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Sample records for chromizing

  1. High temperature oxidation in boiler environment of chromized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia, F. F.; Kurniawan, T.; Asmara, Y. P.; Ani, M. H. B.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-10-01

    The demand for increasing efficiency has led to the development and construction of higher operating temperature power plant. This condition may lead to more severe thickness losses in boiler tubes due to excessive corrosion process. Hence, the research to improve the corrosion resistance of the current operated material is needed so that it can be applied for higher temperature application. In this research, the effect of chromizing process on the oxidation behaviour of T91 steel was investigated under steam condition. In order to deposit chromium, mixture of chromium (Cr) powder as master alloy, halide salt (NH4Cl) powder as activator and alumina (Al2O3) powder as inert filler were inserted into alumina retort together with the steel sample and heated inside furnace at 1050°C for ten hours under argon gas environment. Furthermore, for the oxidation process, steels were exposed at 700°C at different oxidation time (6h-24h) under steam condition. From FESEM/EDX analysis, it was found that oxidation rate of pack cemented steel was lower than the un-packed steel. These results show that Cr from chromizing process was able to become reservoir for the formation of Cr2O3 in high temperature steam oxidation, and its existence can be used for a longer oxidation time.

  2. Effect of elevated temperature on the composition, structure, and mechanical properties of diffusion chromized steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osintsev, V.D.

    1986-01-01

    The author studies the effect of operating temperature for equipment in contact sections of sulfuric acid workshops on the structure and mechanical properties of the chromized coatings and core of chromized articles. The ferrite lattice spacing was determined in a DRON-0.5 diffractometer according to the line in copper K /sub alpha/ radiation exposure was carried out after layer-by-layer anodic etching of the coating in an aqueous solution. It was shown that diffusion chromizing may lead to a reduction in strength properties compared with those of unchromized steel. As a base for chromized articles intended for operation at temperatures up to 475 0 C it is desirable to use steels 09G2 or 09G25, or for operation at temperatures up to 540 0 C, steels 12KhM and 12MKh

  3. Duplex surface treatment of AISI 1045 steel via plasma nitriding of chromized layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakami, F.; Sohi, M. Heydarzadeh; Ghani, J. Rasizadeh

    2011-01-01

    In this work AISI 1045 steel were duplex treated via plasma nitriding of chromized layer. Samples were pack chromized by using a powder mixture consisting of ferrochromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1273 K for 5 h. The samples were then plasma-nitrided for 5 h at 803 K and 823 K, in a gas mixture of 75%N 2 + 25%H 2 . The treated specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Vickers micro-hardness test. The thickness of chromized layer before nitriding was about 8 μm and it was increased after plasma nitriding. According to XRD analysis, the chromized layer was composed of chromium and iron carbides. Plasma nitriding of chromized layer resulted in the formation of chromium and iron nitrides and carbides. The hardness of the duplex layers was significantly higher than the hardness of the base material or chromized layer. The main cause of the large improvement in surface hardness was due to the formation of Cr x N and Fe x N phases in the duplex treated layers. Increasing of nitriding temperature from 803 to 823 K enhanced the formation of CrN in the duplex treated layer and increased the thickness of the nitrided layer.

  4. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Naiming, E-mail: lnmlz33@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Guo, Junwen [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Xie, Faqin [School of Aeronautics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yao, Xiaofei [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Xi’an Technological University, Xi’an 710032 (China); Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance.

  5. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of chromizing coating and P110 steel for corrosion resistance estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Naiming; Guo, Junwen; Xie, Faqin; Zou, Jiaojuan; Tian, Wei; Yao, Xiaofei; Zhang, Hongyan; Tang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Continuous chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel by pack cementation. • The chromizing coating showed better corrosion resistance. • Comparison of surface fractal dimensions can estimate corrosion resistance. - Abstract: In the field of corrosion research, mass gain/loss, electrochemical tests and comparing the surface elemental distributions, phase constitutions as well as surface morphologies before and after corrosion are extensively applied to investigate the corrosion behavior or estimate the corrosion resistance of materials that operated in various environments. Most of the above methods are problem oriented, complex and longer-period time-consuming. However from an object oriented point of view, the corroded surfaces of materials often have self-similar characterization: fractal property which can be employed to efficiently achieve damaged surface analysis. The present work describes a strategy of comparison of the surface fractal dimensions for corrosion resistance estimation: chromizing coating was synthesized on P110 steel surface to improve its performance via pack cementation. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to investigate the surface morphologies of the original and corroded samples. Surface fractal dimensions of the detected samples were calculated by binary images related to SEM images of surface morphologies with box counting algorithm method. The results showed that both surface morphologies and surface fractal dimensions of P110 steel varied greatly before and after corrosion test, but the chromizing coating changed slightly. The chromizing coating indicated better corrosion resistance than P110 steel. Comparison of surface fractal dimensions of original and corroded samples can rapidly and exactly realize the estimation of corrosion resistance

  6. Effects of combined plasma chromizing and shot peening on the fatigue properties of a Ti6Al4V alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shouming; Liu, Daoxin; Zhang, Xiaohua; Du, Dongxing

    2015-10-01

    A plasma chromizing treatment was conducted on Ti6Al4V samples by employing the recently developed double glow plasma surface alloying technology. The Cr-alloyed layer consisted of four sub-layers, namely the Cr deposition, Cr2Ti, CrTi4, and Cr-Ti solid-solution layers. The local hardness and moduli were determined via nanoindentation. In addition, the fatigue properties of the samples were evaluated by using a rotating-bending fatigue machine under a given load. The results showed that the hardness or elastic moduli of the adjacent sub-layers differed significantly and the fatigue properties of the Ti6Al4V alloy deteriorated with the plasma chromizing treatment. This deterioration stemmed mainly from cracks initiated at the interfaces between the sub-layers and the microstructural changes of the substrate; these changes were induced by the high temperature used in the plasma chromizing process. However, the fatigue life of the plasma-chromized samples was increased by a shot peening post-treatment. The fatigue life of the samples resulting from this combination of treatments was slightly higher than that of the single-shot-peened Ti6Al4V substrate. In fact, the sample retaining only the Cr-Ti solid-solution layer (that is, the first three sub-layers were removed), when shot-peened, exhibited the highest fatigue life among all the tested samples; this was attributed to that sample having the highest residual compressive stress, the significant work hardening, and the good hardness to toughness balance.

  7. A study of roll-bonding MS90 alloy to steel utilizing chromized interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolaminejad, B.; Arabi, H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a study of the application of a roll bonding technique to MS90(CuZn10) alloy strips and steel sheets using a chromized interlayer. It was found that the overall bond between these two metals resulted from two different types of bonds: a block bond, linking the MS90 alloy strips and chromium topcoat layer, and a blank bond, linking the MS90 alloy strips and bare steel surface in the area where the chromium coating has been fragmented. This study investigated the effects of plating time on the thickness of the coating layers and of the area fraction of the blank bond on the bond strength. The overall bond strength depends mainly on the strength and the area fraction of the blank bond. A linear relationship model exists between the overall bond strength and the area fraction of the blank bond. The bond strength of the blank bond was eight times greater than that of the block bond. The area fraction of the blank bond increased with increasing the coating thickness up to 55 μm, but thereafter decreased due to the rotation of the chromium blocks

  8. The bipolar plate of AISI 1045 steel with chromized coatings prepared by low-temperature pack cementation for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ching-Yuan; Wen, Tse-Min; Hou, Kung-Hsu; Ger, Ming-Der

    The low-temperature pack chromization, a reforming pack cementation process, is employed to modify AISI 1045 steel for the application of bipolar plates in PEMFC. The process is conducted to yield a coating, containing major Cr-carbides and minor Cr-nitrides, on the substrate in view of enhancing the steel's corrosion resistance and lowering interfacial contact resistance between the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer. Electrical discharge machining and rolling approach are used as the pretreatment to produce an activated surface on the steel before pack chromization process to reduce operating temperatures and increase deposition rates. The rolled-chromized steel shows the lowest corrosion current density, 3 × 10 -8 A cm -2, and the smallest interfacial contact resistance, 5.9 mΩ cm 2, at 140 N cm -2 among all tested steels. This study clearly states the performance of 1045 carbon steel modified by activated and low-temperature pack chromization processes, which possess the potential to be bipolar plates in the application of PEMFC.

  9. The bipolar plate of AISI 1045 steel with chromized coatings prepared by low-temperature pack cementation for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Ching-Yuan; Ger, Ming-Der [Department of Chemistry and Materials Science and Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tau-Yuan 335 (China); Wen, Tse-Min [School of Defense Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tao-Yuan 335 (China); Hou, Kung-Hsu [Department of Power Vehicles and System Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Tao-Yuan 335 (China)

    2010-02-01

    The low-temperature pack chromization, a reforming pack cementation process, is employed to modify AISI 1045 steel for the application of bipolar plates in PEMFC. The process is conducted to yield a coating, containing major Cr-carbides and minor Cr-nitrides, on the substrate in view of enhancing the steel's corrosion resistance and lowering interfacial contact resistance between the bipolar plate and gas diffusion layer. Electrical discharge machining and rolling approach are used as the pretreatment to produce an activated surface on the steel before pack chromization process to reduce operating temperatures and increase deposition rates. The rolled-chromized steel shows the lowest corrosion current density, 3 x 10{sup -8} A cm{sup -2}, and the smallest interfacial contact resistance, 5.9 m{omega} cm{sup 2}, at 140 N cm{sup -2} among all tested steels. This study clearly states the performance of 1045 carbon steel modified by activated and low-temperature pack chromization processes, which possess the potential to be bipolar plates in the application of PEMFC. (author)

  10. Corrosion behaviors and contact resistances of the low-carbon steel bipolar plate with a chromized coating containing carbides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Ching-Yuan; Ger, Ming-Der [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Ta-His, Tao-Yuan, 335 (China); Wu, Min-Sheng [Department of Weapon System Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Ta-His, Tao-Yuan, 335 (China)

    2009-08-15

    This work improved the surface performance of low-carbon steel AISI 1020 by a reforming pack chromization process at low temperature (700 C) and investigated the possibility that the modified steels are used as metal bipolar plates (BPP) of PEMFCs. The steel surface was activated by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with different currents before the chromizing procedure. Experimental results indicate that a dense and homogenous Cr-rich layer is formed on the EDM carbon steels by pack chromization. The chromized coating pretreated with electrical discharge currents of 2 A has the lowest corrosion current density, 5.78 x 10{sup -8} Acm{sup -2}, evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization in a 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution and the smallest interfacial contact resistance (ICR), 11.8 m{omega}-cm{sup 2}, at 140 N/cm{sup 2}. The carbon steel with a coating containing carbides and nitrides is promising for application as metal BPPs, and this report presents the first research in producing BPPs with carbon steels. (author)

  11. Anticorrosion performance of chromized coating prepared by pack cementation in simulated solution with H2S and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Behnamian, Yashar; Luo, Hong; Wang, Xian-Zong; Leitch, Michael; Zeng, Hongbo; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-10-01

    A hash service environment containing H2S and CO2 in oil industry usually causes corrosion of carbon steel. In this study, the chromized coatings with different deposited time were prepared on the surface of carbon steel by the method of pack cementation to enhance its corrosion resistance. Then the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance as well as the semiconductor behavior of coatings in the simulated solution with saturated H2S and CO2 were investigated. The results show that the content of Cr in coating was increased by prolonging deposited time, and both chromium carbides and chromium nitrides were formed. Furthermore, coatings display higher polarization resistance, Rp, than that of the substrate, indicating a higher resistance to charge transfer on coating surface. The corrosion rates of coatings with different deposited time were significantly lower than that of substrate. Chemical analysis showed the formation of heavy sulfides on the surface of substrates after corrosion, while the least corrosion products were detected on the surface of coating with deposited time of 12 h. Mott-Schottky results indicated that coating of 12 h displayed less defects than the other two coatings with deposited time of 4 h and 8 h, which will be beneficial to improve corrosion resistance. The investigation showed that chromized coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance and owned a potential application in oil industry for corrosion prevention.

  12. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmaz, M., E-mail: mdurmaz@sakarya.edu.tr; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Kilinc, B. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Institute of Arts and Sciences, Sakarya University, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-03-30

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr{sub 2}N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV{sub 0.025}. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  13. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durmaz, M.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.; Kilinc, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr 2 N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV 0.025 . For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results

  14. Tribological properties of CrN coatings deposited by nitro-chromizing treatment on AISI D2 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, M.; Kilinc, B.; Abakay, E.; Sen, U.; Sen, S.

    2015-03-01

    In this work, the wear test of uncoated and chromium nitride coated AISI D2 cold work tool steel against alumina ball realized at 0.1 m/s sliding speeds and under the loads of 2.5N, 5N and 10N. Steel samples were nitrided at 575°C for 8 h in the first step of the coating process, and then chromium nitride coating was performed thermo-reactive deposition technique (TRD) in a powder mixture consisting of ferro-chromium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1000°C for 2 h. Nitro-chromized samples were characterized by X-Ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-hardness and ball on disk wear tests. The coating layer formed on the AISI D2 steel was compact and homogeneous. X-ray studies showed that the phase formed in the coated layer is Cr2N. The depth of the layer was 8.15 µm. The average hardness of the layer was 2160±15 HV0.025. For uncoated and chromium nitride materials, wear rate increased with increasing load. The results of friction coefficient and wear rate of the tested materials showed that the CrN coating presents the lowest results.

  15. A study on the improvement on the surface characteristics of STS403 stainless steel by chromizing and boronizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Seok; Lee, Sang Yul; Lee, Eui Yeoul

    1999-01-01

    STS403 stainless steel substrate was treated by duplex treatment of chromizing and boronizing. Metallographic cross sections of the treated specimens were consisted of duplex layer, layer, Cr diffusion layer, and matrix. Microstructures of duplex layer and others layers formed on STS403 were examined by OM, SEM, EDS, XRD and surface properties of duplex layer were evaluated by micro-Vickers hardness tester, wear tester and corrosion tester. From the XRD analysis of the duplex layer, various phases such as FeB, Fe 2 B, CrB were identified. The results from EDS analysis showed that intermedium layer contained much more Cr than any other layers. The activation energy for the diffusion of boron in the chromium diffusion layer in the duplex treated STS403 steel was calculated to be approximately 220kJ/mole, which was higher than the diffusional activation energy of boron in the STS403 steel, 160kJ/mole. Microhardness of duplex layer was measured to be approximately Hv1800∼2000 (50 gf). On high temperature wear testing at 600 .deg. C, duplex treated specimen exhibited an excellent wear resistance, showing that the wear volume of the duplex treated specimen was approximately five times smaller than that of untreated specimen. From the result of anodic polarization curves in 1M, H 2 SO 4 solution, duplex treated specimen showed an excellent corrosion resistance than the specimen treated by boronizing only

  16. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  17. Chemical heat treatment of low alloyed maraging steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinov, L S; Korotich, I K [Zhdanovskij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-09-01

    The investigation concerned the nitriding, cementation, chromizing, borating of economically alloyed maraging grade 04Kh2N5MFYu steel. The investigated methods of chemothermal treatment were found to considerably increase the hardness of the surface layer of the maraging steel. The high tempering of the grade 04Kh2N5MFYu cemented and hardened steel was found to produce secondary hardening. On chromizing, the diffusion layer is an alloyed ferrite which strengthens because of the dispersion hardening on ageing. The formation of the plastic low-carbon martensite at relatively small cooling rates greatly decreases the tendency of the boride layer to cracking.

  18. Synthesis of TiO2-doped SiO2 composite films and its applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    structure of the titanium oxide species in the TiO2-doped SiO2 composite films and the photocatalytic reactiv- ity in order to ... gaku D-max γA diffractometer with graphite mono- chromized ... FT–IR absorption spectra of TiO2-doped SiO2 com-.

  19. Hard Surface Layers by Pack Boriding and Gaseous Thermo-Reactive Deposition and Diffusion Treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Bottoli, Federico; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    2017-01-01

    ) layers with hardnesses up to 1800 HV. Titanizing of ARNE tool steel results in a surface layer consisting of TiC with a hardness of approximately 4000 HV. Duplex treatments, where boriding is combined with subsequent (TRD) titanizing, result in formation of hard TiB2 on top of a thick layer of Fe......Thermo-reactive deposition and diffusion (TRD) and boriding are thermochemical processes that result in very high surface hardness by conversion of the surface into carbides/nitrides and borides, respectively. These treatments offer significant advantages in terms of hardness, adhesion, tribo...... subjected to TRD (chromizing and titanizing) and boriding treatments. For the steels with low carbon content, chromizing results in surface alloying with chromium, i.e., formation of a (soft) “stainless” surface zone. Steels containing higher levels of carbon form chromium carbide (viz. Cr23C6, Cr7C3...

  20. Investigation of fretting corrosion of vacuum-chrome-plated vt3-1 titanium alloy in pair with unprotected vt3-1 alloy and 40khnma steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojkh, I.L.; Koltunova, L.N.; Vejtsman, M.G.; Birman, Ya.N.; Skosarev, A.V.; Kogan, I.S.

    1978-01-01

    The character of destruction of contacting surfaces in the process of fretting corrosion of titanium alloy VT3-1 chromized in vacuum in pair with unprotected alloy VT3-1 and steel 40KhNMA has been studied by scanning electron microscopy, electronography, and recording the surface profile. The specific load was 200 kg/cm 2 , vibration amplitude 50 mkm and frequency 500 Hz. It has been established that pairs unprotected with coating are subjected to intensive fretting corrosion especially when they are made of titanium alloy. For the pair chromized alloy VT3-1 - unprotected alloy VT3-1 no destruction of a chromized surface is observed. Vacuum chromium coating in the pair with steel 40KhNMA reveals similar properties as in pair with a titanium alloy. The surface of a steel sample is destroyed because of fretting corrosion, though the intensity of corrosion is lower than in the case of unprotected pairs. Vacuum chromium coating is recommended for protection of titanium alloy VT3-1 from fretting corrosion in pair with steel 40KhNMA or an alloy VT3-1 especially in those cases when various organic coatings are unsuitable

  1. An introduction to surface alloying of metals

    CERN Document Server

    Hosmani, Santosh S; Goyal, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    An Introduction to Surface Alloying of Metals aims to serve as a primer to the basic aspects of surface alloying of metals. The book serves to elucidate fundamentals of surface modification and their engineering applications. The book starts with basics of surface alloying and goes on to cover key surface alloying methods, such as carburizing, nitriding, chromizing, duplex treatment, and the characterization of surface layers. The book will prove useful to students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, as also to researchers and practitioners looking for a quick introduction to surface alloying.

  2. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  3. The influence of Cr and Al pack cementation on low carbon steel to improve oxidation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetya, Didik; Sugiarti, Eni; Destyorini, Fredina; Thosin, Kemas Ahmad Zaini

    2012-06-01

    Pack chromizing and aluminizing has been widely used for many years to improve hot temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance of metals. The coating process involves packing the steel in a powder mixture which contain aluminum and chromium source, and inert filler (usually alumina), and halide activator NH4Cl. Al and Cr were deposited onto carbon steel by pack cementation process using elemental Al and Cr powder as Al and Cr source, whereas NiCo alloys codeposited by electrodeposition. The position of Al and Cr could be under or over Ni-Co alloys deposited. Pack cementation was heated on dry inert gas at temperature 800 °C about 5 hours and 20 minute for Cr and Al respectively. Al and Cr was successfully deposited. Laying down effect of Al and Cr onto carbon steel whether up and down toward NiCo alloys coating have affected to oxidation resistance. The pack aluminizing as top layer given best resitance to restrain excessive oxide scale, in contrast pack chromizing reveal bad oxidation resistance, moreover occured spallation on layer.

  4. Structural steels for power generating equipment and heat and chemical heat treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Development of structural steels for power generating equipment and for reactor engineering, in particular, is elucidated. Noted is utilization of the 15Kh2NMFA steels for the WWER-1000 reactor vessels, the 10GN2MFA steels for steam generators, pressurizers, vessels of the automatic emergency shut down and safety system; the 00Kh12N3DL steel for cast pump vessels and main locking bars. The recommendations on heat treatment of big forgings, for instance, ensuring the necessary complex of mechanical properties are given. Diffusion chromizing with subsequent nitriding of austenitic steels which increase durability of the components in BN reactors more than 4 times, is practised on a large scale

  5. Diffusion and surface alloying of gradient nanostructured metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbo Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Gradient nanostructures (GNSs have been optimized in recent years for desired performance. The diffusion behavior in GNS metals is crucial for understanding the diffusion mechanism and relative characteristics of different interfaces that provide fundamental understanding for advancing the traditional surface alloying processes. In this paper, atomic diffusion, reactive diffusion, and surface alloying processes are reviewed for various metals with a preformed GNS surface layer. We emphasize the promoted atomic diffusion and reactive diffusion in the GNS surface layer that are related to a higher interfacial energy state with respect to those in relaxed coarse-grained samples. Accordingly, different surface alloying processes, such as nitriding and chromizing, have been modified significantly, and some diffusion-related properties have been enhanced. Finally, the perspectives on current research in this field are discussed.

  6. DISILICIDE BASE REFRACTORY METAL COATINGS IN SPACE ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocarsly, Sidney I.

    1963-03-15

    Studies of probable effects of space environment exposure of Durak B'' (a Chromizing Corp. proprietary disilicide coating) coated Mo are described. It was concluded that, in a high-temperature environment, solar radiation will not affect the material system. Sputtering will not cause a structural problem, but it may cause a change in optical properties. Meteoroids may cause coating spalling and minimum to possibly total failure. Some protection system will probably be necessary. Vacuum will cause some coating evaporation. The rate will be temperature-dependent and probably of a low order. The possible problem area is that the evaporation appears to occur preferentially at crack sites. Ionized nitrogen and hydrogen may react with the coating and charge physical or mechanical properties. (A.G.W.)

  7. Examples illustrating the effects of high-temperature corrosion and protective coatings on the creep-to-rupture behaviour of materials resistant to very high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachova, E.; Hougardy, H.P.; Granacher, J.

    1989-01-01

    Assessing the creep stress, it is assumed in general that the sub-surface effects in a specimen correspond to those at the surface. Particularly in very high temperature environments, however, oxidation is an additional effect to be taken into account, and there are other operational stresses to be reckoned with, as e.g. hot gas corrosion of gas turbine blades. The reduction of the effective cross section due to corrosion for instance of the material affected by long-term creep leads to an increase in stresses and thus shortens the period up to rupture. Protective coatings will prevent or at least delay corrosion. The paper reports the performance of various protective coatings. Pt-Al coatings have have been found to remain intact even on specimens with the longest testing periods up to rupture, to an extent that there was no oxidation at the grain boundaries proceeding from the surface to the sub-surface material. The same applies to the plasma-sprayed coatings, although in some cases pores had developed in the coating. The chromium alitizations were used up irregularly over the surface of some specimens tested at 1000deg C. Chromizing layers have been found to be more strongly damaged than the other coatings tested under comparable conditions. (orig./RHM) [de

  8. Final Report, Materials for Industrial Heat Recovery Systems, Tasks 3 and 4 Materials for Heat Recovery in Recovery Boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiser, James R.; Kish, Joseph R.; Singh, Preet M.; Sarma, Gorti B.; Yuan, Jerry; Gorog, J. Peter; Frederick, Laurie A.; Jette, Francois R.; Meisner, Roberta A.; Singbeil, Douglas L.

    2007-12-31

    tubes. Also, these fluctuating air flow patterns can result in deposition of black liquor on the wall tubes, and during periods when deposition is high, there is a noticeable increase in the concentrations of sulfur-bearing gases like hydrogen sulfide and methyl mercaptan. Laboratory studies have shown that chromized and aluminized surface treatments on carbon steel improve the resistance to sulfidation attack. Studies of superheater corrosion and cracking have included laboratory analyses of cracked tubes, laboratory corrosion studies designed to simulate the superheater environment and field tests to study the movement of superheater tubes and to expose a corrosion probe to assess the corrosion behavior of alternate superheater alloys, particularly alloys that would be used for superheaters operating at higher temperatures and higher pressures than most current boilers. In the laboratory corrosion studies, samples of six alternate materials were immersed in an aggressive, low melting point salt mixture and exposed for times up to 336 h, at temperatures of 510, 530 or 560°C in an inert or reactive cover gas. Using weight change and results of metallographic examination, the samples were graded on their resistance to the various environments. For the superheater corrosion probe studies, samples of the same six materials were exposed on an air-cooled corrosion probe exposed in the superheater section of a recovery boiler for 1000 h. Post exposure examination showed cracking and/or subsurface attack in the samples exposed at the higher temperatures with the attack being more severe for samples 13 exposed above the first melting temperature of the deposits that collected on the superheater tubes. From these superheater studies, a ranking was developed for the six materials tested. The task addressing cracking and corrosion of primary air port tubes that was part of this project produced results that have been extensively implemented in recovery boilers in North America