rufifacies is phylogenetically older than the amphogenic species. The maternal sex realizer locus F'/f on polytene chromosome 5 of C. rufifacies is not associated with a structural heterozygosity. Chromosome pair 6 of C. rufifacies and the sex chromosome pair of C. pinguis are under-replicated in polytene nuclei; they consist of irregular chromatin granules, frequently associated with nucleolus material. Evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes in Chrysomya is probably correlated with heterochromatin accumulation. A search for sex determining genes in Chrysomya was initiated using sex determining sequences from Drosophila melanogaster for in situ hybridization. The polytene band 41A1 on chromosome 5 of monogenic and amphogenic Chrysomya species contains sequences homologous to the maternal sex determining gene daughterless (da). Homology to the zygotic gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) of Drosophila is detected in band 39A1 on chromosome 5 of C. rufifacies. The findings reported here are the first evidence for a possible homology between the da gene of Drosophila and the maternal sex realizer F' of C. rufifacies. An hypothesis for the evolution of the maternal effect sex determination of C. rufifacies is proposed.

  5. Comparison of the chromosome banding patterns in Dryomys laniger and D. nitedula from Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Kankilic, T.; Yorulmaz, T.; Kankilic, T.; Zima, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 3 (2016), s. 363-368 ISSN 1300-0179 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : dormice * karyotype * C-banding * AgNOR staining Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.785, year: 2016

  6. C-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization with rDNA sequences in chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Mariza Dortas Maffei

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of Cycloneda sanguinea using C-banding, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH rDNA probes, and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining. The chromosome number was 2n = 18 + XX for females and 2n = 18 + Xy for males. The X chromosome was metacentric and the Y chromosome was very small. During meiosis, the karyotypic meioformula was n = 9 + Xy p, and sex chromosomes configured a parachute at metaphase I. At the beginning of pachytene, bivalents were still individualized, and sex chromosomes were associated end-to-end through the heteropycnotic region of the X chromosome. Later in pachytene, further condensation led to the formation of a pseudo-ring by the sex bivalent. All chromosomes showed pericentromeric heterochromatin. FISH and sequential FISH/Ag-NOR staining evidenced the location of the nucleolar organizer region in one pair of autosomes (at spermatogonial metaphase. During meiosis, these genes were mapped to a region outside the sex vesicle by FISH, although Xy p was deeply stained with silver at metaphase I. These results suggest that these argyrophilic substances are of a nucleolar protein nature, and seem to be synthesized by a pair of autosomes and imported during meiosis (prophase I to the sex pair, during the association of the sex chromosomes.

  7. The banded karyotype of the 2n=58 chromosomal race of mole rats from Erzincan, Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Zima, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2013), s. 19-23 ISSN 0139-7893 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Ag-NOR staining * C-banding * Nannospalax xanthodon Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.741, year: 2013 http://hdl.handle.net/11104/0221259

  8. Chromosome banding pattern in fat dormouse and bank vole (Mammalia: Rodentia) from Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Zima, Jan; Yorulmaz, T.; Gözütok, S.; Toyran, K.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, 1-2 (2013), s. 47-51 ISSN 0015-5497 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : AgNOR staining * Anatolia * C-banding * Glis glis * Myodes glareorus Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.478, year: 2013

  9. Development and evaluation of automated systems for detection and classification of banded chromosomes: current status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xingwei; Zheng Bin; Wood, Marc; Li Shibo; Chen Wei; Liu Hong

    2005-01-01

    Automated detection and classification of banded chromosomes may help clinicians diagnose cancers and other genetic disorders at an early stage more efficiently and accurately. However, developing such an automated system (including both a high-speed microscopic image scanning device and related computer-assisted schemes) is quite a challenging and difficult task. Since the 1980s, great research efforts have been made to develop fast and more reliable methods to assist clinical technicians in performing this important and time-consuming task. A number of computer-assisted methods including classical statistical methods, artificial neural networks and knowledge-based fuzzy logic systems, have been applied and tested. Based on the initial test using limited datasets, encouraging results in algorithm and system development have been demonstrated. Despite the significant research effort and progress made over the last two decades, computer-assisted chromosome detection and classification systems have not been routinely accepted and used in clinical laboratories. Further research and development is needed

  10. Development and evaluation of automated systems for detection and classification of banded chromosomes: current status and future perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xingwei [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, OK (United States); Zheng Bin [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Wood, Marc [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, OK (United States); Li Shibo [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Medical Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Chen Wei [Department of Physics and Engineering, University of Central Oklahoma, Edmond, OK (United States); Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, OK (United States)

    2005-08-07

    Automated detection and classification of banded chromosomes may help clinicians diagnose cancers and other genetic disorders at an early stage more efficiently and accurately. However, developing such an automated system (including both a high-speed microscopic image scanning device and related computer-assisted schemes) is quite a challenging and difficult task. Since the 1980s, great research efforts have been made to develop fast and more reliable methods to assist clinical technicians in performing this important and time-consuming task. A number of computer-assisted methods including classical statistical methods, artificial neural networks and knowledge-based fuzzy logic systems, have been applied and tested. Based on the initial test using limited datasets, encouraging results in algorithm and system development have been demonstrated. Despite the significant research effort and progress made over the last two decades, computer-assisted chromosome detection and classification systems have not been routinely accepted and used in clinical laboratories. Further research and development is needed.

  11. Assignment of FUT8 to chicken chromosome band 5q1.4 and to human chromosome 14q23.2-->q24.1 by in situ hybridization. Conserved and compared synteny between human and chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coullin, Ph.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Heilig, R.; Mollicone, R.; Oriol, R.; Candelier, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    The human FUT8 gene is implicated in crucial developmental stages and is overexpressed in some tumors and other malignant diseases. Based on three different experiments we have assigned the FUT8 gene to chromosome bands 14q23.2 --> q24.1 and not 14q24.3 as previously shown (Yamaguchi et al.,

  12. Genes with a spike expression are clustered in chromosome (sub)bands and spike (sub)bands have a powerful prognostic value in patients with multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Hose, Dirk; Moreaux, Jérôme; Walker, Brian A.; Protopopov, Alexei; Reme, Thierry; Pellestor, Franck; Pantesco, Véronique; Jauch, Anna; Morgan, Gareth; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Klein, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic abnormalities are common in patients with multiple myeloma, and may deregulate gene products involved in tumor survival, proliferation, metabolism and drug resistance. In particular, translocations may result in a high expression of targeted genes (termed spike expression) in tumor cells. We identified spike genes in multiple myeloma cells of patients with newly-diagnosed myeloma and investigated their prognostic value. Design and Methods Genes with a spike expression in multiple myeloma cells were picked up using box plot probe set signal distribution and two selection filters. Results In a cohort of 206 newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma, 2587 genes/expressed sequence tags with a spike expression were identified. Some spike genes were associated with some transcription factors such as MAF or MMSET and with known recurrent translocations as expected. Spike genes were not associated with increased DNA copy number and for a majority of them, involved unknown mechanisms. Of spiked genes, 36.7% clustered significantly in 149 out of 862 documented chromosome (sub)bands, of which 53 had prognostic value (35 bad, 18 good). Their prognostic value was summarized with a spike band score that delineated 23.8% of patients with a poor median overall survival (27.4 months versus not reached, Pband score was independent of other gene expression profiling-based risk scores, t(4;14), or del17p in an independent validation cohort of 345 patients. Conclusions We present a new approach to identify spike genes and their relationship to patients’ survival. PMID:22102711

  13. Extensive polymorphism and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in a loach fish, Cobitis vardarensis (Ostariophysi, Cobitidae) detected by different banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rábová, Marie; Ráb, Petr; Ozouf-Costaz, C.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 111, - (2001), s. 413-422 ISSN 0016-6707 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/00/0668; GA AV ČR IAA6045704; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Keywords : chromosome banding * cytotaxonomy * fish Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.916, year: 2001

  14. [Chromosome banding analysis of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with IL2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stěpanovská, K; Vaňková, G; Némethová, V; Tomášiková, L; Smuhařová, P; Divíšková, E; Vallová, V; Kuglík, P; Plevová, K; Oltová, A; Doubek, M; Pospíšilová, S; Mayer, J

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations play an important role as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These aberrations are mostly detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as chromosomal banding analysis has been scarce due to low proliferative activity of malignant B-lymphocytes in vitro. In 2006, a new method using stimulation with IL-2 and CpG oligonucleotide DSP30 for metaphase generation in CLL was published [1]. The objective of our study was to verify the efficacy of stimulation and to evaluate if the method is suitable for routine diagnostics. In total, peripheral blood samples of 369 CLL patients were analyzed in parallel by chromosomal banding analysis and by FISH probes for 13q14, 11q22-23, CEP12 and 17p13. Out of 369 patients, 307 (83%) were successfully stimulated for metaphase generation. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 243 (79%) out of 307 patients evaluated by chromosomal banding analysis. Other aberrations that are not included into standard FISH panel were detected in patients karyotypes, e.g. del(6q), del(14q), t(14;18)(q32;q21), t(11;14)(q13;q32) and t(18;22)(q21;q11). One hundred and three (42%) patients showed complex aberrant karyotype not detected by FISH analysis. Stimulation with IL-2 and oligonucleotide DSP30 is an efficient method how to induce proliferation of malignant B-lymphocytes and allows detection of a substantial number of chromosomal aberrations in addition to those detected by standard FISH panel. Using this method in routine diagnostics is helpful particularly in identification of patients with complex aberrant karyotype.

  15. Karyotype characterization of Crotalaria juncea (L. by chromosome banding and physical mapping of 18S-5.8S-26S and 5S rRNA gene sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Mondin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomes of Crotalaria juncea, a legume of agronomic interest with a 2n = 16 karyotype composed of metacentric chromosomes, were analyzed using several cytogenetic techniques. C-banding revealed heterochromatic regions around the centromeres in all chromosomes and adjacent to the secondary constriction on the chromosome 1 short arm. Fluorescent staining with the GC-specific chromomycin A3 (CMA highlighted these heterochromatic regions and a tiny site on the chromosome 1 long arm while the AT-specific stain 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI induced a reversed pattern. Staining with CMA combined with AT-specific distamycin A (DA counterstaining quenched the pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes, but enhanced fluorescence was observed at the heterochromatic regions around the secondary constriction and on the long arms of chromosomes 1 and 4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH revealed 18S-5.8S-26S rRNA gene sites (45S rDNA on chromosomes 1 and 4, and one 5S rDNA locus on chromosome 1. All the rDNA sites were co-located with the positive-CMA/DA bands, suggesting they were very rich in GC. Silver staining revealed signals at the main 45S rDNA locus on chromosome 1 and, in some cells, chromosome 4 was labeled. Two small nucleoli were detected in a few interphase cells, suggesting that the minor site on chromosome 4 could be active at some stages of the cell cycle.

  16. Karyotype characterization of Trigona fulviventris Guérin, 1835 (Hymenoptera, Meliponini by C banding and fluorochrome staining: report of a new chromosome number in the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingues Alayne Magalhães Trindade

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many species of the genus Trigona have been taxonomically described, cytogenetic studies of these species are still rare. The aim of the present study was to obtain cytogenetic data by conventional staining, C banding and fluorochrome staining for the karyotype characterization of the species Trigona fulviventris. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that this species possesses a diploid chromosome number of 2n = 32, different from most other species of this genus studied so far. This variation was probably due to the centric fusion in a higher numbered ancestral karyotype, this fusion producing the large metacentric chromosome pair and the lower chromosome number observed in Trigona fulviventris. Heterochromatin was detected in the pericentromeric region of the first chromosome pair and in one of the arms of the remaining pairs. Base-specific fluorochrome staining with 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI showed that the heterochromatin was rich in AT base pairs (DAPI+ except for pair 13, which was chromomycin A3 (CMA3 positive indicating an excess of GC base pairs. Our data also suggests that there was variation in heterochromatin base composition.

  17. Karyotype differentiation in Chromaphyosemion killfishes (Cyprinodontiformes, Nothobranchiidae). I: Chromosome banding patterns of C. alpha, C. kouamense and C. lugens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Völker, M.; Ráb, Petr; Kullmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 125, - (2005), s. 33-41 ISSN 0016-6707 Grant - others:DAAD(DE) D19-CZ29/04-05; DAAD(DE) D/03/44465 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chromosomal evolution Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.772, year: 2005

  18. Linkage Map of the Long Arm of Barley Chromosome 3 Using C-Bands and Marker Genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1982-01-01

    locations. No recombination was observed between the two proximal C-band locations whereas the two distal locations recombined with a frequency of 12 2 per cent. The three C-band locations were linked with loci cer-zd, uz, and cer-zn, but not with the tightly linked loci Est-1 and Est-4. The order...

  19. The chromosome banding pattern in two cytotypes (2n = 36 and 38) of blind mole rats from Turkey (Mammalia: Spalaxidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Arisoy, A.; Zima, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 2 (2013), s. 95-100 ISSN 0939-7140 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : Nannospalax xanthodon * Ag-NOR staining * C-banding * Aydin * Manisa * western Anatolia Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.524, year: 2013

  20. Physical mapping of the Bloom syndrome region by the identification of YAC and P1 clones from human chromosome 15 band q26.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straughen, J.; Groden, J. [Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (United States); Ciocci, S. [New York Blood Center, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The gene for Bloom syndrome (BLM) has been mapped to human chromosome 15 band q26.1 by homozygosity mapping. Further refinement of the location of BLM has relied upon linkage-disequilibrium mapping and somatic intragenic recombination. In combination with these mapping approaches and to identify novel DNA markers and probes for the BLM candidate region, a contiguous representation of the 2-Mb region that contains the BLM gene was generated and is presented here. YAC and P1 clones from the region have been identified and ordered by using previously available genetic markers in the region along with newly developed sequence-tagged sites from radiation-restriction map of the 2-Mb region that allowed estimation of the distance between polymorphic microsatellite loci is also reported. This map and the DNA markers derived from it were instrumental in the recent identification of the BLM gene. 25 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Microclones derived from the mouse chromosome 7 D-E bands map within the proximal region of the c14CoS deletion in albino mutant mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toenjes, R.R.W.; Weith, A.; Rinchik, E.M.; Winking, H.; Carnwath, J.W.; Kaliner, B.; Paul, D.

    1991-01-01

    A group of radiation-induced perinatal-lethal deletions that include the albino (c) locus on mouse chromosome 7 causes failure of expression of various hepatocyte-specific genes when homozygous. The transcription of such genes could be controlled in trans by a regulatory gene(s) located within the proximal region of the C14CoS deletion. To identify this potential regulatory gene, a microclone library was established from microdissected D and E bands of chromosome 7. Three nonoverlapping microclones (E305, E336B, and E453B) hybridizing with wildtype but not with C14CoS/C14CoS DNA were isolated. E336B represents a single-copy DNA fragment, whereas E305 and E453B hybridized with 3 and 10 EcoRI DNA restriction fragments, respectively. All fragments map exclusively within the deletion. The microclones hybridized to DNA of viable C6H/C14CoS deletion heterozygotes but not to DNA of homozygotes for the lethal mutation c10R75M, which belongs to the same complementation group as c14CoS. DNA of viable homozygous mutant C62DSD, which carries a deletion breakpoint proximal to that of c6H, hybridized only with E453B. This microclone identified 6 EcoRI restriction fragments in C62DSD/C62DSD DNA. The results demonstrate that of the isolated microclones, E453B identifies a locus (D7RT453B) that maps closest to the hsdr-1 (hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation) locus, which maps between the proximal breakpoints of deletions c10R75M and c62DSD

  2. HRAS1-selected chromosome transfer generates markers that colocalize aniridia- and genitourinary dysplasia-associated translocation breakpoints and the Wilms tumor gene within band 11p13.

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, D J; Bickmore, W; Christie, S; Boyd, P A; Cranston, G; Fletcher, J M; Gosden, J R; Rout, D; Seawright, A; Simola, K O

    1987-01-01

    We show that chromosome-mediated gene transfer can provide an enriched source of DNA markers for predetermined, subchromosomal regions of the human genome. Forty-four human DNA recombinants isolated from a HRAS1-selected chromosome-mediated gene transformant map exclusively to chromosome 11, with several sublocalizing to the Wilms tumor region at 11p13. We present a detailed molecular map of the deletion chromosomes 11 from five WAGR (Wilms tumor/aniridia/genitourinary abnormalities/mental re...

  3. On-line sorting of human chromosomes by centromeric index, and identification of sorted populations by GTG-banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, G. A.; Rens, W.; Manders, E.; van Oven, C.; Barendsen, G. W.; Aten, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Using slit-scan flow cytometry, the shape of human metaphase chromosomes, as expressed in their centromeric index (CI), and the DNA content of the chromosomes have been used as parameters in bivariate flow karyotyping. The resolution of the DNA vs CI flow karyogram of the larger chromosomes up to

  4. Chromosome Connections: Compelling Clues to Common Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Students compare banding patterns on hominid chromosomes and see striking evidence of their common ancestry. To test this, human chromosome no. 2 is matched with two shorter chimpanzee chromosomes, leading to the hypothesis that human chromosome 2 resulted from the fusion of the two shorter chromosomes. Students test that hypothesis by looking for…

  5. A recurrent deletion syndrome at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12 flanked by segmental duplications at the breakpoints and including REEP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Servi J C; Blom, Eveline W; Siegelaer, Ingrid T J; Smeets, Eric E J G L

    2015-04-01

    We identified an identical and recurrent 9.4-Mbp deletion at chromosome bands 2p11.2-2p12, which occurred de novo in two unrelated patients. It is flanked at the distal and proximal breakpoints by two homologous segmental duplications consisting of low copy repeat (LCR) blocks in direct orientation, which have >99% sequence identity. Despite the fact that the deletion was almost 10 Mbp in size, the patients showed a relatively mild clinical phenotype, that is, mild-to-moderate intellectual disability, a happy disposition, speech delay and delayed motor development. Their phenotype matches with that of previously described patients. The 2p11.2-2p12 deletion includes the REEP1 gene that is associated with spastic paraplegia and phenotypic features related to this are apparent in most 2p11.2-2p12 deletion patients, but not in all. Other hemizygous genes that may contribute to the clinical phenotype include LRRTM1 and CTNNA2. We propose a recurrent but rare 2p11.2-2p12 deletion syndrome based on (1) the identical, non-random localisation of the de novo deletion breakpoints in two unrelated patients and a patient from literature, (2) the patients' phenotypic similarity and their phenotypic overlap with other 2p deletions and (3) the presence of highly identical LCR blocks flanking both breakpoints, consistent with a non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR)-mediated rearrangement.

  6. Comprehensive genetic characterization of CLL: a study on 506 cases analysed with chromosome banding analysis, interphase FISH, IgV(H) status and immunophenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haferlach, C; Dicker, F; Schnittger, S; Kern, W; Haferlach, T

    2007-12-01

    In CLL data from chromosome banding analysis (CBA) have been scarce due to the low proliferative activity of CLL cells in vitro. We improved the cultivation technique using an immunostimulatory CpG-oligonucleotide DSP30 and IL-2. A total of 506 CLL samples were analysed with CBA and interphase FISH using probes for the detection of trisomy 12, IgH rearrangements and deletions of 6q21, 11q22.3 (ATM), 13q14 (D13S25 and D13S319) and 17p13 (TP53). A total of 500 of 506 (98.8%) cases were successfully stimulated for metaphase generation and are subject to this study. Aberrations were detected in 415 of 500 (83.0%) cases by CBA and in 392 of 500 (78.4%) cases by FISH. CBA detected 832 abnormalities and FISH only 502. Therefore, CBA offers important information in addition to FISH. (1) CLL is characterized mainly by genomic imbalances and reciprocal translocations are rare. (2) A subgroup with complex aberrant karyotype (16.4%) is identified which is associated with an unmutated IgV(H) status and CD38 expression (P=0.034 and 0.02, respectively). (3) Additional abnormalities are detectable providing new biological insights into different CLL subclasses revealing a much more heterogeneous pattern of cytogenetic abnormalities as assumed so far based on FISH data only. Therefore, prospective clinical trials should evaluate the prognostic impact of newly available CBA data.

  7. Phylogenetic reconstruction by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding in four species of Phyllostomini tribe (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae) in the Brazilian Amazon: an independent evidence for monophyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Talita Fernanda Augusto; Rodrigues, Luis Reginaldo Ribeiro; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Gomes, Anderson José Baia; Rissino, Jorge das Dores; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Yang, Fengtang; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The subfamily Phyllostominae comprises taxa with a variety of feeding strategies. From the cytogenetic point of view, Phyllostominae shows different rates of chromosomal evolution between genera, with Phyllostomus hastatus probably retaining the ancestral karyotype for the subfamily. Since chromosomal rearrangements occur rarely in the genome and have great value as phylogenetic markers and in taxonomic characterization, we analyzed three species: Lophostoma silvicola (LSI), Phyllostomus discolor (PDI) and Tonatia saurophila (TSA), representing the tribe Phyllostomini, collected in the Amazon region, by classic and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships within this tribe. LSA has a karyotype of 2n=34 and FN=60, PDI has 2n=32 and FN=60 and TSA has 2n=16 and FN=20. Comparative analysis using G-banding and chromosome painting show that the karyotypic complement of TSA is highly rearranged relative to LSI and PHA, while LSI, PHA and PDI have similar karyotypes, differing by only three chromosome pairs. Nearly all chromosomes of PDI and PHA were conserved in toto, except for chromosome 15 that was changed by a pericentric inversion. A strongly supported phylogeny (bootstrap=100 and Bremer=10 steps), confirms the monophyly of Phyllostomini. In agreement with molecular topologies, TSA was in the basal position, while PHA and LSI formed sister taxa. A few ancestral syntenies are conserved without rearrangements and most associations are autapomorphic traits for Tonatia or plesiomorphic for the three genera analyzed here. The karyotype of TSA is highly derived in relation to that of other phyllostomid bats, differing from the supposed ancestral karyotype of Phyllostomidae by multiple rearrangements. Phylogenies based on chromosomal data are independent evidence for the monophyly of tribe Phyllostomini as determined by molecular topologies and provide additional support for the paraphyly of the genus Tonatia by the exclusion

  8. Phylogenetic reconstruction by cross-species chromosome painting and G-banding in four species of Phyllostomini tribe (Chiroptera, Phyllostomidae in the Brazilian Amazon: an independent evidence for monophyly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Fernanda Augusto Ribas

    Full Text Available The subfamily Phyllostominae comprises taxa with a variety of feeding strategies. From the cytogenetic point of view, Phyllostominae shows different rates of chromosomal evolution between genera, with Phyllostomus hastatus probably retaining the ancestral karyotype for the subfamily. Since chromosomal rearrangements occur rarely in the genome and have great value as phylogenetic markers and in taxonomic characterization, we analyzed three species: Lophostoma silvicola (LSI, Phyllostomus discolor (PDI and Tonatia saurophila (TSA, representing the tribe Phyllostomini, collected in the Amazon region, by classic and molecular cytogenetic techniques in order to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships within this tribe. LSA has a karyotype of 2n=34 and FN=60, PDI has 2n=32 and FN=60 and TSA has 2n=16 and FN=20. Comparative analysis using G-banding and chromosome painting show that the karyotypic complement of TSA is highly rearranged relative to LSI and PHA, while LSI, PHA and PDI have similar karyotypes, differing by only three chromosome pairs. Nearly all chromosomes of PDI and PHA were conserved in toto, except for chromosome 15 that was changed by a pericentric inversion. A strongly supported phylogeny (bootstrap=100 and Bremer=10 steps, confirms the monophyly of Phyllostomini. In agreement with molecular topologies, TSA was in the basal position, while PHA and LSI formed sister taxa. A few ancestral syntenies are conserved without rearrangements and most associations are autapomorphic traits for Tonatia or plesiomorphic for the three genera analyzed here. The karyotype of TSA is highly derived in relation to that of other phyllostomid bats, differing from the supposed ancestral karyotype of Phyllostomidae by multiple rearrangements. Phylogenies based on chromosomal data are independent evidence for the monophyly of tribe Phyllostomini as determined by molecular topologies and provide additional support for the paraphyly of the genus Tonatia by

  9. Chromosome condensation and segmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viegas-Pequignot, E.M.

    1981-01-01

    Some aspects of chromosome condensation in mammalians -humans especially- were studied by means of cytogenetic techniques of chromosome banding. Two further approaches were adopted: a study of normal condensation as early as prophase, and an analysis of chromosome segmentation induced by physical (temperature and γ-rays) or chemical agents (base analogues, antibiotics, ...) in order to show out the factors liable to affect condensation. Here 'segmentation' means an abnormal chromosome condensation appearing systematically and being reproducible. The study of normal condensation was made possible by the development of a technique based on cell synchronization by thymidine and giving prophasic and prometaphasic cells. Besides, the possibility of inducing R-banding segmentations on these cells by BrdU (5-bromodeoxyuridine) allowed a much finer analysis of karyotypes. Another technique was developed using 5-ACR (5-azacytidine), it allowed to induce a segmentation similar to the one obtained using BrdU and identify heterochromatic areas rich in G-C bases pairs [fr

  10. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G. [Brown Univ. School of Medicine, Providence, RI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  11. PTPN13, a Fas-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase, is located on the long arm of chromosome 4 at band q21.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inazawa, Johji; Ariyama, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuo [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1996-01-15

    PTPN13 is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that associates with the C-terminal negative regulatory domain in the Fas (APO-1/CD95) receptor. The PTPN13 protein contains six GLGF repeats that have been found in the rat postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95) and the Drosophila tumor suppressor protein, lethal-(1)-disclarge-1 (dlg-1). The localization of the PTPN13 gene to human chromosome 4q21.3 was determined by both FISH and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids. This 4q21.3 chromosomal region contains a gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease as well as the region frequently deleted in liver and ovarian cancers, suggesting that PTPN13 is a candidate for one of the putative tumor suppressor genes on the long arm of chromosome 4. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Chromosome heteromorphisms in the Japanese, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-12-01

    The type and frequency of chromosome variants detected by the C-staining method were ascertained in 1,857 individuals residing in Hiroshima. The most frequent heteromorphic variant was the total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 9 found in 27 individuals (1.45%). The total inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was not seen in this sample, but the partial inversion of the C-band in chromosome 1 was found in 18 persons (0.97%). Partial inversion was also detected in the C-band in chromosome 9 in 22 individuals (1.18%). In chromosome 16, neither total nor partial inversion of the C-band was observed in the present study. The frequencies of chromosomes 1, 9, and 16 with a very large C-band were 0.70%, 0.22%, and 0.54%, respectively. Aside from these (1, 9, and 16) a very large C-band was found occasionally in chromosomes 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 14, and 15, and an unusual insertion of the Y chromosome was observed. A total of 128 C-band variants (6.89%) was found in the 1,857 Hiroshima residents. (author)

  13. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...

  14. Comparison of the chromosome banding patterns in three species of social voles (Microtus irani karamani, M. schidlovskii, M. anatolicus) from Turkey

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arslan, A.; Toyran, K.; Gözütok, S.; Yorulmaz, T.; Zima, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 6 (2016), s. 910-916 ISSN 1300-0179 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : karyotype * C-banding * AgNOR staining * divergence pattern Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.785, year: 2016

  15. Modeling Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Learning about chromosomes is standard fare in biology classrooms today. However, students may find it difficult to understand the relationships among the "genome", "chromosomes", "genes", a "gene locus", and "alleles". In the simple activity described in this article, which follows the 5E approach…

  16. Chromosomal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and more. Stony Point, NY 10980 Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Chromosomal conditions Chromosomal conditions ... Disorders See also: Genetic counseling , Your family health history Last reviewed: February, 2013 ... labor & premature birth The newborn intensive care unit (NICU) Birth defects & ...

  17. Chromosome Territories

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Thomas; Cremer, Marion

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome territories (CTs) constitute a major feature of nuclear architecture. In a brief statement, the possible contribution of nuclear architecture studies to the field of epigenomics is considered, followed by a historical account of the CT concept and the final compelling experimental evidence of a territorial organization of chromosomes in all eukaryotes studied to date. Present knowledge of nonrandom CT arrangements, of the internal CT architecture, and of structural interactions wit...

  18. Chromosomal aberration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yutaka

    1988-01-01

    Chromosomal aberrations are classified into two types, chromosome-type and chromatid-type. Chromosom-type aberrations include terminal deletion, dicentric, ring and interstitial deletion, and chromatid-type aberrations include achromatic lesion, chromatid deletion, isochromatid deletion and chromatid exchange. Clastogens which induce chromosomal aberration are divided into ''S-dependent'' agents and ''S-independent''. It might mean whether they can induce double strand breaks independent of the S phase or not. Double strand breaks may be the ultimate lesions to induce chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine added even in the G 2 phase appeared to modify the frequency of chromatid aberrations induced by X-rays and mitomycin C. Those might suggest that the G 2 phase involves in the chromatid aberration formation. The double strand breaks might be repaired by ''G 2 repair system'', the error of which might yield breakage types of chromatid aberrations and the by-pass of which might yield chromatid exchanges. Chromosome-type aberrations might be formed in the G 1 phase. (author)

  19. Comparison of the Giemsa C-banded karyotypes of the three subspecies of Psathyrostachys fragilis, subspp. villosus (2x), secaliformis (2x, 4x), and fragilis (2x) (Poaceae), with notes on chromosome pairing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, I.; Baden, C.

    1994-01-01

    . Only the presence of 12 nucleoli in interphases identified 6 SAT-chromosome pairs. In subsp. villosus one or two extra micronucleoli indicated a chromosome pair with very low nucleolus-forming activity, bringing the number of SAT-chromosome pairs to 4. This number may be a characteristic...... of a common genome, N. NORs had different nucleolus-forming activities. Meiotic analysis demonstrated a high level of bivalent pairing in the three taxa. A chromosomal rearrangement was suggested in subsp. villosus. The low multivalent frequency in subsp. secaliformis indicates the presence of a pairing...

  20. Identification of Chromosomes Alterations in Primary Breast Cancer Using Premature Chromosome Condensation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Griffin, Constance

    2000-01-01

    .... We are developing a new method, premature chromosome condensation (PCC),using mitotic Xenopus extracts that will allow us to obtain G-banded karyotypes from primary, uncultured breast cancer specimens...

  1. Retrospective dosimetry using chromosome painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.B.; Giorgio, M.D.; Taja, M.R.

    2000-01-01

    Chromosome aberration frequency measured in peripheral lymphocytes of persons exposed to ionizing radiation has been used since 1960s for dose assessment. Suspected overexposure is usually evaluated by the frequency of dicentrics and centric rings using an appropriate in vitro calibration curve. However, these chromosome aberrations are unstable with time after exposure and dose reconstruction may encounter uncertainties when the time between the exposure and the analysis is considerable or even unknown. It appears that translocations persist with time after exposure and may be used as an indication of acute past overexposures. Moreover, they appear to accumulate the cytogenetical information, which correlates with the dose received under fractionated, chronic or even occupational exposure conditions. Translocations may be detected using G-banding, which allows to score the total amount of radiation induced translocations but it is a time consuming method, or by Chromosome Painting, a method base on the Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) technique, painting only some chromosome pairs with specific whole chromosome probes and then extrapolating the observed translocation frequencies to the full genome. The latter method allows a faster aberration scoring than G-banding and appears to be the most promissory tool for biodosimetry, particularly when it is necessary to assess low doses and consequently to score a large number of metaphases, e.g. radiation workers exposed within dose limits. As with the unstable chromosome aberration, it is necessary an in vitro calibration curve based on the frequency of stable chromosome aberrations to assess doses. Our laboratory performed calibration curves for Co 60 γ-rays based on the frequencies of unstable (dicentrics and centric rings detected by conventional Giemsa staining) and stable chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions, detected by G-banding). In order to minimize the interlaboratory variability, we

  2. Delineation of an Isodicentric Y Chromosome in a Mosaic 45,X/46,X,idic(Y(qter-p11.3:: p11.3-qter Fetus by SRY Sequencing, G-banding, FISH, SKY and Study of Distribution in Different Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Hsuan Wu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Many factors such as genetic, developmental and hormonal are involved in mammalian sex determination. The relative importance and the mutual interactions among those factors are obscure. Study of cytogenetic mosaicism involving sex chromosomes may help to further unravel the mysterious process. We report a fetus with a mosaic karyotype, 45,X/46,X,idic(Y(qter-p11.3::p11.3-qter, with unambiguous male external genitalia and a defect in the interventricular septum of the heart. Genotype of this fetus was extensively studied by technologies including sequencing of SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome gene, G-banding, FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization and SKY (spectral karyotyping. A markedly higher percentage of Y-containing cells was observed in the gonads (55% than in the amniotic fluid (17% and placental villi (11%, which was considered to be the major reason why the fetus did not have ambiguous genitalia.

  3. The structure of chromosom 5 in interphase-nucleii of HeLa-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Claussen, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In order to examine the structure of chromosoms during the interphase HeLa-cells were synchronised and preperated. In further steps visulaised we the chromosom5 with help of multicour-banding. It could be showed that the chromosom 5 has a similar structure during the interphase as a metaphase-chromosom.

  4. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Pablo; Boeris, Juan M.; Blasco-Zúñiga, Ailin; Barbero, Gastón; Gomes, Anderson; Gazoni, Thiago; Costa, William; Nagamachi, Cleusa Y.; Rivera, Miryan; Parise-Maltempi, Patricia P.; Wiley, John E.; Pieczarka, Julio C.; Haddad, Celio F. B.; Faivovich, Julián; Baldo, Diego

    2018-01-01

    The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46) and H. alytolylax (FN = 38), with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p), H. palmeri (4q), and H. larinopygion (1p). Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns) for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini. PMID:29444174

  5. Chromosome evolution in Cophomantini (Amphibia, Anura, Hylinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan M Ferro

    Full Text Available The hylid tribe Cophomantini is a diverse clade of Neotropical treefrogs composed of the genera Aplastodiscus, Boana, Bokermannohyla, Hyloscirtus, and Myersiohyla. The phylogenetic relationships of Cophomantini have been comprehensively reviewed in the literature, providing a suitable framework for the study of chromosome evolution. Employing different banding techniques, we studied the chromosomes of 25 species of Boana and 3 of Hyloscirtus; thus providing, for the first time, data for Hyloscirtus and for 15 species of Boana. Most species showed karyotypes with 2n = 2x = 24 chromosomes; some species of the B. albopunctata group have 2n = 2x = 22, and H. alytolylax has 2n = 2x = 20. Karyotypes are all bi-armed in most species presented, with the exception of H. larinopygion (FN = 46 and H. alytolylax (FN = 38, with karyotypes that have a single pair of small telocentric chromosomes. In most species of Boana, NORs are observed in a single pair of chromosomes, mostly in the small chromosomes, although in some species of the B. albopunctata, B. pulchella, and B. semilineata groups, this marker occurs on the larger pairs 8, 1, and 7, respectively. In Hyloscirtus, NOR position differs in the three studied species: H. alytolylax (4p, H. palmeri (4q, and H. larinopygion (1p. Heterochromatin is a variable marker that could provide valuable evidence, but it would be necesserary to understand the molecular composition of the C-bands that are observed in different species in order to test its putative homology. In H. alytolylax, a centromeric DAPI+ band was observed on one homologue of chromosome pair 2. The band was present in males but absent in females, providing evidence for an XX/XY sex determining system in this species. We review and discuss the importance of the different chromosome markers (NOR position, C-bands, and DAPI/CMA3 patterns for their impact on the taxonomy and karyotype evolution in Cophomantini.

  6. Advanced microtechnologies for detection of chromosome abnormalities by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Shah, Pranjul

    2012-01-01

    Cytogenetic and molecular cytogenetic analyses, which aim to detect chromosome abnormalities, are routinely performed in cytogenetic laboratories all over the world. Traditional cytogenetic studies are performed by analyzing the banding pattern of chromosomes, and are complemented by molecular cy...

  7. Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia gene region cloned in yeast artificial chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kere, J. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)]|[Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Grzeschik, K.H. [Univ. of Marburg (Germany); Limon, J. [Medical Academy, Gdansk (Poland); Gremaud, M.; Schlessinger, D. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); De La Chapelle, A. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)

    1993-05-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA), an X-chromosomal recessive disorder, is expressed in a few females with chromosomal translocations involving bands Xq12-q13. Using available DNA markers from the region and somatic cell hybrids the authors mapped the X-chromosomal breakpoints in two such translocations. The breakpoints were further mapped within a yeast artificial chromosome contig constructed by chromosome walking techniques. Genomic DNA markers that map between the two translocation breakpoints were recovered representing putative portions of the EDA gene. 32 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Chromosomal homologies among vampire bats revealed by chromosome painting (phyllostomidae, chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, C G; Pieczarka, J C; Nagamachi, C Y; Gomes, A J B; Lira, T C; O'Brien, P C M; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Souza, M J; Santos, N

    2011-01-01

    Substantial effort has been made to elucidate karyotypic evolution of phyllostomid bats, mostly through comparisons of G-banding patterns. However, due to the limited number of G-bands in respective karyotypes and to the similarity of non-homologous bands, an accurate evolutionary history of chromosome segments remains questionable. This is the case for vampire bats (Desmodontinae). Despite several proposed homologies, banding data have not yet provided a detailed understanding of the chromosomal changes within vampire genera. We examined karyotype differentiation of the 3 species within this subfamily using whole chromosomal probes from Phyllostomus hastatus (Phyllostominae) and Carollia brevicauda (Carolliinae). Painting probes of P. hastatus respectively detected 22, 21 and 23 conserved segments in Diphylla ecaudata, Diaemus youngi, and Desmodus rotundus karyotypes, whereas 27, 27 and 28 were respectively detectedwith C. brevicauda paints. Based on the evolutionary relationships proposed by morphological and molecular data, we present probable chromosomal synapomorphies for vampire bats and propose chromosomes that were present in the common ancestor of the 5 genera analyzed. Karyotype comparisons allowed us to relate a number of conserved chromosomal segments among the 5 species, providing a broader database for understanding karyotype evolution in the family. 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Chromosomal characterization of the bonytongue Arapaima gigas (Osteoglossiformes: Arapaimidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Karla Marques

    Full Text Available The mitotic chromosomes of the pirarucu Arapaima gigas inhabiting the middle Araguaia River and collected in the municipality of Araguaiana (MT, Brazil were studied. The chromosomes were analyzed through Giemsa staining, C-banding, Ag-NOR staining and in situ hybridization using an 18S rRNA gene probe. The karyotype had 2n=56 comprising 14 biarmed and 14 uniarmed chromosome pairs in both sexes. No cytologically distinguishable sex chromosome was identified. A single NOR-bearing chromosome pair was detected by Ag-NOR staining and confirmed by 18S rDNA- FISH. Faint constitutive heterochromatin was C-banded in the centromeric region of some chromosomes.

  10. Karyotypical characterization from stock of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, at Londrina State University, PR, Brazil, through several techniques of chromosomes band/ Caracterização cariotípica de um estoque de tilápia do Nilo,Oreochromis niloticus, da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, mediante diversas técnicas de bandamento cromossômico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Hermann Leonhardt

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available 14 specimens of Nile’s tilapia were analyzed cytogenetically, Oreochromis niloticus, that belong to the stock of fish breeding from the Freshwater Aquaculture Station of the Londrina State University in the Paraná, Brazil. All specimens presented the same disploid number of 44 chromosomes. The NORs were observed in four chromosomes with marks in terminal position of the short arm and the hybridization “in situ” (FISH with probe of 18 S also evidenced the presence of two pairs of chromosomes containing ribbosomic cistrons. The treatment with the fluochromes CMA3 and DAPI, respectively, didn’t show shinning bands in any chromosome of the complement. The band C (CBG evidenced regions of heterochromatin distributed on several chromosomes in the centromeric regions, being observed some marks in telomeric regions, mainly on the biggest pair of chromosomes of the complement, a pair presented itself almost totally heterochromatic. The obtained results are in accordance with the data found in literature, nevertheless when the C bands and NORs were analyzed, were evidenced some differences that apparently characterized the local fish population of the Londrina State University. Key words: Cytogenetics, Oreochromis niloticus, NORs, CMA3, DAPI, fish, heterochromatin.Foram analisados citogeneticamente 14 indivíduos de tilápia do Nilo, Oreochromis niloticus que fazem parte do estoque de reposição de reprodutores da Estação de Piscicultura da Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Paraná, Brasil. Todos os indivíduos apresentaram o mesmo número diplóide de 44 cromossomos. As NORs foram observadas em quatro cromossomos com marcações em posição terminal do braço curto e a hibridação “in situ” (FISH com sonda de 18S também evidenciou a presença de dois pares de cromossomos contendo cístrons ribossômicos. O tratamento com os fluorocromos CMA3 e DAPI, respectivamente, não mostrou bandas brilhantes em nenhum cromossomo do complemento. A

  11. Mitotic chromosome structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    2012-01-01

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  12. Mitotic chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heermann, Dieter W., E-mail: heermann@tphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2012-07-15

    Mounting evidence is compiling linking the physical organizational structure of chromosomes and the nuclear structure to biological function. At the base of the physical organizational structure of both is the concept of loop formation. This implies that physical proximity within chromosomes is provided for otherwise distal genomic regions and thus hierarchically organizing the chromosomes. Together with entropy many experimental observations can be explained with these two concepts. Among the observations that can be explained are the measured physical extent of the chromosomes, their shape, mechanical behavior, the segregation into territories (chromosomal and territories within chromosomes), the results from chromosome conformation capture experiments, as well as linking gene expression to structural organization.

  13. New trends and techniques in chromosome aberration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: automation of chromosome analysis; storage of fixed cells from cultures of lymphocytes obtained routinely during periodic employee medical examinations; analysis of banded chromosomes; identification of first division metaphases; sister chromatid exchange; and patterns of aberration induction

  14. Chromosomal localization of the human diazepam binding inhibitor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBernardi, M.A.; Crowe, R.R.; Mocchetti, I.; Shows, T.B.; Eddy, R.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used in situ chromosome hybridization and human-mouse somatic cell hybrids to map the gene(s) for human diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous putative modulator of the γ-aminobutyric acid receptor acting at the allosteric regulatory center of this receptor that includes the benzodiazepine recognition site. In 784 chromosome spreads hybridized with human DBI cDNA, the distribution of 1,476 labeled sites revealed a significant clustering of autoradiographic grains (11.3% of total label) on the long arm of chromosome 2 (2q). Furthermore, 63.5% of the grains found on 2q were located on 2q12-21, suggesting regional mapping of DBI gene(s) to this segment. Secondary hybridization signals were frequently observed on other chromosomes and they were statistically significant mainly for chromosomes 5, 6, 11, and 14. In addition, DNA from 32 human-mouse cell hybrids was digested with BamHI and probed with human DBI cDNA. A 3.5-kilobase band, which probably represents the human DBI gene, was assigned to chromosome 2. Four higher molecular weight bands, also detected in BamHI digests, could not be unequivocally assigned. A chromosome 2 location was excluded for the 27-, 13-, and 10-kilobase bands. These results assign a human DBI gene to chromosome 2 (2q12-21) and indicate that three of the four homologous sequences detected by the human DBI probe are located on three other chromosomes

  15. Analysis of the Ceratitis capitata y chromosome using in situ hybridization to mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1998-01-01

    In Ceratitis capitata the Y chromosome is responsible for sex-determination. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for cytogenetic analysis of mitotic chromosomes. FISH with the wild-type strain EgyptII and two repetitive DNA probes enabled us to differentiate between the short and the long arm of the Y chromosome and gives a much better resolution than C-banding of mitotic chromosomes. We identified the Y-chromosomal breakpoints in Y-autosome translocations using FISH. Even more complex rearrangements i.e. deletions and insertions in some translocation strains were detected by this method. A strategy for mapping the primary sex determination factor in Ceratitis capitata by FISH is presented. (author)

  16. UTILIDAD DEL BANDEO CROMOSÓMICO CON LA ENZIMA Alu I PARA LA IDENTIFICACIÓN DE ZONAS METILADAS EN LEUCEMIAS AGUDAS I UTILITY OF CHROMOSOME BANDING WITH Alu I ENZYME FOR IDENTIFYING METHYLATED AREAS IN ACUTE LEUKEMIAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Quintero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are malignant hematopoietic cells of immature proliferations of the blastic type, whose progressive accumulation is accompanied by a decrease in the production of normal myeloid elements. Transcription of inactive tumor suppressor genes by hypermethylation of CpG islands in promoter regions, has been a focus of researchers as a causal factor in hematological malignancies. The purpose of this study was to determine hypermethylated regions of chromosomal spread samples using Alu I and relate these regions with sites of suppressor gene associated to acute leukemia tumors. From an analysis of a 30 bone marrow samples, 18 were diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Acute Lymphoid Leukemia, and 12 underwent cell culture. Chromosomal spreads were stained with Giemsa after being previously digested with the enzyme Alu I. In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoid leukemia it was observed that 16/18 (88% and 12/12 (100% had abnormally stained regions, single in four and three methylated regions observed in acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoid leukemia, respectively, no association was found in the literature with methylated genes, which was highly significant ( p < 0.01 in both conditions. This shows the usefulness of this technique for the identification of methylated areas, since they have provided the foundation and the molecular basis for a better targeted therapeutic approach with demethylating agents, both in acute leukemias and myelodysplastic syndromes.

  17. An integrated physical map of 210 markers assigned to the short arm of human chromosome 11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redeker, E.; Hoovers, J. M.; Alders, M.; van Moorsel, C. J.; Ivens, A. C.; Gregory, S.; Kalikin, L.; Bliek, J.; de Galan, L.; van den Bogaard, R.; Visser, J.; van der Voort, R.; Feinberg, A. P.; Little, P. F. R.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    1994-01-01

    Using a panel of patient cell lines with chromosomal breakpoints, we constructed a physical map for the short arm of human chromosome 11. We focused on 11p15, a chromosome band harboring at least 25 known genes and associated with the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, several childhood tumors, and

  18. Fetal chromosome analysis: screening for chromosome disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, Ann; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  19. [Chromomeric organization of interphase chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuimulev, I F; Beliaeva, E S; Zykova, T Iu; Semeshin, V F; Demakov, S A; Demakova, O V; Goncharov, F P; Khoroshko, V A; Boldyreva, L V; Kokoza, E B; Pokholkiova, G V

    2013-01-01

    As a result of treatment of bioinformatic data on the genome localization of structural proteins, histone modifications, DNase-hypersensitive regions, replication origins (taken from modENCODE) and their cytological localization to polytene chromosome structures, it is shown here that two types of interphase chromosomes -polytene chromosomes from salivary glands and from mitotically dividing cells cultures - demonstrate identical pictures of interband/band, i. e. the same localization and length on physical map and the same sets of proteins. In the interbands of both chromosome types we find the proteins that control initiation of transcription (RNA-polymerase II, transcription factors), replication (ORC2) as well as proteins modifying nucleosome structure (WDS, NURF) and proteins of insulators (BEAF). The nucleosome density and H1 histone concentration in the interbands are depleted; localization of DNase-hypersensitive regions corresponds strictly to the interbands. So, we conclude that both polytene and cell line interphase chromosomes are arranged according to general principle and polytene chromosomes represent precise model of interphase chromosomes. The interbands play a critical role in the initiation of transcription and replication. The interbands of interphase chromosomes are the sites of 5' parts of genes, while the 3' gene ends are located in the adjacent bands. The constancy of interbands decondensation results in the conclusion that the "interbands" genes are constantly active, i. e. they contain "house-keeping" genes. The large late replicating bands contain genes that do not have direct contact to the adjoining interbands are usually polygenic and contain tissue-specific genes.

  20. Chromosome painting in plants.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, I.; Fransz, P.F.; Fuchs, J.; Jong, de J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The current 'state-of-art' as to chromosome painting in plants is reviewed. We define different situations described as painting so far: i) Genomic in situ hybridisation (GISH) with total genomic DNA to distinguish alien chromosomes on the basis of divergent dispersed repeats, ii) 'Chromosomal in

  1. Chromosomal geometry in the interface from the frequency of the radiation induced chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Otero, D.; Di Giorgio, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosomal aberrations. Stable chromosomal aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). When DSBs induction and interaction is done at random, and the proximity effects are neglected, the expected relation between translocations and inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm length. The number of translocations and inversions is analyzed by using G-banding in 16 lymphocytes cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0,5 Gy - 3 Gy). The result obtained was: F=13,5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values, but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have more interaction probability. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. A DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length= 1μ is assumed. According to our results, the confinement volume is ≅ 6.4% of the nuclear volume. Nevertheless, we presume that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosomal confinement. (authors). 14 refs

  2. Differential rates of genic and chromosomal evolution in bats of the family Rhinolophidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qumsiyeh, M B; Owen, R D; Chesser, R K

    1988-06-01

    Data for nondifferentially stained chromosomes from 10 species of Rhinolophus (Chiroptera: Rhinolophidae) suggest a conserved chromosomal evolution. G-banded chromosomes for three well differentiated species (Rhinolophus hipposideros, Rhinolophus blasii, and Rhinolophus acuminatus) corroborate a low level of gross chromosomal rearrangements. Additionally, a comparison between G-banded chromosomes of Rhinolophus (Rhinolophidae) and Hipposideros (Hipposideridae) suggests extreme conservatism in chromosomal arms between these two distantly related groups. On the other hand, we report extensive genic divergence as assayed by starch gel electrophoresis among these 10 species, and between Rhinolophus and two hipposiderid genera (Hipposideros and Aselliscus). The present chromosomal data are not sufficient for phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenies based on electrophoretic data are in many aspects discordant with those based on the classical morphological criteria. Different (and as yet not clearly understood) evolutionary forces affecting chromosomal, morphologic, and electrophoretic variation may be the reason for the apparent lack of concordance in these independent data sets.

  3. Large Clinically Consequential Imbalances Detected at the Breakpoints of Apparently Balanced and Inherited Chromosome Rearrangements

    OpenAIRE

    South, Sarah T.; Rector, Lyndsey; Aston, Emily; Rowe, Leslie; Yang, Samuel P.

    2010-01-01

    When a chromosome abnormality is identified in a child with a developmental delay and/or multiple congenital anomalies and the chromosome rearrangement appears balanced, follow-up studies often examine both parents for this rearrangement. If either clinically unaffected parent has a chromosome abnormality with a banding pattern identical to the affected child's study, then it is assumed that the chromosome rearrangement is balanced and directly inherited from the normal carrier parent. It is ...

  4. A Rare De novo Complex Chromosomal Rearrangement (CCR) Involving Four Chromosomes in An Oligo-asthenosperm Infertile Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asia, Saba; Vaziri Nasab, Hamed; Sabbaghian, Marjan; Kalantari, Hamid; Zari Moradi, Shabnam; Gourabi, Hamid; Mohseni Meybodi, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) are rare events involving more than two chromosomes and over two breakpoints. They are usually associated with infertility or sub fertility in male carriers. Here we report a novel case of a CCR in a 30-year-old oligoasthenosperm man with a history of varicocelectomy, normal testes size and normal endocrinology profile referred for chromosome analysis to the Genetics unit of Royan Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center. Chromosomal analysis was performed using peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures and analyzed by GTG banding. Additional tests such as C-banding and multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure for each of the involved chromosomes were performed to determine the patterns of the segregations. Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) region were analyzed with multiplex polymerase chain reaction. To identify the history and origin of this CCR, all the family members were analyzed. No micro deletion in Y chromosome was detected. The same de novo reciprocal exchange was also found in his monozygous twin brother. The other siblings and parents were normal. CCRs are associated with male infertility as a result of spermatogenic disruption due to complex meiotic configurations and the production of chromosomally abnormal sperms. These chromosomal rearrangements might have an influence on decreasing the number of sperms.

  5. Flow cytogenetics: progress toward chromosomal aberration detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrano, A.V.; Gray, J.W.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Using clonal derivatives of the Chinese hamster M3-1 cell line, we demonstrate the potential of flow systems to karyotype homogeneous aberrations (aberrations which are identical and present in every cell) and to detect heterogeneous aberrations (aberrations which occur randomly in a population and are not identical in every cell). Flow cytometry (FCM) of ethidium bromide stained isolated chromosomes from clone 650A of the M3-1 cells distinguishes nine chromosome types from the fourteen present in the actual karyotype. X-irradiation of this parent 650A clone produced two sub-clones with an altered flow karyotype, that is, their FCM distributions were characterized by the addition of new peaks and alterations in area under existing peaks. From the relative DNA content and area for each peak, as determined by computer analysis, we predicted that each clone had undergone a reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes from two peaks. This prediction was confirmed by Giemsa-banding the metaphase cells. Heterogeneous aberrations are reflected in the flow karyotype as an increase in background, that is, an increase in area underlying the chromosome peaks. This increase is dose dependent but, as yet, the sample variability has been too large for quantitative analysis. Flow sorting of the valleys between chromosome peaks produces enriched fractions of aberrant chromosomes for visual analysis. These approaches are potentially applicable to the analysis of chromsomal aberrations induced by environmental contaminants

  6. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G; Baker, Robert J; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-10-13

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae), focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  7. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele G. Sotero-Caio

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62. As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within distinct bat lineages (especially Phyllostomidae, Hipposideridae and Rhinolophidae, focusing on two perspectives: evolution of genome architecture, modes of chromosomal evolution, and the use of chromosome data to resolve taxonomic problems.

  8. Heterochromatin and rDNA sites distribution in the holocentric chromosomes of Cuscuta approximata Bab. (Convolvulaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Marcelo; García, Miguel A

    2004-02-01

    Cuscuta is a widely distributed genus of holoparasitic plants. Holocentric chromosomes have been reported only in species of one of its subgenera (Cuscuta subg. Cuscuta). In this work, a representative of this subgenus, Cuscuta approximata, was investigated looking for its mitotic and meiotic chromosome behaviour and the heterochromatin distribution. The mitotic chromosomes showed neither primary constriction nor Rabl orientation whereas the meiotic ones exhibited the typical quadripartite structure characteristic of holocentrics, supporting the assumption of holocentric chromosomes as a synapomorphy of Cuscuta subg. Cuscuta. Chromosomes and interphase nuclei displayed many heterochromatic blocks that stained deeply with hematoxylin, 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI), or after C banding. The banded karyotype showed terminal or subterminal bands in all chromosomes and central bands in some of them. The single pair of 45S rDNA sites was observed at the end of the largest chromosome pair, close to a DAPI band and a 5S rDNA site. Two other 5S rDNA site pairs were found, both closely associated with DAPI bands. The noteworthy giant nuclei of glandular cells of petals and ovary wall exhibited large chromocentres typical of polytenic nuclei. The chromosomal location of heterochromatin and rDNA sites and the structure of the endoreplicated nuclei of C. approximata seemed to be similar to those known in monocentric nuclei, suggesting that centromeric organization has little or no effect on chromatin organization.

  9. Identical functional organization of nonpolytene and polytene chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Yu Vatolina

    Full Text Available Salivary gland polytene chromosomes demonstrate banding pattern, genetic meaning of which is an enigma for decades. Till now it is not known how to mark the band/interband borders on physical map of DNA and structures of polytene chromosomes are not characterized in molecular and genetic terms. It is not known either similar banding pattern exists in chromosomes of regular diploid mitotically dividing nonpolytene cells. Using the newly developed approach permitting to identify the interband material and localization data of interband-specific proteins from modENCODE and other genome-wide projects, we identify physical limits of bands and interbands in small cytological region 9F13-10B3 of the X chromosome in D. melanogaster, as well as characterize their general molecular features. Our results suggests that the polytene and interphase cell line chromosomes have practically the same patterns of bands and interbands reflecting, probably, the basic principle of interphase chromosome organization. Two types of bands have been described in chromosomes, early and late-replicating, which differ in many aspects of their protein and genetic content. As appeared, origin recognition complexes are located almost totally in the interbands of chromosomes.

  10. Chromosome 10q tetrasomy: First reported case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackston, R.D.; May, K.M.; Jones, F.D. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    While there are several reports of trisomy 10q (at least 35), we are not aware of previous cases of 10q tetrasomy. We present what we believe to be the initial report of such a case. R.J. is a 6 1/2 year old white male who presented with multiple dysmorphic features, marked articulation problems, hyperactivity, and developmental delays. He is the product of a term uncomplicated pregnancy. There was a normal spontaneous vaginal delivery with a birth weight of 6 lbs. 4oz. and length was 19 1/2 inch. Dysmorphic features include small size, an asymmetrically small head, low set ears with overfolded helixes, bilateral ptosis, downslanting eyes, right eye esotropia, prominent nose, asymmetric facies, high palate, mild pectus excavatum deformity of chest, and hyperextensible elbow joints. The patient is in special needs classes for mildly mentally handicapped students. Chromosome analysis at a resolution of 800 bands revealed a complex rearrangement of chromosomes 10 and 11. The segment 10q25.3 to q16.3 appears to be inverted and duplicated within the long arm of chromosome 10 at band q25.3 and the same segment of chromosome 10 is present on the terminal end of the short arm of chromosome 11. There is no visible loss of material from chromosome 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed with a chromosome 10 specific {open_quotes}paint{close_quotes} to confirm that all of the material on the abnormal 10 and the material on the terminal short arm of 11 was from chromosome 10. Thus, it appears that the segment 10q25.3 to q26.3 is present in four copies. Parental chromosome studies are normal. We compared findings which differ in that the case of 10q tetrasomy did not have prenatal growth deficiency, microphthalmia, cleft palate, digital anomalies, heart, or renal defects. Whereas most cases of 10q trisomy are said to have severe mental deficiency, our case of 10q tetrasomy was only mildly delayed. We report this first apparent cited case of 10q tetrasomy.

  11. Discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masubuchi, Masanori

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes discrimination of chromosome by autoradiography. In this method, the difference in DNA synthetic phase between each chromosome was used as a standard, and the used chromosome was in metaphase, as morphological characteristics were markedly in this phase. Cell cycle and autoradiography with 3 H-thymidine were also examined. In order to discriminate chromosome by autoradiography, it was effective to utilize the labelled pattern in late DNA synthetic phase, where asynchronous replication of chromosome appeared most obviously. DNA synthesis in chromosome was examined in each DNA synthetic phase by culturing the chromosome after the treatment with 3 H-thymidine and altering the time to prepare chromosome specimen. Discrimination of chromosome in plants and animals by autoradiography was also mentioned. It was noticed as a structural and functional discrimination of chromosome to observe amino acid uptake into chromosome protein and to utilize the difference in labelled pattern between the sites of chromosome. (K. Serizawa)

  12. Fetal chromosome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Philip, J; Tabor, A; Bang, J

    1983-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the rationale of the current indications for fetal chromosome analysis. 5372 women had 5423 amniocentesis performed, this group constituting a consecutive sample at the chromosome laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen from March 1973 to September 1980 (Group...... A + B). Pregnant women 35 years of age, women who previously had a chromosomally abnormal child, families with translocation carriers or other heritable chromosomal disease, families where the father was 50 years or more and women in families with a history of Down's syndrome (group A), were compared...... to women having amniocentesis, although considered not to have any increased risk of fetal chromosome abnormality (1390 pregnancies, group B). They were also compared with 750 consecutive pregnancies in women 25-34 years of age, in whom all heritable diseases were excluded (group C). The risk of unbalanced...

  13. Isolation of the Drosophila melanogaster dunce chromosomal region and recombinational mapping of dunce sequences with restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ronald L.; Davidson, Norman

    1984-01-01

    Using the method of chromosomal walking, we have isolated a contiguous region of the Drosophila melanogaster X chromosome which corresponds to salivary gland chromosome bands 3C12 to 3D4. This five-band region contains approximately 100 kilobases of DNA, including those sequences comprising dunce, a gene which functions in memory and cyclic nucleotide metabolism. Genome blots of DNA from flies carrying several different chromosomal aberrations with breakpoints in the region have been probed w...

  14. Spectral Karyotyping. An new method for chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liying; Qian Jianxin; Guo Xiaokui; Dai Hong; Liu Yulong; Zhou Jianying

    2006-01-01

    Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) can reveal fine changes in Chromosome structure which could not be detected by G, R, Q banding before, has become an accurate, sensitive and reliable method for karyotyping, promoted the development of cell genetics to molecular level and has been used in medicine and radiological injury research. It also has the ability of analyzing 24 chromosomes on its once test run and, find implicated structure of chromosome changes, such as metathesis, depletion, amplification, rearrangement, dikinetochore, equiarm and maker-body, detect the abnormal change of stable Chromosome and calculate the bio-dose curve; The abnormal Chromosome detected by SKY can be adopted as early diagnosis, effective indexes of minor remaining changes for use of monitor of treatment and in the duration of follow up. This technique provides us a more advanced and effective method for relative gene cloning and the study of pathological mechanism of cancer. (authors)

  15. Ultrastructural analysis of radiation induced chromosome breaks and rearrangements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.L.; Goyanes, V.J.; Campos, A.; Cajigal, D.

    1990-01-01

    Chinese Hamster chromosomes R-banded in vitro were gamma-irradiated and chromatid breaks and rearrangements examined by electron microscopy employing whole-mounting technique. Breaks were preferentially located at the point of transition between G- and R-bands where the chromosome showed an average diameter 71.65 % of the wide condensed R-bands. This result was similar to the average diameter of narrow G-bands. Three chromosomes which were thin sectioned presented their broken terminal end organized as a coil constituted by two 23 nm wide chromatin fibers coiling together. Coils diameter was 43.70 % of the mean chromatid diameter. The border of damage-breakage was analyzed in whole-mounted chromosomes where breaks were photoinduced in BrdU-substituted DNA. Measurements of the angle of the sharp border of damage with respect to the chromatid axis showed a tendency to be more perpendicular as condensation progressed. These results clearly correlate with the several levels of chromatin fiber organization of the metaphase chromosome. (author)

  16. Chromosome sizes of phytoplasmas composing major phylogenetic groups and subgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcone, C; Neimark, H; Ragozzino, A; Lauer, U; Seemüller, E

    1999-09-01

    ABSTRACT Chromosome sizes of 71 phytoplasmas belonging to 12 major phylogenetic groups including several of the aster yellows subgroups were estimated from electrophoretic mobilities of full-length chromosomes in pulsed-field gels. Considerable variation in genome size, from 660 to 1,130 kilobases (kb), was observed among aster yellows phytoplasmas. Chromosome size heterogeneity was also observed in the stolbur phytoplasma group (range 860 to 1,350 kb); in this group, isolate STOLF contains the largest chromosome found in a phytoplasma to date. A wide range of chromosome sizes, from 670 to 1,075 kb, was also identified in the X-disease group. The other phytoplasmas examined, which included members of the apple proliferation, Italian alfalfa witches' broom, faba bean phyllody, pigeon pea witches' broom, sugarcane white leaf, Bermuda grass white leaf, ash yellows, clover proliferation, and elm yellows groups, all have chromosomes smaller than 1 megabase, and the size ranges within each of these groups is narrower than in the aster yellows, stolbur, and X-disease groups. The smallest chromosome, approximately 530 kb, was found in two Bermuda grass white leaf phytoplasma isolates. This not only is the smallest mollicute chromosome found to date, but also is the smallest chromosome known for any cell. More than one large DNA band was observed in several phytoplasma preparations. Possible explanations for the occurrence of more than one band may be infection of the host plant by different phytoplasmas, the presence of more than one chromosome in the same organism, or the presence of large extrachromosomal DNA elements.

  17. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A. [Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  18. CHROMOSOMES OF WOODY SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio R Daviña

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome numbers of nine subtropical woody species collected in Argentina and Paraguay are reported. The counts tor Coutarea hexandra (2n=52, Inga vera subsp. affinis 2n=26 (Fabaceae and Chorisia speciosa 2n=86 (Bombacaceae are reported for the first time. The chromosome number given for Inga semialata 2n=52 is a new cytotype different from the previously reported. Somatic chromosome numbers of the other taxa studied are: Sesbania punicea 2n=12, S. virgata 2n=12 and Pilocarpus pennatifolius 2n=44 from Argentina

  19. A simple chromosomal marker can reliably distinguishes Poncirus from Citrus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasileiro-Vidal, A C; Dos Santos-Serejo, J A; Soares Filho, W Dos S; Guerra, M

    2007-03-01

    Several chromosome types have been recognized in Citrus and related genera by chromomycin A(3 )(CMA) banding patterns and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). They can be used to characterize cultivars and species or as markers in hybridization and backcrossing experiments. In the present work, characterization of six cultivars of P. trifoliata ("Barnes", "Fawcett", "Flying Dragon", "Pomeroy", "Rubidoux", "USDA") and one P. trifoliata x C. limonia hybrid was performed by sequential analyses of CMA banding and FISH using 5S and 45S rDNA as probes. All six cultivars showed a similar CMA(+) banding pattern with the karyotype formula 4B + 8D + 6F. The capital letters indicate chromosomal types: B, a chromosome with one telomeric and one proximal band; D, with only one telomeric band; F, without bands. In situ hybridization labeling was also similar among cultivars. Three chromosome pairs displayed a closely linked set of 5S and 45S rDNA sites, two of them co-located with the proximal band of the B type chromosomes (B/5S-45S) and the third one co-located with the terminal band of a D pair (D/5S-45S). The B/5S-45S chromosome has never been found in any citrus accessions investigated so far. Therefore, this B chromosome can be used as a marker to recognize the intergeneric Poncirus x Citrus hybrids. The intergeneric hybrid analyzed here displayed the karyotype formula 4B + 8D + 6F, with two chromosome types B/5S-45S and two D/5S-45S. The karyotype formula and the presence of two B/5S-45S chromosomes clearly indicate that the plant investigated is a symmetric hybrid. It also demonstrates the suitability of karyotype analyses to differentiate zygotic embryos or somatic cell fusions involving trifoliate orange germplasm.

  20. Karyological characterization of the endemic Iberian rock lizard, Iberolacerta monticola (Squamata, Lacertidae): insights into sex chromosome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, V; Giovannotti, M; Naveira, H; Nisi Cerioni, P; González-Tizón, A M; Caputo Barucchi, V; Galán, P; Olmo, E; Martínez-Lage, A

    2014-01-01

    Rock lizards of the genus Iberolacerta constitute a promising model to examine the process of sex chromosome evolution, as these closely related taxa exhibit remarkable diversity in the degree of sex chromosome differentiation with no clear phylogenetic segregation, ranging from cryptic to highly heteromorphic ZW chromosomes and even multiple chromosome systems (Z1Z1Z2Z2/Z1Z2W). To gain a deeper insight into the patterns of karyotype and sex chromosome evolution, we performed a cytogenetic analysis based on conventional staining, banding techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization in the species I. monticola, for which previous cytogenetic investigations did not detect differentiated sex chromosomes. The karyotype is composed of 2n = 36 acrocentric chromosomes. NORs and the major ribosomal genes were located in the subtelomeric region of chromosome pair 6. Hybridization signals of the telomeric sequences (TTAGGG)n were visualized at the telomeres of all chromosomes and interstitially in 5 chromosome pairs. C-banding showed constitutive heterochromatin at the centromeres of all chromosomes, as well as clear pericentromeric and light telomeric C-bands in several chromosome pairs. These results highlight some chromosomal markers which can be useful to identify species-specific diagnostic characters, although they may not accurately reflect the phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. In addition, C-banding revealed the presence of a heteromorphic ZW sex chromosome pair, where W is smaller than Z and almost completely heterochromatic. This finding sheds light on sex chromosome evolution in the genus Iberolacerta and suggests that further comparative cytogenetic analyses are needed to understand the processes underlying the origin, differentiation and plasticity of sex chromosome systems in lacertid lizards. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Chromosomal abnormalities and autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farida El-Baz

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Chromosomal abnormalities were not detected in the studied autistic children, and so the relation between the genetics and autism still needs further work up with different study methods and techniques.

  2. New chromosome characteristics of the monozoic tapeworm Caryophyllaeus laticeps (Cestoda, Caryophyllidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bombarová M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of a caryophyllidean tapeworm Caryophyllaeus laticeps (Pallas, 1781 from the freshwater bream Abramis brama (L. caught in the Slovak part of the River Tisa, was described and originally inspected for amount of heterochromatin and its chromosome localization. The chromosome set comprised nine metacentric and one submetacentric (No. 3 pairs (2n = 20. The chromosomes were up to 12.0 ± 2.5 μm long and the mean total length of haploid genome (TLC reached 80.6 μm that represents one of the highest yet recorded values among tapeworms. C-banding and staining with fl uorescent dyes DAPI and YOYO1 revealed a distinct banding pattern explicitly on chromosomes with centromeric bright heterochromatin bands present on all 10 chromosome pairs; no pair showed any interstitial heterochromatin. A complete course of spermatocyte meiosis and dynamics of nucleolus formation and degradation during meiotic division was described.

  3. Chromosomal Evolution in Chiroptera

    OpenAIRE

    Sotero-Caio, Cibele G.; Baker, Robert J.; Volleth, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Chiroptera is the second largest order among mammals, with over 1300 species in 21 extant families. The group is extremely diverse in several aspects of its natural history, including dietary strategies, ecology, behavior and morphology. Bat genomes show ample chromosome diversity (from 2n = 14 to 62). As with other mammalian orders, Chiroptera is characterized by clades with low, moderate and extreme chromosomal change. In this article, we will discuss trends of karyotypic evolution within d...

  4. Proteomic analysis of human metaphase chromosomes reveals Topoisomerase II alpha as an Aurora B substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ciaran; Henzing, Alexander J; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2002-01-01

    B in the presence of radioactive ATP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the HeLa scaffold fraction to be enriched for known chromosomal proteins including CENP-A, CENP-B, CENP-C, ScII and INCENP. Mass spectrometry of bands excised from one-dimensional polyacrylamide gels further defined the protein......The essential Aurora B kinase is a chromosomal passenger protein that is required for mitotic chromosome alignment and segregation. Aurora B function is dependent on the chromosome passenger, INCENP. INCENP, in turn, requires sister chromatid cohesion for its appropriate behaviour. Relatively few...... composition of the extracted chromosome fraction. Cloning, fluorescent tagging and expression in HeLa cells of the putative GTP-binding protein NGB/CRFG demonstrated it to be a novel mitotic chromosome protein, with a perichromosomal localisation. Identi fication of the protein bands corresponding to those...

  5. Abnormalities of chromosome No. 1: significance in malignant transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1978-01-01

    Studies of human hematologic malignancies have provided sufficient data not only for the identification of nonrandom abnormalities of whole chromosomes, but also for determination of the specific chromosome regions involved. In clonal aberrations leading to an excess of chromosome No. 1, or a partial excess of No. 1, trisomy for bands 1q25 to 1q32 was noted in the myeloid cells obtained from every one of 35 patients who had various disorders, such as acute leukemia, polycythemia vera, or myelofibrosis. Similar chromosome changes were a consistent finding in various solid tumors as well. This rearrangement was not the result of a particularly fragile site in that region of the chromosome, since the break points in reciprocal translocations that involve No. 1 occurred almost exclusively in the short arm. The nonrandom chromosome changes found in neoplastic cells can now be correlated with the gene loci on these chromosomes or chromosome segments as an attempt is made to identify specific genes that might be related to malignancy.

  6. Radiation induced chromosome aberrations and interphase DNA geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Di Giorgio, M.; Otero, D.

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) and their interaction and illegitimate recombination produces chromosome aberrations. Stable chromosome aberrations comprise inter-chromosomal events (translocations) and intra-chromosomal events (inversions). Assuming DSBs induction and interaction is completely random and neglecting proximity effects, the expected ratio of translocations to inversions is F=86, based on chromosome arm lengths. We analyzed the number of translocations and inversions using G-banding, in 16 lymphocyte cultures from blood samples acutely irradiated with γ-rays (dose range: 0.5Gy-3Gy). Our results give F=13.5, significantly smaller than F=86. Literature data show similar small F values but strongly spread. The excess of inversions could be explained by a 'proximity effect', it means that more proximate DSBs have an extra probability of interaction. Therefore, it is possible to postulate a special chromosome arrangement during irradiation and the subsequent interval. We propose a model where individual chromosomes show spherical confinement with some degree of overlapping and DSBs induction proportional to cross section. We assume a DSBs interaction probability function with cut-off length = 1 μ. We propose that large spread in F data could be due to temporal variation in overlapping and spatial chromosome confinement. (author). 14 refs

  7. Micromechanics of human mitotic chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kawamura, Ryo; Marko, John F

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryote cells dramatically reorganize their long chromosomal DNAs to facilitate their physical segregation during mitosis. The internal organization of folded mitotic chromosomes remains a basic mystery of cell biology; its understanding would likely shed light on how chromosomes are separated from one another as well as into chromosome structure between cell divisions. We report biophysical experiments on single mitotic chromosomes from human cells, where we combine micromanipulation, nano-Newton-scale force measurement and biochemical treatments to study chromosome connectivity and topology. Results are in accord with previous experiments on amphibian chromosomes and support the 'chromatin network' model of mitotic chromosome structure. Prospects for studies of chromosome-organizing proteins using siRNA expression knockdowns, as well as for differential studies of chromosomes with and without mutations associated with genetic diseases, are also discussed

  8. A rare balanced nonrobertsonian translocation involving acrocentric chromosomes: Chromosome abnormality of t(13;15(p11.2;q22.1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalvi Rupa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Balanced non-robertsonian translocation (RT, involving acrocentric chromosomes, is a rare event and only a few cases are reported. Most of the RTs are balanced involving acrocentric chromosomes with the breakpoints (q10;q10. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chromosome analysis was performed as per standard procedure – Giemsa-trypsin banding with 500 band resolution was analyzed for chromosome identification. RESULTS: In the present study, we report a rare balanced non-RTs involving chromosomes 13 and 15 with cytogenetic finding of 46, XX, t(13;15(p11.2;q22.1. CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first such report of an unusual non-RT of t(13:15 with (p11.2;q22.1 break points.

  9. Male infertility associated with de novo pericentric inversion of chromosome 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasar, Özgür; Zamani, Ayşe Gül; Balasar, Mehmet; Acar, Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Inversion occurs after two breaks in a chromosome have happened and the segment rotates 180° before reinserting. Inversion carriers have produced abnormal gametes if there is an odd number crossing- over between the inverted and the normal homologous chromosomes causing a duplication or deletion. Reproductive risks such as infertility, abortion, stillbirth and birth of malformed child would be expected in that case. A 54-year- old male patient was consulted to our clinic for primary infertility. The routine chromosome study were applied using peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures and analyzed by giemsa-trypsin-giemsa (GTG) banding, and centromer banding (C-banding) stains. Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF) regions were analyzed with polymerase chain reaction. Additional test such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to detect the sex-determining region of the Y chromosome (SRY). Semen analysis showed azoospermia. A large pericentric inversion of chromosome 1 46,XY, inv(1) (p22q32) was found in routine chromosome analysis. No microdeletions were seen in AZF regions. In our patient the presence of SRY region was observed by using FISH technique with SRY-specific probe. Men who have pericentric inversion of chromosome 1, appear to be at risk for infertility brought about by spermatogenic breakdown. The etiopathogenic relationship between azoospermia and pericentric inversion of chromosome 1 is discussed.

  10. Distribution of X-ray-induced chromosome breakpoints in Down syndrome lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafik, H.M.; Au, W.W.; Whorton, E.B. Jr.; Legator, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) individuals are known to be predisposed to develop leukemia and their lymphocytes are highly sensitive to the induction of chromosome aberrations by X-rays. A study was conducted to identify the chromosome breakpoints and to evaluate whether site specificity for chromosome breakage and rearrangement may exist which may explain the predisposition phenomenon. DS lymphocytes at the G1 phase of the cell cycle were irradiated with 300, 450, and 600 rad of X-rays. Cells were harvested after 3 days in culture and 193 G-banded karyotypes were analyzed to identify the induced chromosome abnormalities. Out of 273 breakpoints identified, 122 were involved in the formation of stable chromosome rearrangements and 151 in the formation of unstable abnormalities. The Poisson analysis of these breakpoints demonstrated that 16 chromosome bands located in chromosomes 1, 3, 7, 12, 17, 19 and X were preferentially involved in breakage and rearrangement (P less than 0.05). These 16 bands are also found to be locations of cancer breakpoints, oncogenes, or fragile sites. Many abnormal cells were observed to carry stable chromosome rearrangements only. Therefore, these cells are presumed to be compatible with survival and to be initiated in the transformation process. We propose that similar stable and site-specific chromosome rearrangements may exist in proliferating cells in DS individuals after exposure to clastogens and that this abnormality predisposes them to develop leukemia

  11. Use of M-FISH analysis of α-particle-induced chromosome aberrations for the assessment of chromosomal breakpoint distribution and complex aberration formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.M.; Sumption, N.D.; Papworth, D.G.; Goodhead, D.T.

    2003-01-01

    Double strand breaks (dsb) of varying complexity are an important class of damage induced after exposure to ionising radiation and are considered to be the critical lesion for the formation of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. Assuming the basic principles of the 'Breakage and Reunion' theory, dsb represent 'breakage' and aberrations are produced from the illegitimate repair (reunion) of the resulting dsb free-'ends'. Numerous questions relate to this process, in particular, (1) do chromosomal breakpoint 'hot-spots' that represent sensitive sites for breakage and/or regions of preferential repair/mis-repair, exist? (2) Considering that individual chromosomes and chromosome regions occupy discrete territories in the interphase nucleus, could rearrangements between specific chromosomes reflect domain organisation at the time of damage? (3) Assuming the topological constraints imposed on chromatin are not dramatically influenced by the presence of dsb, then how do multiple 'ends' from different chromosomes proximally associate for mis-repair as complex chromosome aberrations? To address these questions, we have analysed the chromosome aberrations induced in peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to 0.5 Gy α -particles (mean of 1 α -particle/cell) using the technique of M-FISH. This technique 'paints' all the human chromosomes (excluding homologues) uniquely, allowing chromosomal mis-repair to be visualised as differential colour-junctions and in addition, enhanced DAPI banding enables gross breakpoint assignation of these colour junctions. To test for non-randomness, we are comparing the frequency of occurrence of breakpoints obtained up to now with the F98 glioma model our knowledbased on chromosome length. Similarly, the involvement of each chromosome relative to other chromosomes within individual rearrangements can be determined by assuming the volume of chromosome domains is also proportional to their length. The current data to be presented will

  12. Vibrio chromosome-specific families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Ussery, David

    2014-01-01

    We have compared chromosome-specific genes in a set of 18 finished Vibrio genomes, and, in addition, also calculated the pan- and core-genomes from a data set of more than 250 draft Vibrio genome sequences. These genomes come from 9 known species and 2 unknown species. Within the finished...... chromosomes, we find a core set of 1269 encoded protein families for chromosome 1, and a core of 252 encoded protein families for chromosome 2. Many of these core proteins are also found in the draft genomes (although which chromosome they are located on is unknown.) Of the chromosome specific core protein...... families, 1169 and 153 are uniquely found in chromosomes 1 and 2, respectively. Gene ontology (GO) terms for each of the protein families were determined, and the different sets for each chromosome were compared. A total of 363 different "Molecular Function" GO categories were found for chromosome 1...

  13. American marsupials chromosomes: why study them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Svartman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Marsupials, one of the three main groups of mammals, are only found in Australia and in the American continent. Studies performed in Australian marsupials have demonstrated the great potential provided by the group for the understanding of basic genetic mechanisms and chromosome evolution in mammals. Genetic studies in American marsupials are relatively scarce and cytogenetic data of most species are restricted to karyotype descriptions, usually without banding patterns. Nevertheless, the first marsupial genome sequenced was that of Monodelphis domestica, a South American species. The knowledge about mammalian genome evolution and function that resulted from studies on M. domestica is in sharp contrast with the lack of genetic data on most American marsupial species. Here, we present an overview of the chromosome studies performed in marsupials with emphasis on the South American species.

  14. Chromosome analysis of five Brazilian species of poison frogs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ern regions of Amazon, in the states of Mato Grosso do. Sul and Goiás, Brazil, extending west towards the foothills of the Andes from Bolivia to Venezuela, and in Panama. (Frost 2008). The genus Dendrobates is found from South. Keywords. C-banding; chromosomes; cytogenetics; dendrobatids; karyotype; NOR. Journal of ...

  15. A comparative study of chromosome morphology among some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... genetic source of wheat, some cytogenetic analysis reported (Chennaveeraiah, 1960; Badaeva et al., 1998,. 2001) and indicated that all A. crassa chromosomes can be identified by their morphology and C-banding patterns. Cytogenetical studies have been carried out on A. crassa but a comparative study ...

  16. Spectral Karyotyping for identification of constitutional chromosomal abnormalities at a national reference laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anguiano Arturo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spectral karyotyping is a diagnostic tool that allows visualization of chromosomes in different colors using the FISH technology and a spectral imaging system. To assess the value of spectral karyotyping analysis for identifying constitutional supernumerary marker chromosomes or derivative chromosomes at a national reference laboratory, we reviewed the results of 179 consecutive clinical samples (31 prenatal and 148 postnatal submitted for spectral karyotyping. Over 90% of the cases were requested to identify either small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs or chromosomal exchange material detected by G-banded chromosome analysis. We also reviewed clinical indications of those cases with marker chromosomes in which chromosomal origin was identified by spectral karyotyping. Our results showed that spectral karyotyping identified the chromosomal origin of marker chromosomes or the source of derivative chromosomal material in 158 (88% of the 179 clinical cases; the identification rate was slightly higher for postnatal (89% compared to prenatal (84% cases. Cases in which the origin could not be identified had either a small marker chromosome present at a very low level of mosaicism (

  17. Partial 2p deletion in a girl with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving chromosomes 2, 6, 11, and 21.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, R S; Medrano, M A; Hansen, K L

    1985-01-01

    We describe the clinical and cytogenetic findings of a 9 1/2 month old girl with a complex chromosome rearrangement resulting in a probable deletion of band 2p14. She does not resemble other reported cases of del(2p).

  18. Non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breakpoints in human lymphoblastoid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, Stephen R.; Papworth, David; Grosovsky, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    Genomic instability is observed in tumors and in a large fraction of the progeny surviving irradiation. One of the best-characterized phenotypic manifestations of genomic instability is delayed chromosome aberrations. Our working hypothesis for the current study was that if genomic instability is in part attributable to cis mechanisms, we should observe a non-random distribution of chromosomes or sites involved in instability-associated rearrangements, regardless of radiation quality, dose, or trans factor expression. We report here the karyotypic examination of 296 instability-associated chromosomal rearrangement breaksites (IACRB) from 118 unstable TK6 human B lymphoblast, and isogenic derivative, clones. When we tested whether IACRB were distributed across the chromosomes based on target size, a significant non-random distribution was evident (p < 0.00001), and three IACRB hotspots (chromosomes 11, 12, and 22) and one IACRB coldspot (chromosome 2) were identified. Statistical analysis at the chromosomal band-level identified four IACRB hotspots accounting for 20% of all instability-associated breaks, two of which account for over 14% of all IACRB. Further, analysis of independent clones provided evidence within 14 individual clones of IACRB clustering at the chromosomal band level, suggesting a predisposition for further breaks after an initial break at some chromosomal bands. All of these events, independently, or when taken together, were highly unlikely to have occurred by chance (p < 0.000001). These IACRB band-level cluster hotspots were observed independent of radiation quality, dose, or cellular p53 status. The non-random distribution of instability-associated chromosomal rearrangements described here significantly differs from the distribution that was observed in a first-division post-irradiation metaphase analysis (p = 0.0004). Taken together, these results suggest that genomic instability may be in part driven by chromosomal cis mechanisms

  19. Cytogenetic characterization of Melipona rufiventris Lepeletier 1836 and Melipona mondury Smith 1863 (Hymenoptera, Apidae by C banding and fluorochromes staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denilce Meneses Lopes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The stingless bees Melipona rufiventris and M. mondury were analyzed cytogenetically by conventional staining with Giemsa, C-banding and sequential staining with the fluorochromes CMA3/DA/DAPI. Both species presented 2n = 18 and n = 9, except for one colony of M. rufiventris, in which some individuals had 2n = 19 due to the presence of a B chromosome. After Giemsa staining and C-banding the chromosomes appeared very condensed and presented a high heterochromatic content, making it difficult to localize the centromere and therefore to visualize the chromosomes morphology. The constitutive heterochromatin was located in interstitial chromosome regions covering most of the chromosomes extension and consisted mainly of AT, as shown by DAPI staining. The euchromatin was restricted to the chromosome extremities and was GC-rich, as evidenced by CMA3 staining. The B chromosome was CMA3-negative and DAPI-positive, a heterochromatic constitution similar to that of the A genome chromosomes.

  20. Chromosomal mechanisms in murine radiation acute myeloid leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouffler, S.D.; Breckon, G.; Cox, R.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome 2 abnormalities, particularly interstitial deletions, characterize murine radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemias (AMLs). Here, G-band analyses in CBA/H mice of early (1-6 month) post 3 Gy X-radiation events in bone marrow cells in vivo and karyotype evolution in one unusual AML are presented. The early event analysis showed that all irradiated animals carry chromosome 2 abnormalities, that chromosome 2 abnormalities are more frequent than expected and that interstitial deletions are more common in chromosome 2 than in the remainder of the genome. On presentation AML case N122 carried a t(2; 11) terminal translocation which, with passaging, evolved into a del2(C3F3). Therefore two pathways in leukaemogenesis might exist, one deletion-driven, the other terminal tranlocation-driven involving interstitial genes and terminal genes respectively of chromosome 2. As all irradiated individuals carried chromosome 2 abnormalities, the formation of these aberrations does not determine individual leukaemogenic sensitivity as only 20-25% of animals would be expected to develop AML. Similar lines of argument suggest that chromosome 2 abnormalities are necessary but not sufficient for radiation leukaemogenesis in CBA/H nor are they rate limiting in leukaemogenesis. (Author)

  1. Computer aided analysis of additional chromosome aberrations in Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia using a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohr Brigitte

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The analysis of complex cytogenetic databases of distinct leukaemia entities may help to detect rare recurring chromosome aberrations, minimal common regions of gains and losses, and also hot spots of genomic rearrangements. The patterns of the karyotype alterations may provide insights into the genetic pathways of disease progression. Results We developed a simplified computer readable cytogenetic notation (SCCN by which chromosome findings are normalised at a resolution of 400 bands. Lost or gained chromosomes or chromosome segments are specified in detail, and ranges of chromosome breakpoint assignments are recorded. Software modules were written to summarise the recorded chromosome changes with regard to the respective chromosome involvement. To assess the degree of karyotype alterations the ploidy levels and numbers of numerical and structural changes were recorded separately, and summarised in a complex karyotype aberration score (CKAS. The SCCN and CKAS were used to analyse the extend and the spectrum of additional chromosome aberrations in 94 patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and secondary chromosome anomalies. Dosage changes of chromosomal material represented 92.1% of all additional events. Recurring regions of chromosome losses were identified. Structural rearrangements affecting (pericentromeric chromosome regions were recorded in 24.6% of the cases. Conclusions SCCN and CKAS provide unifying elements between karyotypes and computer processable data formats. They proved to be useful in the investigation of additional chromosome aberrations in Ph-positive ALL, and may represent a step towards full automation of the analysis of large and complex karyotype databases.

  2. Philadelphia chromosome-positive adult acute leukemia with monosomy of chromosome number seven: a subgroup with poor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, A M; Keating, M J; Trujillo, J; Cork, A; Youness, E; Ahearn, M J; McCredie, K B; Freireich, E J

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-four adult patients were seen at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute at Houston, Texas between 1969 and 1980 with acute leukemia (AL) and a deleted G-group chromosome that was shown by Giemsa banding to be a Philadelphia (Ph1) chromosome t(9;22) in 21 patients. Fourteen had the Ph1 chromosome as the sole abnormality, 12 had the Ph1 chromosome and loss of one chromosome of the C-group (identified by Giemsa banding analysis as number 7 in eight patients), while eight had the Ph1 chromosome and other changes. These three groups were similar in sex, age distribution and hematologic parameters. The median age of 40 was lower than usually seen in AL. The distribution of the morphologic subtypes was similar to that seen at this institution, with 50% being acute myeloblastic, 12% acute myelomonocytic, 20% lymphoblastic and 18% acute undifferentiated. The complete remission rate with chemotherapy was low: 25% in the Ph1 +/- 7, 50% in the Ph1 +/other group and 43% in the Ph1 +/other group. Median survival time was 8 months for the Ph1 +/- 7 group, 5.5 months for the Ph1 +/other group and 9.0 months for the Ph1 +/alone group. These patients with Ph1 + AL had higher white blood cell counts, increased extramedullary disease and poorer responses to therapy than usual for patients with AL. The deletion of chromosome 7 and the acquisition of the Ph1 chromosome identifies a group of patients with characteristics similar to all the patients with Ph1 + AL but a poor response to therapy and short remission duration.

  3. Electochemical detection of chromosome translocation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Dimaki, Maria; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetics is a study of the cell structure with a main focus on chromosomes content and their structure. Chromosome abnormalities, such as translocations may cause various genetic disorders and heametological malignancies. Chromosome translocations are structural rearrangements of two...... chromosomes that results in formation of derivative chromosomes with a mixed DNA sequence. The method currently used for their detection is Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization, which requires a use of expensive, fluorescently labeled probes that target the derivative chromosomes. We present here a double...... hybridization approach developed for label-free detection of the chromosome translocations. For specific translocation detection it is necessary to determine that the two DNA sequences forming a derivative chromosome are connected, which is achieved by two subsequent hybridization steps. The electrochemical...

  4. Mutations and chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihlman, B.A.

    1977-01-01

    The genetic changes of mutations and chromosomal aberrations are discussed. The consequences of both depend not only on the type of genetic change produced but also on the type of cell that is affected and on the development stage of the organism. (C.F.)

  5. Chromosomes, cancer and radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samouhos, E.

    1983-01-01

    Some specific chromosomal abnormalities are associated with certain cancers. The earliest description of such a specific association is the one of the Philadelphia chromosome and myelogenous leukemia (1960). Other congenital karyotype abnormalities are associated with specific cancers. Examples of these are Down's syndrome with leukemia and Klinefelter's syndrome with male breast cancer. Genetic diseases of increased chromosome breakage, or of defective chromosome repair, are associated with greatly increased cancer incidence. Three such diseases have been recognized: 1) Fanconi's anemia, associated with leukemias and lymphomas, 2) Bloom's syndrome, associated with acute leukemias and lymphosarcoma, and 3) ataxia telangiectasia, associated with Hodgkin's disease, leukemia, and lymphosarcomas. Ten percent of individuals with ataxia telangiectasia will develop one of these neoplasms. Individuals with certain of these syndromes display an unusually high radiosensitivity. Radiation therapy for cancers has been fatal in patients who received as low as 3000 rad. This remarkable radiosensitivity has been quantitated in cell cultures from such cases. Evidence suggests that the apparent sensitivity may reflect subnormal ability to repair radiation damage. The rapid proliferation of information in this field stems from the interdigitation of many disciplines and specialties, including cytogenetics, cell biology, molecular biology, epidemiology, radiobiology, and several others. This paper is intended for clinicians; it presents a structured analytic scheme for correlating and classifying this multidisciplinary information as it becomes available

  6. Know Your Chromosomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 3. Know Your Chromosomes The Strong Holds of Family Trees. Vani Brahmachari. Series Article Volume 1 Issue 3 March 1996 pp 30-38. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  8. Recombinant Chromosome 4 from a Familial Pericentric Inversion: Prenatal and Adulthood Wolf-Hirschhorn Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Malvestiti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pericentric inversion of chromosome 4 can give rise to recombinant chromosomes by duplication or deletion of 4p. We report on a familial case of Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome characterized by GTG-banding karyotypes, FISH, and array CGH analysis, caused by a recombinant chromosome 4 with terminal 4p16.3 deletion and terminal 4q35.2 duplication. This is an aneusomy due to a recombination which occurred during the meiosis of heterozygote carrier of cryptic pericentric inversion. We also describe the adulthood and prenatal phenotypes associated with the recombinant chromosome 4.

  9. The analysis of distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qin; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the distribution of the chromosome aberration breakpoints from medical diagnostic x-ray workers. Methods: The breakpoints of lymphocyte chromosomes are analyzed using G-banding. Results: There are 146 breakpoints among 3545 metaphase in 37 cases of X-ray workers. There are statistically significant differences between observed values and expected values (χ 2 =42.82, df=23, P 0.05). Conclusion: The chromosome aberration breakpoints of medical diagnostic X-ray workers are non-random. The observed values of breakpoint numbers are higher than those of the expected values in 7 and 14 chromosomes (P<0.05)

  10. [Molecular cytogenetic analysis of a case with ring chromosome 3 syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihui; Song, Fengling; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Yi; Gai, Zhongtao

    2016-12-10

    To investigate the genetic cause for a child with developmental delay and congenital heart disease through molecular cytogenetic analysis. G-banded karyotyping and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) were performed for the patient and his parents. The proband's karyotype was detected as ring chromosome 3, and a 3q26.3-25.3 deletion encompassing 45 genes has been found with CMA. Testing of both parents was normal. Clinical phenotype of the patient with ring chromosome 3 mainly depends on the involved genes. It is necessary to combine CMA and karyotyping for the diagnosis of ring chromosome, as CMA can provide more accurate information for variations of the genome.

  11. [Origin and morphological features of small supernumerary marker chromosomes in Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan; Tong, Tong; Chen, Yue; Chen, Yanling; Cai, Chunquan

    2018-02-10

    OBJECTIVE To explore the origin and morphological features of small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMCs) in Turner syndrome. METHODS For 5 cases of Turner syndrome with a sSMC identified by conventional G-banding, dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was applied to explore their origin and morphological features. RESULTS Among the 5 cases, 3 have derived from the X chromosome, which included 2 ring chromosomes and 1 centric minute. For the 2 sSMCs derived from the Y chromosome, 1 was ring or isodicentric chromosome, while the other was an isodicentric chromosome. CONCLUSION The sSMCs found in Turner syndrome have almost all derived from sex chromosomes. The majority of sSMCs derived from the X chromosome will form ring chromosomes, while a minority will form centric minute. While most sSMC derived from Y chromosome may exist as isodicentric chromosomes, and a small number may exist as rings. For Turner syndrome patients with sSMCs, dual-color FISH may be used to delineate their origins to facilitate genetic counseling and selection of clinical regime.

  12. Chromosome phylogenies of man, great apes, and Old World monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grouchy, J

    1987-08-31

    The karyotypes of man and of the closely related Pongidae--chimpanzee, gorilla, and orangutan--differ by a small number of well known rearrangements, mainly pericentric inversions and one fusion which reduced the chromosome number from 48 in the Pongidae to 46 in man. Dutrillaux et al. (1973, 1975, 1979) reconstructed the chromosomal phylogeny of the entire primate order. More and more distantly related species were compared thus moving backward in evolution to the common ancestors of the Pongidae, of the Cercopithecoidae, the Catarrhini, the Platyrrhini, the Prosimians, and finally the common ancestor of all primates. Descending the pyramid it becomes possible to assign the rearrangements that occurred in each phylum, and the one that led to man in particular. The main conclusions are that this phylogeny is compatible with the occurrence during evolution of simple chromosome rearrangements--inversions, fusions, reciprocal translocation, acquisition or loss of heterochromatin--and that it is entirely consistent with the known primate phylogeny based on physical morphology and molecular evolution. If heterochromatin is not taken into account, man has in common with the other primates practically all of his chromosomal material as determined by chromosome banding. However, it is arranged differently, according to species, on account of chromosome rearrangements. This interpretation has been confirmed by comparative gene mapping, which established that the same chromosome segments, identified by banding, carry the same genes (Finaz et al., 1973; Human Gene Mapping 8, 1985). A remarkable observation made by Dutrillaux is that different primate phyla seem to have adopted different chromosome rearrangements in the course of evolution: inversions for the Pongidae, Robertsonian fusions for the lemurs, etc. This observation may raise many questions, among which is that of an organized evolution. Also, the breakpoints of chromosomal rearrangements observed during evolution

  13. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  14. The X chromosome in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jégu, Teddy; Aeby, Eric; Lee, Jeannie T

    2017-06-01

    Extensive 3D folding is required to package a genome into the tiny nuclear space, and this packaging must be compatible with proper gene expression. Thus, in the well-hierarchized nucleus, chromosomes occupy discrete territories and adopt specific 3D organizational structures that facilitate interactions between regulatory elements for gene expression. The mammalian X chromosome exemplifies this structure-function relationship. Recent studies have shown that, upon X-chromosome inactivation, active and inactive X chromosomes localize to different subnuclear positions and adopt distinct chromosomal architectures that reflect their activity states. Here, we review the roles of long non-coding RNAs, chromosomal organizational structures and the subnuclear localization of chromosomes as they relate to X-linked gene expression.

  15. Chromosome aberrations of bone marrow cells in heavily exposed atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Ohkita, Takeshi

    1986-01-01

    Seven hundred and ten bone marrow cells from 13 A-bomb survivors, who were heavily exposed to atomic radiation, were examined using chromosome banding method. An average frequency of chromosome aberrations was 17 %. The most common structural abnormality was translocation (47 %), followed by complex aberrations involving three or more chromosomes (32 %). These abnormalities were frequently seen in A-bomb survivors exposed to estimated doses of 3.5 - 4.0 Gy. Eighty two percent of the structural aberrations were stable. Diploid cells were seen in 0.4 % and tetraploid cells were seen in 0.7 %. The frequency of breakpoint sites was high in chromosomes 1 and 17; while it was low in chromosomes 3, 6, 9, and 11. Abnormal clones were seen in one of the 13 survivors. Chromosome aberrations common to the bone marrow cells and peripheral lymphocytes were not seen in the same individual. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Infraspecific variation of C-banded karyotype and chiasma frequency in Cucumis sativus (Cucurbitaceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramachandran, C.; Brandenburg, W.A.; Nijs, de S.A.P.M.

    1985-01-01

    Infraspecific cytogenetical variation was studied in a diverse collection of five non-cultivated and cultivatedCucumis sativus accessions. The individual chromosomes of different accessions could be identified by the C-banding pattern and chromosome measurements. About 40–50% of the genomic area are

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of inv dup(15) chromosomes observed in two patients with autistic disorder and mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flejter, W.L. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Bennett-Baker, P.E.; Gorski, J.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [and other

    1996-01-11

    A variety of distinct phenotypes has been associated with supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Although different cytogenetic rearrangements have been associated with distinguishable clinical syndromes, precise genotype-phenotype correlations have not been determined. However, the availability of chromosome 15 DNA markers provides a means to characterize inv dup(15) chromosomes in detail to facilitate the determination of specific genotype-phenotype associations. We describe 2 patients with an autistic disorder, mental retardation, developmental delay, seizures, and supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosomes. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies confirmed the chromosomal origin of the supernumerary chromosomes and showed that the duplicated region extended to at least band 15q13. An analysis of chromosome 15 microsatellite CA polymorphisms suggested a maternal origin of the inv dup(15) chromosomes and biparental inheritance of the two intact chromosome 15 homologs. The results of this study add to the existing literature which suggests that the clinical phenotype of patients with a supernumerary inv dup(15) chromosome is determined not only by the extent of the duplicated region, but by the dosage of genes located within band 15q13 and the origin of the normal chromosomes 15. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Chromosome Characteristic of Peranakan Etawa (PE) Goat (Capra hircus Linn.) as Indonesian Local Breed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, A. R. I.; Ciptadi, G.; Warih, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Chromosome characteristics of Peranakan Etawa (PE) goat needs to be analyzed because information about Indonesian goat races is very limited. The purpose of this research was to determine the characteristics of PE goat chromosome as basic data as one of the genetic local resources. Blood was collected from pair of PE goat at Sumber Sekar Field Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Brawijaya University, Malang. Blood cultured using standard cytogenetic technique and stained with G-Banding. Observations being done in metaphase cells and analyzed using Genus Cytovision Image. Chromosomes arranged and numbered by standard goat karyotype. The result of this research showed that PE goat had number of chromosomes 2n=60, consisting of 29 pairs of autosome and a pair of sex chromosomes. Female goat had average of total length (TL) of autosome ranged from 47.91 µm±6.46 to 22.12 µm±3.33. TL of chromosome X are 45.96 µm±4,59 and 44.45 µm±3,96. Centromeric index (Ci) of chromosome X, 31,74 and 32,80. PE goat had average of TL of autosome ranged from 58.20µm±6.72 to 18.97µm±2.82. TL of chromosome X is 56,42µm±7,38 and Y chromosome is 15,80 µm±3,24. Ci in chromosome X and Y are 19.34 and 46.84. These results concluded that the total of goat chromosome was 60 with types of autosomal chromosomes were acrocentric as many as 58 chromosomes and pair of sex chromosomes XX and XY, X classified as subtelocentric and Y submetacentric.

  19. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with severe semen abnormalities and its correlation with successful sperm retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Mascarenhas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To estimate the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletion among men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia and its correlation with successful surgical sperm retrieval. SETTING AND DESIGN: A prospective study in a tertiary level infertility unit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective observation study, men with azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia (concentration <5 million/ml attending the infertility center underwent genetic screening. Peripheral blood karyotype was done by Giemsa banding. Y chromosome microdeletion study was performed by a multiplex polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: The study group consisted of 220 men, 133 of whom had azoospermia and 87 had severe oligozoospermia. Overall, 21/220 (9.5% men had chromosomal abnormalities and 13/220 (5.9% men had Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities were seen in 14.3% (19/133 of azoospermic men and Y chromosome microdeletions in 8.3% (11/133. Of the 87 men with severe oligozoospermia, chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions were each seen in 2.3% (2/87. Testicular sperm aspiration was done in 13 men and was successful in only one, who had a deletion of azoospermia factor c. CONCLUSIONS: Our study found a fairly high prevalence of genetic abnormality in men with severe semen abnormalities and a correlation of genetic abnormalities with surgical sperm retrieval outcomes. These findings support the need for genetic screening of these men prior to embarking on surgical sperm retrieval and assisted reproductive technology intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  20. The ancestral chromosomes of Dromiciops gliroides (Microbiotheridae), and its bearings on the karyotypic evolution of American marsupials

    OpenAIRE

    Su?rez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Haro, Ronie E.; Vargas, Rodrigo A.; Gallardo, Milton H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The low-numbered 14-chromosome karyotype of marsupials has falsified the fusion hypothesis claiming ancestrality from a 22-chromosome karyotype. Since the 14-chromosome condition of the relict Dromiciops gliroides is reminecent of ancestrality, its interstitial traces of past putative fusions and heterochromatin banding patterns were studied and added to available marsupials? cytogenetic data. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and self-genomic in situ hybridization (self-GIS...

  1. Chromosome painting analysis of X-ray-induced aberrations in human lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, A.; Hayashi, M.; Yamazaki, N.; Sofuni, T.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements in human lymphocytes induced by X-rays (0, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gray) were analyzed using chromosome painting. DNA probes for human chromosomes 1, 3 or 4 alone, and a combination of 1 and 4, were used for analysis. The frequency of cells with rearrangements, i.e. reciprocal translocations, dicentrics, insertions, tricentrics and fragments, involving chromosome 4 increased with dose in both 48 and 72 h cultures. The number of translocations per cell also increased with dose at 48 and 72 h. Dicentrics increased with dose in 48 h but not in 72 h cultures. The estimated genomic frequency of aberrations per cell was comparable with results in banded cells. No difference was shown on the detection efficiency of chromosome rearrangements among the various DNA probes used. Since this technique does not necessarily require well-spread metaphases for analysis, it is possible to increase the number of analyzable metaphases compared with the banding technique. Chromosome painting is a simpler, more objective and practical method for detecting chromosome rearrangements than conventional banding analyses. (Author)

  2. Separate Location of Parental Chromosomes in Squashed Metaphases of Hybrid between Hordeum vulgare L. and Four Polyploid, Alien Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Linde-Laursen, Ib

    1984-01-01

    In 38 squashed, somatic metaphases of four hybrids between diploid Hordeum vulgare and two tetra-and two hexaploid alien species, each of the H. vulgare chromosomes was identifed, and differentiated from the chromosomes of the other parental species, by its Giemsa C-banding pattern. The H. vulgare...

  3. Molecular fundamentals of chromosomal mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganassi, E.Eh.; Zaichkina, S.I.; Malakhova, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Precise quantitative correlation between the yield of chromosome structure damages and the yield of DNA damages is shown when comparing data on molecular and cytogenetic investigations carried out in cultural Mammalia cells. As the chromosome structure damage is to be connected with the damage of its carcass structure, then it is natural that DNA damage in loop regions is not to affect considerably the structure, while DNA damage lying on the loop base and connected with the chromosome carcass is to play a determining role in chromosomal mutagenesis. This DNA constitutes 1-2% from the total quantity of nuclear DNA. If one accepts that damages of these regions of DNA are ''hot'' points of chromosomal mutagenesis, then it becomes clear why 1-2% of preparation damages in a cell are realized in chromosome structural damages

  4. Comparative Genomic Hybridization of Human Malignant Gliomas Reveals Multiple Amplification Sites and Nonrandom Chromosomal Gains and Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schròck, Evelin; Thiel, Gundula; Lozanova, Tanka; du Manoir, Stanislas; Meffert, Marie-Christine; Jauch, Anna; Speicher, Michael R.; Nürnberg, Peter; Vogel, Siegfried; Janisch, Werner; Donis-Keller, Helen; Ried, Thomas; Witkowski, Regine; Cremer, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Nine human malignant gliomas (2 astrocytomas grade III and 7 glioblastomas) were analyzed using comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). In addition to the amplification of the EGFR gene at 7p12 in 4 of 9 cases, six new amplification sites were mapped to 1q32, 4q12, 7q21.1, 7q21.2-3, 12p, and 22q12. Nonrandom chromosomal gains and losses were identified with overrepresentation of chromosome 7 and underrepresentation of chromosome 10 as the most frequent events (1 of 2 astrocytomas, 7 of 7 glioblastomas). Gain of a part or the whole chromosome 19 and losses of chromosome bands 9pter-23 and 22q13 were detected each in five cases. Loss of chromosome band 17p13 and gain of chromosome 20 were revealed each in three cases. The validity of the CGH data was confirmed using interphase cytogenetics with YAC clones, chromosome painting in tumor metaphase spreads, and DNA fingerprinting. A comparison of CGH data with the results of chromosome banding analyses indicates that metaphase spreads accessible in primary tumor cell cultures may not represent the clones predominant in the tumor tissue ImagesFigure 1Figure 4Figure 6 PMID:8203461

  5. Intraspecific chromosome variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Dubinin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available (Editorial preface. The publication is presented in order to remind us of one of dramatic pages of the history of genetics. It re-opens for the contemporary reader a comprehensive work marking the priority change from plant cytogenetics to animal cytogenetics led by wide population studies which were conducted on Drosophila polytene chromosomes. The year of the publication (1937 became the point of irretrievable branching between the directions of Old World and New World genetics connected with the problems of chromosome variability and its significance for the evolution of the species. The famous book of T. Dobzhansky (1937 was published by Columbia University in the US under the title “Genetics and the origin of species”, and in the shadow of this American ‘skybuilding’ all other works grew dim. It is remarkable that both Dobzhansky and Dubinin come to similar conclusions about the role of chromosomes in speciation. This is not surprising given that they both might be considered as representatives of the Russian genetic school, by their birth and education. Interestingly, Dobzhansky had never referred to the full paper of Dubinin et al. (1937, though a previous short communication in Nature (1936 was included together with all former papers on the related subject. In full, the volume of the original publication printed in the Biological Journal in Moscow comprised 47 pages, in that number 41 pages of the Russian text accompanied by 16 Figs, a table and reference list, and, above all, 6 pages of the English summary. This final part in English is now reproduced in the authors’ version with the only addition being the reference list in the originally printed form.

  6. Molecular cytogenetic analysis and clinical manifestations of a case with de novo mosaic ring chromosome 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jye-Siung

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Clinical and molecular cytogenetic investigations of a newborn girl exhibiting facial dysmorphism with developmental delay. Methods Phenotypic evaluation was first applied to examine the proband's developmental status. Computed tomography and colour transcranial Doppler were used then to investigate her brain structure and function. Subsequently, chromosomal abnormalities were examined by karyotyping and fluorescent in situ hybridization was performed to investigate size of fragments lost at the two distal ends of the ring chromosome 7. In addition, multicolour banding was applied to rule out structural rearrangement occurs in between the ring chromosome 7. Results The proband was born with mosaic supernumerary ring chromosome 7, without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. The distal arm of chromosome 7p (at least 255 kb from the telomere was part of an extra ring chromosome 7. In addition, the distal arm of 7q, at least 8 kb from the telomere, was missing. There was no other chromosomal rearrangement detected by multicolour banding. Interpretation This is the 19th reported case of complete ring chromosome 7 mosaicism and the first survived case with mosaic supernumerary ring 7 without a normal karyotype detected in the peripheral lymphocytes.

  7. Intra-chromosomal aberrations observed after high-LET radiation exposure in vivo using a state-of-the-art cytogenetic technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, C.R.; Geard, C.R.; Brenner, D.J.; Hande, P.; Azizova, T.V.; Burak, L.E.; Khokhryakov, V.F.; Vasienko, E.K.

    2003-01-01

    Multicolor banding fluorescence in situ hybridization (mBAND) was used to investigate the presence of stable intra-chromosomal aberrations in chromosomes 1, 2 and 5 in a population of individuals exposed previously to low and/or high-LET radiation. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were taken from healthy Russian nuclear workers occupationally exposed to plutonium α -particles, γ -rays or both at the Mayak complex from 1949 onwards. Metaphase spreads were produced and chromosomes hybridized with mBAND probes and scored for intra-chromosomal aberrations including inversions and deletions. A large difference between the intra-chromosomal aberration frequencies for the high-plutonium (∼1.1 Gy) and the high- γ exposed (∼1.5 Gy) individuals was observed in all three chromosomes studied (chromosome 1: 1.9 ± 0.5 % (n=7) vs. 0.1 ± 0.1% (n=5); chromosome 2: 1.7 ± 0.4% (n=7) vs. 0 [0 -0.3]% (n=6); chromosome 5: 3.7 ± 0.5 % (n=11) vs. 0.1 ± 0.1 % (n=11) (high-plutonium vs. high-γ exposure)). Controls (n=5) showed very few or no intra-chromosomal aberrations. Significantly fewer aberrations were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 compared with chromosome 5, studied previously in this cohort, suggesting that intra-chromosomal changes involving chromosomes 1 and 2 may be more lethal to the cell than those involving chromosome 5. The dramatic differences in yields of intra-chromosomal aberrations in high-plutonium exposure relative to low may provide a means of discrimination to estimate both the dose and type of previous radiation exposure in populations

  8. Meiotic synapsis of homogeneously staining regions (HSRs) in chromosome 1 of Mus musculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winking, H; Reuter, C; Traut, W

    1993-05-01

    About 50 copies of a long-range repeat DNA family with a repeat size of roughly 100 kb and with sequence homology to mRNAs are clustered in the G-light band D of chromosome 1 of the house mouse, Mus musculus. We studied amplified versions of the cluster which are found in many wild populations of M. musculus. They are cytogenetically conspicuous as one or two C-band positive homogeneously staining regions (single- and double band HSRs) which increase the mitotic length of chromosome 1. The double band HSR was phylogenetically derived from a single band HSR by a paracentric inversion. In homozygous condition, such HSRs contribute, albeit not as much as expected from their mitotic length, to the synaptonemal complex (SC) length of chromosome 1. In HSR heterozygous animals an elongation of the SCs was not noticeable. In single band HSR heterozygous males, synapsis proceeds regularly and continuously from the distal telomere towards the centromeric end without forming buckles. Thus, the single band HSR has no adverse effect on pairing. The same straight pairing behaviour was found in the majority of double band HSR heterozygous spermatocytes. This shows that extensive nonhomologous pairing can take place in the earliest phase of synapsis. Synapsis was discontinuous, leaving the central part of the bivalent 1 asynapsed, in only 14.3% of double band HSR heterozygous cells. In such cells the chromosome 1 SC is completed at a later stage of meiosis. The delay is presumably an effect of the inversion that includes one HSR band and the segment between the two HSR bands.

  9. Human interphase chromosomes: a review of available molecular cytogenetic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurov Yuri B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human karyotype is usually studied by classical cytogenetic (banding techniques. To perform it, one has to obtain metaphase chromosomes of mitotic cells. This leads to the impossibility of analyzing all the cell types, to moderate cell scoring, and to the extrapolation of cytogenetic data retrieved from a couple of tens of mitotic cells to the whole organism, suggesting that all the remaining cells possess these genomes. However, this is far from being the case inasmuch as chromosome abnormalities can occur in any cell along ontogeny. Since somatic cells of eukaryotes are more likely to be in interphase, the solution of the problem concerning studying postmitotic cells and larger cell populations is interphase cytogenetics, which has become more or less applicable for specific biomedical tasks due to achievements in molecular cytogenetics (i.e. developments of fluorescence in situ hybridization -- FISH, and multicolor banding -- MCB. Numerous interphase molecular cytogenetic approaches are restricted to studying specific genomic loci (regions being, however, useful for identification of chromosome abnormalities (aneuploidy, polyploidy, deletions, inversions, duplications, translocations. Moreover, these techniques are the unique possibility to establish biological role and patterns of nuclear genome organization at suprachromosomal level in a given cell. Here, it is to note that this issue is incompletely worked out due to technical limitations. Nonetheless, a number of state-of-the-art molecular cytogenetic techniques (i.e multicolor interphase FISH or interpahase chromosome-specific MCB allow visualization of interphase chromosomes in their integrity at molecular resolutions. Thus, regardless numerous difficulties encountered during studying human interphase chromosomes, molecular cytogenetics does provide for high-resolution single-cell analysis of genome organization, structure and behavior at all stages of cell cycle.

  10. X chromosome and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, L M; Zouk, H; Himmelman, C; Turecki, G

    2011-02-01

    Suicide completion rates are significantly higher in males than females in most societies. Although gender differences in suicide rates have been partially explained by environmental and behavioral factors, it is possible that genetic factors, through differential expression between genders, may also help explain gender moderation of suicide risk. This study investigated X-linked genes in suicide completers using a two-step strategy. We first took advantage of the genetic structure of the French-Canadian population and genotyped 722 unrelated French-Canadian male subjects, of whom 333 were suicide completers and 389 were non-suicide controls, using a panel of 37 microsatellite markers spanning the entire X chromosome. Nine haplotype windows and several individual markers were associated with suicide. Significant results aggregated primarily in two regions, one in the long arm and another in the short arm of chromosome X, limited by markers DXS8051 and DXS8102, and DXS1001 and DXS8106, respectively. The second stage of the study investigated differential brain expression of genes mapping to associated regions in Brodmann areas 8/9, 11, 44 and 46, in an independent sample of suicide completers and controls. Six genes within these regions, Rho GTPase-activating protein 6, adaptor-related protein complex 1 sigma 2 subunit, glycoprotein M6B, ribosomal protein S6 kinase 90  kDa polypeptide 3, spermidine/spermine N(1)-acetyltransferase 1 and THO complex 2, were found to be differentially expressed in suicide completers.

  11. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... chromosomes are evolutionary consequences of that func- tion. Given sufficient ... (for a review, see Charlesworth et al. 2005). ... In the present paper, I review sex deter- mination .... part had apparently been exchanged against the homologous ... age group III-Y chromosomes were successful while in well-.

  12. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanDevanter, D. R.; Choongkittaworn, N. M.; Dyer, K. A.; Aten, J. A.; Otto, P.; Behler, C.; Bryant, E. M.; Rabinovitch, P. S.

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted

  13. Development of a biological dosimeter for translocation scoring based on two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosome subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, S; Cremer, T [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Human Genetics and Anthropology

    1992-03-01

    Recently fluorescence in situ hybridization protocols have been developed which allow the paining of individual chromosomes using DNA-libraries from sorted human chromosomes. This approach has the particular advantage that radiation induced chromosome translocations can be easily detected, if chromosomes of distinctly different colors take part in the translocation event. To enhance the sensitivity of this approach two metaphase chromosome subsets A and B (A: chromosome 1, 2, 4, 8, 16; B: 3, 5, 9, 10, 13) were simultaneously painted in green and red color. Counterstaining of the chromosomes with DAPI resulted in a third subset which exhibited blue fluorescence only. Green-red, green-blue and red-blue translocation chromosomes could be easily detected after irradiation of lymphocyte cultures with {sup 137}Cs-{gamma}-rays. Analyses of painted chromosomes can be combined with conventional GTG-banding analyses. This new biological dosimeter should become useful to monitor both long term effects of single irradiation events and the cumulative effects of multiple or chronic irradiation exposure. In contrast to translocation scoring based on the analysis of banded chromosomes, this new approach has the particular advantage that a rapid, automated scoring of translocations can now be envisaged. (author).

  14. Band structure of semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Tsidilkovski, I M

    2013-01-01

    Band Structure of Semiconductors provides a review of the theoretical and experimental methods of investigating band structure and an analysis of the results of the developments in this field. The book presents the problems, methods, and applications in the study of band structure. Topics on the computational methods of band structure; band structures of important semiconducting materials; behavior of an electron in a perturbed periodic field; effective masses and g-factors for the most commonly encountered band structures; and the treatment of cyclotron resonance, Shubnikov-de Haas oscillatio

  15. Cohesin in determining chromosome architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, Christian H., E-mail: christian.haering@embl.de [Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Heidelberg (Germany); Jessberger, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.jessberger@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Dresden University of Technology, Dresden (Germany)

    2012-07-15

    Cells use ring-like structured protein complexes for various tasks in DNA dynamics. The tripartite cohesin ring is particularly suited to determine chromosome architecture, for it is large and dynamic, may acquire different forms, and is involved in several distinct nuclear processes. This review focuses on cohesin's role in structuring chromosomes during mitotic and meiotic cell divisions and during interphase.

  16. Sex chromosomes in Ephestia kuehniella

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Marec, František; Sahara, K.; Traut, W.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2001), s. 131 ISSN 0003-3995. [European Cytogenetics Conference /3./. 07.07.2001-10.07.2001, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : Telomere * sex chromosomes * chromosome fragments Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  17. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  18. Chromosome mapping of repetitive sequences in four Serrasalmidae species (Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Braga Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Serrasalmidae family is composed of a number of commercially interesting species, mainly in the Amazon region where most of these fishes occur. In the present study, we investigated the genomic organization of the 18S and 5S rDNA and telomeric sequences in mitotic chromosomes of four species from the basal clade of the Serrasalmidae family: Colossoma macropomum, Mylossoma aureum, M. duriventre, and Piaractus mesopotamicus, in order to understand the chromosomal evolution in the family. All the species studied had diploid numbers 2n = 54 and exclusively biarmed chromosomes, but variations of the karyotypic formulas were observed. C-banding resulted in similar patterns among the analyzed species, with heterochromatic blocks mainly present in centromeric regions. The 18S rDNA mapping of C. macropomum and P. mesopotamicus revealed multiple sites of this gene; 5S rDNA sites were detected in two chromosome pairs in all species, although not all of them were homeologs. Hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed signals in the terminal portions of chromosomes in all the species and an interstitial signal was observed in one pair of C. macropomum.

  19. Extensive polymorphism and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis (Characiformes, Characidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Nirchio

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of the characid fish Triportheus venezuelensis were investigated using differential staining techniques (C-banding, Ag-NOR staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH with an 18S rDNA probe. The diploid chromosome number (2n = 52, karyotype composition and sex chromosome determination system of the ZZ/ZW type were the same as previously described in other species of the genus Triportheus. However, extensive variation regarding nucleolus organizer regions (NOR different from other species was observed. 18S rDNA sequences were distributed on nine chromosome pairs, but the number of chromosomes with Ag-NORs was usually lower, reaching a maximum of four chromosomes. When sequential staining experiments were performed, it was demonstrated that: 1. active NORs usually corresponded to segments with 18S rDNA genes identified in FISH experiments; 2. several 18S rDNA sequences were not silver-stained, suggesting that they do not correspond to active NORs; and 3. some chromosomes with silver-stained regions did not display any 18S rDNA signals. These findings characterize an extensive polymorphism associated with the NOR-bearing chromosomes of T. venezuelensis and emphasize the importance of combining traditional and molecular techniques in chromosome studies.

  20. Sex chromosome aneuploidy in cytogenetic findings of referral patients from south of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Jouyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromosome abnormality (CA including Sex chromosomes abnormality (SCAs is one of the most important causes of disordered sexual development and infertility. SCAs formed by numerical or structural alteration in X and Y chromosomes, are the most frequently CA encountered at both prenatal diagnosis and at birth. Objective: This study describes cytogenetic findings of cases suspected with CA referred for cytogenetic study. Materials and Methods: Blood samples of 4151 patients referred for cytogenetic analysis were cultured for chromosome preparation. Karyotypes were prepared for all samples and G-Banded chromosomes were analyzed using x100 objective lens. Sex chromosome aneuploidy cases were analyzed and categorized in two groups of Turners and Klinefelter’s syndrome (KFS. Results: Out of 230 (5.54% cases with chromosomally abnormal karyotype, 122 (30% cases suspected of sexual disorder showed SCA including 46% Turner’s syndrome, 46% KFS and the remaining other sex chromosome abnormalities. The frequency of classic and mosaic form of Turner’s syndrome was 33% and 67%, this was 55% and 45% for KFS, respectively. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively high sex chromosome abnormality in this region and provides cytogenetic data to assist clinicians and genetic counselors to determine the priority of requesting cytogenetic study. Differences between results from various reports can be due to different genetic background or ethnicity.

  1. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  2. Identification of the linkage group of the Z sex chromosomes of the sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) and elucidation of karyotype evolution in lacertid lizards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Matsubara, Kazumi; Uno, Yoshinobu; Nishida, Chizuko; Olsson, Mats; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2014-12-01

    The sand lizard (Lacerta agilis, Lacertidae) has a chromosome number of 2n = 38, with 17 pairs of acrocentric chromosomes, one pair of microchromosomes, a large acrocentric Z chromosome, and a micro-W chromosome. To investigate the process of karyotype evolution in L. agilis, we performed chromosome banding and fluorescent in situ hybridization for gene mapping and constructed a cytogenetic map with 86 functional genes. Chromosome banding revealed that the Z chromosome is the fifth largest chromosome. The cytogenetic map revealed homology of the L. agilis Z chromosome with chicken chromosomes 6 and 9. Comparison of the L. agilis cytogenetic map with those of four Toxicofera species with many microchromosomes (Elaphe quadrivirgata, Varanus salvator macromaculatus, Leiolepis reevesii rubritaeniata, and Anolis carolinensis) showed highly conserved linkage homology of L. agilis chromosomes (LAG) 1, 2, 3, 4, 5(Z), 7, 8, 9, and 10 with macrochromosomes and/or macrochromosome segments of the four Toxicofera species. Most of the genes located on the microchromosomes of Toxicofera were localized to LAG6, small acrocentric chromosomes (LAG11-18), and a microchromosome (LAG19) in L. agilis. These results suggest that the L. agilis karyotype resulted from frequent fusions of microchromosomes, which occurred in the ancestral karyotype of Toxicofera and led to the disappearance of microchromosomes and the appearance of many small macrochromosomes.

  3. Cytological localization of adenosine kinase, nucleoside phosphorylase-1, and esterase-10 genes on mouse chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuelson, L.C.; Farber, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have determined the regional locations on mouse chromosome 14 of the genes for mouse adenosine kinase (ADK), nucleoside phosphorylase- 1 (NP-1), and esterase-10 (ES-10) by analysis of rearranged mouse chromosomes in gamma-irradiated Chinese hamster X mouse hybrid cell lines. Irradiated clones were screened for expression of the murine forms of these enzymes; segregant clones that expressed only one or two of the three markers were karyotyped. The patterns of enzyme expression in these segregants were correlated with the presence of rearranged chromosomes. The Adk gene was localized to bands A2 to B, Np-1 to bands B to C1, and Es-10 to bands D2 to E2

  4. Chromosomal investigations in patients with mental retardation and/or congenital malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos C.B.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the chromosomal constitution of patients with mental retardation and/or congenital malformations in order to determine genetic causes for such disturbances. The GTG and CBG banding patterns were studied using phytohemagglutinin M-stimulated lymphocytes cultured from peripheral blood. Among 98 individuals with mental retardation and/or congenital malformations who were analyzed there were 12 cases of Down's syndrome, two of Edward's syndrome, one of Patau's syndrome, five of Turner's syndrome, two of Klinefelter's syndrome, one of "cri-du-chat" syndrome, one case of a balanced translocation between chromosomes 13 and 14, one case of a derivative chromosome and one of a marker chromosome. We found abnormal chromosomes in 26% of the patients, 82% of which were numerical abnormalities, with the remaining 18% being structural variants. We conclude that patients with mental retardation and/or congenital malformations should be routinely karyotyped.

  5. Down-Turner Syndrome: A Case with Double Monoclonal Chromosomal Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gioconda Manassero-Morales

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The coexistence of Down and Turner syndromes due to double chromosome aneuploidy is very rare; it is even more rare to find the presence of a double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality. Objective. To report a unique case of double monoclonal chromosomal abnormality with trisomy of chromosome 21 and an X ring chromosome in all cells studied; no previous report has been found. Case Report. Female, 28 months old, with pathological short stature from birth, with the following dysmorphic features: tilted upward palpebral fissures, short neck, brachycephaly, and low-set ears. During the neonatal period, the infant presented generalized hypotonia and lymphedema of hands and feet. Karyotype showed 47,X,r(X,+21 [30]. Conclusion. Clinical features of both Down and Turner syndromes were found, highlighting short stature that has remained below 3 z score from birth to the present, associated with delayed psychomotor development. G-banded karyotype analysis in peripheral blood is essential for a definitive diagnosis.

  6. The alpha-spectrin gene is on chromosome 1 in mouse and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, K; Palumbo, A P; Isobe, M; Kozak, C A; Monaco, S; Rovera, G; Croce, C M; Curtis, P J

    1985-06-01

    By using alpha-spectrin cDNA clones of murine and human origin and somatic cell hybrids segregating either mouse or human chromosomes, the gene for alpha-spectrin has been mapped to chromosome 1 in both species. This assignment of the mouse alpha-spectrin gene to mouse chromosome 1 by DNA hybridization strengthens the previous identification of the alpha-spectrin locus in mouse with the sph locus, which previously was mapped by linkage analysis to mouse chromosome 1, distal to the Pep-3 locus. By in situ hybridization to human metaphase chromosomes, the human alpha-spectrin gene has been localized to 1q22-1q25; interestingly, the locus for a non-Rh-linked form of elliptocytosis has been provisionally mapped to band 1q2 by family linkage studies.

  7. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vagnarelli, Paola

    2012-01-01

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10–15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292–301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories—a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307–316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119–1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579–589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different

  8. Mitotic chromosome condensation in vertebrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vagnarelli, Paola, E-mail: P.Vagnarelli@ed.ac.uk

    2012-07-15

    Work from several laboratories over the past 10-15 years has revealed that, within the interphase nucleus, chromosomes are organized into spatially distinct territories [T. Cremer, C. Cremer, Chromosome territories, nuclear architecture and gene regulation in mammalian cells, Nat. Rev. Genet. 2 (2001) 292-301 and T. Cremer, M. Cremer, S. Dietzel, S. Muller, I. Solovei, S. Fakan, Chromosome territories-a functional nuclear landscape, Curr. Opin. Cell Biol. 18 (2006) 307-316]. The overall compaction level and intranuclear location varies as a function of gene density for both entire chromosomes [J.A. Croft, J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague,W.A. Bickmore, Differences in the localization and morphology of chromosomes in the human nucleus, J. Cell Biol. 145 (1999) 1119-1131] and specific chromosomal regions [N.L. Mahy, P.E. Perry, S. Gilchrist, R.A. Baldock, W.A. Bickmore, Spatial organization of active and inactive genes and noncoding DNA within chromosome territories, J. Cell Biol. 157 (2002) 579-589] (Fig. 1A, A'). In prophase, when cyclin B activity reaches a high threshold, chromosome condensation occurs followed by Nuclear Envelope Breakdown (NEB) [1]. At this point vertebrate chromosomes appear as compact structures harboring an attachment point for the spindle microtubules physically recognizable as a primary constriction where the two sister chromatids are held together. The transition from an unshaped interphase chromosome to the highly structured mitotic chromosome (compare Figs. 1A and B) has fascinated researchers for several decades now; however a definite picture of how this process is achieved and regulated is not yet in our hands and it will require more investigation to comprehend the complete process. From a biochemical point of view a vertebrate mitotic chromosomes is composed of DNA, histone proteins (60%) and non-histone proteins (40%) [6]. I will discuss below what is known to date on the contribution of these two different classes

  9. Mitotic and meiotic chromosomes of a southern Brazilian population of Boophilus microplus (Acari, Ixodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Nunes Garcia

    Full Text Available Using conventional staining with acetic orcein and C-banding techniques it was investigated constitutive heterochromatin chromosomal polymorphisms and the mitotic and the meiotic behavior of male and female chromosomes of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini, 1887. Some differences were detected in the population of southern Brazil as compared to the data of other authors for populations in other latitudes. The differences being mainly concerned with the distribution of constitutive centromeric heterochromatin and variation in the length of heterochromatic blocks in the pericentromeric regions of some chromosome pairs.

  10. Changes in Nuclear Orientation Patterns of Chromosome 11 during Mouse Plasmacytoma Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kristin Schmälter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying changes in nuclear architecture is a unique approach toward the understanding of nuclear remodeling during tumor development. One aspect of nuclear architecture is the orientation of chromosomes in the three-dimensional nuclear space. We studied mouse chromosome 11 in lymphocytes of [T38HxBALB/c]N mice with a reciprocal translocation between chromosome X and 11 (T38HT(X;11 exhibiting a long chromosome T(11;X and a short chromosome T(X;11 and in fast-onset plasmacytomas (PCTs induced in the same strain. We determined the three-dimensional orientation of chromosome 11 using a mouse chromosome 11 specific multicolor banding probe. We also examined the nuclear position of the small translocation chromosome T(X;11 which contains cytoband 11E2 and parts of E1. Chromosomes can point either with their centromeric or with their telomeric end toward the nuclear center or periphery, or their position is found in parallel to the nuclear border. In T38HT(X;11 nuclei, the most frequently observed orientation pattern was with both chromosomes 11 in parallel to the nuclear border (“PP”. PCT cells showed nuclei with two or more copies of chromosome 11. In PCTs, the most frequent orientation pattern was with one chromosome in parallel and the other pointing with its centromeric end toward the nuclear periphery (“CP”. There is a significant difference between the orientation patterns observed in T38HT(X;11 and in PCT nuclei (P < .0001.

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in amenorrhea: a retrospective study and review of 637 patients in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Usha R; Ponnala, Rajitha; Pidugu, Vijaya Kumar; Dalal, Ashwin B

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and to identify the most prevalent or frequent type of chromosomal abnormalities in cases of amenorrhea from the southern region of India. A total of 637 cases with amenorrhea were analyzed using G- banding, C-banding, Silver staining, and fluorescence in situ hybridization was done wherever necessary. Out of the 637 cases involved in our study, 132 abnormalities were detected. The incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in cases with primary and secondary amenorrhea was around 20.7 %. In addition to the numerical anomalies, various structural aberrations of the X chromosome like deletions, isochromosomes, duplications, ring chromosome, and also male karyotype were detected. Review of the literature and overall incidence of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with amenorrhea suggests the need for cytogenetic analysis to be performed in all the cases referred for amenorrhea with or without short stature. Precise identification of chromosomal abnormalities helps in confirming the provisional diagnosis; it helps the secondary amenorrhea patients in assisted reproduction and to understand the clinical heterogeneity involved and in efficient genetic counseling.

  12. Neocentric X-chromosome in a girl with Turner-like syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemmat Morteza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neocentromeres are rare human chromosomal aberrations in which a new centromere has formed in a previously non-centromeric location. We report the finding of a structurally abnormal X chromosome with a neocentromere in a 15-year-old girl with clinical features suggestive of Turner syndrome, including short stature and primary amenorrhea. Result G-banded chromosome analysis revealed a mosaic female karyotype involving two abnormal cell lines. One cell line (84% of analyzed metaphases had a structurally abnormal X chromosome (duplication of the long arm and deletion of the short arm and a normal X chromosome. The other cell line (16% of cells exhibited monosomy X. C-banding studies were negative for the abnormal X chromosome. FISH analysis revealed lack of hybridization of the abnormal X chromosome with both the X centromere-specific probe and the “all human centromeres” probe, a pattern consistent with lack of the X chromosome endogenous centromere. A FISH study using an XIST gene probe revealed the presence of two XIST genes, one on each long arm of the iso(Xq, required for inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. R-banding also demonstrated inactivation of the abnormal X chromosome. An assay for centromeric protein C (CENP-C was positive on both the normal and the abnormal X chromosomes. The position of CENP-C in the abnormal X chromosome defined a neocentromere, which explains its mitotic stability. The karyotype is thus designated as 46,X,neo(X(qter- > q12::q12- > q21.2- > neo- > q21.2- > qter[42]/45,X[8], which is consistent with stigmata of Turner syndrome. The mother of this patient has a normal karyotype; however, the father was not available for study. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first case of mosaic Turner syndrome involving an analphoid iso(Xq chromosome with a proven neocentromere among 90 previously described cases with a proven neocentromere.

  13. Gametocidal chromosomes enhancing chromosome aberration in common wheat induced by 5-azacytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, W-Y; Cong, W-W; Shu, Y-J; Wang, D; Xu, G-H; Guo, C-H

    2013-07-08

    The gametocidal (Gc) chromosome from Aegilops spp induces chromosome mutation, which is introduced into common wheat as a tool of chromosome manipulation for genetic improvement. The Gc chromosome functions similar to a restriction-modification system in bacteria, in which DNA methylation is an important regulator. We treated root tips of wheat carrying Gc chromosomes with the hypomethylation agent 5-azacytidine; chromosome breakage and micronuclei were observed in these root tips. The frequency of aberrations differed in wheat containing different Gc chromosomes, suggesting different functions inducing chromosome breakage. Gc chromosome 3C caused the greatest degree of chromosome aberration, while Gc chromosome 3C(SAT) and 2C caused only slight chromosome aberration. Gc chromosome 3C induced different degrees of chromosome aberration in wheat varieties Triticum aestivum var. Chinese Spring and Norin 26, demonstrating an inhibition function in common wheat.

  14. Imaginal discs--a new source of chromosomes for genome mapping of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Sharakhova

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the primary global vector for dengue and yellow fever viruses. Sequencing of the Ae. aegypti genome has stimulated research in vector biology and insect genomics. However, the current genome assembly is highly fragmented with only ~31% of the genome being assigned to chromosomes. A lack of a reliable source of chromosomes for physical mapping has been a major impediment to improving the genome assembly of Ae. aegypti.In this study we demonstrate the utility of mitotic chromosomes from imaginal discs of 4(th instar larva for cytogenetic studies of Ae. aegypti. High numbers of mitotic divisions on each slide preparation, large sizes, and reproducible banding patterns of the individual chromosomes simplify cytogenetic procedures. Based on the banding structure of the chromosomes, we have developed idiograms for each of the three Ae. aegypti chromosomes and placed 10 BAC clones and a 18S rDNA probe to precise chromosomal positions.The study identified imaginal discs of 4(th instar larva as a superior source of mitotic chromosomes for Ae. aegypti. The proposed approach allows precise mapping of DNA probes to the chromosomal positions and can be utilized for obtaining a high-quality genome assembly of the yellow fever mosquito.

  15. The relationships among lemons, limes and citron: a chromosomal comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, R; Soares Filho, W S; Brasileiro-Vidal, A C; Guerra, M

    2005-01-01

    Lemons, limes and citron constitute a group of closely related Citrus species, whose species delimitations and taxonomic relationships are unclear. In order to identify karyotypic similarities and species relationships within this group, the CMA+/DAPI- banding pattern and the distribution of the 5S and 45S rDNA sites of 10 accessions of lime, lemon, and citron were investigated. The four cultivars of C. limon analyzed showed the same pattern of CMA+ bands and rDNA sites, suggesting that they originated from a single germplasm, later differentiated by distinct somatic mutations. The lemons C. jambhiri, C. limonia and C. volkameriana displayed karyotypes very similar to each other, but they differed from C. limon by the absence of a single chromosome with one band in each telomere. The limes, C. aurantifolia and C. limettioides, seemed less related to each other and exhibited different heteromorphic chromosome pairs. In C. aurantifolia, the presence of a chromosome type unknown in all other Citrus species cytologically known so far supports the assumption that this accession may be derived from a hybrid with a species from the subgenus Papeda or from another genus. Citrus medica was the only homozygous accession of this group and all of its chromosome types were clearly represented in limes and lemons, some of them forming heteromorphic pairs. The analysis of the distribution of rDNA sites allowed a further refinement of the comparison among accessions. The lemons and limes were heterozygous for all rDNA sites, whereas C. medica was entirely homozygous. These data support the hypothesis that C. medica is a true species while the other nine accessions are hybrids. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Deletion affecting band 7q36 not associated with holoprosencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahim, S.A.D.; Krivchenia, E.; Mohamed, A.N. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although the appearance of 7q36 aberrations have been postulated to be responsible for holoprosencephaly (HPE), the presence of a de novo 7q36 deletion in fetus without HPE has not been reported. We report the first case of a fetus with 7q36 deletion but lacking HPE. Ultrasound examination of a 25-year-old G3P1 Caucasian female showed small head circumference with microcephaly at 28 weeks. Decreased amniotic fluid volume, bilateral renal dilatation and abnormal facial features were also noted. Chromosome analysis after cordocentesis showed an abnormal female karyotype with a deletion involving the chromosome band 7q36, 46,XX,del(7)(q36). Chromosome studies on the biological parents were normal. In view of the chromosome finding and after extensive counseling, the couple elected to terminate the pregnancy. The chromosome findings were confirmed by fetal blood chromosome analysis at termination. Post-mortem examination confirmed dysmorphic features including a depressed nasal bridge and large flat ears with no lobules, but no cleft lip or palate was noted. Internal abnormalities included a bicuspid pulmonary valve and abnormally located lungs. The brain weighed 190g (249 {plus_minus} 64g expected) and had symmetric cerebral hemispheres without evidence of HPE or other gross or microscopic malformation, except focal cerebellar cortical dysplasia. In summary, our patient showed a deletion of the same chromosomal band implicated in HPE but lacked HPE. This finding indicates that 7q36 deletion may be seen in the absence of HPE and suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be responsible for HPE in this setting.

  17. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1988-08-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid {beta} precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS.

  18. Comparative mapping of DNA markers from the familial Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome regions of human chromosome 21 to mouse chromosomes 16 and 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, S.V.; Nadeau, J.H.; Tanzi, R.E.; Watkins, P.C.; Jagadesh, J.; Taylor, B.A.; Haines, J.L.; Sacchi, N.; Gusella, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Mouse trisomy 16 has been proposed as an animal model of Down syndrome (DS), since this chromosome contains homologues of several loci from the q22 band of human chromosome 21. The recent mapping of the defect causing familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) and the locus encoding the Alzheimer amyloid β precursor protein (APP) to human chromosome 21 has prompted a more detailed examination of the extent of conservation of this linkage group between the two species. Using anonymous DNA probes and cloned genes from human chromosome 21 in a combination of recombinant inbred and interspecific mouse backcross analyses, the authors have established that the linkage group shared by mouse chromosome 16 includes not only the critical DS region of human chromosome 21 but also the APP gene and FAD-linked markers. Extending from the anonymous DNA locus D21S52 to ETS2, the linkage map of six loci spans 39% recombination in man but only 6.4% recombination in the mouse. A break in synteny occurs distal to ETS2, with the homologue of the human marker D21S56 mapping to mouse chromosome 17. Conservation of the linkage relationships of markers in the FAD region suggests that the murine homologue of the FAD locus probably maps to chromosome 16 and that detailed comparison of the corresponding region in both species could facilitate identification of the primary defect in this disorder. The break in synteny between the terminal portion of human chromosome 21 and mouse chromosome 16 indicates, however, that mouse trisomy 16 may not represent a complete model of DS

  19. Chromosome fragility in Freemartin cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barbieri

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify chromosome fragility in freemartin cattle using chromosome aberration (CA and sister chromatid exchange (SCE tests. A total of eighteen co-twins were investigated. Fourteen animals were identified as cytogenetically chimeric (2n=60, XX/XY while 4 were classified as normal. Freemartin cattle showed a higher percentage of aneuploid cells (18.64% and highly significant statistical differences (P < 0.001 in mean values of gaps (4.53 ± 2.05, chromatid breaks (0.26 ± 0.51, and significant statistical differences (P < 0.005 in mean values of chromosome breaks (0.12 ± 0.43 when compared to 10 control animals from single births (aneuploid cells, 11.20%; gaps, 2.01 ± 1.42; chromatid breaks, 0.05 ± 0.22; chromosome breaks, 0.02 ± 0.14.

  20. Are There Knots in Chromosomes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Siebert

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments have for the first time allowed the determination of three-dimensional structures of individual chromosomes and genomes in nuclei of single haploid mouse embryonic stem (ES cells based on Hi–C chromosome conformation contact data. Although these first structures have a relatively low resolution, they provide the first experimental data that can be used to study chromosome and intact genome folding. Here we further analyze these structures and provide the first evidence that G1 phase chromosomes are knotted, consistent with the fact that plots of contact probability vs sequence separation show a power law dependence that is intermediate between that of a fractal globule and an equilibrium structure.

  1. Flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, L S

    1990-06-01

    This review of flow cytogenetics and chromosome sorting provides an overview of general information in the field and describes recent developments in more detail. From the early developments of chromosome analysis involving single parameter or one color analysis to the latest developments in slit scanning of single chromosomes in a flow stream, the field has progressed rapidly and most importantly has served as an important enabling technology for the human genome project. Technological innovations that advanced flow cytogenetics are described and referenced. Applications in basic cell biology, molecular biology, and clinical investigations are presented. The necessary characteristics for large number chromosome sorting are highlighted. References to recent review articles are provided as a starting point for locating individual references that provide more detail. Specific references are provided for recent developments.

  2. Algorithm for sorting chromosomal aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ida; Lund, Najaaraq; Rasmussen, Steen

    2018-01-01

    Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray.......Prenatal diagnostic methods and screening procedures change rapidly in these years. Years ago only karyotyping was performed prenatally, and we monitored only Down syndrome(1) . Since then the diagnostic possibilities have increased to QF-PCR, FISH, MLPA and chromosomal microarray....

  3. Cloning of the chromosome translocation breakpoint junction of the t(14;19) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKeithan, T.W.; Rowley, J.D.; Shows, T.B.; Diaz, M.O.

    1987-01-01

    The authors' laboratory has reported that t(14;19)(q32;q13.1) is a recurring translocation in the neoplastic cells of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In the present study, they have analyzed the leukemic cells from one such patient with probes from the immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus, which is present on band q32 of chromosome 14. Using a probe for the α constant-region gene segments, they detected a rearranged band by Southern blot analysis. This rearranged band was cloned and mapped. A subclone free of repetitive sequences was shown to be from chromosome 19 by analysis of human-mouse somatic cell hybrids, confirming that the rearranged band contains the translocation breakpoint junction. This probe may be used to identify a gene on chromosome 19 adjacent to the breakpoint that can contribute to the malignant development of B lymphocytes

  4. Chromosome break points of T-lymphocytes from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kimio; Kamada, Nanao; Kuramoto, Atsushi; Ohkita, Takeshi

    1980-01-01

    Chromosome break points of T-lymphocytes were investigated for 9 atomic bomb survivors estimated to be irradiated with 100 - 630 red. Chromosome aberration was found in 199 cells out of 678 cells investigated, with non-random distribution. The types of the chromosome aberration were, transfer: 56%, deficit: 38%, additional abnormality 3%, and reverse: 2%. High and low incidence of chromosome aberrations were observed at the chromosome numbers of 22, 21, and 13, and 11, 12, and 4, respectively. The aberration numbers per arm were high in 22q, 21q, and 18p and low in 11q, 5p, and 12q. For the distribution of aberration number within a chromosome, 50.7% was observed at the terminal portion and 73% was at the pale band appeared by Q-partial-stain method, suggesting the non-random distribution. The incidence of aberration number in 22q was statistically significant (P 1 chromosome in chronic myelocytic leukemia. The non-random distribution of chromosome break points seemed to reflect the selection effect since irradiation. (Nakanishi, T.)

  5. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.R.; Hecht, F.; Lubs, H.A.; Kimberling, W.; Brown, J.; Gerald, P.S.; Summitt, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, s o radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant. (U.K.)

  6. Diagnostic radiation and chromosome aberrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, S R; Hecht, F [Dept. of Pediatrics, Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, Univ. of Oregon Health Sciences Center, Portland, Oregon (USA); Lubs, H A; Kimberling, W; Brown, J; Gerald, P S; Summitt, R L

    1977-01-15

    Some evidence is presented suggesting that diagnostic X-rays may be important in the origin of a new chromosomal abnormality other than Down syndrome. Chromosome analyses have been carried out on 4342 children, seven or eight years old. Maternal diagnostic irradiation in the year before conception and up to third lunar month of the index pregnancy was recorded, before the chromosome study began, together with a large amount of family and clinical data. Information on X-ray exposure was supplied by the mothers, so radiation dosage could not be estimated. 21 children (including a pair of twins and a pair of siblings) born to 19 mothers had chromosomal aberrations. The mothers of six children with inherited translocations, rearrangements and XYY karyotypes were excluded, and 3 (23%) of the remaining 13 mothers had received abdominal and pelvic X-ray exposures. In the whole sample, however, only 6% of the mothers had diagnostic irradiation. Two of these mothers, aged sixteen and twenty, gave birth to a child each with de-novo autosomal translocations, and the third mother, aged thirty-two, had a child with a complex mosaicism involving one X chromosome. Although the sample size of the mothers with chromosomally abnormal children is small, the results are significant.

  7. Evidence of activity-specific, radial organization of mitotic chromosomes in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri G Strukov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization and the mechanisms of condensation of mitotic chromosomes remain unsolved despite many decades of efforts. The lack of resolution, tight compaction, and the absence of function-specific chromatin labels have been the key technical obstacles. The correlation between DNA sequence composition and its contribution to the chromosome-scale structure has been suggested before; it is unclear though if all DNA sequences equally participate in intra- or inter-chromatin or DNA-protein interactions that lead to formation of mitotic chromosomes and if their mitotic positions are reproduced radially. Using high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of live or minimally perturbed, fixed chromosomes in Drosophila embryonic cultures or tissues expressing MSL3-GFP fusion protein, we studied positioning of specific MSL3-binding sites. Actively transcribed, dosage compensated Drosophila genes are distributed along the euchromatic arm of the male X chromosome. Several novel features of mitotic chromosomes have been observed. MSL3-GFP is always found at the periphery of mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that active, dosage compensated genes are also found at the periphery of mitotic chromosomes. Furthermore, radial distribution of chromatin loci on mitotic chromosomes was found to be correlated with their functional activity as judged by core histone modifications. Histone modifications specific to active chromatin were found peripheral with respect to silent chromatin. MSL3-GFP-labeled chromatin loci become peripheral starting in late prophase. In early prophase, dosage compensated chromatin regions traverse the entire width of chromosomes. These findings suggest large-scale internal rearrangements within chromosomes during the prophase condensation step, arguing against consecutive coiling models. Our results suggest that the organization of mitotic chromosomes is reproducible not only longitudinally, as demonstrated by chromosome-specific banding

  8. Designing of plant artificial chromosome (PAC) by using the Chlorella smallest chromosome as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noutoshi, Y; Arai, R; Fujie, M; Yamada, T

    1997-01-01

    As a model for plant-type chromosomes, we have been characterizing molecular organization of the Chlorella vulgaris C-169 chromosome I. To identify chromosome structural elements including the centromeric region and replication origins, we constructed a chromosome I specific cosmid library and aligned each cosmid clones to generate contigs. So far, more than 80% of the entire chromosome I has been covered. A complete clonal physical reconstitution of chromosome I provides information on the structure and genomic organization of plant genome. We propose our strategy to construct an artificial chromosome by assembling the functional chromosome structural elements identified on Chrorella chromosome I.

  9. Numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 24, discusses numerically abnormal chromosome constitutions in humans. This involves abnormalities of human chromosome number, including polyploidy (when the number of sets of chromosomes increases) and aneuploidy (when the number of individual normal chromosomes changes). Chapter sections discuss the following chromosomal abnormalities: human triploids, imprinting and uniparental disomy, human tetraploids, hydatidiform moles, anomalies caused by chromosomal imbalance, 13 trisomy (D{sub 1} trisomy, Patau syndrome), 21 trisomy (Down syndrome), 18 trisomy syndrome (Edwards syndrome), other autosomal aneuploidy syndromes, and spontaneous abortions. The chapter concludes with remarks on the nonrandom participation of chromosomes in trisomy. 69 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Damage of chromosoms under irradiation of human blood lymphocytes and development of bystander effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemetun, O V

    2016-12-01

    the research the distribution of radiation induced damages among chromosomes and their bands in irra diated in vitro human blood lymphocytes and in unirradiated bystander cells.Material and methods of research: cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes by semi micromethod D.A. Hungerford, modeling of radiation induced bystander effect in mixed cultures consisting of irradiated in vitro and non irradiated blood lymphocytes from persons of different gender, GTG staining of metaphase chromosomes and their cytogenetic analysis. Break points in chromosomes under the formation of aberrations were identified in exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes in doses 0.25 Gy (95 breaks in 1248 cells) and 1.0 Gy (227 breaks in 726 cells) and in non irradiated bystander cells under their joint cultivation with irradiated in vitro human lymphocytes (51 breaks in 1137 cells at irradiation of adjacent populations of lymphocytes in dose 0.25 Gy and 75 breaks in 1321 cells at irradiation of adjacent population of lymphocytes in a dose 1.0 Gy). The distribution of injuries among the chromo somes and their bands was investigated. in radiation exposed in vitro human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in bystander cells the fre quency of damaged bands and number of breaks which localized in them exceeded the control value (p chromosomes were damaged according to their relative length. Location of bands with increasing number of breaks coincided with the «hot spots» of chromosome damage following irradiation and fragile sites. More sensitive to damage were G negative euchromatin chromosome bands, in which were localized 82 88 % breaks. Damageability of telomeric regions in the irradiated cells had no significant difference from the control, while in bystander cells was lower than control value (p < 0.05). O. V. Shemetun.

  11. Wide Band to ''Double Band'' upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasper, P.; Currier, R.; Garbincius, P.; Butler, J.

    1988-06-01

    The Wide Band beam currently uses electrons obtained from secondary photon conversions to produce the photon beam incident on the experimental targets. By transporting the positrons produced in these conversions as well as the electrons it is possible to almost double the number of photons delivered to the experiments per primary beam proton. 11 figs

  12. Chromosomal Behavior during Meiosis in the Progeny of Triticum timopheevii × Hexaploid Wild Oat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhou An

    Full Text Available The meiotic behavior of pollen mother cells (PMCs of the F2 and F3 progeny from Triticum timopheevii × hexaploid wild oat was investigated by cytological analysis and sequential C-banding-genomic in situ hybridization (GISH in the present study. A cytological analysis showed that the chromosome numbers of the F2 and F3 progeny ranged from 28 to 41. A large number of univalents, lagging chromosomes, chromosome bridges and micronuclei were found at the metaphase I, anaphase I, anaphase II and tetrad stages in the F2 and F3 progeny. The averages of univalents were 3.50 and 2.73 per cell, and those of lagging chromosomes were 3.37 and 1.87 in the F2 and F3 progeny, respectively. The PMC meiotic indices of the F2 and F3 progeny were 12.22 and 20.34, respectively, indicating considerable genetic instability. A sequential C-banding-GISH analysis revealed that some chromosomes and fragments from the hexaploid wild oat were detected at metaphase I and anaphase I in the progeny, showing that the progeny were of true intergeneric hybrid origin. The alien chromosomes 6A, 7A, 3C and 2D were lost during transmission from F2 to F3. In addition, partial T. timopheevii chromosomes appeared in the form of univalents or lagging chromosomes, which might result from large genome differences between the parents, and the wild oat chromosome introgression interfered with the wheat homologues' normally pairing.

  13. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Abdelbasit, Omer B.; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M.; Alhussein, Khalid A.; Miqdad, Abeer M.; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S.; Khalil, Mohammed I.; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. Methods: We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Results: Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. Conclusions: There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions. PMID:25551112

  14. Genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidahmed, Mohammed Z; Abdelbasit, Omer B; Shaheed, Meeralebbae M; Alhussein, Khalid A; Miqdad, Abeer M; Samadi, Abdulmohsen S; Khalil, Mohammed I; Al-Mardawi, Elham; Salih, Mustafa A

    2014-12-01

    To ascertain the incidence, and describe the various forms of neural tube defects (NTDs) due to genetic, chromosomal, and syndromic causes. We carried out a retrospective analysis of data retrieved from the medical records of newborn infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with NTDs and their mothers spanning 14 years (1996-2009) at the Security Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The cases were ascertained by a perinatologist, neonatologist, geneticist, radiologist, and neurologist. The literature was reviewed via a MEDLINE search. Only liveborn babies were included. Permission from the Educational Committee at the Security Forces Hospital was obtained prior to the collection of data. Out of 103 infants with NTDs admitted during this period, 20 (19.4%) were found to have an underlying genetic syndromic, chromosomal and/or other anomalies. There were 5 cases of Meckel-Gruber syndrome, 2 Joubert syndrome, one Waardenburg syndrome, one Walker-Warburg syndrome, 2 chromosomal disorders, 2 caudal regression, one amniotic band disruption sequence, one associated with omphalocele, one with diaphragmatic hernia, and 4 with multiple congenital anomalies. There is a high rate of underlying genetic syndromic and/or chromosomal causes of NTDs in the Saudi Arabian population due to the high consanguinity rate. Identification of such association can lead to more accurate provisions of genetic counseling to the family including preimplantation genetic diagnosis or early termination of pregnancies associated with lethal conditions.

  15. Amniotic constriction bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Amniotic band sequence URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/ ... birth. The baby should be delivered in a medical center that has specialists experienced in caring for babies ... or partial loss of function of a body part. Congenital bands affecting large parts of the body cause the ...

  16. Comparative analysis of chromosomes in the Palaearctic bush-crickets of tribe Pholidopterini (Orthoptera, Tettigoniinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Warchałowska-Śliwa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study focused on the evolution of the karyotype in four genera of the tribe Pholidopterini: Eupholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Parapholidoptera Mařan, 1953, Pholidoptera Wesmaël, 1838, Uvarovistia Mařan, 1953. Chromosomes were analyzed using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH with 18S rDNA and (TTAGGn telomeric probes, and classical techniques, such as C-banding, silver impregnation and fluorochrome DAPI/CMA3 staining. Most species retained the ancestral diploid chromosome number 2n = 31 (male or 32 (female, while some of the taxa, especially a group of species within genus Pholidoptera, evolved a reduced chromosome number 2n = 29. All species show the same sex determination system X0/XX. In some taxa, a pericentric inversion has changed the morphology of the ancestral acrocentric X chromosome to the biarmed X. The rDNA loci coincided with active NORs and C-band/CG-rich segments. A comparison of the location of the single rDNA/NOR in the genus Pholidoptera suggests that reduced chromosome number results from Robertsonian translocation between two pairs of autosomes, one carrying the rDNA/NOR. The results constitute a step towards better understanding of the chromosomal reorganization and evolution within the tribe Phaneropterini and the whole subfamily Tettigoniinae.

  17. Transmission of chromosomal and instability via a chromosome irradiated with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Seiji; Tanabe, Masateru; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Oshimura, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    We examined the stability of the transferred chromosome in 5 and 12 microcell hybrids including unirradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively, and 6 and 19 microcell hybrids including 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes 6 and 8, respectively. The transferred chromosome was structurally stable in most microcell hybrids transferred with the unirradiated chromosomes 6 and 8. In contrast, the 4 Gy-irradiated human chromosomes were unstable in 3 out of 6 hybrids (50%) with chromosome 6 and 3 out of 19 hybrids (16%) with chromosome 8, showing multiple aberrations in high frequencies (35∼98%). To know the cause of delayed chromosomal instability, intrachromosomal rearrangements of the human chromosome is investigated by subtelomere FISH in 17 microcell hybrids transferred with chromosomes 6 and 8. We found frequent intrachromosomal in 7 microcell hybrids (41%). However, no clear correlation was observed between the intrachromosomal rearrangements and the induction of delayed chromosomal instability by ionizing radiation

  18. Occurrence of B chromosomes in Tetragonisca Latreille, 1811 (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini: a new contribution to the cytotaxonomy of the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Barth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetragonisca angustula and Tetragonisca fiebrigi have recently been listed as valid species. This study aimed to cytogenetically investigate both species, emphasizing the new registry of B chromosomes in the tribe Meliponini. We analyzed colonies of T. angustula and T. fiebrigi collected at Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso, Brazil, through conventional Giemsa staining, C-banding, and base-specific fluorochrome staining (CMA3/DAPI. T. angustula showed 2n = 34 chromosomes in females and n = 17 in males, with karyotype formula 2K = 34A M. T. fiebrigi showed numeric variation, with chromosome number varying from 2n = 34 to 2n = 36 in females and from n = 17 to n=18in males, with karyotype formula 2K = 32A M+2A Mc and 2K = 32A M+2A Mc + 1 or 2 B-chromosomes. The B chromosomes are heterochromatic. In T. fiebrigi, the CMA3/DAPI staining revealed four chromosomes with a CMA3 positive band. All individuals from the same colony showed the same number of B chromosomes. T. angustula and T. fiebrigi showed karyotype divergence, principally due to the presence of B chromosomes, which are found only in T. fiebrigi. Our data corroborate the status of valid species for both T. angustula and T. fiebrigi, as recently proposed.

  19. Radiation-induced chromosomal instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies on radiation-induced chromosomal instability in the progeny of exposed mammalian cells were briefly described as well as other related studies. For the analysis of chromosomal damage in clones, cells were seeded directly after exposure in cell well-dish to form single cell clones and post-irradiation chromosome aberrations were scored. Both exposure to isoeffective doses of X-ray or 270 MeV/u C-ions (13 keV/μm) increased the number of clones with abnormal karyotype and the increase was similar for X-ray and for C-ions. Meanwhile, in the progeny of cells for mass cultures, there was no indication of a delayed expression of chromosomal damage up to 40 population doublings after the exposure. A high number of aberrant cells were only observed directly after exposure to 10.7 MeV/u O-ions, i.e. in the first cycle cells and decreased with subsequent cell divisions. The reason for these differences in the radiation-induced chromosomal instability between clonal isolates and mass culture has not been clarified. Recent studies indicated that genomic instability occurs at a high frequency in the progeny of cells irradiated with both sparsely and densely ionizing radiation. Such genomic instability is thought likely to increase the risk of carcinogenesis, but more data are required for a well understanding of the health risks resulting from radiation-induced delayed instability. (M.N.)

  20. Chromosome segregation in plant meiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda eZamariola

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Faithful chromosome segregation in meiosis is essential for ploidy stability over sexual life cycles. In plants, defective chromosome segregation caused by gene mutations or other factors leads to the formation of unbalanced or unreduced gametes creating aneuploid or polyploid progeny, respectively. Accurate segregation requires the coordinated execution of conserved processes occurring throughout the two meiotic cell divisions. Synapsis and recombination ensure the establishment of chiasmata that hold homologous chromosomes together allowing their correct segregation in the first meiotic division, which is also tightly regulated by cell-cycle dependent release of cohesin and monopolar attachment of sister kinetochores to microtubules. In meiosis II, bi-orientation of sister kinetochores and proper spindle orientation correctly segregate chromosomes in four haploid cells. Checkpoint mechanisms acting at kinetochores control the accuracy of kinetochore-microtubule attachment, thus ensuring the completion of segregation. Here we review the current knowledge on the processes taking place during chromosome segregation in plant meiosis, focusing on the characterization of the molecular factors involved.

  1. Radiation exposure and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, D.

    1979-01-01

    Chromosome damage is discussed as a means of biologically measuring radiation exposure to the body. Human lymphocytes are commonly used for this test since the extent of chromosome damage induced is related to the exposure dose. Several hundred lymphocytes are analysed in metaphase for chromosome damage, particularly dicentrics. The dose estimate is made by comparing the observed dicentric yield against calibration curves, previously produced by in vitro irradiation of blood samples to known doses of different types of radiation. This test is useful when there is doubt that the film badge has recorded a reasonable whole body dose and also when there is an absence of any physical data. A case of deliberate exposure is described where the chromosome damage test estimated an exposure of 152 rads. The life span of cell aberrations is also considered. Regular checks on radiotherapy patients and some accidental overdose cases have shown little reduction in the aberration levels over the first six weeks after which the damage disappears slowly with a half-life of about three years. In conclusion, chromosome studies have been shown to be of value in resolving practical problems in radiological protection. (U.K.)

  2. Chromosomal rearrangement interferes with meiotic X chromosome inactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Homolka, David; Ivánek, Robert; Čapková, Jana; Jansa, Petr; Forejt, Jiří

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 10 (2007), s. 1431-1437 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR GA301/06/1334; GA ČR GA301/07/1383 Grant - others:Howard Hughes Medical Institute(US) HHMI 55000306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromosomal translocations * meiotic X chromosome inactivation * spermatogenesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 11.224, year: 2007

  3. Ovarian dysgenesis in an alpaca with a minute chromosome 36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows, Elizabeth; Kutzler, Michelle; Avila, Felipe; Das, Pranab J; Raudsepp, Terje

    2014-01-01

    A 4-year-old female alpaca (Lama pacos [LPA]) was presented to the Oregon State Veterinary Teaching Hospital for failure to display receptive behavior to males. Although no abnormalities were found on physical examination, transrectal ultrasonographic examination of the reproductive tract revealed uterine hypoplasia and ovarian dysgenesis. Cytogenetic analysis demonstrated a normal female 74,XX karyotype with 1 exceptionally small (minute) homologue of autosome LPA36. Chromosome analysis by Giemsa staining and DAPI- and C-banding revealed that the minute LPA36 was submetacentric, AT-rich, and largely heterochromatic. Because of the small size and lack of molecular markers, it was not possible to identify the origin of the minute. There is a need to improve molecular cytogenetic tools to further study the phenomenon of this minute chromosome and its relation to female reproduction in alpacas and llamas. © The American Genetic Association. 2012. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Complex Variant t(9;22 Chromosome Translocations in Five Cases of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Valencia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph1 chromosome arising from the reciprocal t(9;22 translocation is found in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and results in the formation of the chimeric fusion gene BCR-ABL. However, a small proportion of patients with CML have simple or complex variants of this translocation, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11. We report five CML cases carrying variant Ph translocations involving both chromosomes 9 and 22 as well as chromosomes 3, 5, 7, 8, or 10. G-banding showed a reciprocal three-way translocation involving 3q21, 5q31, 7q32, 8q24, and 10q22 bands. BCR-ABL fusion signal on der(22 was found in all of the cases by FISH.

  5. Deletion of 1p36 as a primary chromosomal aberration in intestinal tumorigenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Pandis, N; Fenger, C

    1993-01-01

    rearrangements were found that led to loss of genetic material from 1p. In three of the cases, the deletion was restricted to the 1p36 band; the rest had lost larger 1p segments. The rearrangement of chromosome 1 was the sole karyotypic anomaly in three adenomas, all with mild or moderate dysplasia...

  6. Diagnostic Yield of Chromosomal Microarray Analysis in an Autism Primary Care Practice: Which Guidelines to Implement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrew, Susan G.; Peters, Brittany R.; Crittendon, Julie A.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Genetic testing is recommended for patients with ASD; however specific recommendations vary by specialty. American Academy of Pediatrics and American Academy of Neurology guidelines recommend G-banded karyotype and Fragile X DNA. The American College of Medical Genetics recommends Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA). We determined the yield of…

  7. Mapping of 5q35 chromosomal rearrangements within a genomically unstable region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buysse, Karen; Crepel, An; Menten, Björn

    2008-01-01

    these rearrangements. METHODS: We analysed a series of patients with breakpoints clustering within chromosome band 5q35. Using high density arrays and subsequent quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), we characterised the breakpoints of four interstitial deletions (including one associated with an unbalanced...

  8. Comparative cytogenetics and chromosomal characteristics of ribosomal DNA in the fish genus Vimba (Cyprinidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rábová, Marie; Ráb, Petr; Ozouf-Costaz, C.; Ene, C.; Wanzebock, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 1 (2003), s. 83-91 ISSN 0016-6707 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6045704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5045916 Keywords : chromosome banding * cytotaxonomy of Vimba * FISH Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.057, year: 2003

  9. Interphase Chromosome Conformation and Chromatin-Chromatin Interactions in Human Epithelial Cells Cultured Under Different Gravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Hada, Megumi; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    Microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels both in cultured cells and animal models. It has been suggested that the packaging of chromatin fibers in the interphase nucleus is closely related to genome function, and the changes in transcriptional activity are tightly correlated with changes in chromatin folding. This study explores the changes of chromatin conformation and chromatin-chromatin interactions in the simulated microgravity environment, and investigates their correlation to the expression of genes located at different regions of the chromosome. To investigate the folding of chromatin in interphase under various culture conditions, human epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and lymphocytes were fixed in the G1 phase. Interphase chromosomes were hybridized with a multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) probe for chromosome 3 which distinguishes six regions of the chromosome as separate colors. After images were captured with a laser scanning confocal microscope, the 3-dimensional structure of interphase chromosome 3 was reconstructed at multi-mega base pair scale. In order to determine the effects of microgravity on chromosome conformation and orientation, measures such as distance between homologous pairs, relative orientation of chromosome arms about a shared midpoint, and orientation of arms within individual chromosomes were all considered as potentially impacted by simulated microgravity conditions. The studies revealed non-random folding of chromatin in interphase, and suggested an association of interphase chromatin folding with radiation-induced chromosome aberration hotspots. Interestingly, the distributions of genes with expression changes over chromosome 3 in cells cultured under microgravity environment are apparently clustered on specific loci and chromosomes. This data provides important insights into how mammalian cells respond to microgravity at molecular level.

  10. Cross-species chromosome painting in bats from Madagascar: the contribution of Myzopodidae to revealing ancestral syntenies in Chiroptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Leigh R; Rambau, Ramugondo V; Lamb, Jennifer M; Taylor, Peter J; Yang, Fengtang; Schoeman, M Corrie; Goodman, Steven M

    2010-09-01

    The chiropteran fauna of Madagascar comprises eight of the 19 recognized families of bats, including the endemic Myzopodidae. While recent systematic studies of Malagasy bats have contributed to our understanding of the morphological and genetic diversity of the island's fauna, little is known about their cytosystematics. Here we investigate karyotypic relationships among four species, representing four families of Chiroptera endemic to the Malagasy region using cross-species chromosome painting with painting probes of Myotis myotis: Myzopodidae (Myzopoda aurita, 2n = 26), Molossidae (Mormopterus jugularis, 2n = 48), Miniopteridae (Miniopterus griveaudi, 2n = 46), and Vespertilionidae (Myotis goudoti, 2n = 44). This study represents the first time a member of the family Myzopodidae has been investigated using chromosome painting. Painting probes of M. myotis were used to delimit 29, 24, 23, and 22 homologous chromosomal segments in the genomes of M. aurita, M. jugularis, M. griveaudi, and M. goudoti, respectively. Comparison of GTG-banded homologous chromosomes/chromosomal segments among the four species revealed the genome of M. aurita has been structured through 14 fusions of chromosomes and chromosomal segments of M. myotis chromosomes leading to a karyotype consisting solely of bi-armed chromosomes. In addition, chromosome painting revealed a novel X-autosome translocation in M. aurita. Comparison of our results with published chromosome maps provided further evidence for karyotypic conservatism within the genera Mormopterus, Miniopterus, and Myotis. Mapping of chromosomal rearrangements onto a molecular consensus phylogeny revealed ancestral syntenies shared between Myzopoda and other bat species of the infraorders Pteropodiformes and Vespertilioniformes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of Robertsonian (Rb) translocations and fusions/fissions in chromosomal evolution within Chiroptera.

  11. Fish Karyome version 2.1: a chromosome database of fishes and other aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpure, Naresh Sahebrao; Pathak, Ajey Kumar; Pati, Rameshwar; Rashid, Iliyas; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Shri Prakash; Singh, Mahender; Sarkar, Uttam Kumar; Kushwaha, Basdeo; Kumar, Ravindra; Murali, S

    2016-01-01

    A voluminous information is available on karyological studies of fishes; however, limited efforts were made for compilation and curation of the available karyological data in a digital form. 'Fish Karyome' database was the preliminary attempt to compile and digitize the available karyological information on finfishes belonging to the Indian subcontinent. But the database had limitations since it covered data only on Indian finfishes with limited search options. Perceiving the feedbacks from the users and its utility in fish cytogenetic studies, the Fish Karyome database was upgraded by applying Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (pre hypertext processor) (LAMP) technologies. In the present version, the scope of the system was increased by compiling and curating the available chromosomal information over the globe on fishes and other aquatic organisms, such as echinoderms, molluscs and arthropods, especially of aquaculture importance. Thus, Fish Karyome version 2.1 presently covers 866 chromosomal records for 726 species supported with 253 published articles and the information is being updated regularly. The database provides information on chromosome number and morphology, sex chromosomes, chromosome banding, molecular cytogenetic markers, etc. supported by fish and karyotype images through interactive tools. It also enables the users to browse and view chromosomal information based on habitat, family, conservation status and chromosome number. The system also displays chromosome number in model organisms, protocol for chromosome preparation and allied techniques and glossary of cytogenetic terms. A data submission facility has also been provided through data submission panel. The database can serve as a unique and useful resource for cytogenetic characterization, sex determination, chromosomal mapping, cytotaxonomy, karyo-evolution and systematics of fishes. Database URL: http://mail.nbfgr.res.in/Fish_Karyome. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. Optimization of Neuro-Fuzzy System Using Genetic Algorithm for Chromosome Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuro-fuzzy system has been shown to provide a good performance on chromosome classification but does not offer a simple method to obtain the accurate parameter values required to yield the best recognition rate. This paper presents a neuro-fuzzy system where its parameters can be automatically adjusted using genetic algorithms. The approach combines the advantages of fuzzy logic theory, neural networks, and genetic algorithms. The structure consists of a four layer feed-forward neural network that uses a GBell membership function as the output function. The proposed methodology has been applied and tested on banded chromosome classification from the Copenhagen Chromosome Database. Simulation result showed that the proposed neuro-fuzzy system optimized by genetic algorithms offers advantages in setting the parameter values, improves the recognition rate significantly and decreases the training/testing time which makes genetic neuro-fuzzy system suitable for chromosome classification.

  13. Chromosome characterization of two varieties of Mangifera indica L.¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Izabel Pierozzi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome studies were performed in two varieties of Mangifera indica L. (mango, 'IAC-140 Espadona' and in its progenitor 'Espada Stahl'. Both varieties showed 2n=40 chromosomes though the karyotype formulae were 8m + 10sm + 2sm s for 'Stahl' and 7m + 11sm + 2sm s for 'IAC-140'. The varieties showed moderate karyotype asymmetry which was estimated according to four different indices. Both varieties exhibited three chromosome pairs with silver impregnation after NOR-banding. The number of nucleoli within interphase cells varied from one, the commonest, to eight. The nucleolus persistent phenomenon was observed in more than 22% of metaphase cells of both varieties, seeing that in 'Stahl', up to two nucleoli were evidenced. This variety also showed one nucleolus in several anaphase cells. The studies were suitable for evidencing diversity at chromosomal level between these two varieties.

  14. Band parameters of phosphorene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lew Yan Voon, L C; Wang, J; Zhang, Y; Willatzen, M

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene. (paper)

  15. Infrared diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazutdinov, G. A.; Lee, Jae-Joon; Han, Inwoo; Lee, Byeong-Cheol; Valyavin, G.; Krełowski, J.

    2017-05-01

    We present high-resolution (R ˜ 45 000) profiles of 14 diffuse interstellar bands in the ˜1.45 to ˜2.45 μm range based on spectra obtained with the Immersion Grating INfrared Spectrograph at the McDonald Observatory. The revised list of diffuse bands with accurately estimated rest wavelengths includes six new features. The diffuse band at 15 268.2 Å demonstrates a very symmetric profile shape and thus can serve as a reference for finding the 'interstellar correction' to the rest wavelength frame in the H range, which suffers from a lack of known atomic/molecular lines.

  16. Band parameters of phosphorene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.; Wang, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorene is a two-dimensional nanomaterial with a direct band-gap at the Brillouin zone center. In this paper, we present a recently derived effective-mass theory of the band structure in the presence of strain and electric field, based upon group theory. Band parameters for this theory...... are computed using a first-principles theory based upon the generalized-gradient approximation to the density-functional theory. These parameters and Hamiltonian will be useful for modeling physical properties of phosphorene....

  17. Chromosomal rearrangements in Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Birgitte; Debes, Nanette Mol; Hjermind, Lena E

    2013-01-01

    , and identification of susceptibility genes through linkage and association studies has been complicated due to inherent difficulties such as no clear mode of inheritance, genetic heterogeneity, and apparently incomplete penetrance. Positional cloning through mapping of disease-related chromosome rearrangements has...... been an efficient tool for the cloning of disease genes in several Mendelian disorders and in a number of complex disorders. Through cytogenetic investigation of 205 TS patients, we identified three possibly disease-associated chromosome rearrangements rendering this approach relevant in chasing TS...

  18. Chromosomal instability determines taxane response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swanton, C.; Nicke, B.; Schuett, M.

    2009-01-01

    chromosomal instability (CIN). Silencing 22/50 of these genes, many of which are involved in DNA repair, caused cancer cell death, suggesting that these genes are involved in the survival of aneuploid cells. Overexpression of these "CIN-survival'' genes is associated with poor outcome in estrogen receptor......-positive breast cancer and occurs frequently in basal-like and Her2-positive cases. In diploid cells, but not in chromosomally unstable cells, paclitaxel causes repression of CIN-survival genes, followed by cell death. In the OV01 ovarian cancer clinical trial, a high level of CIN was associated with taxane...

  19. Leukemia-related clonal chromosome aberrations observed in A-bomb survivors. Deletion in chromosome 5 and inversion in chromosome 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo

    1999-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations were analyzed by G differentiation staining method on about 5,400 peripheral lymphocytes of 168 A-bomb survivors, of whom 143 had been exposed to mean DS86 dose of 2.05 Gy (exposed group) and of 25, 0 Gy (control) and results concerning clonal growth of abnormal cells were described in this paper. G band analysis of the aberrations in T-lymphocytes revealed that frequency of translocation in the exposed group increased to 17 times of the control and deletion, 5 times. Deletion in chromosome 5 where tumor-suppressor gene was present, [del(5q-)], was found in about 30% of total deletions. Since patients of myelodysplasia syndrome and acute myelogenic leukemia had the deletion in more than 50%, growth of cells possessing it was suggestive of the progression of pre-leukemic step. Frequency of inversion in chromosome 14, inv(14)(q11q32), was as high as 80% of total 118 inversions of T-ALL (T-acute lymphocyte leukemia) and T-CLL (T-chronic LL) types in the exposed group. Therefore, the inversion also can be a pre-leukemic step. However, it was suggested that these aberrations were not sufficient for crisis of the disease, which required other factors.(K.H.)

  20. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY chromosome sex determination system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail G Divashuk

    Full Text Available Hemp (Cannabis sativa L. was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71, 5S rDNA (pCT4.2, a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1 and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants. The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution.

  1. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of the dioecious Cannabis sativa with an XY chromosome sex determination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divashuk, Mikhail G; Alexandrov, Oleg S; Razumova, Olga V; Kirov, Ilya V; Karlov, Gennady I

    2014-01-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) was karyotyped using by DAPI/C-banding staining to provide chromosome measurements, and by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes for 45 rDNA (pTa71), 5S rDNA (pCT4.2), a subtelomeric repeat (CS-1) and the Arabidopsis telomere probes. The karyotype has 18 autosomes plus a sex chromosome pair (XX in female and XY in male plants). The autosomes are difficult to distinguish morphologically, but three pairs could be distinguished using the probes. The Y chromosome is larger than the autosomes, and carries a fully heterochromatic DAPI positive arm and CS-1 repeats only on the less intensely DAPI-stained, euchromatic arm. The X is the largest chromosome of all, and carries CS-1 subtelomeric repeats on both arms. The meiotic configuration of the sex bivalent locates a pseudoautosomal region of the Y chromosome at the end of the euchromatic CS-1-carrying arm. Our molecular cytogenetic study of the C. sativa sex chromosomes is a starting point for helping to make C. sativa a promising model to study sex chromosome evolution.

  2. In situ hybridization of bat chromosomes with human (TTAGGGn probe, after previous digestion with Alu I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina de Cassia Faria

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to verify the ability of the enzyme Alu I to cleave and/or remove satellite DNA sequences from heterochromatic regions in chromosomes of bats, by identifying the occurrence of modifications in the pattern of fluorescence in situ hybridization with telomeric DNA. The localization and fluorescence intensity of the telomeric DNA sites of the Alu-digested and undigested chromosomes of species Eumops glaucinus, Carollia perspicillata, and Platyrrhinus lineatus were analyzed. Telomeric sequences were detected at the termini of chromosomes of all three species, although, in C. perspicillata, the signals were very faint or absent in most chromosomes. This finding was interpreted as being due to a reduced number of copies of the telomeric repeat, resulting from extensive telomeric association and/or rearrangements undergone by the chromosomes of Carollia. Fluorescent signals were also observed in centromeric and pericentromeric regions in several two-arm chromosomes of E. glaucinus and C. perspicillata. In E. glaucinus and P. lineatus, some interstitial and terminal telomeric sites were observed to be in association with regions of constitutive heterochromatin and ribosomal DNA (NORs. After digestion, these telomeric sites showed a significant decrease in signal intensity, indicating that enzyme Alu I cleaves and/or removes part of the satellite DNA present in these regions. These results suggest that the telomeric sequence is a component of the heterochromatin, and that the C-band- positive regions of bat chromosomes have a different DNA composition.

  3. Translocations of chromosome end-segments and facultative heterochromatin promote meiotic ring formation in evening primroses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories.

  4. CSF oligoclonal banding - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100145.htm CSF oligoclonal banding - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... 5 out of 5 Overview The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves to supply nutrients to the central nervous ...

  5. Decay of superdeformed bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, M.P.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the study of superdeformation is to directly connect the large number of superdeformed bands now known to the yrast states. In this way, excitation energies, spins and parities can be assigned to the levels in the second well which is essential to establish the collective and single-particle components of these bands. This paper will review some of the progress which has been made to understand the decay of superdeformed bands using the new arrays including the measurement of the total decay spectrum and the establishment of direct one-step decays from the superdeformed band to the yrast line in 194 Hg. 42 refs., 5 figs

  6. Laparoscopic gastric banding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat by making you feel full after eating small amounts of food. After surgery, your doctor can adjust the band ... You will feel full after eating just a small amount of food. The food in the small upper pouch will ...

  7. Electron microscope mapping of the pericentric and intercalary heterochromatic regions of the polytene chromosomes of the mutant Suppressor of underreplication in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeshin, F; Belyaeva, S; Zhimulev, F

    2001-12-01

    Breaks and ectopic contacts in the heterochromatic regions of Drosophila melanogaster polytene chromosomes are the manifestations of the cytological effects of DNA underreplication. Their appearance makes these regions difficult to map. The Su(UR)ES gene, which controls the phenomenon, has been described recently. Mutation of this locus gives rise to new blocks of material in the pericentric heterochromatic regions and causes the disappearance of breaks and ectopic contacts in the intercalary heterochromatic regions, thereby making the banding pattern distinct and providing better opportunities for mapping of the heterochromatic regions in polytene chromosomes. Here, we present the results of an electron microscope study of the heterochromatic regions. In the wild-type salivary glands, the pericentric regions correspond to the beta-heterochromatin and do not show the banding pattern. The most conspicuous cytological effect of the Su(UR)ES mutation is the formation of a large banded chromosome fragment comprising at least 25 bands at the site where the 3L and 3R proximal arms connect. In the other pericentric regions, 20CF, 40BF and 41BC, 15, 12 and 9 new bands were revealed, respectively. A large block of densely packed material appears in the most proximal part of the fourth chromosome. An electron microscope analysis of 26 polytene chromosome regions showing the characteristic features of intercalary heterochromatin was also performed. Suppression of DNA underreplication in the mutant transforms the bands with weak spots into large single bands.

  8. Male meiosis, heterochromatin characterization and chromosomal location of rDNA in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Hammacerinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Poggio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we analysed the male meiosis, the content and distribution of heterochromatin and the number and location of nucleolus organizing regions in Microtomus lunifer (Berg, 1900 by means of standard technique, C- and fluorescent bandings, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an 18S rDNA probe. This species is the second one cytogenetically analysed within the Hammacerinae. Its male diploid chromosome number is 31 (2n=28+X1X2Y, including a minute pair of m-chromosomes. The diploid autosomal number and the presence of m-chromosomes are similar to those reported in M. conspicillaris (Drury, 1782 (2n=28+XY. However, M. lunifer has a multiple sex chromosome system X1X2Y (male that could have originated by fragmentation of the ancestral X chromosome. Taking into account that M. conspicillaris and M. lunifer are the only two species within Reduviidae that possess m-chromosomes, the presence of this pair could be a synapomorphy for the species of this genus. C- and fluorescent bandings showed that the amount of heterochromatin in M. lunifer was small, and only a small CMA3 bright band was observed in the largest autosomal pair at one terminal region. FISH with the 18S rDNA probe demonstrated that ribosomal genes were terminally placed on the largest autosomal pair. Our present results led us to propose that the location of rDNA genes could be associated with variants  of the sex chromosome systems in relation with a kind of the sex chromosome systems within this family. Furthermore, the terminal location of NOR in the largest autosomal pair allowed us to use it as a chromosome marker and, thus, to infer that the kinetic activity of both ends is not a random process, and there is an inversion of this activity.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drugs. Prolonged seizure episodes known as non-convulsive status epilepticus also appear to be characteristic of ring chromosome ... K, Takahashi Y. Ring chromosome 20 and nonconvulsive status epilepticus. A new epileptic syndrome. Brain. 1997 Jun;120 ( ...

  10. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary L Harton; Helen G Tempest

    2012-01-01

    infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family.Despite this,the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered.Nevertheless,more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified.This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically:chromosomal aneuploidy,structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions.Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans.Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin,but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts.Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm.Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed,as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases.Clinical recommendations where possible will be made,as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  11. Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated With Omphalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Fetuses with omphalocele have an increased risk for chromosomal abnormalities. The risk varies with maternal age, gestational age at diagnosis, association with umbilical cord cysts, complexity of associated anomalies, and the contents of omphalocele. There is considerable evidence that genetics contributes to the etiology of omphalocele. This article provides an overview of chromosomal abnormalities associated with omphalocele and a comprehensive review of associated full aneuploidy such as trisomy 18, trisomy 13, triploidy, trisomy 21, 45,X, 47,XXY, and 47,XXX, partial aneuploidy such as dup(3q, dup(11p, inv(11, dup(1q, del(1q, dup(4q, dup(5p, dup(6q, del(9p, dup(15q, dup(17q, Pallister-Killian syndrome with mosaic tetrasomy 12p and Miller-Dieker lissencephaly syndrome with deletion of 17p13.3, and uniparental disomy (UPD such as UPD 11 and UPD 14. Omphalocele is a prominent marker for chromosomal abnormalities. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert chromosomal abnormalities and familial unbalanced translocations, and prompt thorough cytogenetic investigations and genetic counseling.

  12. CHROMOSOMAL MULTIPLICITY IN BURKHOLDERIA CEPACIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have used CHEF gel electrophoresis to screen preparations of large DNA from different Burkholderia cepacia isolates for the presence of DNA species corresponding to the linearized forms of the three chromosomes of 3.4,2.5, and 0.9 Mb identified in B. cepacia strain 17616. DNA ...

  13. First description of multivalent ring structures in eutherian mammalian meiosis: new chromosomal characterization of Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae, Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Ramon Everton Ferreira; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; da Costa, Marlyson Jeremias Rodrigues; Noronha, Renata Coelho Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Luís Reginaldo Ribeiro; Pieczarka, Julio César

    2016-08-01

    Twelve specimens of the bat Cormura brevirostris (Emballonuridae: Chiroptera) were collected from four localities in the Brazilian Amazon region and analyzed by classical and molecular cytogenetics. The diploid number and autosomal fundamental number were as previously reported (2n = 22 and FNa = 40, respectively). Fluorescence in situ hybridization using rDNA probes and silver nitrate technique demonstrated the presence of two NOR sites and the presence of internal telomeric sequences at pericentromeric regions of all chromosomes with exception of Y. Based on meiotic studies and chromosome banding we suggest that the sex chromosome pair of C. brevirostris was equivocally identified as it appears in the literature. Meiotic analysis demonstrated that at diplotene-diakinesis the cells had a ring conformation involving four chromosome pairs. This suggests the occurrence of multiple reciprocal translocations among these chromosomes, which is a very rare phenomenon in vertebrates, and has never been described in Eutheria.

  14. Comparison of the Giemsa C-banded and N-banded karyotypes of two Elymus species, E. dentatus and E. glaucescens (Poaceae; Triticeae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde-Laursen, I.; Seberg, O.; Salomon, B.

    1994-01-01

    The karyotypes of Elymus dentatus from Kashmir and E. glaucescens from Tierra del Fuego, both carrying genomes S and H, were investigated by C- and N-banding. Both taxa had 2n = 4x = 28. The karyotype of E. dentatus was symmetrical with large chromosomes. It had 18 metacentric, four submetacentric...

  15. Polytene chromosome maps and RAPD polymorphisms in Glossina austeni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gariou-Papalexiou, A.; Yannopoulos, G.; Zacharopoulou, A.; Robinson, A.S.

    2000-01-01

    A combined methodology of cloned RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) polymorphic bands and in situ hybridisation to polytene chromosomes is an efficient way to initiate construction of a physical and genetic map of insect disease vectors (Dimopoulos et al. 1996, Mutebi et al. 1997). The studies presented here are the first step in developing this approach in tsetse flies. This technology will be used to support tsetse sterile insect technique (SIT) programmes by providing tools with which population structure and isolation can be assessed and genetic markers that can be used to differentiate released flies from wild flies identified. An added benefit is their possible use in unravelling epidemiological complexity and problems regarding speciation (Besansky et al. 1997). Polytene chromosomes of Diptera have been shown to be excellent material for the study of chromosome structure and function as well as for an understanding of the genetics of natural populations (Lefevre 1976). They provide a means for the accurate mapping of chromosome rearrangements and the precise localisation of genes, using both rearrangement analysis and in situ hybridisation. Previous reports on the cytology of the tsetse flies (Riordan 1968, Maudlin 1970, 1979, Southern et al. 1972, Southern and Pell 1973, Davies and Southern 1976, Southern 1980) have described the basic mitotic karyotype in several Glossina species, and demonstrated the presence of well banded polytene chromosomes in pupal trichogen cells (Southern and Pell 1974, 1981, Pell and Southern 1976). Polytene chromosomes were described for G. austeni Newstead, G. morsitans morsitans Westwood, G. pallidipes Austen and G. fuscipes fuscipes Newstead, but these descriptions are difficult to work with as they are drawings of polytene chromosome elements. In this paper, the photographic chromosome maps of pupal scutellar bristles of G. austeni are presented. They show that these chromosomes can be used with much greater ease

  16. Molecular cytogenetics and characterization of a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system in Triportheus nematurus (Characiformes, Characidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Débora; Moreira-Filho, Orlando; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos

    2008-05-01

    Chromosomes of Triportheus nematurus, a fish species from family Characidae, were analyzed in order to establish the conventional karyotype, location of C-band positive heterochromatin, Ag-NORs, GC- and AT-rich sites, and mapping of 18S and 5S rDNA with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The diploid number found was 2n = 52 chromosomes in both males and females. However, the females presented a pair of differentiated heteromorphic chromosomes, characterizing a ZZ/ZW sex chromosome system. The Z chromosome was metacentric and the largest one in the karyotype, bearing C-positive heterochromatin at pericentromeric and telomeric regions. The W chromosome was middle-sized submetacentric, appearing mostly heterochromatic after C-banding and presenting heterogeneous heterochromatin composed of GC- and AT-rich regions revealed by fluorochrome staining. Ag-NORs were also GC-rich and surrounded by heterochromatic regions, being located at the secondary constriction on the short arms of the second chromosome pair, in agreement with 18S rDNA sites detected with FISH. The 18S and 5S rDNA were aligned in tandem, representing an uncommon situation in fishes. The results obtained reinforce the basal condition of the ZZ/ZW sex system in the genus Triportheus, probably arisen prior to speciation in the group.

  17. Cytogenetic evaluation of human glial tumors: correlation of overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFB) with abnormalities of chromosome 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Chromosome banding analysis of human glial tumors were performed using G- and Q-banding techniques in an attempt to establish recurring sites of chromosome change. Results revealed a nonrandom karyotypic profile including aneuploidy and considerable variation in chromosome number (range 40 → 200). All tumors examined displayed numerical abnormalities, with the most common numeric change being a gain of chromosome 7. An attempt was then made to correlate the observed chromosome 7 changes with activation of the cellular proto-oncogene c-erb-B, whose produce is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Six human glial tumors were analyzed for 125 I-EGF binding, EGFR gene copy number, EGFR gene rearrangement, mRNA expression, and karyotypic profile. Saturation analysis at 4 0 C revealed significant numbers of EGFR's in all 6 tumors. Southern blotting analysis utilizing cDNA probes for the EGFR failed to demonstrate significant amplification or structural rearrangement of the EFGR gene. The results suggest that overexpression of the EGFR may be related to an alternative mechanism, other than gene amplification and elevated mRNA levels, such as the regulation of receptor biosynthesis and degradation. In summary, findings indicate that alterations of chromosome 7 are the most prevalent chromosomal change in human glial tumors, and that these alterations may lead to overexpression of the protooncogene c-erb-B

  18. Chromosomal Evolution in Lower Vertebrates: Sex Chromosomes in Neotropical Fishes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cioffi, M. de B.; Yano, C. F.; Sember, Alexandr; Bertollo, L.A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 10 (2017), č. článku 258. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000460 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : alternative evolutionary models * simple and multiple sex chromosomes * independent and common origins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  19. Microdissection and Chromosome Painting of the Alien Chromosome in an Addition Line of Wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R.-C.; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat - Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th . intermedium . Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th . intermedium , 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th . intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a Js genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (Js, J and St) in Th . intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th . bessarabicum . Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the Js genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th . intermedium . Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  20. Cytogenetic and molecular markers for detecting Aegilops uniaristata chromosomes in a wheat background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wenping; Li, Guangrong; Zhou, Jianping; Li, Genying; Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chengyan; Zhao, Zhendong; Yang, Zujun

    2014-09-01

    Aegilops uniaristata has many agronomically useful traits that can be used for wheat breeding. So far, a Triticum turgidum - Ae. uniaristata amphiploid and one set of Chinese Spring (CS) - Ae. uniaristata addition lines have been produced. To guide Ae. uniaristata chromatin transformation from these lines into cultivated wheat through chromosome engineering, reliable cytogenetic and molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes need to be developed. Standard C-banding shows that C-bands mainly exist in the centromeric regions of Ae. uniaristata but rarely at the distal ends. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using (GAA)8 as a probe showed that the hybridization signal of chromosomes 1N-7N are different, thus (GAA)8 can be used to identify all Ae. uniaristata chromosomes in wheat background simultaneously. Moreover, a total of 42 molecular markers specific for Ae. uniaristata chromosomes were developed by screening expressed sequence tag - sequence tagged site (EST-STS), expressed sequence tag - simple sequence repeat (EST-SSR), and PCR-based landmark unique gene (PLUG) primers. The markers were subsequently localized using the CS - Ae. uniaristata addition lines and different wheat cultivars as controls. The cytogenetic and molecular markers developed herein will be helpful for screening and identifying wheat - Ae. uniaristata progeny.

  1. Interclonal variations in the molecular karyotype of Trypanosoma cruzi: chromosome rearrangements in a single cell-derived clone of the G strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Fabio Mitsuo; Souza, Renata Torres; Santori, Fábio Rinaldo; Santos, Michele Fernandes; Cortez, Danielle Rodrigues; Barros, Roberto Moraes; Cano, Maria Isabel; Valadares, Helder Magno Silva; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Mortara, Renato Arruda; da Silveira, José Franco

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi comprises a pool of populations which are genetically diverse in terms of DNA content, growth and infectivity. Inter- and intra-strain karyotype heterogeneities have been reported, suggesting that chromosomal rearrangements occurred during the evolution of this parasite. Clone D11 is a single-cell-derived clone of the T. cruzi G strain selected by the minimal dilution method and by infecting Vero cells with metacyclic trypomastigotes. Here we report that the karyotype of clone D11 differs from that of the G strain in both number and size of chromosomal bands. Large chromosomal rearrangement was observed in the chromosomes carrying the tubulin loci. However, most of the chromosome length polymorphisms were of small amplitude, and the absence of one band in clone D11 in relation to its reference position in the G strain could be correlated to the presence of a novel band migrating above or below this position. Despite the presence of chromosomal polymorphism, large syntenic groups were conserved between the isolates. The appearance of new chromosomal bands in clone D11 could be explained by chromosome fusion followed by a chromosome break or interchromosomal exchange of large DNA segments. Our results also suggest that telomeric regions are involved in this process. The variant represented by clone D11 could have been induced by the stress of the cloning procedure or could, as has been suggested for Leishmania infantum, have emerged from a multiclonal, mosaic parasite population submitted to frequent DNA amplification/deletion events, leading to a 'mosaic' structure with different individuals having differently sized versions of the same chromosomes. If this is the case, the variant represented by clone D11 would be better adapted to survive the stress induced by cloning, which includes intracellular development in the mammalian cell. Karyotype polymorphism could be part of the T. cruzi arsenal for responding to environmental pressure.

  2. The study on cytogenetic analysis and dosimetry reconstruction for medical diagnostic X-ray workers using G-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jin; Wang Qin; Tang Weisheng; Sun Yuanming; Wang Zhiquan

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the dose of medical diagnostic X-ray workers. Methods: The chromosome aberrations were analyzed by G-banding or FISH in medical diagnostic X-ray workers with different calendar years of entry. Results: The biological doses estimated by the two methods were in agreement with the doses evaluated by physical methods. Conclusion: G-banding and FISH are effective ways to analyse the chromosome translocations

  3. Polytene Chromosomes - A Portrait of Functional Organization of the Drosophila Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zykova, Tatyana Yu; Levitsky, Victor G; Belyaeva, Elena S; Zhimulev, Igor F

    2018-04-01

    This mini-review is devoted to the problem genetic meaning of main polytene chromosome structures - bands and interbands. Generally, densely packed chromatin forms black bands, moderately condensed regions form grey loose bands, whereas decondensed regions of the genome appear as interbands. Recent progress in the annotation of the Drosophila genome and epigenome has made it possible to compare the banding pattern and the structural organization of genes, as well as their activity. This was greatly aided by our ability to establish the borders of bands and interbands on the physical map, which allowed to perform comprehensive side-by-side comparisons of cytology, genetic and epigenetic maps and to uncover the association between the morphological structures and the functional domains of the genome. These studies largely conclude that interbands 5'-ends of housekeeping genes that are active across all cell types. Interbands are enriched with proteins involved in transcription and nucleosome remodeling, as well as with active histone modifications. Notably, most of the replication origins map to interband regions. As for grey loose bands adjacent to interbands, they typically host the bodies of house-keeping genes. Thus, the bipartite structure composed of an interband and an adjacent grey band functions as a standalone genetic unit. Finally, black bands harbor tissue-specific genes with narrow temporal and tissue expression profiles. Thus, the uniform and permanent activity of interbands combined with the inactivity of genes in bands forms the basis of the universal banding pattern observed in various Drosophila tissues.

  4. Dynamics of chromosome segregation in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1960’es the conformation and segregation of the chromosome in Escherichia coli has been a subject of interest for many scientists. However, after 40 years of research, we still know incredibly little about how the chromosome is organized inside the cell, how it manages to duplicate...... this incredibly big molecule and separate the two daughter chromosomes and how it makes sure that the daughter cells receives one copy each. The fully extended chromosome is two orders of magnitude larger than the cell in which it is contained. Hence the chromosome is heavily compacted in the cell...

  5. Ultra wide band antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Begaud, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    Ultra Wide Band Technology (UWB) has reached a level of maturity that allows us to offer wireless links with either high or low data rates. These wireless links are frequently associated with a location capability for which ultimate accuracy varies with the inverse of the frequency bandwidth. Using time or frequency domain waveforms, they are currently the subject of international standards facilitating their commercial implementation. Drawing up a complete state of the art, Ultra Wide Band Antennas is aimed at students, engineers and researchers and presents a summary of internationally recog

  6. Frequencies of chromosome aberration on radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanti Lusiyanti; Zubaidah Alatas

    2016-01-01

    Radiation exposure of the body can cause damage to the genetic material in cells (cytogenetic) in the form of changes in the structure or chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Chromosomal aberrations can be unstable as dicentric and ring chromosomes, and is stable as translocation. Dicentric chromosome is the gold standard biomarker due to radiation exposure, and chromosome translocation is a biomarker for retrospective biodosimetry. The aim of this studi is to conduct examination of chromosomal aberrations in the radiation worker to determine the potential damage of cell that may arise due to occupational radiation exposure. The examination have been carried out on blood samples from 55 radiation workers in the range of 5-30 year of service. Chromosome aberration frequency measurement starts with blood sampling, culturing, harvesting, slide preparations, and lymphocyte chromosome staining with Giemsa and painting with Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH) technique. The results showed that chromosomal translocations are not found in blood samples radiation workers and dicentric chromosomes found only on 2 blood samples of radiation workers with a frequency of 0.001/cell. The frequency of chromosomal aberrations in the blood cells such workers within normal limits and this means that the workers have been implemented a radiation safety aspects very well. (author)

  7. Chromosomal instability induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1995-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents. For instance, some cells surviving exposure to ionizing radiations show delayed reproductive cell death, delayed mutation and / or delayed chromosomal instability. Such instability, especially chromosome destabilization has been implicated in mutation, gene amplification, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosomal instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells. The relationship between delayed chromosomal destabilization and other endpoints of genomic instability, namely; delayed mutation and gene amplification will be discussed, as will the potential cytogenetic and molecular mechanisms contributing to delayed chromosomal instability

  8. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  9. Genome Organization Drives Chromosome Fragility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canela, Andres; Maman, Yaakov; Jung, Seolkyoung; Wong, Nancy; Callen, Elsa; Day, Amanda; Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Zhang, Hongliang; Rao, Suhas S P; Huang, Su-Chen; Mckinnon, Peter J; Aplan, Peter D; Pommier, Yves; Aiden, Erez Lieberman; Casellas, Rafael; Nussenzweig, André

    2017-07-27

    In this study, we show that evolutionarily conserved chromosome loop anchors bound by CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin are vulnerable to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) mediated by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B). Polymorphisms in the genome that redistribute CTCF/cohesin occupancy rewire DNA cleavage sites to novel loop anchors. While transcription- and replication-coupled genomic rearrangements have been well documented, we demonstrate that DSBs formed at loop anchors are largely transcription-, replication-, and cell-type-independent. DSBs are continuously formed throughout interphase, are enriched on both sides of strong topological domain borders, and frequently occur at breakpoint clusters commonly translocated in cancer. Thus, loop anchors serve as fragile sites that generate DSBs and chromosomal rearrangements. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Chromosomes aberations and enviromental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marković Srđan Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic: Changes in genetic material can lead to aberrant cell in the direction of disorders of cellular regulation, malignant transformation, cell death, or if the adjustment was made at the level of the reproductive cells, to genetic changes in some of the consequent off spring. The topic position in scientific/professional public: Breaking of chromosomes can occur spontaneously or can be induced. Chromatid/chromosome breakings can be induced by different environmental factors: chemicals, biological clastogenic agents, accidentally or intentionally. Conclusions: The authors suggest: - making conditions for strong respect of environmental regulations; - to use higher plants for the early detection of environmental mutagens; - create and orderly update National radionuclide database.

  11. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chromosome painting is an efficient tool for chromosome research. However, plant chromosome painting is relatively underdeveloped. In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat-Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and chromosomes of...

  12. Isolation of a cosmid sublibrary for a region of chromosome 12 frequently amplified in human cancers using a complex chromosome microdissection probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkahloun, A.G.; Meltzer, P.S.; Guan, Xin-Yuan [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    Chromosome-specific cosmid libraries are in extremely useful resource for positional cloning projects. Once a particular region of interest has been identified, it would be of value to have an approach for isolating chromosome band-specific cosmids that could be assembled into a sublibrary for rapid screening. We constructed a region-specific sublibrary of 700 cosmids by screening a chromosome 12-specific cosmid library with a complex probe generated by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR of a microdissected homogeneously staining region containing sequences amplified from chromosome 12q13-q15. Based on fluorescence in situ hybridization, approximately 60% of the cosmids in the sublibrary were derived from the microdissected region. To demonstrate further the utility of the sublibrary, a 150-kb contig containing the SAS and CDK4 genes was constructed, as well as several additional contigs between CDK4 and MDM2. This study demonstrates the possibility of utilizing probes generated by microdissection for assembling band-specific libraries that are amendable to rapid screening with multiple markers.

  13. Identification of 2nd chromosome region translocated onto the W chromosome by RFLP with EST-cDNA clones in the Gensei-kouken strains of the mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mori L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaramakurup Sreekumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In silkworms, sex-limited strains are either obtained spontaneously or induced by X-rays or gamma rays. When a fragment of an autosome carrying a dominant allele of those genes responsible for certain characters is translocated onto a W chromosome, the female of the successive generations will express these phenotypic characters and sex discrimination can be facilitated. Gensei-kouken strains are sex-limited strains of silkworms developed by irradiating the pupae with gamma rays, by which a portion of the second chromosome is translocated onto the W chromosome. In these improved strains, the females are yellow-blooded and spin yellow cocoons. By using the EST-cDNA clones mapped on the Z chromosome, we identified the sex according to the polymorphic banding pattern or intensity of the signals. Furthermore, by using the clones on the second chromosome, the region of the second chromosome translocated onto the W chromosome was also defined. In both the A95 and A 96 strains selected for the present study, only the mid-portion of the second chromosome was translocated. The differences in length of the fragments translocated in these strains are discussed.

  14. GSK-3 inhibitors induce chromosome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staples Oliver D

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mechanisms operate during mitosis to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. However, during tumour evolution these mechanisms go awry resulting in chromosome instability. While several lines of evidence suggest that mutations in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC may promote chromosome instability, at least in colon cancer, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we turn our attention to GSK-3 – a protein kinase, which in concert with APC, targets β-catenin for proteolysis – and ask whether GSK-3 is required for accurate chromosome segregation. Results To probe the role of GSK-3 in mitosis, we inhibited GSK-3 kinase activity in cells using a panel of small molecule inhibitors, including SB-415286, AR-A014418, 1-Azakenpaullone and CHIR99021. Analysis of synchronised HeLa cells shows that GSK-3 inhibitors do not prevent G1/S progression or cell division. They do, however, significantly delay mitotic exit, largely because inhibitor-treated cells have difficulty aligning all their chromosomes. Although bipolar spindles form and the majority of chromosomes biorient, one or more chromosomes often remain mono-oriented near the spindle poles. Despite a prolonged mitotic delay, anaphase frequently initiates without the last chromosome aligning, resulting in chromosome non-disjunction. To rule out the possibility of "off-target" effects, we also used RNA interference to selectively repress GSK-3β. Cells deficient for GSK-3β exhibit a similar chromosome alignment defect, with chromosomes clustered near the spindle poles. GSK-3β repression also results in cells accumulating micronuclei, a hallmark of chromosome missegregation. Conclusion Thus, not only do our observations indicate a role for GSK-3 in accurate chromosome segregation, but they also raise the possibility that, if used as therapeutic agents, GSK-3 inhibitors may induce unwanted side effects by inducing chromosome instability.

  15. Chromosome aberration assays in Allium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, W.F.

    1982-01-01

    The common onion (Allium cepa) is an excellent plant for the assay of chromosome aberrations after chemical treatment. Other species of Allium (A. cepa var. proliferum, A. carinatum, A. fistulosum and A. sativum) have also been used but to a much lesser extent. Protocols have been given for using root tips from either bulbs or seeds of Allium cepa to study the cytological end-points, such as chromosome breaks and exchanges, which follow the testing of chemicals in somatic cells. It is considered that both mitotic and meiotic end-points should be used to a greater extent in assaying the cytogenetic effects of a chemical. From a literature survey, 148 chemicals are tabulated that have been assayed in 164 Allium tests for their clastogenic effect. Of the 164 assays which have been carried out, 75 are reported as giving a positive reaction, 49 positive and with a dose response, 1 positive and temperature-related, 9 borderline positive, and 30 negative; 76% of the chemicals gave a definite positive response. It is proposed that the Allium test be included among those tests routinely used for assessing chromosomal damage induced by chemicals.

  16. Vietnam, a Hotspot for Chromosomal Diversity and Cryptic Species in Black Flies (Diptera: Simuliidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Hiroyuki; Sofian-Azirun, Mohd; Low, Van Lun; Ya’cob, Zubaidah; Chen, Chee Dhang; Lau, Koon Weng; Pham, Xuan Da

    2016-01-01

    The increasing attention on Vietnam as a biodiversity hotspot prompted an investigation of the potential for cryptic diversity in black flies, a group well known elsewhere for its high frequency of isomorphic species. We analyzed the banding structure of the larval polytene chromosomes in the Simulium tuberosum species group to probe for diversity beyond the morphological level. Among 272 larvae, 88 different chromosomal rearrangements, primarily paracentric inversions, were discovered in addition to 25 already known in the basic sequences of the group in Asia. Chromosomal diversity in Vietnam far exceeds that known for the group in Thailand, with only about 5% of the rearrangements shared between the two countries. Fifteen cytoforms and nine morphoforms were revealed among six nominal species in Vietnam. Chromosomal evidence, combined with available molecular and morphological evidence, conservatively suggests that at least five of the cytoforms are valid species, two of which require formal names. The total chromosomal rearrangements and species (15) now known from the group in Vietnam far exceed those of any other area of comparable size in the world, supporting the country’s status as a biodiversity hotspot. Phylogenetic inference based on uniquely shared, derived chromosomal rearrangements supports the clustering of cytoforms into two primary lineages, the Simulium tani complex and the Southeast Asian Simulium tuberosum subgroup. Some of these taxa could be threatened by habitat destruction, given their restricted geographical distributions and the expanding human population of Vietnam. PMID:27695048

  17. [Nuclear protein matrix from giant nuclei of Chironomus plumosus determinates polythene chromosome organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, M S; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    Giant nuclei from salivary glands of Chironomus plumosus were treated in situ with detergent, 2 M NaCl and nucleases in order to reveal residual nuclear matrix proteins (NMP). It was shown, that preceding stabilization of non-histone proteins with 2 mM CuCl2 allowed to visualize the structure of polythene chromosomes at every stage of the extraction of histones and DNA. Stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes maintains their morphology and banding patterns, which is observed by light and electron microscopy, whereas internal fibril net or residual nucleoli are not found. In stabilized NPM of polythene chromosomes, topoisomerase IIalpha and SMC1 retain their localization that is typical of untreated chromosomes. NPM of polythene chromosomes also includes sites of DNA replication, visualized with BrDU incubation, and some RNA-components. So, we can conclude that structure of NPM from giant nuclei is equal to NPM from normal interphase nuclei, and that morphological features of polythene chromosomes depend on the presence of NMP.

  18. Frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada Dorta, Marlen; Bello Alvarez, Daisy; Gonzalez Fernandez, Pedro

    2004-01-01

    This paper was aimed at determining the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in a group of patients carriers of gonosomopathies and at relating in each case the meaning of the different chromosomal aberrations found to the patients' clinical diagnosis. 656 patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies from different hospital institutions of the country that were received at the molecular genetics laboratory of Hermanos Ameijeiras Clinical and Surgical Hospital from 1982 to 2001, were studied. Of the total of patients with presumptive diagnosis of gonosomopathies, in 32.7 % (215/656) the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the cytogenetic study. The chromosomal study was conducted by using G band techniques. The chromosomal rearrangements found were classified into 4 groups. The group of numerical gonosomopathies showed the highest frequency with 110 patients, accounting for 51 % of the total. It was followed by the group of numerical and structural alterations (mosaics) with 59 patients (27.0), the inversions of sex with 24 patients (12.0), and the group of structural gonosomopathies with 22 patients (10.0) The most common chromosomal aberrations were the numerical gonosomopathies (Turner and Klinefelter's syndrome). The chromosomal study in these patients is a very important diagnostic value indicator for the therapeutical conduct to be followed in every case

  19. Different structure of polytene chromosome of phaseolus coccineus suspensors during early embryogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagliasacchi, A.M.; Forino, L.M.C.; Cionini, P.G.; Cavallini, A.; Durante, M.; Cremonini, R.; Avanzi, S.

    1984-01-01

    Different regions of polytene chromosomes pair VI have been characterized by: 1. morphological observations, 2. incorporation of 3 H-thymidine and 3 H-uridine, 3. cytophotometry of DNA and associated proteins, 4. hybridization with satellite DNA and highly repeated DNA sequences. The collected data indicate that DNA and RNA puffs are organized by heterochromatic segments. DNA puffs show often a clustered pattern of labeling by 3 H-thymidine and RNA puffs are always labeled by 3 H-urindine. Each heterochromatic segment is characterized by a definite ratio between DNA and associated fastgreen stainable proteins. Satellite DNA binds mostly to heterochromatic blocks at centromers, highly repeated DNA sequences bind, with approximately the same frequency, to centromeric heterochromatin and to the main intercalary heterochromatic band. The telomeric portions of euchromatin seem to be also enriched in highly repeated DNA sequences. The results indicate that heterochromatic chromosome segments might be sites of intense localized DNA replication. The same chromosome regions are also engaged in an active transcription process. The response to hybridization suggests that heterochromatic blocks of chromosome pair VI are heterogeneous in nucleotide sequences. The present studies also indicate that DNA and RNA puffs organized by different chromosome sites are specific of particular steps of embryo differentiation. The observed metabolic aspects of the suspensior's polytene chromosomes are discussed in relation to the synthesis of growth regulators which is known to occur in the suspensor. (Author)

  20. Molecular cytogenetic characterization of two Turner syndrome patients with mosaic ring X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Pooja; Jaiswal, Sushil Kumar; Lakhotia, Anjali Rani; Rai, Amit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we reported two cases of TS with mosaic ring X chromosome showing common clinical characteristics of TS like growth retardation and ovarian dysfunction. The purpose of the present study was to cytogenetically characterize both cases. Whole blood culture and G-banding were performed for karyotyping the cases following standard protocol. Origin of the ring chromosome and degree of mosaicism were further determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Breakpoints and loss of genetic material in formation of different ring X chromosomes r (X) in cases were determined with the help of cytogenetic microarray. Cases 1 and 2 with ring chromosome were cytogenetically characterized as 45, X [114]/46Xr (X) (p22.11q21.32) [116] and 45, X [170]/46, Xr (X) (p22.2q21.33) [92], respectively. Sizes of these ring X chromosomes were found to be ~75 and ~95 Mb in cases 1 and 2, respectively, using visual estimation as part of cytogenetic observation. In both cases, we observed breakpoints on Xq chromosome were within relatively narrow region between Xq21.33 and Xq22.1 compared to regions in previously reported cases associated with ovarian dysgenesis. Our observation agrees with the fact that despite of large heterogeneity, severity of the cases with intact X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is dependent on degree of mosaicism and extent of Xq deletion having crucial genes involved directly or indirectly in various physiological involving ovarian cyclicity.

  1. Unexpected structural complexity of supernumerary marker chromosomes characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hing Anne V

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs are structurally abnormal extra chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by conventional banding techniques. In the past, SMCs have been characterized using a variety of different molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although these techniques can sometimes identify the chromosome of origin of SMCs, they are cumbersome to perform and are not available in many clinical cytogenetic laboratories. Furthermore, they cannot precisely determine the region or breakpoints of the chromosome(s involved. In this study, we describe four patients who possess one or more SMCs (a total of eight SMCs in all four patients that were characterized by microarray comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH. Results In at least one SMC from all four patients, array CGH uncovered unexpected complexity, in the form of complex rearrangements, that could have gone undetected using other molecular cytogenetic techniques. Although array CGH accurately defined the chromosome content of all but two minute SMCs, fluorescence in situ hybridization was necessary to determine the structure of the markers. Conclusion The increasing use of array CGH in clinical cytogenetic laboratories will provide an efficient method for more comprehensive characterization of SMCs. Improved SMC characterization, facilitated by array CGH, will allow for more accurate SMC/phenotype correlation.

  2. Fine genetic structure of the 2D3-2F5 region of the X-chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvozdev, V.A.; Gostimsky, S.A.; Gerasimova, T.I.; Dubrovskaya, E.S.; Braslavskaya, O.Yu.

    1975-01-01

    97 lethal and semilethal mutations were induced by ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrosomethyl urea and γ-irradiation in the 2D3-F5 region of the X-chromosome of D. melanogaster. Approximately 1 per cent of the tested X-chromosomes carried a lethal in the 2D3-2F5 region. The mutation frequencies per band of DNA content in this region and the whole X-chromosome are equal. Complementation analysis revealed at least 10 functionally independent essential loci in this region including about 10 bands. The data presented in this study support the one band - one gene hypothesis. The Pgd locus coding for 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD) is mapped in the 2D3 (or 2D4) band. Isolation of 11 lethal or semilethal point mutations with null or reduced 6PGD acticity shows that the Pgd locus is a vital one. (orig.) [de

  3. Inter-chromosomal heterogeneity in the formation of radiation induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, A.T.; Vermeulen, S.; Boei, J.J.W.A.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally assumed that radiation induced chromosomal lesions are distributed randomly and repaired randomly among the genome. Recent studies using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and chromosome specific DNA libraries indicate that some chromosomes are more sensitive for radiation induced aberration formation than others. Chromosome No. 4 in human and chromosome No. 8 in Chinese hamster have been found to involve more in exchange aberrations than others, when calculated on the basis of their DNA content. Painting with arm specific chromosome libraries indicate that the frequencies of radiation induced intra-chromosome exchanges (i.e., between the arms of a chromosome, such as centric rings and inversions) are far in excess than one would expect on the basis of the frequencies of observed inter-chromosomal exchanges. The possible factors leading to the observed heterogeneity will be discussed

  4. Chromosomal divergence and evolutionary inferences in Rhodniini based on the chromosomal location of ribosomal genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we used fluorescence in situ hybridisation to determine the chromosomal location of 45S rDNA clusters in 10 species of the tribe Rhodniini (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae. The results showed striking inter and intraspecific variability, with the location of the rDNA clusters restricted to sex chromosomes with two patterns: either on one (X chromosome or both sex chromosomes (X and Y chromosomes. This variation occurs within a genus that has an unchanging diploid chromosome number (2n = 22, including 20 autosomes and 2 sex chromosomes and a similar chromosome size and genomic DNA content, reflecting a genome dynamic not revealed by these chromosome traits. The rDNA variation in closely related species and the intraspecific polymorphism in Rhodnius ecuadoriensis suggested that the chromosomal position of rDNA clusters might be a useful marker to identify recently diverged species or populations. We discuss the ancestral position of ribosomal genes in the tribe Rhodniini and the possible mechanisms involved in the variation of the rDNA clusters, including the loss of rDNA loci on the Y chromosome, transposition and ectopic pairing. The last two processes involve chromosomal exchanges between both sex chromosomes, in contrast to the widely accepted idea that the achiasmatic sex chromosomes of Heteroptera do not interchange sequences.

  5. Band-notched spiral antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Jae; Chang, John

    2018-03-13

    A band-notched spiral antenna having one or more spiral arms extending from a radially inner end to a radially outer end for transmitting or receiving electromagnetic radiation over a frequency range, and one or more resonance structures positioned adjacent one or more segments of the spiral arm associated with a notch frequency band or bands of the frequency range so as to resonate and suppress the transmission or reception of electromagnetic radiation over said notch frequency band or bands.

  6. Frequent induction of chromosomal aberrations in in vivo skin fibroblasts after allogeneic stem cell transplantation: hints to chromosomal instability after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massenkeil, G.; Zschieschang, P.; Thiel, G.; Hemmati, P. G.; Budach, V.; Dörken, B.; Pross, J.; Arnold, R.

    2015-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been part of standard conditioning regimens before allogeneic stem cell transplantation for many years. Its effect on normal tissue in these patients has not been studied extensively. We studied the in vivo cytogenetic effects of TBI and high-dose chemotherapy on skin fibroblasts from 35 allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) patients. Biopsies were obtained prospectively (n = 18 patients) before, 3 and 12 months after allogeneic SCT and retrospectively (n = 17 patients) 23–65 months after SCT for G-banded chromosome analysis. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 2/18 patients (11 %) before allogeneic SCT, in 12/13 patients (92 %) after 3 months, in all patients after 12 months and in all patients in the retrospective group after allogeneic SCT. The percentage of aberrant cells was significantly higher at all times after allogeneic SCT compared to baseline analysis. Reciprocal translocations were the most common aberrations, but all other types of stable, structural chromosomal aberrations were also observed. Clonal aberrations were observed, but only in three cases they were detected in independently cultured flasks. A tendency to non-random clustering throughout the genome was observed. The percentage of aberrant cells was not different between patients with and without secondary malignancies in this study group. High-dose chemotherapy and TBI leads to severe chromosomal damage in skin fibroblasts of patients after SCT. Our long-term data suggest that this damage increases with time, possibly due to in vivo radiation-induced chromosomal instability

  7. Chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shekhar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to study the chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle. Materials and Methods: 27 female cattle (21 arsenic affected and 6 normal were selected for cytogenetical study. The blood samples were collected, incubated, and cultured using appropriate media and specific methods. The samples were analyzed for chromosome number and morphology, relative length of the chromosome, arm ratio, and centromere index of X chromosome and chromosomal abnormalities in arsenic affected cattle to that of normal ones. Results: The diploid number of metaphase chromosomes in arsenic affected cattle as well as in normal cattle were all 2n=60, 58 being autosomes and 2 being sex chromosomes. From the centromeric position, karyotyping studies revealed that all the 29 pair of autosomes was found to be acrocentric or telocentric, and the sex chromosomes (XX were submetacentric in both normal and arsenic affected cattle. The relative length of all the autosome pairs and sex chrosomosome pair was found to be higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle. The mean arm ratio of X-chromosome was higher in normal than that of arsenic affected cattle, but it is reverse in case of centromere index value of X-chromosome. There was no significant difference of arm ratio and centromere index of X-chromosomes between arsenic affected and normal cattle. No chromosomal abnormalities were found in arsenic affected cattle. Conclusion: The chromosome analysis of arsenic affected cattle in West Bengal reported for the first time in this present study which may serve as a guideline for future studies in other species. These reference values will also help in comparison of cytological studies of arsenic affected cattle to that of various toxicants.

  8. Comparative mapping of DNA probes derived from the V{sub k} immunoglobulin gene regions on human and great ape chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, N.; Wienberg, J.; Ermert, K. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of cosmid clones of human V{sub K} gene regions to human and primate chromosomes contributed to the dating of chromosome reorganizations in evolution. A clone from the K locus at 2p11-p12 (cos 106) hybridized to the assumed homologous chromosome bands in the chimpanzees Pan troglodytes (PTR) and P. paniscus (PPA), the Gorilla gorilla (GGO), and the orangutan Pongo Pygmaeus (PPY). Human and both chimpanzees differed from gorilla and orangutan by the mapping of cos 170, a clone derived from chromosome 2cen-q11.2; the transposition of this orphon to the other side of the centromere can, therefore, be dated after the human/chimpanzee and gorilla divergence. Hybridization to homologous bands was also found with a cosmid clone containing a V{sub K}I orphon located on chromosome 1 (cos 115, main signal at 1q31-q32), although the probe is not fully unique. Also, a clone derived from the orphon V{sub K} region on chromosome 22q11 (cos 121) hybridized to the homologous bands in the great apes. This indicates that the orphons on human chromosomes 1 and 22 had been translocated early in primate evolution. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  9. A pericentric inversion of chromosome X disrupting F8 and resulting in haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yu; Zhou, Jingyi; Ding, Qiulan; Chen, Changming; Wu, Xi; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Hongli; Jiang, Xiaofeng

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of X chromosome pericentric inversion is much less than that of autosome chromosome. We hereby characterise a pericentric inversion of X chromosome associated with severe factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency in a sporadic haemophilia A (HA) pedigree. PCR primer walking and genome walking strategies were adopted to identify the exact breakpoints of the inversion. Copy number variations (CNVs) of the F8 and the whole chromosomes were detected by AccuCopy and Affymetrix CytoScan High Definition (HD) assays, respectively. A karyotype analysis was performed by cytogenetic G banding technique. We identified a previously undescribed type of pericentric inversion of the X chromosome [inv(X)(p11.21q28)] in the proband with FVIII:C inversion segment was approximately 64.4% of the total chromosomal length. The karyotype analysis of the X chromosome confirmed the pericentric inversion of the X chromosome in the proband and his mother. A haplotype analysis traced the inversion to his maternal grandfather, who was not a somatic mosaic of the inversion. This finding indicated that the causative mutation may originate from his germ cells or a rare possibility of germ-cell mosaicism. The characterisation of pericentric inversion involving F8 extended the molecular mechanisms causing HA. The pericentric inversion rearrangement involves F8 by non-homologous end joining is responsible for pathogensis of severe HA. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Chromosomal abnormalities in human glioblastomas: gain in chromosome 7p correlating with loss in chromosome 10q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, María del Mar; Fan, Xing; Muñoz, Jorge; Perot, Christine; Fauvet, Didier; Danglot, Giselle; Palacio, Ana; Madero, Pilar; Zazpe, Idoya; Portillo, Eduardo; Tuñón, Teresa; Martínez-Peñuela, José María; Alfaro, Jorge; Eiras, José; Bernheim, Alain; Castresana, Javier S

    2003-01-01

    Various genomic alterations have been detected in glioblastoma. Chromosome 7p, with the epidermal growth factor receptor locus, together with chromosome 10q, with the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10 and deleted in malignant brain tumors-1 loci, and chromosome 9p, with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A locus, are among the most frequently damaged chromosomal regions in glioblastoma. In this study, we evaluated the genetic status of 32 glioblastomas by comparative genomic hybridization; the sensitivity of comparative genomic hybridization versus differential polymerase chain reaction to detect deletions at the phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10, deleted in malignant brain tumors-1, and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A loci and amplifications at the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 locus; the frequency of genetic lesions (gain or loss) at 16 different selected loci (including oncogenes, tumor-suppressor genes, and proliferation markers) mapping on 13 different chromosomes; and the possible existence of a statistical association between any pair of molecular markers studied, to subdivide the glioblastoma entity molecularly. Comparative genomic hybridization showed that the most frequent region of gain was chromosome 7p, whereas the most frequent losses occurred on chromosomes 10q and 13q. The only statistically significant association was found for 7p gain and 10q loss. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Persistence of chromosomal abnormalities additional to the Philadelphia chromosome after Philadelphia chromosome disappearance during imatinib therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, Alfonso; Valenti, Anna Maria; Donti, Emilio; Gozzetti, Alessandro; Ronconi, Sonia; Spedicato, Francesco

    2007-04-01

    Five Philadelphia chromosome positive (Ph+) chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients with additional chromosome abnormalities at diagnosis have been followed during Imatinib therapy. In all, the Ph chromosome disappeared, while the 5 cases, additional abnormalities [dup(1); del(5), +8 (2 patients) and +14] persisted in the subsequent studies, performed over a period of 11 to 49 months, either alone or together with a karyotypically normal cell population. This finding is consistent with a secondary origin of the Ph chromosome in these patients. It is still to early to evaluate the possible prognostic value of these additional abnormalities.

  12. Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Genomic Medicine Working Group New Horizons and Research Patient Management Policy and Ethics Issues Quick Links for Patient Care Education All About the Human Genome Project Fact Sheets Genetic Education Resources for ...

  13. Chromosome engineering: power tools for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Simon W L

    2010-12-01

    The term "chromosome engineering" describes technologies in which chromosomes are manipulated to change their mode of genetic inheritance. This review examines recent innovations in chromosome engineering that promise to greatly increase the efficiency of plant breeding. Haploid Arabidopsis thaliana have been produced by altering the kinetochore protein CENH3, yielding instant homozygous lines. Haploid production will facilitate reverse breeding, a method that downregulates recombination to ensure progeny contain intact parental chromosomes. Another chromosome engineering success is the conversion of meiosis into mitosis, which produces diploid gametes that are clones of the parent plant. This is a key step in apomixis (asexual reproduction through seeds) and could help to preserve hybrid vigor in the future. New homologous recombination methods in plants will potentiate many chromosome engineering applications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A chromosome study of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutants in T lymphocytes of Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kodama, Yoshiaki; Hakoda, Masayuki; Shimba, Hachiro; Awa, A.A.; Akiyama, Mitoshi.

    1989-07-01

    Cytogenetic characterizations were made of lymphocyte colonies established from somatic mutation assays for 6-thioguanine (TG) resistance in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors. G-banded chromosomes were analyzed in both TG-resistant (TG r ) and wild-type (not TG-selected) colonies. Included were 45 TG r and 19 wild-type colonies derived from proximally exposed A-bomb survivors, as well as colonies from distally exposed control individuals who were not exposed to a significant level of A-bomb radiation (18 TG r and 9 wild-type colonies). Various structural and numerical abnormalities of chromosomes were observed in both TG r and wild-type colonies. Aberrations of the X chromosome, on which the hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus is present, were found in six colonies: two resistant colonies from controls [45,X/46,XX; 46,X,ins(X)], three resistant colonies [45,X/46,XX/46,X,+mar; 46,X,t(Xq+;14q-); 46,Y,t(Xq-;5q+)], and one wild-type colony [45,X/47,XXX] from proximally exposed persons. In cases with exchange aberrations, each of the break points on the X chromosome was situated proximally to band q26 where the HPRT locus is known to be assigned. DNA replicating patterns were also studied, and it was found that abnormal X chromosomes showed early replicating patterns, while normal X chromosomes showed late replicating patterns. (author)

  15. Advances in plant chromosome genomics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Kubaláková, Marie; Burešová, Veronika; Šimková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2014), s. 122-136 ISSN 0734-9750 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/10/1740; GA ČR GAP501/10/1778; GA ČR GBP501/12/G090; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED0007/01/01 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : BAC library * Chromosome sorting * Cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 9.015, year: 2014

  16. Nonrandom distribuion of chromosome breaks in cultured lymphocytes of normal subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayme, S.; Mattei, J.F.; Mattei, M.G.; Aurran, Y.; Giraud, F.

    1976-02-29

    Breakpoint distribution was studied from cultured lymphocytes on 7653 metaphases from 524 subjects whose karyotypes were normal. The mean break rate was 5% in both sexes. The frequency increased significantly after 40 years and varied during the year. The location of the breaks was very different from the expected random distribution. The break frequency for each chromosome was different according to the type of break (chromatid, simple chromosomal and chromosomal involving rearrangements). The location of the breaks was also studied according to the type of band and with respect to the centromere. A comparison between spontaneous breaks, x-ray induced breaks, breaks in Fanconi's anemia and in congenital rearrangements, show very significant differences.

  17. Analysis of the karyotype of Callisia elegans Alexand. (Commelinaceae including differential staining of chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The number and morphology of Callisia elegans Alexand. chromosomes were studied employing staining with acetic carmine and differential Giemsa staining. It was found that its karyotype was 2n = 12 chromosomes, whose lengths fell in the range of 16.8 to 8.8 µm. The chomosomes, arranged in order of length, were classified respectively to types: sm, t, t, t, t, st. The distribution of C-banding is given for this karyotype. The presence of microsatellites on the long and short arms was found in the chromosomes of the second pair. Frequently there were 4 nucleoli of unequal size in interphase nuclei. In many cells, lower numbers of nucleoli (3-1 were seen which was -probably due to their fusion. The maximum number of nucleoli corresponded to the number of nucleolar organizers accompanying the satellites.

  18. Chromosome investigations on persons whose mothers have been treated with ionizing radiations during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanebuth, P.

    1982-01-01

    This thesis reports on chromosome investigations on seven persons between 2 and 26 years of age who, during their prenatal life, have been exposed to ionizing radiation. The metaphase chromosomes from peripheral lymphocytes, obtained by standard cytogenic methods, have been scanned for numerical and structural aberrations after a culture period of two or three days. Comparison with non-irradiated specimens revealed a summarily slight increase in the occurrence of some structural aberrations in the irradiated material. The differences are smaller in number than the rate of deviation to be accounted to culturing techniques so that one cannot deduce a radiation-induced impairment from these results. As one of the persons investigated has been undergoing longterm therapy with anticonvulsive drugs, this case is discussed separately. In another case, new staining methods (G, C, or Q-bands) together with an investigation of material from the father, revealed a particularly small Y-chromosome. (orig./MG) [de

  19. Exceptional Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Three Generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannie Kartapradja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an exceptional complex chromosomal rearrangement (CCR found in three individuals in a family that involves 4 chromosomes with 5 breakpoints. The CCR was ascertained in a phenotypically abnormal newborn with additional chromosomal material on the short arm of chromosome 4. Maternal karyotyping indicated that the mother carried an apparently balanced CCR involving chromosomes 4, 6, 11, and 18. Maternal transmission of the derivative chromosome 4 resulted in partial trisomy for chromosomes 6q and 18q and a partial monosomy of chromosome 4p in the proband. Further family studies found that the maternal grandmother carried the same apparently balanced CCR as the proband’s mother, which was confirmed using the whole chromosome painting (WCP FISH. High resolution whole genome microarray analysis of DNA from the proband’s mother found no evidence for copy number imbalance in the vicinity of the CCR translocation breakpoints, or elsewhere in the genome, providing evidence that the mother’s and grandmother’s CCRs were balanced at a molecular level. This structural rearrangement can be categorized as an exceptional CCR due to its complexity and is a rare example of an exceptional CCR being transmitted in balanced and/or unbalanced form across three generations.

  20. Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Chromosomal Abnormalities and Common Trombophilic Mutations in Cases with Recurrent Miscarriage. Ahmet Karatas, Recep Eroz, Mustafa Albayrak, Tulay Ozlu, Bulent Cakmak, Fatih Keskin ...

  1. Reflections and meditations upon complex chromosomal exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, John R K

    2002-12-01

    The application of FISH chromosome painting techniques, especially the recent mFISH (and its equivalents) where all 23 human chromosome pairs can be distinguished, has demonstrated that many chromosome-type structural exchanges are much more complicated (involving more "break-rejoins" and arms) than has hitherto been assumed. It is clear that we have been greatly under-estimating the damage produced in chromatin by such agents as ionising radiation. This article gives a brief historical summary of observations leading up to this conclusion, and after outlining some of the problems surrounding the formation of complex chromosomes exchanges, speculates about possible solutions currently being proposed.

  2. Chromosomal aberrations in ore miners of Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beno, M.; Vladar, M.; Nikodemova, D.; Vicanova, M.; Durcik, M.

    1998-01-01

    A pilot study was performed in which the incidence of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners in ore mines located in Central Slovakia was monitored and related to lifetime underground radon exposure and to lifetime smoking. The conclusions drawn from the results of the study were as follows: the counts of chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of miners were significantly higher than in an age matched control group of white-collar staff; the higher counts of chromosomal aberrations could be ascribed to underground exposure of miners and to smoking; a dependence of chromosomal aberration counts on the exposure to radon could not be assessed. (A.K.)

  3. Chromosomal instability can be induced by the formation of breakage-prone chromosome rearrangement junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.N.; Ritter, L.; Moore, S.R.; Grosovsky, A.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Studies in our lab have led to the hypothesis that chromosomal rearrangements can generate novel breakage-prone sites, resulting in chromosomal instability acting predominantly in cis. For example, specific breakage of large blocks of centromeric region heterochromatin on chromosome 16q by treatment with 2,6-diaminopurine (DAP) is associated with repeated rearrangement of chromosome 16q during outgrowth of DAP-treated clones, thereby establishing a link between the initial site of damage and the occurrence of persistent chromosomal instability. Similarly, karyotypic analysis of gamma ray induced instability demonstrated that chromosomal rearrangements in sub-clones were significantly clustered near the site of previously identified chromosomal rearrangement junctions in unstable parental clones. This study investigates the hypothesis that integration of transfected sequences into host chromosomes could create breakage-prone junction regions and persistent genomic instability without exposure to DNA-damage agents. These junctions may mimic the unstable chromosomal rearrangements induced by DAP or radiation, and thus provide a test of the broader hypothesis that instability can to some extent be attributed to the formation of novel chromosomal breakage hot spots. These experiments were performed using human-hamster hybrid AL cells containing a single human chromosome 11, which was used to monitor instability in a chromosomal painting assay. AL cells were transfected with a 2.5 Kb fragment containing multiple copies of the 180 bp human alpha heterochromatic repeat, which resulted in chromosomal instability in 41% of the transfected clones. Parallel exposure to gamma-radiation resulted in a similar level of chromosomal instability, although control transfections with plasmid alone did not lead to karyotypic instability. Chromosomal instability induced by integration of alpha heterochromatic repeats was also frequently associated with delayed reproductive

  4. The chromosomal complement of the artedidraconid fish Histiodraco velifer (Perciformes: Notothenioidei) from Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, V; Splendiani, A; Nisi Cerioni, P; Olmo, E

    2003-01-01

    The karyotype of Histiodraco velifer from the Antartic Ocean was analyzed using various banding methods and in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe. A male and a female had a diploid set of 46 chromosomes (6 submetacentric + 40 acrocentric, FN = 52); the nucleolar organizer was CMA3-positive and was located on the short arm of a medium-sized submetacentric pair. All chromosomes stained uniformly with DAPI, whereas C-banding revealed heterochromatic blocks that were mostly located centromerically and telomerically and were resistant to ALUI digestion. The substantial identity of the karyotype of H. velifer with that of the other artedidraconids investigated so far suggests that chromosome changes must have played a less than significant role in the speciation among the lineages of this fish family endemic to Antarctica. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  5. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia interval on chromosome 8p23.1 characterized by genetics and protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longoni, Mauro; Hansen, Kasper Lage; Russell, Meaghan K.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome 8p23.1 is a common hotspot associated with major congenital malformations, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) and cardiac defects. We present findings from high‐resolution arrays in patients who carry a loss (n = 18) or a gain (n = 1) of sub‐band 8p23.1. We confirm a region...

  6. Karyotype and chromosomal characteristics of Ag-NOR sites and 5S rDNA in European smelt, Osmerus eperlanus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ocalewicz, K.; Hliwa, P.; Krol, J.; Rábová, Marie; Stabinski, R.; Ráb, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 131, - (2007), s. 29-35 ISSN 0016-6707 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA6045405; GA MŠk LC06073 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : chromosome banding * cytotaxonomy of smelt * fish cytogenetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.396, year: 2007

  7. Chromosomal Rainbows detect Oncogenic Rearrangements of Signaling Molecules in Thyroid Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Benjamin; Jossart, Gregg H.; Ito, Yuko; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Munne, Santiago; Clark, Orlo H.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2010-08-19

    Altered signal transduction can be considered a hallmark of many solid tumors. In thyroid cancers the receptor tyrosine kinase (rtk) genes NTRK1 (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man = OMIM *191315, also known as 'TRKA'), RET ('Rearranged during Transfection protooncogene', OMIM *164761) and MET (OMIM *164860) have been reported as activated, rearranged or overexpressed. In many cases, a combination of cytogenetic and molecular techniques allows elucidation of cellular changes that initiate tumor development and progression. While the mechanisms leading to overexpression of the rtk MET gene remain largely unknown, a variety of chromosomal rearrangements of the RET or NTKR1 gene could be demonstrated in thyroid cancer. Abnormal expressions in these tumors seem to follow a similar pattern: the rearrangement translocates the 3'-end of the rtk gene including the entire catalytic domain to an expressed gene leading to a chimeric RNA and protein with kinase activity. Our research was prompted by an increasing number of reports describing translocations involving ret and previously unknown translocation partners. We developed a high resolution technique based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to allow rapid screening for cytogenetic rearrangements which complements conventional chromosome banding analysis. Our technique applies simultaneous hybridization of numerous probes labeled with different reporter molecules which are distributed along the target chromosome allowing the detection of cytogenetic changes at near megabase-pair (Mbp) resolution. Here, we report our results using a probe set specific for human chromosome 10, which is altered in a significant portion of human thyroid cancers (TC's). While rendering accurate information about the cytogenetic location of rearranged elements, our multi-locus, multi-color analysis was developed primarily to overcome limitations of whole chromosome painting (WCP) and chromosome banding

  8. Chromosomal replicons of higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van't Hof, J.

    1987-01-01

    This brief discussion of replicons of higher plants offers a glimpse into the properties of chromosomal DNA replication. It gives evidence that the S phase of unrelated plant species is comprised of temporally ordered replicon families that increase in number with genome size. This orderly process, which assures a normal inheritance of genetic material to recipient daughter cells, is maintained at the level of replicon clusters by two mutually exclusive mechanisms, one involving the rate at which single replicons replicate their allotment of DNA, and another by means of the tempo-pause. The same two mechanisms are used by cells to alter the pattern of chromosomal DNA replication just prior to and during normal development. Both mechanisms are genetically determined and produce genetic effects when disturbed of disrupted by additional non-conforming DNAs. Further insight into how these two mechanisms operate requires more molecular information about the nature of replicons and the factors that govern when a replicon family replicates. Plant material is a rich and ideal source for this information just awaiting exploitation. 63 refs

  9. Increased chromosome radiosensitivity during pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricoul, Michelle; Sabatier, Laure; Dutrillaux, Bernard

    1997-01-01

    It was necessary to consider the risks of exposure of pregnant women, not only in relation to the child, but also in relation to their own hypersensitivity. We have demonstrated that pregnancy increases radiosensitivity of chromosome in the mouse at the end of gestation. This is of importance since it may have implications on radioprotection of pregnant women and give experimental guidelines to the problems of hypersensitivity to drugs and cancer aggravation during pregnancy. Blood obtained from women at various times of pregnancy was exposed to ionizing radiations. By comparison to non-pregnant women, an increase in chromosome breakage was observed in metaphases from lymphocytes, after short-term culture in the presence of the serum of the same donor. Immediately after delivery, this increase in radiosensitivity disappeared. In a prospective study, serial analyses showed a very strong correlation between the amount of pregnancy hormones, progesterone in particular, and the increase in radiosensitivity. Pregnant women may have an increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation during the second half of their pregnancy. This study provides the first evidence in human that radiosensitivity may vary in relation to physiological conditions

  10. Selfish X chromosomes and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Manus M

    2017-12-27

    In two papers published at about the same time almost thirty years ago, Frank (Evolution, 45, 1991a, 262) and Hurst and Pomiankowski (Genetics, 128, 1991, 841) independently suggested that divergence of meiotic drive systems-comprising genes that cheat meiosis and genes that suppress this cheating-might provide a general explanation for Haldane's rule and the large X-effect in interspecific hybrids. Although at the time, the idea was met with skepticism and a conspicuous absence of empirical support, the tide has since turned. Some of the clearest mechanistic explanations we have for hybrid male sterility involve meiotic drive systems, and several other cases of hybrid sterility are suggestive of a role for meiotic drive. In this article, I review these ideas and their descendants and catalog the current evidence for the meiotic drive model of speciation. In addition, I suggest that meiotic drive is not the only intragenomic conflict to involve the X chromosome and contribute to hybrid incompatibility. Sexually and parentally antagonistic selection pressures can also pit the X chromosome and autosomes against each other. The resulting intragenomic conflicts should lead to co-evolution within populations and divergence between them, thus increasing the likelihood of incompatibilities in hybrids. I provide a sketch of these ideas and interpret some empirical patterns in the light of these additional X-autosome conflicts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Noise exposure in marching bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies involving orchestras have shown that music ensembles can produce hazardous noise levels. There are no similar data for marching bands and pep bands. In order to evaluate the noise levels produced by marching and pep bands, 1/3-octave-band sound-pressure levels were measured while these groups rehearsed and performed. Data were collected while marching with the bands to ensure a realistic environment. Comparing these data to OSHA and NIOSH criteria, marching and pep band exposures often exceed safe values. For typical exposures, OSHA doses range from 11% to 295%, while NIOSH doses range from 35% to 3055%. Exposures that would be considered hazardous in the workplace are common in marching and pep bands; students and band directors should take steps to recognize the risk posed by various instruments and various locations, and should implement hearing conservation efforts.

  12. Chromosomal break points in irradiated and ethyl methane sulphonate treated leucocytes of patients with Down syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeja, T.C.; Chandra, N.; Marimuthu, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    Frequencies of chromosomal damage in the peripheral leucocytes of patients with Down syndrome, on exposure to gamma rays (2Gy) or ethyl methane sulphonate (EMS, 1 x 10 -4 M), were assessed. Analysis of break points in the chromosomes of irradiated cells revealed a non-random occurrence. Six of the break points observed in EMS-treated cells were found to overlap with those recorded in irradiated cells. Thirteen break points observed were found to correlate with the location of cancer-specific break points and four of these coincided with the bands where oncogenes have been located. Two break points were localised to the same bands as that of known heritable fragile sites. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Exchange of core chromosomes and horizontal transfer of lineage-specific chromosomes in Fusarium oxysporum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaardingerbroek, I.; Beerens, B.; Rose, L.; Fokkens, L.; Cornelissen, B.J.C.; Rep, M.

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal transfer of supernumerary or lineage-specific (LS) chromosomes has been described in a number of plant pathogenic filamentous fungi. So far it was not known whether transfer is restricted to chromosomes of certain size or properties, or whether 'core' chromosomes can also undergo

  14. Cytogenetic analysis of the neotropical spider Nephilengys cruentata (Araneomorphae, tetragnathidae: standard staining, NORs, C-bands and base-specific fluorochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Araújo

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to characterize Nephilengys cruentata in relation to the diploid number, chromosome morphology, type of sex determination chromosome system, chromosomes bearing the Nucleolar Organizer Regions (NORs, C-banding pattern, and AT or GC repetitive sequences. The chromosome preparations were submitted to standard staining (Giemsa, NOR silver impregnation, C-banding technique, and base-specific fluorochrome staining. The analysis of the cells showed 2n = 24 and 2n = 26 chromosomes in the embryos, and 2n = 26 in the ovarian cells, being all the chromosomes acrocentric. The long arm of the pairs 1, 2 and 3 showed an extensive negative heteropycnotic area when the mitotic metaphases were stained with Giemsa. The sexual chromosomes did not show differential characteristics that allowed to distinguish them from the other chromosomes of the complement. Considering the diploid numbers found in N. cruentata and the prevalence of X1X2 sex determination chromosome system in Tetragnathidae, N. cruentata seems to possess 2n = 24 = 22 + X1X2 in the males, and 2n = 26 = 22 + X1X1X2X2 in the females. The pairs 1, 2 and 3 showed NORs which are coincident with the negative heteropycnotic patterns. Using the C-banding technique, the pericentromeric region of the chromosomes revealed small quantity or even absence of constitutive heterochromatin, differing of the C-banding pattern described in other species of spiders. In N. cruentata the fluorochromes DAPI/DA, DAPI/MM and CMA3/DA revealed that the constitutive heterochromatin is rich in AT bases and the NORs possess repetitive sequences of GC bases.

  15. Distributions of Low- and High-LET Radiation-Induced Breaks in Chromosomes are Associated with Inter- and Intrachromosome Exchanges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    To study the breakpoint along the length of the chromosome induced by low- and high-LET radiations, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to Cs-137 rays at both low and high dose rates, secondary neutrons at a low dose rate, and 600 MeV/u Fe ions at a high dose rate. The location of the breaks was identified using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) that paints Chromosome 3 in 23 different colored bands. The breakpoint distributions were found to be similar between rays of low and high dose rates and between the two high-LET radiation types. Detailed analysis of the chromosome break ends involved in inter- and intrachromosome exchanges revealed that only the break ends participating in interchromosome exchanges contributed to the hot spots found for low-LET. For break ends participating in intrachromosome exchanges, the distributions for all four radiation scenarios were similar with clusters of breaks found in three regions. Analysis of the locations of the two break ends in Chromosome 3 that joined to form an intrachromosome exchange demonstrated that two breaks with a greater genomic separation may be more likely to rejoin than two closer breaks, indicating that chromatin folding can play an important role in the rejoining of chromosome breaks. Our study demonstrated that the gene-rich regions do not necessarily contain more breaks. The breakpoint distribution depends more on the likelihood that a break will join with another break in the same chromosome or in a different chromosome.

  16. Computational Analysis of G-Quadruplex Forming Sequences across Chromosomes Reveals High Density Patterns Near the Terminal Ends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia H Chariker

    Full Text Available G-quadruplex structures (G4 are found throughout the human genome and are known to play a regulatory role in a variety of molecular processes. Structurally, they have many configurations and can form from one or more DNA strands. At the gene level, they regulate gene expression and protein synthesis. In this paper, chromosomal-level patterns of distribution are analyzed on the human genome to identify high-level distribution patterns potentially related to global functional processes. Here we show unique high density banding patterns on individual chromosomes that are highly correlated, appearing in a mirror pattern, across forward and reverse DNA strands. The highest density of G4 sequences occurs within four megabases of one end of most chromosomes and contains G4 motifs that bind with zinc finger proteins. These findings suggest that G4 may play a role in global chromosomal processes such as those found in meiosis.

  17. Localization of introduced genes on the chromosomes of transgenic barley, wheat and triticale by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Zimny, J.; Becker, D.

    1997-01-01

    Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized introduced genes on metaphase chromosomes of barley, wheat, and triticale transformed by microprojectile bombardment of microspores and scutellar tissue with the pDB1 plasmid containing the uidA and bar genes. Thirteen integration sites...... of single-copy integrations. There was a slight tendency towards the localization of transgenes in distal chromosome regions. Using the GAA-satellite sequence for chromosome banding, the chromosomes containing the inserted genes were identified in most cases. Two barley lines derived from the same...... transformant showed a totally different integration pattern. Southern analysis confirmed that the inserted genes were segregating independently, resulting in different integration patterns among the progeny lines. The application of the FISH technique for the analysis of transgenic plants is discussed....

  18. Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae reveals different chromosome number for the genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izaura Bezerra Francini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetic analysis of the Amazon stingless bee Melipona seminigra merrillae, by conventional Giemsa staining and C-banding, revealed a different chromosome number for Melipona: 2n = 22 for females and diploid drones while the haploid drones present n = 11. There is no evidence of B chromosomes. This result contrasts with previous studies, in which the chromosome number of 19 Melipona species was determined as 2n = 18 for females and n = 9 for haploid males. Based on cytogenetic information available for other Melipona species, we propose that M. s. merrillae has a more derived diploid number. This indicates that chromosome number is not a conservative characteristic within the genus as previously thought. Cytogenetic data for stingless bees are scarce, especially in Amazon region. Additional studies will be very important in order to promote Melipona karyoevolution discussion and consequently a taxonomy review.

  19. Late-replicating X-chromosome: replication patterns in mammalian females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tunin Karen

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The GTG-banding and 5-BrdU incorporation patterns of the late-replicating X-chromosome were studied in female dogs and cattle, and compared to human female patterns. The replication patterns of the short arm of the X-chromosomes did not show any difference between human, dog and cattle females. As to the long arm, some bands showed differences among the three studied species regarding the replication kinetics pattern. These differences were observed in a restricted region of the X-chromosome, delimited by Xq11 -> q25 in humans, by Xq1 -> q8 in dogs, and by Xq12 -> q32 in cattle. In an attempt to find out if these differences in the replication kinetics could be a reflection of differences in the localization of genes in that region of the X-chromosome, we used the probe for the human androgen receptor gene (AR localized at Xq12, which is in the region where we observed differences among the three studied species. We did not, however, observe hybridization signals. Our study goes on, using other human probes for genes located in the region Xq11 -> Xq25.

  20. The use of unstable chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in the individual biomonitoring: a comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Thiago de Salazar e

    2005-02-01

    Biodosimetry is based on the investigation of radioinduced biological effects in order to correlate them with the absorbed dose. The quantification of unstable chromosome aberrations and micronuclei, in peripheral blood lymphocytes, are two methods commonly used in biodosimetry. In this context, the aim of this research was to compare these methods in the biomonitoring of health care professionals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. In parallel, the technique of C-banding was evaluated for quality control of unstable chromosome aberrations analyses. Thus, samples of peripheral blood from health care professionals of three hospitals from Recife (Brazil) were collected, and the lymphocytes cultures were carried out based on the cytogenetic classical technique. It was pointed out that analysis of micronuclei is faster than the unstable chromosome aberrations ones, which suggests the use of the former in preliminary evaluation in cases of suspected accidental exposure. C-banding technique was efficient, as confirmatory test, in the identification of dicentrics and rings during the analyses of unstable chromosome aberrations, being able to be applied in the quality control in biodosimetry. The comparison between the individual work conditions with the frequencies of unstable aberrations and micronuclei obtained from cytogenetic analysis, resulted in the change of behavior of the professionals involved in this research, with a better observance of the radioprotection standards. (author)

  1. Identification of a structural chromosomal rearrangement in the karyotype of a root vole from Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadzhafova, R.S.; Bulatova, N.Sh.; Kozlovskii, A.I.; Ryabov, I.N.

    1994-01-01

    Karyological studies of rodents within a 30-km radius of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant revealed one female root vole (Microtus oeconomus) with an abnormal karyotype. The use of C, G, and AgNOR banding methods allowed determination that morphological changes in two nonhomologous autosomes, which were accompanied by rearrangements in distribution of G bands, heterochromatin, and NOR, are the result of a reciprocal translocation. Chromosomal aberrations were probably inherited or appeared in embryogenesis, since none of the analyzed cells of the studied vole had a normal karyotype. It is important to note that this rearrangement was detected five years after the meltdown. Both breaks and reunions of the chromosomes that participate in this rearrangement are probably located in regions that are not important for functioning of these chromosomes. Thus, it can be supposed that the detected rearrangement did not influence the viability of the vole. This karyotype was compared to a standard karyotype of a root vole from another area of the species range. The heteromorphism of the first pair of chromosomes in both voles, which was detected for the first time, is probably normal for the karyotype of M. oeconomus and is not linked with any radiation-induced intrachromosomal aberrations

  2. Semiconductors bonds and bands

    CERN Document Server

    Ferry, David K

    2013-01-01

    As we settle into this second decade of the twenty-first century, it is evident that the advances in micro-electronics have truly revolutionized our day-to-day lifestyle. The technology is built upon semiconductors, materials in which the band gap has been engineered for special values suitable to the particular application. This book, written specifically for a one semester course for graduate students, provides a thorough understanding of the key solid state physics of semiconductors. It describes how quantum mechanics gives semiconductors unique properties that enabled the micro-electronics revolution, and sustain the ever-growing importance of this revolution.

  3. A recurrent human papillomavirus integration site at chromosome region 12q14-q15 in SW756 and SK-v cell lines derived from genital tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sastre-Garau, X.; Couturier, J.; Favre, M.; Orth, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SW756 cell line, derived from an invasive cancer of the uterine cervix, harbours integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 DNA sequences which have been located in chromosome band 12q13. By in situ hybridization experiments with tritiated and digoxigenin-labelled HPV18 probes on R-banded chromosomes, we now localize the integrated viral sequences in 12q14-q15. Interestingly, we have previously localized integrated HPV16 sequences in the same chromosomal region in SK-v cells, derived from a pre-invasive vulvar neoplasia. The chromosomal region 12q14-q15 could thus correspond to a preferential site for the integration of HPV DNA in genital tumors. (authors). 29 refs., 2 figs

  4. Translocations of Chromosome End-Segments and Facultative Heterochromatin Promote Meiotic Ring Formation in Evening Primroses[W][OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golczyk, Hieronim; Massouh, Amid; Greiner, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Due to reciprocal chromosomal translocations, many species of Oenothera (evening primrose) form permanent multichromosomal meiotic rings. However, regular bivalent pairing is also observed. Chiasmata are restricted to chromosomal ends, which makes homologous recombination virtually undetectable. Genetic diversity is achieved by changing linkage relations of chromosomes in rings and bivalents via hybridization and reciprocal translocations. Although the structural prerequisite for this system is enigmatic, whole-arm translocations are widely assumed to be the mechanistic driving force. We demonstrate that this prerequisite is genome compartmentation into two epigenetically defined chromatin fractions. The first one facultatively condenses in cycling cells into chromocenters negative both for histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 4 and for C-banding, and forms huge condensed middle chromosome regions on prophase chromosomes. Remarkably, it decondenses in differentiating cells. The second fraction is euchromatin confined to distal chromosome segments, positive for histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation and for histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation. The end-segments are deprived of canonical telomeres but capped with constitutive heterochromatin. This genomic organization promotes translocation breakpoints between the two chromatin fractions, thus facilitating exchanges of end-segments. We challenge the whole-arm translocation hypothesis by demonstrating why reciprocal translocations of chromosomal end-segments should strongly promote meiotic rings and evolution toward permanent translocation heterozygosity. Reshuffled end-segments, each possessing a major crossover hot spot, can furthermore explain meiotic compatibility between genomes with different translocation histories. PMID:24681616

  5. Degenerate band edge laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veysi, Mehdi; Othman, Mohamed A. K.; Figotin, Alexander; Capolino, Filippo

    2018-05-01

    We propose a class of lasers based on a fourth-order exceptional point of degeneracy (EPD) referred to as the degenerate band edge (DBE). EPDs have been found in parity-time-symmetric photonic structures that require loss and/or gain; here we show that the DBE is a different kind of EPD since it occurs in periodic structures that are lossless and gainless. Because of this property, a small level of gain is sufficient to induce single-frequency lasing based on a synchronous operation of four degenerate Floquet-Bloch eigenwaves. This lasing scheme constitutes a light-matter interaction mechanism that leads also to a unique scaling law of the laser threshold with the inverse of the fifth power of the laser-cavity length. The DBE laser has the lowest lasing threshold in comparison to a regular band edge laser and to a conventional laser in cavities with the same loaded quality (Q ) factor and length. In particular, even without mirror reflectors the DBE laser exhibits a lasing threshold which is an order of magnitude lower than that of a uniform cavity laser of the same length and with very high mirror reflectivity. Importantly, this novel DBE lasing regime enforces mode selectivity and coherent single-frequency operation even for pumping rates well beyond the lasing threshold, in contrast to the multifrequency nature of conventional uniform cavity lasers.

  6. Flow Analysis and Sorting of Plant Chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vrána, Jan; Cápal, Petr; Šimková, Hana; Karafiátová, Miroslava; Čížková, Jana; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Oct 10 (2016), 5.3.1-5.3.43 ISSN 1934-9300 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : cell cycle synchronization * chromosome genomics * chromosome isolation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  7. Chromosome studies in Cashew ( Anacardium occidentale L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the increased cultivation of cashew as a commodity crop in sub-Sahara Africa, Asia and South America there are few chromosome studies on it. The present study investigates number, structure and behavior of chromosome in cashew populations growing in Nigeria. Cytological examination of these populations ...

  8. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The literature is surveyed for data on recombination between loci on chromosome 5 of barley; 13 loci fall into the category “mapped” loci, more than 20 into the category “associated” loci and nine into the category “loci once suggested to be on chromosome 5”. A procedure was developed...

  9. Statistics for X-chromosome associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbek, Umut; Lin, Hui-Min; Lin, Yan; Weeks, Daniel E; Chen, Wei; Shaffer, John R; Purcell, Shaun M; Feingold, Eleanor

    2018-06-13

    In a genome-wide association study (GWAS), association between genotype and phenotype at autosomal loci is generally tested by regression models. However, X-chromosome data are often excluded from published analyses of autosomes because of the difference between males and females in number of X chromosomes. Failure to analyze X-chromosome data at all is obviously less than ideal, and can lead to missed discoveries. Even when X-chromosome data are included, they are often analyzed with suboptimal statistics. Several mathematically sensible statistics for X-chromosome association have been proposed. The optimality of these statistics, however, is based on very specific simple genetic models. In addition, while previous simulation studies of these statistics have been informative, they have focused on single-marker tests and have not considered the types of error that occur even under the null hypothesis when the entire X chromosome is scanned. In this study, we comprehensively tested several X-chromosome association statistics using simulation studies that include the entire chromosome. We also considered a wide range of trait models for sex differences and phenotypic effects of X inactivation. We found that models that do not incorporate a sex effect can have large type I error in some cases. We also found that many of the best statistics perform well even when there are modest deviations, such as trait variance differences between the sexes or small sex differences in allele frequencies, from assumptions. © 2018 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  10. Cytometric analysis of irradiation damaged chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, M.E.; Raju, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of cells in interphase results in dose-dependent damage to DNA which is discernable by flow-cytometric analysis of chromosomes. The quantity (and possibly the quality) of chromosomal changes is different in survival-matched doses of x and α irradiation. It may, therefore, be possible to use these methods for analysis of dose and type of exposure in unknown cases

  11. X-chromosome inactivation and escape

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-06

    Nov 6, 2015 ... tion and cancer in mice after a long period of time (Yildirim et al. 2013). ... chromosome of man has a short pairing seg- ment, that is not normally ..... Lyon M. F. 1988 The William Allan memorial award address: X-chromosome ...

  12. Chromosomal evolution and phylogenetic analyses in Tayassu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chromosome preparation and karyotype description. The material analysed consists of chromosome preparations of the tayassuid species T. pecari (three individuals) and. P. tajacu (four individuals) and were made from short-term lymphocyte cultures of whole blood samples using standard protocols (Chaves et al. 2002).

  13. AFM image of an entire polygene chromosome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Minqian; Takeuchi; Ikai, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author present AFM images of an entire polygene chromosome of Drosophila for the first time. Comparing with conventional optical microscope, the AFM image of the polygene chromosomes provides much higher resolution and 3-D measurement capability which will lead to finer scale gene mapping and identification

  14. A sexy spin on nonrandom chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charville, Gregory W; Rando, Thomas A

    2013-06-06

    Nonrandom chromosome segregation is an intriguing phenomenon linked to certain asymmetric stem cell divisions. In a recent report in Nature, Yadlapalli and Yamashita (2013) observe nonrandom segregation of X and Y chromosomes in Drosophila germline stem cells and shed light on the complex mechanisms of this fascinating process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Chromosomal evolution of the Canidae. I. Species with high diploid numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, R K; Nash, W G; O'Brien, S J

    1987-01-01

    The Giemsa banding patterns of seven canid species, including the grey wolf (Canis lupus), the maned wolf (Chrysocyon brachyurus), the bush dog (Speothos venaticus), the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous), the grey fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus), the bat-eared fox (Otocyon megalotis), and the fennec (Fennecus zerda), are presented and compared. Relative to other members of Canidae, these species have high diploid complements (2n greater than 64) consisting of largely acrocentric chromosomes. They show a considerable degree of chromosome homoeology, but relative to the grey wolf, each species is either missing chromosomes or has unique chromosomal additions and rearrangements. Differences in chromosome morphology among the seven species were used to reconstruct their phylogenetic history. The results suggest that the South American canids are closely related to each other and are derived from a wolf-like progenitor. The fennec and the bat-eared fox seem to be recent derivatives of a lineage that branched early from the wolf-like canids and which also includes the grey fox.

  16. Ring chromosome 4 and Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) in a child with multiple anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sevim; Engiz, Ozlem; Aktaş, Dilek; Vargel, Ibrahim; Beksaç, M S; Mrasek, Kristin; Vermeesch, Joris; Liehr, Thomas

    2006-03-15

    We report on a 16-month-old male patient with ring chromosome 4 and deletion of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) region with multiple congenital anomalies including unilateral cleft lip and palate, iris coloboma, microcephaly, midgut malrotation, hypospadias, and double urethral orifices. Peripheral chromosome analysis of the patient showed 46,XY,r(4)(p16.3q35) de novo. Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) study was also performed and according to multicolor banding (MCB) a r(4)(::p16.3 --> q34.3 approximately 35.1::) was found in all metaphases. Subtelomeric 4p region, subtelomeric 4q region, as well as, Wolf-Hirschhorn critical region were deleted in ring chromosome 4. Genomic microarray analysis was also performed to delineate the size of deletion. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypoplastic corpus callosum, delayed myelinization, and frontal and occipital lobe atrophies. Both maternal and paternal chromosomal analyses were normal. We compare the phenotypic appearance of our patient with the previously reported 16 cases of ring chromosome 4 in the medical literature. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Heterogeneity of chromosome 22 breakpoint in Philadelphia-positive (Ph+) acute lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, J.; Griffin, C.A.; Ar-Rushdi, A.

    1986-01-01

    In chronic myelogenous leukemias (CML) with the t(9;22)(q34;q11) chromosome translocation the breakpoints on chromosome 22 occur within a 5.8-kilobase segment of DNA referred to as breakpoint cluster region (bcr). The same cytogenetically indinstinguishable translocation occurs in approximately 10% of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemias (ALL). In this study the authors have investigated the chromosome breakpoints in several cases of ALL carrying the t(9;22) translocation. In three of five cases of ALL they found that the bcr region was not involved in the chromosome rearrangement and that the 22q11 chromosome breakpoints were proximal (5') to the bcr region at band 22q11. In addition, they observed normal size bcr and c-alb transcripts in an ALL cell line carrying the t(9;22) translocation. They conclude, therefore, that if c-alb is inappropriately expressed in ALL cells without bcr rearrangements, the genetic mechanism of activation must be different from that reported for CML

  18. Fluorescence- and NOR-studies at chromosomes of several vertebrate-species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, F.

    1984-05-01

    In the investigated species of fishes clear-cut Chromomycin-positive blocks were visualised. This holds true as well for Lecaspius delineatus, Gobio gobio, Perca fluciatilis, Cyprinus carpio, Carassius and auratus gibelio. In contrast, DA-DAPI-Fluorescence was homogenous along the entire chromosome. The silver-impregnation-technique proved useful in all investigated species of fisches. In the chicken certain chromosome-districts the Chromomycin-fluorescence was more pronounced than in others; Distamycin-DAPI led to a homogeneous staining along hole the arms. The investigations in mouse-chromosomes revealed an R-banding-pattern. The Distamycin-DAPI-pattern of mouse-chromosomes were complementary to the Chromomycin-pattern and strongly pronounced centromeres. Again Distmycin-DAPI-staining did not allow an unquastinable bandling resolution; simularities to Actimomycin-DAPI-fluorochrome-included patterns were observed. By means of silver-impragnation-techniques the presence of double-point-formed NOR's on more chromosomes were highlighted. However an exact destination of the number was not possible and remains reserved to further investigations. (Author)

  19. Structural divergence of chromosomes between malaria vectors Anopheles lesteri and Anopheles sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Liang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles lesteri and Anopheles sinensis are two major malaria vectors in China and Southeast Asia. They are dramatically different in terms of geographical distribution, host preference, resting habitats, and other traits associated with ecological adaptation and malaria transmission. Both species belong to the Anopheles hyrcanus group, but the extent of genetic differences between them is not well understood. To provide an effective way to differentiate between species and to find useful markers for population genetics studies, we performed a comparative cytogenetic analysis of these two malaria vectors. Results Presented here is a standard cytogenetic map for An. lesteri, and a comparative analysis of chromosome structure and gene order between An. lesteri and An. sinensis. Our results demonstrate that much of the gene order on chromosomes X and 2 was reshuffled between the two species. However, the banding pattern and the gene order on chromosome 3 appeared to be conserved. We also found two new polymorphic inversions, 2Lc and 3Rb, in An. lesteri, and we mapped the breakpoints of these two inversions on polytene chromosomes. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the extent of structural divergence of chromosomes between An. lesteri and An. sinensis, and provide a new taxonomic cytogenetic tool to distinguish between these two species. Polymorphic inversions of An. lesteri could serve as markers for studies of the population structure and ecological adaptations of this major malaria vector.

  20. Temporal genomic evolution of bird sex chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zongji; Zhang, Jilin; Yang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sex chromosomes exhibit many unusual patterns in sequence and gene expression relative to autosomes. Birds have evolved a female heterogametic sex system (male ZZ, female ZW), through stepwise suppression of recombination between chrZ and chrW. To address the broad patterns and complex...... driving forces of Z chromosome evolution, we analyze here 45 newly available bird genomes and four species' transcriptomes, over their course of recombination loss between the sex chromosomes. RESULTS: We show Z chromosomes in general have a significantly higher substitution rate in introns and synonymous...... ('fast-Z' evolution). And species with a lower level of intronic heterozygosities tend to evolve even faster on the Z chromosome. Further analysis of fast-evolving genes' enriched functional categories and sex-biased expression patterns support that, fast-Z evolution in birds is mainly driven by genetic...

  1. Chromosome behaviour in Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y J

    1980-01-01

    Rhoeo spathacea var. variegata is unusual in that its twelve chromosomes are arranged in a ring at meiosis. The order of the chromosomes has been established, and each chromosome arm has been designated a letter in accordance with the segmental interchange theory. Chromosomes are often irregularly orientated at metaphase I. Chromosomes at anaphase I are generally distributed equally (6-6, 58.75%) although not necessarily balanced. Due to adjacent distribution, 7-5 distribution at anaphase I was frequently observed (24.17%), and due to lagging, 6-1-5 and 5-2-5 distributions were also observed (10.83% and 3.33% respectively). Three types of abnormal distribution, 8-4, 7-1-4 and 6-2-4 were observed very infrequently (2.92% total), and their possible origins are discussed. Irregularities, such as adjacent distribution and lagging, undoubtedly reduce the fertility of the plant because of the resulting unbalanced gametes.

  2. Chromosome reduction in Eleocharis maculosa (Cyperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, C R M; González-Elizondo, M S; Laforga Vanzela, A L

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome numbers in Cyperaceae lower than the typical basic number x = 5 have been described for only three species: Rhynchospora tenuis (n = 2), Fimbristylis umbellaris (n = 3) and Eleocharis subarticulata (n = 3). Eleocharis maculosa is recorded here as the fourth species of Cyperaceae that has a chromosome number lower than 2n = 10, with 2n = 8, 7 and 6. The karyotype differentiation in E. maculosa was studied using conventional staining (mitosis and meiosis), FISH with 45S and 5S rDNA and telomere probes. The results allow us to determine which chromosomes of the chromosome race with 2n = 10 fused to form the remaining reduced numbers, as well as to understand how the symploidy and translocation mechanisms were important in karyotype differentiation and the formation of chromosome races in Eleocharis. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia-associated chromosomal abnormalities and miRNA deregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiefer Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Yvonne Kiefer1, Christoph Schulte2, Markus Tiemann2, Joern Bullerdiek11Center for Human Genetics, University of Bremen, Bremen, Germany; 2Hematopathology Hamburg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is the most common leukemia in adults. By cytogenetic investigations major subgroups of the disease can be identified that reflect different routes of tumor development. Of these chromosomal deviations, trisomy 12 and deletions of parts of either the long arm of chromosome 13, the long arm of chromosome 11, or the short arm of chromosome 17 are most commonly detected. In some of these aberrations the molecular target has been identified as eg, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM in case of deletions of chromosomal region 11q22~23 and the genes encoding microRNAs miR-15a/16-1 as likely targets of deletions of chromosomal band 13q14.3. Of note, these aberrations do not characterize independent subgroups but often coexist within the metaphases of one tumor. Generally, complex aberrations are associated with a worse prognosis than simple karyotypic alterations. Due to smaller sizes of the missing segment the detection of recurrent deletions is not always possible by means of classical cytogenetics but requires more advanced techniques as in particular fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. Nevertheless, at this time it is not recommended to replace classical cytogenetics by FISH because this would miss additional information given by complex or secondary karyotypic alterations. However, the results of cytogenetic analyses allow the stratification of prognostic and predictive groups of the disease. Of these, the group characterized by deletions involving TP53 is clinically most relevant. In the future refined methods as eg, array-based comparative genomic hybridization will supplement the existing techniques to characterize CLL. Keywords: chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chromosomal abnormality, miRNA deregulation

  4. Energy Landscapes of Folding Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin

    The genome, the blueprint of life, contains nearly all the information needed to build and maintain an entire organism. A comprehensive understanding of the genome is of paramount interest to human health and will advance progress in many areas, including life sciences, medicine, and biotechnology. The overarching goal of my research is to understand the structure-dynamics-function relationships of the human genome. In this talk, I will be presenting our efforts in moving towards that goal, with a particular emphasis on studying the three-dimensional organization, the structure of the genome with multi-scale approaches. Specifically, I will discuss the reconstruction of genome structures at both interphase and metaphase by making use of data from chromosome conformation capture experiments. Computationally modeling of chromatin fiber at atomistic level from first principles will also be presented as our effort for studying the genome structure from bottom up.

  5. The Y chromosome of the Atelidae family (Platyrrhini): study by chromosome microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifalli-Iughetti, C; Koiffmann, C P

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the intergeneric variability of the Y chromosome, we describe the hybridization of the Y chromosome of Brachytelesarachnoides, obtained by microdissection, to metaphases of Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus, Lagothrixlagothricha, and Alouatta male specimens. Brachytelesarachnoides (Atelinae) has 62 chromosomes and a very small Y chromosome. Our results showed that the Brachytelesarachnoides Y chromosome probe hybridized to Lagothrixlagothricha metaphases yielding one hybridization signal on only the tiny Y chromosome, and when hybridized with Atelesbelzebuthmarginatus metaphases it yielded one hybridization signal on two thirds of the small acrocentric Y chromosome. However, no hybridization signal was observed in Alouatta metaphases (subfamily Alouattinae), a closely related genus in the Atelidae family. Furthermore, our data support a close phylogenetic relationship among Brachyteles, Ateles, and Lagothrix and their placement in the Atelinae subfamily, but exclude Alouatta from this group indicating its placement as basal to this group. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Y-chromosome evolution: emerging insights into processes of Y-chromosome degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachtrog, Doris

    2013-02-01

    The human Y chromosome is intriguing not only because it harbours the master-switch gene that determines gender but also because of its unusual evolutionary history. The Y chromosome evolved from an autosome, and its evolution has been characterized by massive gene decay. Recent whole-genome and transcriptome analyses of Y chromosomes in humans and other primates, in Drosophila species and in plants have shed light on the current gene content of the Y chromosome, its origins and its long-term fate. Furthermore, comparative analysis of young and old Y chromosomes has given further insights into the evolutionary and molecular forces triggering Y-chromosome degeneration and into the evolutionary destiny of the Y chromosome.

  7. Cytogenetic data of Partamona peckolti (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini by C banding and fluorochrome staining with DA/CMA3 and DA/DAPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brito Rute Magalhães

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The stingless bees of the Partamona genus have been studied taxonomically, ecologically and behaviourally, but cytogenetic studies are still rare. The objective of this study was to obtain cytogenetic data to contribute to Partamona peckolti species characterization. Heterochromatin was localized in all chromosome pericentromeric regions but some blocks could be visualized on some large chromosomes arms. A large heterozygous DA-CMA3-positive band was observed on one large chromosome arm, but was completely absent when C banding was applied before fluorochrome staining, with only one small positive band being visualized. Sequential DA-CMA3-NOR staining of interphase nuclei provided coincident positive responses. This suggests that DA-CMA3-positive bands of P. peckolti correspond to nucleolar organizer regions, as previously confirmed for another Partamona species by FISH.

  8. Screening for Y Chromosome Microdeletion in a Nonobstructive Azoospermic Male Patient with Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation from His Sister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Gurkan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA of a patient diagnosed with nonobstructive azoospermia and with the history of allogenic bone marrow transplantation from his sister due to chronic myeloid leukemia was isolated from peripheral blood in order to screen Y chromosome microdeletions. 13 short tagged sites belonging to AZF a, b, and c loci were detected with multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. Bands were determined in ZFX/ZFY wells, whereas no bands were determined in wells of other STS regions. DNA isolation was done from buccal mucosa smear to obtain genomic DNA from patient's own cells and multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique was performed again. Bands were seen in all wells of 13 STS regions. Y chromosome microdeletion was not detected in the patient. In conclusion, genomic DNA isolation in patients undergoing BMT should be done from patients' own cells.

  9. Wide band ENDOR spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendonca Filho, C.

    1973-01-01

    The construction of an ENDOR spectrometer operating from 0,5 to 75 MHz within a single band, with ore Klystron and homodine detection, and no fundamental changes on the electron spin resonance spectrometer was described. The ENDOR signal can be detected both by amplitude modulation of the frequency field, or direct detection of the ESR output, which is taken to a signal analyser. The signal-to-noise ratio is raised by averaging rather than filtering avoiding the use of long time constants, providing natural line widths. The experimental apparatus and the spectra obtained are described. A discussion, relating the ENDOR line amplitudes with the experimental conditions is done and ENDOR mechanism, in which there is a relevant presence of cross relaxation is proposed

  10. Electronic band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, G.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to present, in detail, some theoretical methods used to calculate electronic band structures in crystals. The basic strategies employed to attack the problem of electronic-structure calculations are presented. Successive sections present the basic formulations of the tight-binding, orthogonalized-plane-wave, Green'sfunction, and pseudopotential methods with a discussion of their application to perfect solids. Exemplifications in the case of a few selected problems provide further insight by the author into the physical aspects of the different methods and are a guide to the use of their mathematical techniques. A discussion is offered of completely a priori Hartree-Fock calculations and attempts to extend them. Special aspects of the different methods are also discussed in light of recently published related work

  11. Aberrations of chromosome 8 in myelodysplastic syndromes: Clinical and biological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisavljević Dragomir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rearrangements of any single chromosome in human karyotype have been reported in patients with pMDS. Objective: To examine the role of aberrations of chromosome 8 in pathogenesis, clinical presentation and progression of myelodysplastic syndromes. Method: Cytogenetic analysis of bone marrow cells was carried out by direct method and by means of 24- and/or 48-hour unstimulated cell culture. Chromosomes were obtained by modified method of HG-bands. Results: On presentation, 109 out of 271 successfully karyotyped patients (40,2% had abnormal karyotypes. Among them, 22 patients (10.9% had aberrations of chromosome 8. Ten patients had trisomy 8 as "simple" aberration whilst additional three cases had trisomy 8 included in "complex" karyotypes (≥3 chromosomes. Cases with constitutional trisomy 8 mosaicism (CT8M were excluded using the chromosome analyses of PHA-stimulated blood cultures. On the contrary, monosomy (seven patients or deletion of chromosome 8 (two patients were exclusively found in "complex" karyotypes. During prolonged cytogenetic follow-up, trisomy 8 was not recorded in evolving karyotypes. In contrast, trisomy 8 disappeared in two cases during subsequent cytogenetic studies, i.e. 23 and 72 months from diagnosis, accompanied in one patient with complete hematological remission. No difference regarding age, sex, cytopenia, blood and marrow blast count or response to treatment was found between patients with trisomy 8 as the sole aberration compared to those with normal cytogenetics. Median survival of patients with trisomy 8 as the sole aberration was 27 months, as compared to 32 months in patients with normal cytogenetics (p=0.468, whilst median survival of patients with aberrations of chromosome 8 included in "complex" karyotypes was only 4 months. Conclusion: Aberrations of chromosome 8 are common in patients with pMDS. The presence of a clone with trisomy 8 is not always the sign of disease progression or poor

  12. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the continued development of a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and...

  13. Chromatid Painting for Chromosomal Inversion Detection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a novel approach to the detection of chromosomal inversions. Transmissible chromosome aberrations (translocations and inversions) have profound genetic...

  14. Automatic Metaphase Finding by Inter-Chromosome Extrema Profile Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vega-Alvarado, Leticia

    2001-01-01

    ...-level inter-chromosome coarseness features in microscopic images of metaphase spreads, and allows to quantity the texture of the cytological objects analysing the intensity profile between chromosome...

  15. Label Free Chromosome Translocation Detection with Silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwasny, Dorota; Andersen, Karsten Brandt; Frøhling, Kasper Bayer

    HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method is a Fluore......HROMOSOME translocation, which is a rearrangement of arms between two chromosomes, is a major group of chromosome abnormalities leading to cancer. As a result, two derivative chromosomes with sequences coming from both chromosomes are formed. The current translocation detection method...

  16. Chromosome mapping of repetitive DNAs in sergeant major fishes (Abudefdufinae, Pomacentridae): a general view on the chromosomal conservatism of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getlekha, Nuntaporn; Cioffi, Marcelo de Bello; Yano, Cassia Fernanda; Maneechot, Nuntiya; Bertollo, Luiz Antonio Carlos; Supiwong, Weerayuth; Tanomtong, Alongklod; Molina, Wagner Franco

    2016-10-01

    Species of the Abudefduf genus (sergeant-majors) are widely distributed in the Indian, Pacific and Atlantic oceans, with large schools inhabiting rocky coastal regions and coral reefs. This genus consists of twenty recognized species are of generalist habit, showing typical characteristics of colonizers. Some populations maintain gene flow between large oceanic areas, a condition that may influence their cytogenetic features. A number of species have been shown to be invaders and able to hybridize with local species. However, cytogenetic data in this genus are restricted to few species. In this way, the present study includes the chromosomal investigation, using conventional (Giemsa staining, Ag-NOR and C-banding) and molecular (in situ mapping of six different repetitive DNA classes) approaches in four Abudefduf species from different oceanic regions (A. bengalensis and A. sexfasciatus from the Indo-Pacific, A. vaigiensis from the Indian and A. saxatilis from the Atlantic oceans, respectively), to investigate the evolutionary events associated with the chromosomal diversification in this group. All species share a similar karyotype (2n = 48; NF = 52), except A. sexfasciatus (2n = 48; NF = 50), which possesses a characteristic pericentric inversion in the NOR-bearing chromosomal pair. Mapping of repetitive sequences suggests a chromosomal conservatism in this genus. The high karyotypic similarity between allopatric species of Abudefduf may be related to the success of natural viable hybrids among species with recent secondary contact.

  17. Phenotype and 244k array-CGH characterization of chromosome 13q deletions: an update of the phenotypic map of 13q21.1-qter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Maria; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Stoeva, Radka

    2009-01-01

    Partial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 13 lead to variable phenotypes dependant on the size and position of the deleted region. In order to update the phenotypic map of chromosome 13q21.1-qter deletions, we applied 244k Agilent oligonucleotide-based array-CGH to determine the exact break......-genotype correlation on chromosome 13. In contrast to previous reports of carriers of 13q32 band deletions as the most seriously affected patients, we present two such individuals with long-term survival, 28 and 2.5 years....

  18. Transcriptionally Active Heterochromatin in Rye B Chromosomes[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carchilan, Mariana; Delgado, Margarida; Ribeiro, Teresa; Costa-Nunes, Pedro; Caperta, Ana; Morais-Cecílio, Leonor; Jones, R. Neil; Viegas, Wanda; Houben, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    B chromosomes (Bs) are dispensable components of the genomes of numerous species. Thus far, there is a lack of evidence for any transcripts of Bs in plants, with the exception of some rDNA sequences. Here, we show that the Giemsa banding-positive heterochromatic subterminal domain of rye (Secale cereale) Bs undergoes decondensation during interphase. Contrary to the heterochromatic regions of A chromosomes, this domain is simultaneously marked by trimethylated H3K4 and by trimethylated H3K27, an unusual combination of apparently conflicting histone modifications. Notably, both types of B-specific high copy repeat families (E3900 and D1100) of the subterminal domain are transcriptionally active, although with different tissue type–dependent activity. No small RNAs were detected specifically for the presence of Bs. The lack of any significant open reading frame and the highly heterogeneous size of mainly polyadenylated transcripts indicate that the noncoding RNA may function as structural or catalytic RNA. PMID:17586652

  19. Complex chromosome rearrangements related 15q14 microdeletion plays a relevant role in phenotype expression and delineates a novel recurrent syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaiuolo Anna

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Complex chromosome rearrangements are constitutional structural rearrangements involving three or more chromosomes or having more than two breakpoints. These are rarely seen in the general population but their frequency should be much higher due to balanced states with no phenotypic presentation. These abnormalities preferentially occur de novo during spermatogenesis and are transmitted in families through oogenesis. Here, we report a de novo complex chromosome rearrangement that interests eight chromosomes in eighteen-year-old boy with an abnormal phenotype consisting in moderate developmental delay, cleft palate, and facial dysmorphisms. Standard G-banding revealed four apparently balanced traslocations involving the chromosomes 1;13, 3;19, 9;15 and 14;18 that appeared to be reciprocal. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis showed no imbalances at all the breakpoints observed except for an interstitial microdeletion on chromosome 15. This deletion is 1.6 Mb in size and is located at chromosome band 15q14, distal to the Prader-Willi/Angelman region. Comparing the features of our patient with published reports of patients with 15q14 deletion this finding corresponds to the smallest genomic region of overlap. The deleted segment at 15q14 was investigated for gene content.

  20. Chromosomal structures and repetitive sequences divergence in Cucumis species revealed by comparative cytogenetic mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunxia; Cheng, Chunyan; Li, Ji; Yang, Shuqiong; Wang, Yunzhu; Li, Ziang; Chen, Jinfeng; Lou, Qunfeng

    2015-09-25

    Differentiation and copy number of repetitive sequences affect directly chromosome structure which contributes to reproductive isolation and speciation. Comparative cytogenetic mapping has been verified an efficient tool to elucidate the differentiation and distribution of repetitive sequences in genome. In present study, the distinct chromosomal structures of five Cucumis species were revealed through genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) technique and comparative cytogenetic mapping of major satellite repeats. Chromosome structures of five Cucumis species were investigated using GISH and comparative mapping of specific satellites. Southern hybridization was employed to study the proliferation of satellites, whose structural characteristics were helpful for analyzing chromosome evolution. Preferential distribution of repetitive DNAs at the subtelomeric regions was found in C. sativus, C hystrix and C. metuliferus, while majority was positioned at the pericentromeric heterochromatin regions in C. melo and C. anguria. Further, comparative GISH (cGISH) through using genomic DNA of other species as probes revealed high homology of repeats between C. sativus and C. hystrix. Specific satellites including 45S rDNA, Type I/II, Type III, Type IV, CentM and telomeric repeat were then comparatively mapped in these species. Type I/II and Type IV produced bright signals at the subtelomeric regions of C. sativus and C. hystrix simultaneously, which might explain the significance of their amplification in the divergence of Cucumis subgenus from the ancient ancestor. Unique positioning of Type III and CentM only at the centromeric domains of C. sativus and C. melo, respectively, combining with unique southern bands, revealed rapid evolutionary patterns of centromeric DNA in Cucumis. Obvious interstitial telomeric repeats were observed in chromosomes 1 and 2 of C. sativus, which might provide evidence of the fusion hypothesis of chromosome evolution from x = 12 to x = 7 in

  1. Structure of the human chromosome interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sarnataro

    Full Text Available New Hi-C technologies have revealed that chromosomes have a complex network of spatial contacts in the cell nucleus of higher organisms, whose organisation is only partially understood. Here, we investigate the structure of such a network in human GM12878 cells, to derive a large scale picture of nuclear architecture. We find that the intensity of intra-chromosomal interactions is power-law distributed. Inter-chromosomal interactions are two orders of magnitude weaker and exponentially distributed, yet they are not randomly arranged along the genomic sequence. Intra-chromosomal contacts broadly occur between epigenomically homologous regions, whereas inter-chromosomal contacts are especially associated with regions rich in highly expressed genes. Overall, genomic contacts in the nucleus appear to be structured as a network of networks where a set of strongly individual chromosomal units, as envisaged in the 'chromosomal territory' scenario derived from microscopy, interact with each other via on average weaker, yet far from random and functionally important interactions.

  2. Chromosomal characteristics and distribution of rDNA sequences in the brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska-Jewsiewicka, A; Kuciński, M; Kirtiklis, L; Dobosz, S; Ocalewicz, K; Jankun, Malgorzata

    2015-08-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchill, 1814) chromosomes have been analyzed using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques enabling characteristics and chromosomal location of heterochromatin, nucleolus organizer regions (NORs), ribosomal RNA-encoding genes and telomeric DNA sequences. The C-banding and chromosome digestion with the restriction endonucleases demonstrated distribution and heterogeneity of the heterochromatin in the brook trout genome. DNA sequences of the ribosomal RNA genes, namely the nucleolus-forming 28S (major) and non-nucleolus-forming 5S (minor) rDNAs, were physically mapped using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and primed in situ labelling. The minor rDNA locus was located on the subtelo-acrocentric chromosome pair No. 9, whereas the major rDNA loci were dispersed on 14 chromosome pairs, showing a considerable inter-individual variation in the number and location. The major and minor rDNA loci were located at different chromosomes. Multichromosomal location (3-6 sites) of the NORs was demonstrated by silver nitrate (AgNO3) impregnation. All Ag-positive i.e. active NORs corresponded to the GC-rich blocks of heterochromatin. FISH with telomeric probe showed the presence of the interstitial telomeric site (ITS) adjacent to the NOR/28S rDNA site on the chromosome 11. This ITS was presumably remnant of the chromosome rearrangement(s) leading to the genomic redistribution of the rDNA sequences. Comparative analysis of the cytogenetic data among several related salmonid species confirmed huge variation in the number and the chromosomal location of rRNA gene clusters in the Salvelinus genome.

  3. Chromosomal aberrations in benign prostatic hyperplasia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muammer Altok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the chromosomal changes in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 patients diagnosed with clinical BPH underwent transurethral prostate resection to address their primary urological problem. All patients were evaluated by use of a comprehensive medical history and rectal digital examination. The preoperative evaluation also included serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA measurement and ultrasonographic measurement of prostate volume. Prostate cancer was detected in one patient, who was then excluded from the study. We performed conventional cytogenetic analyses of short-term cultures of 53 peripheral blood samples obtained from the BPH patients. Results: The mean (±standard deviation age of the 53 patients was 67.8±9.4 years. The mean PSA value of the patients was 5.8±7.0 ng/mL. The mean prostate volume was 53.6±22.9 mL. Chromosomal abnormalities were noted in 5 of the 53 cases (9.4%. Loss of the Y chromosome was the most frequent chromosomal abnormality and was observed in three patients (5.7%. There was no statistically significant relationship among age, PSA, prostate volume, and chromosomal changes. Conclusions: Loss of the Y chromosome was the main chromosomal abnormality found in our study. However, this coexistence did not reach a significant level. Our study concluded that loss of the Y chromosome cannot be considered relevant for the diagnosis of BPH as it is for prostate cancer. Because BPH usually occurs in aging men, loss of the Y chromosome in BPH patients may instead be related to the aging process.

  4. The ancestral chromosomes of Dromiciops gliroides (Microbiotheridae), and its bearings on the karyotypic evolution of American marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y; Haro, Ronie E; Vargas, Rodrigo A; Gallardo, Milton H

    2016-01-01

    The low-numbered 14-chromosome karyotype of marsupials has falsified the fusion hypothesis claiming ancestrality from a 22-chromosome karyotype. Since the 14-chromosome condition of the relict Dromiciops gliroides is reminecent of ancestrality, its interstitial traces of past putative fusions and heterochromatin banding patterns were studied and added to available marsupials' cytogenetic data. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and self-genomic in situ hybridization (self-GISH) were used to detect telomeric and repetitive sequences, respectively. These were complemented with C-, fluorescent banding, and centromere immunodetection over mitotic spreads. The presence of interstitial telomeric sequences (ITS) and diploid numbers were reconstructed and mapped onto the marsupial phylogenetic tree. No interstitial, fluorescent signals, but clearly stained telomeric regions were detected by FISH and self-GISH. Heterochromatin distribution was sparse in the telomeric/subtelomeric regions of large submetacentric chromosomes. Large AT-rich blocks were detected in the long arm of four submetacentrics and CG-rich block in the telomeric regions of all chromosomes. The ancestral reconstructions both ITS presence and diploid numbers suggested that ITS are unrelated to fusion events. Although the lack of interstitial signals in D. gliroides' karyotype does not prove absence of past fusions, our data suggests its non-rearranged plesiomorphic condition.

  5. Chromosome breakage in Vicia faba by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetner, R H

    1958-02-15

    Meristem cells of Vicia faba roots were exposed to an atmosphere of ozone and the fraction of cells showing chromosome aberrations were recorded. Chromosome aberrations were observed on a dose-response basis after exposing the seeds to 0.4 wt. percent ozone for 15, 30, and 60 minutes. The results of ozone, x-rays, and ozone and x-ray treatments are presented. A small number of root tips from each group was treated with colchicine and an analysis made of metaphase aberrations. These observations confirmed that the aberrations were all of the chromosome-type.

  6. Genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The genetic and chromosomal effects of ionizing radiations deal with those effects in the descendants of the individuals irradiated. The information base concerning genetic and chromosomal injury to humans from radiation is less adequate than is the information base for cancer and leukemia. As a result, it is not possible to make the kinds of quantitative estimates that have been made for carcinogenesis in previous chapters of this book. The chapter includes a detailed explanation of various types of genetic injuries such as chromosomal diseases, x-linked diseases, autosomal dominant diseases, recessive diseases, and irregularly inherited diseases. Quantitative estimates of mutation rates and incidences are given based on atomic bomb survivors data

  7. Chromosome mosaicism in hypomelanosis of Ito.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, C L; Steele, M W; Wenger, S L; Cohen, B A

    1990-01-01

    Our finding of chromosome mosaicism with a ring 22 in a retarded black boy with hypomelanosis of Ito prompted a review of this "syndrome." Most patients have a variety of non-dermal defects, particularly those affecting CNS function. Among karyotyped patients, most are chromosome mosaics of one sort or another. Hypomelanosis of Ito turns out to be a causable non-specific phenotype, i.e., a clinical marker for chromosome mosaicism of all different types in individuals with a dark enough skin to show lighter patches. Consequently, cytogenetic evaluation is indicated in all patients with this skin finding.

  8. The Barley Chromosome 5 Linkage Map

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms

    1975-01-01

    The distances between nine loci on barley chromosome 5 have been studied in five two-point tests, three three-point tests, and one four-point test. Our previous chromosome 5 linkage map, which contained eleven loci mapped from literature data (Jensen and Jørgensen 1975), is extended with four loci......-position is fixed on the map by a locus (necl), which has a good marker gene located centrally in the linkage group. The positions of the other loci are their distances in centimorgans from the 0-position; loci in the direction of the short chromosome arm are assigned positive values and those...

  9. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... 1 cephalosporinase. We found a wide range of chromosomal beta-lactamase activity in the sputum samples, with no correlation with basal or induced activity of beta-lactamase expression. The presence of anti-beta-lactamase antibodies in endobronchial sputum could be an important factor in the defense...

  10. Transfer of Hessian fly resistance from rye to wheat via radiation-induced terminal and intercalary chromosomal translocations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friebe, B.; Hatchett, J.H.; Gill, B.S.; Mukai, Y.; Sebesta, E.E.

    1991-01-01

    A new Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) resistance gene derived from 'Balbo' rye and its transfer to hexaploid wheat via radiation-induced terminal and intercalary chromosomal translocations are described. Crosses between resistant 'Balbo' rye and susceptible 'Suwon 92' wheat and between the F1 amphidiploids and susceptible 'TAM 106' and 'Amigo' wheats produced resistant BC2F3 lines that were identified by C-banding analysis as being 6RL telocentric addition lines. Comparative chromosomal analyses and resistance tests revealed that the resistance gene is located on the 6RL telocentric chromosome. X-irradiated pollen of 6RL addition plants was used to fertilize plants of susceptible wheats 'TAM 106,' 'TAM 101,' and 'Vona.' After several generations of selection for resistance, new sublines were obtained that were homogeneous for resistance. Thirteen of these lines were analyzed by C-banding, and three different wheat-6RL chromosomal translocations (T) were identified. Wheat chromosomes involved in the translocations were 6B, 4B, and 4A. Almost the complete 6RL arm is present in T6BS · 6BL-6RL. Only the distal half of 6RL is present in T4BS · 4BL-6RL, which locates the resistance gene in the distal half of 6RL. Only a very small segment (ca 1.0 μm) of the distal region of 6RL is present in an intercalary translocation (Ti) Ti4AS · 4AL-6RL-4AL. The 6RL segment is inserted in the intercalary region between the centromere of chromosome 4A and the large proximal C-band of 4AL. The break-points of the translocations are outside the region of the centromere, indicating that they were induced by the X-ray treatment. All three translocations are cytologically stable and can be used directly in wheat breeding programs

  11. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediates chromosome-specific meiotic synapsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Carolyn M; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M; Dernburg, Abby F

    2005-12-16

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis. him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as the meiotic pairing center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8 bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE) throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient.

  12. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediates chromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-01-01

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient

  13. In situ hybridization of iodinated 5S and 18/25S RNA to Vicia faba metaphase chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, I.; Baeumlein, H.; Wobus, U.

    1978-01-01

    In vitro labelled 125 I ribosomal RNA fractions (18/25S and 5S) were in situ hybridized to metaphase chromosomes of a reconstructed karyotype of Vicia faba (characterized by two translocations and one pericentric inversion, each being present homozygously). The sites of 18S and 25S RNA were found to be confined to the nucleolus organizing secondary constriction. Two loci of 5S RNA were recognized on the satellite of nucleolus bearing chromosome. Possible correlations between the location of ribosomal genes, heterochromatic G-bands and clusters of mutagen induced chromatid aberrations are discussed. (author)

  14. Drug-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) protocols: cytogenetic approaches in mitotic chromosome and interphase chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Eisuke

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome analysis is a fundamental technique which is used in wide areas of cytogenetic study including karyotyping species, hereditary diseases diagnosis, or chromosome biology study. Chromosomes are usually prepared from mitotic cells arrested by colcemid block protocol. However, obtaining mitotic chromosomes is often hampered under several circumstances. As a result, cytogenetic analysis will be sometimes difficult or even impossible in such cases. Premature chromosome condensation (PCC) (see Note 1) is an alternative method that has proved to be a unique and useful way in chromosome analysis. Former, PCC has been achieved following cell fusion method (cell-fusion PCC) mediated either by fusogenic viruses (e.g., Sendai virus) or cell fusion chemicals (e.g., polyethylene glycol), but the cell fusion PCC has several drawbacks. The novel drug-induced PCC using protein phosphatase inhibitors was introduced about 20 years ago. This method is much simpler and easier even than the conventional mitotic chromosome preparation protocol use with colcemid block and furthermore obtained PCC index (equivalent to mitotic index for metaphase chromosome) is usually much higher than colcemid block method. Moreover, this method allows the interphase chromatin to be condensed to visualize like mitotic chromosomes. Therefore drug-induced PCC has opened the way for chromosome analysis not only in metaphase chromosomes but also in interphase chromatin. The drug-induced PCC has thus proven the usefulness in cytogenetics and other cell biology fields. For this second edition version, updated modifications/changes are supplemented in Subheadings 2, 3, and 4, and a new section describing the application of PCC in chromosome science fields is added with citation of updated references.

  15. Why Do Sex Chromosomes Stop Recombining?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnikas, Suvi; Sigeman, Hanna; Abbott, Jessica K; Hansson, Bengt

    2018-04-28

    It is commonly assumed that sex chromosomes evolve recombination suppression because selection favours linkage between sex-determining and sexually antagonistic genes. However, although the role of sexual antagonism during sex chromosome evolution has attained strong support from theory, experimental and observational evidence is rare or equivocal. Here, we highlight alternative, often neglected, hypotheses for recombination suppression on sex chromosomes, which invoke meiotic drive, heterozygote advantage, and genetic drift, respectively. We contrast the hypotheses, the situations when they are likely to be of importance, and outline why it is surprisingly difficult to test them. Lastly, we discuss future research directions (including modelling, population genomics, comparative approaches, and experiments) to disentangle the different hypotheses of sex chromosome evolution. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Human oocyte chromosome analyses need a standardized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Studies of DNA polymorphisms in human trisomic abor- tions and liveborn have ... Keywords. human oocyte chromosomes; cytogenetic analysis; aneuploidy; nondisjunction; predivision. Journal of .... oocytes and giant embryos. Hum. Reprod.

  17. Conservation of sex chromosomes in lacertid lizards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rovatsos, M.; Vukič, J.; Altmanová, M.; Johnson Pokorná, Martina; Moravec, J.; Kratochvíl, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 13 (2016), s. 3120-3126 ISSN 0962-1083 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : lizards * molecular sex ing * reptiles * sex chromosomes Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 6.086, year: 2016

  18. Micro-Raman spectroscopy of chromosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mul, F.F.M.; van Welle, A.G.M.; Otto, Cornelis; Greve, Jan

    1984-01-01

    Raman spectra of intact chromosomes (Chinese hamster), recorded with a microspectrometer, are reported. The spectra could be assigned to protein and DNA contributions. Protein and DNA conformations and the ratio of base pairs in DNA were determined.

  19. Partial Duplication of Chromosome 8p

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rme

    The partial chromosome 8p duplication is a rare syndrome and is ... abnormality of maternal origin that ... second trimester by vaginal bleeding and ... echocardiography, brain CT scan and. MRI. Fig. 1:Conventional karyotype of case 3 showing.

  20. Chromosomal contact permits transcription between coregulated genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available . To ask whether chromosomal contacts are required for cotranscription in multigene complexes, we devised a strategy using TALENs to cleave and disrupt gene loops in a well-characterized multigene complex. Monitoring this disruption using RNA FISH...

  1. Evaluation of chromosomal abnormalities and common trombophilic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Infections, genetic, endocrine, anatomic and immunologic problems have been suggested as causes for RM. ... Metaphase chromosome preparations from the .... The rate of karyotypically abnormal abortion specimens.

  2. Histone modifications: Cycling with chromosomal replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications tend to be lost during chromosome duplication. Several recent studies suggest that the RNA interference pathway becomes active during the weakened transcriptional repression occurring at centromeres in S phase, resulting in the re-establishment of histone modifications...

  3. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostagno, A.; Revesz, T.; Lashley, T.

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 13 dementias, familial British dementia (FBD) and familial Danish dementia (FDD), are associated with neurodegeneration and cerebrovascular amyloidosis, with striking neuropathological similarities to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite the structural differences among the amyloid subunits...

  4. Non-disjunction of chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, Merete; Collins, Andrew; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2007-01-01

    We performed a molecular study with 21 microsatellites on a sample of 82 trisomy 13 conceptuses, the largest number of cases studied to date. The parental origin was determined in every case and in 89% the extra chromosome 13 was of maternal origin with an almost equal number of maternal MI and MII...... recombination in both maternal MI and MII errors and the former is associated with a significant number of tetrads (33%) that are nullichiasmate, which do not appear to be a feature of normal chromosome 13 meiosis. This study supports the evidence for subtle chromosome-specific influences on the mechanisms...... that determine non-disjunction of human chromosomes, consistent with the diversity of findings for other trisomies. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Aug-15...

  5. System for the analysis of plant chromosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina Martin, D.; Peraza Gonzalez, L.H.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes a computer system for the automation workers of recognition analysis and interpretation of plant chromosomes. This system permit to carry out the analysis in a more comfortable and faster way, using the image processing techniques

  6. Sex chromosomes and speciation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presgraves, Daven C.

    2010-01-01

    Two empirical rules suggest that sex chromosomes play a special role in speciation. The first is Haldane's rule— the preferential sterility and inviability of species hybrids of the heterogametic (XY) sex. The second is the disproportionately large effect of the X chromosome in genetic analyses of hybrid sterility. Whereas the causes of Haldane's rule are well established, the causes of the ‘large X-effect’ have remained controversial. New genetic analyses in Drosophila confirm that the X is a hotspot for hybrid male sterility factors, providing a proximate explanation for the large X-effect. Several other new findings— on faster X evolution, X chromosome meiotic drive, and the regulation of the X chromosome in the male-germline— provide plausible evolutionary explanations for the large X-effect. PMID:18514967

  7. Errata :Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromosomal Abnormalities in Couples with Recurrent Abortions in Lagos, Nigeria. Akinde OR, Daramola A O, Taiwo I A, Afolayan M O and Akinsola Af. Sonographic Mammary Gland Density Pattern in Women in Selected ommunities of Southern Nigeria.

  8. Demasculinization of the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Kalle

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of organisms sex-biased genes are non-randomly distributed between autosomes and the shared sex chromosome X (or Z. Studies on Anopheles gambiae have produced conflicting results regarding the underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X chromosome and it is unclear to what extent sexual antagonism, dosage compensation or X-inactivation in the male germline, the evolutionary forces that have been suggested to affect the chromosomal distribution of sex-biased genes, are operational in Anopheles. Results We performed a meta-analysis of sex-biased gene expression in Anopheles gambiae which provides evidence for a general underrepresentation of male-biased genes on the X-chromosome that increased in significance with the observed degree of sex-bias. A phylogenomic comparison between Drosophila melanogaster, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus also indicates that the Anopheles X chromosome strongly disfavours the evolutionary conservation of male-biased expression and that novel male-biased genes are more likely to arise on autosomes. Finally, we demonstrate experimentally that transgenes situated on the Anopheles gambiae X chromosome are transcriptionally silenced in the male germline. Conclusion The data presented here support the hypothesis that the observed demasculinization of the Anopheles X chromosome is driven by X-chromosome inactivation in the male germline and by sexual antagonism. The demasculinization appears to be the consequence of a loss of male-biased expression, rather than a failure in the establishment or the extinction of male-biased genes.

  9. Human Chromosome 7: DNA Sequence and Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Stephen W.; Cheung, Joseph; MacDonald, Jeffrey R.; Osborne, Lucy R.; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Herbrick, Jo-Anne; Carson, Andrew R.; Parker-Katiraee, Layla; Skaug, Jennifer; Khaja, Razi; Zhang, Junjun; Hudek, Alexander K.; Li, Martin; Haddad, May; Duggan, Gavin E.

    2003-01-01

    DNA sequence and annotation of the entire human chromosome 7, encompassing nearly 158 million nucleotides of DNA and 1917 gene structures, are presented. To generate a higher order description, additional structural features such as imprinted genes, fragile sites, and segmental duplications were integrated at the level of the DNA sequence with medical genetic data, including 440 chromosome rearrangement breakpoints associated with disease. This approach enabled the discovery of candidate gene...

  10. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  11. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Schoenmakers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW, whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis.

  12. Abnormal sex chromosome constitution and longitudinal growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Juul, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles.......Growth is a highly complex process regulated by the interaction between sex steroids and the GH IGF-axis. However, other factors such as sex chromosome-related genes play independent roles....

  13. Paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in association with a maternal supernumerary marker chromosome (6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, R.S.; Crolla, J.A.; Sitch, F.L. [Salisbury District Hospital, Wiltshire (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Uniparental disomy may arise by a number of different mechanisms of aneuploidy correction. A population that has been identified as being at increased risk of aneuploidy are those individuals bearing supernumerary marker chromosomes (SMCs). There have been a number of cases reported of trisomy 21 in association with bi-satellited marker chromosomes have described two individuals with small inv dup (15) markers. One had paternal isodisomy of chromosome 15 and Angelman syndrome. The other had maternal heterodisomy (15) and Prader-Willi syndrome. At the Wessex Regional Genetics Laboratory we have conducted a search for uniparental disomy of the normal homologues of the chromosomes from which SMCs originated. Our study population consists of 39 probands with SMCs originating from a number of different autosomes, including 17 with SMCs of chromosome 15 origin. Using PCR amplification of microsatellite repeat sequences located distal to the regions included in the SMCs we have determined the parental origin of the two normal homologues in each case. We have identified paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 in a female child with a supernumerary marker ring chromosome 6 in approximately 70% of peripheral blood lymphocytes. The marker was found to be of maternal origin. This is the second case of paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 to be reported, and the first in association with a SMC resulting in a partial trisomy for a portion of the short arm of chromosome 6. In spite of this, the patient appears to be functioning appropriately for her age.

  14. Chromosomes in the genesis and progression of ependymomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogatto, S R; Casartelli, C; Rainho, C A

    1993-01-01

    chromosomes in three cases. Structural rearrangements of chromosome 2 were a finding for all cases and involved loss of material at 2q32-34. Other structural chromosome abnormalities detected involved chromosomes 4, 6, 10, 11, 12, and X. We also reviewed data on 22 cases previously reported....

  15. Karyotypic Evolution in Malagasy Flying Foxes (Pteropodidae, Chiroptera) and Their Hipposiderid Relatives as Determined by Comparative Chromosome Painting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Leigh R; Rambau, Ramugondo V; Goodman, Steven M; Taylor, Peter J; Schoeman, M Corrie; Yang, Fengtang; Lamb, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    Pteropodidae and Hipposideridae are 2 of the 9 chiropteran families that occur on Madagascar. Despite major advancements in the systematic study of the island's bat fauna, few karyotypic data exist for endemic species. We utilized G- and C-banding in combination with chromosome painting with Myotismyotis probes to establish a genome-wide homology among Malagasy species belonging to the families Pteropodidae (Pteropus rufus 2n = 38; Rousettus madagascariensis, 2n = 36), Hipposideridae (Hipposideros commersoni s.s., 2n = 52), and a single South African representative of the Rhinolophidae (Rhinolophus clivosus, 2n = 58). Painting probes of M. myotis detected 26, 28, 28, and 29 regions of homology in R. madagascariensis, P. rufus, H. commersoni s.s, and R. clivosus, respectively. Translocations, pericentric inversions, and heterochromatin additions were responsible for karyotypic differences amongst the Malagasy pteropodids. Comparative chromosome painting revealed a novel pericentric inversion on P. rufus chromosome 4. Chromosomal characters suggest a close evolutionary relationship between Rousettus and Pteropus. H. commersoni s.s. shared several chromosomal characters with extralimital congeners but did not exhibit 2 chromosomal synapomorphies proposed for Hipposideridae. This study provides further insight into the ancestral karyotypes of pteropodid and hipposiderid bats and corroborates certain molecular phylogenetic hypotheses. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Physical mapping of chromosome 8p22 markers and their homozygous deletion in a metastatic prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bova, G.S.; Pin, S.S.; Isaacs, W.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)]|[Brady Urological Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Numerous studies have implicated the short arm of chromosome 8 as the site of one or more tumor suppressor genes inactivated in carcinogenesis of the prostate, colon, lung, and liver. Previously, we identified a homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22 in a metastatic prostate cancer. To map this homozygous deletion physically, long-range restriction mapping was performed using yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of chromosome band 8p22. Subcloned genomic DNA and cDNA probes isolated by hybrid capture from these YACs were mapped in relation to one another, reinforcing map integrity. Mapped single-copy probes from the region were then applied to DNA isolated from a metastatic prostate cancer containing a chromosome 8p22 homozygous deletion and indicated that its deletion spans 730-970 kb. Candidate genes PRLTS (PDGF-receptor {beta}-like tumor suppressor) and CTSB (cathepsin B) are located outside the region of homozygous deletion. Genethon marker D8S549 is located approximately at the center of this region of homozygous deletion. Two new microsatellite polymorphisms, D8S1991 and D8S1992, also located within the region of homozygous deletion on chromosome 8p22, are described. Physical mapping places cosmid CI8-2644 telomeric to MSR (macrophage scavenger receptor), the reverse of a previously published map, altering the interpretation of published deletion studies. This work should prove helpful in the identification of candidate tumor suppressor genes in this region. 47 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. A ScaI RFLP demonstrated for the GRO gene on chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, J.S.; Murray, J.C. (Univ. of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City (USA)); Sager, R. (Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-11-11

    TC870 is a 0.85 kb fragment running from the EcoRI site 200 pb from the 5{prime} end of the human cDNA subcloned into the EcoRI site of pGEM3. ScaI detects a polymorphism with two variable bands of 19 kb and 16 kb. One strong constant band (14 kb) and two fainter constant bands (5 kb and 3 kb) are also present. The polymorphism type is unknown. GRO has been localized to 4q13-4q21 by somatic cell hybrid analysis and in situ hybridization. Codominant segregation and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium demonstrated in 20 CEPH families. The probe also was assigned to chromosome 4 with significant linkage to ALB, GC, INP10, MT2P1. GRO may be the same gene as MGSA.

  18. Molecular and genetic characterization of a radiation-induced structural rearrangement in mouse chromosome 2 causing mutations at the limb deformity and agouti loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woychik, R.P.; Generoso, W.M.; Russell, L.B.; Cain, K.T.; Cacheiro, N.L.; Bultman, S.J.; Selby, P.B.; Dickinson, M.E.; Hogan, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular characterization of mutations in the mouse, particularly those involving agent-induced major structural alterations, is proving to be useful for correlating the structure and expression of individual genes with their function in the whole organism. Here we present the characterization of a radiation-induced mutation that simultaneously generated distinct alleles of both the limb deformity (ld) and agouti (a) loci, two developmentally important regions of chromosome 2 normally separated by 20 centimorgans. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that an interstitial segment of chromosome 17 (17B- 17C; or, possibly, 17A2-17B) had been translocated into the distal end of chromosome 2, resulting in a smaller-than-normal chromosome 17 (designated 17del) and a larger form of chromosome 2 designated 2(17). Additionally, a large interstitial segment of the 2(17) chromosome, immediately adjacent and proximal to the insertion site, did not match bands 2E4-2H1 at corresponding positions on a normal chromosome 2. Molecular analysis detected a DNA rearrangement in which a portion of the ld locus was joined to sequences normally tightly linked to the a locus. This result, along with the genetic and cytogenetic data, suggests that the alleles of ld and a in this radiation-induced mutation, designated ldIn2 and ajIn2, were associated with DNA breaks caused by an inversion of an interstitial segment in the 2(17) chromosome

  19. Report from the banding lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tautin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Tautin reported on the seemingly everchanging structure of biological science units within the Interior Department. Current Congressional proposals would either change the name of the Bird Banding Lab's parent agency or make it part of the Geological Survey. The current Congress has not looked favorably on science budgets within the Interior Department, and the Banding Lab's budget is being squeezed ever tighter.

  20. Chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomonaga, Y [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1976-09-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells were recognized in 6 cases which consisted of one case of chronic myelogenous leukemia, two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, one case of sideroblastic anemia, and two cases of myelodysplasis. Frequency of stable type chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells was investigated in 45 atomic bomb survivors without hematologic disorders and 15 controls. It was 1.4% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 1 km from the hypocenter, which was significantly higher as compared with 0.1% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb over 2.5 km from the hypocenter and 0.2% in normal controls. Examination of chromosome was also made on 2 of 3 cases which were the seconds born of female with high chromosome abnormality, who was exposed to within 1 km from the hypocenter, and healthy male exposed 3 km from the hypocenter. These two cases showed chromosome of normal male type, and balanced translocation was not recognized. There was not a significant difference in chromosome abnormalities between the seconds of atomic bomb survivors and controls.

  1. Evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovatsos, Michail; Vukić, Jasna; Lymberakis, Petros; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-12-22

    Amniote vertebrates possess various mechanisms of sex determination, but their variability is not equally distributed. The large evolutionary stability of sex chromosomes in viviparous mammals and birds was believed to be connected with their endothermy. However, some ectotherm lineages seem to be comparably conserved in sex determination, but previously there was a lack of molecular evidence to confirm this. Here, we document a stability of sex chromosomes in advanced snakes based on the testing of Z-specificity of genes using quantitative PCR (qPCR) across 37 snake species (our qPCR technique is suitable for molecular sexing in potentially all advanced snakes). We discovered that at least part of sex chromosomes is homologous across all families of caenophidian snakes (Acrochordidae, Xenodermatidae, Pareatidae, Viperidae, Homalopsidae, Colubridae, Elapidae and Lamprophiidae). The emergence of differentiated sex chromosomes can be dated back to about 60 Ma and preceded the extensive diversification of advanced snakes, the group with more than 3000 species. The Z-specific genes of caenophidian snakes are (pseudo)autosomal in the members of the snake families Pythonidae, Xenopeltidae, Boidae, Erycidae and Sanziniidae, as well as in outgroups with differentiated sex chromosomes such as monitor lizards, iguanas and chameleons. Along with iguanas, advanced snakes are therefore another example of ectothermic amniotes with a long-term stability of sex chromosomes comparable with endotherms. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Chromosome aberration assays in barley (Hordeum vulgare)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, M J [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville; Nilan, R A

    1982-01-01

    Barley is an exceellent organism for studies of induced chromosome aberrations because of its few (2n = 2x = 14) relatively large chromosomes. Root-tip and shoot-tip cells have been used extensively for the study of ionizing radiation-induced chromosome aberrations. The general procedures are well known, the technology is simple and easy to learn, and the assays are relatively quick and inexpensive. Both root tips and shoot tips can be used for the study of chemical mutagens as well as ionizing radiations. Pollen mother cells are well suited for studying the effects of mutagens on meiotic chromosomes. The literature review for the Gene-Tox Program reported on 61 chemicals tested for their effects on barley chromosomes. Of these, 90% were reported to be either positive or positive dose-related, while 7% were negative and 3% were questionable. Barley assays based on chromosomal aberrations are useful to detect the clastogenic potency of chemicals under laboratory conditions. Indications are that the data from barley can be used to corroborate data obtained from other organisms. Among the classes of chemicals assayed were: alcohols and phenols; alkaloids; epoxides; alkyl sulfates; amides and sulfonamides; aromatic amines; aryl halides; aziridines; alkenes; carbamates; hydroazides; nitroaromatics; nitrosamides; nitrosources; phenothiazines; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  3. Chromosome abnormalities in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomonaga, Yu

    1976-01-01

    Chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells were recognized in 6 cases which consisted of one case of chronic myelogenous leukemia, two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia, one case of sideroblastic anemia, and two cases of myelodysplasis. Frequency of stable type chromosome abnormalities in bone marrow cells was investigated in 45 atomic bomb survivors without hematologic disorders and 15 controls. It was 1.4% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb within 1 km from the hypocenter, which was significantly higher as compared with 0.1% (15 cases) in the group exposed to atomic bomb over 2.5 km from the hypocenter and 0.2% in normal controls. Examination of chromosome was also made on 2 of 3 cases which were the seconds born of female with high chromosome abnormality, who was exposed to within 1 km from the hypocenter, and healthy male exposed 3 km from the hypocenter. These two cases showed chromosome of normal male type, and balanced translocation was not recognized. There was not a significant difference in chromosome abnormalities between the seconds of atomic bomb survivors and controls. (Kanao, N.)

  4. A Marfan syndrome-like phenotype caused by a neocentromeric supernumerary ring chromosome 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinonez, Shane C; Gelehrter, Thomas D; Uhlmann, Wendy R

    2017-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized by standard banding cytogenetic techniques. A minority of sSMC contain a neocentromere, which is an ectopic centromere lacking the characteristic alpha-satellite DNA. The phenotypic manifestations of sSMC and neocentromeric sSMC are variable and range from severe intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies to a normal phenotype. Here we report a patient with a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and infertility found to have an abnormal karyotype consisting of a chromosome 15 deletion and a ring-type sSMC likely stabilized by a neocentromere derived via a mechanism initially described by Barbara McClintock in 1938. Analysis of the sSMC identified that it contained the deleted chromosome 15 material and also one copy of FBN1, the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome. We propose that the patient's diagnosis arose from disruption of the FBN1 allele on the sSMC. To date, a total of 29 patients have been reported with an sSMC derived from a chromosomal deletion. We review these cases with a specific focus on the resultant phenotypes and note significant difference between this class of sSMC and other types of sSMC. Through this review we also identified a patient with a clinical diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 who lacked a family history of the condition but was found to have a chromosome 17-derived sSMC that likely contained NF1 and caused the patient's disorder. We also review the genetic counseling implications and recommendations for a patient or family harboring an sSMC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cytogenetic and molecular genetic characterization of immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial cell lines: consistent loss of chromosome 13 and amplification of chromosome 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yuesheng; Zhang, Hao; Tsao, Sai Wah; Jin, Charlotte; Lv, Mei; Strömbeck, Bodil; Wiegant, Joop; Wan, Thomas Shek Kong; Yuen, Po Wing; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the genetic events involved in immortalization of ovarian epithelial cells, which might be important steps in ovarian carcinogenesis. The genetic profiles of five human ovarian surface epithelial (HOSE) cell lines immortalized by retroviral transfection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 genes were thoroughly characterized by chromosome banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), at various passages pre- and post-crisis. In pre-crisis, most cells had simple, non-clonal karyotypic changes. Telomere association was the commonest aberration, suggesting that tolermase dysfunction might be an important genetic event leading to cellular crisis. After immortalization post-crisis, however, the karyotypic patterns were non-random. Loss of genetic materials was a characteristic feature. The commonest numerical aberrations were -13, -14, -16, -17, -18, and +5. Among them, loss of chromosome 13 was common change observed in all lines. The only recurrent structural aberration was homogeneously staining regions (hsr) observed in three lines. FISH and combined binary ratio labeling (COBRA)-FISH showed in two cases that the hsrs were derived from chromosome 20. Clonal evolution was observed in four of the lines. In one line, hsr was the only change shared by all subclones, suggesting that it might be a primary event in cell immortalization. The results of the present study suggested that loss of chromosome 13 and the amplification of chromosome 20 might be early genetic events involved in ovarian cell immortalization, and might be useful targets for the study of genomic aberrations in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  6. Polytene chromosome map and inversion polymorphism in Drosophila mediopunctata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Ananina

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila mediopunctata belongs to the tripunctata group, and is one of the commonest Drosophila species collected in some places in Brazil, especially in the winter. A standard map of the polytene chromosomes is presented. The breakpoints of the naturally occurring chromosomal rearrangements are marked on the map. The distribution of breaking points through the chromosomes of D. mediopunctata is apparently non-random. Chromosomes X, II and IV show inversion polymorphisms. Chromosome II is the most polymorphic, with 17 inversions, 8 inversions in the distal region and 9 in the proximal region. Chromosome X has four different gene arrangements, while chromosome IV has only two.

  7. FISH with whole chromosome and telomeric probes demonstrates huge karyotypic reorganization with ITS between two species of Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae, Rodentia): Hylaeamys megacephalus probes on Cerradomys langguthi karyotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; O'Brien, Patricia Caroline Mary; Pinto, Jamilly Amaral; Malcher, Stella Miranda; Pereira, Adenilson Leão; Rissino, Jorge das Dores; Mendes-Oliveira, Ana Cristina; Rossi, Rogério Vieira; Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm Andrew

    2013-04-01

    Rodentia comprises 42 % of living mammalian species. The taxonomic identification can be difficult, the number of species currently known probably being underestimated, since many species show only slight morphological variations. Few studies surveyed the biodiversity of species, especially in the Amazon region. Cytogenetic studies show great chromosomal variability in rodents, with diploid numbers ranging from 10 to 102, making it difficult to find chromosomal homologies by comparative G banding. Chromosome painting is useful, but only a few species of rodents have been studied by this technique. In this study, we sorted whole chromosome probes by fluorescence-activated cell sorting from two Hylaeamys megacephalus individuals, an adult female (2n = 54) and a fetus (2n = 50). We made reciprocal chromosome painting between these karyotypes and cross-species hybridization on Cerradomys langguthi (2n = 46). Both species belong to the tribe Oryzomyini (Sigmodontinae), which is restricted to South America and were collected in the Amazon region. Twenty-four chromosome-specific probes from the female and 25 from the fetus were sorted. Reciprocal chromosome painting shows that the karyotype of the fetus does not represent a new cytotype, but an unbalanced karyotype with multiple rearrangements. Cross-species hybridization of H. megacephalus probes on metaphases of C. langguthi shows that 11 chromosomes of H. megacephalus revealed conserved synteny, 10 H. megacephalus probes hybridized to two chromosomal regions and three hybridized to three regions. Associations were observed on chromosomes pairs 1-4 and 11. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with a telomeric probe revealed interstitial regions in three pairs (1, 3, and 4) of C. langguthi chromosomes. We discuss the genomic reorganization of the C. langguthi karyotype.

  8. Dual-band infrared camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, H.; Schlemmer, H.

    2005-10-01

    Every year, numerous accidents happen on European roads due to bad visibility (fog, night, heavy rain). Similarly, the dramatic aviation accidents of year 2001 in Milan and Zurich have reminded us that aviation safety is equally affected by reduced visibility. A dual-band thermal imager was developed in order to raise human situation awareness under conditions of reduced visibility especially in the automotive and aeronautical context but also for all transportation or surveillance tasks. The chosen wavelength bands are the Short Wave Infrared SWIR and the Long Wave Infrared LWIR band which are less obscured by reduced visibility conditions than the visible band. Furthermore, our field tests clearly show that the two different spectral bands very often contain complementary information. Pyramidal fusion is used to integrate complementary and redundant features of the multi-spectral images into a fused image which can be displayed on a monitor to provide more and better information for the driver or pilot.

  9. Cytogenetic and genetic studies of radiation-induced chromosome damage in mouse oocytes. Part 1. Numerical and structural chromosome anomalies in metaphase II oocytes, pre- and post-implantation embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tease, Charles; Fisher, Graham

    1996-01-01

    The incidences of X-ray induced numerical and structural chromosome anomalies were screened in a range of developmental stages from metaphase II oocytes through to post-implantation embryos. Following 1 Gy of acute X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes, the rate of hyperploidy (chromosome gain) was found to be elevated over levels in unirradiated controls, at metaphase II, in 1-cell and 3.5 day pre-implantation embryos but not in 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. In the latter, however, the frequency of mosaicism was significantly increased. A similar response of an increase in mosaicism but not in hyperploidy in 8.5 day post-implantation embryos was also found after irradiation of dictyate stage oocytes with 4 Gy of acute X-rays. Significantly elevated frequencies of structural chromosome anomalies were present in metaphase II oocytes and pre-implantation embryonic stages, but could not be detected in block-stained chromosome preparations from 8.5 day post-implantation foetuses. However, analysis of chromosome preparations after G-banding showed that almost 14% of 14.5 day foetuses carried a chromosome rearrangement after 1 Gy of X-rays to immediately preovulatory stage oocytes. Overall, our data indicate that the presence of radiation-induced chromosome gains are incompatible with embryonic survival but that a proportion of embryos with structural chromosome damage develop past mid-gestation. These latter embryos are therefore potentially capable of contributing to the genetic burden of the next generation

  10. Interleukin 3 gene is located on human chromosome 5 and is deleted in myeloid leukemias with a deletion of 5q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Beau, M.M.; Epstein, N.D.; O'Brien, S.J.; Nienhuis, A.W.; Yang, Y.C.; Clark, S.C.; Rowley, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    The gene IL-3 encodes interleukin 3, a hematopoietic colony-stimulating factor (CSF) that is capable of supporting the proliferation of a broad range of hematopoietic cell types. By using somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, the authors localized this gene to human chromosome 5 at bands q23-31, a chromosomal region that is frequently deleted [del(5q)] in patients with myeloid disorders. By in situ hybridization, IL-3 was found to be deleted in the 5q-chromosome of one patient with refractory anemia who had a del(5)(q15q33.3), of three patients with refractory anemia (two patients) or acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) de novo who had a similar distal breakpoint [del(5)(q13q33.3)], and of a fifth patient, with therapy-related ANLL, who had a similar distal breakpoint in band q33[del(5)(q14q33.3)]. Southern blot analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the normal or the deleted chromosome 5 from two patients with the refractory anemia 5q- syndrome indicated that IL-3 sequences were absent from the hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 5 but not from hybrids that had a cytologically normal chromosome 5. Thus, a small segment of chromosome 5 contains IL-3, GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS. The findings and earlier results indicating that GM-CSF, CSF-1, and FMS were deleted in the 5q- chromosome, suggest that loss of IL-3 or of other CSF genes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of hematologic disorders associated with a del(5q)

  11. Chromosome aberrations in cultured skin cells obtained from atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takeo; Sadamori, Naoki.

    1989-01-01

    Skin specimens were obtained from 11 A-bomb survivors, 10 of whom had been exposed at ≤2300 m from the hypocenter, and 7 non-exposed controls. There was a higher frequency (12%, 147/1222 cells) of chromosome aberrations in the exposed group compared with 1.2% (4/341 cells) in the control group. This suggests that aberrant cells are still present in the skin tissue 40 years or more after the bombing. Of 147 cells, 136 cells (91.3%) showed translocation of chromosome. Other aberrations, such as inversion, deletion, dicentric chromosome and acentric fragment, were observed in only 3.8%. These aberrant cells tended to be observed in A-bomb survivors exposed to high doses and with a history of severe acute symptoms. One hundred and twenty two (83%) of 136 aberrant cells were obtained from 3 A-bomb survivors, which has important implications for marked proliferation of specific clone cells. In an analysis by B-band staining technique for the 122 cells, band sites of break point were found to correspond to loci of protooncogenes, suggesting the involvement in aggressive proliferation of clone cells. (Namekawa, K)

  12. Heterochromatin diversity and its co-localization with 5S and 45S rDNA sites in chromosomes of four Maxillaria species (Orchidaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, Juliano S.; Felix, Leonardo P.; Guerra, Marcelo

    2006-01-01

    We investigated four orchids of the genus Maxillaria (M. discolor, M. acicularis, M. notylioglossa and M. desvauxiana) in regard to the position of heterochromatin blocks as revealed using chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) fluorochrome staining and 5S and 45S rDNA sites using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The species showed differences in chromosome number and a diversified pattern of CMA+ and DAPI+ bands, including heteromorphism for CMA+ bands. The 5...

  13. SINGLE-BAND, TRIPLE-BAND, OR MULTIPLE-BAND HUBBARD MODELS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ESKES, H; SAWATZKY, GA

    1991-01-01

    The relevance of different models, such as the one-band t-J model and the three-band Emery model, as a realistic description of the electronic structure of high-T(c) materials is discussed. Starting from a multiband approach using cluster calculations and an impurity approach, the following

  14. Sequencing of individual chromosomes of plant pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwa, Takeshi; Kozaki, Toshinori; Ishii, Kazuo; Turgeon, B Gillian; Teraoka, Tohru; Komatsu, Ken; Arie, Tsutomu

    2017-01-01

    A small chromosome in reference isolate 4287 of F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) has been designated as a 'pathogenicity chromosome' because it carries several pathogenicity related genes such as the Secreted In Xylem (SIX) genes. Sequence assembly of small chromosomes in other isolates, based on a reference genome template, is difficult because of karyotype variation among isolates and a high number of sequences associated with transposable elements. These factors often result in misassembly of sequences, making it unclear whether other isolates possess the same pathogenicity chromosome harboring SIX genes as in the reference isolate. To overcome this difficulty, single chromosome sequencing after Contour-clamped Homogeneous Electric Field (CHEF) separation of chromosomes was performed, followed by de novo assembly of sequences. The assembled sequences of individual chromosomes were consistent with results of probing gels of CHEF separated chromosomes with SIX genes. Individual chromosome sequencing revealed that several SIX genes are located on a single small chromosome in two pathogenic forms of F. oxysporum, beyond the reference isolate 4287, and in the cabbage yellows fungus F. oxysporum f. sp. conglutinans. The particular combination of SIX genes on each small chromosome varied. Moreover, not all SIX genes were found on small chromosomes; depending on the isolate, some were on big chromosomes. This suggests that recombination of chromosomes and/or translocation of SIX genes may occur frequently. Our method improves sequence comparison of small chromosomes among isolates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Recombinant chromosome 7 in a mosaic 45,X/47,XXX patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado, Carlos A; Gotway, Garrett; Torgbe, Emmanuel; Iyer, Santha; Dallaire, Stephanie; Appleberry, Taylor; Suterwala, Mohamed; Garcia, Rolando; Valdez, Federico; Patel, Sangeeta; Koduru, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with pericentric inversions are at risk for producing offspring with chromosomal gains and losses, while those carrying paracentric inversions usually produce unviable gametes [Madan, 1995]. In this current study, we present a newborn with dysmorphic features and malformations, whose karyotype showed an abnormal copy of chromomosome 7 described at first as add(7)(q32) as well as mos 45,X/47,XXX. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) revealed an interstitial deletion in the long arm of chromosome 7 involving bands q35 to q36.3 but retaining the 7q subtelomere. The patient's deletion is believed to be due to meiotic recombination in the inversion loop in the phenotypically normal father who seems to carry two paracentric inversions in the long arm of chromosome 7, which was described as rec(7)(7pter- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter)pat. The abnormal copy of chromosome 7 in the father has been described as: der(7)(7pter- > q22.1::q36.3- > q35::q22.1- > q35::q36.3- > 7qter). This is a unique karyotype that to our knowledge has not been previously reported in the literature and predisposes to meiotic recombination that can result in deletions or duplications of 7q35-36. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Combining M-FISH and Quantum Dot technology for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Mohammed

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physical mapping of transgenic insertions by Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH is a reliable and cost-effective technique. Chromosomal assignment is commonly achieved either by concurrent G-banding or by a multi-color FISH approach consisting of iteratively co-hybridizing the transgenic sequence of interest with one or more chromosome-specific probes at a time, until the location of the transgenic insertion is identified. Results Here we report a technical development for fast chromosomal assignment of transgenic insertions at the single cell level in mouse and rat models. This comprises a simplified 'single denaturation mixed hybridization' procedure that combines multi-color karyotyping by Multiplex FISH (M-FISH, for simultaneous and unambiguous identification of all chromosomes at once, and the use of a Quantum Dot (QD conjugate for the transgene detection. Conclusions Although the exploitation of the unique optical properties of QD nanocrystals, such as photo-stability and brightness, to improve FISH performance generally has been previously investigated, to our knowledge this is the first report of a purpose-designed molecular cytogenetic protocol in which the combined use of QDs and standard organic fluorophores is specifically tailored to assist gene transfer technology.

  17. Periventricular heterotopia and white matter abnormalities in a girl with mosaic ring chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Satsuki; Hamazaki, Takashi; Saito, Mika; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Seto, Toshiyuki; Shintaku, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Ring chromosome 6 is a rare chromosome abnormality that arises typically de novo. The phenotypes can be highly variable, ranging from almost normal to severe malformations and neurological defects. We report a case of a 3-year-old girl with mosaic ring chromosome 6 who presented with being small for gestational age and intellectual disability, and whose brain MRI later revealed periventricular heterotopia and white matter abnormalities. Mosaicism was identified in peripheral blood cells examined by standard G-bands, mos 46,XX,r(6)(p25q27)[67]/45,XX,-6[25]/46,XX,dic r(6:6)(p25q27:p25q27)[6]/47,XX,r(6)(p25q27) × 2[2]. Using array-comparative genomic hybridization, we identified terminal deletion of 6q27 (1.5 Mb) and no deletion on 6p. To our knowledge, this is the first report of periventricular heterotopia and white matter abnormalities manifested in a patient with ring chromosome 6. These central nervous system malformations are further discussed in relation to molecular genetics.

  18. Fishing for radiation quality: chromosome aberrations and the role of radiation track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The yield of chromosome aberrations is not only dependent on dose but also on radiation quality, with high linear energy transfer (LET) typically having a greater biological effectiveness per unit dose than those of low-LET radiation. Differences in radiation track structure and cell morphology can also lead to quantitative differences in the spectra of the resulting chromosomal rearrangements, especially at low doses associated with typical human exposures. The development of combinatorial fluorescent labelling techniques (such as mFISH and mBAND) has helped to reveal the complexity of rearrangements, showing increasing complexity of observed rearrangements with increasing LET but has a resolution limited to ∼10 MBp. High-LET particles have not only been shown to produce clustered sites of DNA damage but also produce multiple correlated breaks along its path resulting in DNA fragments smaller than the resolution of these techniques. Additionally, studies have shown that the vast majority of radiation-induced HPRT mutations were also not detectable using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) techniques, with correlation of breaks along the track being reflected in the complexity of mutations, with intra- and inter-chromosomal insertions, and inversions occurring at the sites of some of the deletions. Therefore, the analysis of visible chromosomal rearrangements observed using current FISH techniques is likely to represent just the tip of the iceberg, considerably underestimating the extent and complexity of radiation induced rearrangements. (author)

  19. Molecular mapping of chromosomes 17 and X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, D.F.

    1991-01-15

    Progress toward the construction of high density genetic maps of chromosomes 17 and X has been made by isolating and characterizing a relatively large set of polymorphic probes for each chromosome and using these probes to construct genetic maps. We have mapped the same polymorphic probes against a series of chromosome breakpoints on X and 17. The probes could be assigned to over 30 physical intervals on the X chromosome and 7 intervals on 17. In many cases, this process resulted in improved characterization of the relative locations of the breakpoints with respect to each other and the definition of new physical intervals. The strategy for isolation of the polymorphic clones utilized chromosome specific libraries of 1--15 kb segments from each of the two chromosomes. From these libraries, clones were screened for those detecting restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The markers were further characterized, the chromosomal assignments confirmed and in most cases segments of the original probes were subcloned into plasmids to produce probes with improved signal to noise ratios for use in the genetic marker studies. The linkage studies utilize the CEPH reference families and other well-characterized families in our collection which have been used for genetic disease linkage work. Preliminary maps and maps of portions of specific regions of 17 and X are provided. We have nearly completed a map of the 1 megabase Mycoplasma arthritidis genome by applying these techniques to a lambda phage library of its genome. We have found bit mapping to be an efficient means to organize a contiguous set of overlapping clones from a larger genome.

  20. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Feng, T.L.; Xue, Feiyu; Zhong, Wuwei; Cotecchia, S.; Frielle, T.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Francke, U.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β 2 -and α 2 -AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α 1 -AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β 2 -AR, and the β 1 -AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α 2 -AR, is located. In mouse, both α 2 -and β 1 -AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α 1 -AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α 1 -and β 2 -AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α 2 - and β 1 -AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  1. Klinefelter syndrome and other sex chromosomal aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham John M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The term Klinefelter syndrome (KS describes a group of chromosomal disorder in which there is at least one extra X chromosome to a normal male karyotype, 46,XY. XXY aneuploidy is the most common disorder of sex chromosomes in humans, with prevalence of one in 500 males. Other sex chromosomal aneuploidies have also been described, although they are much less frequent, with 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY being present in 1 per 17,000 to 1 per 50,000 male births. The incidence of 49,XXXXY is 1 per 85,000 to 100,000 male births. In addition, 46,XX males also exist and it is caused by translocation of Y material including sex determining region (SRY to the X chromosome during paternal meiosis. Formal cytogenetic analysis is necessary to make a definite diagnosis, and more obvious differences in physical features tend to be associated with increasing numbers of sex chromosomes. If the diagnosis is not made prenatally, 47,XXY males may present with a variety of subtle clinical signs that are age-related. In infancy, males with 47,XXY may have chromosomal evaluations done for hypospadias, small phallus or cryptorchidism, developmental delay. The school-aged child may present with language delay, learning disabilities, or behavioral problems. The older child or adolescent may be discovered during an endocrine evaluation for delayed or incomplete pubertal development with eunuchoid body habitus, gynecomastia, and small testes. Adults are often evaluated for infertility or breast malignancy. Androgen replacement therapy should begin at puberty, around age 12 years, in increasing dosage sufficient to maintain age appropriate serum concentrations of testosterone, estradiol, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH, and luteinizing hormone (LH. The effects on physical and cognitive development increase with the number of extra Xs, and each extra X is associated with an intelligence quotient (IQ decrease of approximately 15–16 points, with language most affected

  2. Additional chromosome abnormalities in chronic myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Hua Hsiao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The Philadelphia (Ph chromosome and/or Breakpoint cluster region-Abelson leukemia virus oncogene transcript are unique markers for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML. However, CML demonstrates heterogeneous presentations and outcomes. We analyzed the cytogenetic and molecular results of CML patients to evaluate their correlation with clinical presentations and outcome. A total of 84 newly diagnosed CML patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were treated according to disease status. Bone marrow samples were obtained to perform cytogenetic and molecular studies. Clinical presentations, treatment courses, and survival were reviewed retrospectively. Among 84 patients, 72 had chronic phase and 12 had accelerated phase CML. Cytogenetic study showed 69 (82.1% with the classic Ph chromosome, 6 (7.2% with a variant Ph chromosome, and 9 (10.7% with additional chromosome abnormalities. Fifty-four (64.3% cases harbored b3a2 transcripts, 29 (34.5% had b2a2 transcript, and 1 had e19a2 transcript. There was no difference in clinical presentations between different cytogenetic and molecular groups; however, additional chromosome abnormalities were significantly associated with the accelerated phase. Imatinib therapy was an effective treatment, as measured by cytogenetic response, when administered as first- and second-line therapy in chronic phase patients. Survival analysis showed that old age, additional chromosome abnormalities, high Sokal score, and no cytogenetic response in second-line therapy had a significant poor impact (p<0.05. In conclusion, we presented the cytogenetic and molecular pattern of CML patients and demonstrated that the additional chromosome abnormality was associated with poor outcome.

  3. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuanliang; Bai, Lili; Fu, Shulan; Yin, Weibo; Zhang, Yingxin; Chen, Yuhong; Wang, Richard R-C; Zhang, Xiangqi; Han, Fangpu; Hu, Zanmin

    2013-01-01

    In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome) and pDbH12 (a J(s) genome specific probe) as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s) , J and St) in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s) genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of different

  4. Microdissection and chromosome painting of the alien chromosome in an addition line of wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanliang Deng

    Full Text Available In this study, chromosome painting was developed and used to identify alien chromosomes in TAi-27, a wheat--Thinopyrum intermedium addition line, and the chromosomes of the three different genomes of Th. Intermedium. The smallest alien chromosome of TAi-27 was microdissected and its DNA amplified by DOP-PCR was used as a probe to hybridize with metaphase chromosomes of TAi-27 and Th. intermedium. Results showed that hybridization signals were observed in all regions of a pair of the smallest alien chromosomes and the pericentromeric area of another pair of alien chromosomes in TAi-27, indicating that the probe from microdissected chromosome is species specific. In Th. intermedium, 14 chromosomes had wide and strong hybridization signals distributed mainly on the pericentromere area and 9 chromosomes with narrow and weak signals on the pericentromere area. The remaining chromosomes displayed a very weak or no signal. Sequential FISH/GISH on Th. intermedium chromosomes using the DNAs of microdissected chromosome, Pseudoroegneria spicata (St genome and pDbH12 (a J(s genome specific probe as the probes indicated that the microdissected chromosome belonged to the St genome, three genomes (J(s , J and St in Th. intermedium could be distinguished, in which there is no hybridization signal on J genome that is similar to the genome of Th. bessarabicum. Our results showed that the smallest alien chromosomes may represent a truncated chromosome and the repetitive sequence distribution might be similar in different chromosomes within the St genome. However, the repetitive sequence distributions are different within the J(s genome, within a single chromosome, and among different genomes in Th. intermedium. Our results suggested that chromosome painting could be feasible in some plants and useful in detecting chromosome variation and repetitive sequence distribution in different genomes of polyploidy plants, which is helpful for understanding the evolution of

  5. Chromosome and genome size variation in Luzula (Juncaceae), a genus with holocentric chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bozek, M.; Leitch, A. R.; Leitch, I. J.; Záveská Drábková, Lenka; Kuta, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 170, č. 4 (2012), s. 529-541 ISSN 0024-4074 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/07/P147 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : chromosomal evolution * endopolyploidy * holokinetic chromosome * karyotype evolution * tetraploides * centromeres * TRNF intergenic spacer Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2012

  6. Chromosome painting in biological dosimetry: Semi-automatic system to score stable chromosome aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sagredo, J.M.; Vallcorba, I.; Sanchez-Hombre, M.C.; Ferro, M.T.; San Roman Cos-Gayon, C.; Santos, A.; Malpica, N.; Ortiz, C.

    1997-01-01

    From the beginning of the description of the procedure of chromosome painting by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), it was thought its possible application to score induced chromosomal aberrations in radiation exposition. With chromosome painting it is possible to detect changes between chromosomes that has been validated in radiation exposition. Translocation scoring by FISH, contrarily to the unstable dicentrics, mainly detect stable chromosome aberrations that do not disappear, it allows the capability of quantify delayed acute expositions or chronic cumulative expositions. The large number of cells that have to be analyzed for high accuracy, specially when dealing with low radiation doses, makes it almost imperative to use an automatic analysis system. After validate translocation scoring by FISH in our, we have evaluated the ability and sensitivity to detect chromosomal aberrations by chromosome using different paint probes used, showing that any combination of paint probes can be used to score induced chromosomal aberrations. Our group has developed a FISH analysis that is currently being adapted for translocation scoring analysis. It includes systematic error correction and internal control probes. The performance tests carried out show that 9,000 cells can be analyzed in 10 hr. using a Sparc 4/370. Although with a faster computer, a higher throughput is expected, for large population screening or very low radiation doses, this performance still has to be improved. (author)

  7. Unique mosaicism of structural chromosomal rearrangement: is chromosome 18 preferentially involved?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pater, J.M. de; Smeets, D.F.C.M.; Scheres, J.M.J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The mentally normal mother of a 4-year-old boy with del(18)(q21.3) syndrome was tested cytogenetically to study the possibility of an inherited structural rearrangement of chromosome 18. She was found to carry an unusual mosaicism involving chromosomes 18 and 21. Two unbalanced cell lines were seen

  8. Painting of fourth and chromosome-wide regulation of the 4th chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anna-Mia; Stenberg, Per; Bernhardsson, Carolina; Larsson, Jan

    2007-05-02

    Drosophila melanogaster exhibits two expression-regulating systems that target whole, specific chromosomes: the dosage compensation system whereby the male-specific lethal complex doubles transcription of genes on the male X-chromosome and the chromosome 4-specific protein Painting of fourth, POF. POF is the first example of an autosome-specific protein and its presence raises the question of the universality of chromosome-specific regulation. Here we show that POF and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) are involved in the global regulation of the 4th chromosome. Contrary to previous conclusions, Pof is not essential for survival of diplo-4th karyotype flies. However, Pof is essential for survival of haplo-4th individuals and expression of chromosome 4 genes in diplo-4th individuals is decreased in the absence of Pof. Mapping of POF using chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that it binds within genes. Furthermore, we show that POF binding is dependent on heterochromatin and that POF and HP1 bind interdependently to the 4th chromosome. We propose a balancing mechanism involving POF and HP1 that provides a feedback system for fine-tuning expression status of genes on the 4th chromosome.

  9. Variation of morphology, karyotype and protein band pattern of adenium (Adenium obesum varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRABANG SETYONO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Hastuti D, Suranto, Setyono P. 2009. Variation of morphology, karyotype and protein band pattern of adenium (Adenium obesum varieties. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 78-83. The aim of this research to find out the Adenium obesum variation from six varieties, namely: obesum, cery, red lucas, red fanta , white bigben and harry potter based on morphology, karyotype, as well as protein banding pattern. The chromosome preparation was made using semi-permanent squash method from the tip of root plant; while protein banding pattern was made using SDS-PAGE method. Qualitative data included shape and color of the leave and flower described from each variety. Data were presented in morphometry and analyzed using ANOVA and then followed by DMRT with 5% of confidence levels, indicated significance difference. Protein banding pattern, the root, stem, leave and all organs were analyzed using Hierarchical Cluster Analysis method with Average Linkage (between Groups using SPSS 10.0. The result of research shows that the six A. obesum varieties have morphological character with no variation of light green to dark green leave, not hairy, smooth leave bone, meanwhile for light red to dark red flower crown color although some of them are white and the same funnel color, yellow. All varieties of A. obesum have same number of chromosome, 2n = 22 and shows the difference ranging from 2.56 to 5.13 um. In the banding pattern formed qualitatively, there is variation among the six varieties.

  10. Breakpoint of an inversion of chromosome 14 in a T-cell leukemia: sequences downstream of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus are implicated in tumorigenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, R.; Heppell, A.; Taylor, A.M.R.; Rabbitts, P.H.; Boullier, B.; Rabbitts, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    T-cell tumors are characterized by inversions or translocations of chromosome 14. The breakpoints of these karyotypic abnormalities occur in chromosome bands 14q11 and 14q32 - the same bands in which the T-cell receptor (TCR) α-chain and immunoglobulin heavy chain genes have been mapped, respectively. Patients with ataxia-telangiectasia are particularly prone to development of T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with such chromosomal abnormalities. The authors describe DNA rearrangements of the TCR α-chain gene in an ataxia-telangiectasia-associated leukemia containing both a normal and an inverted chromosome 14. The normal chromosome 14 has undergone a productive join of TCR α-chain variable (V/sub α/) and joining (J/sub α/) gene segments. The other allele of the TCR α-chain gene features a DNA rearrangement, about 50 kilobases from the TCR α-chain constant (C/sub α/) gene, that represents the breakpoint of the chromosome 14 inversion; this breakpoint is comprised of a TCR J/sub α/) segment (from 14q11) fused to sequences derived from 14q32 but on the centromeric side of C/sub μ/. These results imply that 14q32 sequences located at an undetermined distance downstream of immunoglobulin C/sub μ/ locus can contribute to the development of T-cell tumors

  11. Mechanisms of ring chromosome formation in 11 cases of human ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGinniss, M J; Kazazian, H H; Stetten, G

    1992-01-01

    We studied the mechanism of ring chromosome 21 (r(21)) formation in 13 patients (11 unique r(21)s), consisting of 7 from five families with familial r(21) and 6 with de novo r(21). The copy number of chromosome 21 sequences in the rings of these patients was determined by quantitative dosage......), resulting in deletion of varying amounts of 21q22.1 to 21qter. The data from one individual who had a Down syndrome phenotype were consistent with asymmetric breakage and reunion of 21q sequences from an intermediate isochromosome or Robertsonian translocation chromosome as reported by Wong et al. Another......). The phenotype of patients correlated well with the extent of deletion or duplication of chromosome 21 sequences. These data demonstrate three mechanisms of r(21) formation and show that the phenotype of r(21) patients varies with the extent of chromosome 21 monosomy or trisomy....

  12. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by 60 Co γ rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  13. Localization of the MEN1 gene to a small region within chromosome 11q13 by deletion mapping in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroem, C.; Larsson, C.; Blomberg, C.; Nordenskjoeld, M.; Sandelin, K.; Falkmer, U.; Werner, S.; Skogseid, B.; Oeberg, K.

    1990-01-01

    The gene for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), and inherited predisposition to neuroendocrine neoplasm of the parathyroid glands, the pancreatic islet parenchyma, and the anterior pituitary gland, was recently mapped to chromosome 11q13 based on genetic linkage in families. The authors now show that the pathogenesis of MEN1-associated parathyroid lesions involves unmasking of a recessive mutation at the disease locus and that sporadic primary hyperparathyroidism shares the same mechanisms. By examination of allele losses in MEN1-associated lesions, they could define deletions of chromosome 11 and map the MEN1 locus to a small region within chromosome band 11q13, telomeric to the PYGM locus. In contrast, a low incidence of deletions involving the MEN1 gene was found in sporadic pituitary adenomas

  14. Chromosomal abnormality in patients with secondary amenorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safai, Akbar; Vasei, Mohammad; Attaranzadeh, Armin; Azad, Fariborz; Tabibi, Narjes

    2012-04-01

    Secondary amenorrhea is a condition in which there is cessation of menses after at least one menstruation. It is a symptom of different diseases, such as hormonal disturbances which range from pituitary to ovarian origin, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. Knowledge of the distinct cause of secondary amenorrhea is of tremendous benefit for the management and monitoring of patients. In this study, we determine the chromosomal abnormalities in patients with secondary amenorrhea in Southwest Iran. We selected 94 patients with secondary amenorrhea who referred to our Cytogenetic Ward from 2004 until 2009. For karyotyping, peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures were set up by conventional technique. In this study, 5.3% (n=5) of patients with secondary amenorrhea presented with chromosomal abnormalities, of which all contained an X element. The chromosomal abnormalities were: i) 45, X (n=1); ii) 47, XXX (n=1); iii) 45, X [13]/ 45, Xi(X)q[17] (n=1);  iv) 45, X[12]/46,X,+mar[12] (n=1); and v) 46,X,del(Xq)(q23q28) (n=1). Our study revealed that some causes of secondary amenorrhea could be due to chromosomal abnormalities. Therefore, cytogenetic studies should be important tests in the evaluation of patients with secondary amenorrhea.

  15. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  16. Genomic regulatory landscapes and chromosomal rearrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladegaard, Elisabete L Engenheiro

    2008-01-01

    The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes is that they ......The main objectives of the PhD study are to identify and characterise chromosomal rearrangements within evolutionarily conserved regulatory landscapes around genes involved in the regulation of transcription and/or development (trans-dev genes). A frequent feature of trans-dev genes...... the complex spatio-temporal expression of the associated trans-dev gene. Rare chromosomal breakpoints that disrupt the integrity of these regulatory landscapes may be used as a tool, not only to make genotype-phenotype associations, but also to link the associated phenotype with the position and tissue...... specificity of the individual CNEs. In this PhD study I have studied several chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints in the vicinity of trans-dev genes. This included chromosomal rearrangements compatible with known phenotype-genotype associations (Rieger syndrome-PITX2, Mowat-Wilson syndrome-ZEB2...

  17. Y chromosome STR typing in crime casework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roewer, Lutz

    2009-01-01

    Since the beginning of the nineties the field of forensic Y chromosome analysis has been successfully developed to become commonplace in laboratories working in crime casework all over the world. The ability to identify male-specific DNA renders highly variable Y-chromosomal polymorphisms, the STR sequences, an invaluable addition to the standard panel of autosomal loci used in forensic genetics. The male-specificity makes the Y chromosome especially useful in cases of male/female cell admixture, namely in sexual assault cases. On the other hand, the haploidy and patrilineal inheritance complicates the interpretation of a Y-STR match, because male relatives share for several generations an identical Y-STR profile. Since paternal relatives tend to live in the geographic and cultural territory of their ancestors, the Y chromosome analysis has a potential to make inferences on the population of origin of a given DNA profile. This review addresses the fields of application of Y chromosome haplotyping, the interpretation of results, databasing efforts and population genetics aspects.

  18. Contrasting the Chromosomal Organization of Repetitive DNAs in Two Gryllidae Crickets with Highly Divergent Karyotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio M Palacios-Gimenez

    Full Text Available A large percentage of eukaryotic genomes consist of repetitive DNA that plays an important role in the organization, size and evolution. In the case of crickets, chromosomal variability has been found using classical cytogenetics, but almost no information concerning the organization of their repetitive DNAs is available. To better understand the chromosomal organization and diversification of repetitive DNAs in crickets, we studied the chromosomes of two Gryllidae species with highly divergent karyotypes, i.e., 2n(♂ = 29,X0 (Gryllus assimilis and 2n = 9, neo-X1X2Y (Eneoptera surinamensis. The analyses were performed using classical cytogenetic techniques, repetitive DNA mapping and genome-size estimation. Conserved characteristics were observed, such as the occurrence of a small number of clusters of rDNAs and U snDNAs, in contrast to the multiple clusters/dispersal of the H3 histone genes. The positions of U2 snDNA and 18S rDNA are also conserved, being intermingled within the largest autosome. The distribution and base-pair composition of the heterochromatin and repetitive DNA pools of these organisms differed, suggesting reorganization. Although the microsatellite arrays had a similar distribution pattern, being dispersed along entire chromosomes, as has been observed in some grasshopper species, a band-like pattern was also observed in the E. surinamensis chromosomes, putatively due to their amplification and clustering. In addition to these differences, the genome of E. surinamensis is approximately 2.5 times larger than that of G. assimilis, which we hypothesize is due to the amplification of repetitive DNAs. Finally, we discuss the possible involvement of repetitive DNAs in the differentiation of the neo-sex chromosomes of E. surinamensis, as has been reported in other eukaryotic groups. This study provided an opportunity to explore the evolutionary dynamics of repetitive DNAs in two non-model species and will contribute to the

  19. Molecular cloning and chromosome mapping of the human gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown-Shimer, S.; Johnson, K.A.; Bruskin, A.; Green, N.R.; Hill, D.E.; Lawrence, J.B.; Johnson, C.

    1990-01-01

    The inactivation of growth suppressor genes appears to play a major role in the malignant process. To assess whether protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatases function as growth suppressors, the authors have isolated a cDNA clone encoding human protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B for structural and functional characterization. The translation product deduced from the 1,305-nucleotide open reading frame predicts a protein containing 435 amino acids and having a molecular mass of 49,966 Da. The amino-terminal 321 amino acids deduced from the cDNA sequence are identical to the empirically determined sequence of protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B. A genomic clone has been isolated and used in an in situ hybridization to banded metaphase chromosomes to determine that the gene encoding protein phosphotyrosyl phosphatase 1B maps as a single-copy gene to the long arm of chromosome 20 in the region q13.1-q13.2

  20. The 3 micron ice band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, J.M.; Bult, C.E.P.M. van de

    1984-01-01

    Ever since it was proposed that H 2 O could be a dominant constituent of interstellar grains, its detection, or lack thereof, has played a large role in theories of grains and their evolution. It now appears possible to provide a basic theoretical structure for the evolution of grains in molecular clouds based on current observational evidence and laboratory experiments on the ice band. Both band strengths and shapes can be reasonably predicted by grain models. (U.K.)

  1. Superdeformed bands in 130Ce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, E.S.; Semple, A.T.; Boston, A.J.; Joss, D.T.; Nolan, P.J.; Shepherd, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    Four superdeformed bands have been assigned to 130 Ce following a high-statistics γ-ray study using the EUROGAM II spectrometer. The strongest band exhibits two distinct backbends which, in one scenario, may be interpreted as crossings between high-j N = 6 neutron orbitals (νi 13/2 ) and low-j N = 4 orbitals (νd 3/2 ) in an unpaired system. (author)

  2. Dipole Bands in 196Hg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D.; Msezane, B.; Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P.; Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M.; Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P.

    2011-01-01

    High spin states in 196 Hg have been populated in the 198 Pt(α,6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  3. Localisation of aphidicolin-induced break points in Holstein-Friesian cattle (Bos taurus using RBG-banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mernies Beatriz

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Fragile sites (FS seem to play a role in genome instability and may be involved in karyotype evolution and chromosome aberrations. The majority of common fragile sites are induced by aphidicolin. Aphidicolin was used at two different concentrations (0.15 and 0.30 μM to study the occurrence of FS in the cattle karyotype. In this paper, a map of aphidicolin induced break points and fragile sites in cattle chromosomes was constructed. The statistical analysis indicated that any band with three or more breaks was significantly damaged (P r = 0.54. On the contrary, 21 FS were identified on negative R bands while 9 FS were located on positive R bands.

  4. Karyotypes and heterochromatin variation (C-bands in Melipona species (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Marla Piumbini

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the karyotypes of eight bee species of the genus Melipona and compare them in terms of heterochromatin content and location (C-banding technique. All species had 2n = 18 (females and n = 9 (males chromosomes, but a wide variation in heterochromatin content was detected among karyotypes. On the basis of these differences, the species were divided into two functional groups, one of them comprising species with a karyotype having a low heterochromatin content (M. bicolor bicolor, M. quadrifasciata, M. marginata, and M. asilvai, and the other species with a high heterochromatin content (M. seminigra fuscopilosa, M. capixaba, M. scutellaris, and M. captiosa. In the species with high heterochromatin content, heterochromatin occupied practically the entire extent of all chromosomes, with euchromatin being limited to the extremities, a fact that prevented observation of the centromere. In contrast, in the species with karyotypes having a low heterochromatin content, heterochromatin was visualized only in some chromosomes. In the chromosomes in which it was present, heterochromatin was located in the centromere or on the short arm. M. bicolor bicolor had the smallest heterochromatin content with only three chromosome pairs presenting heterochromatin in females. Increased heterochromatin content may be explained by interstitial and pericentromeric growth.

  5. HOMOZYGOUS DELETION IN A SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER CELL-LINE INVOLVING A 3P21 REGION WITH A MARKED INSTABILITY IN YEAST ARTIFICIAL CHROMOSOMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOK, K; van den Berg, Anke; VELDHUIS, PMJF; VANDERVEEN, AY; FRANKE, M; SCHOENMAKERS, EFPM; HULSBEEK, MMF; VANDERHOUT, AH; DELEIJ, L; VANDEVEN, W; BUYS, CHCM

    1994-01-01

    All types of lung carcinoma are characterized by a high frequency of loss of sequences from the short arm of chromosome 3, the smallest region of overlap containing D3F15S2 in band p21. Here we characterize a 440-kilobase segment from this region, which we found homozygously deleted in one of our

  6. Comparison of type and frequency of chromosome aberrations by conventional and G-staining methods in Hiroshima atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Kazuo; Shimba, Hachiro; Sofuni, Toshio; Awa, A.A.

    1982-07-01

    Somatic chromosomes derived from cultured lymphocytes of 23 atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima were analyzed to determine the type and frequency of radiation-induced structural aberrations, using in sequence the ordinary staining method (O-method) and the trypsin G-banding method (G-method). Of 896 cells examined, 342 were found to contain induced aberrations, including 31 cells in which the precise identification of the type of aberrations was not possible even by the G-method. The number of chromosome aberrations observed was 376 in the 311 cells where aberrant precise identification was possible. The majority (288 or 76.6%) were intra- or inter-chromosomal symmetric exchanges due to a two-break event, while only 24 were found to be asymmetric exchanges (dicentrics, rings, and interstitial deletions). Further, there were 28 aberrations showing acentric fragments and terminal deletions, and the remaining 36 were complex intra- and inter-chromosomal exchanges involving three or more breaks which result in insertions and double translocations. A comparative karyotype analysis of the same metaphases examined by the sequential 0- And G-methods was carried out independently on 361 aberrations, mostly of the symmetric type. It was found that 78 (21.6%) of the 361 were detected only by the G-method; among these were 14 paracentric inversions, 48 reciprocal interchanges of chromosome segments with either equal length (11) or unequal length (37), 14 minor deletions and 2 complex rearrangements, all of which were nevertheless judged to fall within the normal range of variation by theO-method. In contrast, 25 aberrations detected in O-method chromosomes which were overcontracted or twisted, were shown to have normal banding patterns by the G-method. (author)

  7. RFLPs for ATP1BL1 (. beta. subunit Na sup + /K sup + ATPase pseudogene) on chromosome 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiou, C.; Shull, M. (Univ. of Iowa Hospitals, Iowa City (USA)); Lingrel, J.B.; Murray, J.C.; Lane, L.K. (Univ. of Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1989-11-11

    {beta}51-1(1.4) contains a 1.4kb EcoRI fragment, free of repetitive elements, from the {beta} subunit Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase pseudogene (ATP1BL1). The vector is pUG18. EcoRI identifies 2 allelic bands of 7.0 and 14.0 kb. KpnI identifies 2 allelic bands of 19.0 and 23.0 kb. The probe was localized to chromosome 4 by linkage to chromosome 4 markers (D4S35, KIT) and somatic cell hybrid analysis. Co-dominant segregation was shown in 32 and 16 CEPH families for EcoRI and KpnI respectively.

  8. Mapping replication origins in yeast chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, B J; Fangman, W L

    1991-07-01

    The replicon hypothesis, first proposed in 1963 by Jacob and Brenner, states that DNA replication is controlled at sites called origins. Replication origins have been well studied in prokaryotes. However, the study of eukaryotic chromosomal origins has lagged behind, because until recently there has been no method for reliably determining the identity and location of origins from eukaryotic chromosomes. Here, we review a technique we developed with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allows both the mapping of replication origins and an assessment of their activity. Two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization with total genomic DNA are used to determine whether a particular restriction fragment acquires the branched structure diagnostic of replication initiation. The technique has been used to localize origins in yeast chromosomes and assess their initiation efficiency. In some cases, origin activation is dependent upon the surrounding context. The technique is also being applied to a variety of eukaryotic organisms.

  9. Chromosomal aberrations induced by alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Brena V, M.

    2005-01-01

    The chromosomal aberrations produced by the ionizing radiation are commonly used when it is necessary to establish the exposure dose of an individual, it is a study that is used like complement of the traditional physical systems and its application is only in cases in that there is doubt about what indicates the conventional dosimetry. The biological dosimetry is based on the frequency of aberrations in the chromosomes of the lymphocytes of the individual in study and the dose is calculated taking like reference to the dose-response curves previously generated In vitro. A case of apparent over-exposure to alpha particles to which is practiced analysis of chromosomal aberrations to settle down if in fact there was exposure and as much as possible, to determine the presumed dose is presented. (Author)

  10. Can molecular cell biology explain chromosome motions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagliardi L

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitotic chromosome motions have recently been correlated with electrostatic forces, but a lingering "molecular cell biology" paradigm persists, proposing binding and release proteins or molecular geometries for force generation. Results Pole-facing kinetochore plates manifest positive charges and interact with negatively charged microtubule ends providing the motive force for poleward chromosome motions by classical electrostatics. This conceptual scheme explains dynamic tracking/coupling of kinetochores to microtubules and the simultaneous depolymerization of kinetochore microtubules as poleward force is generated. Conclusion We question here why cells would prefer complex molecular mechanisms to move chromosomes when direct electrostatic interactions between known bound charge distributions can accomplish the same task much more simply.

  11. Chromosomal abnormalities in a psychiatric population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, K.E.; Lubetsky, M.J.; Wenger, S.L.; Steele, M.W. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States)

    1995-02-27

    Over a 3.5 year period of time, 345 patients hospitalized for psychiatric problems were evaluated cytogenetically. The patient population included 76% males and 94% children with a mean age of 12 years. The criteria for testing was an undiagnosed etiology for mental retardation and/or autism. Cytogenetic studies identified 11, or 3%, with abnormal karyotypes, including 4 fragile X positive individuals (2 males, 2 females), and 8 with chromosomal aneuploidy, rearrangements, or deletions. While individuals with chromosomal abnormalities do not demonstrate specific behavioral, psychiatric, or developmental problems relative to other psychiatric patients, our results demonstrate the need for an increased awareness to order chromosomal analysis and fragile X testing in those individuals who have combinations of behavioral/psychiatric, learning, communication, or cognitive disturbance. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Progressive segregation of the Escherichia coli chromosome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2006-01-01

    We have followed the fate of 14 different loci around the Escherichia coli chromosome in living cells at slow growth rate using a highly efficient labelling system and automated measurements. Loci are segregated as they are replicated, but with a marked delay. Most markers segregate in a smooth...... temporal progression from origin to terminus. Thus, the overall pattern is one of continuous segregation during replication and is not consistent with recently published models invoking extensive sister chromosome cohesion followed by simultaneous segregation of the bulk of the chromosome. The terminus......, and a region immediately clockwise from the origin, are exceptions to the overall pattern and are subjected to a more extensive delay prior to segregation. The origin region and nearby loci are replicated and segregated from the cell centre, later markers from the various positions where they lie...

  13. Non-disjunction of chromosome 18

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bugge, M; Collins, A; Petersen, M B

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 100 trisomy 18 conceptuses analysed separately and together with a published sample of 61 conceptuses confirms that an error in maternal meiosis II (MII) is the most frequent cause of non-disjunction for chromosome 18. This is unlike all other human trisomies that have been studied......, which show a higher frequency in maternal meiosis I (MI). Maternal MI trisomy 18 shows a low frequency of recombination in proximal p and medial q, but not the reduction in proximal q observed in chromosome 21 MI non-disjunction. Maternal MII non-disjunction does not fit the entanglement model...... that predicts increased recombination, especially near the centromere. Whereas recent data on MII trisomy 21 show the predicted increase in recombination proximally, maternal MII trisomy 18 has non-significantly reduced recombination. Therefore, chromosome-specific factors must complicate the simple model...

  14. Radiation hybrid mapping of human chromosome 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francke, U.; Moon, A.J.; Chang, E.; Foellmer, B.; Strauss, B.; Haschke, A.; Chihlin Hsieh; Geigl, E.M.; Welch, S.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have generated a Chinese hamster V79/380-6 HPRT minus x human leukocyte hybrid cell line (18/V79) with chromosome 18 as the only human chromosome that is retained at high frequency without specific selection. Hybrid cells were selected in HAT medium, and 164 individual colonies were isolated. Of 110 colonies screened for human DNA by PCR amplification using a primer specific for human Alu repeats 67 (61%) were positive. These were expanded in culture for large-scale DNA preparations. Retesting expanded clones by PCR with Alu and LINE primers has revealed unique patterns of amplification products. In situ hybridization of biotin labelled total human DNA to metaphase spreads from various hybrids revealed the presence of one or more human DNA fragments integrated in hamster chromosomes. The authors have generated a resource that should allow the construction of a radiation map, to be compared with the YAC contig map also under construction in their laboratory

  15. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  16. Chromosome Mapping of Repetitive Sequences in Rachycentron canadum (Perciformes: Rachycentridae: Implications for Karyotypic Evolution and Perspectives for Biotechnological Uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uedson Pereira Jacobina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The cobia, Rachycentron canadum, a species of marine fish, has been increasingly used in aquaculture worldwide. It is the only member of the family Rachycentridae (Perciformes showing wide geographic distribution and phylogenetic patterns still not fully understood. In this study, the species was cytogenetically analyzed by different methodologies, including Ag-NOR and chromomycin A3 (CMA3/DAPI staining, C-banding, early replication banding (RGB, and in situ fluorescent hybridization with probes for 18S and 5S ribosomal genes and for telomeric sequences (TTAGGGn. The results obtained allow a detailed chromosomal characterization of the Atlantic population. The chromosome diversification found in the karyotype of the cobia is apparently related to pericentric inversions, the main mechanism associated to the karyotypic evolution of Perciformes. The differential heterochromatin replication patterns found were in part associated to functional genes. Despite maintaining conservative chromosomal characteristics in relation to the basal pattern established for Perciformes, some chromosome pairs in the analyzed population exhibit markers that may be important for cytotaxonomic, population, and biodiversity studies as well as for monitoring the species in question.

  17. An approach to automated chromosome analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Go, Roland

    1972-01-01

    The methods of approach developed with a view to automatic processing of the different stages of chromosome analysis are described in this study divided into three parts. Part 1 relates the study of automated selection of metaphase spreads, which operates a decision process in order to reject ail the non-pertinent images and keep the good ones. This approach has been achieved by Computing a simulation program that has allowed to establish the proper selection algorithms in order to design a kit of electronic logical units. Part 2 deals with the automatic processing of the morphological study of the chromosome complements in a metaphase: the metaphase photographs are processed by an optical-to-digital converter which extracts the image information and writes it out as a digital data set on a magnetic tape. For one metaphase image this data set includes some 200 000 grey values, encoded according to a 16, 32 or 64 grey-level scale, and is processed by a pattern recognition program isolating the chromosomes and investigating their characteristic features (arm tips, centromere areas), in order to get measurements equivalent to the lengths of the four arms. Part 3 studies a program of automated karyotyping by optimized pairing of human chromosomes. The data are derived from direct digitizing of the arm lengths by means of a BENSON digital reader. The program supplies' 1/ a list of the pairs, 2/ a graphic representation of the pairs so constituted according to their respective lengths and centromeric indexes, and 3/ another BENSON graphic drawing according to the author's own representation of the chromosomes, i.e. crosses with orthogonal arms, each branch being the accurate measurement of the corresponding chromosome arm. This conventionalized karyotype indicates on the last line the really abnormal or non-standard images unpaired by the program, which are of special interest for the biologist. (author) [fr

  18. Origin and domestication of papaya Yh chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuren, Robert; Zeng, Fanchang; Chen, Cuixia; Zhang, Jisen; Wai, Ching Man; Han, Jennifer; Aryal, Rishi; Gschwend, Andrea R.; Wang, Jianping; Na, Jong-Kuk; Huang, Lixian; Zhang, Lingmao; Miao, Wenjing; Gou, Jiqing; Arro, Jie; Guyot, Romain; Moore, Richard C.; Wang, Ming-Li; Zee, Francis; Charlesworth, Deborah; Moore, Paul H.; Yu, Qingyi; Ming, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Sex in papaya is controlled by a pair of nascent sex chromosomes. Females are XX, and two slightly different Y chromosomes distinguish males (XY) and hermaphrodites (XYh). The hermaphrodite-specific region of the Yh chromosome (HSY) and its X chromosome counterpart were sequenced and analyzed previously. We now report the sequence of the entire male-specific region of the Y (MSY). We used a BAC-by-BAC approach to sequence the MSY and resequence the Y regions of 24 wild males and the Yh regions of 12 cultivated hermaphrodites. The MSY and HSY regions have highly similar gene content and structure, and only 0.4% sequence divergence. The MSY sequences from wild males include three distinct haplotypes, associated with the populations’ geographic locations, but gene flow is detected for other genomic regions. The Yh sequence is highly similar to one Y haplotype (MSY3) found only in wild dioecious populations from the north Pacific region of Costa Rica. The low MSY3-Yh divergence supports the hypothesis that hermaphrodite papaya is a product of human domestication. We estimate that Yh arose only ∼4000 yr ago, well after crop plant domestication in Mesoamerica >6200 yr ago but coinciding with the rise of the Maya civilization. The Yh chromosome has lower nucleotide diversity than the Y, or the genome regions that are not fully sex-linked, consistent with a domestication bottleneck. The identification of the ancestral MSY3 haplotype will expedite investigation of the mutation leading to the domestication of the hermaphrodite Yh chromosome. In turn, this mutation should identify the gene that was affected by the carpel-suppressing mutation that was involved in the evolution of males. PMID:25762551

  19. Delayed chromosomal instability caused by large deletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, M.; Suzuki, K.; Kodama, S.; Watanabe, M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: There is accumulating evidence that genomic instability, manifested by the expression of delayed phenotypes, is induced by X-irradiation but not by ultraviolet (UV) light. It is well known that ionizing radiation, such as X-rays, induces DNA double strand breaks, but UV-light mainly causes base damage like pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) photoproducts. Although the mechanism of radiation-induced genomic instability has not been thoroughly explained, it is suggested that DNA double strand breaks contribute the induction of genomic instability. We examined here whether X-ray induced gene deletion at the hprt locus induces delayed instability in chromosome X. SV40-immortalized normal human fibroblasts, GM638, were irradiated with X-rays (3, 6 Gy), and the hprt mutants were isolated in the presence of 6-thioguanine (6-TG). A 2-fold and a 60-fold increase in mutation frequency were found by 3 Gy and 6 Gy irradiation, respectively. The molecular structure of the hprt mutations was determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction of nine exons. Approximately 60% of 3 Gy mutants lost a part or the entire hprt gene, and the other mutants showed point mutations like spontaneous mutants. All 6 Gy mutants show total gene deletion. The chromosomes of the hprt mutants were analyzed by Whole Human Chromosome X Paint FISH or Xq telomere FISH. None of the point or partial gene deletion mutants showed aberrations of X-chromosome, however total gene deletion mutants induced translocations and dicentrics involving chromosome X. These results suggest that large deletion caused by DNA double strand breaks destabilizes chromosome structure, which may be involved in an induction of radiation-induced genomic instability

  20. Chromosomes of Protists: The crucible of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyer-Gobillard, Marie-Odile; Dolan, Michael F

    2015-12-01

    As early as 1925, the great protozoologist Edouard Chatton classified microorganisms into two categories, the prokaryotic and the eukaryotic microbes, based on light microscopical observation of their nuclear organization. Now, by means of transmission electron microscopy, we know that prokaryotic microbes are characterized by the absence of nuclear envelope surrounding the bacterial chromosome, which is more or less condensed and whose chromatin is deprived of histone proteins but presents specific basic proteins. Eukaryotic microbes, the protists, have nuclei surrounded by a nuclear envelope and have chromosomes more or less condensed, with chromatin-containing histone proteins organized into nucleosomes. The extraordinary diversity of mitotic systems presented by the 36 phyla of protists (according to Margulis et al., Handbook of Protoctista, 1990) is in contrast to the relative homogeneity of their chromosome structure and chromatin components. Dinoflagellates are the exception to this pattern. The phylum is composed of around 2000 species, and characterized by unique features including their nucleus (dinokaryon), dinomitosis, chromosome organization and chromatin composition. Although their DNA synthesis is typically eukaryotic, dinoflagellates are the only eukaryotes in which the chromatin, organized into quasi-permanently condensed chromosomes, is in some species devoid of histones and nucleosomes. In these cases, their chromatin contains specific DNA-binding basic proteins. The permanent compaction of their chromosomes throughout the cell cycle raises the question of the modalities of their division and their transcription. Successful in vitro reconstitution of nucleosomes using dinoflagellate DNA and heterologous corn histones raises questions about dinoflagellate evolution and phylogeny. [Int Microbiol 18(4):209-216 (2015)]. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  1. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRobbie, M.L.; Riches, A.; Baxby, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients is being investigated using the G2 assay and the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus(CBMN)assay. The G2 assay evaluates chromosomal damage caused by irradiating cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. The CBMN assay quantifies the post mitotic micronuclei, which are the expression of damage incurred during G0. An association between hypersensitivity to the chromosome damaging effects of ionising radiation and cancer predispostion has been demonstrated in a number of heritable conditions by using the aforementioned techniques. Recently, increased chromosomal radiosensitivity has been demonstrated in a significant proportion of patients with no obvious family history of malignancy. The aim of this study is to establish whether a group of prostatic carcinoma patients exists and if so whether there are any correlations between their G2 and G0 sensitivities. The study has shown there is no correlation between G2 and G0 sensitivity, confirming the general trend that individuals exhibiting chromosomal radiosensitivity are defective in only one mechanism and G2 and G0 sensitivity are largely independent. Current data indicates that there is an identifiable group of men within the prostate cancer population with increased chromosomal radiosensitivity. Using the G2 assay and the 90th percentile of the controls as a cut off point for sensitivity, no significant difference between the controls and the patient population has been found. However, using the CBMN assay and again the 90th percentile, approximately 11% of the control group are sensitive compared with approximately 40% of the carcinoma cases. The implications of this increased radiosensitivity are as yet unclear, but it is indicative of increased chromosomal fragility and therefore, possibly associated with malignant transformation. Hence, it may prove a useful tool in identifying individuals at increased risk of developing

  2. From equator to pole: splitting chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, Eris

    2015-01-01

    During eukaryotic cell division, chromosomes must be precisely partitioned to daughter cells. This relies on a mechanism to move chromosomes in defined directions within the parental cell. While sister chromatids are segregated from one another in mitosis and meiosis II, specific adaptations enable the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I to reduce ploidy for gamete production. Many of the factors that drive these directed chromosome movements are known, and their molecular mechanism has started to be uncovered. Here we review the mechanisms of eukaryotic chromosome segregation, with a particular emphasis on the modifications that ensure the segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis I. PMID:25593304

  3. Chromosome aberration analysis for biological dosimetry: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.F.D.; Venkatachalam, P.; Jeevanram, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    Among various biological dosimetry techniques, dicentric chromosome aberration method appears to be the method of choice in analysing accidental radiation exposure in most of the laboratories. The major advantage of this method is its sensitivity as the number of dicentric chromosomes present in control population is too small and more importantly radiation induces mainly dicentric chromosome aberration among unstable aberration. This report brings out the historical development of various cytogenetic methods, the basic structure of DNA, chromosomes and different forms of chromosome aberrations. It also highlights the construction of dose-response curve for dicentric chromosome and its use in the estimation of radiation dose. (author)

  4. Computational simulation of chromosome breaks in human liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jianshe; Li Wenjian; Jin Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    An easy method was established for computing chromosome breaks in cells exposed to heavily charged particles. The cell chromosome break value by 12 C +6 ions was theoretically calculated, and was tested with experimental data of chromosome breaks by using a premature chromosome condensation technique. The theoretical chromosome break value agreed well with the experimental data. The higher relative biological effectiveness of the heavy ions was closely correlated to its physical characteristics. In addition, the chromosome break value can be predicted off line. (authors)

  5. Chromosomal DNA replication of Vicia faba cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikushima, Takaji

    1976-01-01

    The chromosomal DNA replication of higher plant cells has been investigated by DNA fiber autoradiography. The nuclear DNA fibers of Vicia root meristematic cells are organized into many tandem arrays of replication units or replicons which exist as clusters with respect to replication. DNA is replicated bidirectionally from the initiation points at the average rate of 0.15 μm/min at 20 0 C, and the average interinitiation interval is about 16 μm. The manner of chromosomal DNA replication in this higher plant is similar to that found in other eukaryotic cells at a subchromosomal level. (auth.)

  6. Chromosomal phylogeny of Lagothrix, Brachyteles, and Cacajao.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas Péquignot, E; Koiffmann, C P; Dutrillaux, B

    1985-01-01

    Based on a comparison of the karyotypes of two Plathyrrhini species, Cacajao melanocephalus (Pitheciinae) and Brachyteles arachnoides (Atelinae), with those of two previously studied species, Lagothrix lagothrica (Atelinae) and C calvus rubicundus (Pitheciinae), it appears that the two Cacajao species have undergone the same number of chromosome rearrangements since they diverged from their common ancestor and that the karyotype of Brachyteles is ancestral to that of Lagothrix. The chromosomal phylogeny of these four species is proposed. A Y-autosome translocation is present in the karyotypes of the two Cacajao species.

  7. DNA Repair Defects and Chromosomal Aberrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Megumi; George, K. A.; Huff, J. L.; Pluth, J. M.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2009-01-01

    Yields of chromosome aberrations were assessed in cells deficient in DNA doublestrand break (DSB) repair, after exposure to acute or to low-dose-rate (0.018 Gy/hr) gamma rays or acute high LET iron nuclei. We studied several cell lines including fibroblasts deficient in ATM (ataxia telangiectasia mutated; product of the gene that is mutated in ataxia telangiectasia patients) or NBS (nibrin; product of the gene mutated in the Nijmegen breakage syndrome), and gliomablastoma cells that are proficient or lacking in DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity. Chromosomes were analyzed using the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) chromosome painting method in cells at the first division post irradiation, and chromosome aberrations were identified as either simple exchanges (translocations and dicentrics) or complex exchanges (involving >2 breaks in 2 or more chromosomes). Gamma irradiation induced greater yields of both simple and complex exchanges in the DSB repair-defective cells than in the normal cells. The quadratic dose-response terms for both simple and complex chromosome exchanges were significantly higher for the ATM- and NBS-deficient lines than for normal fibroblasts. However, in the NBS cells the linear dose-response term was significantly higher only for simple exchanges. The large increases in the quadratic dose-response terms in these repair-defective cell lines points the importance of the functions of ATM and NBS in chromatin modifications to facilitate correct DSB repair and minimize the formation of aberrations. The differences found between ATM- and NBS-deficient cells at low doses suggest that important questions should with regard to applying observations of radiation sensitivity at high dose to low-dose exposures. For aberrations induced by iron nuclei, regression models preferred purely linear dose responses for simple exchanges and quadratic dose responses for complex exchanges. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) factors of all of

  8. Gonadal sex chromosome complement in individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridge, J.A.; Sanger, W.G.; Seemayer, T. [Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Gonadal abnormalities are characteristically seen in patients with sex chromosomal aneuploidy. Morphologically these abnormalities can be variable and are hypothesized to be dependent on the sex chromosomal consititution of the gonad (independent of the chromosomal complement of other tissues, such as peripheral blood lymphocytes). In this study, the gonadal sex chromosome complement was evaluated for potential mosaicism and correlated with the histopathology from 5 patients with known sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders. FISH techniques using X and Y chromosome specific probes were performed on nuclei extracted from paraffin embedded tissue. Gonadal tissue obtained from case 1 (a true hemaphroditic newborn) consisted of ovotestes and epididymis (left side) and ovary with fallopian tube (right side). Cytogenetic and FISH studies performed on blood, ovotestes and ovary revealed an XX complement. Cytogenetic analysis of blood from case 2, a 4-year-old with suspected Turner syndrome revealed 45,X/46,X,del(Y)(q11.21). FISH analysis of the resected gonads (histologically = immature testes) confirmed an X/XY mosaic complement. Histologically, the gonadal tissue was testicular. Severe autolysis prohibited successful analysis in the 2 remaining cases. In summary, molecular cytogenetic evaluation of gonadal tissue from individuals with sex chromosomal and/or gonadal disorders did not reveal tissue-specific anomalies which could account for differences observed pathologically.

  9. The distribution of chromosome aberrations among chromosomes of karyotype in exposed human lymphocyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Que Tran; Tien Hoang Hung

    1997-01-01

    Induced chromosome aberrations (ch. ab.) in exposed Human peripheral blood lymphocyte have been used to assay radio.bio.doses, because of their characters such as: the maintaining Go phase in cell cycle in body, the distribution of cell in blood system and the distribution of ch. ab. in exposed cells of body and among chromosomes of karyotype. The frequency of ch. ab. reflected the quantity of radiation dose, dose rate and radiation energy. The dependence between radiation dose and frequency of ch. ab. was illustrated by the mathematic equations. The distribution of induced ch. ab. among the cells exposed to uniform radiation fields was Poisson's, but the distribution of ch. ab. among chromosomes in karyotype depended on radiation field and mononucleotid sequence of DNA molecular of each chromosome. The minimum influence of mononucleotid sequence of DNA molecular in inform ch. ab. will be advantageous state for dose-assessments. The location of induced ch. ab. in exposed Human lymphocyte had been determined by karyotype analyses. The data of statistic analyse had improved that the number of ch. ab. depended on the size of chromosomes in karyotype. The equal distribution of ch. ab.among chromosomes in karyotype provided the objectiveness and the accuracy of using the chromosomal aberrant analysis technique on bio-dosimetry. (author)

  10. Origin of amphibian and avian chromosomes by fission, fusion, and retention of ancestral chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Stephen R.; Kump, D. Kevin; Putta, Srikrishna; Pauly, Nathan; Reynolds, Anna; Henry, Rema J.; Basa, Saritha; Walker, John A.; Smith, Jeramiah J.

    2011-01-01

    Amphibian genomes differ greatly in DNA content and chromosome size, morphology, and number. Investigations of this diversity are needed to identify mechanisms that have shaped the evolution of vertebrate genomes. We used comparative mapping to investigate the organization of genes in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), a species that presents relatively few chromosomes (n = 14) and a gigantic genome (>20 pg/N). We show extensive conservation of synteny between Ambystoma, chicken, and human, and a positive correlation between the length of conserved segments and genome size. Ambystoma segments are estimated to be four to 51 times longer than homologous human and chicken segments. Strikingly, genes demarking the structures of 28 chicken chromosomes are ordered among linkage groups defining the Ambystoma genome, and we show that these same chromosomal segments are also conserved in a distantly related anuran amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis). Using linkage relationships from the amphibian maps, we predict that three chicken chromosomes originated by fusion, nine to 14 originated by fission, and 12–17 evolved directly from ancestral tetrapod chromosomes. We further show that some ancestral segments were fused prior to the divergence of salamanders and anurans, while others fused independently and randomly as chromosome numbers were reduced in lineages leading to Ambystoma and Xenopus. The maintenance of gene order relationships between chromosomal segments that have greatly expanded and contracted in salamander and chicken genomes, respectively, suggests selection to maintain synteny relationships and/or extremely low rates of chromosomal rearrangement. Overall, the results demonstrate the value of data from diverse, amphibian genomes in studies of vertebrate genome evolution. PMID:21482624

  11. Neocentromeres Provide Chromosome Segregation Accuracy and Centromere Clustering to Multiple Loci along a Candida albicans Chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Burrack

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of kinetochore complexes, involving greater than one hundred proteins, is essential for chromosome segregation and genome stability. Neocentromeres, or new centromeres, occur when kinetochores assemble de novo, at DNA loci not previously associated with kinetochore proteins, and they restore chromosome segregation to chromosomes lacking a functional centromere. Neocentromeres have been observed in a number of diseases and may play an evolutionary role in adaptation or speciation. However, the consequences of neocentromere formation on chromosome missegregation rates, gene expression, and three-dimensional (3D nuclear structure are not well understood. Here, we used Candida albicans, an organism with small, epigenetically-inherited centromeres, as a model system to study the functions of twenty different neocentromere loci along a single chromosome, chromosome 5. Comparison of neocentromere properties relative to native centromere functions revealed that all twenty neocentromeres mediated chromosome segregation, albeit to different degrees. Some neocentromeres also caused reduced levels of transcription from genes found within the neocentromere region. Furthermore, like native centromeres, neocentromeres clustered in 3D with active/functional centromeres, indicating that formation of a new centromere mediates the reorganization of 3D nuclear architecture. This demonstrates that centromere clustering depends on epigenetically defined function and not on the primary DNA sequence, and that neocentromere function is independent of its distance from the native centromere position. Together, the results show that a neocentromere can form at many loci along a chromosome and can support the assembly of a functional kinetochore that exhibits native centromere functions including chromosome segregation accuracy and centromere clustering within the nucleus.

  12. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A. [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain); Tusell, L., E-mail: laura.tusell@uab.es [Department of Cell Biology, Physiology and Immunology, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra E-08193 (Spain)

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16{sup INK4a} protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and

  13. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pampalona, J.; Soler, D.; Genesca, A.; Tusell, L.

    2010-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16 INK4a protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear

  14. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome structure modulate the contribution of individual chromosomes in abnormal nuclear morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampalona, J; Soler, D; Genescà, A; Tusell, L

    2010-01-05

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay has emerged as a biomarker of chromosome damage relevant to cancer. Although it was initially developed to measure micronuclei, it is also useful for measuring nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds. Abnormal nuclear morphologies are frequently observed in malignant tissues and short-term tumour cell cultures. Changes in chromosome structure and number resulting from chromosome instability are important factors in oncogenesis. Telomeres have become key players in the initiation of chromosome instability related to carcinogenesis by means of breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. To better understand the connection between telomere dysfunction and the appearance of abnormal nuclear morphologies, we have characterised the presence of micronuclei, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear buds in human mammary primary epithelial cells. These cells can proliferate beyond the Hayflick limit by spontaneously losing expression of the p16(INK4a) protein. Progressive telomere shortening leads to the loss of the capping function, and the appearance of end-to-end chromosome fusions that can enter into breakage-fusion-bridge cycles generating massive chromosomal instability. In human mammary epithelial cells, different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies were observed, however only nucleoplasmatic bridges and buds increased significantly with population doublings. Fluorescent in situ hybridisation using centromeric and painting specific probes for chromosomes with eroded telomeres has revealed that these chromosomes are preferentially included in the different types of abnormal nuclear morphologies observed, thus reflecting their common origin. Accordingly, real-time imaging of cell divisions enabled us to determine that anaphase bridge resolution was mainly through chromatin breakage and the formation of symmetric buds in daughter nuclei. Few micronuclei emerged in this cell system thus validating the scoring of nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear

  15. Integration sites of Epstein-Barr virus genome on chromosomes of human lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuu, K.D.; Chen, Y.J.; Wang-Wuu, S. [Institute of Genetics, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1994-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is the pathogen of infectious mononucleosis. The viral genome is present in more than 95% of the African cases of Burkitt lymphoma and it is usually maintained in episomal form in the tumor cells. Viral integration has been described only for Nanalwa which is a Burkitt lymphoma cell line lacking episomes. In order to examine the role of EBV in the immortalization of human Blymphocytes, we investigated whether the EBV integration into the human genome is essential. If the integration does occur, we would like to know whether the integration is randomly distributed or whether the viral DNA integrates preferentially at certain sites. Fourteen in vitro immortalized human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a biotinylated EBV BamHI w DNA fragment as probe. The episomal form of EBV DNA was found in all cells of these cell lines, while only about 65% of the cells have the integrated viral DNA. This might suggest that integration is not a pre-requisite for cell immortalization. Although all chromosomes, except Y, have been found with integrated viral genome, chromsomes 1 and 5 are the most frequent EBV DNA carrier (p<0.05). Nine chromosome bands, namely, 1p31, 1q31, 2q32, 3q13, 3q26, 5q14, 6q24, 7q31 and 12q21, are preferential targets for EBV integration (p<0.001). Eighty percent of the total 938 EBV hybridization signals were found to be at G-band-positive area. This suggests that the mechanism of EBV integration might be different from that of the retroviruses, which specifically integrate to G-band-negative areas. Thus, we conclude that the integration of EBV to host genome is non-random and it may have something to do with the structure of chromosome and DNA sequences.

  16. Comparative anatomy of chromosomal domains with imprinted and non-imprinted allele-specific DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Anupam; Temkin, Alexis M; Kerkel, Kristi; Yale, Alexander; Yotova, Iveta; Drost, Natalia; Lax, Simon; Nhan-Chang, Chia-Ling; Powell, Charles; Borczuk, Alain; Aviv, Abraham; Wapner, Ronald; Chen, Xiaowei; Nagy, Peter L; Schork, Nicholas; Do, Catherine; Torkamani, Ali; Tycko, Benjamin

    2013-08-01

    Allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM) is well studied in imprinted domains, but this type of epigenetic asymmetry is actually found more commonly at non-imprinted loci, where the ASM is dictated not by parent-of-origin but instead by the local haplotype. We identified loci with strong ASM in human tissues from methylation-sensitive SNP array data. Two index regions (bisulfite PCR amplicons), one between the C3orf27 and RPN1 genes in chromosome band 3q21 and the other near the VTRNA2-1 vault RNA in band 5q31, proved to be new examples of imprinted DMRs (maternal alleles methylated) while a third, between STEAP3 and C2orf76 in chromosome band 2q14, showed non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM. Using long-read bisulfite sequencing (bis-seq) in 8 human tissues we found that in all 3 domains the ASM is restricted to single differentially methylated regions (DMRs), each less than 2kb. The ASM in the C3orf27-RPN1 intergenic region was placenta-specific and associated with allele-specific expression of a long non-coding RNA. Strikingly, the discrete DMRs in all 3 regions overlap with binding sites for the insulator protein CTCF, which we found selectively bound to the unmethylated allele of the STEAP3-C2orf76 DMR. Methylation mapping in two additional genes with non-imprinted haplotype-dependent ASM, ELK3 and CYP2A7, showed that the CYP2A7 DMR also overlaps a CTCF site. Thus, two features of imprinted domains, highly localized DMRs and allele-specific insulator occupancy by CTCF, can also be found in chromosomal domains with non-imprinted ASM. Arguing for biological importance, our analysis of published whole genome bis-seq data from hES cells revealed multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) peaks near CTCF binding sites with ASM.

  17. [Diagnosis of a case with Williams-Beuren syndrome with nephrocalcinosis using chromosome microarray analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S J; Liu, M; Long, W J; Luo, X P

    2016-12-02

    Objective: To explore the clinical phenotypes and the genetic cause for a boy with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders. Method: Routine G-banding and chromosome microarray analysis were applied to a child with unexplained growth retardation, nephrocalcinosis, auditory anomalies and multi-organ/system developmental disorders treated in the Department of Pediatrics of Tongji Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology in September 2015 and his parents to conduct the chromosomal karyotype analysis and the whole genome scanning. Deleted genes were searched in the Decipher and NCBI databases, and their relationships with the clinical phenotypes were analyzed. Result: A six-month-old boy was refered to us because of unexplained growth retardation and feeding intolerance.The affected child presented with abnormal manifestation such as special face, umbilical hernia, growth retardation, hypothyroidism, congenital heart disease, right ear sensorineural deafness, hypercalcemia and nephrocalcinosis. The child's karyotype was 46, XY, 16qh + , and his parents' karyotypes were normal. Chromosome microarray analysis revealed a 1 436 kb deletion on the 7q11.23(72701098_74136633) region of the child. This region included 23 protein-coding genes, which were reported to be corresponding to Williams-Beuren syndrome and its certain clinical phenotypes. His parents' results of chromosome microarray analysis were normal. Conclusion: A boy with characteristic manifestation of Williams-Beuren syndrome and rare nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed using chromosome microarray analysis. The deletion on the 7q11.23 might be related to the clinical phenotypes of Williams-Beuren syndrome, yet further studies are needed.

  18. [Chromosomal localization of foreign genes in transgenic mice using dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan; Gong, Xiu-li; Li, Wei; Guo, Xin-bing; Zhu, Yi-wen; Huang, Ying

    2008-02-01

    To establish a highly sensitive and specific dual-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (D-FISH) method used for chromosomal localization of foreign genes in double transgenic mice. Two strains of double transgenic mice were used in this experiment, one was integrated with the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP), the other was with the short hairpin RNA interference(RNAi) and beta(654). Splenic cells cultured in vitro were arrested in metaphase by colchicine and hybridized with digoxigenin-labeled and biotinylated DNA probes, then detected by rhodamine-conjugated avidin and FITC-conjugated anti-digoxigenin. Dual-color fluorescence signals were detected on the same metaphase in both transgenic mice strains. In HSV-tk/eGFP double transgenic mice, strong green fluorescence for HSV-tk and red for eGFP were observed and localized at 2E5-G3 and 8A2-A4 respectively. In beta(654)/RNAi mice, beta(654) was detected as red fluorescence on chromosome 7D3-E2, and RNAi showed random integration on chromosomes. It was detected as green fluorescence on chromosome 12B1 in one mouse, while on 1E2.3-1F and 3A3 in the other. Highly sensitive and specific D-FISH method was established using the self-prepared DNA probes, and chromosomal localization of the foreign genes was also performed in combination with G-banding in double transgenic mice. This technology will facilitate the researches in transgenic animals and gene therapy models.

  19. Single-Band and Dual-Band Infrared Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z. (Inventor); Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor); Nguyen, Jean (Inventor); Khoshakhlagh, Arezou (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Bias-switchable dual-band infrared detectors and methods of manufacturing such detectors are provided. The infrared detectors are based on a back-to-back heterojunction diode design, where the detector structure consists of, sequentially, a top contact layer, a unipolar hole barrier layer, an absorber layer, a unipolar electron barrier, a second absorber, a second unipolar hole barrier, and a bottom contact layer. In addition, by substantially reducing the width of one of the absorber layers, a single-band infrared detector can also be formed.

  20. Adhesives for fixed orthodontic bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millett, Declan T; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Mattick, Rye Cr; Hickman, Joy; Mandall, Nicky A

    2016-10-25

    Orthodontic treatment involves using fixed or removable appliances (dental braces) to correct the positions of teeth. It has been shown that the quality of treatment result obtained with fixed appliances is much better than with removable appliances. Fixed appliances are, therefore, favoured by most orthodontists for treatment. The success of a fixed orthodontic appliance depends on the metal attachments (brackets and bands) being attached securely to the teeth so that they do not become loose during treatment. Brackets are usually attached to the front and side teeth, whereas bands (metal rings that go round the teeth) are more commonly used on the back teeth (molars). A number of adhesives are available to attach bands to teeth and it is important to understand which group of adhesives bond most reliably, as well as reducing or preventing dental decay during the treatment period. To evaluate the effectiveness of the adhesives used to attach bands to teeth during fixed appliance treatment, in terms of:(1) how often the bands come off during treatment; and(2) whether they protect the banded teeth against decay during fixed appliance treatment. The following electronic databases were searched: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (searched 2 June 2016), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 5) in the Cochrane Library (searched 2 June 2016), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 2 June 2016) and EMBASE Ovid (1980 to 2 June 2016). We searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform for ongoing trials. No restrictions were placed on the language or date of publication when searching the electronic databases. Randomised and controlled clinical trials (RCTs and CCTs) (including split-mouth studies) of adhesives used to attach orthodontic bands to molar teeth were selected. Patients with full arch fixed orthodontic appliance(s) who had bands attached to molars were included. All review authors

  1. Differential chromosomal organization between Saguinus midas and Saguinus bicolor with accumulation of differences the repetitive sequence DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfaty, Dayane Martins Barbosa; Carvalho, Natália Dayane Moura; Gross, Maria Claudia; Gordo, Marcelo; Schneider, Carlos Henrique

    2017-10-01

    Saguinus is the largest and most complex genus of the subfamily Callitrichinae, with 23 species distributed from the south of Central America to the north of South America with Saguinus midas having the largest geographical distribution while Saguinus bicolor has a very restricted one, affected by the population expansion in the state of Amazonas. Considering the phylogenetic proximity of the two species along with evidence on the existence of hybrids between them, as well as cytogenetic studies on Saguinus describing a conserved karyotypic macrostructure, we carried out a physical mapping of DNA repeated sequences in the mitotic chromosome of both species, since these sequences are less susceptible to evolutionary pressure and possibly perform an important function in speciation. Both species presented 2n = 46 chromosomes; in S. midas, chromosome Y is the smallest. Multiple ribosomal sites occur in both species, but chromosome pairs three and four may be regarded as markers that differ the species when subjected to G banding and distribution of retroelement LINE 1, suggesting that it may be cytogenetic marker in which it can contribute to identification of first generation hybrids in contact zone. Saguinus bicolor also presented differences in the LINE 1 distribution pattern for sexual chromosome X in individuals from different urban fragments, probably due to geographical isolation. In this context, cytogenetic analyses reveal a differential genomic organization pattern between species S. midas and S. bicolor, in addition to indicating that individuals from different urban fragments have been accumulating differences because of the isolation between them.

  2. HindIII RFLP on chromosome 8 detected with a calbindin 27 kDa cDNA probe, HBSC21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, M; Vassart, G

    1988-10-11

    A 1.8 kb for EcoRI fragment of the human calbindin cDNA clone HBSC21 was subcloned into M13mp18 and used as a probe. HindIII identifies a 2 allele polymorphism with a band at 4.7 kb (A1) and a band at 4.3 kb (A2). A constant band is located at 5.3 kb. The calbindin 27 kDa gene was assigned to chromosome 8 using chinese hamster-human and mouse-human cell hybrids. Co-dominant segregation was demonstrated in 3 families (total of 20 individuals).

  3. Comparative karyotype analysis and chromosome evolution in the genus Aplastodiscus (Cophomantini, Hylinae, Hylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruber Simone

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frogs of the Tribe Cophomantini present, in general, 2n = 24 karyotype, but data on Aplastodiscus showed variation in diploid number from 2n = 24 to 2n = 18. Five species were karyotyped, one of them for the first time, using conventional and molecular cytogenetic techniques, with the aim to perform a comprehensive comparative analysis towards the understanding of chromosome evolution in light of the phylogeny. Results Aplastodiscus perviridis showed 2n = 24, A. arildae and A. eugenioi, 2n = 22, A. callipygius, 2n = 20, and A. leucopygius, 2n = 18. In the metaphase I cells of two species only bivalents occurred, whereas in A. arildae, A. callipygius, and A. leucopygius one tetravalent was also observed besides the bivalents. BrdU incorporation produced replication bands especially in the largest chromosomes, and a relatively good banding correspondence was noticed among some of them. Silver impregnation and FISH with an rDNA probe identified a single NOR pair: the 11 in A. perviridis and A. arildae; the 6 in A. eugenioi; and the 9 in A. callipygius and A. leucopygius. C-banding showed a predominantly centromeric distribution of the heterochromatin, and in one of the species distinct molecular composition was revealed by CMA3. The telomeric probe hybridised all chromosome ends and additionally disclosed the presence of telomere-like sequences in centromeric regions of three species. Conclusions Based on the hypothesis of 2n = 24 ancestral karyotype for Aplastodiscus, and considering the karyotype differences and similarities, two evolutionary pathways through fusion events were suggested. One of them corresponded to the reduction of 2n = 24 to 22, and the other, the reduction of 2n = 24 to 20, and subsequently to 18. Regarding the NOR, two conditions were recognised: plesiomorphy, represented by the homeologous small-sized NOR-bearing pairs, and derivation, represented by the NOR in

  4. Inactivation of the P16INK4/MTS1 gene by a chromosome translocation t(9;14)(p21-22;q11) in an acute lymphoblastic leukemia of B-cell type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duro, D; Bernard, O; Della Valle, V; Leblanc, T; Berger, R; Larsen, C J

    1996-02-15

    We have reported previously a preliminary study of a t(9;14)(p21-22; q11) in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This translocation had rearranged the TCRA/D locus on chromosome band 14q11 and the locus encoding the tumor suppressor gene P16INK4/MTS1 (P16) on band 9p21 (D. Duro et al., Oncogene, 11: 21-29, 1995). In the present report, the breakpoints were precisely localized on each chromosome partner. On the 14q- derivative, the sequence derived from chromosome 9 was interrupted at 1.0 kb upstream of the first exon of P16, close to a consensus recombination heptamer, CACTGTG. In addition, the chromosome 14 breakpoint was localized at the end of the TCRD2 (delta 2) segment, and 22 residues with unknown origin were present at the translocation junction. On the 9p+ derivative, chromosome 9 sequences were in continuity with those displaced onto chromosome 14, and the 14q11 breakpoint was located within TCRJA29 segment. These features are consistent with aberrant activity of the TCR gene recombinase complex. Although all three coding exons of P16 were displaced onto the chromosome 14q-derivative, no P16 transcript was detected in the leukemic cells. Because the region spanning the P16 exon 1 was not inactivated by methylation and because the other P16 allele was deleted, the implication is that the chromosome breakpoint was likely to disrupt regulatory elements involved in the normal expression of the gene. As a whole, then, our results show that translocations affecting band 9p21 can participate to the inactivation of P16, thus justifying a systematic survey of translocations of the 9p21 band in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  5. Two siblings with alternate unbalanced recombinants derived from a large cryptic maternal pericentric inversion of chromosome 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descipio, Cheryl; Morrissette, Jennifer D; Conlin, Laura K; Clark, Dinah; Kaur, Maninder; Coplan, James; Riethman, Harold; Spinner, Nancy B; Krantz, Ian D

    2010-02-01

    Two brothers, with dissimilar clinical features, were each found to have different abnormalities of chromosome 20 by subtelomere fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The proband had deletion of 20p subtelomere and duplication of 20q subtelomere, while his brother was found to have a duplication of 20p subtelomere and deletion of 20q subtelomere. Parental cytogenetic studies were initially thought to be normal, both by G-banding and by subtelomere FISH analysis. Since chromosome 20 is a metacentric chromosome and an inversion was suspected, we used anchored FISH to assist in identifying a possible inversion. This approach employed concomitant hybridization of a FISH probe to the short (p) arm of chromosome 20 with the 20q subtelomere probe. We identified a cytogenetically non-visible, mosaic pericentric inversion of one of the maternal chromosome 20 homologs, providing a mechanistic explanation for the chromosomal abnormalities present in these brothers. Array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) with both a custom-made BAC and cosmid-based subtelomere specific array (TEL array) and a commercially available SNP-based array confirmed and further characterized these rearrangements, identifying this as the largest pericentric inversion of chromosome 20 described to date. TEL array data indicate that the 20p breakpoint is defined by BAC RP11-978M13, approximately 900 kb from the pter; SNP array data reveal this breakpoint to occur within BAC RP11-978M13. The 20q breakpoint is defined by BAC RP11-93B14, approximately 1.7 Mb from the qter, by TEL array; SNP array data refine this breakpoint to within a gap between BACs on the TEL array (i.e., between RP11-93B14 and proximal BAC RP11-765G16). Copyright 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Chromosomal instability drives metastasis through a cytosolic DNA response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Ngo, Bryan; Laughney, Ashley M; Cavallo, Julie-Ann; Murphy, Charles J; Ly, Peter; Shah, Pragya; Sriram, Roshan K; Watkins, Thomas B K; Taunk, Neil K; Duran, Mercedes; Pauli, Chantal; Shaw, Christine; Chadalavada, Kalyani; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Genovese, Giulio; Venkatesan, Subramanian; Birkbak, Nicolai J; McGranahan, Nicholas; Lundquist, Mark; LaPlant, Quincey; Healey, John H; Elemento, Olivier; Chung, Christine H; Lee, Nancy Y; Imielenski, Marcin; Nanjangud, Gouri; Pe'er, Dana; Cleveland, Don W; Powell, Simon N; Lammerding, Jan; Swanton, Charles; Cantley, Lewis C

    2018-01-25

    Chromosomal instability is a hallmark of cancer that results from ongoing errors in chromosome segregation during mitosis. Although chromosomal instability is a major driver of tumour evolution, its role in metastasis has not been established. Here we show that chromosomal instability promotes metastasis by sustaining a tumour cell-autonomous response to cytosolic DNA. Errors in chromosome segregation create a preponderance of micronuclei whose rupture spills genomic DNA into the cytosol. This leads to the activation of the cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-stimulator of interferon genes) cytosolic DNA-sensing pathway and downstream noncanonical NF-κB signalling. Genetic suppression of chromosomal instability markedly delays metastasis even in highly aneuploid tumour models, whereas continuous chromosome segregation errors promote cellular invasion and metastasis in a STING-dependent manner. By subverting lethal epithelial responses to cytosolic DNA, chromosomally unstable tumour cells co-opt chronic activation of innate immune pathways to spread to distant organs.

  7. Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aneuploids of wheat and chromosomal localization of genes. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... cytogenetic methods for the chromosomal localization of major genes in wheat including Chinese spring (CS) monosomics (Triticum aestivum, ...

  8. Divergent actions of long noncoding RNAs on X-chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-10-20

    Oct 20, 2015 ... Organisms with heterochromatic sex chromosomes need to compensate for differences in dosages of ... could also get genetically inactive and late replicating when ... tial to achieve the chromosomal level modifications were.

  9. Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human oocyte chromosome analysis: complicated cases and major ... dardized even after more than 20 years of research, making it difficult to draw .... (c) Part of a metaphase with a chromosome break in the centromeric region (arrows).

  10. Understanding Chromosome Disorders and their Implications for Special Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Gilmore

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available More children are now being diagnosed with chromosome abnormalities. Some chromosome disorder syndromes are relatively well known; while others are so rare that there is only limited evidence about their likely impact on learning and development. For educators, a basic level of knowledge about chromosome abnormalities is important for understanding the literature and communicating with families and professionals. This paper describes chromosomes, and the numerical and structural anomalies that can occur, usually spontaneously during early cell division. Distinctive features of various chromosome syndromes are summarised before a discussion of the rare chromosome disorders that are labelled, not with a syndrome name, but simply by a description of the chromosome number, size and shape. Because of the potential within-group variability that characterises syndromes, and the scarcity of literature about the rare chromosome disorders, expectations for learning and development of individual students need to be based on the range of possible outcomes that may be achievable.

  11. Flow cytometry measurements of human chromosome kinetochore labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantes, J.A.; Green, D.K.; Malloy, P.; Sumner, A.T.

    1989-01-01

    A method for the preparation and measurement of immunofluorescent human chromosome centromeres in suspension is described using CREST antibodies, which bind to the centromeric region of chromosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated antihuman antibodies provide the fluorescent label. Labeled chromosomes are examined on microscope slides and by flow cytometry. In both cases a dye which binds to DNA is added to provide identification of the chromosome groups. Sera from different CREST patients vary in their ability to bind to chromosome arms in addition to the centromeric region. Flow cytometry and microfluorimetry measurements have shown that with a given CREST serum the differences in kinetochore fluorescence between chromosomes are only minor. Flow cytometry experiments to relate the number of dicentric chromosomes, induced by in vitro radiation of peripheral blood cells to the slightly increased number of chromosomes with above-average kinetochore fluorescence did not produce decisive radiation dosimetry results

  12. Sex Chromosome Translocations in the Evolution of Reproductive Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Martin L.

    1972-01-01

    Haldane's rule states that in organisms with differentiated sex chromosomes, hybrid sterility or inviability is generally expressed more frequently in the heterogametic sex. This observation has been variously explained as due to either genic or chromosomal imbalance. The fixation probabilities and mean times to fixation of sex-chromosome translocations of the type necessary to explain Haldane's rule on the basis of chromosomal imbalance have been estimated in small populations of Drosophila melanogaster. The fixation probability of an X chromosome carrying the long arm of the Y(X·YL) is approximately 30% greater than expected under the assumption of no selection. No fitness differences associated with the attached YL segment were detected. The fixation probability of a deficient Y chromosome is 300% greater than expected when the X chromosome contains the deleted portion of the Y. It is suggested that sex-chromosome translocations may play a role in the establishment of reproductive isolation. PMID:4630586

  13. The value of chromosomal analysis in oligozoospermic men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegen, Çarcia; van Rumste, Minouche M. E.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Koks, Carolien A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in relation to sperm concentration in subfertile oligozoospermic men. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: Two teaching hospitals. Patient(s): We retrospectively studied all men who received chromosomal analysis prior to

  14. The genomics of plant sex chromosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vyskot, Boris; Hobza, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 236, JUL 2015 (2015), s. 126-135 ISSN 0168-9452 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP501/12/G090; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/12/2220 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : Y-CHROMOSOME * SILENE-LATIFOLIA * DIOECIOUS PLANT Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.362, year: 2015

  15. Study of radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfring, E.

    2004-06-01

    A method for determining chromosomal aberrations was established for the purpose of examining the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of photon radiation with respect to mammary epithelium cells. Cells were exposed to 25 kV X-radiation and to 200 kV X-radiation for comparison and the resulting concentrations of chromosomal aberrations were compared. The RBE M value for radiation-induced fragmentation was found to be 4.2 ± 2.4, while the RBE M value for radiation-induced generation of dicentric chromosomes was found to be 0.5 ± 0.5. In addition to the evaluation of chromosomal aberrations the number of cell cycles undergone by the cells was monitored by means of BrDU staining. As expected, the proportion of cells which underwent more than one cell cycle following exposure to 5 Gy was very low in both cases, amounting to 1.9% (25 kV) and 3.2 (200 kV). Non-radiated cells yielded control values of 26.0% and 12.6%, suggesting variations in external conditions from day to day

  16. Chromosome 22 microdeletion in children with syndromic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytogenetic study and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed in the patients. The study revealed that 2 patients were with chromosomal aberrations [one with 46,XY, add (13)(p13) & the other with 47,XX,+13]. In addition, FISH revealed 4 patients (20%) with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome. The congenital ...

  17. Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-01-01

    The genotype theory of Wilhelm Johannsen (1857-1927) was an important contribution to the founding of classical genetics. This theory built on Johannsen's experimental demonstration that hereditary change is discontinuous, not continuous as had been widely assumed. Johannsen is also known for his criticism of traditional Darwinian evolution by natural selection, as well as his criticism of the classical Mendelian chromosome theory of heredity. He has often been seen as one of the anti-Darwinians that caused the "eclipse of Darwinism" in the early 20th century, before it was saved by the Modern Synthesis. This article focuses on Johannsen's criticism of the chromosome theory. He was indeed skeptical of the notion of the chromosomes as the sole carriers of heredity, but he praised the mapping of Mendelian genes on the chromosomes as a major step forward. Johannsen objected that these genes could not account for the whole of heredity, and that the stability of the genotype depended on much more than the stability of Mendelian genes. For Johannsen, the genotype, as a property of the whole organism, was the fundamental and empirically well-established entity.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NBK1339/ Citation on PubMed Tyler-Smith C. An evolutionary perspective on Y-chromosomal variation and male infertility. ... genome editing and CRISPR-Cas9? What is precision medicine? What is newborn screening? New Pages Alopecia areata ...

  19. P chromosomes involved in intergenomic rearrangements of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-04-08

    Apr 8, 2014 ... [Wang Q., Han H., Gao A., Yang X. and Li L. 2014 P chromosomes ... Y, were affected predominantly by ecological factors and altitude in nine populations of Kengyilia thoroldiana (Wang et al. 2012). To investigate the effects of different altitudes on .... AB51 0LX, UK) for improving the article linguistically.

  20. Psychoeducational Implications of Sex Chromosome Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.; Tarbox, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Numerous anomalies involving the sex chromosomes (X or Y) have been documented and their impact on development, learning, and behavior studied. This article reviews three of these disorders, Turner syndrome, Klinefelter syndrome, and Lesch-Nyhan disease. Each of these three is associated with one or more selective impairments or behavioral…