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Sample records for chromium steels

  1. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0% and nickel does not exceed 50.0%

  2. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes are normally used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  3. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel covered welding electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for covered corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes. These electrodes normally are used for shielded metal arc welding, and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium-nickel steels in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  4. Ductility of high chromium stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peretyat'ko, V.N.; Kazantsev, A.A.

    1997-01-01

    Aimed to optimize the hot working conditions for high chromium stainless steels the experiments were carried in the temperature range of 800-1300 deg C using hot torsion tests and cylindrical specimens of ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels 08Kh13, 12Kh13, 20Kh13, 30Kh13 and 40Kh13. Testing results showed that steel plasticity varies in a wide range depending on carbon content. Steels of lesser carbon concentration (08Kh13 and 12Kh13) exhibit a sharp increase in plasticity with a temperature rise, especially in the interval of 1200-1250 deg C. Steels 20Kh13 and 30Kh13 display insignificant plasticity increasing, whereas plastic properties of steel 40Kh13 increase noticeably in the range of 1000-1300 deg C. It is shown that optimal hot working conditions for specific steel must be selected with account of steel phase composition at high temperatures

  5. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined.

  6. Low-chromium reduced-activation chromium-tungsten steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Bainitic microstructures formed during continuous cooling can differ from classical upper and lower bainite formed during isothermal transformation. Two types of non-classical bainite were observed depending on the cooling rate: carbide-free acicular bainite at rapid cooling rates and granular bainite at slower cooling rates. The Charpy impact toughness of the acicular ferrite was found to be considerably better than for the granular bainite. It was postulated that alloying to improve the hardenability of the steel would promote the formation of acicular bainite, just as increasing the cooling rate does. To test this, chromium and tungsten were added to the 2 1/4Cr-2W and 2 1/4Cr-2WV steel compositions to increase their hardenability, and the microstructures and mechanical properties were examined

  7. Chromium-Makes stainless steel stainless

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropschot, S.J.; Doebrich, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Chromium, a steely-gray, lustrous, hard metal that takes a high polish and has a high melting point, is a silvery white, hard, and bright metal plating on steel and other material. Commonly known as chrome, it is one of the most important and indispensable industrial metals because of its hardness and resistance to corrosion. But it is used for more than the production of stainless steel and nonferrous alloys; it is also used to create pigments and chemicals used to process leather.

  8. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    OpenAIRE

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  9. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi F. A.; Kurniawan T.; Salwani M. S.; Bin Y. S.; Harun W. S. W.

    2016-01-01

    The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on...

  10. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium +6 could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 by nitric. acid; and the reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium +3 to chromium +6 was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium +6 back to chromium +3 by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the +6 oxidation state and would not exist in the +6 state in the final process waste solutions

  11. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.M.

    1995-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine if chromium(+6) could exist in plutonium process solutions under normal operating conditions. Four individual reactions were studied: the rate of dissolution of stainless steel, which is the principal source of chromium in process solutions; the rate of oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) by nitric acid; and the reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel and with oxalic acid. The stainless steel corrosion rate was found to increase with increasing nitric acid concentration, increasing hydrofluoric acid concentration, and increasing temperature. Oxidation of chromium(+3) to chromium(+6) was negligible at room temperature and only became significant in hot concentrated nitric acid. The rate of reduction of chromium(+6) back to chromium(+3) by reaction with stainless steel or oxalic acid was found to be much greater than the rate of the reverse oxidation reaction. Based on these findings and taking into account normal operating conditions, it was determined that although there would be considerable chromium in plutonium process streams it would rarely be found in the (+6) oxidation state and would not exist in the (+6) state in the final process waste solutions

  12. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods and bare electrodes - approved 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    This specification covers corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel welding rods for use with the atomic hydrogen and gas-tungsten-arc welding processes and bare electrodes for use with the submerged arc and gas metal-arc welding processes. These welding rods and electrodes include those alloy steels designated as corrosion- or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4% and nickel does not exceed 50%

  13. Chromium Enrichment on P11 Ferritic Steel by Pack Cementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauzi F. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The future thermal power plant is expected to operate at higher temperature to improve its efficiency and to reduce greenhouse gas emission. This target requires better corrosion properties of ferritic steels, which commonly used as materials for superheater and reheater of boiler tubes. In this work, chromium enrichment on the surface of ferritic steel is studied. The deposited chromium is expected to become a reservoir for the formation of chromia protective layer. Chromium was deposited on the substrate of steel by pack cementation process for two hours at the temperature of 850ºC, 950ºC and 1050ºC, respectively. XRD analysis indicated that chromium was successfully deposited at all temperatures. Somehow, SEM cross sectional image showed that continuous layer of chromium was not continuously formed at 850oC. Therefore, this research clarify that chromium enrichment by pack cementation may be conducted at the temperature above 950°C.

  14. Development of low-chromium, chromium-tungsten steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    High-chromium (9-12% Cr) Cr-Mo and Cr-W ferritic steels are favored as candidates for fusion applications. In early work to develop reduced-activation steels, an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C steel (designated 2.25Cr-2WV) had better strength than an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) steel (compositions are in weight percent). However, the 2.25Cr-2WV had poor impact properties, as determined by the ductile-brittle transition temperature and upper-shelf energy of subsize Charpy impact specimens. Because low-chromium steels have some advantages over high-chromium steels, a program to develop low-chromium steels is in progress. Microstructural analysis indicated that the reason for the inferior impact toughness of the 2.25Cr-2WV was the granular bainite obtained when the steel was normalized. Properties can be improved by developing an acicular bainite microstructure by increasing the cooling rate after austenitization. Alternatively, acicular bainite can be promoted by increasing the hardenability. Hardenability was changed by adding small amounts of boron and additional chromium to the 2.25Cr-2WV composition. A combination of B, Cr, and Ta additions resulted in low-chromium reduced-activation steels with mechanical properties comparable to those of 9Cr-2WVTa. (orig.)

  15. Chromium depletion from stainless steels during vacuum annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.F.; Hales, R.

    1977-01-01

    During selective chromium oxidation of stainless steels the changes in chromium concentration at the metal surface and in the metal have an important bearing on the overall oxidation performance. It has been proposed that an analogue of chromium behaviour during selective oxidation is obtained from volatilisation of chromium during high temperature vacuum annealing. In the present report the evaporation of chromium from 316 type of steel, vacuum annealed at 1,000 0 C, has been investigated by means of energy dispersive X-ray analysis and by neutron activation analysis. It was established that chromium loss from austenitic stainless steels is rate controlled by interdiffusion in the alloy. As predicted the chromium concentration at the metal surface decreased with increasing vacuum annealing time. The chromium depletion profile in the metal was in good agreement with the previously derived model apart from an anomalous region near the surface. Here the higher resolution of the neutron activation technique indicated a zone within approximately 2μm of the surface where the chromium concentration decreased more steeply than expected. (orig.) [de

  16. On the rational alloying of structural chromium-nickel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astaf'ev, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on the influence of chromium nickel, phosphorus on the critical brittleness temperature of Cr-Ni-Mo-V structural steels. It is shown that the critical brittleness temperature of these steels increases at chromium content more over than 2% and nickel content more than 2% in the result of carbide transformations during tempering. Increase of nickel content in Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels strengthens the tendency to embrittlement during slow cooling, from tempering temperature owing to development of process of phosphorus grain-boundary segregation. Two mentioned mechanisms of embrittlement determine principles of rational steel alloying. The extreme dependence of the critical brittleness temperature on chromium and nickel content, which enables to choose the optimum composition of Cr-Ni-Mo-V-steels, was established

  17. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  18. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  19. Behaviour of carbon steel and chromium steels in CO2 environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, B.; Bounie, P.; Guntz, G.; Prouheze, J.C.; Renault, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The behavior in aqueous CO 2 environments of steel with chromium content between 0 and 22% has been studied by autoclave tests. The influence of chromium and molybdenum contents has been investigated particularly on 13 Cr steel. Conventional electrochemical test results are related to the CO 2 autoclave test results. The influence of the environment: temperature, chloride concentration, partial pressure of CO 2 and some amount of H 2 S on the corrosion resistance are discussed

  20. Composite Coatings of Chromium and Nanodiamond Particles on Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidikova N.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chrome plating is used to improve the properties of metal surfaces like hardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance in machine building. To further improve these properties, an electrodeposited chromium coating on steel, modified with nanodiamond particles is proposed. The nanodiamond particles (average size 4 nm measured by TEM are produced by detonation synthesis (NDDS. The composite coating (Cr+NDDS has an increased thickness, about two times greater microhardness and finer micro-structure compared to that of unmodified chromium coating obtained under the same galvanization conditions. In the microstructure of specimen obtained from chrome electrolyte with concentration of NDDS 25 g/l or more, “minisections” with chromium shell were found. They were identified by metallographic microscope and X-ray analyser on etched section of chromium plated sample. The object of further research is the dependence of the presence of NDDS in the composite coating from the nanodiamond particles concentration in the chroming electrolyte.

  1. Specification for corrosion-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel bare and composite metal cored and stranded arc welding electrodes and welding rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    This specification prescribes requirements for corrosion or heat resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steel electrodes and welding rods. These electrodes and welding rods are normally used for arc welding and include those alloy steels designated as corrosion or heat-resisting chromium and chromium-nickel steels, in which chromium exceeds 4.0 percent and nickel does not exceed 50.0 percent

  2. Principles of alloy design in high nitrogen 12% chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goecmen, A.; Ernst, P.; Holmes, P.

    1999-01-01

    12% chromium steels are hardened by a martensitic transformation and by precipitation reactions of the martensite during a subsequent tempering treatment. The original alloy design of these steels is based on the intensifying effect of C on the martensitic transformation hardening as well as on the effects of V and Mo on intensity and stability of carbide precipitation hardening reactions. Advanced alloy design of high carbon 12% chromium steels makes use of f.c.c.-MX type carbonitrides to improve grain refinement and tempering resistance, whereas alloying with about 0.05 wt.-% nitrogen already plays a decisive role. In this paper, new alloy design opportunities provided by high nitrogen are reviewed, which promise to achieve a best possible compromise between grain size limitation, particle hardening and particle stability of 12% chromium steels. The crucial effects of the solubility product of MX-type phases on grain coarsening resistance, precipitation hardening and particle stability are reviewed. The advantages of high nitrogen steels to improve these properties are rationalized to result from the lower solubility of nitrides compared with carbides. As an advantageous opportunity of the achievable higher grain coarsening resistance, the normalizing temperature in high nitrogen steels can be increased in order to increase the amount of the less soluble and thereby slow coarsening f.c.c.-nitrides. In addition, as a consequence of a higher normalizing temperature, the solubility gap of nitrides in the austenite is expanded, which in turn enables an effective precipitation hardening due to low soluble nitrides in the metastable austenite before the martensitic transformation

  3. Intragranular Chromium Nitride Precipitates in Duplex and Superduplex Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Iversen, Torunn Hjulstad

    2012-01-01

    Intragranular chromium nitrides is a phenomenon with detrimental effects on material properties in superduplex stainless steels which have not received much attention. Precipitation of nitrides occurs when the ferritic phase becomes supersaturated with nitrogen and there is insufficient time during cooling for diffusion of nitrogen into austenite. Heat treatment was carried out at between 1060◦C and 1160◦C to study the materials susceptibility to nitride precipitation with...

  4. Chromium surface alloying of structural steels during laser treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurov, I.E.; Nagornykh, S.N.; Sivukhin, G.A.; Solenov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    Results of matrix alloying from the surface layer and creation of considerably increased chromium concentration in the depth which permits to increase the efficiency of laser treatment of steels (12Kh18N10T and 38KhN3M) in the process of their further mechanical polishing, are presented. The treatment was realized by continuous CO 2 -laser at different power densities and scanning rates are presented. A model describing the creation of anomalous distributions of the alloying element in steels is plotted

  5. 77 FR 32998 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-04

    ...-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan Determination On the basis of the record \\1\\ developed in the subject five... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or... USITC Publication 4325 (May 2012), entitled Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan...

  6. Testing of advanced chromium - iron based steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeg Veternikova, J.; Degmova, J.; Sabelova, V.; Sojak, S.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.; Simko, F.; Pekarcikova, M.

    2015-01-01

    Research and Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Generation IV (GEN IV) are limited by the selection of proper construction materials. Suitable candidate materials are still under extensive investigation, because their properties must be excellent to achieve high level of reactor system safety. NF 709 (Fe-20Cr-25Ni) is new austenitic steel with improved properties in compare to AISI steels; therefore it is also one of candidate materials. Our study is focused on investigation of radiation resistance as well as thermal stability of this steel - NF 709. New austenitic steel NF 709, candidate materials for construction of Generation IV reactors, was observed in term of its stability after an exposure to very high temperature and irradiation. The change of microstructure was observed by positron annihilation techniques which demonstrated the growth of vacancy defects from di-vacancies in as-received material to three-vacancies in material after the thermal and implantation treatments; although the total change of structure was very small. Thus, NF 709 showed good resistance to tested strains and according to our preliminary results. Therefore, this material could be used for high temperature applications and interchangeable components of Generation IV reactors. (authors)

  7. High-carbon chromium steel resistance to small plastic deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajduchenya, V.F.; Madyanov, S.A.; Apaev, B.A.; Kirillov, Yu.V.; Sokolov, L.D.

    1978-01-01

    The phase composition of a steel with 1.08% C and 2.1% Cr, and the variation in the level of microstresses in the matrix as related to the annealing temperature in the range of 400-600 deg C and in the applied compression stress were investigated. To study the phase composition, and chromium content in the α-solution and the carbide phases, magnetic, chemical, and X-ray spectrum analyses were carried out. The change in the level of microstresses was determined roentgenographically. During the stress relaxation test at temperatures of 20-180 deg C, the mechanism of plastic deformation near the yield point was investigated. It is shown that three dislocation mechanisms operate in high-carbon chromium steel under the conditions at hand: overcoming the Pierls-Nabarro barriers by the dislocations, overcoming the stress fields of coherent carbide particles by dislocations, and circumvention of second-phase particles by dislocations. The dependence of the realization of the different plastic deformation mechanisms on the number of carbide particles and the chromium concentration in the matrix was established. The thermally activated nature of the motion of the dislocations under conditions of stress relaxation at an elevated temperature is noted

  8. Microstructure of a high boron 9-12% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andren, H.O. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Applied Physics

    2008-07-01

    Additions of small amounts of boron (10-100 ppm) to 9-12% chromium steels are often made since they have been found to be beneficial for the creep strength up to and above 600 C. The effect of boron is to restrict the coarsening of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates during service. It was found that increasing the boron content from 9 to 40 ppm gave a decrease in coarsening constant at 600 C by a factor of 2. The present understanding of boron solution, non-equilibrium grain boundary segregation, incorporation into M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, and diffusion is reviewed in the paper. A very high boron addition (300 ppm) was made in the trial TAF steel already in the 1950'ies. The microstructure of a similar trial steel, FT3B, has been studied detail. In this steel large Mo, Cr, Fe and V containing metal borides are formed rather than the expected BN, with the crystal structure M{sub 2}B{sub 2}. Nitrogen is therefore still available for the formation of VN. Due to tempering at a low temperature (690 C) to a high strength (830 MPa), this steel contained a dense distribution of very small VN precipitates, 5-15 nm in size. A similar VN distribution is probably the cause of the still unsurpassed creep strength of the TAF steel. (orig.)

  9. Multitracer method of diffusion measurement in chromium-manganese steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudala, J.; Stegowski, Z.; Gilewicz-Wolter, J.

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents an application of multitracer method to diffusion measurement in Cr-Mn steels. Radioisotope tracers of chromium 51 Cr, manganese 54 Mn and iron 59 Fe were used simultaneously in the diffusion process, Gamma-spectrum measurement and the proper analysis enabled evaluation of concentration distribution for each tracer. As a new tool, artificial neural networks (ANN) method was used for spectrum analysis. The proper solution of the diffusion model was applied to the experimental tracers' distribution data and diffusion coefficients were determined. (author)

  10. Material physical properties of 12 chromium ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Wakai, Takashi; Aoto, Kazumi

    2003-09-01

    High chromium ferritic steel is an attractive candidate for structural material of the next Fast Breeder Reactor, since both of thermal properties and high temperature strength of the steel are superior to those of conventional austenitic stainless steels. In this study, physical properties of 12Cr steels are measured and compared to those obtained in the previous studies to discuss about stochastic dispersions. The effect of measurement technique on Young's modulus and the influence of the specimen size on coefficient of thermal expansion are also investigated. The following conclusions are obtained. (1) Young's modulus of 12Cr steels obtained in this study tends to larger than those obtained in the previous studies especially in high temperature. Such a discrepancy is resulted from the difference in measurement technique. It was clarified that Young's modulus obtained by free vibration method is more adequate those obtained by the cantilever characteristic vibration method. Therefore, the authors recommend using the values obtained by free vibration method as Young's modulus of 12Cr steels. (2) Both instant and mean coefficient of thermal expansion of 12Cr steels obtained in this study is in a good agreement with those obtained in the previous studies. However, the obviously different values are obtained from the measurement by large size specimens. Such a discrepancy is resulted from heterogeneous during heating process of the specimens. Therefore, the authors recommend using the values obtained by φ4 x 20 mm specimens as instant and mean coefficient of thermal expansion of 12Cr steels. (3) Specific heat of 12Cr steels obtained in this study agree with those obtained in the previous studies with a few exceptions. (4)Thermal conductivity of 12Cr steels obtained in this study agree with those obtained in the previous studies. (5) It was confirmed that instant and mean coefficient of thermal expansion, density, specific heat and thermal conductivity of 12Cr steels

  11. Corrosion behaviour of high chromium ferritic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiesheyer, H.; Lennartz, G.; Brandis, H.

    1976-01-01

    Ferritic steels developed for seawater desalination and containing 20 to 28% chromium, up to 5% Mo and additions of nickel and copper have been tested with respect to their corrosion behaviour, in particular in chloride containing media. The materials in the sensibilized state were tested for intercrystalline corrosion susceptibility in the Strauss-, Streicher-, nitric acid hydrofluoric acid- and Huey-Tests. No intercrystalline corrosion was encountered in the case of the steels with 28% Cr and 2% Mo. The resistance to pitting was assessed on the basis of rupture potentials determined by potentiokinetic tests. The resistance of the steels with 20% Cr and 5% Mo or 28% Cr and 2% Mo is superior to that of the molybdenum containing austenitic types. Addition of nickel yields a significant increase in crevice corrosion resistance; the same applies to resistance in sulfuric acid. In boiling seawater all the materials tested are resistant to stress corrosion cracking. No sign of any type of corrosion was found on nickel containing steels after about 6,000 hours exposure to boiling 50% seawater brine even under salt deposits. (orig.) [de

  12. Assessment of biological chromium among stainless steel and mild steel welders in relation to welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmé, J L; Shirali, P; Mereau, M; Sobaszek, A; Boulenguez, C; Diebold, F; Haguenoer, J M

    1997-01-01

    Air and biological monitoring were used for assessing external and internal chromium exposure among 116 stainless steel welders (SS welders) using manual metal arc (MMA), metal inert gas (MIG) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding processes (MMA: n = 57; MIG: n = 37; TIG: n = 22) and 30 mild steel welders (MS welders) using MMA and MIG welding processes (MMA: n = 14; MIG: n = 16). The levels of atmospheric total chromium were evaluated after personal air monitoring. The mean values for the different groups of SS welders were 201 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 185 micrograms/m3 (MIG), 52 micrograms/m3 (TIG) and for MS welders 8.1 micrograms/m3 (MMA) and 7.3 micrograms/m3 (MIG). The curve of cumulative frequency distribution from biological monitoring among SS welders showed chromium geometric mean concentrations in whole blood of 3.6 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 19.9), in plasma of 3.3 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 21.0) and in urine samples of 6.2 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 58.0). Among MS welders, mean values in whole blood and plasma were rather more scattered (1.8 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 9.3 and 1.3 micrograms/l, 95th percentile = 8.4, respectively) and in urine the value was 2.4 micrograms/l (95th percentile = 13.3). The analysis of variance of chromium concentrations in plasma previously showed a metal effect (F = 29.7, P process effect (F = 22.2, P process interaction (F = 1.3, P = 0.25). Concerning urinary chromium concentration, the analysis of variance also showed a metal effect (F = 30, P process effect (F = 72, P process interaction (F = 13.2, P = 0.0004). Throughout the study we noted any significant differences between smokers and non-smokers among welders. Taking in account the relationships between chromium concentrations in whole, plasma or urine and the different welding process. MMA-SS is definitely different from other processes because the biological values are clearly higher. These higher levels are due to the very significant

  13. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non-Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    UNCLASSIFIED: Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion...00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Laboratory Validation and Demonstrations of Non- Hexavalent Chromium Conversion Coatings for Steel Substrates 5a...to MRAP II Acquisition Pretreatment /conversion coatings omitted: • Hex- chrome pretreatments prohibited for new ground vehicles • Hydrogen

  14. Chromium in aqueous nitrate plutonium process streams: Corrosion of 316 stainless steel and chromium speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, W.H.; Purdy, G.

    1994-01-01

    According to the measurements made in this study, the only situation in which chromium (+6) could exist in a plutonium process solution is one in which a feed containing chromium is dissolved in a glass pot dissolver in high nitric acid concentration and at high temperature. But when the resulting feed is prepared for ion exchange, the chemical treatment reduces chromium to the +3 state. Any solution being processed through the evaporator will only contain chromium in the +3 state and any chromium salts remaining in the evaporator bottoms will be chromium +3 salts

  15. Changes in structure and phase composition of chromium diffusion layer on stainless steels after long annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knyazev, E.V.; Voshedchenko, B.M.; Voskresenskij, Yu.A.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on the effect of elevated temperatures UU and long holdings at heat on structure, phase composition and properties of chromium diffusion layer on austenitic chromium-nickel stainless steels 10Kh18N10TVD, 10Kh15N30M4B, 10Kh11N23T3MR, 10Kh21N28V6M3. The following mechanism of processes taking place in diffusion chromium layer is presented. The steady drop of chromium concentrations is observed after diffusion saturation. Chromium redistribution related with system transformation to more equilibrium state and simultaneous decarburization of steel surfaces takes place in diffusion layers of 10Kh15N30M4B and 10Kh21N28V6M3 steels after annealing at different temperatures and holdings at heat. Decarburization of steel surface layers is practically excluded in diffusion layers of 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels. Diffusion chromium-saturated layer stays effective only on 10Kh18N10T-VD and 10Kh11N23T3MR steels on heating up to 1000 deq C with holding up to 250 h

  16. Formation and properties of chromium nitride coatings on martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendala, B.; Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on martensitic E1961 (13H12NWMFA) steel, which is used on compressor blades in the aircraft engines, were presented. The chemical composition of E1961 was given. The PVT-550 device was used for coating. The protective chromium nitride coatings were tested. The influence of ARC-PVD method parameters for example: bias, pressure and flow rate of reactive gases on the structure and properties of the CrN coatings in corrosion tests were investigated. Technical parameters of obtained CrN coatings were given. The phase analysis of chromium nitride coatings obtained with different technical parameters were tested. The results of phase analysis are given. The pitting corrosion resistance tests in 10% FeCl 3 solution was conducted. The corrosion rate for CrN coated samples were defined. It was found that 50 V and 100 V bias, about 0.5 and 0.7 Pa pressure and 140 sccm (standard cubic centimeter) flow rate of nitride during coating favour the CrN monophase structure while increasing bias to 150 V, decreasing the pressure to about 0.5 Pa and 0.3 Pa and increasing the flow rate of nitride to 160 - 180 sccm favour the CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure. On the basis of corrosion investigations for CrN coatings obtained with different ARC-PVD parameters the best corrosion resistance in 10% FeCl 3 solution for CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure was found. (author)

  17. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  18. FP corrosion dependence on carbon and chromium content in Fe-Cr steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Koei; Tanigaki, Takanori; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Uno, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    In an attempt to investigate Cs or Cs-Te corrosion dependence on chromium or carbon content in Fe-Cr steel, cesium and Cs-Te corrosion test were performed to three specimens, Fe-9Cr-0C, Fe-9Cr-0.14C and Fe-13Cr-0.14C, for 100 hours at 973K in simulated high burn-up fuel pin environment. Cesium corrosion depth has no dependence on chromium or carbon content in Fe-Cr steel. Cs-Te corrosion was appeared in only Fe-13Cr-0.14C which has chromium carbides ranged along grain boundary. Appearance of the Cs-Te corrosion was determined by distribution or arrangement of chromium carbides which depends on chromium and carbon content. (author)

  19. Forgings made of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for the low temperature range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruendler, O.; Schwarz, W.; Koren, M.

    1981-01-01

    The authors discuss the low temperature application of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for energy production and process techniques. Material requirements are presented, and the behaviour, mechanical and physical properties of such steels are discussed. The manufacture of forgings is considered and test results presented. (Auth.)

  20. Forgings made of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for the low temperature range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruendler, O.; Schwarz, W.; Koren, M. (Vereinigte Edelstahlwerke A.G. (VEW), Kapfenberg (Austria))

    1981-09-01

    The authors discuss the low temperature application of austenitic chromium-nickel steels for energy production and process techniques. Material requirements are presented, and the behaviour, mechanical and physical properties of such steels are discussed. The manufacture of forgings is considered and test results presented.

  1. Serum chromium levels sampled with steel needle versus plastic IV cannula. Does method matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Ø; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Modern metal-on-metal (MoM) joint articulations releases metal ions to the body. Research tries to establish how much this elevates metal ion levels and whether it causes adverse effects. The steel needle that samples the blood may introduce additional chromium to the sample thereby...... causing bias. This study aimed to test that theory. METHODS: We compared serum chromium values for two sampling methods, steel needle and IV plastic cannula, as well as sampling sequence in 16 healthy volunteers. RESULTS: We found statistically significant chromium contamination from the steel needle...... with mean differences between the two methods of 0.073 ng/mL, for the first sample, and 0.033 ng/mL for the second. No difference was found between the first and second plastic sample. The first steel needle sample contained an average of 0.047 ng/mL more than the second. This difference was only borderline...

  2. 76 FR 58536 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Notice of Commission Determination To Conduct a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... Concerning the Antidumping Duty Order on Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan AGENCY: United.... 1675(c)(5)) to determine whether revocation of the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated...

  3. The heat treatment effect on the structural changes and properties of high-nitrogen chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, V.M.; Elistratov, A.A.; Kolesnikov, A.G.; Rakhshtadt, A.G.; Plokhikh, A.I.; Morozova, E.I.; Kostina, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The structural transformations in the steels with 0.4-1.3 %N and 15-24 %Cr content, originating by thermal treatment, are studied. The dependences of the phase composition of the high-chromium steels (18 %Cr) on the nitrogen content are established. The ratio of the unchanged austenite increases and the martensite quantity decreases correspondingly with growth of the nitrogen concentration from 0.4 up to 1.2 %. The effect of strengthening the steels with the initial martensite structure as well as austenite and martensite steels is observed in the process of steels tempering due to the hardening on the account of the martensite dispersion hardening [ru

  4. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested

  5. Relationship between equivalent chromium content and irradiation-induced swelling in 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.F.; Guthrie, G.L.

    1974-12-01

    A correlation is noted between equivalent chromium content and resistance to irradiation induced swelling in various 316 stainless steel specimens which have slightly different chemical compositions. Several examples are cited where an increased concentration of an α-stabilizing minor constituent results in decreased swelling. It is shown that the relative swelling resistance of alloys having the same carbon and equivalent nickel contents is higher for those alloys with the higher equivalent chromium content

  6. Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2 Whole wheat bread, 2 slices 2 Red wine, 5 ounces 1–13 Apple, unpeeled, 1 medium ... chromium or a placebo) might simply show the benefits of supplementation in a chromium-deficient population. Overall, ...

  7. Influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour on 13% chromium steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Thomas, K G; Meisel, H; Sessler, W

    1986-01-01

    The influence of coatings on the corrosion fatigue behaviour of 13% chromium steel has been studied. There have been selected different coating systems: Barrier coating (enamel), diffusion coatings, (aluminizing, chromizing) and anodic coating, (aluminium, zinc, tin, cadmium). The corrosion fatigue limits of coated with uncoated specimens in neutral NaCl-solution are compared. Salt-concentrations were 0,01 and 22% (=0,38 M) NaCl at 80/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C. The tests were carried out with alternating tensions and a constant frequency of 50 Hz. Only the use of anodic coatings improved the corrosion fatigue behaviour of the chromium steel.

  8. The effect of chromium diffusion redistribution on wear resistance of carburized 3Kh13 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbedinskij, G.V.; Shumakov, A.I.; Zemskij, S.V.; Pereverzev, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    The redistribution of chromium in steel 3Kh13 on carburization in a high-activity carburizer and the wear-resistance of the steel have been investigated. Surface layers with an increased chromium concentration show the highest wear-resistance. The chromium content in the surface layer increases due to its diffusion from the interior. The distribution of carbon and chromium in the carburized layers has been studied with the aid of the radioactive isotope 14 C by the method of layer-by-layer spectral analysis on a vacuum quantometer, layer-by-layer chemical and X-ray structure analysis. The composition of the carbides has been determined by physicochemical analysis. It has been established that the carburized layer can be divided into four zones with respect to its phase composition: first zone - hematite and spinal with 0.5-2.0% C; second zone - solid carbides (Fe,Cr) 7 C 3 ; up to 5% C; third zone - globular carbides in a troostite matrix (Cr,Fe) 7 C 3 and Cr 23 C 6 ; up to 3.5% C; fourth, transitional, zone - troostite carbide mixture Cr 23 C 6 ; up to 1% C. The chromium diffusion in the carburized layer is faster than in the initial austenite. The chromium counterdiffusion is due to the development of a zone of solid carbides M 7 C 3

  9. Benzohydroxamic acid as a reductometric titrant:determination of manganese, chromium and vanadium in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.K.; Subbarao, C.

    1981-01-01

    A method has been developed for the rapid determination of manganese and chromium by direct stepwise reductometric titration with benzohydroxamic acid, and of vanadium by titration with ascorbic acid (with benzohydroxamic acid as indicator) in the same aliquot. The method is free from the interference of common alloying elements present in steels. Some BCS steel samples have been analysed with good precision and accuracy. (author)

  10. Grain boundary chromium concentration effects on the IGSCC and IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, S.M.; Arey, B.W.; Charlot, L.A.

    1993-08-01

    Comparisons are made between grain boundary composition and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of 304 and 309 austenitic stainless steels in high-temperature water environments. Chromium depletion had the dominant effect on cracking resistance with the extent of IG cracking controlled by the interfacial chromium concentration. The minimum chromium concentration required to promote cracking was a function of the applied strain rate during slow-strain-rate tensile tests in 288 C air-saturated water. Depletion from bulk levels of 18 wt% to ∼13.5 wt% Cr at grain boundaries prompted 100% IG cracking at a strain rate of 1 x 10 -6 s -1 , while embrittlement was observed with only a slight depletion to ∼17 wt% at 2 x 10 -7 s -1 . Insights into critical interfacial compositions promoting IGSCC are discussed in reference to cracking of irradiated stainless steel nuclear reactor core components

  11. An evaluation of the effect of surface chromium concentration on the oxidation of a stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, R.C.; Evans, H.E.

    1983-01-01

    Short-term oxidation tests have been performed at 850 deg C in a CO 2 -based atmosphere on 20Cr-25Ni-Nb-stabilized steels previously exposed to dynamic vacuum at 1000 deg C. This pre-treatment preferentially removes chromium from the metal surface and is always detrimental to the oxidation properties. It is shown that porous, iron-rich oxides initially form on specimens with surface chromium concentrations 18.5 w/o chromium, a protective surface layer is produced. It is suggested that the transition between these extremes is determined by nucleation conditions and, in the present steels, it is shown how the metal grain size plays a significant role. (author)

  12. Corrosion of chromium, nickel, titanium and steels in solutions of sodium and ammonium thiosulfates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenshchikova, S.V.; Kochergin, V.P.; Doronina, I.V.

    1983-01-01

    Results of gravimetric determinatiion of average rate of chromium, nickel, titatnium and steels 12Kh18N10T and VSt.3 corrosion rate in solutions 50 mass.% (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 3 and Na 2 S 2 O 3 in the air and nitrogen atmosphere at 333 K have been generalized. Anodic polarization curves are recorded and stationary potentials of metals and steels under the conditions are measured. It is shown that in (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 3 solution the rate of metal and steels corrosion is higher than in Na 2 S 2 O 3 solution indepenent of the nature of gaseous medium contacting with solution. In the series Ni → VSt.3 → 12Kh18N10T → VT1 → chromium in (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 3 and Na 2 S 2 O 3 solutions at 333 K corrosion resistance increases. Chromium, titanium and chromium-nickel steel 12Kh18N10T possess a high corrosion resistance

  13. Experience in melting of high-quality chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel in oxygen converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosoi, L F; Yaburov, S I; Shul' kin, M L; Vedernikov, G G; Bragin, E D; Filork' yan, B K

    1978-10-01

    Technology of melting high-quality medium-carbon constructional chromium-nickel-molybdenum steel has been developed and tested in 130-t converters. The technology envisages metal refinement in a casting laddle using synthetic lime-aluminous slag and argon blowing, as well as liquid ferroallys (master alloys) for steel deoxidation and alloying. Due to a smaller content of sulfur, phosphorus, arsenic and sulphide inclusions, and to a smaller grain size (N 11-12), the steel, produced according to this technology possesses higher plastic properties and impact strength than conventional open-hearth furnace metal after heat treatment for the same strength.

  14. On superplasticity of corrosion resistant ferritic-austenitic chromium-nickel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surovtsev, A P; Sukhanov, V E

    1988-01-01

    The deformability of corrosion resistant chromium-nickel ferritic austenitic steel type O8Kh22N6T under tension, upsetting and torsion in the 600-1200 deg C temperature range is studied. For the deformation rate of the order of 10/sup -3/ s/sup -1/ the effect of superelasticity reveals itself at 850 deg C in the process of ferrite dynamic polymerization, in the 925-950 deg C range, at initial stages of dynamic recrystallization - the dynamic polygonization controlled by chromium carbide dissolving in steel and maximum at 1050 deg C in the process of development of austenite dynamic recrystallization with grain refinement with F/A ratio equalling 1. After upsetting in the elasticity mode at 1050 deg C the impact strength of the above steel is maximum.

  15. Creep strength and ductility of 9 to 12% chromium steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, John

    2004-01-01

    The present paper focuses in on long-term creep properties of parent material of the new 9-12%Cr creep resistant steels, P91, E911 and P92 developed for use in advanced ultrasupercritical power plants. These steels have been at the center of activities in the ECCC Working Group 3A (WG3A) "Ferriti...

  16. 76 FR 31633 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium... Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet from Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission... the antidumping duty order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead...

  17. XPS and SEM studies of chromium oxide films chemically formed on stainless steel 316 L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanov, P.; Marinova, T.

    2000-01-01

    The structure and composition of chromium oxide films formed on stainless steel by immersion in a chromium electrolyte have been studied by SEM and XPS. Cr 2 O 3 crystallites in the range 30-150 nm are fully developed and cover the whole surface. The chemical composition in the depth and the thickness of the oxide layer have been determined by XPS sputter profiles. The oxide film can be described within the framework of a double layer consisting of a thin outer hydrated layer and an inner layer of Cr 2 O 3 . (orig.)

  18. Corrosion resistance of chromium-nickel steel containing rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asatiani, G.N.; Mandzhgaladze, S.N.; Tavadze, L.F.; Chuvatina, S.N.; Saginadze, D.I.

    1983-01-01

    Effect of additional out-of-furnace treatment with complex alloy (foundry alloy) calcite-silicon-magnesium-rare earth metal on corrosion resistance of the 03Kh18N20M3D3C3B steel has been studied. It is shown that introduction of low additions of rare earths improves its corrosion resistance improves its corrosion resistance in agressive media (in 70% - sulfuric acid) in the range of transition from active to passive state. Effect of additional introduction of rare earth metals is not considerable, if potential of steel corrosion is in the range of stable passive state (32% - sulfuric acid). Additional out-of-furnace treatment with complex foundry alloy, containing rare earth metals, provides a possibility to use a steel with a lower content of Cr, Ni, Mo, than in conventional acid-resistant steels in highly agressive media

  19. Chromium steel corrosion rates and mechanisms in aqueous nickel chloride at 300C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, J.E.; Broomfield, J.P.; Mitra, P.K.

    1985-01-01

    Rapid corrosion of PWR steam generator carbon steel support structures and consequential denting of steam generator tubes led to investigation of alternative support designs and materials. In recent designs of steam generators the carbon steel drilled hole tube support plate has been replaced by one of quatrefoil or trefoil shape to minimize the contact area. These plates are now made of more corrosion resistant chromium steel (approx. 12%Cr) to ensure that they are less vulnerable to attack in the event of adverse boiler water chemistry. This study was initiated to examine the corrosion behavior of a range of chromium steels in the acid chloride environments characteristic of tube/support plate crevices under adverse boiler water conditions. Objectives of the study were to: 1) determine the relative susceptibility of candidate tube support plate steels to acid chloride corrosion; 2) investigate the corrosion product morphology and its relationship to the corrosion mechanism; 3) determine the effect of environment aggressiveness on 12%Cr (A405) steel corrosion rates and mechanisms; and 4) investigate the effect of restraint stress/environment on denting potential of A405. Experimental method and results are discussed

  20. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  1. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, S.P; Charadia, R; Vaca, L.S; Cimetta, J

    2008-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  2. Optimum tungsten content in high strength 9 to 12% chromium containing creep resistant steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Y.; Muraki, T.; Mimura, H.

    2000-01-01

    Tungsten containing ferritic creep resistant steels are the candidate materials for ultra-super-critical fossil power plant because of their high creep rupture strength. But the strengthening mechanisms by tungsten addition have not yet been completely studied. In this report, creep rupture time and creep strain rate measurement decided the optimum tungsten content in 9 to 12% chromium ferritic steels. The precipitation behavior of Laves phase and the precise discussion of creep strain rate analyses explain the contribution of Laves phase at the lath boundary and the contribution of tungsten in solid solution. P92 contains the optimum amount of tungsten and chromium, 1.8 mass% and 9 mass% respectively judging from the creep rupture strength point of view. (orig.)

  3. Traditional Technology of Chromium-Tungsten Steels Facing, its Disadvantages and Suggestions for their Eliminations

    OpenAIRE

    Valuev, Denis Viktorovich; Malushin, N. N.; Valueva, Anna Vladimirovna; Dariev, R. S.; Mamadaliev, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the disadvantages of the traditional technology of facing with chromium-tungsten steels analysis of the given technology was completed. The analysis showed that the main disadvantages of the technology are high-temperature heating and underutilization of high-alloyed metal properties. To eliminate the disadvantages we developed the methods of facing allowing obtaining faced metal which state is close to that of the hardened one without cracks.

  4. Positron and nanoindentation study of helium implanted high chromium ODS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veternikova, Jana Simeg; Fides, Martin; Degmova, Jarmila; Sojak, Stanislav; Petriska, Martin; Slugen, Vladimir

    2017-12-01

    Three oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels with different chromium content (MA 956, MA 957 and ODM 751) were studied as candidate materials for new nuclear reactors in term of their radiation stability. The radiation damage was experimentally simulated by helium ion implantation with energy of ions up to 500 keV. The study was focused on surface and sub-surface structural change due to the ion implantation observed by mostly non-destructive techniques: positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and nanoindentation. The applied techniques demonstrated the best radiation stability of the steel ODM 751. Blistering effect occurred due to high implantation dose (mostly in MA 956) was studied in details.

  5. Determination of the chromium concentration of phase decomposition products in an aged duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwano, Hisashi; Imamasu, Hisanao

    2006-01-01

    A commercial duplex stainless steel has been aged at 673 K for up to 55,000 h. The aging results in the phase decomposition of the ferrite in duplex stainless steel. The end products of the phase decomposition are a Fe-rich and a Cr-rich phase. The chromium concentration of these phases is determined by measuring the hyperfine magnetic field and the isomer shift using Moessbauer effect. The experimental results are compared with a phase diagram calculated for Fe-Cr-Ni ternary system at 673 K.

  6. Corrosion behavior of ODS steels with several chromium contents in hot nitric acid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanno, Takashi; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji

    2017-10-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel cladding tubes have been developed for fast reactors. Tempered martensitic ODS steels with 9 and 11 wt% of chromium (9Cr-, 11Cr-ODS steel) are the candidate material in research being carried out at JAEA. In this work, fundamental immersion tests and electrochemical tests of 9 to 12Cr-ODS steels were systematically conducted in various nitric acid solutions at 95 °C. The corrosion rate decreased exponentially with effective solute chromium concentration (Creff) and nitric acid concentration. Addition of vanadium (V) and ruthenium (Ru) also decreased the corrosion rate. The combination of low Creff and dilute nitric acid could not avoid the active mass dissolution during active domain at the beginning of immersion, and the corrosion rate was high. Higher Creff decreased the partial anodic current during the active domain and assisted the passivation of the surface of the steel. Concentrated nitric acid and addition of Ru and V increased partial cathodic current and shifted the corrosion potential to noble side. These effects should have prevented the active mass dissolution and decreased the corrosion rate.

  7. Mechanosynthesis of A Ferritic ODS (Oxide Dispersion Strengthened) Steel Containing 14% Chromium and Its Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivai, A. K.; Dimyati, A.; Adi, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    One of the advanced materials for application at high temperatures which is aggressively developed in the world is ODS (Oxide Dispersion strengthened) steel. ODS ferritic steels are one of the candidate materials for future nuclear reactors in the world (Generation IV reactors) because it is able to be used in the reactor above 600 °C. ODS ferritic steels have also been developed for the interconnect material of SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) which will be exposed to about 800 °C of temperature. The steel is strengthened by dispersing homogeneously of oxide particles (ceramic) in nano-meter sized in the matrix of the steel. Synthesis of a ferritic ODS steel by dispersion of nano-particles of yttrium oxide (yttria: Y2O3) as the dispersion particles, and containing high-chromium i.e. 14% has been conducted. Synthesis of the ODS steels was done mechanically (mechanosynthesis) using HEM (High Energy ball Milling) technique for 40 and 100 hours. The resulted samples were characterized using SEM-EDS (Scanning Electron Microscope-Energy Dispersive Spectroscope), and XRD (X-ray diffraction) to analyze the microstructure characteristics. The results showed that the crystal grains of the sample with 100 hours milling time was much smaller than the sample with 40 hours milling time, and some amount of alloy was formed during the milling process even for 40 hours milling time. Furthermore, the structure analysis revealed that some amount of iron atom substituted by a slight amount of chromium atom as a solid solution. The quantitative analysis showed that the phase mostly consisted of FeCr solid-solution with the structure was BCC (body-centered cubic).

  8. Study of cast and thermo-mechanically strengthened chromium-nickel nitrogen-containing steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokoshkina, V.G.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Svyazhin, A.G.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nitrogen on the structure and strength of corrosion-resistant chromium-nickel steels after thermal and thermomechanical treatment is studied. The 06Kh15N7AD and 07Kh15N7DAMB steels alloying by nitrogen was accomplished through the basic composition steels remelting in the molecular nitrogen atmosphere under the pressure of 0.1-2.5 MPa. The 02Kh15N5DAF and 05Kh15N5DAM steels ingots were obtained through melting in a plasma furnace under the nitrogen pressure of 0.4MPA. The high-temperature thermomechanical treatment (HTMT) was performed by rolling with preliminary blanks heating up to 1050 deg C and the rolling end temperature not below 950 deg C. It is shown, that the HTMT of the nitrogen-containing steels makes it possible to obtain strength characteristics by 1.5 times exceeding the properties of traditionally applicable corrosion-resistant steels, whereby sufficiently high plasticity of the nitrogen-containing steel is retained [ru

  9. Characterization and Evaluation of Aged Chromium Nickel Niobium Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Matthew

    20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steel alloys are commonly used in hydrogen reformer manifolds for transporting hot hydrogen by-products at 750-950°C. After long periods of exposure, embrittling secondary carbides and intermetallic phases can precipitate at the grain boundaries which can drastically reduce the ductility, and the repair weldability of the alloy. The intermetallic silicide, G-phase, is commonly observed in 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb stainless steels, and is prone to liquation cracking during welding operations. G-phase is deleterious to the material, where a high degree of G-phase coarsening will render the material unweldable. The present work will investigate various methods in mitigating G-phase precipitation. Variations in casting methods, wall thickness, homogenization treatments, and alloy chemistry will be examined by evaluating their microstructure after periodically aging the samples. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using computational thermodynamic tools will be used to optimize the 20Cr-32Ni-1Nb chemistry following ASTM specifications.

  10. Nickel and chromium ion release from stainless steel bracket on immersion various types of mouthwashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihardjanti, M.; Ismah, N.; Purwanegara, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    The stainless steel bracket is widely used in orthodontics because of its mechanical properties, strength, and good biocompatibility. However, under certain conditions, it can be susceptible to corrosion. Studies have reported that the release of nickel and chromium ions because of corrosion can cause allergic reactions in some individuals and are mutagenic. The condition of the oral environment can lead to corrosion, and one factor that can alter the oral environment is mouthwash. The aim of this study was to measure the nickel and chromium ions released from stainless steel brackets when immersed in mouthwash and aquadest. The objects consisted of four groups of 17 maxillary premolar brackets with .022 slots. Each group was immersed in a different mouthwash and aquadest and incubated at 37 °C for 30 days. After 30 days of immersion, the released ions were measured using the ICP-MS (Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer). For statistical analysis, both the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used. The results showed differences among the four groups in the nickel ions released (p < 0.05) and the chromium ions released (p < 0.5). In conclusion, the ions released as a result of mouthwash immersion have a small value that is below the limit of daily intake recommended by the World Health Organization.

  11. Bonding evolution with sintering temperature in low alloyed steels with chromium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuentes-Pacheco L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, high performance PM steels for automotive applications follow a processing route that comprises die compaction of water-atomized powder, followed by sintering and secondary treatments, and finishing operations. This study examines Cr-alloyed sintered steels with two level of alloying. In chromium-alloyed steels, the surface oxide on the powder is of critical importance for developing the bonding between the particles during sintering. Reduction of this oxide depends mainly on three factors: temperature, dew point of the atmosphere, and carbothermic reduction provided by the added graphite. The transformation of the initial surface oxide evolves sequence as temperature increases during sintering, depending on the oxide composition. Carbothermic reduction is supposed to be the controlling mechanism, even when sintering in hydrogen-containing atmospheres. The effect of carbothermic reduction can be monitored by investigating the behavior of the specimens under tensile testing, and studying the resultant fracture surfaces.

  12. Preplastic strain effect on chromium carbides precipitation of type 316 stainless steel during high-temperature ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, X.; Zhao, W.

    1992-01-01

    Long exposure of Type 316 stainless steel to elevated temperature (400-900 o C) is known to cause high-temperature embrittlement due to chromium carbides and σ-phase precipitating in grain boundaries. Numerous investigations have been published on the mechanical properties and microstructure changes occurring during such exposure. However, no investigations exist on the preplastic deformation effect on chromium carbide precipitation in the grain matrix and grain boundary during high-temperature ageing of Type 316 stainless steel and then its effects on the room-temperature tensile properties. Since the stainless steel sometimes is deformed before use at high temperatures, it is necessary to study the preplastic strain effect of the stainless steel on the microstructure change and mechanical property change during high-temperature exposure. The purpose of the present investigation was to carry out such a study. The conclusions reached are as follows. First, chromium carbides are precipitated in deformation lines (slip lines) and then the amount of chromium carbides precipitation in the grain boundary is relatively reduced in predeformed stainless steel after ageing. Secondly, plastic strain pretreatments of and subsequent ageing treatments of Type 316 stainless steel can improve its tensile ductility. Finally, secondary cracking of aged stainless steel occurs in a normal tensile test. The secondary cracking can be reduced by adding preplastic strain into the material. (Author)

  13. Casting of Hearth Plates from High-chromium Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drotlew A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the development of manufacturing technologies to cast hearth plates operating in chamber furnaces for heat treatment. Castings made from the heat-resistant G-X40CrNiSi27-4 steel were poured in hand-made green sand molds. The following operations were performed: computer simulation to predict the distribution of internal defects in castings produced by the above mentioned technology with risers bare and coated with exothermic and insulating sleeves, analysis of each variant of the technology, and manufacture of experimental castings. As a result of the conducted studies and analysis it was found that the use of risers with exothermic sleeves does not affect to a significant degree the quality of the produced castings of hearth plates, but it significantly improves the metal yield.

  14. Influence of chemical heterogeneity of solid solutions on brittleness in chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madyanov, S.A.; Sedov, V.K.; Apaev, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    The role of chemical heterogeneity of solid solutions in formation of mechanical properties of Kh09, Kh15, Kh20, Kh19N2G5T chromium steels has been investigated. It is established that besides the known regioA of chemical heterogeneity in the vicinity of 475 deg C exists a high-temperature region (1000-1050 deg C), where maximum heteroge=- neity of chromium distribution in solid solution, is observed. Both types of chemical heterogeneity cause essential hardening of alloys, which becomes apparent in abrupt change of capability to microplastic deformation The mechanism of occurrence of the given temper brittleness consists in carbon diffusion into microvolunes enriched in carbide-forming elements

  15. Radiation swelling diagram of chromium-nickel austenitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gol' tsev, V.P.; Bulyga, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The diagram of radiation swelling of the gas-cooled reactor core materials is presented. The swelling diagram is built on the basis of the relationships existing between the damaging dose and maximum swelling and takes an account of the temperature corresponding to maximum swelling. The analysis of the estimated data on swelling show that for the same temperatures especially with damaging dose above 30 displ./at., large scattering of swelling absolute values obtained during utilization of different empirical expressions, is observed. The scattering of material swelling values of the fuel elements irradiated under identical conditions results from a variety of gas content in the material of cans in the process of void formation. The displacement of swelling temperature maximum finds explanation in various rates of damaging dose attainment, the temperature swelling maximum being displaced to the side of large values during the increase of the velocity of atomic displacement upon irradiation (displ./atx sec). The suggested characteristic of steel swelling gives the idea about the behaviour of materisls upon neutron irradiation and can be useful for developing of the core elements of the gas-cooled reactors.

  16. Low temperature grain boundary diffusion of chromium in SUS316 and 316L stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizouchi, Masaki; Yamazaki, Yoshihiro; Iijima, Yoshiaki; Arioka, Koji

    2004-01-01

    Grain boundary diffusivity of chromium is SUS316 and 316L stainless steels has been determined in the temperature range between 518 and 1173 K. The magnitudes of the grain boundary diffusivities in four kinds of specimens are in the order of the cold-worked SUS316, the solution-treated SUS316L, the solution-treated SUS316 and the sensitized SUS316. The grain boundary diffusivities in these specimens are remarkably higher than those of previous works. The activation energies for the former are 85-91 kJmol -1 , whereas those for the latter are 151-234 kJmol -1 . (author)

  17. 76 FR 77013 - Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-860 (Second Review)] Tin- and Chromium-Coated Steel Sheet From Japan; Scheduling of a Full Five-Year Review Concerning the Antidumping Duty... order on tin- and chromium-coated steel sheet from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or...

  18. Influence of chromium and vanadium in the mechanical resistance of steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, L.; Gonzalez, G.; Brizuela, G.; Juan, A.; Simonetti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Steel exposed to high temperatures and stress in a corrosive environment suffers detriment in the mechanical properties and finally embrittlement. The objective of this work is to study the mechanical properties of steels of different chemical compositions under hydrogen attack (HA). The influence of chromium and vanadium in the mechanical resistance was analyzed. The 1.25Cr1Mo0.25V and 2.25Cr1Mo ferritic steels previously hydrogenated are studied at different temperatures and loads. The temperature, electric charge density and electrolyte concentration were modified during the electrochemical charge in order to find the optimum hydrogen income to the material. The metal test conditions were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The material remains in stationary state for a period of time and the residual damage was evaluated. The steels were subject to torsion creep tests while the temperature and the load were maintained constant along the experience. We studied the relationship between the strain rate at the secondary stage and both the stress and temperature. The stress exponent and the activation energy were also determined. A comparison with the same steel samples without hydrogen charge was also performed. The microstructural mechanics during the tests and the embrittlement degree were also discussed

  19. Microstructural characterization of 5-9% chromium reduced-activation steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaram, R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The microstructures of a 9Cr-2W-0.25-0.1C (9Cr-2WV), a 9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa), a 7Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (7Cr-2WVTa), and a 5Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (5Cr-2WVTa) steel (all compositions are in weight percent) have been characterized by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM). The matrix in all four reduced-activation steels was 100% martensite. In the two 9Cr steels, the stable precipitates were blocky M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and small spherical MC. The two lower-chromium steels contained blocky M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and small needle-shaped carbonitrides in addition to M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. AEM and APFIM analysis revealed that in the steels containing tantalum, the majority of the tantalum was in solid solution. The experimental observations were in good agreement with phases and compositions predicted by phase equilibria calculations.

  20. Microstructural characterization of 5-9% chromium reduced-activation steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaram, R.; Klueh, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructures of a 9Cr-2W-0.25-0.1C (9Cr-2WV), a 9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa), a 7Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (7Cr-2WVTa), and a 5Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (5Cr-2WVTa) steel (all compositions are in weight percent) have been characterized by Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM) and Atom Probe Field Ion Microscopy (APFIM). The matrix in all four reduced-activation steels was 100% martensite. In the two 9Cr steels, the stable precipitates were blocky M 23 C 6 and small spherical MC. The two lower-chromium steels contained blocky M 7 C 3 and small needle-shaped carbonitrides in addition to M 23 C 6 . AEM and APFIM analysis revealed that in the steels containing tantalum, the majority of the tantalum was in solid solution. The experimental observations were in good agreement with phases and compositions predicted by phase equilibria calculations

  1. Corrosion studies of a chromium steel in imitated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos-Varsanyi, M.; Meisel, W.

    2002-01-01

    A series of in-door experiments was performed to get some insight into the corrosion behavior of a commercial alloy Fe-12% Cr (3CR12) exposed to imitated seawater. Applying different analytical methods, the main corrosion process was found to be the formation of flakes on the surface which, peel off after they have reached a certain size. Some Cr is dissolved in the solution, its relative concentration with respect to Fe is higher than in the bulk material. The flakes consist mainly of mixed oxihydroxides of the type FeOOH containing some Cr and Mg. The oxidic layer on the interface is very thin, behaves essentially stationary with a slight growth of about 0.05 nm/day. It consists of Cr oxide with some inclusions of Fe and Mg and is not of a chromite type. Immediately below this oxidic layer, the metallic substrate exhibits a thin layer depleted in Cr and behaving like α-Fe (bcc). As compared with stainless steel, potentiostatic current vs. time records at anodic potentials below the pitting potential indicate a very different stability of the surface films for 3CR12. The kinetics of the passive layer formation on 3CR12 was found to follow a parabolic law initially and to change later (after 10...100 seconds in deaerated solution and even earlier in aerated solution) to a linear law. After some time, pitting corrosion and/or cracks due to internal stresses play the dominant role. Cr does not form a protective oxidic layer. The surface morphology of samples exposed at -200 mV for 20 and 80 minutes has been studied by scanning electron microscopy and scanning Auger microprobe. The results reflect the competing formation of oxidic layers and pitting, the participation of Cr in the dissolution process. It is also suggested that Mg, which is a component of the solution was incorporated into the rust and some Mg was also found on the metallic surface. (author)

  2. The Kinetics of Phase Transformations During Tempering in Laser Melted High Chromium Cast Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M. Y.; Wang, Y.; Han, B.

    2012-06-01

    The precipitation of secondary carbides in the laser melted high chromium cast steels during tempering at 300-650 °C for 2 h in air furnace was characterized and the present phases was identified, by using transmission electron microscopy. Laser melted high chromium cast steel consists of austenitic dendrites and interdendritic M23C6 carbides. The austenite has such a strong tempering stability that it remains unchanged at temperature below 400 °C and the secondary hardening phenomenon starts from 450 °C to the maximum value of 672 HV at 560 °C. After tempering at 450 °C fine M23C6 carbides precipitate from the supersaturated austenite preferentially. In addition, the dislocation lines and slip bands still exist inside the austenite. While tempering at temperature below 560 °C, the secondary hardening simultaneously results from the martensite phase transformation and the precipitation of carbides as well as dislocation strengthening within a refined microstructure. Moreover, the formation of the ferrite matrix and large quality of coarse lamellar M3C carbides when the samples were tempered at 650 °C contributes to the decrease of hardness.

  3. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  4. Effect of nitrate on corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in boiling nitric acid solution containing chromium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Kim, Seong-Yun; Ebina, Tetsunari; Ito, Tatsuya; Nagano, Nobumichi; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ishii, Keizo; Tokuda, Haruaki

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of chromium and the corrosion behavior of austenitic stainless steel in boiling nitric acid solution containing highly concentrated nitrates were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopic measurements, Raman spectral measurements, immersion tests, and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The oxidation rate measurement of chromium from Cr(III) to Cr(VI) was performed by 1 M boiling nitric acid solution containing each highly concentrated nitrates: Al(NO_3)_3, Nd(NO_3)_3, Ca(NO_3)_2, Mg(NO_3)_2, and NaNO_3 as a simulant of uranium nitrate in uranium concentrator in reprocessing plants. As a result, the rate of chromium oxidation was different depending on the added nitrates even at the same nitric acid concentration. In addition, the oxidation rate of chromium was increased with increasing the calculated partial pressure of nitric acid in consideration of the hydration of cation of nitrates. Furthermore, the corrosion rate of type 310 stainless steel was accelerated by the solution having a high chromium oxidation rate containing nitrates. These results indicated that the acceleration of the corrosion rate in the solutions depending on the oxidation rate of chromium, and the rate is affected by the salt-effect of nitrates. (author)

  5. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of the effect of chromium additions to the steel and solution on CO2 corrosion of pipeline steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, M.; Ingham, B.; Laycock, N.; Williams, D.E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We studied the effect of chromium on CO 2 corrosion processes. •Chromium addition accelerates the onset of siderite and chukanovite precipitation. •One of the key effects is to decrease the critical supersaturation for siderite nucleation. -- Abstract: We demonstrate the important effects of chromium in the steel composition and of Cr 3+ ions in solution on the nucleation and growth of corrosion layers in a CO 2 environment. We propose that high-valent metal cations in solution (within the boundary layer) catalyse the nucleation of siderite, which otherwise has a high critical supersaturation for precipitation. One of the key effects of small alloy additions to the steel is to put into the local solution species that decrease the critical supersaturation for siderite and modify the growth rate of the scale, thereby promoting the formation of an adherent and protective scale

  6. Performance capabilities of EDM of high carbon high chromium steel with copper and brass electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surekha, B.; Swain, Sudiptha; Suleman, Abu Jafar; Choudhury, Suvan Dev

    2017-07-01

    The paper address the statistical modeling of input-output relationships of electric discharge machining. In the present work, peak current (I) pulse on time (T) and gap voltage of electric discharge machining (EDM) process are chosen as control parameters to analyze the performance of the process. The output characteristics, namely radial overcut, electrode wear rate (EWR) and metal removal rate (MRR) are treated as the responses. A full factorial design (FFD) of experiments has been used to conduct the experiments and linear regression models are developed for different process characteristics. While conducting the experiments, high carbon and high chromium steel is considered as work piece material and brass and copper are used as electrode material. It is important to note that the experimental conditions are kept similar while machining with the help of different electrode materials. The data obtained from the experiments has been used to develop the regression models for three process parameters for two electrode materials.

  7. A study on Z-phase nucleation in martensitic chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golpayegani, Ardeshir; Andren, Hans-Olof; Danielsen, Hilmar; Hald, John

    2008-01-01

    9-12% chromium martensitic steels are liable to the precipitation of Z-phase, Cr(V,Nb)N, after long time exposure at 550-650 deg. C. This complex nitride consumes vanadium nitrides and causes the creep strength of the material to fall drastically after several thousand hours of exposure. In this work, initial stages of precipitation of Z-phase have been studied and characterized using energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). Vanadium nitrides were found to provide the most suitable nucleation site for Z-phase, since the misfit between the (0 0 1) planes of VN and Z-phase is very small. Furthermore, such a nucleation site would provide vanadium and nitrogen for the growth of Z-phase. The presence of niobium carbide has also been observed close to Z-phase nucleation sites, indicating niobium to be important for the nucleation and growth of Z-phase

  8. INVESTIGATION OF TRIVALENT CHROMIUM-BASED CONVERSION COATINGS ON ELECTROGALVANISED STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Tomachuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The passivation process of electrogavanised steel is very important, especially for improving of the corrosion protection and the thickness of the layer obtained can further enhance such protection. In the market exists Cr(III‑based thick layers passivation, however, are operated around 60°C. In order to attend market demands a new process with only 20% of the chromium content is developed, which operates at room temperature. The corrosion behavior was investigated through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique in chloride solution and accelerated tests in salt spray chamber. The combination of these tests provides a more complete assessment of the behavior against corrosion of layer passivation obtained. The results with respect to appearance, brightness, uniformity, layer thickness and corrosion resistance are similar to those presented by Cr(III based passivation existing market and Cr(VI based conversion treatment.

  9. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F. [Ciemat, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigree. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs.

  10. Corrosion of High Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steels in High Temperature Water. a Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Blazquez, F.

    2000-01-01

    Available literature concerning corrosion of high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steels in high temperature water has been reviewed. The subjects considered are general corrosion, effect of irradiation on corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). In addition some investigations about radiation induced segregation (RIS) are shown in order to know the compositional changes at grain boundaries of these alloys and their influence on corrosion properties. The data on general corrosion indicate moderate corrosion rates in high temperature water up to 350 degree centigrade. Considerably larger corrosion rates were observed under neutron irradiation. The works concerning to the behaviour of these alloys to stress corrosion cracking seem to conclude that in these materials is necessary to optimize the temper temperature and to carry out the post-weld heat treatments properly in order to avoid stress corrosion cracking. (Author) 40 refs

  11. Investigation of Creep Processes and Microdamages in 10Kh9V2MFBR-Sh High-Chromium Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grin', E. A.; Pchelintsev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    During the modernization and the new construction of power units at TPPs in Russia, high-chromium martensitic steels with higher heat-resistant properties than the traditional perlite steels are increasingly used as structural materials. High-chromium steels have a necessary regulatory support for their use in domestic power engineering. However, up to the present time, the issue of assessing the quality of these steels at the analysis of their state during long-term operation remains open. The article proposed is one of the first attempts to create a system of quality criteria for martensitic steels based on their microdamage parameters. Tests were carried out on the long-term strength and creep of samples from 10Kh9V2MFBR-Sh steel at high temperatures with the construction of creep curves in relative coordinates "deformation related to the deformation of fracture, current time related to time to failure." For some samples, the tests were interrupted and the metal was subjected to metallographic studies consisting of the analysis of microdamage with reference to the accumulated creep strain. It has been shown experimentally that the deformation curve of high-chromium steel differs from the analogous curve of pearlitic steel by a longer and flat section of steady creep and by a sharper transition to the third accelerated creep stage, which has a very short time period (approximately 10% of the total durability). The tendency to the increase in the microdamage of the structure of steel as the accumulated creep strain increases with time was confirmed. The beginning of transition to the final creep phase is characterized by the formation of contours of future pore chains and by the appearance of individual large pores of up to 6 μm in size, the presence of which in the microstructure of the martensitic steel indicates a very significant accumulation of creep strain, and corresponds to the predestruction stage of metal. It is necessary to continue the research to

  12. Corrosion behavior of Al-Fe-sputtering-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics in high temperature Pb-Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Khalid, Rivai; Minoru, Takahashi

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion tests of Al-Fe-coated steel, high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics were carried out in high temperature Pb-Bi at 700 C degrees. Oxygen concentrations in this experiment were 6.8*10 -7 wt.% for Al-Fe-coated steels and 5*10 -6 wt.% for high chromium steels, refractory metals and ceramics. All specimens were immersed in molten Pb-Bi in a corrosion test pot for 1.000 hours. Coating was done with using the unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) technique to protect the steel from corrosion. Sputtering targets were Al and SUS-304. Al-Fe alloy was coated on STBA26 samples. The Al-Fe alloy-coated layer could be a good protection layer on the surface of steel. The whole of the Al-Fe-coated layer still remained on the base surface of specimen. No penetration of Pb-Bi into this layer and the matrix of the specimen. For high chromium steels i.e. SUS430 and Recloy10, the oxide layer formed in the early time could not prevent the penetration of Pb-Bi into the base of the steels. Refractory metals of tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. Penetration of Pb-Bi into the matrix of niobium (Nb) was observed. Ceramic materials were SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 . The ceramic materials of SiC and Ti 3 SiC 2 had high corrosion resistance with no penetration of Pb-Bi into their matrix. (authors)

  13. Effect of triple ion beam irradiation on mechanical properties of high chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioka, Ikuo; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Nanjyo, Yoshiyasu; Kiuchi, Kiyoshi; Anegawa, Takefumi

    2003-01-01

    A high-chromium austenitic stainless steel has been developed for an advanced fuel cladding tube considering waterside corrosion and irradiation embrittlement. The candidate material was irradiated in triple ion (Ni, He, H) beam modes at 573 K up to 50 dpa to simulate irradiation damage by neutron and transmutation product. The change in hardness of the very shallow surface layer of the irradiated specimen was estimated from the slope of load/depth-depth curve which is in direct proportion to the apparent hardness of the specimen. Besides, the Swift's power low constitutive equation (σ=A(ε 0 + ε) n , A: strength coefficient, ε 0 : equivalent strain by cold rolling, n: strain hardening exponent) of the damaged parts was derived from the indentation test combined with an inverse analysis using a finite element method (FEM). For comparison, Type304 stainless steel was investigated as well. Though both Type304SS and candidate material were also hardened by ion irradiation, the increase in apparent hardness of the candidate material was smaller than that of Type304SS. The yield stress and uniform elongation were estimated from the calculated constitutive equation by FEM inverse analysis. The irradiation hardening of the candidate material by irradiation can be expected to be lower than that of Type304SS. (author)

  14. Precipitation of Chromium Nitrides in the Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Niklas; Pettersson, Rachel F. A.; Wessman, Sten

    2015-03-01

    Precipitation of chromium nitrides during cooling from temperatures in the range 1373 K to 1523 K (1100 °C to 1250 °C) has been studied for the super duplex stainless steel 2507 (UNS S32750). Characterization with optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy was combined to quantify the precipitation process. Primarily Cr2N nitrides were found to precipitate with a high density in the interior of ferrite grains. An increased cooling rate and/or an increased austenite spacing clearly promoted nitride formation, resulting in precipitation within a higher fraction of the ferrite grains, and lager nitride particles. Furthermore, formation of the meta-stable CrN was induced by higher cooling rates. The toughness seemed unaffected by nitrides. A slight decrease in pitting resistance was, however, noticed for quenched samples with large amounts of precipitates. The limited adverse effect on pitting resistance is attributed to the small size (~200 nm) of most nitrides. Slower cooling of duplex stainless steels to allow nitrogen partitioning is suggested in order to avoid large nitrides, and thereby produce a size distribution with a smaller detrimental effect on pitting resistance.

  15. Effect of process parameters on surface oxides on chromium-alloyed steel powder during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chasoglou, D.; Hryha, E.; Nyborg, L.

    2013-01-01

    The use of chromium in the PM steel industry today puts high demands on the choice and control of the atmosphere during the sintering process due to its high affinity to oxygen. Particular attention is required in order to control the surface chemistry of the powder which in turn is the key factor for the successful sintering and production of PM parts. Different atmosphere compositions, heating rates and green densities were employed while performing sintering trials on water atomized steel powder pre-alloyed with 3 wt.% Cr in order to evaluate the effect on surface chemical reactions. Fracture surfaces of sintered samples were examined using high resolution scanning electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. The investigation was complemented with thermogravimetric (TG) studies. Reaction products in particulate form containing strong-oxide forming elements such as Cr, Si and Mn were formed during sintering for all conditions. Processing in vacuum results in intensive inter-particle neck development during the heating stage and consequently in the excessive enclosure of surface oxide which is reflected in less good final mechanical properties. Enhanced oxide reduction was observed in samples processed in hydrogen-containing atmospheres independent of the actual content in the range of 3–10 vol.%. An optimum heating rate was required for balancing reduction/oxidation processes. A simple model for the enclosure and growth of oxide inclusions during the sinter-neck development is proposed. The obtained results show that significant reduction of the oxygen content can be achieved by adjusting the atmosphere purity/composition. - Highlights: ► A local atmosphere microclimate is very important for sintering of PM steels. ► High risk of surface oxide enclosure between 800 and 1000 °C. ► Coalescence and agglomeration of enclosed oxides take place during sintering. ► The effect of different process parameters on the oxide reduction is examined. ► A

  16. Effect of mechanical pre-loadings on corrosion resistance of chromium-electroplated steel rods in marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubina Helbert, Varvara; Dhondt, Matthieu; Homette, Remi; Arbab Chirani, Shabnam; Calloch, Sylvain

    2018-03-01

    Providing high hardness, low friction coefficient, as well as, relatively good corrosion resistance, chromium-plated coatings (∼20 μm) are widely used for steel cylinder rods in marine environment. However, the standardized corrosion test method (ISO 9227, NSS) used to evaluate efficiency of this type of coatings does not take into account in-service mechanical loadings on cylinder rods. Nevertheless, the uniform initial network of microcracks in chromium coating is changing under mechanical loadings. Propagation of these microcracks explains premature corrosion of the steel substrate. The aim of the study was to evaluate relationship between mechanical loadings, propagation of microcracks network and corrosion resistance of chromium coatings. After monotonic pre-loading tests, it was demonstrated by microscopic observations that the microcracks propagation started at stress levels higher than the substrate yield stress (520 MPa). The microcracks become effective, i.e. they have instantly undergone through the whole coating thickness to reach the steel substrate. The density of effective microcracks increases with the total macroscopic level, i.e. the intercrack distance goes from 60 ± 5 μm at 1% of total strain to approximately 27 ± 2 μm at 10%. Electrochemical measurements have shown that the higher the plastic strain level applied during mechanical loading, the more the corrosion potential of the sample decreased until reaching the steel substrate value of approximately ‑0.65 V/SCE after 2 h of immersion. The polarization curves have also highligthed an increase in the corrosion current density with the strain level. Therefore, electrochemical measurements could be used to realize quick and comprehensive assesment of the effect of monotonic pre-loadings on corrosion properties of the chromium coating.

  17. Effect of coatings obtanied by sputtering of chromium catode on the corrosion resistance of AISI H13 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandoval, A; Peña, D; Piratoba, U

    2013-01-01

    Corrosion resistance of coatings obtained by sputtering a chromium target were evaluated. The films were deposited on substrates of disk-shaped AISI H13 steel. By means of potentiodynamic polarization curves were able to determine the current density vs. potential for the coated and uncoated substrate and the difference in the corrosion potential Ecorr. All samples with coating showed an increase in Ecorr respect to substrate. The electrochemical tests were conducted in an electrolytic solution of 3% NaCl

  18. Effect of silicon on the structure, tribological behaviour, and mechanical properties of nitrogen-containing chromium-manganese austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korshunov, L.G.; Chernenko, N.L.; Gojkhenberg, Yu.N.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of silicon in quantity of 3.5-4.5 mass. % on tribological behaviour is studied for nitrogen-bearing (0.20-0.52 mass. % of nitrogen) chromium-manganese austenitic steels (10Kh15G23S4A0.20, 10Kh16G17N3S4A0.30, 10Kh19G20NS4A0.50, 12Kh19G19NS2A0.50, 10Kh18G19A0.50, 08Kh16G8N10S4A0.18). Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the steels are determined. Using metallographic, x-ray diffraction and electron microscopical methods a study is made into structural transformations running in the steels considered under friction and static tension. It is shown that additional silicon alloying of nitrogen-bearing chromium-manganese austenitic steels results in an essential increase of adhesion wear resistance of the materials on retention of low friction coefficient (f=0.25-0.33). A strong silicon effect on steel tribological behaviour is related with planar slip activation and with an increase of austenite strength and heat resistance [ru

  19. Pelepasan ion nikel dan kromium kawat Australia dan stainless steel dalam saliva buatan (The release of nickel and chromium ions from Australian wire and stainless steel in artificial saliva)

    OpenAIRE

    Nolista Indah Rasyid; Pinandi Sri Pudyani; JCP Heryumani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fixed orthodontic treatment needs several types of wire to produce biomechanical force to move teeth. The use orthodontic wire within the mouth interacts with saliva, causing the release of nickel and chromium ions. Purpose: The study was aimed to examine the effect of immersion time in artificial saliva between special type of Australian wire and stainless steel on the release of nickel and chromium ions. Methods: Thirty special type Australian wires and 30 stainless steel wires ...

  20. Residual effects of chromium gettering on the outgassing behavior of a stainless steel vacuum vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, J.E.; Blanchard, W.R.; Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1986-05-01

    Laboratory experiments that compared chromium and titanium gettering showed that with chromium, unlike titanium, there is no appreciable diffusion of hydrogen isotopes into the film. It was concluded from these experiments that chromium gettering on tokamaks is more desirable than titanium gettering, since chromium should provide higher hydrogen recycling, minimize tritium inventories, and avoid hydrogen embrittlement. Large-scale sublimation sources, consisting of hollow elongated chromium spheres with internal resistance heaters, were developed for use on tokamaks. These sources have been used to getter both the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). In both bases, significant effects on plasma performance were observed, including lower Z/sub eff/ and radiated power losses and an increase in the density limit. In TFTR these effects were observed for a period of weeks after a single chromium deposition. This paper reports the results of laboratory experiments made to examine the gettering characteristics of chromium films under conditions simulating those in TFTR

  1. Effect of temperature and aluminium additions on the mechanical properties of the 13% chromium ferrite stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, S.

    1975-01-01

    The potential interest of the ferritic stainless steels as component materials for nuclear power reactors led to investigate how aluminium influences the mechanical properties of 13% chromium ferritic stainless steels between room temperature and about 700 0 C. Nominal 13% chromium and 0.04 to 0.08% carbon ferritic stainless steels containing 0, 0.13, 2.19 and 4.15% aluminium, respectively, were obtained by vacuum remelting of a commercial martensitic-ferritic stainless steel and suitable additions of aluminium. After successive rolling operations and recrystallizations performed in order to obtain final 0.5 mm thick sheets with similar average grain sizes the specimens of the above mentioned steels were tested in a tensile test Instron machine, with a constant strain rate (approximately equal to 1.6 x 10 -3 min -1 ), at room temperature, 140, 265, 415, 565 and 715 0 C. The results obtained show that strengthening by aluminium is strongly temperature dependent. At 265 0 C all the steels presentes serrated plastic deformation (Portevin-Le Chatelier effect), which is attributed to interactions of the interstitial and substitutional solute atoms with dislocations in the body centered cubic structure. Flow stress drops were still observed at 465 0 C, although the tests performed at 565 and 715 0 C showed work-softening of the materials and total absence of serrations. Stress relaxation tests at room temperature yielded values of the apparent activation volumes, which are scattered between about 100 and 130 b 3 (b-Burgers vector), being almost constant with stress, strain and aluminium content. Therefore, although aluminium appreciably strengthens the 13% chromium steel, the behaviour summarized suggests that the mechanism controlling plastic deformation at room temperature is the same for all the tested steels, the values of the apparent activitation volumes being probably determined by the interstitial content. Stress relaxation tests at 20, 75, 140 and 265 0 C for

  2. Filter effectiveness in the manufacture of high-chromium steel castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Garbiak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies on the application of ceramic filters in the manufacture of cast hearth plates at the WestPomeranian University of Technology in Szczecin. Castings were poured from the heat-resistant G-X40CrNiSi27-4 cast steel in greensand moulds. The development of casting manufacturing technology included the following studies: analysis of the causes of nonmetallicinclusions in high-chromium alloys, computer simulation of mould filling with liquid metal using standard gating systems without filters and new systems with the built-in filter, making pilot castings, quantitative determination of the content of non-metallicinclusions, determination of the oxygen and nitrogen content, and evaluation of the extent of occurrence of the raw casting s urfacedefects. As a result of the conducted studies and analyses, the quality of produced castings was improved, mainly through the reducedcontent of non-metallic inclusions and better raw casting surface quality.

  3. Absorption of Nickel, Chromium, and Iron by the Root Surface of Primary Molars Covered with Stainless Steel Crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Keinan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to analyze the absorption of metal ions released from stainless steel crowns by root surface of primary molars. Study Design. Laboratory research: The study included 34 primary molars, exfoliated or extracted during routine dental treatment. 17 molars were covered with stainless-steel crowns for more than two years and compared to 17 intact primary molars. Chemical content of the mesial or distal root surface, 1 mm apically to the crown or the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ, was analyzed. An energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS was used for chemical analysis. Results. Higher amounts of nickel, chromium, and iron (5-6 times were found in the cementum of molars covered with stainless-steel crowns compared to intact molars. The differences between groups were highly significant (<.001. Significance. Stainless-steel crowns release nickel, chromium, and iron in oral environment, and the ions are absorbed by the primary molars roots. The additional burden of allergenic metals should be reduced if possible.

  4. Effect of Low Nickel Dopant on Torque Transducer Response Function in High-Chromium Content ESR Stainless Tool Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewel, Joseph L.; Hecox, Bryan G.; Orris, Jason T.; Boley, Mark S.

    2007-03-01

    The change in magnetoelastic torque transducer response was investigated as a low nickel content (up to 0.2%) is alloyed into an ESR (Electro-Slag-Refining) stainless tool steel with a chromium content of around 13%, which our previous studies have proven to be the ideal level of chromium content for optimal transducer performance. Two separate hollow steel 3/4-inch diameter shafts were prepared from ESR 416 and ESR 420 steel, respectively, the first having no nickel content and the second having 0.2% nickel content. The heat treatment of these steels consisted of a hardening process conducted in a helium atmosphere at 1038^oC, followed by an annealing at 871^oC for 5h and a 15^oC cool down rate. Prior and subsequent to the heat treatment processes, the circumferential and axial magnetic hysteresis properties of the samples were measured and their external field signals were mapped over the magnetically polarized regions both with and without applied shear stress up to 2500 psi on the samples. It was found that the effect of the low nickel dopant was to improve torque transducer sensitivity and linearity, but heat treatment worsened the performance of both samples.

  5. Monitoring of occupational exposure in manufacturing of stainless steel constructions. Part I: Chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium in the workplace air of stainless steel welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, J; Bencko, V; Pápayová, A; Saligová, D; Tejral, J; Borská, L

    2001-11-01

    Exposure to workplace airborne pollutants was examined in a group of 20 workers dealing mainly with welding, polishing, drilling and assembling of stainless steel constructions. Airborne particulate matter (APM) collected using both personal and stationary samplers was analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Quality assurance procedures of both sampling and analytical stages are described. Of the elements determined, results are presented for chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium. The median values of element concentrations exceeded the maximum admissible limits for workplace pollutants only for chromium, while for nickel the limit was exceeded in several individual cases. Sampling of hair, nails, blood, urine and saliva to be used for biological monitoring of the exposed and control groups is also described.

  6. Analysis of the passive layer developed on stainless steels implanted with chromium; Analisis de las peliculas pasivas generadas en aceros inoxidables implantados con cromo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, C. M.; Cristobal, M. J.; Novoa, X. R.; Pena, G.; Perez, M. C.

    2004-07-01

    This work studies the effect of chromium implantation on the development of passive layers generated electrochemically in alkaline medium over two stainless steels. The XPS analyses show that the layers generated on the implanted steels present less thickness together with similar composition compared to the unimplanted steels layers. However, SEM micrographs show that the layers grown on implanted steels present more defects and less adherence that the films on unimplanted steels. These changes together with the results obtained by Cyclic Voltammetry suggest an oxide structure modification, lattice structure or crystallinity state. (Author) 6 refs.

  7. Experimental studies on improving the performance of electrochemical machining of high carbon, high chromium die steel using jet patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Sathiyamoorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical machining (ECM is a non-traditional process used mainly to cut hard or difficult-to-cut metals, where the application of a more traditional process is not convenient. Stiff market competition and ever-growing demand for better, durable and reliable products has brought about a material revolution, which has greatly expanded the families of difficult-to-machine materials namely highcarbon,high-chromium die steel; stainless steel and superalloys. This investigation attempts to analyze the effect of electrolyte distribution on material removal rate (MRR and surface roughness (SR on electrochemical machining of high-carbon, high-chromium die steel using NaCl aqueous solution. Three electrolyte jet patterns namely straight jet in circular, inclined jet in circular and straight jet in spiral were used for this experimentation. The results reveal that electrolyte distribution significantly improves the performance of ECM and the straight jet in spiral pattern performs satisfactorily in obtaining better MRR and surface roughness.

  8. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianbo; Sun, Chong; Lin, Xueqiang; Cheng, Xiangkun; Liu, Huifeng

    2016-01-01

    The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH)3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels. PMID:28773328

  9. Effect of Chromium on Corrosion Behavior of P110 Steels in CO2-H2S Environment with High Pressure and High Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The novel Cr-containing low alloy steels have exhibited good corrosion resistance in CO2 environment, mainly owing to the formation of Cr-enriched corrosion film. In order to evaluate whether it is applicable to the CO2 and H2S coexistence conditions, the corrosion behavior of low-chromium steels in CO2-H2S environment with high pressure and high temperature was investigated using weight loss measurement and surface characterization. The results showed that P110 steel suffered localized corrosion and both 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels exhibited general corrosion. However, the corrosion rate of 5Cr-P110 was the highest among them. The corrosion process of the steels was simultaneously governed by CO2 and H2S. The outer scales on the three steels mainly consisted of FeS1−x crystals, whereas the inner scales on Cr-containing steels comprised of amorphous FeS1−x, Cr(OH3 and FeCO3, in contrast with the amorphous FeS1−x and FeCO3 mixture film of P110 steel. The more chromium the steel contains, the more chromium compounds the corrosion products contain. The addition of chromium in steels increases the uniformity of the Cr-enriched corrosion scales, eliminates the localized corrosion, but cannot decrease the general corrosion rates. The formation of FeS1−x may interfere with Cr-enriched corrosion scales and lowering the corrosion performance of 3Cr-P110 and 5Cr-P110 steels.

  10. Formation of M23C6-type precipitates and chromium-depleted zones in austenite stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Kenji; Fukunaga, Tatsuya; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Nakada, Nobuo; Kikuchi, Masao; Saghi, Zineb; Barnard, Jon S.; Midgley, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Precipitate formation during the in situ annealing experiment at 650 o C. -- Formation of M 23 C 6 carbides and chromium-depleted zones in commercially available type 304L stainless steel were investigated by in situ transmission electron microscopy and analytical transmission electron microscopy. It was found that each individual small M 23 C 6 carbide starts to grow with a clear orientation relationship with the matrix, and film-like carbide was subsequently observed at the interfaces with asymmetric Cr-depleted zones. From these experimental results, a model describing the precipitation of M 23 C 6 and the formation of the Cr-depleted zone was proposed.

  11. Optimized chemical composition, working and heat treatment condition for resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of cold worked 316 and high-chromium austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, Toshio; Iwamura, Toshihiko; Fujimoto, Koji; Ajiki, Kazuhide

    2000-01-01

    The authors have reported that the primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in baffle former bolts made of austenitic stainless steels for PWR after long-term operation is caused by irradiation-induced grain boundary segregation. The resistance to PWSCC of simulated austenitic stainless steels whose chemical compositions are simulated to the grain boundary chemical composition of 316 stainless steel after irradiation increased with decrease of the silicon content, increases of the chromium content, and precipitation of M 23 C 6 carbides at the grain boundaries. In order to develop resistance to irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in austenitic stainless steels, optimized chemical compositions and heat treatment conditions for 316CW and high-chromium austenitic stainless steels for PWR baffle former bolts were investigated. For 316CW stainless steel, ultra-low-impurities and high-chromium content are beneficial. About 20% cold working before aging and after solution treatment has also been recommended to recover sensitization and make M 23 C 6 carbides coherent with the matrix at the grain boundaries. Heating at 700 to 725degC for 20 to 50 h was selected as a suitable aging procedure. Cold working of 5 to 10% after aging produced the required mechanical properties. The optimized composition of the high-chromium austenitic stainless steel contents 30% chromium, 30% nickel, and ultra-low impurity levels. This composition also reduces the difference between its thermal expansion coefficient and that of 304 stainless steel for baffle plates. Aging at 700 to 725degC for longer than 40 h and cold working of 10 to 15% after aging were selected to meet mechanical property specifications. (author)

  12. AES and SIMS analysis of non-metallic inclusions in a low-carbon chromium-steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammer, Katharina; Rosner, M; Poeckl, G; Hutter, H

    2003-05-01

    In the final step of secondary metallurgical steel processing, calcium is added. Besides Mg, Ca is the most powerful deoxidiser and desulfurisation agent. It reacts with dissolved oxygen and sulfur and reduces oxides and sulfides thereby forming non-metallic inclusions. Within this paper we present the analysis of such inclusions in a low-carbon chromium-steel. Depending on the time of quenching of the steel sample, different structures were revealed by REM, Auger and SIMS: If the steel was quenched immediately after Ca-addition, non-metallic inclusions that appeared to have "cavities" could be detected with SEM. SIMS investigations of these particles showed ring-shaped structures and revealed that the ring is made up of Al, Ca, Mg, O and S. No secondary ions however could be retrieved from the core inside the ring, thus leaving the nature of the "cavities" unclear. If the steel sample was quenched 3 min after Ca addition, inclusions did not have a ring-shaped structure but a compact one.

  13. On mechanism of austenite chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels intercrystalline corrosion in weak and strong oxidizing media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaskeev, A.V.; Savkina, L.Ya.; Knyazheva, V.M.; Kolotyrkin, Ya.M.; Fil'dgandler, Eh.G.; Rodin, N.N.

    1975-01-01

    Wide possibilities γ-spectrometry for kinetic investigation of intercrystalline corrosion (ICC) and also for recognizing the nature of the selectively soluble structural components at the stages of their initiation and development has been determined using 00Cr16Ni15Mo steel, containing 0,05 and 0,03%C. It is shown by γ-spectrometry, autoradiography, electrochemistry, optical and electron metallography in combination with (Cr,Fe,Mo) 23 C 6 carbide properties investigation, that ICC of sensitized 00Cr16Ni15Mo3 steel, is determined by selective dissolution of chromium and molybdenum depleted boundary regions of solid solutions. At potentials of passivation region (imitation of D method) the main cause of ICC is the selective dissolution of (Cr;Fe;Mo) 23 C 6 carbides arranged at grain boundaries. This process is facilitated in the presence of molybdenum in carbide

  14. Influence of temperature, chloride ions and chromium element on the electronic property of passive film formed on carbon steel in bicarbonate/carbonate buffer solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tubular Goods Research Center of CNPC, Xi' an 710065 (China)], E-mail: dangguoli78@yahoo.com.cn; Feng, Y.R.; Bai, Z.Q. [Tubular Goods Research Center of CNPC, Xi' an 710065 (China); Zhu, J.W.; Zheng, M.S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2007-11-01

    The influences of temperature, chloride ions and chromium element on the electronic property of passive film formed on carbon steel in NaHCO{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} buffer solution are investigated by capacitance measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that the passive film appears n-type semiconductive character; with increasing the solution temperature, the addition of chromium into carbon steel and increasing the concentration of chloride ions, the slopes of Mott-Schottky plots decrease, which indicates the increment of the defect density in the passive film. EIS results show that the transfer impedance R{sub 1} and the diffusion impedance W decrease with increasing the solution temperature, with the addition of chromium into carbon steel and with increasing the chloride ions concentration. It can be concluded that the corrosion protection effect of passive film on the substrate decreases with increasing the solution temperature, adding chromium into carbon steel and increasing chloride ions concentration.

  15. Human biomonitoring of chromium and nickel from an experimental exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes of low and high alloyed steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The uptake and elimination of metals from welding fumes is currently not fully understood. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL) it is possible to investigate the impact of welding fumes on human subjects under controlled exposure conditions. In this study, the uptake and elimination of chromium or chromium (VI) respectively as well as nickel was studied in subjects after exposure to the emissions of a manual metal arc welding process using low or high alloyed steel. In this present study 12 healthy male non-smokers, who never worked as welders before, were exposed for 6h to welding fumes of a manual metal arc welding process. In a three-fold crossover study design, subjects were exposed in randomized order to either clean air, emissions from welding low alloyed steel, and emissions from welding high alloyed steel. Particle mass concentration of the exposure aerosol was 2.5mg m(-3). The content of chromium and nickel in the air was determined by analysing air filter samples on a high emission scenario. Urine analysis for chromium and nickel was performed before and after exposure using methods of human biomonitoring. There were significantly elevated chromium levels after exposure to welding fumes from high alloyed steel compared to urinary chromium levels before exposure to high alloyed welding fumes, as well as compared to the other exposure scenarios. The mean values increased from 0.27 µg l(-1) to 18.62 µg l(-1). The results were in good agreement with already existing correlations between external and internal exposure (German exposure equivalent for carcinogenic working materials EKA). The variability of urinary chromium levels was high. For urinary nickel no significant changes could be detected at all. Six-hour exposure to 2.5mg m(-3) high alloyed manual metal arc welding fumes lead to elevated urinary chromium levels far higher (7.11-34.16 µg l(-1)) than the German biological exposure reference value (BAR) of 0.6 µg l(-1) directly after

  16. Comparison of high temperature wear behaviour of plasma sprayed WC–Co coated and hard chromium plated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balamurugan, G.M.; Duraiselvam, Muthukannan; Anandakrishnan, V.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► WC–12wt.%Co powders were deposited to a thickness of 300 μm on to steel substrates. ► The micro hardness of the above coatings was lower than that of chromium plating. ► Wear resistance of chromium coating was increased up to five times of AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel. ► Wear resistance of chromium coat higher than plasma coat at different temperatures. -- Abstract: The wear behaviour of plasma sprayed coating and hard chrome plating on AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel substrate is experimentally investigated in unlubricated conditions. Experiments were conducted at different temperatures (room temp, 100 °C, 200 °C and 300 °C) with 50 N load and 1 m/s sliding velocity. Wear tests were carried out by dry sliding contact of EN-24 medium carbon steel pin as counterpart on a pin-on-disc wear testing machine. In both coatings, specimens were characterised by hardness, microstructure, coating density and sliding wear resistance. Wear studies showed that the hard chromium coating exhibited improved tribological performance than that of the plasma sprayed WC–Co coating. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) of the coatings showed that the better wear resistance at high temperature has been attributed to the formation of a protective oxide layer at the surface during sliding. The wear mechanisms were investigated through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and XRD. It was observed that the chromium coating provided higher hardness, good adhesion with the substrate and nearly five times the wear resistance than that obtained by uncoated AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel.

  17. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S 0 per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625 0 C. 31 figures

  18. Damping capacity of unstable steels on chromium-nickel-manganese base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochkin, L.I.; Rudakov, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The paper deals with results of a study on the energy scattering in OKh13N3G8, 20Kh13N3G4 and 30Kh13N3G4 unstable steels. It is shown that the development of microplastic strains most easily occurs in low-carbon steel having a two-phase structure in the initial state. The proceeding of microplastic deformations in carbon unstable steels is limited by the interstitial atom effect on the dislocation movement. It is established that in OKh13N3G8 steel the martensite α→γ- transformation begins under the cyclic stress amplitudes below the yield point of this steel. The steels studied possess a high vibrostrength [ru

  19. Damping capacity of unstable steels on chromium-nickel-manganese base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kochkin, L.I.; Rudakov, A.A. (Kirovskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1982-02-01

    The paper deals with results of a study on the energy scattering in OKh13N3G8, 20Kh13N3G4 and 30Kh13N3G4 unstable steels. It is shown that the development of microplastic strains most easily occurs in low-carbon steel having a two-phase structure in the initial state. The proceeding of microplastic deformations in carbon unstable steels is limited by the interstitial atom effect on the dislocation movement. It is established that in OKh13N3G8 steel the martensite ..cap alpha --> gamma..- transformation begins under the cyclic stress amplitudes below the yield point of this steel. The steels studied possess a high vibrostrength.

  20. Modeling the influence of the parameters the diffusion of chromium plating on operational and physical and mechanical properties of steels for stamping tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олександр Петрович Чейлях

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion hardening steel can be produced in any plant having a thermal equipment, besides, it is more economical than obtaining an alloy steel with similar properties. The influence of the parameters of the diffusion of chromium plating (the composition of the steel, powder mixture on the structure and mechanical properties of structural and tool steels was investigated. Results of X-ray analysis showed that the diffusion zone in the samples consists of two layers. First layer is predominantly carbides Cr7C3, Cr23C6, Fe3C. An intermediate layer composed of carbon-free solid solution of chromium in the iron. The maximum total thickness of the diffusion zone is observed in the steel 130Cr12V1 and 130Cr12Mo1 (~80 µm, minimum – in carbon steels 45, U10 (~10-30 µm. The thickness of carbide layer is approximately the same – 1-3 µm. Analyzing of data micro-hardness measurement across the thickness of the diffusion zone it must be noted that the diffusion layers of the samples of the tool steels have a high micro-hardness 6000-10000. The maximum HV=10200 was in steel 30Cr2W8V1. Chromium saturation of steel surface significantly increases its wear resistance. A much greater effect of increase of coefficient of relative wear resistance (3 fold increase was observed in steels 30Cr2W8V1, 130Cr12V1 and 130Cr12Mo1. The mathematical models relating the micro-hardness, wear resistance, the thickness of the diffusion layer were obtained. In view of the analytical relationships ascertained that the wear resistance of hardened steels substantially depend on the thickness of the diffusion coating, the micro-hardness of the layer and the core of steel and alloy steels has increased more than two times. For hardening steel punching tool 30Cr2W8V1 can be recommended composition of the powder mixture: 50% FeCr + 48% Al2O3 + 2% NaF, and for steel 130Cr12V1 preferably used as activator NH4F

  1. Effect of prior deformation on microstructural development and Laves phase precipitation in high-chromium stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Z-W; Chen, D; Kuo, J-C; Lin, D-Y

    2017-04-01

    This study investigated the influence of deformation on precipitation behaviour and microstructure change during annealing. Here, the prior deformation of high-chromium stainless steel was tensile deformation of 3%, 6% and 10%, and the specimens were then annealed at 700˚C for 10 h. The specimens were subsequently analyzed using backscattered electron image and electron backscattering diffraction measurements with SEM. Compared with the deformation microstructure, the grains revealed no preferred orientation. The precipitates of TiN and NbC were formed homogenously in the grain interior and at grain boundaries after annealing. Fine Laves phase precipitates were observed in grains and along subgrain boundaries as the deformation increased. Furthermore, the volume fraction of Laves phase increased, but the average particle diameter of precipitate was reduced as the deformation increased. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  2. A new 12% chromium steel strengthened by Z-phase precipitates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Fang; Rashidi, Masoud; Johansson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase the corrosion resistance and simultaneously maintain the creep resistance of 9-12% Cr steels at 650 degrees C, a new alloy design concept was proposed, using thermodynamically stable Z-phase (CrTaN) precipitates to strengthen the steel. A new trial Z-phase strengthened 12% Cr...

  3. The thermal expansion of austenitic manganese and manganese-chromium steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, F.

    1977-01-01

    The linear coefficient of thermal expansion was determined by dilatometer for 5 Mn steels and 6 Mn-Cr steels between -196 and +500 0 C. Because of the antiferromagnetic properties, the thermal expansion of austenitic Mn and Mn-Cr steels is determined by the position of the magnetic changeover temperature (Neel temperature), which depends on the chemical composition of the steel. Below the Neel temperature, the thermal coefficient of expansion is greatly reduced by volumetric magnetostriction (Invar effect). For this reason, one can only give approximate values for thermal expansion for all Mn and Mn-Cr steels in the temperature range of -100 0 C to about +100 0 C. (GSC) [de

  4. Non-destructive automated express method for determining the inclination of chromium-nickel steels IGC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, A.A.; Kamenev, Yu.B.; Kuusk, L.V.; Kormin, E.G.; Vasil'ev, A.N.; Sumbaeva, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    Methods of automated control of 18-10-type steel inclination to IGC are developed and a corresponding automated testing complex (ATS) is created. 08Kh18N10T steel samples had two variants of thermal treatment: 1) 1200 deg (5 h), 600 deg (50 h); 2) 1200 deg (5 h). Methods of non-destructive automated control of 18-10-type steel inclination to IGC are developed on the basis of potentiodynamic reactivation (PR) principle. Automated testing complex is developed, which has undergone experimental running and demonstrated a high confidence of results, reliability and easy operation

  5. Boron effect on plasticity of austenite chromium-nickel-manganese steel with nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, S.I.; Sorokina, N.A.; Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1975-01-01

    Plasticity of the stainless steels, with boron content changing from 0 to 0.13% is investigated. It follows from the test results that when the boron content amounts to 0.001 - 0.005%, plasticity of the steel rises at temperatures from 800 to 1000 deg C. When the boron content is higher, plasticity of the steel drops down, particularly at a temperature of 1000 deg C. Due to high sensitivity of the test steel to overheating at temperatures above 1260 deg C, the temperatures of 1240 -1260 deg C are considered to be the optimum for ingot heating, provided that the ingots are preliminarily held at the first stage of heating at a temperature of 1200 - 1220 deg C

  6. Comparison of nickel and chromium ions released from stainless steel and NiTi wires after immersion in Oral B®, Orthokin® and artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilian, Abdolreza; Moghaddas, Omid; Toopchi, Shabnam; Perillo, Letizia

    2014-07-01

    Oral environment of the mouth is a suitable place for biodegradation of alloys used in orthodontic wires. The toxicity of these alloys namely nickel and chromium has concerned the researchers about the release of these ions from orthodontic wires and brackets. The aim of this study was to measure the levels of nickel and chromium ions released from 0.018" stainless steel (SS) and NiTi wires after immersion in three solutions. One hundred and forty-four round NiTi and 144 round SS archwires with the diameters of 0.018" were immersed in Oral B®, Orthokin® and artificial saliva. The amounts of nickel and chromium ions released were measured after 1, 6, 24 hours and 7 days. Two way repeated ANOVA showed that the amount of chromium and nickel significantly increased in all solutions during all time intervals (p nickel ions were released more in NiTi wire in all solutions compared with SS wire. The lowest increase rate was also seen in artificial saliva. There is general consensus in literature that even very little amounts of nickel and chromium are dangerous for human body specially when absorbed orally; therefore, knowing the precise amount of these ions released from different wires when immersed in different mouthwashes is of high priority.

  7. Microstructural Stability and Oxidation Resistance of 9-12 Chromium Steels at Elevated Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, O.N.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Hawk, J.A.

    2006-05-01

    Various martensitic 9-12 Cr steels are utilized currently in fossil fuel powered energy plants for their good elevated temperature properties such as creep strength, steam side oxidation resistance, fire side corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. Need for further improvements on the properties of 9-12 Cr steels for higher temperature (>600oC) use is driven by the environmental concerns (i.e., improve efficiency to reduce emissions and fossil fuel consumption). In this paper, we will discuss the results of the research done to explore new subsitutional solute solution and precipitate hardening mechanisms for improved strength of 9-12 Cr martensitic steels. Stability of the phases present in the steels will be evaluated for various temperature and time exposures. A comparison of microstructural properties of the experimental steels and commercial steels will also be presented.

    The influence of a Ce surface treatment on oxidation behavior of a commercial (P91) and several experimental steels containing 9 to 12 weight percent Cr was examined at 650ºC in flowing dry and moist air. The oxidation behavior of all the alloys without the Ce modification was significantly degraded by the presence of moisture in the air during testing. For instance the weight gain for P91 was two orders of magnitude greater in moist air than in dry air. This was accompanied by a change in oxide scale from the formation of Cr-based scales in dry air to the formation of Fe-based scales in moist air. The Ce surface treatment was very effective in improving the oxidation resistance of the experimental steels in both moist and dry air. For instance, after exposure to moist air at 650ºC for 2000 hours, an experimental alloy with the cerium surface modification had a weight gain three orders of magnitude lower than the alloy without the Ce modification and two orders of magnitude lower than P91. The Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of Fe-based scales and

  8. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coriou, H.; Hure, J.; Plante, G.

    1961-01-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [fr

  9. Investigation of thermal fatigue of chromium-molybdenum steels, used for calcining and agglomeration constructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinyavskij, D.P.; Gorkalo, A.P.

    1979-01-01

    The technique for investigating thermal fatigue of materials is described. The data on sample stress deformed state and current temperature values are taken from the local volume of the material studied. Results of investigating thermal fatigue of the 15KhMl and 20KhMl steels are presented

  10. Residual stresses determination by neutron diffraction in a 100Cr6 chromium steel bearing ring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rogante, M.; Martinat, G.; Mikula, Pavol; Vrána, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 5 (2013), s. 275-281 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(XE) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : 100Cr6 steel * rings * martensitic hardening * tempering * residual stress es * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.546, year: 2013

  11. Fracture Toughness and Strength in a New Class of Bainitic Chromium-Tungsten Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, S. X.; Sikka, V. K.

    2006-06-01

    This project dealt with developing an understanding of the toughening and stengthening mechanisms for a new class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) steels developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in collaboration with Nooter Corporation and other industrial partners. The new steele had 50% higher tensile strength up to 650 degrees Celsius than currently used steels and the potential for not requiring any postweld heat treatment (PWHT) and for reducing equipment weight by 25%. This project was closely related to the Nooter project described in the report Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic steels for Industrial Process Applications (ORNL/TM-2005/82). The project was carried out jointly by the University of Pittsburgh and ORNL. The University of Pittsburgh carried out fracture toughness measurements and microstructural analysis on base metal and welded plates prepared at ORNL. The project focused on three areas. The first dealt with detailed microstructural analysis of base compositions of 3Cr-3WV and 3Cr-3WBV(Ta) in both normalized (N) and normalized and tempered (NT) conditions. The second aspect of the prject dealt with determining tensile properties and fracture toughness values of K{subIC} at room temperature for both 3Cr-3Wv and 3Cr-3WV(Ta) compositions. The third focus of the project was to measure the fracture toughness values of the base metal and the heat-affectged zone (HAZ) of a plate of Fe-3Cr-W(Mo)V steel plate welded by the gas tungsten are (GTA) process. The HAZ toughness was measured in both the as-welded and the PWHT condition.

  12. Cleanliness distribution of high-carbon chromium bearing steel billets and growth behavior of inclusions during solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, C.; Bao, Y.; Lin, L.

    2017-01-01

    Variation of cleanliness and distribution of inclusions in thickness and width direction of highcarbon chromium bearing steel billets has been studied using total oxygen and nitrogen analysis and SEM/EDS, and the growth behavior of inclusions during solidification was studied with the help of solidification model. The region wit h relatively high total oxygen contents in the cross profile of billets is between inner arc side 3/16 and outer arc side 1/4; between left edge side 5/16 and right edge side 5/16. The formation sequence of inclusions is MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. MnS could wrap MgO-Al2O3 and reduces the damage to steel matrix caused by the latter, but generally could not effectively wrap TiN. Besides, TiN could wrap MgO-Al2O3 before MnS, which would weaken the protective capacity of MnS. Moreover, compared with MgO-Al2O3 inclusions, the sizes of TiN inclusions are generally larger. Thus the control of TiN inclusions should be strengthened. In hickness direction, the maximum size regions of TiN and MnS inclusions are inner arc side 1/3 and outer arc side 1/3; in width direction, the regions are edge side 1/3. During bearing processing, these regions and the regions with high total oxygen content should be avoided. [es

  13. Influence of heating temperature on bainite transformation proceeding in chromium-nickel-molybdenum steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletin, Yu.M.; Kaletin, A.Yu.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to investigate the effect of heating and cooling from austenization temperature on development of bainite transformation in 37KhN3MFA and 18Kh2N4MA structural alloyed steels. The metallographical analysis of specimens has revealed that first crystals of bainite under slow heating up to 770-790 deg C appear at the temperature of about 500 deg C and at 475 deg C there has been much bainite over the whole cross section of the specimen. It is revealed that an increase of heating temperature and cooling rate replace the starting point of bainite transformation upwards. The strongest displacement of the point Bsub(S) into hogh-temperature range takes place after heating steel with the initial bainite structure in intercritical temperature range

  14. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  15. Effect of plasma nitriding time on surface properties of hard chromium electroplated AISI 1010 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocabas, Mustafa; Uelker, Suekrue

    2015-01-01

    Properties of steel can be enhanced by surface treatments such as coating. In some cases, further treatments such as nitriding can also be used in order to get even better results. In order to investigate the properties of nitride layer on hard Cr coated AISI 1010 steel, substrates were electroplated to form hard Cr coatings. Then hard Cr coatings were plasma nitrided at 700 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h and nitride phases on the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer thickness and surface properties of nitride films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and adhesion properties of Cr-N phases were examined using nano indentation and Daimler-Benz Rockwell C adhesion tests. The highest measured hardness was 24.1 GPa and all the three samples exhibited poor adhesion.

  16. Effect of plasma nitriding time on surface properties of hard chromium electroplated AISI 1010 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocabas, Mustafa [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Dept.; Danisman, Murat [Gedik Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Electrical and Electronic Engineering Dept.; Cansever, Nurhan [Yildiz Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Uelker, Suekrue [Afyon Kocatepe Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2015-06-01

    Properties of steel can be enhanced by surface treatments such as coating. In some cases, further treatments such as nitriding can also be used in order to get even better results. In order to investigate the properties of nitride layer on hard Cr coated AISI 1010 steel, substrates were electroplated to form hard Cr coatings. Then hard Cr coatings were plasma nitrided at 700 C for 3 h, 5 h and 7 h and nitride phases on the coatings were investigated by X-ray diffraction analysis. The layer thickness and surface properties of nitride films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy. The hardness and adhesion properties of Cr-N phases were examined using nano indentation and Daimler-Benz Rockwell C adhesion tests. The highest measured hardness was 24.1 GPa and all the three samples exhibited poor adhesion.

  17. Microstructure evolution and dislocation behaviour in high chromium, fully ferritic steels strengthened by intermetallic Laves phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Barrilao, Jennifer; Kuhn, Bernd; Wessel, Egbert

    2018-05-01

    In the present study a stainless, high strength, ferritic (non-martensitic) steel was analysed regarding microstructure and particle evolution. The preceding hot-rolling process of the steel results in the formation of sub-grain structures, which disappear over time at high temperature. Besides that the formation of particle-free zones was observed. The pronounced formation of these zones preferentially appears close to high angle grain boundaries and is considered to be responsible for long-term material failure under creep conditions. The reasons for this are lacking particle hardening and thus a concentration and accumulation of deformation in the particle free areas close to the grain boundaries. Accordingly in-depth investigations were performed by electron microscopy to analyse dislocation behaviour and its possible effect on the mechanical response of these weak areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Close toleranoe forging of chromium steel blades for powerful steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shastin, Eh.G.; Kositskij, Yu.N.; Lyubchits, G.A.

    1989-01-01

    Work on simulating technological process on die-forging hammer was performed in order to reduce the preparation period bringing technology of close tolerance forging of turbine blades to a commercial level. A special attention was paid to development of accurate forming of forgings of 20Kh13Sh, 12Kh13 and 15Kh11MFSh steels on screw presses with nominal effort equal to 80 and 144 MN

  19. Surface Alloying of SUS 321 Chromium-Nickel Steel by an Electron-Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Teresov, A. D.; Petrikova, E. A.; Krysina, O. V.; Ivanova, O. V.; Shugurov, V. V.; Moskvin, P. V.

    2017-07-01

    The mechanisms of forming nanostructured, nanophase layers are revealed and analyzed in austenitic steel subjected to surface alloying using an electron-plasma process. Nanostructured, nanophase layers up to 30 μm in thickness were formed by melting of the film/substrate system with an electron beam generated by a SOLO facility (Institute of High Current Electronics, SB RAS), Tomsk), which ensured crystallization and subsequent quenching at the cooling rates within the range 105-108 K/s. The surface was modified with structural stainless steel specimens (SUS 321 steel). The film/substrate system (film thickness 0.5 μm) was formed by a plasma-assisted vacuum-arc process by evaporating a cathode made from a sintered pseudoalloy of the following composition: Zr - 6 at.% Ti - 6 at.% Cu. The film deposition was performed in a QUINTA facility equipped with a PINK hot-cathode plasma source and DI-100 arc evaporators with accelerated cooling of the process cathode, which allowed reducing the size and fraction of the droplet phase in the deposited film. It is found that melting of the film/substrate system (Zr-Ti-Cu)/(SUS 321 steel) using a high-intensity pulsed electron beam followed by the high-rate crystallization is accompanied by the formation of α-iron cellular crystallization structure and precipitation of Cr2Zr, Cr3C2 and TiC particles on the cell boundaries, which as a whole allowed increasing microhardness by a factor of 1.3, Young's modulus - by a factor of 1.2, wear resistance - by a factor of 2.7, while achieving a three-fold reduction in the friction coefficient.

  20. Microstructure stability and creep behaviour of advanced high chromium ferritic steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenička, Václav; Kuchařová, Květa; Kudrman, J.; Svoboda, Milan; Kloc, Luboš

    43 2005, č. 1 (2005), s. 20-33 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0608; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA2041101; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : 9-12%Cr steels * microstructure stability * creep behaviour * nonsteady creep loading Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.973, year: 2005

  1. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  2. Effects of Rare Earth Metal Addition on Wear Resistance of Chromium-Molybdenum Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasinska J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses changes in the microstructure and abrasive wear resistance of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel modified with rare earth metals (REM. The changes were assessed using scanning microscopy. The wear response was determined in the Miller test to ASTM G75. Abrasion tests were supplemented with the surface profile measurements of non-modified and modified cast steel using a Talysurf CCI optical profilometer. It was demonstrated that the modification substantially affected the microstructure of the alloy, leading to grain size reduction and changed morphology of non-metallic inclusions. The observed changes in the microstructure resulted in a three times higher impact strength (from 33 to 99 kJ/cm2 and more than two times higher resistance to cracking (from 116 to 250 MPa. The following surface parameters were computed: Sa: Arithmetic mean deviation of the surface, Sq: Root-mean-square deviation of the surface, Sp: Maximum height of the peak Sv: Maximum depth of the valley, Sz: Ten Point Average, Ssk: Asymmetry of the surface, Sku: Kurtosis of the surface. The findings also indicated that the addition of rare earth metals had a positive effect on the abrasion behaviour of G17CrMo5-5 cast steel.

  3. Monitoring of occupational exposure in manufacturing of stainless steel constructions. Part I: Chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium in the workplace air of stainless steel welders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucera, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Bencko, V.; Papayova, A.; Saligova, D.; Tejral, J.; Borska, L.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to workplace airborne pollutants was examined in a group of 20 workers dealing mainly with welding, polishing, drilling and assembling of stainless steel constructions. Monitoring of airborne particulate matter (ARM) was performed using both personal and stationary samplers. For the personal full-shift monitoring, a SKC 224 PCRX-4 constant flow rate pump was used which was connected to a sampling head with mixed cellulose matched-weight filters having a diameter of 32 mm and a 0.8 μm pore size. The constant flow rate amounted to 2 L min -1 . For the stationary sampling, the ''Gent'' stacked filter unit PM10 sampler was used, operating at a flow rate of 16 L min -1 . It collects particles having an equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD) of less than 10,um in the separate ''coarse'' (2-10 μm EAD) and ''fine'' (< 2 μm EAD) size fractions on two sequential polycarbonate (Costar, Nuclepore) filters with a 47 mm diameter. The filters of both types were analyzed by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Of the elements determined, results for chromium, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel and vanadium are presented. Procedures for quality assurance of both sampling and analytical stages are described. Sampling of biological material for elemental analysis (hair, nails, urine and blood and/or serum) of exposed and control persons in contamination-free conditions was also performed. In addition, saliva samples were collected for studying immunological and genotoxicity aspects of occupational exposure. (author)

  4. Effect of Zr addition on intergranular corrosion of low-chromium ferritic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Jeong Kil; Lee, Bong Ho; Seo, Hyung Suk; Kim, Kyoo Young

    2014-01-01

    Addition of Zr to low-Cr ferritic stainless steel forms a mixture of ZrC and Fe 23 Zr 6 precipitates that can prevent intergranular corrosion. Transmission electron microscopy and three-dimensional atom probe analysis suggest that the ZrC and Fe 23 Zr 6 mixture prevents intergranular corrosion in two ways: by acting as a strong carbide former to suppress the formation of Cr-carbide and by acting as a barrier against the diffusion of the solute Cr towards the grain boundary

  5. Anisotropy of fracture toughness of austenitic high nitrogen chromium-manganese steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balitskii, A.I.; Pokhmurskii, V.I.; Diener, M.; Magdowski, R.; Speidel, M.O.

    1999-01-01

    The anisotropy of mechanical properties, in particular of the fracture toughness measured by the J-integral method, is demonstrated for industrially manufactured high strength retaining rings made from the nitrogen alloyed steel 18Mn18Cr. The RT-orientation turns out to be the weakest with regard to the resistance of the material to stable crack growth. The fracture toughness results are compared with results from calorimetric measurements. Here, also an orientation dependence of the heat irradiation energy is observed, clearly showing the same ranking of specimen orientation as the toughness data suggest. (orig.)

  6. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  7. Austenitic chromium nickel steel as standard reference material in measurement of thermal and temperature conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binkele, L.

    1990-01-01

    A niobium-stabilized CrNi steel with the NBS designation SRM 735 is introduced as WLF standard reference material in a report by Hust and Giarratano, for the temperature range 300-1200 K and for thermal conductivities around 20 W/mk. However, its specification does not show it to be a direct member of the DIN family of CrNi steels. This report should be regarded as a continuation and supplement to the above-mentioned efforts in America. On the one hand, a solution of a possibly too-narrow specification is aimed at for the reference material, where it is important how sensitive the thermal conductivity is to changes in the chemical composition and changes of the manufacturing parameters and what accuracy can be reached for the reference values with the best measurement techniques. On the other hand, the data base should be expanded and the accuracy of the reference curve should be improved if possible. (orig./MM) [de

  8. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  9. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelic, S.K., E-mail: susanne.michelic@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Loder, D. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A. [Outokumpu Nirosta GmbH, Essener Straße 244, 44793 Bochum (Germany); Bernhard, C. [Chair of Ferrous Metallurgy, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  10. Molybdenum and chromium pollution around Mobarakeh steel manufacturing, Esfahan province, Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norozi, S.; Ardestani, M.; Ghazban, F.; Khosro Tehrani, Kh.

    2010-01-01

    Industrial activities are among the major factors leading to environmental disturbances. One of such activities is that of Mobarakeh Steel Complex. The major aim of this study was to investigate the concentration and distribution of Cr and mo in soil,water and air around the factory. In this study, systematic sampling and geochemical analyses were used. After granulumetry, the samples were analysed with ICP and AAS methods and the maps representing the dispersion of Mo, Cr were drawn using the S urfer S oftware. From the obtained results, the effects of pollutants on the surrounding areas were determined. This was compared with global standards. Finally some controlling methods to prevent distribution of environmental pollutants in the area were presented. ?

  11. On the low-cycle fracture of chromium-nickel-molybdenum structural steels in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, G.V.; Kobzaruk, A.V.; Malyshevskij, V.A.; Shul'te, A.Yu.; Rybin, V.V.; Silaev, I.I.

    1977-01-01

    The processes of low-cycle fracture of the chrome-nickel-molybdenum steels 15KhN5MF, 12KhN4MF and 15KhN3M in air, and in sea water have been investigated by the optical microscopy method, and electron microscopic examination of thin films. Bringing no change in the fracture character, sea water produces a speeding-up effect on the low-cycle fatigue fracture process. During long-time corrosion fatigue testing considerable importance lies with the electrochemical corrosion factor expediting the occurrence of corrosive pits acting as crack-initiation nuclei, fatigue crack attack, accumulation of corrosion products in fatigue cracks, etc

  12. Failures by stress corrosion of electrical heating accessories, instrument leads and thermoelements of chromium nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, M.

    1982-01-01

    Measurement and control devices are being increasingly used for process control, monitoring and the safety of chemical plants. Pressure, temperature, through-put, moisture, composition and the like are continuously measured at many positions of the system. The supervision of the measuring equipment and hence the necessary exchanging ability of the devices during operation means good access to the plant. An extensive system of pipelines between the measuring equipment and the product lines to be supervised is the result. Common austenite 18 10 CrNi steel pipes of 12 mm diameter and 1 mm wall thickness are used for assembling and corrosion reasons in these pulse instrument leads. The failure of several instrument leads in a large scale plant at the beginning of the frost period interfers with the control. It was therefore necessary to find the exact cause; this is described in the present work. (orig.) [de

  13. Hot rolling of chromium - nickel - manganese stainless steel containing nitrogen and boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khorosh, V.A.; Bulat, S.I.; Mukhina, M.A.; Sorokina, N.A.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Tsentral'nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel'skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Ehlektrosvarki)

    1976-01-01

    The strength of stainless steel of the 03Kh2ON16AG6 type increases perceptibly with an increase in the nitrogen content from 0.11 to 0.37%. At the same time, however, its ductility in the region of hot deformation temperatures (red brittleness range of 800 to 1,000 deg C) decreases. Microalloying with boron (0.002 to 0.005% by calculation) permits enhancing the hot ductility to an acceptable level without adversely affecting the working properties. The mechaniusm of boron effect is analyzed. The temperature at which ingots are heated prior to rolling to achieve the desired effect must be sufficiently low. Optimum condition for two stage heating of 6.2-ton ingots are recommeded

  14. Pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion of an advanced chromium-based stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.

    1999-01-01

    Alloy 33 is a (wt. %) 33 Cr-32Fe-31Ni-1.6Mo-0.6CU-0.4N austenitic stainless steel combining high yield strength of min. 380 N/mm 2 (55 KSI) with high resistance to local corrosion and superior resistance to stress corrosion cracking. Ranking the material according to its PRE (pitting resistance equivalent) value, the new alloy fits in between the advanced 6% Mo superaustenitics and the nickel-base Alloy 625 but due to the balanced chemical composition the alloy shows a lot less sensitivity to segregation in the base material as well as in welded structures. It is recommended to weld the material with matching filler. The critical pitting temperature of such joints in the 10% FeCl 3 · 6H 2 O solution is reduced by only 10 C in comparison to the base material. Corrosion tests in artificial seawater (20 g/l Cl - ) with additions of chloride up to 37 g/l as well as in a NaCl-CaCl 2 , solution with 62 g/l Cl - --revealed that the critical pitting temperature does not differentiate from the 6% Mo austenitic steel Alloy 926. With respect to crevice corrosion the depassivation pH value has been determined in 1 M NaCl solution according to Crolet and again there was no difference between Alloy 33 and Alloy 926. SCC tests performed on Alloy 33 in the solution annealed condition as well as after heavy cold work up to R PO,2 ∼ 1,100--1,200 N/mm 2 (160--174 KSI) indicate the high resistance to stress corrosion cracking in hot sodium chloride solutions

  15. Creep-rupture tests on chromium-containing conventional and ODS steels in oxygen-controlled Pb and air at 650 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurechko, Mariya; Schroer, Carsten; Wedemeyer, Olaf; Skrypnik, Aleksandr; Konys, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Generally superior creep performance of ODS steels with 12–14% Cr is indicated. • Strength of 9Cr-ODS at 650°C approaches conventional 9Cr steels at decreasing load. • ODS steels show brittle primary and ductile residual fracture. • Apparent link between secondary creep rate and fracture mode of ODS steels. • Clear impact of liquid Pb at low load, corresponding to long time-to-rupture. - Abstract: Conventional martensitic steels with 9 mass% chromium (Cr), namely T91 and P92, and ODS steels with 9, 12 and 14 mass% Cr, respectively, were subjected to creep-rupture tests in stagnant oxygen-controlled lead (Pb) at 650 °C and c o = 10 −6 mass% dissolved oxygen. The 9Cr conventional steels were tested in the liquid metal at static engineering stress in the range from 75 to 200 MPa. 12 and 14Cr ODS were tested at 190–400 MPa, and 9Cr ODS at 75–300 MPa. Reference tests in stagnant air were carried out in the same stress ranges. The ODS steels with 12 or 14 mass% Cr, mainly tested in oxygen containing Pb, clearly exhibit a change in the stress-dependence of secondary creep rate and appearance of fracture surface at 330–400 MPa. No such change has been observed for 9Cr ODS so far. The conventional martensitic steel P92 shows a significant drop in creep strength accompanied by reduced necking and a change from ductile to brittle fracture when tested in Pb at 75 MPa (time-to-rupture t R = 13,090 h)

  16. Pelepasan ion nikel dan kromium kawat Australia dan stainless steel dalam saliva buatan (The release of nickel and chromium ions from Australian wire and stainless steel in artificial saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolista Indah Rasyid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fixed orthodontic treatment needs several types of wire to produce biomechanical force to move teeth. The use orthodontic wire within the mouth interacts with saliva, causing the release of nickel and chromium ions. Purpose: The study was aimed to examine the effect of immersion time in artificial saliva between special type of Australian wire and stainless steel on the release of nickel and chromium ions. Methods: Thirty special type Australian wires and 30 stainless steel wires were used in this study, each of which weighed 0.12 grams. The wires were immersed for 1, 7, 28, 35, 42, and 49 days in artificial saliva with a normal pH. The release of ions in saliva was examined using Atomic Absorption spectrophotometry. Results: The result indicated that the release of nickel ions on special type of Australian wire was larger than that on stainless steel wire (p<0.005, there were differences in the release of the amount of nickel ions on special type of Australia in different immersion time, and there was a correlation between the types of wire and immersion time. Nickel ions released from the special type of Australian wire detected on the 7th day of immersion and reached its peak on the 35th day, while from stainless steel wire were detected on the 49th day of immersion. The released of chromium ions from the special type of Australian wire and stainless steel wire were not detected until the 49th day of immersion. Conclusion: The release of nickel ions were highest on the 35th day of immersion in special type of Australian wire and they were detected on the 49th day in stainless steel wire. The release of chromium ions were not detected until 49th day of immersion in special type of Australian and stainless steel wire.Latar belakang: Perawatan ortodonti cekat memerlukan beberapa macam kawat untuk menghasilkan kekuatan biomekanika yang sesuai dalam menggerakkan gigi. Pemakaian kawat ortodonti di dalam mulut dapat bereaksi dengan

  17. Effect of Different Chromium Additions on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Multipass Weld Joint of Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Hae Woo

    2012-12-01

    The correlation between the mechanical properties and ferrite volume fraction (approximately 40, 50, and 60 Ferrite Number [FN]) in duplex stainless steel weld metals were investigated by changing the Cr content in filler wires with a flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) process. The interpass temperature was thoroughly maintained under a maximum of 423 K (150 °C), and the heat input was also sustained at a level under 15 KJ/cm in order to minimize defects. The microstructure examination demonstrated that the δ-ferrite volume fraction in the deposited metals increased as the Cr/Ni equivalent ratio increased, and consequently, chromium nitride (Cr2N) precipitation was prone to occur in the ferrite domains due to low solubility of nitrogen in this phase. Thus, more dislocations are pinned by the precipitates, thereby lowering the mobility of the dislocations. Not only can this lead to the strength improvement, but also it can accentuate embrittlement of the weld metal at subzero temperature. Additionally, the solid-solution strengthening by an increase of Cr and Mo content in austenite phase depending on the reduction of austenite proportion also made an impact on the increase of the tensile and yield strength. On the other hand, the impact test (at 293 K, 223 K, and 173 K [20 °C, -50 °C, and -100 °C]) showed that the specimen containing about 40 to 50 FN had the best result. The absorbed energy of about 40 to 50 J sufficiently satisfied the requirements for industrial applications at 223 K (-50 °C), while the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior exhibited in weldment containing 60 FN. As the test temperature decreased under 223 K (-50 °C), a narrow and deep dimple was transformed into a wide and shallow dimple, and a significant portion of the fracture surface was occupied by a flat cleavage facet with river patterns.

  18. Effects of carbon content and chromium segregation on creep rupture properties of low carbon and medium nitrogen type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, Takanori; Fujita, Nobuhiro; Kimura, Hidetaka; Komatsu, Hajime; Kotoh, Hiroyuki; Kaguchi, Hitoshi.

    1997-01-01

    The creep rupture properties of type 316 stainless steels containing 0.005-0.022%C and 0.07%N have been investigated at 550degC and 600degC from the aspect of the grain boundary carbide precipitation which was changed with carbon content and chromium segregation. A small amount of carbide precipitated on grain boundaries during creep, because the solubility limit of the carbide is less than 0.005%. The creep rupture ductility of this steel increased with the reduction of carbon content from 0.010% to 0.005% while it decreased with increasing carbon content from 0.010% to 0.020%. Since the amount of grain boundary carbide decreased with reducing carbon content, the increase in ductility was due to the suppression of grain boundary embrittlement caused by the carbide. The creep rupture ductility of this steel was also improved by reducing chromium segregation. This behavior was attributed to the change in carbide morphology from concentrated type to dispersed one, which reduced the grain boundary embrittlement. (author)

  19. Microstructure and properties of the heat-resistant chromium steel P91; Gefuege und Eigenschaften des warmfesten Chromstahls P91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohlar, Stefanie

    2017-07-01

    The heat-resistant chromium steel X10CrMoVNb9-1 specified as P91 is based on its good properties at high temperatures and high mechanical Stresses as a potential material for use as reactor pressure vessel material in fourth generation nuclear reactors. Subject of this work was the characterization of the microstructure and mechanical properties of this material. For this purpose it was metallographically examined and technically important characteristic values were determined. Different etching methods and imaging techniques were used, with the method of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material providing meaningful results. Tensile tests, hardness tests and notched bar impact tests provided mechanical-technological characteristics. The fracture mechanical behavior was determined by means of fracture mechanics tests on bending and compact tensile tests. The main focus was on the investigation of the applicability of the evaluation methods described in standards ASTM 1921 and ASTM 1820 for low alloy steels. The investigations showed that the P91 is expected to have a homogeneous martensitic structure consisting of annealed martensite with embedded carbides and carbonitrides. The location and size of the found carbides could be represented by the process of oxalic acid etching newly applied to this material. The mechanical-technological tests showed a good strength and toughness behavior typical for tempered steel. The application of the linear-elastic fracture mechanics and the yielding fracture mechanics made it possible to determine a reference temperature according to ASTM 1921-08a, but also showed that the evaluation methods and geometries described for this high-alloy steel in ASTM 1820-08 do not lead to valid material characteristics. In order to determine the suitability of this material for nuclear applications, the irradiation and creep behavior of the P91 should be characterized more precisely in further investigations. [German] Der als P91

  20. Corrosion behavior of ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% chromium for the automobile exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua-bing; Jiang, Zhou-hua; Feng, Hao; Zhu, Hong-chun; Sun, Bin-han; Li, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    The effect of chloride ion concentration, pH value, and grain size on the pitting corrosion resistance of a new ferritic stainless steel with 15wt% Cr was investigated using the anodic polarization method. The semiconducting properties of passive films with different chloride ion concentrations were performed using capacitance measurement and Mott-Schottky analysis methods. The aging precipitation and intergranular corrosion behavior were evaluated at 400-900°C. It is found that the pitting potential decreases when the grain size increases. With the increase in chloride ion concentration, the doping density and the flat-bland potential increase but the thickness of the space charge layer decreases. The pitting corrosion resistance increases rapidly with the decrease in pH value. Precipitants is identified as Nb(C,N) and NbC, rather than Cr-carbide. The intergranular corrosion is attributed to the synergistic effects of Nb(C,N) and NbC precipitates and Cr segregation adjacent to the precipitates.

  1. Sodium compatibility of aluminide and chromium nitride coatings on austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler-Latge, P.; Ardellier, A.; Depierre, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The present study is a part of a more general research and development program which is presented in another session of this meeting. The main aim of this program was the selection of coatings or treatments able to improve the tribological behaviour of austenitic stainless steel intended to use as structural material for subassemblies and diagrid of a LMFBR in project. Among this environmental conditions imposed for that application, we can retain: in normal conditions of operation, a purified sodium flow at about 400 0 C with a certain number of accidental cold thermal shocks, during the 30 years period of life of the reactor, and also with some hot variations of the sodium temperature from 400 0 C to 550 0 C. Some coatings which had been preselected for that use having not yet been tested in compatibility with liquid sodium for a long period, it was necessary to proceed to corrosion resistance tests in sodium environment almost for the thinner of them, in order to see if they were able to bear the environment conditions required for the project. Consecutively of these tests, metallurgical examinations have been made on samples, firstly after a 4000 hours period of dwell in sodium flowing at 400 0 C, and secondly after an additional dwelling period in flowing sodium of 500 hours at 550 0 C. The main metallurgical observations relative to three coatings or treatments are related thereafter

  2. Study of fatigue crack nucleation in 12% chromium stainless steel in sulphate and phosphate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalaby, H.M.; Begley, J.A.; Macdonald, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The morphology of fatigue crack nucleation has been studied in 12%Cr stainless steel at a single stress level of 448 MN m -2 in deaerated H 2 SO 4 -Na 2 SO 4 -NaOH ([SO 4 2- ] = 0.01M and 1M) and in H 3 PO 4 -NaOH ([PO 4 3- ] = 0.01M and 1M) solutions at pH 2, 7 and 10 at 100 0 C. In sulphate solutions at pH 2, the specimen suffered overall surface attack without the initiation of microcracks. The surface attack intensified at the prior austenite grain boundaries, martensite platelet boundaries, and non-metallic inclusions. In contrast, cracks initiated transgranularly in sulphate solutions at pH 7 and 10 with the development of selective attack at crack sites at later stages in the fatigue life. This attack was ascribed to local acidification as a result of hydrolysis of corrosion products extruded from inside the cracks. Long cracks with crack branching and debonded zones were observed in all phosphate solutions, except in 0.01M phosphate solution at pH 7. In this latter environment, short intrusion-extrusion microcracks were observed. This difference in behaviour was attributed to changes in the characteristics of the passive film as influenced by the local environmental conditions, mechanical rupture by plastic deformation, and electrochemical differences at the metal surface. (author)

  3. Changes of surface structure of Ni, W and chromium-nickel steel Cr18Ni10 irradiated by high fluences of krypton ions with high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didyk, A.Yu.; Semina, V.K.; Khalil, A.; Suvorov, A.L.; Stepanov, A.Eh.; Cheblukov, Yu.N.

    1999-01-01

    The surfaces of W single crystal, Ni polycrystal and chromium-nickel steel, irradiated by Kr ions with energy 305 and 245 MeV up to the fluences 2*10 15 and 3*10 15 ion/cm 2 , were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The evaporation coefficients of material surfaces were estimated on the base of changes of surface relief. The values of these coefficients turned out much more than ones predicted by the inelastic sputtering model. The method of 'step' was offered and realized for the more correct estimations evaporation coefficient on the Ni example. The phenomenological model explaining the observed phenomena is introduced

  4. A compact and low cost laser induced breakdown spectroscopic system: Application for simultaneous determination of chromium and nickel in steel using multivariate calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbieri Gonzaga, Fabiano [Chemical Metrology Division, National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology, Av. N. S. das Gracas, 50, Xerem, 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Pasquini, Celio, E-mail: pasquini@iqm.unicamp.br [Institute of Chemistry, State University of Campinas, POB 6154, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    This work describes a compact and low cost analyzer for laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on a diode pumped passively Q-switched Nd:LSB microchip laser and a conventional Czerny-Turner spectrograph (spectral range from about 250 to 390 nm) containing a non-intensified, non-gated and non-cooled 1024 pixel linear sensor array. The new LIBS instrument was applied for analyzing steel samples containing chromium and nickel in the concentration range from about 5 to 26% w/w (certified reference materials), integrating the emitted radiation for 40 s under continuous application of laser pulses at 2 kHz for each acquired spectrum (integration of about 80,000 plasmas). The emission data from about 356 to 362 nm and 340 to 354 nm were employed for the construction of two Partial Least Squares (PLS) calibration models for determination of chromium and nickel, respectively. The average relative errors of prediction of chromium and nickel concentrations were 3.7 and 6.7%, respectively, which are similar to or lower than those obtained using higher cost LIBS analyzers. The results have shown that multivariate calibration can help to overcome the decreasing instrumental performance associated with the low cost equipment. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low cost laser induced breakdown spectroscopy instrumentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microchip laser based LIBS system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Standard non-intensified, non-gated, non-cooled detector for LIBS system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improvement of results from a low cost LIBS system using multivariate calibration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr and Ni determination in steel by a low cost LIBS system.

  5. The roles of the micro-organisms and chromium content in the corrosion of iron-chromium steels in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, V.

    1991-09-01

    If it is widely accepted that the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria can increase the aqueous corrosion of steels, the induced mechanisms are still not definitively established. The aim of this work is to specify the roles, for corrosion, of the presence of bacteria (D. Vulgaris) in one part and of chemical parameters as the composition of the material and the accumulation of sulfides in another part. The use of experimental techniques coming from microbiology, electrochemistry or chemical analysis has revealed the interdependence which exists between the bacteria and the material, and the importance of the steel composition towards the adhesion of microorganisms and the generalized corrosion. The bacteria and the dissolved sulfides do not seem to influence remarkably the generalized corrosion. Nevertheless, the alterations of the surface state they induce could be the cause of localized corrosion phenomena. (O.M.)

  6. The roles of the micro-organisms and chromium content in the corrosion of iron-chromium steels in the presence of sulfate-reducing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, V.

    1991-12-01

    Although the ability of sulfate-reducing bacteria to enhance the corrosion of steel is now widely accepted, the actual processes involved in such phenomena are still discussed. This work is dedicated to the study of the exact roles played in corrosion processes firstly, by the presence of D. vulgaris cells and, secondly, by chemical factors such as the material composition and the accumulation of sulfide ions in the solution. The use of microbiological, electrochemical and analytical experimental techniques lead to results that show the interdependence of the bacteria and the material as well as the importance of the steel composition in the adhesion of the micro-organisms and the general corrosion rates. The bacteria cells and dissolved sulfide ions do not markedly influence the general corrosion rates. They however induce surface state modifications that can result in localized corrosion phenomena

  7. Anti corrosion layer for stainless steel in molten carbonate fuel cell - comprises phase vapour deposition of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride layer then oxidising layer in molten carbonate electrolyte

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Forming an anticorrosion protective layer on a stainless steel surface used in a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) - comprises the phase vapour deposition (PVD) of a layer comprising at least one of titanium nitride, aluminium nitride or chromium nitride and then forming a protective layer in situ...

  8. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Implantation of titanium, chromium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum ion source into 440C stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Jun; Hayashi, Kazunori; Sugiyama, Kenji; Ichiko, Osami; Hashiguchi, Yoshihiro

    1992-01-01

    Titanium, yttrium, molybdenum, silver, chromium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum ions generated by a metal vapor vacuum arc (MEVVA) ion source were implanted into 440C stainless steel in the dose region 10 17 ions cm -2 with extraction voltages of up to 70 kV. Glow discharge spectroscopy (GDS), friction coefficient, and Vickers microhardness of the specimens were studied. Grooves made by friction tests were investigated by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). GDS showed incorporation of carbon in the yttrium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten and platinum implanted specimens, as well as titanium implanted samples. A large amount of oxygen was observed in the yttrium implanted specimen. The friction coefficient was measured by reciprocating sliding of an unimplanted 440C ball without lubricant at a load of 0.245 N. The friction decreased and achieved a stable state after implantation of titanium, hafnium and tantalum. The friction coefficient of the platinum implanted specimen showed a gradual decrease after several cycles of sliding at high friction coefficient. The yttrium implanted sample exhibited a decreased but slightly unstable friction coefficient. Results from EPMA showed that the implanted elements, which gave decreased friction, remained even after sliding of 200 cycles. Implantation of chromium, molybdenum, silver and tungsten did not provide a decrease in friction and the implants were gone from the wear grooves after the sliding tests. (orig.)

  10. Establishment of Wear Resistant HVOF Coatings for 50CrMo4 Chromium Molybdenum Alloy Steel as an Alternative for Hard Chrome Plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuppasamy, S.; Sivan, V.; Natarajan, S.; Kumaresh Babu, S. P.; Duraiselvam, M.; Dhanuskodi, R.

    2018-05-01

    High cost imported components of seamless steel tube manufacturing plants wear frequently and need replacement to ensure the quality of the product. Hard chrome plating, which is time consuming and hazardous, is conventionally used to restore the original dimension of the worn-out surface of the machine components. High Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF) thermal spray coatings with NiCrBSi super alloy powder and Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 alloy powder applied on a 50CrMo4 (DIN-1.7228) chromium molybdenum alloy steel, the material of the wear prone machine component, were evaluated for use as an alternative for hard chrome plating in this present work. The coating characteristics are evaluated using abrasive wear test, sliding wear test and microscopic analysis, hardness test, etc. The study results revealed that the HVOF based NiCrBSi and Cr3C2NiCr75/25 coatings have hardness in the range of 800-900 HV0.3, sliding wear rate in the range of 50-60 µm and surface finish around 5 microns. Cr3C2 NiCr75/25 coating is observed to be a better option out of the two coatings evaluated for the selected application.

  11. 77 FR 6627 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Hard and Decorative Chromium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... aluminum to provide resistance to corrosion. The chromium anodizing process is used to coat aircraft parts... Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities and Hydrochloric Acid... Decorative Chromium Electroplating and Chromium Anodizing Tanks; and Steel Pickling-HCl Process Facilities...

  12. Steel dust in the New York City subway system as a source of manganese, chromium, and iron exposures for transit workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chillrud, Steven N; Grass, David; Ross, James M; Coulibaly, Drissa; Slavkovich, Vesna; Epstein, David; Sax, Sonja N; Pederson, Dee; Johnson, David; Spengler, John D; Kinney, Patrick L; Simpson, H James; Brandt-Rauf, Paul

    2005-03-01

    The United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 reflected increasing concern about potential effects of low-level airborne metal exposure on a wide array of illnesses. Here we summarize results demonstrating that the New York City (NYC) subway system provides an important microenvironment for metal exposures for NYC commuters and subway workers and also describe an ongoing pilot study of NYC transit workers' exposure to steel dust. Results from the TEACH (Toxic Exposure Assessment, a Columbia and Harvard) study in 1999 of 41 high-school students strongly suggest that elevated levels of iron, manganese, and chromium in personal air samples were due to exposure to steel dust in the NYC subway. Airborne concentrations of these three metals associated with fine particulate matter were observed to be more than 100 times greater in the subway environment than in home indoor or outdoor settings in NYC. While there are currently no known health effects at the airborne levels observed in the subway system, the primary aim of the ongoing pilot study is to ascertain whether the levels of these metals in the subway air affect concentrations of these metals or related metabolites in the blood or urine of exposed transit workers, who due to their job activities could plausibly have appreciably higher exposures than typical commuters. The study design involves recruitment of 40 transit workers representing a large range in expected exposures to steel dust, the collection of personal air samples of fine particulate matter, and the collection of blood and urine samples from each monitored transit worker.

  13. Analytical description of changes in the magnetic states of chromium-nickel steel under uniaxial elastic deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorkunov, E. S.; Yakushenko, E. I.; Zadvorkin, S. M.; Mushnikov, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    Dependences of magnetization and magnetic permeability of the 15KhN4D structural steel on the value of uniaxial stresses and magnetic field strength are obtained. A polynomial approximation fairly accurately describing the observed changes is proposed on the basis of experimental data.

  14. Self-protective powder wire for semiautomatic welding of corrosion resistant chromium-nickel type 18-10 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipodaev, V.N.; Kakhovskij, N.I.; Fadeeva, G.V.

    1977-01-01

    Self-protecting NP-ANV1 powder wire has been developed for welding 18-10 type stainless steels. The use of the wire provides for the same running properties of the welds as the TsL-11 electrodes, the welding being 3-5 times more efficient

  15. Characterization of surface hardening in a nitrated chromium steel by microwave plasma type ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La O C, G. de.

    1995-01-01

    With this work it is demonstrated the possibility of performing the nitriding process by using a CVD-ECR source, based on the results obtained after treating several samples of AISI H-12 steel. Also, the main operating parameters (time of treatment, sample temperatures and gas mixture) are determined during nitriding of this steel with the mentioned source. Samples used before nitriding were quenched and tempered at 580 Centigrade degrees. Several experiments were done by using a pure nitrogen plasma with exposure times of the samples of 20 minutes at temperatures from 450 to 550 Centigrade degrees, and by using a N 2 - H 2 plasma with exposure times of the samples of 20, 30 and 40 minutes at temperatures from 350 to 550 Centigrade degrees. Metallography, microhardness, EDS and Auger analysis were done to observe changes suffered for the samples after treatment. (Author)

  16. Pipes out of the chromium-molybdenum 12Kh2M1 steel intended for power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saf'yanov, A.V.; Plyatskovskij, O.A.; Khokhlov-Nekrasov, O.G.; Palatnikova, E.S.; Karpenko, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Vanadiumless steel 12Kh2M1 (2.25%Cr, 1%Mo) known to be applied abroad has been used for production of 325x60 mm tubes. The technology involves heating of the blanks to 1270-1300 deg C, their piercing in a double-roller mill, rolling on a pilger mill 8-16'' in thick wall caliber rolls, thermal treatment (normalizing at 930-960 deg C for 1 hour and tempering at 730+-10 deg C for 4 hours and etching (12-22% H 2 SO 4 and up to 143 g/l FeSO 4 ) for 3-4 hours at 55-65 deg C. Good technological properties of the steel and its capacity of working at 540-580 deg C are confirmed. Vanadium alloying of boiler steels does not provide for essential improvement of oxydation resistance and long term strength, but decreases the workability and enhances scatter of working parameters on account of minor variations of chemical composition

  17. Estimation of changes in nickel and chromium content in nickel-titanium and stainless steel orthodontic wires used during orthodontic treatment: An analytical and scanning electron microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana Kararia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The biocompatibility of orthodontic dental alloys has been investigated over the past 20 years, but the results have been inconclusive. The study compares standard 3 M Unitek nickel-titanium (NiTi and stainless steel archwires with locally available JJ orthodontics wires. Scanning electron microscope (SEM study of surface changes and complexometric titration to study compositional change was performed. Materials and Methods: Ten archwires each of group 1-3 M 0.016" NiTi, group 2-JJ 0.016" NiTi, group 3-3 M 0.019" FNx010.025" SS and group 4-JJ SS contributed a 10 mm piece of wire for analysis prior to insertion in the patient and 6 weeks post insertion. SEM images were recorded at Χ2000, Χ4000 and Χ6000 magnification. The same samples were subjected to complexiometric titration using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid to gauge the actual change in the composition. Observations and Results: The SEM images of all the archwires showed marked changes with deep scratches and grooves and dark pitting corrosion areas post intraoral use. 3M wires showed an uniform criss-cross pattern in as received wires indicating a coating which was absent after intraoral use. There was a significant release of Nickel and Chromium from both group 3 and 4. Group 2 wires released ions significantly more than group 1 (P = 0.0. Conclusion: Extensive and stringent trials are required before certifying any product to be used in Orthodontics.

  18. Roentgenoelectronic investigation into oxidation of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimov, A.G.; Rozenfel'd, I.L.; Kazanskij, L.P.; Machavariani, G.V.

    1978-01-01

    Kinetics of iron-chromium and iron-chromium-nickel alloy oxidation (of the Kh13 and Kh18N10T steels) in oxygen was investigated using X-ray electron spectroscopy. It was found that according to X-ray electron spectra chromium oxidation kinetics in the iron-chromium alloy differs significantly from oxidation kinetics of chromium pattern. Layer by layer X-ray electron analysis showed that chromium is subjected to a deeper oxidation as compared to iron, and accordingly, Cr 2 O 3 layer with pure iron impregnations is placed between the layer of mixed oxide (Fe 3 O 4 +Cr 2 O 3 ) and metal. A model of the iron-chromium alloy surface is suggested. The mixed oxide composition on the steel surface is presented as spinel Fesub(2+x)Crsub(1-x)Osub(y)

  19. Monitoring of chromium and nickel in biological fluids of stainless steel welders using the flux-cored-wire (FCW) welding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stridsklev, Inger Cecilie; Schaller, Karl-Heinz; Langård, Sverre

    2004-11-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) in flux-cored wire (FCW) welders welding on stainless steel (SS). Seven FCW welders were monitored for 3 days to 1 workweek, measuring Cr and Ni in air, blood, and urine. The welders were questioned about exposure to Cr and Ni during their whole working careers, with emphasis on the week of monitoring, about the use of personal protective equipment and their smoking habits. The air concentrations were mean 200 microg/m(3) (range 2.4-2,744) for total Cr, 11.3 microg/m(3) (416.7) for Ni during the workdays for the five welders who were monitored with air measurements. The levels of Cr and Ni in biological fluids varied between different workplaces. For Cr in whole blood, plasma, and erythrocytes, the mean levels after work were 1.25 (<0.4-8.3) and 1.68 (<0.2-8.0) and 0.9 (<0.4-7.2) microg/l, respectively. For Ni most of the measurements in whole blood and plasma were below the detection limits, the mean levels after work being 0.84 (<0.8-3.3) and 0.57 microg/l (<0.4-1.7), respectively. Mean levels for Cr and Ni in the urine after work were 3.96 (0.34-40.7) and 2.50 (0.56-5.0) microg/g creatinine, respectively. Correlations between the Cr(VI) levels measured in air and the levels of total Cr in the measured biological fluids were found. The results seem to support the view that monitoring of Cr in the urine may be versatile for indirect monitoring of the Cr(VI) air level in FCW welders. The results seem to suggest that external and internal exposure to Cr and Ni in FCW welders welding SS is low in general.

  20. Effect of volume ratio of liquid to solid on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Bowen; Cai Changchun; Lu Baiping

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Volume ratio of liquid to solid affects significantly the interfacial microstructure. → Elemental diffusion activity is increased by increasing volume ratio. → Mechanical property is improved by increasing volume ratio. - Abstract: The high chromium cast iron and medium carbon steel bimetal was fabricated by liquid-solid casting technology. The effect of volume ratios of liquid to solid (6:1, 10:1 and 12:1) on the interfacial microstructure and mechanical properties of bimetal was investigated. The interfacial microstructure was analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The shear strength and microhardness in as-cast condition were studied at room temperature. The results show that the volume ratios of liquid to solid affect significantly the interfacial microstructure. When liquid-solid volume ratio was 6:1, the unbonded region was detected in interface region because the imported heat energy cannot support effectively the diffusion of element, whereas, when liquid-solid volume ratios reach 10:1 and 12:1, a sound interfacial microstructure was achieved by the diffusion of C, Cr, Mo, Cu and Mn, and metallurgical bonding without unbonded region, void and hole, etc. was detected. With the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the elemental diffusion activity improves, resulting in the increase of width of interface transition region. At the same distance from interface, with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio, the microhardness is degraded in HCCI, but increased in MCS. The shear strength is also improved with the increase of liquid-solid volume ratio.

  1. On the corrosion behaviour of stainless steel, nickel-chromium and zirconium-alloys in pore water of Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitz, E.; Graefen, H.

    1991-12-01

    On the basis of an extensive review of literature and available experience, an evaluation was made of the corrosion of a metallic matrix for radioactive nuclides embedded in porous, water containing Portland cement. As a metallic matrix, austenitic high-alloy steel, nickel-base alloys and zirconium alloys are discussed. Pore waters in Portland cement have low aggressivity. However, through contact with formation water, chloride and sulphate enrichment can occur. Although corrosion is principally possible on the basis of purely thermodynamic considerations, it can be assumed that local corrosion (pitting, stress corrosion cracking, intergranular corrosion) is highly improbable under the given boundary conditions. This is valid for all three groups of alloys and means that only low release rates of corrosion products are to be expected. As a result of the discussion on radiolysis-induced corrosion, additional corrosion activity can be excluded. Final conclusions concerning the stimulation of corrosion processes by microbial action cannot be drawn and, therefore, additional experiments are proposed. The release rates of radioactive products are controlled by a very low dissolution rate of the materials in the passive state. All three groups of alloys show this type of general dissolution. From a survey of literature data it can be concluded that release rates greater than 250 mg/m 2 per day are not exceeded. Since these data were mainly obtained by electrochemical methods, it is proposed that quantitative analytical investigations of the corrosion products in pore water be made. On the whole the release rates determined are far below corrosion rates which are generally technically relevant. (author) 13 figs., 9 tabs., 61 refs

  2. Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean; Slaven, James; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Antonini, James

    2009-02-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. To isolate elements in stainless steel welding fumes with high potential for adverse health outcomes, fumes were generated using a robotic gas metal arc system, using four shield gases of varying oxygen content. The objective was to measure Cr(VI) concentrations in a broad spectrum of gas metal arc welding processes, and identify processes of exceptionally high or low Cr(VI) content. The gases used were 95% Ar/5% O(2), 98% Ar/2% O(2), 95% Ar/5%CO(2), and 75% He/25% Ar. The welder was operated in axial spray mode (Ar/O(2), Ar/CO(2)), short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO(2) low voltage and He/Ar), and pulsed axial-spray mode (98% Ar/2% O(2)). Results indicate large differences in Cr(VI) in the fumes, with Ar/O(2) (Pulsed)>Ar/O(2)>Ar/CO(2)>Ar/CO(2) (SC)>He/Ar; values were 3000+/-300, 2800+/-85, 2600+/-120, 1400+/-190, and 320+/-290 ppm respectively (means +/- standard errors for 2 runs and 3 replicates per run). Respective rates of Cr(VI) generation were 1.5, 3.2, 4.4, 1.3, and 0.46 microg/min; generation rates were also calculated in terms of microg Cr(VI) per metre of wire used. The generation rates of Cr(VI) increased with increasing O(3) concentrations. Particle size measurements indicated similar distributions, but somewhat higher >0.6 microm fractions for the short-circuit mode samples. Fumes were also sampled into 2 selected size ranges, a microspatter fraction (>or=0.6 microm) and a fine (welding type and shield gas type, and this presents an opportunity to tailor welding practices to lessen Cr(VI) exposures in workplaces by selecting low Cr(VI)-generating processes. Short-circuit processes generated less Cr(VI) than axial-spray methods, and inert gas shielding gave lower Cr(VI) content than shielding with active gases. A short circuit He/Ar shielded process and a pulsed axial spray Ar/O(2) process were both identified as having substantially lower Cr(VI) generation rates per unit of wire used relative

  3. Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  4. Chromium allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M B; Johansen, J D; Menné, Torkil

    2003-01-01

    Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr(VI)-sensitive ......Most studies investigating chromium allergy have been performed with Cr(VI). However, real exposure to chromium from leather products includes both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). We have determined and compared the minimum elicitation threshold (MET) concentration for Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in Cr......(III) was concluded to play an important role in chromium allergy, because Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were both capable of eliciting eczema at low concentrations. Rather than regarding chromium dermatitis as a result of Cr(VI) allergy alone, it may be more correct to consider it as a result of a combined Cr(III) and Cr......(VI) allergy....

  5. Long-term strength and allowable stresses of grade 10Kh9MFB and X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91/P91) chromium heat-resistant steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Danyushevskiy, I. A.; Schenkova, I. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, grade X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91, P91) and 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) chromium steels are widely applied in equipment manufacturing for thermal power plants in Russia and abroad. Compilation and comparison of tensile, impact, and long-term strength tests results accumulated for many years of investigations of foreign grade X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, P91, and domestic grade 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) steels is carried out. The property identity of metals investigated is established. High strength and plastic properties of steels, from which pipes and other products are made, for operation under creep conditions are confirmed. Design characteristics of long-term strength on the basis of tests with more than one million of hour-samples are determined ( and at temperatures of 500-650°C). The table of recommended allowable stresses for grade 10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-SH, X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, and P91 steels is developed. The long-time properties of pipe welded joints of grade 10Kh9MFB+10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-Sh+10Kh9MFB-Sh, X10CrMoVNb9-1+X10CrMoVNb9-1, P91+P91, T91+T91, 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh)+X10CrMoVNb9-1(T/P91) steels is researched. The welded joint reduction factor is experimentally determined.

  6. The compatibility of chromium-aluminium steels with high pressure carbon dioxid at intermediate- temperatures; Compatibilite des aciers au chrome-aluminium avec le gaz carbonique sous pression aux temperatures moyennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leclercq, D; Loriers, H; David, R; Darras, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    With a view to their use in the exchangers of nuclear reactors of the graphite-gas or heavy water-gas types, the behaviour of chromium-aluminium steels containing up to 7 per cent chromium and 1.5 per cent aluminium has been studied in the presence of high-pressure carbon dioxide at temperatures of between 400 and 700 deg. C. The two most interesting grades of steel (2 per cent Cr - 0.35 per cent Al - 0.35 per cent Mo and 7 per cent Cr - 1.5 per cent Al - 0.6 per cent Si) are still compatible with carbon dioxide up to 550 and 600 deg. C respectively. A hot dip aluminised coating considerably increases resistance to oxidation of the first grade and should make possible its use up to temperatures of at least 600 deg. C. (authors) [French] Dans l'optique de leur emploi dans les echangeurs de reacteurs nucleaires des filieres graphite-gaz ou eau lourde-gaz, le comportement en presence de gaz carbonique sous pression d'aciers au chrome-aluminium, contenant jusqu'a 7 pour cent de chrome et 1,5 pour cent d'aluminium a ete etudie entre 400 et 700 deg. C. Les deux nuances les plus interessantes (2 pour cent Cr - 0,35 pour cent Al - 0,35 pour cent Mo et 7 pour cent Cr - 1,5 pour cent Al - 0,6 pour cent Si) restent compatibles avec le gaz carbonique jusqu'a 550 et 600 deg. C respectivement. Un revetement d'aluminium, effectue par immersion dans un bain fondu, ameliore notablement la resistance a l'oxydation de la premiere et doit permettre son empioi jusqu'a 600 deg. C au moins. (auteurs)

  7. Wear resistance and structural changes in nitrogen-containing high-chromium martensitic steels under conditions of abrasive wear and sliding friction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, A.V.; Korshunov, L.G.; Schastlivtsev, V.M.; Chernenko, N.L.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic nitrogen-containing steels Kh17N2A0.14, Kh13A0.14, Kh14G4A0.22 as well as steel 20Kh13 were studied for their wear resistance under conditions of friction and abrasion. Metallography, X ray diffraction analysis and electron microscopy were used to investigate the structural changes taking place in a thin surface layer on wearing. It is shown that an increase of nitrogen content of 0.14 to 0.22% promotes an enhancement of steel resistance to abrasive and adhesive wear, especially after tempering in the range of 500-550 deg C. Typically, the nitrogen-containing steels exhibit lower resistance to various types of wear in comparison with the steels with high-carbon martensite due to their lower deformability under conditions of friction loading

  8. Influence of Magnesium Ions in the Seawater Environment on the Improvement of the Corrosion Resistance of Low-Chromium-Alloy Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sol-Ji; Kim, Jung-Gu

    2018-01-20

    This study examined the synergic effect of alloying the element Cr and the environmental element Mg 2+ ions on the corrosion property of a low-alloy steel in seawater at 60 °C, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) tests and weight-loss tests. The Mg 2+ ions in seawater played an important role in lowering the electron transfer of the rust layer in the Cr-containing steel. The corrosion resistance of the Cr-containing steel is superior to that of blank steel in Mg 2+ ions containing seawater. XPS and XRD results indicated that the formation of MgFe₂O₄ and a mixed layer (Cr oxide + FeCr₂O₄ + MgCr₂O₄) improved the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel in the seawater.

  9. Influence of Magnesium Ions in the Seawater Environment on the Improvement of the Corrosion Resistance of Low-Chromium-Alloy Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sol-Ji Song

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the synergic effect of alloying the element Cr and the environmental element Mg2+ ions on the corrosion property of a low-alloy steel in seawater at 60 °C, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS, linear polarization resistance (LPR tests and weight-loss tests. The Mg2+ ions in seawater played an important role in lowering the electron transfer of the rust layer in the Cr-containing steel. The corrosion resistance of the Cr-containing steel is superior to that of blank steel in Mg2+ ions containing seawater. XPS and XRD results indicated that the formation of MgFe2O4 and a mixed layer (Cr oxide + FeCr2O4 + MgCr2O4 improved the corrosion resistance of the low-alloy steel in the seawater.

  10. Use of ferritic steels in breeder reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriarca, P.

    1983-01-01

    The performance of LMFBR reactor steam generator materials is reviewed. Tensile properties of stainless steel-304, stainless steel-316, chromium-molybdenum steels, and Incoloy 800H are presented for elevated temperatures

  11. Interfacial failure in dissimilar weld joint of high boron 9% chromium steel and nickel-based alloy under high-temperature creep condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Tetsuya, E-mail: MATSUNAGA.Tetsuya@nims.go.jp; Hongo, Hiromichi, E-mail: HONGO.Hiromichi@nims.go.jp; Tabuchi, Masaaki, E-mail: TABUCHI.Masaaki@nims.go.jp

    2017-05-17

    The advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) power generation system is expected to become the next-generation base-load power station in Japan. Dissimilar weld joints between high-Cr heat-resistant steels and nickel-based alloys with a nickel-based filler metal (Alloy 82) will need to be adopted for this purpose. However, interfacial failure between the steels and weld metal has been observed under high-temperature creep conditions. Fractography and microstructure observations showed the failure initiated in a brittle manner by an oxide notch at the bottom of the U-groove. The fracture then proceeded along the bond line in a ductile manner with shallow dimples, where micro-Vickers hardness tests showed remarkable softening in the steel next to the bond line. In addition, the steel showed a much larger total elongation and reduction of area than the weld metal at low stresses under long-term creep conditions, leading to mismatch deformation at the interface. According to the results, it can be concluded that the interfacial failure between the 9Cr steels and Alloy 82 weld metal is initiated by an oxide notch and promoted by softening and the difference in the plasticity of the steels and weld metal.

  12. Corrosion of low alloy steel containing 0.5% chromium in supercritical CO2-saturated brine and water-saturated supercritical CO2 environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Gao, Kewei; Li, Qian

    2018-05-01

    The corrosion behavior of P110 low-Cr alloy steel in supercritical CO2-saturated brine (aqueous phase) and water-saturated supercritical CO2 (SC CO2 phase) was investigated. The results show that P110 steel primarily suffered general corrosion in the aqueous phase, while severe localized corrosion occurred in the SC CO2 phase. The formation of corrosion product scale on P110 steel in the aqueous phase divided into three stages: formation of the initial corrosion layer containing amorphous Cr(OH)3, FeCO3 and a small amount of Fe3C; transformation of initial corrosion layer to mixed layer, which consisted of FeCO3 and a small amount of Cr(OH)3 and Fe3C; growth and dissolution of the mixed layer. Finally, only a single mixed layer covered on the steel in the aqueous phase. However, the scale formed in SC CO2 phase consisted of two layers: the inner mixed layer and the dense outer FeCO3 crystalline layer.

  13. Tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  14. Changes In Properties and Microstructure of High-Chromium 9-12%Cr Steels Due to Long-Term Exposure at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieliński A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the characteristics of the performance of P91 (X10CrMoVNb9-1, P92 (X10CrWMoVNb9-2 and VM12 (X12CrCoWVNb12-2-2 steels used for condition assessment of the pressure components of boilers with supercritical steam parameters. Studies on the mechanical properties, microstructure tests using scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray analysis of the phase composition of precipitates were performed for selected steels in the as-received condition and after long-term annealing. These steel characteristics are used for the evaluation of the microstructural changes and mechanical properties of the material of components after long-term service. The result of this study is the database of material characteristics representing the mechanical properties related to the microstructure analysis and it can be used for diagnosis of the components of pressure parts of power boilers.

  15. Standard practice for determining the susceptibility of stainless steels and related Nickel-Chromium-Iron Alloys to stress-corrosion cracking in polythionic acids

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for preparing and conducting the polythionic acid test at room temperature, 22 to 25°C (72 to 77°F), to determine the relative susceptibility of stainless steels or other related materials (nickel-chromiumiron alloys) to intergranular stress corrosion cracking. 1.2 This practice can be used to evaluate stainless steels or other materials in the “as received” condition or after being subjected to high-temperature service, 482 to 815°C (900 to 1500°F), for prolonged periods of time. 1.3 This practice can be applied to wrought products, castings, and weld metal of stainless steels or other related materials to be used in environments containing sulfur or sulfides. Other materials capable of being sensitized can also be tested in accordance with this test. 1.4 This practice may be used with a variety of stress corrosion test specimens, surface finishes, and methods of applying stress. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, ...

  16. Nature of higher chaomium steels tendency to carbide formation during cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereverzev, V.M.; Kolmykov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of manganese, chromium and vanadium upon carbide formation in steels during cementation was investigated. It was found that the increase in the tendency of chromium steels to form carbides during cementation is caused by the stabilization of cementite by chromium. As a result of the dissolution of chromium, the isobaric-isothermal potential of cementite increases to such a point, as to make possible the formation, on energy grounds, of granular cementite. The formation of granular cementite in chromium steels is promoted also by a substantial magnitude of the coefficient of thermal activity of chromium in austenite

  17. Coarsening of (Fe, Cr)23C6 carbide phase on the tempering of 14Kh17N2 chromium-nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psarev, V.I.

    2002-01-01

    Paper lists the results of computer analysis of distribution according to sizes (Fe, Cr) 23 C 6 microparticles resulting from 14Kh17N2 steel tempering under 700 Deg C. Data were obtained at the maximum beneficial magnification of a light microscope. The mentioned curves of distribution densities are characterized by more reliable run from most permissible sizes of dispersed particles. Application of general rules of distributions and of previously elaborated procedure to identify experimental histograms with theoretical distributions enables to derive valuable information on dynamics of coarsening of a disperse phase in this case, as well [ru

  18. Hexavalent Chromium Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about chromium, exposure to which can increase your risk of lung cancer and cancer of the paranasal sinuses and nasal cavity. Hexavalent chromium compounds have been used as corrosion inhibitors in a wide variety of products and processes.

  19. Cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt coatings processed by laser beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giren, B.G.; Szkodo, M.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the cavitation erosion of chromium-manganese and chromium-cobalt clads were tested, each of them for three cases: (1) without additional processing; (2) after laser heating of the solid state and (3) after laser remelting of the material. Armco iron, carbon steel 45 and chromium-nickel steel 0H18N9T were used as substrates. C.W. CO 2 laser with a beam power of 1000 W was used as a source of radiation. The investigated samples were subjected to cavitation impingement in a rotating disk facility. The results indicate that laser processing of the thick, electrode deposited coatings by laser beam leads in some cases to an increase of their cavitation resistance. Strong dependence of the coatings performance on the substrate, both for the laser processed or unprocessed parts of the materials was also discovered. (author)

  20. Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Logistics 4 Initiative - DoD Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Non- Chrome Primer IIEXAVAJ ENT CHRO:M I~UMI CHROMIUM (VII Oil CrfVli.J CANCEfl HAnRD CD...Management Office of the Secretary of Defense Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent Chromium Minimization Strategy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry applied to dealloying phenomena II. Selective dissolution of iron and chromium during active-passive cycles of an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogle, K.; Mokaddem, M.; Volovitch, P.

    2010-01-01

    Atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry was used to investigate selective dissolution of a 304 austenitic stainless steel sample in 2 M H 2 SO 4 . The partial dissolution rates of Fe, Cr, Ni, Mn, Mo, and Cu were measured as function of time during a series of potentiostatic triggered activation/passivation cycles. When first exposed to sulfuric acid solution, the steel sample was in a passive state with a total steady state ionic dissolution rate expressed as an equivalent current density of 10 μA cm -2 . A transition into the active and passive state could be triggered by cathodic (-700 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) and anodic (+400 to +700 mV vs. Ag/AgCl) potentiostatic pulses respectively of variable time. Excess Cr dissolution was observed during the activation cycle as compared to Fe and a depletion of Cr dissolution was observed during the passivation cycle. These results are interpreted in terms of the dissolution of a Cr rich passive layer during activation and selective dissolution of Fe, Mn, Ni and other elements to form a Cr rich passive layer during passivation. Quantitative analysis of the excess Cr showed that the residual film contained approximately 0.38 μg Cr/cm 2 . Fe does not appear to be incorporated into the film at this early stage of passive film growth. Residual films of metallic nickel and copper were formed on the surface during the active period that subsequently dissolved during passivation.

  2. A numerical approach to predict the long-term creep behaviour and precipitate back-stress evolution of 9-12% chromium steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzer, I.; Cerjak, H. [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. for Materials Science and Welding; Kozeschnik, E. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Materials Science and Technology; Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. ' Early Stages of Precipitation'

    2010-07-01

    The mechanical properties of modern 9-12% Cr steels are significantly influenced by the presence and stability of different precipitate populations. These secondary phases grow, coarsen and, sometimes, dissolve again during heat treatment and service, which leads to a remarkable change in the obstacle effect of these precipitates on dislocation movement. In the present work, the experimentally observed creep rupture strength of a modified 9-12% Cr steel developed in the European COST Group is compared to the calculated maximum obstacle effect (Orowan threshold stress) caused by the precipitates present in the investigated alloy for different heat treatment conditions. It is shown that the differences in creep rupture strength caused by different heat treatments disappear after long time service. This observation is discussed on the basis of the calculated evolution of the precipitate microstructure. The concept of boosting long-term creep rupture strength by maximizing the initial creep strength with optimum quality heat treatment parameters for precipitation strengthening is critically assessed. (orig.)

  3. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based

  4. Biocompatibility and mechanical properties of diamond-like coatings on cobalt-chromium-molybdenum steel and titanium-aluminum-vanadium biomedical alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinüber, C; Kleemann, C; Friederichs, R J; Haubold, L; Scheibe, H J; Schuelke, T; Boehlert, C; Baumann, M J

    2010-11-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are favored for wear components because of diamond-like hardness, low friction, low wear, and high corrosion resistance (Schultz et al., Mat-wiss u Werkstofftech 2004;35:924-928; Lappalainen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2003;66B:410-413; Tiainen, Diam Relat Mater 2001;10:153-160). Several studies have demonstrated their inertness, nontoxicity, and the biocompatibility, which has led to interest among manufacturers of surgical implants (Allen et al., J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 2001;58:319-328; Uzumaki et al., Diam Relat Mater 2006;15:982-988; Hauert, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:583-589; Grill, Diam Relat Mater 2003;12:166-170). In this study, hydrogen-free amorphous, tetrahedrally bonded DLC films (ta-C) were deposited at low temperatures by physical vapor deposition on medical grade Co28Cr6Mo steel and the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V (Scheibe et al., Surf Coat Tech 1996;85:209-214). The mechanical performance of the ta-C was characterized by measuring its surface roughness, contact angle, adhesion, and wear behavior, whereas the biocompatibility was assessed by osteoblast (OB) attachment and cell viability via Live/Dead assay. There was no statistical difference found in the wettability as measured by contact angle measurements for the ta-C coated and the uncoated samples of either Co28Cr6Mo or Ti6Al4V. Rockwell C indentation and dynamic scratch testing on 2-10 μm thick ta-C films on Co28Cr6Mo substrates showed excellent adhesion with HF1 grade and up to 48 N for the critical load L(C2) during scratch testing. The ta-C coating reduced the wear from 3.5 × 10(-5) mm(3)/Nm for an uncoated control sample (uncoated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) to 1.1 × 10(-7) mm(3)/Nm (coated Co28Cr6Mo against uncoated stainless steel) in reciprocating pin-on-disk testing. The lowest wear factor of 3.9 × 10(-10) mm(3)/Nm was measured using a ta-C coated steel ball running against a ta-C coated and polished Co28Cr6Mo disk

  5. Transition welds in welding of two-ply steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fartushnyj, V.G.; Evsyukov, Yu.G.

    1977-01-01

    Studied were physico-mechanical properties of welds made by various welding wires of chromium-nickel and nickel-chromium steels in submerged arc welding of double-layer steels with main layer of the VSt.3sp. carbon steel. It is shown that service-reliable structures welded of two-layer steels are obtained by providing the content from 11 to 20 % Ni in the automatically welded transition layer

  6. The influence of Span-20 surfactant and micro-/nano-Chromium (Cr) Powder Mixed Electrical Discharge Machining (PMEDM) on the surface characteristics of AISI D2 hardened steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosni, N. A. J.; Lajis, M. A.

    2018-04-01

    The application of powder mixed dielectric to improve the efficiency of electrical discharge machining (EDM) has been extensively studied. Therefore, PMEDM have attracted the attention of many researchers since last few decades. Improvement in EDM process has resulted in the use of span-20 surfactant and Cr powder mixed in dielectric fluid, which results in increasing machiniability, better surface quality and faster machining time. However, the study of powder suspension size of surface charateristics in EDM field is still limited. This paper presents the improvement of micro-/nano- Cr powder size on the surface characteristics of the AISI D2 hardened steels in PMEDM. It has found that the reacst layer in PMEDM improved by as high as 41-53 % compared to conventional EDM. Also notably, the combination of added Cr powder and span-20 surfactant reduced the recast layer thickness significantly especially in nano-Cr size. This improvement was great potential adding nano-size Cr powder to dielectric for machining performance.

  7. The influence of lead temperature on the accuracy of various stainless-steel sheathed, mineral-inulated nickel-chromium/nickel aluminium thermocouples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, P.; Burns, J.S.

    1977-10-01

    Samples of three types of stainless steel sheathed MI thermocouples, such as are currently used in fire and furnace tests of transport flasks, have been subjected to high lead temperatures whilst the thermojunctions were kept at a constant low temperature. Both the lead temperature and the length of lead at temperature have been varied. As the lead temperature rises from ambient to a selected value, the emf output from the thermocouple initially decreases and then increases, taking up a final value dependent on the particular conditions. Below a threshold lead temperature, no significant steady state error occurs and the negative transient is generally negligible. Each thermocouple has its own threshold temperature, the lowest found being about 600 0 C, although the average lies at about 750 0 C. Above the threshold lead temperature, the thermal emf can be in error by the equivalent of more than 100 0 C, the highest error found being nearly 230 0 C at a temperature 250 0 C above threshold. The same thermocouple showed a negative transient of 13 0 C 3 minutes after start of heating to 890 0 C. It is probable that the steady state error arises because of the degradation of the thermocouple mineral insulation at elevated temperatures and recommendations are made on the use of such thermocouples in fire and furnace tests. The cause of the initial negative transient error has not been identified, but ways of minimising any resultant errors are suggested. (author)

  8. Mechanical-thermal synthesis of chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cintho, Osvaldo Mitsuyuki; Favilla, Eliane Aparecida Peixoto; Capocchi, Jose Deodoro Trani

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the synthesis of chromium carbides (Cr 3 C 2 and Cr 7 C 3 ), starting from metallic chromium (obtained from the reduction of Cr 2 O 3 with Al) and carbon (graphite). The synthesis was carried out via high energy milling, followed by heat-treating of pellets made of different milled mixtures at 800 o C, for 2 h, under an atmosphere of argon. A SPEX CertPrep 8000 Mixer/Mill was used for milling under argon atmosphere. A tool steel vat and two 12.7 mm diameter chromium steel balls were used. The raw materials used and the products were characterized by differential thermal analysis, thermo gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, electronic microscopy and X-ray fluorescence chemical analysis. The following variables were investigated: the quantity of carbon in the mixture, the milling time and the milling power. Mechanical activation of the reactant mixture depends upon the milling power ratio used for processing. The energy liberated by the reduction of the chromium oxide with aluminium exhibits a maximum for milling power ratio between 5:1 and 7.5:1. Self-propagating reaction occurred for all heat-treated samples whatever the carbon content of the sample and the milling power ratio used. Bearing carbon samples exhibited hollow shell structures after the reaction. The level of iron contamination of the milled samples was kept below 0.3% Fe. The self-propagated reaction caused high temperatures inside the samples as it may be seen by the occurrence of spherules, dendrites and whiskers. The carbon content determines the type of chromium carbide formed

  9. Investigations of the oxidation-induced service life of chromium steels for high temperature fuel cell application (SOFC); Untersuchungen zur oxidationsbedingten Lebensdauer von Chromstaehlen fuer die Anwendung in der Hochtemperaturbrennstoffzelle (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl, S.T.

    2006-08-17

    The increasing energy consumption of future automobiles should be covered by a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) used as an additional energy supply (auxiliary power unit). The application of a SOFC with about 5 kW power in cars requires small size, low weight and an economic fabrication. To achieve this goal the interconnector and the metallic anode substrate (depending on an alternative concept of construction) should be manufactured out of thin Crofer22APU, a high chromium ferritic steel. The scale formation mechanisms on Crofer22APU sheets, wires and powder metallurgical produced foils of different thicknesses were investigated in several atmospheres of water vapour/hydrogen at 800 and 900 C, simulating the anode conditions. For scale characterization a number of conventional analysis techniques such as optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used in combination with deflection testing in monofacial oxidation and two-stage oxidation studies using {sup 18}O and H{sub 2} {sup 18}O tracer. With these results a theoretical model for the determination of lifetime was developed for Crofer22APU components in simulated anode gas. It was found that the lifetime at a given temperature depends not only on the surface-to-volume ratio, but also on the geometry of the component (e.g. sheet or wire). The critical Cr content required for breakaway oxidation depends on microcrack formation in the surface oxide scale, which occurs on ridges of a sheet during thermal cycling. The development of a metallic interconnector and a metallic anode substrate requires measures to avoid interdiffusion between the alloy and the bordering nickel-YSZ (yttrium stabilized zirconia) cermet of the anode, or depending on the conception of the stack, the bordering nickel-YSZ cermet of the anode functional layer. Therefore the suitability of preoxidation layers after different preoxidation conditions was tested. It was found that the inhibition of the interdiffusion

  10. Chromium carcinogenicity: California strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeeff, G V; Satin, K; Painter, P; Zeise, L; Popejoy, C; Murchison, G

    1989-10-01

    Hexavalent chromium was identified by California as a toxic air contaminant (TAC) in January 1986. The California Department of Health Services (CDHS) concurred with the findings of the International Agency for Research on Cancer that there is sufficient evidence to demonstrate the carcinogenicity of chromium in both animals and humans. CDHS did not find any compelling evidence demonstrating the existence of a threshold with respect to chromium carcinogenesis. Experimental data was judged inadequate to assess potential human reproductive risks from ambient exposures. Other health effects were not expected to occur at ambient levels. The theoretically increased lifetime carcinogenic risk from a continuous lifetime exposure to hexavalent chromium fell within the range 12-146 cancer cases per nanogram hexavalent chromium per cubic meter of air per million people exposed, depending on the potency estimate used. The primary sources found to contribute significantly to the risk of exposure were chrome platers, chromic acid anodizing facilities and cooling towers utilizing hexavalent chromium as a corrosion inhibitor. Evaluation of genotoxicity data, animal studies and epidemiological studies indicates that further consideration should be given to the potential carcinogenicity of hexavalent chromium via the oral route.

  11. Contingency plans for chromium utilization. Publication NMAB-335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The United States depends entirely on foreign sources for the critical material, chromium, making it very vulnerable to supply disruptions. This vulnerability results because chromium is essential for the fabrication of corrosion-resisting steels and high-temperature, oxidation-resisting alloys in applications that are vital to the nation's technological well-being; because no substitutes are known for these materials in those applications; and because the known, substantial deposits of chromite ore are only in a few geographical locations that could become inaccessible to the United States as a result of political actions. The effectiveness of programs such as stockpiling, conservation, and research and development for substitutes to reduce the impact of disruption of imports of chromite and ferrochromium are discussed. Alternatives for decreasing chromium consumption also are identified for chromium-containing materials in the areas of design, processing, and substitution

  12. Effects of chromium on the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Richa; Upreti, R K; Seth, P K; Chaturvedi, U C

    2002-09-06

    Chromium is a naturally occurring heavy metal found commonly in the environment in trivalent, Cr(III), and hexavalent, Cr(VI), forms. Cr(VI) compounds have been declared as a potent occupational carcinogen among workers in chrome plating, stainless steel, and pigment industries. The reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) results in the formation of reactive intermediates that together with oxidative stress oxidative tissue damage and a cascade of cellular events including modulation of apoptosis regulatory gene p53, contribute to the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Cr(VI)-containing compounds. On the other hand, chromium is an essential nutrient required to promote the action of insulin in body tissues so that the body can use sugars, proteins and fats. Chromium is of significant importance in altering the immune response by immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive processes as shown by its effects on T and B lymphocytes, macrophages, cytokine production and the immune response that may induce hypersensitivity reactions. This review gives an overview of the effects of chromium on the immune system of the body. Copyright 2002 Federation of European Microbiological Societies

  13. Chromium speciation in rainwater: temporal variability and atmospheric deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieber, R.J.; Willey, J.D.; Zvalaren, S.D. [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, Wilmington, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2002-12-15

    Chromium is released into the atmosphere by a variety of anthropogenic activities which include steel manufacturing, leather tanning, wood presentation and fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of the various chromium species were determined in 89 rainwater samples collected in Wilmington, NC from October 1, 1999 to December 31, 2001. Volume weighted annual average concentrations of Cr{sub total}, particulate Cr, Cr(III)(aq), and Cr(VI)(aq) were 4.6, 2.2, 0.8 and 1.2 nM, respectively. There was distinct seasonal and diurnal variability in the concentrations of the various chromium species. Chromium emissions to the global atmosphere by both natural and anthropogenic sources are estimated to be 2.2 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. Using rainwater concentration data along with other published rainwater Cr concentrations and an estimate for total global annual rain, the total global flux of chromium removed from the atmosphere via wet deposition is 2.1 x 10{sup 9} mol/yr. This represents complete removal of Cr and indicates that essentially all chromium released into the global atmosphere is removed via rain. About half this chromium is dissolved with roughly equal concentrations of toxic Cr(VI) and relatively harmless Cr(III) species. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  15. Deposition of heated whey proteins on a chromium oxide surface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurnink, Th.; Verheul, M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Kruif, de C.G.

    1996-01-01

    Whey protein solutions were given different heat treatments after which their deposition on a chromium oxide surface (the outer layer of stainless steel) was measured by reflectometry. The deposition was studied under controlled flow conditions by using a stagnation point flow configuration. The

  16. Substoichiometric extraction of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, T.; Kudo, K.

    1980-01-01

    Substoichiometric extraction of chromium with tetraphenylarsonium chloride (TPACl), tri-n-octylamine (TNOA), diethylammonium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDDC) and ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (APDC) was examined in detail. Chromium can be extracted substoichiometrically in a pH range, which is 1.1-2.6 for the TPACl compound, 0.6-2.3 for the TNOA compound, 5.1-6.4 for the DDDC chelate and 3.9-4.9 for the APDC chelate. Chromium in high-purity calcium carbonate, Orchard Leaves (NBS SRM-1571) and Brewers Yeast (NBS SRM-1569) was determined by neutron activation analysis combined with substoichiometric extraction by DDDC and APDC. The values of 2.0+-0.02 ppm and 2.6+-0.2 ppm were obtained for Brewers Yeast and Orchard Leaves, respectively. These values were in good agreement with those reported by NBS. The reaction mechanism and the reaction ratio between hexavalent chromium and dithiocarbamate are also discussed. (author)

  17. Integrated Criteria Document Chromium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff W; Cleven RFMJ; Janus JA; van der Poel P; van Beelen P; Boumans LJM; Canton JH; Eerens HC; Krajnc EI; de Leeuw FAAM; Matthijsen AJCM; van de Meent D; van der Meulen A; Mohn GR; Wijland GC; de Bruijn PJ; van Keulen A; Verburgh JJ; van der Woerd KF

    1990-01-01

    Betreft de engelse versie van rapport 758701001
    Bij dit rapport behoort een appendix onder hetzelfde nummer getiteld: "Integrated Criteria Document Chromium: Effects" Auteurs: Janus JA; Krajnc EI
    (appendix: see 710401002A)

  18. Microstructure and transformation kinetics in bainitic steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luzginova, N.V.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim of reaching a better understanding of the microstructure evolution and the overall phase transformation kinetics in hyper-eutectoid steels a commercial SAE 52100 bearing steel and 7 model alloys with different concentrations of chromium, cobalt and aluminum have been studied in this

  19. High quality steel casting for energy technics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, F.; Koefler, G.

    1982-01-01

    The casting of several chromium-molybdenum steels for steam and hydraulic turbines is discussed. Non-destructive testing of the castings is performed demonstrating the safety for use in nuclear technology. The effect of metallurgical parameters on steel casting quality, the heat treatment, and the effect of construction design on costs for fettling and repair weldings are considered. (Auth.)

  20. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961); Aspect electrochimique de la corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique et en presence de chrome hexavalent (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H; Hure, J; Plante, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [French] La corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique bouillant augmente notablement quand le milieu contient des ions chrome a l'etat hexavalent. Par suite de divers phenomenes d'oxydo-reduction, le potentiel de l'acier evolue generalement au cours du temps. Les mesures effectuees permettent d'etablir une relation entre les pertes de poids et le potentiel des echantillons. L'addition de Mn(VI) et Ce(IV) est compare a celle de Cr(VI) et montre que la relation precedente s'applique de facon generale. L'attaque du metal en milieu oxydant est en grande, partie due a une corrosion intergranulaire conduisant a un dechaussement des grains bien que l'acier etudie ne soit pas sensible aux tests classiques de Huey et de Strauss. Aussi, meme en l'absence de toute autre reaction d'oxydation l'intensite qu l'on observerait en soumettant l'acier a un potentiel anodique dans un montage potentiostatique ne correspondrait pas a la perte de poids reelle du metal. (auteurs)

  1. Corrosion of oxide dispersion strengthened iron–chromium steels and tantalum in fluoride salt coolant: An in situ compatibility study for fusion and fusion–fission hybrid reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dasher, Bassem; Farmer, Joseph; Ferreira, James; Serrano de Caro, Magdalena; Rubenchik, Alexander; Kimura, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► ODS steel corrosion in molten fluoride salts was studied in situ using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. ► Steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface. ► The addition of tungsten to ODS steels increases corrosion resistance measurably at 600 °C. - Abstract: Primary candidate classes of materials for future nuclear power plants, whether they be fission, fusion or hybrids, include oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels which rely on a dispersion of nano-oxide particles in the matrix for both mechanical strength and swelling resistance, or tantalum alloys which have an inherent neutron-induced swelling resistance and high temperature strength. For high temperature operation, eutectic molten lithium containing fluoride salts are attractive because of their breeding capability as well as their relatively high thermal capacity, which allow for a higher average operating temperature that increases power production. In this paper we test the compatibility of Flinak (LiF–NaF–KF) salts on ODS steels, comparing the performance of current generation ODS steels developed at Kyoto University with the commercial alloy MA956. Pure tantalum was also tested for comparative purposes. In situ data was obtained for temperatures ranging from 600 to 900 °C using a custom-built high temperature electrochemical impedance spectroscopy cell. Results for ODS steels show that steel/coolant interfacial resistance increases from 600 to 800 °C due to an aluminum enriched layer forming at the surface, however an increase in temperature to 900 °C causes this layer to break up and aggressive attack to occur. Performance of current generation ODS steels surpassed that of the MA956 ODS steel, with an in situ impedance behavior similar or better than that of pure tantalum.

  2. Chromium in potatoes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoddard-Gilbert, K.; Blincoe, C.

    1989-01-01

    Chromium concentration in potatoes was determined, and tubes were labeled either intrinsically or extrinsically with radioactive chromate ( 51 Cr). A labeled chromium complex was isolated from preparations of raw, baked, or fried potatoes and chromatographed on gel permeation media. Potato pulp and peel contained 1.63 and 2.70 μg of Cr/g tissue, respectively. There was no correlation between the two, nor did they respond similarly to changes of variety or locations. No significant differences were apparent in relative migration of the isolated complexes except between raw and cooked extrinsically labeled preparations

  3. Kinetics of borided gear steels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ration (FeB + Fe2B) due to the high intensity stress states generally situated at the ... performed molten salt boriding of AISI D2 steel with borax (Na2B4O7) as the ... the borided layer thickness; silicon, chromium and aluminium have moderate.

  4. Corrosion-resistant coating technique for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ando, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are attractive materials for application as fuel cladding in fast reactors and first-wall material of fusion blanket. Recent studies have focused more on high-chromium ferritic (12-18 wt% Cr) ODS steels with attractive corrosion resistance properties. However, they have poor material workability, require complicated heat treatments for recrystallization, and possess anisotropic microstructures and mechanical properties. On the other hand, low-chromium ferritic/martensitic (8-9 wt% Cr) ODS steels have no such limitations; nonetheless, they have poor corrosion resistance properties. In our work, we developed a corrosion-resistant coating technique for a low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. The ODS steel was coated with the 304 or 430 stainless steel, which has better corrosion resistances than the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steels. The 304 or 430 stainless steel was coated by changing the canning material from mild steel to stainless steel in the conventional material processing procedure for ODS steels. Microstructural observations and micro-hardness tests proved that the stainless steels were successfully coated without causing a deterioration in the mechanical property of the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. (author)

  5. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  6. Chromium and aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with increased blood glucose, insulin, blood lipids, and fat mass, and decreased lean body mass leading to increased incidences of diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Improved chromium nutrition is associated with improvements in all of these variables. Insulin sensitivity de...

  7. Carcinogenicity and mutagenicity of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léonard, A; Lauwerys, R R

    1980-11-01

    Occupational exposure represents the main source of human contamination by chromium. For non-occupationally exposed people the major environmental exposure to chromium occurs as a consequence of its presence in food. Chromium must be considered as an essential element. Its deficiency impairs glucose metabolism. Trivalent chromium salts are poorly absorbed through the gastro-intestinal and respiratory tracts because they do not cross membranes easily. Hexavalent chromium can be absorbed by the oral and pulmonary routes and probably also through the skin. After its absorption, hexavalent chromium is rapidly reduced to the trivalent form which is probably the only form to be found in biological material. Epidemiological studies have shown that some chromium salts (mainly the slightly soluble hexavalent salts) are carcinogens. Lung cancers have, indeed, often been reported among workers in chromate-producing industry and, to a lesser extent, in workers from the chrome-pigment industry. The first attempts to produce cancers in experimental animals by inhalation or parenteral introduction gave negative or equivocal results but, from 1960, positive results have been obtained with various chromium compounds. As for the carcinogenic activity, the mutagenicity of chromium has mainly been found with hexavalent salts. In the majority of assay systems used, trivalent chromium appears inactive. It can be considered as evident, however, that the ultimate mutagen which binds to the genetic material is the trivalent form produced intracellularly from hexavalent chromium, the apparent lack of activity of the trivalent form being due to its poor cellular uptake.

  8. Dephosphorization of melts with chromium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motloch, Z.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of the results of laboratory and pilot plant research into the dephosphorization of high-chromium melts reported in the literature, mostly Japanese. The use of high-alloy chromium and chromium-nickel steels in nuclear power engineering showed the negative impact of phosphorus on stress corrosion at high temperatures and on the development of cracks under overlays during welding. For a number of years attention is therefore being devoted to the attainment of a low phosphorus content in these steels. Current dephosphorization methods may be divided into oxidation and reduction methods. Oxidation dephosphorization may be carried out using synthetic mixtures: in the use of CaO-FeCl 2 , BaO-BaCl 2 -Cr 2 O 3 , Li 2 CO 3 -CaO-CaF 2 -FeO and Na 2 CO 3 /K 2 CO 3 -NaCl/KCl/KF/CaCl 2 /FeCl 2 a high initial C content, low content of Cr and Si and a low temperature of the melt are advantageous for dephosphorization. Experiments have also been made with dephosphorization in a bottom-blown oxygen converter and in an AOD converter. The most frequently used substances for reduction dephosphorization are calcium and calcium carbide; the best C content ranges between 0.5 and 1.8%, a high Cr content and a high bath temperature are also advantageous. The use of the reduction procedure is greatly limited by the generation of highly toxic phosphine. Another tested method - electroslag remelting is not suitable for commercial application for its economic exactingness. (A.K.)

  9. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  10. Mechanism of chromium poisoning the conventional cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Guangsen; Zeng, Shumao; Parbey, Joseph; Xiao, Shuhao; Li, Baihai; Li, Tingshuai; Andersson, Martin

    2018-03-01

    Chromium poisoning the La0.875Sr0.125MnO3 (LSM) cathode for solid oxide fuel cells is a critical issue that can strongly affect the stability. In this study, we evaluate the temperature distribution in a SOFC based on a 3D model and then combine conductivity test and material computation to reveal the effects of chromium in SUS430 stainless steels on LSM conductivities. The starch concentration in LSM pellets and the applied pressure on the contact with interconnect materials show close relationships with the chromium poisoning behavior. The density functional theory (DFT) computing results indicate that chromium atoms preferably adsorb on the MnO2-terminated and La (Sr)-O-terminated (001) surfaces. The resulting conclusions are expected to deeply understand mechanism of chromium deactivating conventional cathodes at some typical operational conditions, and offer crucial information to optimize the structure to avoid the poisoning effect.

  11. Fixed bed adsorption of hexavalent chromium onto natural zeolite from air stream

    OpenAIRE

    F. Golbabaei; E. Rahmanzadeh; G. R. Moussavi; A. Faghihi zarandi; M. R. Baneshi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Chromium (VI) is a known human carcinogenic agent which is used in numerous industrial processes such as electroplating, welding, textile, cement and steel fabrication. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of natural zeolite on the fixed bed adsorption of Cr (VI) from air stream. . Material and Method: In this experimental study, chromium mists were generated by a nebulizer (3A model, Italy). Performance of natural zeolite in the Cr (VI) adsorption and ...

  12. Investigation of Steel Surfaces Treated by a Hybrid Ion Implantation Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuther, H.; Richter, E.; Prokert, F.; Ueda, M.; Beloto, A. F.; Gomes, G. F.

    2004-01-01

    Implantation of nitrogen ions into stainless steel in combination with oxidation often results in a decrease or even complete removal of the chromium in the nitrogen containing outermost surface layer. While iron nitrides can be formed easily by this method, due to the absence of chromium, the formation of chromium nitrides is impossible and the beneficial influence of chromium in the steel for corrosion resistance cannot be used. To overcome this problem we use the following hybrid technique. A thin chromium layer is deposited on steel and subsequently implanted with nitrogen ions. Chromium can be implanted by recoil into the steel surface and thus the formation of iron/chromium nitrides should be possible. Both beam line ion implantation and plasma immersion ion implantation are used. Due to the variation of the process parameters, different implantation profiles and different compounds are produced. The produced layers are characterized by Auger electron spectroscopy, conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The obtained results show that due to the variation of the implantation parameters, the formation of iron/chromium nitrides can be achieved and that plasma immersion ion implantation is the most suitable technique for the enrichment of chromium in the outermost surface layer of the steel when compared to the beam line implantation.

  13. Toxicity assessment and geochemical model of chromium leaching from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao; Li, Junguo; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization) slag is a by-product of the stainless steel refining process. The leaching toxicity of chromium from AOD slag cannot be ignored in the recycling process of the AOD slag. To assess the leaching toxicity of the AOD slag, batch leaching tests have been performed. PHREEQC simulations combined with FactSage were carried out based on the detailed mineralogical analysis and petrophysical data. Moreover, Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system was protracted by HSC 5.0 software to explore the chromium speciation in leachates. It was found that AOD slag leachate is an alkaline and reductive solution. The Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system indicated that trivalent chromium, such as Cr(OH)4(-), is the major chromium species in the experimental Eh-pH region considered. However, toxic hexavalent chromium was released with maximum concentrations of 30 µg L(-1) and 18 µg L(-1) at L/S 10 and 100, respectively, during the earlier leaching stage. It concluded that the AOD slag possessed a certain leaching toxicity. After 10 d of leaching, trivalent chromium was the dominant species in the leachates, which corresponded to the results of PHREEQC simulation. Leaching toxicity of AOD slag is based on the chromium speciation and its transformation. Great attention should be focused on such factors as aging, crystal form of chromium-enriched minerals, and electrochemical characteristics of the leachates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The electrochemical aspect of the corrosion of austenitic stainless steels, in nitric acid and in the presence of hexavalent chromium (1961); Aspect electrochimique de la corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique et en presence de chrome hexavalent (1961)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coriou, H.; Hure, J.; Plante, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1961-07-01

    The corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in boiling nitric acid markedly increases when the medium contains hexavalent chromium ions. Because of several redox phenomena, the potential of the steel generally changes in course of time. Measurements show a relation between the weight loss and the potential of specimens. Additions of Mn(VII) and Ce(IV) are compared with that of Cr(VI), and show that the relation is a general one. The attack cf the metal in oxidizing media is largely intergranular, leading to exfoliation of the grains, although the steel studied is not sensitive to the classical Huey and Strauss tests. Also even in the absence of any other oxidizing reaction, the current density observed when the steel is anodically polarized under potentiostatic conditions does not correspond to the actual weight loss of the metal. (authors) [French] La corrosion d'aciers inoxydables austenitiques en milieu nitrique bouillant augmente notablement quand le milieu contient des ions chrome a l'etat hexavalent. Par suite de divers phenomenes d'oxydo-reduction, le potentiel de l'acier evolue generalement au cours du temps. Les mesures effectuees permettent d'etablir une relation entre les pertes de poids et le potentiel des echantillons. L'addition de Mn(VI) et Ce(IV) est compare a celle de Cr(VI) et montre que la relation precedente s'applique de facon generale. L'attaque du metal en milieu oxydant est en grande, partie due a une corrosion intergranulaire conduisant a un dechaussement des grains bien que l'acier etudie ne soit pas sensible aux tests classiques de Huey et de Strauss. Aussi, meme en l'absence de toute autre reaction d'oxydation l'intensite qu l'on observerait en soumettant l'acier a un potentiel anodique dans un montage potentiostatique ne correspondrait pas a la perte de poids reelle du metal. (auteurs)

  15. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  16. Characterization of surface hardening in a nitrated chromium steel by microwave plasma type ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance); Caracterizacion del endurecimiento superficial del acero H-12 nitrurado con plasma de microondas tipo ECR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La O C, G de

    1996-12-31

    With this work it is demonstrated the possibility of performing the nitriding process by using a CVD-ECR source, based on the results obtained after treating several samples of AISI H-12 steel. Also, the main operating parameters (time of treatment, sample temperatures and gas mixture) are determined during nitriding of this steel with the mentioned source. Samples used before nitriding were quenched and tempered at 580 Centigrade degrees. Several experiments were done by using a pure nitrogen plasma with exposure times of the samples of 20 minutes at temperatures from 450 to 550 Centigrade degrees, and by using a N{sub 2} - H{sub 2} plasma with exposure times of the samples of 20, 30 and 40 minutes at temperatures from 350 to 550 Centigrade degrees. Metallography, microhardness, EDS and Auger analysis were done to observe changes suffered for the samples after treatment. (Author).

  17. Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-12

    Hexavalent Chromium Substitution Projects Date (12 May 2011) Gene McKinley ASC/WNV (937) 255-3596 Gene.McKinley@wpafb.af.mil Aeronautical Systems...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 12 MAY 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Hexavalent ...A-10) – AETC (T-6, T-38 and T1A) • Both Cr Primers & Non-Cr primers as well as Cr Surface Treatment – F-22 8 Non- Chrome Tie-coat & touch-up

  18. High-strength chromium--molybdenum rails

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Y.E.; Sawhill, J.M. Jr.; Cias, W.W.; Eldis, G.T.

    1976-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted with the aim of developing an as-rolled rail of over 100 ksi (689 N/mm 2 ) yield strength. A series of compositions providing both pearlitic and bainitic microstructures was evaluated. A fine pearlitic structure was developed in a 0.73 percent C -- 0.83 percent Mn -- 0.16 percent Si -- 0.75 percent Cr -- 0.21 percent Mo steel by simulating the mill cooling rate of 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Two 100-ton commercial heats were made of this approximate composition and processed into 132-lb/yd (65.5-kg/m) rail. Samples tested in the laboratory ranged from 109 to 125 ksi (750 to 860 N/mm 2 ) in yield strength. The chromium-molybdenum rails also exhibited excellent fracture toughness and fatigue properties. Sections of the rail were joined by both flash-butt welding and thermite welding. The hardness peaks produced in the flash-butt welds could be reduced by applying either a postweld current or an induction heating cycle. The high-strength chromium-molybdenum rails have been in service for over eight months in curved sections of an ore railway that carries over 55 million gross long tons per year. 7 tables, 18 figs

  19. Effect of machining on the deformability of steel in surface-active medium at lower temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusti, E.Ya.; Babej, Yu.I.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of some machining methods of carbon steel, chromium steel, and chromium nickel steel, and that of low temperatures on the principle characteristics of formability during impact bending in air and a surface-active environment have been studied. The temperature decrease from the ambient to -80 deg is shown to reduce steel formability as evaluated by deflection (f) and to increase the forming force. The variation of these characteristics with lowering temperature, however, is greatly affected by machining process conditions. The FRHT (Friction-Hardening Treatment) on the white layer assures minimum ductility losses, and increases steel strength at low temperatures both in air and in the surface-active environment

  20. Chromium in Postmortem Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek-Adamska, Danuta; Lech, Teresa; Konopka, Tomasz; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2018-04-17

    Recently, considerable attention has been paid to the negative effects caused by the presence and constant increase in concentration of heavy metals in the environment, as well as to the determination of their content in human biological samples. In this paper, the concentration of chromium in samples of blood and internal organs collected at autopsy from 21 female and 39 male non-occupationally exposed subjects is presented. Elemental analysis was carried out by an electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. Reference ranges of chromium in the blood, brain, stomach, liver, kidneys, lungs, and heart (wet weight) in the population of Southern Poland were found to be 0.11-16.4 ng/mL, 4.7-136 ng/g, 6.1-76.4 ng/g, 11-506 ng/g, 2.9-298 ng/g, 13-798 ng/g, and 3.6-320 ng/g, respectively.

  1. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  2. Determination of chromium, iron, zinc and calcium contents in pastes commercialized at Sao Paulo, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luizar-Obrigon, Celina; Baruffaldi, Renato

    1999-01-01

    Foods, in particular pastes, in the industrial manufacture process are in contact with equipment made of stainless steel, containing Cr, fe and Zn in their structures. The aim of this study is to verify Cr, Fe and Zn migration from the stainless steel equipment to the food during the industrial process. Instrumental neutron activation analysis was applied to determine the concentrations of Cr, Fe, Zn and Ca in four brands of pastes. Only the migration of chromium was be observed. (author)

  3. Precipitation of metallic chromium during rapid cooling of Cr2O3 slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Burja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The slag systems of CaO-SiO2- Cr2O3 and Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2- Cr2O3 were analyzed. These slag systems occur in the production of stainless steel and are important from the process metallurgy point of view. Synthetic slag samples with different chromium oxide content were prepared and melted. The melted slag samples where then rapidly cooled on large steel plates, so that the high temperature microstructure was preserved. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The precipitation of different chromium oxide phases was studied, but most importantly the precipitation of metallic chromium was observed. These findings help us interpret industrial slag samples.

  4. Thermogravimetric studies of high temperature reactions between potassium salts and chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmusto, J.; Lindberg, D.; Yrjas, P.; Skrifvars, B.-J.; Hupa, M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► K 2 CO 3 reacted with Cr 2 O 3 forming K 2 CrO 4 . ► Presence of chlorine did not alone explain the initiation of accelerated oxidation. ► More light was shed to the role of chromates in accelerated oxidation. ► Accelerated oxidation of chromia protected steels occurs in two consecutive stages. ► Both potassium and chloride are required, so that both stages of reaction occur. - Abstract: This study compares the high temperature reactions of potassium chloride (KCl) and potassium carbonate (K 2 CO 3 ), two salts found in fly ashes formed in biomass combustion, with both pure metallic chromium (Cr) and chromium oxide (Cr 2 O 3 ). The reactions were investigated with thermogravimetric measurements and the results discussed based on thermodynamic calculations. In simple terms: potassium chloride reacted with chromium forming potassium chromate (K 2 CrO 4 ) and chromium oxide. Potassium chloride did not react with chromium oxide. Potassium carbonate reacted with chromium oxide, but not with chromium. The presence of potassium is sufficient to initiate accelerated oxidation, but chloride is needed to sustain it.

  5. Dissolution mechanism of austenitic stainless steels in lead-bismuth eutectic at 500 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the future nuclear power plants studies, lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) is foreseen as a coolant in the primary or the secondary circuit in three nuclear systems. The use of this liquid alloy induces corrosion issues for structural steels. In liquid lead alloys, steels can undergo two corrosion phenomena: dissolution or oxidation depending on the temperature and the dissolved oxygen content in LBE. The goal of this study is to identify the dissolution mechanisms of austenitic steels in LBE at 500 deg. C. Four Fe-Cr-Ni model austenitic steels, the 316L steel and five other industrial steels were corroded in LBE up to, respectively, 3000, 6000 and 200 h. The dissolution mechanism is identical for all steels: it starts by a preferential dissolution of chromium and nickel. This dissolution leads to the formation of a ferritic corrosion layer penetrated by LBE and containing between 5 and 10 at% of chromium and almost no nickel. This study demonstrates that dissolutions of nickel and chromium are linked. Otherwise, the corrosion kinetics is linear whatever the tested austenitic steel. The controlling steps of the austenitic steels' corrosion rates have been identified. Natural convection in the LBE bath leads to the formation of a diffusion boundary layer at the steel surface. Chromium diffusion in this diffusion boundary layer seems to control the corrosion rates of the model and industrial austenitic steels except the 316L steel. Indeed, the corrosion rate of the 316L steel is controlled by an interfacial reaction which is either the simultaneous dissolution of nickel and chromium in Ni, Cr compounds or the nickel and chromium dissolution catalyzed by the dissolved oxygen in LBE. This study has permitted to highlight the major role of chromium on the corrosion mechanisms and the corrosion rates of austenitic steels: the corrosion rate increases when chromium activity increases. Finally, the impact of the dissolved oxygen and the minor alloying

  6. Clean steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels

  7. Abrasive Wear of Alloyed Cast Steels Applied for Heavy Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Studnicki A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results and analysis of abrasive wear studies were shown for two grades of cast steels: low-alloyed cast steel applied for heavy machinery parts such as housing, covers etc. and chromium cast steels applied for kinetic nodes of pin-sleeve type. Studies were performed using the modified in Department of Foundry pin-on-disc method.

  8. Steel for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A steel contains, in percent by weight, the following constituents: carbon from 0.13 to 0.18, silicon from 0.17 to 0.37, manganese from 0.30 to 0.60, chromium from 1.7 to 2.4, nickel from 1.0 to 1.5, molybdenum from 0.5 to 0.7, vanadium from 0.05 to 0.12, aluminium from 0.01 to 0.035, nitrogen from 0.05 to 0.012, copper from 0.11 to 0.20, arsenic from 0.0035 to 0.0055, iron and impurities, the balance. This steel is preferable for use in the manufacture of nuclear reactors. 1 table

  9. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Development of ferritic steels for fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Corwin, W.R.

    1988-08-01

    Chromium-molybdenum ferritic (martensitic) steels are leading candidates for the structural components for future fusion reactors. However, irradiation of such steels in a fusion environment will produce long-lived radioactive isotopes that will lead to difficult waste-disposal problems. Such problems could be reduced by replacing the elements in the steels (i.e., Mo, Nb, Ni, N, and Cu) that lead to long-lived radioactive isotopes. We have proposed the development of ferritic steels analogous to conventional Cr-Mo steels, which contain molybdenum and niobium. It is proposed that molybdenum be replaced by tungsten and niobium be replaced by tantalum. Eight experimental steels were produced. Chromium concentrations of 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% were used (all concentrations are in wt %). Steels with these chromium compositions, each containing 2% W and 0.25% V, were produced. To determine the effect of tungsten and vanadium, 2.25 Cr steels were produced with 2% W and no vanadium and with 0.25% V and O and 1% W. A 9Cr steel containing 2% W, 0.25 V, and 0.07% Ta was also studied. For all alloys, carbon was maintained at 0.1%. Tempering studies on the normalized steels indicated that the tempering behavior of the new Cr-W steels was similar to that of the analogous Cr-Mo steels. Microscopy studies indicated that 2% tungsten was required in the 2.25 Cr steels to produce 100% bainite in 15.9-mm-thick plate during normalization. The 5Cr and 9Cr steels were 100% martensite, but the 12 Cr steel contained about 75% martensite with the balance delta-ferrite. 33 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Alumina Fiber-Reinforced 9310 Steel Metal Matrix Composite for Rotorcraft Drive System Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AISI 9310 nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy steel is used extensively in military helicopter rotor shafts and gears. This reliable alloy provides excellent fatigue...

  12. Preconcentration and determination of trace chromium using 1-(2-pyridylazo-2 -naphthol) immobilization on surfactant- coated alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemirani, F.; Zamani, M

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Chromium is one of the essential elements for all vertebrates, as it appears to play a role in the metabolism of glucose and some lipids such as cholesterol. Since chromium is used widely in various industries, such as in the galvanization, steel, leather and paint industries, the resulting anthropogenic contamination of chromium is observed in the coastal sediments and seawater. Chromium in natural waters is normally present at low concentration levels, typically 0.3 - 1.0 μg/L in river water, and 0.1.5 μg/L in sea water. In many cases, the separation and preconcentration techniques are generally required to determined chromium at low concentration levels in natural waters, even when the most sensitive techniques, for instance electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP - MS), are used. In the present work, the column of alumina modified with SDS and PAN was prepared in order to achieve a simple, low - cost and effective method for the improvement of the detection limit of ETAAS by preconcentration of chromium from a large volume of the aqueous through immobilization of PAN on surfactant coated alumina. The influence of P H, flow rate of sample solution and eluent, amount of eluent and effect of cationic interferences on percent recovery of chromium were studied. A concentration factor of 100 can be achieved by passing 500 ml of sample through the column. The method was applied to the determination of chromium in waste and mineral waters

  13. Chromium isotope variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arcy, Joan Mary

    the δ53Cr value of continental runoff into the ocean. The major findings were that river water is characterised by heavy δ53Cr values (+0.1‰ to +1.6‰), while soils are characterised by light δ53Cr values (-0.3‰), relative to the catchment bedrock (-0.17‰ to -0.21‰), indicating that Cr isotopes......, and the quantification the Cr isotope composition of major Cr fluxes into and out of ocean. This thesis adds to the current knowledge of the Cr isotope system and is divided into two studies. The focus of the first study was to determine what processes control the Cr isotopic compositionof river water and to quantify......Chromium (Cr) stable isotopes are a useful tracer of changes in redox conditions because changes in its oxidation state are accompanied by an isotopic fractionation. For this reason the Cr isotope system is being developed as a potential tool for paleo-redox reconstruction. Dissolved Cr in seawater...

  14. Nonmetallic inclusions in carbon steel smelted in plasma furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shengelaya, I B; Kostyakov, V N; Nodiy, T K; Imerlishvili, V G; Gavisiani, A G [AN Gruzinskoj SSR, Tbilisi. Inst. Metallurgii

    1979-01-01

    A complex investigation on nonmetallic inclusions in carbon cast iron, smelted in plasma furnace in argon atmosphere and cast partly in the air and partly in argon atmosphere, has been carried out. As compared to open-hearth furnace carbon steel, the test metal was found to contain more oxide inclusions and nitrides; besides, in chromium-containing metal, chromium nitrides form the larger part of nitrides.

  15. Chromium concentrations in ruminant feed ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, J W; Lloyd, K E; Krafka, K

    2017-05-01

    Chromium (Cr), in the form of Cr propionate, has been permitted for supplementation to cattle diets in the United States at levels up to 0.50 mg of Cr/kg of DM since 2009. Little is known regarding Cr concentrations naturally present in practical feed ingredients. The present study was conducted to determine Cr concentrations in feed ingredients commonly fed to ruminants. Feed ingredients were collected from dairy farms, feed mills, grain bins, and university research farms. Mean Cr concentrations in whole cereal grains ranged from 0.025 mg/kg of DM for oats to 0.041 mg/kg of DM for wheat. Grinding whole samples of corn, soybeans, and wheat through a stainless steel Wiley mill screen greatly increased analyzed Cr concentrations. Harvested forages had greater Cr concentrations than concentrates, and alfalfa hay or haylage had greater Cr concentrations than grass hay or corn silage. Chromium in alfalfa hay or haylage (n = 13) averaged 0.522 mg/kg of DM, with a range of 0.199 to 0.889 mg/kg of DM. Corn silage (n = 21) averaged 0.220 mg of Cr/kg of DM with a range of 0.105 to 0.441 mg of Cr/kg of DM. By-product feeds ranged from 0.040 mg of Cr/kg of DM for cottonseed hulls to 1.222 mg of Cr/kg of DM for beet pulp. Of the feed ingredients analyzed, feed grade phosphate sources had the greatest Cr concentration (135.0 mg/kg). Most ruminant feedstuffs and feed ingredients had less than 0.50 mg of Cr/kg of DM. Much of the analyzed total Cr in feed ingredients appears to be due to Cr contamination from soil or metal contact during harvesting, processing, or both. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Estudio del comportamiento de los recargues multicapas de depósitos soldados de fundición blanca al cromo // Study of the hard facing weld behavior in deposits of white chromium steels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Collazo-Carceller

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Se determina la influencia de los parámetros Energía introducida (Hi, Número de capas (Nc yAncho del depósito (Ad, en la morfología y el incremento de la resistencia al desgaste abrasivo decapas depositadas sobre acero 1020 utilizando el electrodo de fundición blanca al cromo UTPLedurit – 61. Empleando la microscopia óptica se identificaron y cuantificaron las fases presentes,analizando su efecto en el desgaste. Siendo determinante la influencia de la inclinación de lasdendritas y su posición con respecto a 90° en el incremento de la resistencia al desgaste abrasivo.Se caracterizaron los posibles mecanismos de daño superficial provocado por desgaste abrasivoempleando la microscopia electrónica de barrido. Se propusieron modelos lineales paracorrelacionar la influencia de la cantidad, tamaño, dispersión de los carburos y el ángulo deinclinación de las dendritas, en el incremento de la resistencia al desgaste.Palabras claves: morfología, desgaste abrasivo, parámetros de soldadura, dendritas, modelos.__________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe influence of different parameters in layer morphology and abrasion resistance of Fe-Cr-Celectrodes UTP Ledurit – 61 on steel 1020 was studied. Introduced Energy (Hi, Number of Layers(Nc, and Deposit Width (Ad were the main parameters considered. The metallographicidentification and quantification of metal phases and the determination of their effect in abrasionresistance were made with optical microscopy. The abrasive wear test characterized by scanningelectron microscopy, defines a possible mechanism of surface damage. It was found that the angleformed between a normal line to the surface and the dendrite inclination is directly related withthe increment of wear resistance. Lineal models that correlate wear resistance with quantity, size,and carbide dispersion and dendrite angle inclination were also developed.Key words: morphology, abrasive

  17. Microstructure and Properties of a New Cr - Mn Steel without Boron Additions for Use in Hot Stamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H.; Zhu, G.; Li, Q.; Chen, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Anew hot-stamping steel that is alloyed with chromium and manganese and does not contain boron additions has been developed. The effect of reheating temperature and cooling rates on the mechanical properties and structure of the steel is determined. Atreatment regime that increases the ductility of the steel without a noticeable decrease in its strength is proposed.

  18. Failure of Stainless Steel Welds Due to Microstructural Damage Prevented by In Situ Metallography

    OpenAIRE

    Lopez,Juan Manuel Salgado; Alvarado,María Inés; Hernandez,Hector Vergara; Quiroz,José Trinidad Perez; Olmos,Luis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In stainless steels, microstructural damage is caused by precipitation of chromium carbides or sigma phase. These microconstituents are detrimental in stainless steel welds because they lead to weld decay. Nevertheless, they are prone to appear in the heat affected zone (HAZ) microstructure of stainless steel welds. This is particularly important for repairs of industrial components made of austenitic stainless steel. Non-destructive metallography can be applied in welding repairs of...

  19. Processing, Microstructure, and Material Property Relationships Following Friction Stir Welding of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Fast, 200 Ferritic- martensitic steels , ODS alloys Stainless steels Lead fast reactor Lead or lead- bismuth 800 Fast, 150 Ferritic- martensitic ...from Zinkle [from 1]. T22, T9, T91, E911, NF12, NF616, and SAVE12 are all Ferritic or Martensitic steels with variations in alloy concentrations and...manufacturing techniques. Similarly HCM12 and HCM12A are High Chromium Martensitic steels

  20. Characterization of black and white chromium electrodeposition films. Surface and optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, M.; Palomar-Pardave, M. [Departamento de Materiales, UAM-Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, Mexico D.F. 02200 (Mexico); Barrera, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana - Iztapalapa, Av. Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, Mexico, D.F. 09340 (Mexico); Huerta, L.; Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2003-11-01

    Thin films of black and white chromium have been prepared by electrodeposition on stainless steel substrates. The potentiodynamic and potentiostatic technique was used in order to prepare these materials. XRD, XPS, SEM and spectral reflectance in the UV-Visible-near IR and medium IR ranges, for both films coatings were characterized. From the SEM analysis, it was found while the black chromium has a lamellar morphology that leads to a strong dispersion level, the white one has a flat morphology. The chemical composition of these thin films was determined by XRD and XPS technique. The XRD results showed that in both cases chromium is the main bulk chemical compound in both films. However, from XPS analysis of these surfaces, it was possible to determine that the most external layers of the films are made of different kinds of chromium compounds. The black chromium film has better optical properties to transform solar energy into thermal energy, and these properties remain practically constant even when heat treated to a high temperature, 400 C. On the other hand the white chromium film is a better substrate for hydrogen evolution reactions than the black one.

  1. Microstructural and corrosivity changes induced by nitrogen ion implantation on chromium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokouhy, A.; Larijani, M.M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Hosseini G, S.H. Haji; Yari, M.; Sari, A.H.; Shahraki, M. Gholipur

    2006-01-01

    The chromium thin films were prepared using ion beam deposition on stainless steel 304. The chromium films were implanted by nitrogen ions after deposition at doses in the range of 4.5 x 10 17 to 2.7 x 10 18 N + /cm 2 and energy of 30 keV. The formation of nitride phases and corrosion behavior after nitrogen implantation were characterized by XRD and corrosion test, respectively. The results show that corrosion resistance rise, reach to a maximum at dose of 1.8 x 10 18 , and then fall down at higher doses. In addition, the effect of corrosion tests was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  2. A comparative tribological study of chromium coatings with different specific hardness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Barthole, M.; Belliard, P.; Lelait, L.

    1995-06-01

    The wear resistance in dry friction of two electrolytic and two pVD hard chromium coatings deposited on construction steel substrates is studied by means of standard pin on disc multi-pass, unidirectional operation. For both of these friction modes low cycle high load operation with cemented carbide pins leads to essentially coatings hardness controlled, abrasive wear. For these well adhering commercial coatings (both for through thickness cracking and for spalling failure) assessed by standard testing, are inadequate for quality ranking with respect to wear resistance. Steady state friction corresponds to a stabilised third body essentially composed of chromium oxide. (authors). 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  3. Chromium Uptake Efficiency of Spinacea olaracea from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the uptake of chromium by Spinacea olaracea and its accumulation in roots and shoots of plants grown in pots at various concentrations of chromium (30, 60, 90,120,150 mg/l). The results revealed that the levels of chromium accumulation in roots and shoots were higher at minimum ...

  4. Magnesium analysis. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    Chromium determination in magnesium used in uranium fabrication by magnesiothermics, applicable for chromium content between 2 to 10 ppm. Magnesium is dissolved in sulfuric acid, oxidized by potassium permanganate, the excess of permanganate is eliminated by sodium nitride. Spectrophotometry at 540 nm of the chromium (VI)-diphenylcarbazide complex [fr

  5. On texture formation of chromium electrodeposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian Bergenstof; Leisner, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    1998-01-01

    The microstructure, texture and hardness of electrodeposited hard, direct current (DC) chromium and pulsed reversed chromium has been investigated. These investigations suggest that the growth and texture of hard chromium is controlled by inhibition processes and reactions. Further, it has been...

  6. A comparison of the iraddiated tensile properties of a high-manganese austenitic steel and type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    The USSR steel EP-838 is a high-manganese, low-nickel steel that also has lower chromium and molybdenum than type 316 stainless steel. Tensile specimens of 20%-cold-worked EP-838 and type 316 stainless steel were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the coolant temperature (approx.=50 0 C). A displacement damage level of 5.2 dpa was reached for the EP-838 and up to 9.5 dpa for the type 316 stainless steel. Tensile tests at room temperature and 300 0 C on the two steels indicated that the irradiation led to increased strength and decreased ductility compared to the unirradiated steels. Although the 0.2% yield stress of the type 316 stainless steel in the unirradiated condition was greater than that for the EP-838, after irradiation there was essentially no difference between the strength or ductility of the two steels. The results indicate that the replacement of the majority of the nickel by manganese and a reduction of chromium and molybdenum in an austenitic stainless steel of composition near that for type 316 stainless steel has little effect on the irradiated and unirradiated tensile properties at low temperatures. (orig.)

  7. Chromium Salen Mediated Alkene Epoxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kaare Brandt; Norrby, Per-Ola; Daly, Adrian M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of alkene epoxidation by chromium(v) oxo salen complexes has been studied by DFT and experimental methods. The reaction is compared to the closely related Mn-catalyzed process in an attempt to understand the dramatic difference in selectivity between the two systems. Overall......-spin surface. The low-spin addition of metal oxo species to an alkene leads to an intermediate which forms epoxide either with a barrier on the low-spin surface or without a barrier after spin inversion. Supporting evidence for this intermediate was obtained by using vinylcyclopropane traps. The chromium...

  8. Environmental biochemistry of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losi, M E; Amrhein, C; Frankenberger, W T

    1994-01-01

    Chromium is a d-block transitional element with many industrial uses. It occurs naturally in various crustal materials and is discharged to the environment as industrial waste. Although it can occur in a number of oxidation states, only 3+ and 6+ are found in environmental systems. The environmental behavior of Cr is largely a function of its oxidation state. Hexavalent Cr compounds (mainly chromates and dichromates) are considered toxic to a variety of terrestrial and aquatic organisms and are mobile in soil/water systems, much more so than trivalent Cr compounds. This is largely because of differing chemical properties: Hexavalent Cr compounds are strong oxidizers and highly soluble, while trivalent Cr compounds tend to form relatively inert precipitates at near-neutral pH. The trivalent state is generally considered to be the stable form in equilibrium with most soil/water systems. A diagram of the Cr cycle in soils and water is given in Fig. 6 (Bartlett 1991). This illustration provides a summary of environmentally relevant reactions. Beginning with hexavalent Cr that is released into the environment as industrial waste, there are a number of possible fates, including pollution of soil and surface water and leaching into groundwater, where it may remain stable and, in turn, can be taken up by plants or animals, and adsorption/precipitation, involving soil colloids and/or organic matter. Herein lies much of the environmental concern associated with the hexavalent form. A portion of the Cr(VI) will be reduced to the trivalent form by inorganic electron donors, such as Fe2+ and S2-, or by bioprocesses involving organic matter. Following this conversion, Cr3+ can be expected to precipitate as oxides and hydroxides or to form complexes with numerous ligands. This fraction includes a vast majority of global Cr reserves. Soluble Cr3+ complexes, such as those formed with citrate, can undergo oxidation when they come in contact with manganese dioxide, thus reforming

  9. Austenitic stainless steels with cryogenic resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarata, Daniela Florentina

    1999-01-01

    The most used austenitic stainless steels are alloyed with chromium and nickel and have a reduced carbon content, usually lower than 0.1 % what ensures corresponding properties for processing by plastic deformation at welding, corrosion resistance in aggressive environment and toughness at low temperatures. Steels of this kind alloyed with manganese are also used to reduce the nickel content. By alloying with manganese which is a gammageneous element one ensures the stability of austenites. Being cheaper these steels may be used extensively for components and equipment used in cryogenics field. The best results were obtained with steels of second group, AMnNi, in which the designed chemical composition was achieved, i.e. the partial replacement of nickel by manganese ensured the toughness at cryogenic temperatures. If these steels are supplementary alloyed, their strength properties may increase to the detriment of plasticity and toughness, although the cryogenic character is preserved

  10. The electrochemistry of chromium, chromium-boron and chromium-phosphorus alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffat, T.P.; Ruf, R.R.; Latanision, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    It is fairly well established that chromium-metalloid interactions represent the key to understanding the remarkable corrosion behavior of TM-Cr-M glasses; (Fe, Ni, Co,...)-Cr-(P, Si, C, S). The character and kinetics of passive film growth on the glasses are being studied ni order to assess the role of the film former, chromium, and the metalloids in the passivation process. A series of thin film microcrystalline chromium, Cr-B and Cr-P binary alloys have been fabricated by physical vapor deposition techniques. Vacuum melted conventionally processed chromium has also been studied. Examination of these materials in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and lM HCl by voltammetry, potentiostatic and impedance techniques yields the following conclusion: 1. Pure chromium with a grain size varying from < 400 A to 0.5 mm exhibits no well defined differences in electrochemical behavior in lM H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. 2. The tremendous corrosion resistance of Cr-B alloys has been confirmed. 3. The beneficial effects observed for boron alloyed with chromium may be considered surprising in view of the neutral/negative influence of alloying boron with iron, i.e. Fe/sub 80/B/sub 20/. 4. The interaction of the electrochemistry of the metalloid constituent with that of the transition base element determines the corrosion behavior. 5. Preliminary work with Cr-P alloys indicates that certain compositions exhibit promising properties - certain films were found to be intact after two days of immersion in concentrated HCl. Further work is in progress

  11. Chromium Chemistry in the Subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chromium (VI) (Cr) is carcinogenic and a threat to human and ecological health. There are adequate and acceptable methods to characterize and assess Cr contaminated sites. Cr chemistry in the environment is well understood. There are documented methods to address Cr contaminat...

  12. Iron-nickel-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karenko, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    A specification is given for iron-nickel-chromium age-hardenable alloys suitable for use in fast breeder reactor ducts and cladding, which utilize the gamma-double prime strengthening phase and are characterized in having a delta or eta phase distributed at or near grain boundaries. A range of compositions is given. (author)

  13. Treatment of chromium contaminated soil using bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purwanti, Ipung Fitri; Putri, Tesya Paramita; Kurniawan, Setyo Budi

    2017-11-01

    Chromium contamination in soil occurs due to the disposal of chromium industrial wastewater or sludge that excess the quality standard. Chromium concentration in soil is ranged between 1 to 300 mg/kg while the maximum health standard is 2.5 mg/kg. Bioremediation is one of technology that could be used for remediating heavy metal contamination in soil. Bacteria have an ability to remove heavy metal from soil. One bacteria species that capable to remove chromium from soil is Bacillus subtilis. The aim of this research was to know the chromium removal percentage in contaminated soil by Bacillus subtilis. Artificial chromium contaminated soil was used by mixing 425gram sand and chromium trichloride solution. Concentration of chromium added into the spiked soil were 50, 75, and 100 mg/L. During 14 days, pH, soil temperature and soil moisture were tested. Initial and final number of bacterial colony and chromium concentration analysed. The result showed that the highest percentage of chromium removal was 11% at a chromium concentration of 75 mg/L

  14. The behaviour of chromium in aquatic and terrestrial food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Chromium has been considered both as potential radioactive and conventional pollutant. Chromium-51 is produced by the activation of 50 Cr, which may be present either as a component of steel alloys used in reactors, or in Na 2 CrO 4 added as an anticorrosion agent to the cooling water. Only small amounts of 51 Cr are normally found in the liquid waste of nuclear power plants before discharge into rivers. In exceptional situations, however, as a result of the direct release of cooling waters, the aquatic environments may receive relatively large quantities of 51 Cr. Part of this 51 Cr is adsorbed e.g. to the sediments, but a fraction remains in solution in the river water. Somme accumulation of the radionuclide is observed in fresh water and marine organisms. Therefore, although 51 Cr has a relatively short physical half life (27.8d), it is of interest to acquire better information on its accumulation by different species of fresh water organisms and plants, as well as on its behaviour in soils, in order to evaluate the relative importance of this nuclide in the radioactive contamination of the aquatic and terrestrial food chains. As a related and sometimes associated pollutant, stable chromium is also taken into consideration. This element occurs fairly frequently as an environmental pollutant in many countries, either because of its abundance in soils derived from serpentine or because of its release to the environment from industrial wastes. The sequence of presentation of the experiment data is based on the consecutive steps of the contamination process: aquatic environment, soils, plant link of the food chain. Special attention is paid, in the different chapters, to the behaviour of various chemical forms of chromium and to their distribution in different fractions: soluble in water, adsorbed, precipitated on particles or complexed with organic material

  15. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Wenjun; Qian Qinfang; Hou Xiaolin; Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang

    2000-01-01

    The contents of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast were determined with the neutron activation analysis in order to study the combination of Cr with DNA, RNA and protein in chromium-rich brewer's yeast. The results showed that the extracting rats and concentrations of DNA, RNA and protein had no significant difference in two types of yeast, but the chromium contents of DNA, RNA and protein in the chromium-rich yeast were significantly higher than those in the normal. In addition, the content of chromium in DNA was much higher than that in RNA and protein, which indicated that the inorganic chromium compounds entered into the yeast cell, during the yeast cultivation in the culture medium containing chromium were converted into organic chromium compounds combined with DNA, RNA and protein

  16. Aircraft Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  17. Plant Line Trial Evaluation of Viable Non-Chromium Passivation Systems for Electrolytin Tinplate, ETP (TRP 9911)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Sinsel

    2003-06-30

    Plant trial evaluations have been completed for two zirconium-based, non-chromium passivation systems previously identified as possible alternatives to cathodic dichromate (CDC) passivation for electrolytic tinplate (ETP). These trials were done on a commercial electrolytic tin plating line at Weirton Steel and extensive evaluations of the materials resulting from these trials have been completed. All this was accomplished as a collaborative effort under the AISI Technology Roadmap Program and was executed by seven North American Tin Mill Products producers [Bethlehem Steel (now acquired by International Steel Group (ISG)), Dofasco Inc., National Steel (now acquired by U.S. Steel), U.S. Steel, USS-Posco, Weirton Steel, and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel] with funding partially from the Department of Energy (DOE) and partially on an equal cost sharing basis among project participants. The initial phases of this project involved optimization of application procedures for the non-chromium systems in the laboratories at Bethlehem Steel and Betz Dearborn followed by extensive testing with various lacquer formulations and food simulants in the laboratories at Valspar and PPG. Work was also completed at Dofasco and Weirton Steel to develop methods to prevent precipitation of insoluble solids as a function of time from the zirconate system. The results of this testing indicated that sulfide staining characteristics for the non-chromium passivation systems could be minimized but not totally eliminated and neither system was found to perform quite as good, in this respect, as the standard CDC system. As for the stability of zirconate treatment, a method was developed to stabilize this system for a sufficient period of time to conduct plant trial evaluations but, working with a major supplier of zirconium orthosulfate, a method for long term stabilization is still under development.

  18. Prevention of burn-on defect on surface of hydroturbine blade casting of ultra-low-carbon refining stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ling

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The burn-on sand is common surface defect encountered in CO2-cured silicate-bonded sand casting of hydroturbine blade of ultra-low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, its feature, causes and prevention measures are presented in this paper. Experiments showed that the burn-on defect is caused by oxidization of chromium in the molten steel at high temperature and can be effectively eliminated by using chromium-corundum coating.

  19. Cleanliness distribution of high-carbon chromium bearing steel billets and growth behavior of inclusions during solidification; Distribución y crecimiento de inclusiones en la solidificación de barras de acero para rodamientos con cromo y alto contenido de carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, C.; Bao, Y.; Lin, L.

    2017-09-01

    Variation of cleanliness and distribution of inclusions in thickness and width direction of highcarbon chromium bearing steel billets has been studied using total oxygen and nitrogen analysis and SEM/EDS, and the growth behavior of inclusions during solidification was studied with the help of solidification model. The region wit h relatively high total oxygen contents in the cross profile of billets is between inner arc side 3/16 and outer arc side 1/4; between left edge side 5/16 and right edge side 5/16. The formation sequence of inclusions is MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. MnS could wrap MgO-Al2O3 and reduces the damage to steel matrix caused by the latter, but generally could not effectively wrap TiN. Besides, TiN could wrap MgO-Al2O3 before MnS, which would weaken the protective capacity of MnS. Moreover, compared with MgO-Al2O3 inclusions, the sizes of TiN inclusions are generally larger. Thus the control of TiN inclusions should be strengthened. In hickness direction, the maximum size regions of TiN and MnS inclusions are inner arc side 1/3 and outer arc side 1/3; in width direction, the regions are edge side 1/3. During bearing processing, these regions and the regions with high total oxygen content should be avoided. [Spanish] La distribución de inclusiones en las secciones transversales y longitudinales de barras de acero para rodamientos al cromo con alto contenido de carbono se ha estudiado determinando el contenido total de nitrógeno y oxígeno y mediante SEM/EDS. El crecimiento de inclusiones durante la solidificación se estudió con la ayuda del modelo de solidificación. La zona con contenido total de oxígeno relativamente alto en la sección transversal de las barras, es entre el arco interior de 3/16 y el exterior 1/4; entre el borde izquierdo 5/16 y el derecho 5/16. La secuencia de formación de las inclusiones es MgO-Al2O3 > TiN > MnS. El MnS podría envolver a los óxidos de magnesio y aluminio (MgO-Al2O3) y reducir el daño causado al acero, pero

  20. Estimation of the Ultimate Tensile Strength of Steel from Its HB and HV Hardness Numbers and Coercive Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandomirskii, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    A formula is derived to accurately describe the tabulated relation between the Brinell ( HB) and Vickers ( HV) hardnesses of steel over the entire range of their possible variation. This formula and the formulas describing the relation between the HB hardness of chromium-molybdenum and chromium-nickel steels and their ultimate tensile strength σu are used to analyze the change in σu of 38KhNM steel upon quenching and tempering. The data that reveal a relation between σu of 38KhNM steel and its coercive force are obtained.

  1. Penentuan konsentrasi stainless steel 316L dan kobalt kromium remanium GM-800 pada uji GPMT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikmal Hafizi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Concentration determination of stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium remanium GM - 800 on GPMT test. Dentistry had used metals such as cobalt chromium and stainless steel in maxillofacial surgery, cardiovascular, and as a dental material. 316L stainless steel is austenistic stainless steel which has low carbon composition to improve the corrosion resistance as well as the content of molybdenum in the material. Cobalt chromium (CoCr is a cobaltbased alloy with a mixture of chromium. Density of a metal cobalt chromium alloy is about 8-9 g/cm3 that caused metal interference relatively mild. Remanium GM-800 is one type of a cobalt chromium alloy with the advantages of having high resistance to fracture and high modulus of elasticity. This study aims to determine the exact concentration used in 316L stainless steel and cobalt chromium GM-800 as the GPMT test material. Subjects were cobalt chromium Remanium GM-800 and 316L stainless steel concentration of 5%, 10%, 20%, 40% and 80%. Patch containing stainless steel or cobalt chromium paste was af xed for 24 hours each on three experimental animals, then the erythema and edema were observed using the Magnusson and Kligman scale. In the study, concentration of 5% is the concentration recommended for stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium GM-800 as material in challenge phase GPMT test, while the concentration of 40% is the concentration recommended for stainless steel 316L and cobalt chromium GM-800 in the induction phase. ABSTRAK Dunia kedokteran gigi banyak menggunakan logam pada pembedahan maxillofacial, cardiovascular, dan sebagai material dental. Logam yang banyak digunakan antara lain adalah kobalt kromium dan stainless steel. Stainless steel 316L merupakan austenistic stainless steel yang memiliki komposisi karbon rendah sehingga dapat meningkatkan ketahanan terhadap korosi sama halnya dengan kandungan molybdenum pada material tersebut. Kobalt kromium (CoCr adalah cobalt-based alloy dengan

  2. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  3. Chromium base high performance materials: Where and how do they come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In-Kap

    1996-08-01

    The origin of chromium base performance materials (CBPM) is described. CBPM may include (1) trivalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acetate, chromic chloride, chromic bromide, chromic fluoride, chromic iodide, chromic phosphate, and chromic sulfate; (2) hexavalent chromium chemicals such as chromic acid, lithium chromate, sodium chromate, sodium dichromate, and potassium dichromate; (3) oxide forms of chromium such as black chrome, chromium dioxide, chromium oxide, and chromium hydroxide; and (4) other chromium compounds such as chromium aluminide, chromium boride, chromium carbide, chromium molybdate, chromium nitride, chromium silicide, chromium tungstate and lanthanum chromite. Extensive reviews of production processes, properties, and applications/end uses of CBPM are made.

  4. Assessing resistance of stabilized corrosion resistant steels to intergranular corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karas, A.; Cihal, V. Jr.; Vanek, V.; Herzan, J.; Protiva, K.; Cihal, V.

    1987-01-01

    Resistance to intergranular corrosion was determined for four types of titanium-stabilized steels from the coefficients of stabilization efficiency according to the degree the chemical composition was known. The ATA SUPER steel showed the highest resistance parameter value. The resistance of this type of steel of a specific composition, showing a relatively low value of mean nitrogen content was compared with steel of an optimized chemical composition and with low-carbon niobium stabilized, molybdenum modified steels. The comparison showed guarantees of a sufficient resistance of the steel to intergranular corrosion. The method of assessing the resistance to intergranular corrosion using the calculation of the minimum content of Cr', i.e., the effective chromium content, and the maximum effective carbon content C' giving the resistance parameter k seems to be prospective for practical use in the production of corrosion resistant steels. (author). 1 tab., 5 figs., 15 refs

  5. Synthesis of chromium containing pigments from chromium galvanic sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreola, F.; Barbieri, L.; Bondioli, F.; Cannio, M.; Ferrari, A.M.; Lancellotti, I.

    2008-01-01

    In this work the screening results of the scientific activity conducted on laboratory scale to valorise chromium(III) contained in the galvanic sludge as chromium precursor for ceramic pigments are reported. The valorisation of this waste as a secondary raw material (SRM) is obtained by achievement of thermal and chemical stable crystal structures able to color ceramic material. Two different pigments pink CaCr 0.04 Sn 0.97 SiO 5 and green Ca 3 Cr 2 (SiO 4 ) 3 were synthesized by solid-state reactions using dried Cr sludge as chromium oxide precursor. The obtained pigments were characterized by X-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. Furthermore the color developed in a suitable ceramic glaze was investigated in comparison with the color developed by the pigments prepared from pure Cr 2 O 3 . The characterization carried out corroborates the thermal and chemical stability of the synthesized pigments and, especially for the Cr-Sn pink pigment, the powders develop an intense color that is very similar to the color developed by the pigments obtained starting from pure Cr 2 O 3

  6. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Liyuan; Huang Shunhong; Yang Zhihui; Peng Bing; Huang Yan; Chen Yuehui

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg -1 at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg -1 . Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  7. A study of the behavior of a cathode film formed in chromium plating with radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katsuyoshi; Suzuki, Akihira; Doi, Kazuyuki; Arai, Katsutoshi

    1979-01-01

    The behavior and composition of a cathode film formed on a steel cathode during chromium plating were studied with radioactive tracers. A special cell with a rapid washing compartment was used for preventing the cathode film from dissolving in electrolyte after plating. The cathode film was composed of two layers. The outer layer facing to the electrolyte had a loose structure and contained more sulfuric anions than the inner layer, for sulfuric acid probably concentrated in the outer layer. This outer layer is called L-film in this paper. The L-film was easily dissolved in the electrolyte solution. The inner layer (called C-film, compact film) was stable against electrolytes and contained less anions than that of L-film. The C-film had a thickness equivalent to 5 mg/m 2 and the concentration of anions unaffected by the composition of electrolytes. The C-film was not reduced to metallic chromium, but it remained in the cathode film during and after plating. This suggests that chromic acid in the cathode film is not reduced to metallic chromium, that metallic chromium is deposited from chromium complexes reaching the cathode surface through the cathode film, and that the complexes do not play a role on the construction of the cathode film. (author)

  8. Serum Chrome levels sampled with steel needle vs. plastic IV cannula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penny, Jeannette Østergaard; Overgaard, Søren

    2010-01-01

    . This study aimed to test that theory. Method: We compared serum chromium values for two sampling methods, steel needle and IV plastic cannula, as well as sampling sequence in 16 healthy volunteers. Results: We found statistically significant chromium contamination from the steel needle with mean differences......  Modern Metal-on-metal (MoM) joint articulations releases metal ions to the body. Research tries to establish how much this elevates metal ion levels and whether it causes adverse effects. The steel needle that samples the blood may introduce additional chromium to the sample thereby causing bias...... between the two methods of 0.073 ng/mL, for the first sample, and 0.033 ng/mL for the second. No difference was found between the first and second plastic sample. The first steel needle sample contained an average of 0.047 ng/mL more than the second. This difference was only borderline significant...

  9. Effect of chromium on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuissello, N.; Novo, P.

    1976-01-01

    Chromium as K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/ and Cr(NO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, was tested for its toxicity, in Petri dishes, on 10 species of crop plants at 1 - 10 - 100 ppm. The total number of germinated seeds is not affected by Chromium salts up to 100 ppm, but the toxicity, measured as diminution of growth, is evident for all the tested plants, at 100 ppm, both with Cr/sup +3/ and Cr/sup +6/. Cr/sup +6/ at 1 ppm shows a negative effect on growth only for Linum usitatissimum, that could be used in phyto-test for polluted waters. Cr/sup +6/ was revealed more toxic than Cr/sup +3/ for plants, as reported for animals. 14 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Simultaneous determination of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in aqueous solutions by ion chromatography and chemiluminescence detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Jøns, O; Nielsen, B

    1992-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous determination of chromium(iii) and chromium(vi) in a flow system based on chemiluminescence was developed. A Dionex cation-exchange guard column was used to separate chromium(iii) from chromium(vi), and chromium(vi) was reduced by potassium sulfite, whereupon both...

  11. Carbon, chromium and molybdenum contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinatora, A; Goldenstein, H.; Mei, P.R.; Albertin, E.; Fuoco, R.; Mariotto, C.L.

    1992-01-01

    This work describes solidification experiments on white cast iron, with 15 and 20% of chromium, 2.3, 3.0 and 3.6 % of carbon and 0.0, 1.5 and 2.5 % of molybdenum in test de samples with 30 mm diameter. Measurements were performed on the austenite and eutectic formation arrests, the number of the eutectic carbide particles relative to the total and the eutectic volumes, and the volume fraction of the primary austenite

  12. Steel making

    CERN Document Server

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  13. Pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooyen, D.; Bandy, R.

    A pitting corrosion resistant austenite stainless steel comprises 17 to 28 wt. % chromium, 15 to 26 wt. % nickel, 5 to 8 wt. % molybdenum, and 0.3 to 0.5 wt. % nitrogen, the balance being iron, unavoidable impurities, minor additions made in the normal course of melting and casting alloys of this type, and may optionally include up to 10 wt. % of manganese, up to 5 wt. % of silicon, and up to 0.08 wt. % of carbon.

  14. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  15. Purity of food cooked in stainless steel utensils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, G N; Packirisamy, S

    1997-01-01

    An extensive programme of cooking operations, using household recipes, has shown that, apart from aberrant values associated with new pans on first use, the contribution made by 19% Cr/9% Ni stainless steel cooking utensils to chromium and nickel in the diet is negligible. New pans, if first used with acid fruits, showed a greater pick-up of chromium and nickel, ranging from approximately 1/20 to 1/3 and 1/20 to 1/2 of the normal daily intake of chromium and nickel respectively. This situation did not recur in subsequent usage, even after the pan had been cleaned by abrasion. A higher rate of chromium and nickel release in new pans on first use was observed on products from four manufactures and appears to be related to surface finish, since treatment of the surface of a new pan was partly, and in the case of electropolishing, wholly effective in eliminating their initial high release.

  16. Structure and corrosion properties of Cr coating deposited on aerospace bearing steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhang, Fengxiang; Zheng, Lijing; Zhang, Hu

    2017-11-01

    The corrosion protection of chromium coating deposited on aerospace bearing steels by using the Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc deposition- Metal Evaporation Vacuum Arc duplex technique (MEVVA-FCVA) had been investigated. The protection efficiency of chromium coating on different substrate materials had also been evaluated. The chromium coating was mainly composed of nanocrystallineα-Cr in a range of 50-200 nm. The orientation distributions of α-Cr film on substrates with different composition had a certain difference to each other. Electrochemical experimental results indicated that the chromium coating significantly improved the corrosion resistance of experimental bearing steels in 3.5% NaCl solution. The protective efficiency of chromium films were all over 98%. The corrosion resistance of chromium coating was influenced by the chemical composition of substrate material. The chromium coatings on higher Cr-containing substrate displayed lower corrosion current density and more positive corrosion potential. The increase of passive film thickness and the formation of a mass of chromium oxide and hydroxide on the surface are responsible for the improved corrosion properties.

  17. Phase equilibria analysis in chromium-nickel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurevich, Yu.G.; Frage, N.R.; Dudorova, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparison of calculation results of nitrogen solubility in liquid multicomponent iron alloys containing essential concentrations of alloying transition metals is conducted. Nitrogen solubility has been calculated by the interaction parameters of the first order, by the interaction parameters of the first and second orders by the Schurmann-Kunze method; by the formula [% N]=[% N]sub(Fe)(Asub(Fe)/Asub(m)(1-1/6 μsub(j=3)sup(m)epsilonsub(N)sup(j)xsub(j))sup(6), where Asub(Fe) - mass of iron mol; Asub(m) - mass of alloy mol; xsub(j) - mol ratio of j-element; epsilonsub(N)sup(j) - Wagner parameter of interaction for nitrogen in iron base alloys. The calculation data have been compared with the experimental values of nitrogen solubility in iron alloys at 1600 deg C. Advantages of calculation by the formula in respect to other calculation methods of nitrogen solubility in iron base alloys are clarified. Approximately pointed out is the region of compositions for which accountancy of interaction parameters of the second and third orders is necessary

  18. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana

    2015-05-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  19. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    KAUST Repository

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved. The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide-hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel.

  20. TiC reinforced cast Cr steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogan, O.N.; Hawk, J.A.; Schrems, K.K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5–4.5Ti, and 1–1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  1. TiC-reinforced cast Cr steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ö. N.; Hawk, J. A.; Schrems, K. K.

    2006-06-01

    A new class of materials, namely TiC-reinforced cast chromium (Cr) steels, was developed for applications requiring high abrasion resistance and good fracture toughness. The research approach was to modify the carbide structure of commercial AISI 440C steel for better fracture resistance while maintaining the already high abrasion resistance. The new alloys contained 12Cr, 2.5-4.5Ti, and 1-1.5C (wt.%) and were melted in a vacuum induction furnace. Their microstructure was composed primarily of a martensitic matrix with a dispersion of TiC precipitates. Modification of TiC morphology was accomplished through changing the cooling rate during solidification. Wear rates of the TiC-reinforced Cr steels were comparable to that of AISI 440C steel, but the impact resistance was much improved.

  2. Desensitization of stainless steels by laser surface heat-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, Yoshikuni; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    1987-11-01

    Laser heating was applied for the desensitization heat-treatment of the surface layer in the sensitized HAZ of Type 304 stainless steel. The degree of sensitization was examined by EPR technique and the 10 % oxalic acid electrolytic etch test. The CO/sub 2/ laser with maximum power of 1.5 kW was used for heat-treatment. Time-Temperature-Desensitization diagram (TTDS diagram) for sensitized Type 304 stainless steels were developed by calculation assuming the chromium diffusion control for desensitization which might occur when the chromium depleted zone was healed up due to dissolution of chromium carbide and chromium diffusion from the matrix being heated at the solution annealing temperatures. TTDS diagrams calculated agree fairly well with ones determined by corrosion tests. Laser irradiation conditions (e.g., Laser power, beam diameter and traveling velocity) required for desensitization of sensitized Type 304 stainless steels were calculated using additivity rule from the TTDS diagram calculated and theoretical thermal curve of laser heating derived from the heat conduction theory. After laser beam irradiated under an optimum condition predicted by calculation, the sensitized HAZ of Type 304 stainless steel restored complete resistance to intergranular corrosion.

  3. Accelerated corrosion of stainless steel in thiocyanate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistorius, P Chris; Li, Wen

    2012-09-19

    It is known that reduced sulfur compounds (such as thiocyanate and thiosulfate) can accelerate active corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in acid solutions, but before we started this project the mechanism of acceleration was largely unclear. This work combined electrochemical measurements and analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS), which provided a comprehensive understanding of the catalytic effect of reduced sulfur species on the active corrosion of stainless steel. Both the behavior of the pure elements and the steel were studied and the work focused on the interaction between the pure elements of the steel, which is the least understood area. Upon completion of this work, several aspects are now much clearer. The main results from this work can be summarized as follows: The presence of low concentrations (around 0.1 mM) of thiocyanate or tetrathionate in dilute sulfuric acid greatly accelerates the anodic dissolution of chromium and nickel, but has an even stronger effect on stainless steels (iron-chromium-nickel alloys). Electrochemical measurements and surface analyses are in agreement with the suggestion that accelerated dissolution really results from suppressed passivation. Even well below the passivation potential, the electrochemical signature of passivation is evident in the electrode impedance; the electrode impedance shows clearly that this pre-passivation is suppressed in the presence of thiocyanate. For the stainless steels, remarkable changes in the morphology of the corroded metal surface and in the surface concentration of chromium support the suggestion that pre-passivation of stainless steels is suppressed because dissolution of chromium is accelerated. Surface analysis confirmed that adsorbed sulfur / sulfide forms on the metal surfaces upon exposure to solutions containing thiocyanate or thiosulfate. For pure nickel, and steels containing nickel (and residual copper), bulk sulfide

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels in high temperature water and alternative stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonezawa, T.

    2015-01-01

    In order to clarify the effect of SFE on SCC resistance of austenitic stainless steels and to develop the alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel for BWR application, the effect of chemical composition and heat treatment on SFE value and SCCGR in oxygenated high temperature water were studied. The correlation factors between SFE values for 54 heats of materials and their chemical compositions for nickel, molybdenum, chromium, manganese, nitrogen, silicon and carbon were obtained. From these correlation factors, original formulae for SFE values calculation of austenitic stainless steels in the SHTWC, SHTFC and AGG conditions were established. The maximum crack length, average crack length and cracked area of the IGSCC for 33 heats were evaluated as IGSCC resistance in oxygenated high temperature water. The IGSCC resistance of strain hardened nonsensitized austenitic stainless steels in oxygenated high temperature water increases with increasing of nickel contents and SFE values. From this study, it is suggested that the SFE value is a key parameter for the IGSCC resistance of non-sensitized strain hardened austenitic stainless steels. As an alternative material of Type 316LN stainless steel, increased SFE value material, which is high nickel, high chromium, low silicon and low nitrogen material, is recommendable. (author)

  5. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  6. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  7. Microstructure and Hardness of High Temperature Gas Nitrided AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Nor Nurulhuda Md.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the microstructure and hardness of as-received and nitrided AISI 420 martensitic stainless steels. High temperature gas nitriding was employed to treat the steels at 1200°C for one hour and four hours using nitrogen gas, followed by furnace cooled. Chromium nitride and iron nitride were formed and concentrated at the outmost surface area of the steels since this region contained the highest concentration of nitrogen. The grain size enlarged at the interior region of the nitrided steels due to nitriding at temperature above the recrystallization temperature of the steel and followed by slow cooling. The nitrided steels produced higher surface hardness compared to as-received steel due to the presence of nitrogen and the precipitation of nitrides. Harder steel was produced when nitriding at four hours compared to one hour since more nitrogen permeated into the steel.

  8. The effect of carbon content on mechanical properties, failure and corrosion resistance of deposited chromium metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Леонід Кімович Лещинськiй

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that if choosing a metal composition for surfacing rolls and rollers of continuous casting machines, both the carbon impact on the mechanical and functional properties and the critical values of the chromium concentration, which determine the corrosion resistance of the metal with regard to electrochemical corrosion theory, should be considered as well. The paper studied the effect of chromium and carbon steel the X5-X12 type on the structure, technological strength, mechanical properties, fracturing resistance and corrosion resistance of the weld metal. The composition of chromium tool steels (deposited metal (X5-used for the rolls of hot rolling mills and (X12-used for continuous casting machines rollers correspond to these values. The impact of carbon on the properties of the deposited metal containing chromium was considered by comparing the data for both types of the deposited metal. It was found that for both types of the deposited metal (X5 and X12, the limiting value of the carbon content, providing an optimal combination of strength, ductility, failure resistance is the same. If the carbon content is more than the limiting value – (0,25% the technological strength and failure resistance of the deposited metal significantly reduce. With increasing carbon content from 0,18 to 0,25% the martensite structure has a mixed morphology – lath and plate. The strength and toughness of the deposited metal grow. Of particular interest is simultaneous increase in the specific work of failure resulted from crack inhibition at the boundary with far less solid and more ductile ferrite. As for the 5% chromium metal, the X12 type composition with 0,25% C, is borderline. With a further increase in the carbon content of the metal both ductility and failure resistance sharply decrease and with 0,40% C the growth rate of fatigue crack increases by almost 1,5 times

  9. High temperature dissolution of chromium substituted nickel ferrite in nitrilotriacetic acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Chandramohan, P.; Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in

    2016-12-01

    High temperature (HT) dissolution of chromium substituted nickel ferrite was carried out with relevance to the decontamination of nuclear reactors by way of chemical dissolution of contaminated corrosion product oxides present on stainless steel coolant circuit surfaces. Chromium substituted nickel ferrites of composition, NiFe{sub (2−x)}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} (x ≤ 1), was synthetically prepared and characterized. HT dissolution of these oxides was carried out in nitrilotriacetic acid medium at 160 °C. Dissolution was remarkably increased at 160 °C when compared to at 85 °C in a reducing decontamination formulation. Complete dissolution could be achieved for the oxides with chromium content 0 and 0.2. Increasing the chromium content brought about a marked reduction in the dissolution rate. About 40 fold decrease in rate of dissolution was observed when chromium was increased from 0 to 1. The rate of dissolution was not very significantly reduced in the presence of N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Dissolution of oxide was found to be stoichiometric. - Highlights: • Dissolution of NiFe{sub (2−x)}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} was remarkably increased at 160 °C in NTA medium. • The dissolution was significantly decreasing with the increase in Cr content in the oxide. • Dissolution rate is dependent on the lability of metal-oxo bonds. • The rate of dissolution was not significantly reduced in the presence of N{sub 2}H{sub 4.} • NTA at high temperature is effective for decontamination of stainless steel surfaces.

  10. Calculated electronic structure of chromium surfaces and chromium monolayers on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victora, R.H.; Falicov, L.M.

    1985-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of the magnetic and electronic properties of the chromium (100) and (110) surfaces and of a chromium monolayer on the (100) and (110) iron surfaces is presented. It is found that (i) the (100) chromium surface is ferromagnetic with a greatly enhanced spin polarization (3.00 electrons); (ii) a substantial enhancement of the spin imbalance exists several (>5) layers into the bulk; (iii) the (110) chromium surface is antiferromagnetic with a large (2.31) spin imbalance; (iv) the (100) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is ferromagnetic, with a huge spin imbalance (3.63), and aligned antiferromagnetically with respect to the bulk iron; (v) the (110) chromium monolayer on ferromagnetic iron is also ferromagnetic, with a spin imbalance of 2.25 and antiferromagnetically aligned to the iron. The spin imbalance of chromium on iron (100) is possibly the largest of any transition-metal system

  11. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MBI

    2013-06-19

    Jun 19, 2013 ... The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial ... number of metals, including chromium, copper, nickel and zinc. The ion ... through filter paper to determine the concentration ... liquid and solid phases were separated by.

  12. Chromium tolerance and reduction potential of Staphylococci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the microbiology of chromium tolerance and reduction at a fly ash dumping site in South Africa, 15 core samples were investigated. It was shown that the 30 year old dumping site exhibited high concentrations of Cr (VI) ranging from 1.6 to 9.6 mg/g. From this contaminated fly ash dumping site, 67 chromium ...

  13. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM AQUEOUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    be used again to adsorb heavy metal ions. ... Among these heavy metals are chromium, copper and ... poisoning can result from high exposure to hexavalent chromium [2]. Most of the ..... At low pH, the sorbent is positively charged because of.

  14. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  15. Niobium stainless steel for implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollo, J.M.D.A.

    1983-01-01

    The materials that have often been used, during the last two or three decades, to carry out materials for implants are made according to the specifications: a)A.S.T.M. (F.55-76, F.56-76, F.138-76, F.139-76) stainless steel b)A.S.T.M. (F.75-76), cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys. c)A.S.T.M. (F.90-76), cobalt-chromium-tungsten-nickel alloys. d)A.S.T.M. (F.67-77), unalloyed titanium. e)A.S.T.M. (F.136-70), titanium alloys. It was the purpose of retaking them, toverify the niobium influence as alloy element in ANSI/ASTM F.55-76 classification stainless steels, usually for these materials elaboration. The problem by substituting molybdenum total or partially for niobium, by comparing the mechanical and corrosion properties, and biocompatibility is presented, by pointing out the variables of these substitutions, when we employ this new material to perform materials for implants. (Author) [pt

  16. Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium in ground water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bansal, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) to its trivalent state (Cr{sup +3}) is showing promising results in treating ground water at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Main Site. An electrolytic cell using stainless-steel and brass electrodes has been found to offer the most efficient reduction while yielding the least amount of precipitate. Trials have successfully lowered concentrations of Cr{sup +6} to below 11 parts per billion (micrograms/liter), the California state standard. We ran several trials to determine optimal voltage for running the cell; each trial consisted of applying a voltage between 6V and 48V for ten minutes through samples obtained at Treatment Facility C(TFC). No conclusive data has been obtained yet.

  17. Microstructural stability of 21-6-9 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krenzer, R.W.; Sanderson, E.C.

    1978-01-01

    Two experiments were designed to better define parameters for thermomechanical processing of 21-6-9 stainless steel. This steel is one of the nitrogen-strengthened chromium, manganese, and nickel austenitic stainless steels having mechanical properties that can be improved by a combination of plastic deformation and heat treatments. By heat-treating coupons, the time-temperature relationship of the precipitate phase, and the solutionizing, recrystallizing, and stress-relieving temperature ranges in 21-6-9 were established. Secondly, mechanical properties and microstructure as a function of percent deformation and stress-relieving temperature are reported

  18. Ferritic steels for French LMFBR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, M.; Mathieu, B.; Petrequin, P.

    1983-06-01

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many components of the French LMFBR. Up to now, ferritic steels have not been considered for these components, mainly due to their relatively low creep properties. Some ferritic steels are usable when the maximum temperatures in service do not exceed about 530 0 C. It is the case of the steam generators of the Phenix plant, where the exchange tubes of the evaporator are made of 2,25% Cr-1% Mo steel, stabilized or not by addition of niobium. These ferritic alloys have worked successfully since the first steam production in October 1973. For the SuperPhenix power plant, an ''all austenitic stainless alloy'' apparatus has been chosen. However, for the future, ferritic alloys offer potential for use as alternative materials in the evaporators: low alloys steels type 2,25% Cr-1% Mo (exchange tubes, tube-sheets, shells), or at higher chromium content type 9% Cr-2% Mo NbV (exchange tubes) or 12M Cr-1% Mo-V (tube-sheets). Most of these steels have already an industrial background, and are widely used in similar applications. The various potential applications of these steels are reviewed with regards to the French LMFBR steam generators, indicating that some points need an effort of clarification, for instance the properties of the heterogeneous ferritic/austenitic weldments

  19. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10...... chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive...

  20. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, E.

    1994-01-01

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  1. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  2. A study of direct- and pulse-current chromium electroplating on rotating cylinder electrode (RCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.H.; Hsu, F.Y.; Liao, M.J.; Huang, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Direct- and pulse-current (DC and PC) chromium electroplating on Cr-Mo steel were performed in a sulfate-catalyzed chromic acid solution at 50 deg. C using a rotating cylinder electrode (RCE). The electroplating cathodic current densities were at 30, 40, 50 and 60 A dm -2 , respectively. The relationship between electroplating current efficiency and the rotating speed of the RCE was studied. The cross-sectional microstructure of Cr-deposit was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM). Results showed that DC-plating exhibited higher current efficiency than the PC-plating under the same conditions of electroplating current density and the rotating speed. We found the critical rotating speed of RCE used in the chromium electroplating, above this rotating speed the chromium deposition is prohibited. At the same plating current density, the critical rotating speed for DC-plating was higher than that for PC-plating. The higher plating current density is, the larger difference in critical rotating speeds appears between DC- and PC-electroplating. Equiaxed grains, in a nanoscale size with lower dislocation density, nucleate on the cathodic surface in both DC- and PC-electroplating. Adjacent to the equiaxed grains, textured grains were found in other portion of chromium deposit. Fine columnar grains were observed in the DC-electroplated deposit. On the other hand, very long slender grains with high degree of preferred orientation were detected in PC-electroplated deposit

  3. Biodegradation of nickel and chromium from space maintainers: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar V

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Band materials are often used in the practice of pediatric dentistry. Nickel and Chromium are the main ingredients of these materials. The potential health hazards of nickel and chromium and their compounds have been the focus of attention for more than 100 years. It has established that these metals could cause hypersensitivity. The study was undertaken to analyze in vitro biodegradation of space maintainers made out of stainless steel band materials from manufacturers Dentaurum and Unitek. The leaching effect simulating the use of one, two, three, and four space maintainers in clinical practice was studied by keeping the respective number of space maintainers in the artificial saliva incubating at 37°C and analyzing for nickel and chromium release after 1,7,14,21 and 28 days using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results showed that there was measurable release of both nickel and chromium which reached maximum level at the end of 7 days which was statistically significant (P < 0.05 and was very much below the dietary average intake even for four bands used and was not capable of causing any toxicity.

  4. Chromium Extraction via Chemical Processing of Fe-Cr Alloys Fine Powder with High Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, D. M.; Navarro, R. C. S.; Souza, R. F. M.; Brocchi, E. A.

    2017-06-01

    Ferrous alloys are important raw materials for special steel production. In this context, alloys from the Fe-Cr system, with typical Cr weight fraction ranging from 0.45 to 0.95, are prominent, particularly for the stainless steel industry. During the process in which these alloys are obtained, there is considerable production of fine powder, which could be reused after suitable chemical treatment, for example, through coupling pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical processes. In the present study, the extraction of chromium from fine powder generated during the production of a Fe-Cr alloy with high C content was investigated. Roasting reactions were performed at 1073 K, 1173 K, and 1273 K (800 °C, 900 °C, and 1000 °C) with 300 pct (w/w) excess NaOH in an oxidizing atmosphere (air), followed by solubilization in deionized water, selective precipitation, and subsequent calcination at 1173 K (900 °C) in order to convert the obtained chromium hydroxide to Cr2O3. The maximum achieved Cr recovery was around 86 pct, suggesting that the proposed chemical route was satisfactory regarding the extraction of the chromium initially present. Moreover, after X-ray diffraction analysis, the final produced oxide has proven to be pure Cr2O3 with a mean crystallite size of 200 nm.

  5. Chromium in leather footwear-risk assessment of chromium allergy and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P; Strandesen, Maria; Poulsen, Pia B

    2012-01-01

    Background. Chromium-tanned leather footwear, which releases >3 ppm hexavalent Cr(VI), may pose a risk of sensitizing and eliciting allergic dermatitis. Objectives. To determine the content and potential release of chromium in leather footwear and to discuss the prevention of chromium contact...... allergy and dermatitis. Methods. Sixty pairs of leather shoes, sandals and boots (20 children's, 20 men's, and 20 women's) were purchased in Copenhagen and examined with X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Chromium was extracted according to the International Standard, ISO 17075. The detection level for Cr......(VI) was 3 ppm. Results. Chromium was identified in 95% of leather footwear products, the median content being 1.7% (range 0-3.3%). No association with store category or footwear category was found. A tendency for there to be a higher chromium content in footwear with high prices was shown (p(trend) = 0...

  6. Characteristics of chromium-allergic dermatitis patients prior to regulatory intervention for chromium in leather

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Zachariae, Claus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromium-tanned leather articles currently constitute the most important cause of contact allergy to chromium in Denmark. A regulation on the content of hexavalent chromium in leather was adopted in November 2013 by the EU member states. OBJECTIVES: To characterize patients...... with chromium allergy and their disease, to serve as a baseline for future studies on the potential effect of the new regulation on chromium in leather. METHODS: A questionnaire case-control study was performed on 155 dermatitis patients with positive patch test reactions to potassium dichromate and a matched...... control group of 621 dermatitis patients. Comparisons were made by use of a χ(2) -test and the Mann-Whitney U-test. Logistic regression analyses were used to test for associations. RESULTS: Sixty-six per cent of chromium-allergic patients had a positive history of contact dermatitis caused by leather...

  7. Leaching of chromium from chromium contaminated soil: Speciation study and geochemical modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anđelković Darko H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of chromium between soil and leachate was monitored. A natural process of percolating rainwater through the soil was simulated in the laboratory conditions and studied with column leaching extraction. Migration of chromium in the soil is conditioned by the level of chromium soil contamination, the soil organic matter content, and rainwater acidity. Chromium (III and chromium(VI were determined by spectrophotometric method with diphenilcarbazide in acidic media. Comparing the results of chromium speciation in leachate obtained by experimental model systems and geochemical modelling calculations using Visual MINTEQ model, a correlation was observed regarding the influence of the tested parameters. Leachate solutions showed that the concentration of Cr depended on the organic matter content. The influence of pH and soil organic matter content is in compliance after its definition through experimental and theoretical way. The computer model - Stockholm Humic Model used to evaluate the leaching results corresponded rather well with the measured values.

  8. Novel implementation of the use of the EPR-in situ technique (Electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation) to identify intergranular corrosion susceptability of stainless steels exposed to high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, N.; Pineda, Y.; Vera, E.; Sepulveda, H.; Heyn, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels (18 % Cr), are often used in pieces that are exposed to temperatures of 450 o C to 900 o C (heat exchangers). At these temperatures sensibilization occurs on the grain boundaries, becoming a key factor in the appearance of intergranular corrosion. In order to prevent this phenomena from occurring 0.3% to 0.8% of niobium is added as an alloying element in the manufacturing process, which prevents the carbon present in the steel combines with the chromium, avoiding the formation of carbides. An electrochemical method for in-situ application was developed to evaluate the corrosive behavior of stainless steel and its susceptibility and degree of sensibilizaton to an intergranular attack. This work shows the effectiveness of this technique in evaluating niobium's inhibitory effect in preventing the formation of chromium carbides on the grain boundaries of 18% chromium steel, and also shows the technique's potentiality in determining how susceptible these steels are to intercrystalline corrosion

  9. The fate of chromium during tropical weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Alfons; Frei, Robert

    2014-01-01

    We performed a mineral, geochemical and Cr–Sr–Pb isotope study on a laterite profile developed on ca. 540 Ma old tonalitic bedrock in Madagascar with special emphasis on the behavior of chromium during tropical weathering. The observed strong depletions of Ca, Si, and P, and enrichment of Fe and Al...... of a former, positively fractionated and mobile chromium pool has been experimentally constrained in circumneutral and basic leachates of powdered tonalite bedrock where δ53Cr of + 0.21 to + 0.48‰ was measured. Our results show that mobilization of chromium is effective under highly oxidative conditions...

  10. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, J. P.; Vite T, J.; Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M.

    2009-01-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  11. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K.H; Koenig, H. [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  12. New ferritic steels for advanced steam plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, K H; Koenig, H [GEC ALSTHOM Energie GmbH, Nuremberg (Germany)

    1999-12-31

    During the last 15-20 years ferritic-martensitic 9-12 % chromium steels have been developed under international research programmes which permit inlet steam temperatures up to approx. 625 deg C and pressures up to about 300 bars, thus leading to improvements in thermal efficiency of around 8 % and a CO{sub 2} reduction of about 20 % versus conventional steam parameters. These new steels are already being applied in 13 European and 34 Japanese power stations with inlet steam temperature up to 610 deg C. This presentation will give an account of the content, scope and results of the research programmes and of the experience gained during the production of components which have been manufactured from the new steels. (orig.) 13 refs.

  13. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Johansen, Jeanne D

    2017-06-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chromium-allergic patients, and 5 patients without chromium allergy. All were patch tested with potassium dichromate, cobalt chloride, nickel sulfate, and nine different metallic discs. The chromium-allergic patients were also patch tested with serial dilutions of potassium dichromate. Positive/weaker reactions were observed to disc B (1 of 10), disc C (1 of 10), and disc D, disc E, and disc I (4 of 10 each). As no controls reacted to any of the discs, the weak reactions indicate allergic reactions. Positive patch test reactions to 1770 ppm chromium(VI) in the serial dilutions of potassium dichromate were observed in 7 of 10 patients. When the case group was narrowed down to include only the patients with a current positive patch test reaction to potassium dichromate, elicitation of dermatitis by both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) discs was observed in 4 of 7 of patients. Many of the patients reacted to both chromium(III) and chromium(VI) surfaces. Our results indicate that both chromium(VI) and chromium(III) pose a risk to chromium-allergic patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  15. Sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.

    1985-01-01

    The sorption of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on lead sulfide was investigated in dependence on pH, time of sorption, and on the concnetrations of sorbate and sorbent. The mechanisms of the sorption of Crsup(3+) and CrOsub(4)sup(2-) traces on lead sulfide are discussed; a difference between CrOsub(4)sup(2-) sorption on PbS and α-Fesub(2)Osub(3) was found. Sulfates and molybdates affect the removal of chromates from aqueous solutions. Lead sulfide carrier prepared in this work was also used for the preconcentration of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) from tap water. (author)

  16. Determination of chromium(III) and total chromium in marine waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, M J [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom); Ravenscroft, J E [WRc, Henley Road, Medmenham, Marlow SL7 2HD (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The development of an analytical technique is described which may be used to determine chromium, chromium(III) and chromium(VI) in estuarine and coastal waters. The method is based on selective micro-solvent extraction with subsequent GFAAS. The technique has been applied in a major North Sea estuary. The results obtained confirm that thermodynamic factors alone cannot be relied upon to describe the form of chromium in estuaries. Kinetic factors appear to have a strong influence over speciation and lead to the persistence of Cr(III) species in environments where Cr(VI) would be expected to be present. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Laws of alloyed cementite particles nucleation during heat-resistant steels carburizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Semenov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a problem analyzing a nucleation of cementite type carbides in carburized heat-resistant steels for the turbofan engines gear wheels.The verification of previously hypothesized mechanism of dislocation nucleation particles chromium-alloyed cementite during process of carburizing was accepted as an objective of the work.As a methodological basis of this paper were accepted the numerical experiments based on the kinetic theory of nucleation, as well as on the known results of experimental studies.According to the kinetic theory of nucleation, a new phase in the solid solutions take place in the defects of the crystal structure of the metal such as inter-grain boundaries and dislocations clusters. A principle feature of the inter-grain boundary mechanism of nucleation is formation of carbide lattice. It is of great practical interest because the cementite lattice drops mechanical properties of hardened parts.According to the experimental studies, the average chromium concentration in the alloyed cementite twice exceeds its Cr content in the heat-resistant steels. Furthermore, the areas of abnormally high (more than ten times in comparison with the average content chromium concentration in cementite have been experimentally revealed.Numerical experiments have revealed that the nucleation of cementite particles alloyed with chromium (chromium concentration of 3% or more occurs, mainly, by the dislocation mechanism on the concentration fluctuations of the alloying element. According to calculations, an obligatory prerequisite to start an active nucleation process of new phase in the solid solution is a local increase of the chromium concentration up to 40%.Despite the lack of physical prerequisites for the formation of chromium precipitates, this phenomenon is explained by a strong chemical affinity of chromium and carbon, causing diffusion of chromium atoms in the region of the carbon atoms clusters. The formation of carbon

  18. Measurement of iron, magnesium and chromium concentrations in the saliva of the patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valiollah Arash

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stainless steel alloy used in orthodontics has elements such as iron - magnesium and chromium , which may be released due to corrosion in the mouth . The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes of these elements in the saliva of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment. Methods: In a clinical study with simple non- random sampling , 1ml saliva of 11 patients (7 females and 4 males who needed fixed orthodontic treatment and had no restorations or crowns were collected. During the fixed orthodontic treatment at successive times ( a day, a week, a month , two months and six months , 1 ml of saliva was collected and evaluated for the amount of iron ( spectrophotometry, chromium ( atomic absorption, and magnesium ( spectrophotometry . Bracket , band and wire used in all patients were stainless steel alloy and were manufactured by Dentaurum Company. After sample collection , the data analysis was performed with " Azeri- 5" and "10SPSS" software and repeated measures test. Results: The mean concentration of iron 66.326±0.541, chromium 0.483±0.324 and magnesium 0.552±293 decreased during the study but these results were not statistical y significant (p>0.05. Conclusions: Iron , chromium and magnesium concentration do not exceed the standard limits in saliva during orthodontic treatment.

  19. Auxiliary Electrodes for Chromium Vapor Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey; Shahzad, Moaiz; Britt, Tommy

    2018-05-15

    Measurement of chromia-containing vapors in solid oxide fuel cell systems is useful for monitoring and addressing cell degradation caused by oxidation of the chomia scale formed on alloys for interconnects and balance-of-plant components. One approach to measuring chromium is to use a solid electrolyte with an auxiliary electrode that relates the partial pressure of the chromium containing species to the mobile species in the electrolyte. One example is YCrO3 which can equilibrate with the chromium containing vapor and yttrium in yttria stabilized zirconia to establish an oxygen activity. Another is Na2CrO4 which can equilibrate with the chromium-containing vapor to establish a sodium activity.

  20. Acute and chronic systemic chromium toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, S C

    1989-10-01

    Although chromium and compounds containing it have been recognized as having potential severe adverse effects on health for more than 160 years, understanding of the systemic toxicology and true hazard of these compounds is still not complete. A review of the current state of knowledge is attempted in this paper, with appropriate attention given to the complications of multiple valence states and solubility. Selected chromium compounds, particularly hexavalent ones, are carcinogens, corrosives, delayed contact sensitizers, and have the kidney as their primary target organ. But chromium is also an essential element for humans. The body clearly possesses some effective detoxification mechanisms for some degree of exposure to hexavalent chrome compounds. The significant features of acute and chronic chromium toxicity are presented in view of these considerations.

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  2. Ductile-brittle transition of thoriated chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, B. A.; Veigel, N. D.; Clauer, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Unalloyed chromium and chromium containing approximately 3 wt % ThO2 were prepared from powder produced by a chemical vapor deposition process. When rolled to sheet and tested in tension, it was found that the thoriated material had a lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) than unalloyed chromium. This ductilizing was evident both in the as-rolled condition and after the materials had been annealed for 1 hour at 1200 C. The improved ductility in thoriated chromium may be associated with several possible mechanisms: (1) particles may disperse slip, such that critical stress or strain concentrations for crack nucleation are more difficult to achieve; (2) particles may act as dislocation sources, thus providing mobile dislocations in this normally source-poor material, in a manner similar to prestraining; and (3) particles in grain boundaries may help to transmit slip across the boundaries, thus relieving stress concentrations and inhibiting crack nucleation.

  3. Uptake and transport of chromium in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, V.; D'souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The uptake of chromium, an important soil and water pollutant, by five different plant species was examined in nutrient culture experiments using chromium-51 as a tracer. The concentration in aerial tissues of both trivalent and hexavalent forms of chromium was the greatest in peas followed by beans, tomato and the cereals over identical uptake periods. The uptake of 51 Cr 3+ was, in general, greater than 51 CrO 4 2- . Studies with bean plants indicated that shoot uptake of both forms of chromium decreased with increasing pH and salt concentration of the external solution. Concentrations of 10 -4 M and 10 -5 M DNP inhibited 51 Cr uptake by bean shoots. (author)

  4. Chemical Speciation of Chromium in Drilling Muds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Takeyoshi; Yoshii, Mitsuru; Shinoda, Kohzo

    2007-01-01

    Drilling muds are made of bentonite and other clays, and/or polymers, mixed with water to the desired viscosity. Without the drilling muds, corporations could not drill for oil and gas and we would have hardly any of the fuels and lubricants considered essential for modern industrial civilization. There are hundreds of drilling muds used and some kinds of drilling muds contain chromium. The chemical states of chromium in muds have been studied carefully due to concerns about the environmental influence. However it is difficult to determine the chemical state of chromium in drilling muds directly by conventional analytical methods. We have studied the chemical form of chromium in drilling muds by using a laboratory XAFS system and a synchrotron facility

  5. Electrochemistry of chromium(0)-aminocarbene complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskovcova, Irena; Rohacova, Jana; Meca, Ludek; Tobrman, Tomas; Dvorak, Dalimil; Ludvik, Jiri

    2005-01-01

    Two series of chromium(0)-(aryl)aminocarbene complexes substituted on the ligand phenyl ring were prepared and electrochemically investigated: pentacarbonyl((N,N-dimethylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (Ia-e) and chelated tetracarbonyl((η 2 -N-allyl-N-allylamino)(phenyl)carbene(chromium(0) (IIa, c-e). For comparison, a tungsten analogue of IIc (III) and a chromium chelate bearing a methyl substituent instead of the phenyl group IV were taken into the study. The intramolecular interactions of p-substituents on the ligand phenyl ring with the reduction and oxidation centres of the molecule of complex (followed electrochemically using LFER [P. Zuman, Substituent Effects in Organic Polarography, Plenum Press, New York, 1967]) enabled to localize the corresponding electron transfer. The influence of the type of coordination, the substituent on the ligand phenyl ring and the central metal atom on oxidation and reduction potentials is discussed

  6. Hexavalent Chromium reduction by Trichoderma inhamatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Battera, L.; Cristiani-Urbina, E.

    2009-07-01

    Reduction of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] is a useful and attractive process for remediation of ecosystems and industrial effluents contaminated with Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(II) can be achieved by both chemical and biological methods; however, the biological reduction is more convenient than the chemical one since costs are lower, and sludge is generated in smaller amounts. (Author)

  7. Simple Heat Treatment for Production of Hot-Dip Galvanized Dual Phase Steel Using Si-Al Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equihua-Guillén, F.; García-Lara, A. M.; Muñíz-Valdes, C. R.; Ortíz-Cuellar, J. C.; Camporredondo-Saucedo, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents relevant metallurgical considerations to produce galvanized dual phase steels from low cost aluminum-silicon steels which are produced by continuous strip processing. Two steels with different contents of Si and Al were austenized in the two-phase field ferrite + austenite (α + γ) in a fast manner to obtain dual phase steels, suitable for hot-dip galvanizing process, under typical parameters of continuous annealing processing line. Tensile dual phase properties were obtained from specimens cooled from temperature below Ar3, held during 3 min, intermediate cooling at temperature above Ar1 and quenching in Zn bath at 465 °C. The results have shown typical microstructure and tensile properties of galvanized dual phase steels. Finally, the synergistic effect of aluminum, silicon, and residual chromium on martensite start temperature ( M s), critical cooling rate ( C R), volume fraction of martensite, and tensile properties has been studied.

  8. REMOVAL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM FROM DRINKING WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Asgari ، F. Vaezi ، S. Nasseri ، O. Dördelmann ، A. H. Mahvi ، E. Dehghani Fard

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Removal of chromium can be accomplished by various methods but none of them is cost-effective in meeting drinking water standards. For this study, granular ferric hydroxide was used as adsorbent for removal of hexavalent chromium. Besides, the effects of changing contact time, pH and concentrations of competitive anions were determined for different amounts of granular ferric hydroxide. It was found that granular ferric hydroxide has a high capacity for adsorption of hexavalent chromium from water at pH≤7 and in 90 min contact time. Maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 0.788 mg Cr+6/g granular ferric hydroxide. Although relatively good adsorption of sulfate and chloride had been specified in this study, the interfering effects of these two anions had not been detected in concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/L. The absorbability of hexavalent chromium by granular ferric hydroxide could be expressed by Freundlich isotherm with R2>0.968. However, the disadvantage was that the iron concentration in water was increased by the granular ferric hydroxide. Nevertheless, granular ferric hydroxide is a promising adsorbent for chromium removal, even in the presence of other interfering compounds, because granular ferric hydroxide treatment can easily be accomplished and removal of excess iron is a simple practice for conventional water treatment plants. Thus, this method could be regarded as a safe and convenient solution to the problem of chromium-polluted water resources.

  9. Ion-nitriding of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, O.; Hertz, D.; Lebrun, J.P.; Michel, H.

    1995-01-01

    Although ion-nitriding is an extensively industrialized process enabling steel surfaces to be hardened by nitrogen diffusion, with a resulting increase in wear, seizure and fatigue resistance, its direct application to stainless steels, while enhancing their mechanical properties, also causes a marked degradation in their oxidation resistance. However, by adaption of the nitriding process, it is possible to maintain the improved wear resistant properties while retaining the oxidation resistance of the stainless steel. The controlled diffusion permits the growth of a nitrogen supersaturated austenite layer on parts made of stainless steel (AISI 304L and 316L) without chromium nitride precipitation. The diffusion layer remains stable during post heat treatments up to 650 F for 5,000 hrs and maintains a hardness of 900 HV. A very low and stable friction coefficient is achieved which provides good wear resistance against stainless steels under diverse conditions. Electrochemical and chemical tests in various media confirm the preservation of the stainless steel characteristics. An example of the application of this process is the treatment of Reactor Control Rod Cluster Assemblies (RCCAs) for Pressurized Water Nuclear Reactors

  10. Permeation of chromium salts through human skin in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Fullerton, A; Avnstorp, C

    1992-01-01

    Chromium permeation studies were performed on full thickness human skin in diffusion cells. All samples were analysed for the total chromium content by graphite furnace Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrometry. Some samples were analysed by an ion chromatographic method permitting...... the simultaneous determination of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) as well. The amounts of chromium found in all skin layers were significantly higher when potassium dichromate was applied to the skin compared with chromium chloride or chromium nitrate. Chromium could only be detected in the recipient phase after application...... of the dichromate solution. Chromium skin levels increased with increasing concentrations of applied chromium salts up to 0.034 M Cr. The amount of chromium in recipient phase and skin layers increased with increasing pH when the applied solution contained potassium dichromate. This was ascribed to a decreased skin...

  11. Enhancement of surface properties of SAE 1020 by chromium plasma immersion recoil implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Mello, C.B.; Beloto, A.F.; Rossi, J.O.; Reuther, H.

    2007-01-01

    SAE 1020 steel is commonly used as concrete reinforcement and small machine parts, but despite its good mechanical properties, as ductility, hardness and wear resistance, it is susceptible to severe corrosion. It is well known that chromium content above 12% in Fe alloys increases their corrosion resistance. In order to obtain this improvement, we studied the introduction of chromium atoms into the matrix of SAE 1020 steel by recoil implantation process using a plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) system. Potentiodynamic scans showed that the presence of Cr film leads to a gain in the corrosion potential, from -650 mV to -400 mV. After PIII treatment, the corrosion potential increased further to -340 mV, but the corrosion current density presented no significant change. Vickers microhardness tests showed surface hardness increase of up to about 27% for the treated samples. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that, for a 30 nm film, Cr was introduced for about 20 nm into the steel matrix. Tribology tests, of pin-on-disk type, showed that friction coefficient of treated samples was reduced by about 50% and a change in wear mechanism, from adhesive to abrasive mode, occurred

  12. Investigation of alternative phosphating treatments for nickel and hexavalent chromium elimination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbinsek, Luiz Antonio Rossi

    2014-01-01

    The phosphating processes are widely used in industry as surface treatments for metals, especially for low thickness plates, improving the adhesion between the metallic surface and the paint coating, and increasing the durability of paint systems against corrosion attacks. The tricationic phosphates containing zinc, nickel and manganese are commonly applied on steel. There is much discussion about the replacement of nickel by another element in order to have an environmentally friendly phosphating process. Niobium as a replacement for nickel has been evaluated. The most significant environmental impacts of phosphating processes are related to the presence of nickel and hexavalent chromium used in the process, this last as a passivation treatment. Nickel and hexavalent chromium are harmful to human and environment leading to contamination of water and soil. In the present study phosphate layers containing zinc, manganese and niobium have been evaluated and characterized on galvanized steel, and the results were compared with phosphates containing zinc, manganese and nickel, or a bicationic phosphate layer with zinc and manganese. Although the use of hexavalent chromium is not recommended worldwide, it is still used in processes for sealing the porosity of phosphate layers. This element is carcinogenic and has been associated with various diseases. Due to the passivation characteristics of niobium, this study also evaluated the tricationic bath containing niobium ammonium oxalate as a passivation treatment. The results showed that it could act as a replacement for the hexavalent chromium. The results of the present study showed that formulations containing niobium are potential replacements for hexavalent chromium and similar corrosion protection was obtained for the phosphate containing nickel or that with niobium. The morphology observed by scanning electron microscopy, gravimetric tests, porosity and adhesion evaluation results indicated that the phosphate

  13. Diminishing Chromium Use on Combined Chromium-Gambier Tanning Process Upon the Characteristics of Tanned Leather

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kasim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The research was aimed to investigate the influence of minimizing chromium use on combined chromium-gambier process upon the characteristics of tanned leather. At the first stage of tanning process, chromium was used and in the second stage it was replaced by gambier. The raw material used was dried saline-preserved goat skin. The treatments applied on the tanning process were the different concentrations of chromium ranging from the highest level of 6% to the lowest level of 1% which was then re-tanned by using 8% concentration of gambier. The examination parameters included chemical and physical properties as well as visual investigation on the tanned leather in accordance with SNI-06-0463-1989-A. The result showed that the tanning process by using 2% chromium in the first step and 8% gambier in the second step was a treatment combination producing tanned leather that met the standard. The examination on tanned leather resulted from such treatment showed 56.33% rawhide, 17.45% of bound tannin, 31.22% of tanning level, tensile strength 386.30 kg/cm2, flexibility 31.91%, leather width 1.3 mm, density 0.75 g/cm3, the leather was quite elastic with light brownish color. In conclusion, minimizing the use of chromium in the combined tanning process of chromium and gambier can be implemented to the lowest of 2% chromium concentration and 8% gambier in the first and second step, respectively.

  14. Separation of valent forms of chromium (3) and chromium (6) by coprecipitation with iron (3) hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazirmadov, B.; Khamidov, B.O.; Egorova, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Soption 9.62x10 -5 mol/l of 51 Cr radioactive isotope in oxidation states 3 and 6 by iron(3) hydroxide in 1 mol/l of KNO 3 and KCl depending on pH medium is investigated. The region of practically total concentration of Cr(3) and Cr(6 + ) (pH=3-6.5) is determined. The results of spectrophotometric investigations, calculational data on distribution of hydroxocation forms of chromium (3) and of chromium (6) anions and sorption by iron (3) hydroxide permit to characterize sorption of chromium forms in different stages of oxidation. The methods of chromium (3) and chromium (6) separation by coprecipitation of iron (3) hydroxide and their precipitation from it is developed on the above foundation

  15. Oral Chromium Exposure and Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hong; Brocato, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known carcinogen when inhaled. However, inhalational exposure to Cr(VI) affects only a small portion of the population, mainly by occupational exposures. In contrast, oral exposure to Cr(VI) is widespread and affects many people throughout the globe. In 2008, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) released a 2-year study demonstrating that ingested Cr(VI) was carcinogenic in rats and mice. The effects of Cr(VI) oral exposure is mitigated by reduction in the gut, however a portion evades the reductive detoxification and reaches target tissues. Once Cr(VI) enters the cell, it ultimately gets reduced to Cr(III), which mediates its toxicity via induction of oxidative stress during the reduction while Cr intermediates react with protein and DNA. Cr(III) can form adducts with DNA that may lead to mutations. This review will discuss the potential adverse effects of oral exposure to Cr(VI) by presenting up-to-date human and animal studies, examining the underlying mechanisms that mediate Cr(VI) toxicity, as well as highlighting opportunities for future research. PMID:26231506

  16. Chromium getter studies in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dylla, H.F.; LaMarche, P.H.; Blanchard, W.R.

    1986-02-01

    We have studied the effects of the deposition of thin films (approx.0.1 μm) of chromium onto approx.70% of the torus area of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The purpose of these experiments was to test the difference between high surface coverage and high pumping speed gettering schemes with respect to minimizing oxygen impurity generation in high power tokamak discharges. The initial Cr deposition had significant effects on vessel outgassing and subsequent plasma performance: the outgassing of H 2 O, CO, and CO 2 decreased by a factor of ten, oxygen impurity radiation decreased by a factor of two, the plasma Z/sub eff/ decreased from 1.3 to 1.1, and the plasma density limit increased by 20%. This improvement correlates with a significant reduction of the edge radiation as the density limit is approached. The effects of the initial and subsequent Cr depositions were relatively long lasting, exhibiting time constants of the order of weeks. We attribute the observed impurity reduction to a modification of the oxide surface on the vessel wall, which is apparently a significant impurity source for oxygen. 17 refs., 6 figs

  17. The effect of σ-phase precipitation at 800°C on the corrosion resistance in sea-water of a high alloyed duplex stainless steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, M.E.; Gadgil, V.J.; Krougman, J.M.; Ijsseling, F.P.

    1994-01-01

    Super-duplex stainless steels are recently developed high alloyed stainless steels that combine good mechanical properties with excellent corrosion resistance. Because of a high content of chromium and molybdenum, these alloys are susceptible to σ-phase precipitation during short exposure to

  18. On electrical resistivity of AISI D2 steel during various stages of cryogenic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomte, Sachin Vijay; Gogte, Chandrashekhar Laxman; Peshwe, Dilip

    2012-06-01

    The effect of dislocation densities and residual stresses is well known in tool steels. Measurement of electrical resistivity in order to monitor dislocation densities or residual stresses has seldom been used in investigating the effect of cryogenic treatment on tool steels. Monitoring residual stresses during cryogenic treatment becomes important as it is directly related to changes due to cryogenic treatment of tool steels. For high carbon high chromium (HCHC- AISI D2) steels, not only wear resistance but dimensional stability is an important issue as the steels are extensively used in dies, precision measuring instruments. This work comprises of study of measurement of electrical resistivity of AISI D2 steel at various stages of cryogenic treatment. Use of these measurements in order to assess the dimensional stability of these steels is discussed in this paper.

  19. Iron -chromium alloys and free surfaces: from ab initio calculations to thermodynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levesque, M.

    2010-11-01

    Ferritic steels possibly strengthened by oxide dispersion are candidates as structural materials for generation IV and fusion nuclear reactors. Their use is limited by incomplete knowledge of the iron-chromium phase diagram at low temperatures and of the phenomena inducing preferential segregation of one element at grain boundaries or at surfaces. In this context, this work contributes to the multi-scale study of the model iron-chromium alloy and their free surfaces by numerical simulations. This study begins with ab initio calculations of properties related to the mixture of atoms of iron and chromium. We highlight complex dependency of the magnetic moments of the chromium atoms on their local chemical environment. Surface properties are also proving sensitive to magnetism. This is the case of impurity segregation of chromium in iron and of their interactions near the surface. In a second step, we construct a simple energy model for high numerical efficiency. It is based on pair interactions on a rigid lattice to which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that we compare to Monte Carlo simulations. The last step of our work is to introduce free surfaces in our model. We then study the effect of ab initio calculated bulk and surface properties on surface segregation.Finally, we calculate segregation isotherms. We therefore propose an evolution model of surface composition of iron-chromium alloys as a function of bulk composition. which are given local chemical environment and temperature dependencies. With this model, we reproduce the ab initio results at zero temperature and experimental results at high temperature. We also deduce the solubility limits at all intermediate temperatures with mean field approximations that

  20. Chromium-induced skin damage among Taiwanese cement workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Wang, Po-Chih; Wu, Jyun-De; Sheu, Shiann-Cherng

    2016-10-01

    Little research has been done on the relationships between chromium exposure, skin barrier function, and other hygienic habits in cement workers. Our purpose was to investigate chromium-induced skin barrier disruption due to cement exposure among cement workers. One hundred and eight cement workers were recruited in this study. Urinary chromium concentration was used to characterize exposure levels. The biological exposure index was used to separate high and low chromium exposure. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was used to assess the skin barrier function. TEWL was significantly increased in workers with high chromium exposure levels than those with low chromium exposure levels (p = 0.048). A positive correlation was also found between urinary chromium concentration and TEWL (R = 0.28, p = 0.004). After adjusting for smoking status and glove use, a significant correlation between urinary chromium concentrations and TEWL remained. Moreover, workers who smoked and had a high chromium exposure had significantly increased TEWL compared to nonsmokers with low chromium exposure (p = 0.01). Skin barrier function of cement workers may have been disrupted by chromium in cement, and smoking might significantly enhance such skin barrier perturbation with chromium exposure. Decreased chromium skin exposure and smoking cessation should be encouraged at work. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Reduction of hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Y C; Paik, N W

    2000-01-01

    Chromium exists at various valences, including elemental, trivalent, and hexavalent chromium, and undergoes reduction-oxidation reactions in the environment. Since hexavalent chromium is known as a human carcinogen, it is most important to evaluate the oxidation-reduction characteristics of the hexavalent chromium species. Although hexavalent chromium can be reduced to trivalent state, the detailed information on this in workplace environments is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate hexavalent chromium reduction in time in various conditions. A pilot chrome plating operation was prepared and operated in a laboratory for this study. There was evidence that the hexavalent chromium was reduced by time after mist generation. The percentage ratio (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of hexavalent chromium to total chromium was almost 100% (99.1 approximately 102.3) immediately after mist generation, and was reduced to 87.4% (84.8 approximately 89.9) at 1 hour and 81.0% (78.3 approximately 83.5) at 2 hours, respectively. Another test indicated that hexavalent chromium collected on PVC filters was also reduced by time after sampling. Hexavalent chromium was reduced to 90.8% (88.2 approximately 93.3) at 2 hours after sampling. It also was found that hexavalent chromium was reduced during storage in air. It is recommended that air samples of hexavalent chromium be protected against reduction during storage.

  2. Abrasion Resistance of as-Cast High-Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokusová Marcela

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High chromium cast irons are widely used as abrasion resistant materials. Their properties and wear resistance depend on carbides and on the nature of the matrix supporting these carbides. The paper presents test results of irons which contain (in wt.% 18-22 Cr and 2-5 C, and is alloyed by 1.7 Mo + 5 Ni + 2 Mn to improve the toughness. Tests showed as-cast irons with mostly austenitic matrix achieved hardness 36-53 HRC but their relative abrasion-resistance was higher than the tool steel STN 19436 heat treated on hardness 60 HRC.

  3. A study of the formation of Cr-surface alloyed layer on structural alloy steel by Co2 laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T.H.; Han, W.S.

    1986-01-01

    In order to improve wear and erosion-resistances of a structural alloy steel (SNCM 8) during heat-cycling, chromium-alloyed layers were produced on the surface by irradiating Co 2 laser. Specimens were prepared either by electroplating of hard-chromium or coating of chromium powders on the steel followed by the laser treatment. Index values, which related the depth and the width of the alloyed layers to the scanning speed of laser, for both samples are experimentally measured. At a fixed scanning speed, while both samples resulted in a similar depth of the alloyed layers, the chromium powder coated specimen showed larger width of the alloyed layer than the chromium electroplated one. The hardness values of the alloyed layers in both samples were slightly lower than that of the martensitic region beneath the alloyed layers. But they are considerably higher than those of steel matrices. Regardless of the prior treatments before laser irradiation, distributions of chromium were fairly uniform throughout the alloyed layers. (Author)

  4. The enriched chromium neutrino source for GALLEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.X.; Hahn, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    The preparation and study of an intense source of neutrinos in the form of neutron irradiated materials which are enriched in Cr-50 for use in the GALLEX solar neutrino experiment are discussed. Chromyl fluoride gas is enriched in the Cr-50 isotope by gas centrifugation and subsequently converted to a very stable form of chromium oxide. The results of neutron activation analyses of such chromium samples indicate low levels of any long-lived activities, but show that short-lived activities, in particular Na-24, may be of concern. These results show that irradiating chromium oxide enriched in Cr-50 is preferable to irradiating either natural chromium or argon gas as a means of producing a neutrino source to calibrate the GALLEX detector. These results of the impurity level analysis of the enriched chromyl fluoride gas and its conversion to the oxide are also of interest to work in progress by other members of the Collaboration investigating an alternative conversion of the enriched gas to chromium metal. 35 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs

  5. Serum chromium levels in gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P G Sundararaman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure serum chromium level in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM from Chennai, South India. Materials and Methods: Thirty women with gestational diabetes, 60 age matched controls. Inclusion criteria: Gestational age 22-28 weeks, age group 20-35 years. Exclusion Criteria: Gestational age beyond 28 weeks, malnutrition or presence of infection. Serum chromium was measured using inductive couple plasma emission spectrometer. Results: Serum chromium levels of women with GDM, 1.59+/-0.02 ng/ml (range: 0.16-4.0 ng/ml were lower than in controls (4.58+/-0.62 ng/ml; range 0.82-5.33 ng/ml (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences among cases and controls when subdivided by parity. Conclusions: Women with GDM from a South Indian city had lower levels of serum chromium compared to pregnant women without GDM. Studies may be done whether chromium supplementation is useful in this group of women.

  6. Studies of ion implanted thermally oxidised chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhl, S.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal oxidation of 99.99% pure chromium containing precise amounts of foreign elements has been studied and compared to the oxidation of pure chromium. Thirty-three foreign elements including all of the naturally occurring rare earth metals were ion implanted into chromium samples prior to oxidation at 750 0 C in oxygen. The role of radiation induced damage, inherent in this doping technique, has been studied by chromium implantations at various energies and doses. The repair of the damage has been studied by vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 800 0 C prior to oxidation. Many of the implants caused an inhibition of oxidation, the greatest being a 93% reduction for 2 x 10 16 ions/cm 2 of praseodymium. The distribution of the implant was investigated by the use of 2 MeV alpha backscattering and ion microprobe analysis. Differences in the topography and structure of the chromic oxide on and off the implanted area were studied using scanning electron and optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis was used to investigate if a rare earth-chromium compound of a perovskite-type structure had been formed. Lastly, the electrical conductivity of chromic oxide on and off the implanted region was examined at low voltages. (author)

  7. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  8. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F., E-mail: farhad.tavassoli@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/DANS/DMN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Diegele, E., E-mail: eberhard.diegele@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Lindau, R., E-mail: rainer.lindau@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzginova, N., E-mail: Natalia.Luzginova@gmail.com [NRG-Petten, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Tanigawa, H., E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Authority (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe–Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7–9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe–8%Cr–2%W–TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe–9%Cr–1%W–TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  9. V and Nb Influence on the Austenitic Stainless Steel Corrosion in 0.1 M HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel GHARBI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium and niobium were added in AISI309 austenitic stainless steel composition to modify their structure and pitting corrosion resistance in 0.1 M HCl. The structural characterization was carried out by X-rays diffraction and optical microscopy. Corrosion behavior was investigated using potentiodynamic tests and electrochemical impedance measurements (EIS .Results showed that vanadium and niobium addition precipitated stable carbides (VC, NbC to chromium carbides’ detriment and improved austenitic stainless steel corrosion resistance.

  10. Characteristic of Low Temperature Carburized Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istiroyah; Pamungkas, M. A.; Saroja, G.; Ghufron, M.; Juwono, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    Low temperature carburizing process has been carried out on austenitic stainless steel (ASS) type AISI 316L, that contain chromium in above 12 at%. Therefore, conventional heat treatment processes that are usually carried out at high temperatures are not applicable. The sensitization process due to chromium migration from the grain boundary will lead to stress corrosion crack and decrease the corrosion resistance of the steel. In this study, the carburizing process was carried out at low temperatures below 500 °C. Surface morphology and mechanical properties of carburized specimens were investigated using optical microscopy, non destructive profilometer, and Vicker microhardness. The surface roughness analysis show the carburising process improves the roughness of ASS surface. This improvement is due to the adsorption of carbon atoms on the surface of the specimen. Likewise, the hardness test results indicate the carburising process increases the hardness of ASS.

  11. Microstructure of warm rolling and pearlitic transformation of ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Jun-Jie; Lian, Fu-Liang; Liu, Hong-Ji; Jiang, Tao; Guo, Sheng-Wu; Du, Lin-Xiu; Liu, Yong-Ning

    2014-01-01

    Pearlitic transformation mechanisms have been investigated in ultra-fine grained GCr15 steel. The ultrafine-grained steel, whose grain size was less than 1 μm, was prepared by thermo-mechanical treatment at 873 K and then annealing at 923 K for 2 h. Pearlitic transformation was conducted by reheating the ultra-fine grained samples at 1073 K and 1123 K for different periods of time and then cooling in air. Scanning electron microscope observation shows that normal lamellar pearlite, instead of granular cementite and ferrite, cannot be formed when the grain size is approximately less than 4(± 0.6) μm, which yields a critical grain size for normal lamellar pearlitic transformations in this chromium alloyed steel. The result confirms that grain size has a great influence on pearlitic transformation by increasing the diffusion rate of carbon atoms in the ultra-fine grained steel, and the addition of chromium element doesn't change this pearlitic phase transformation rule. Meanwhile, the grain growth rate is reduced by chromium alloying, which is beneficial to form fine grains during austenitizing, thus it facilitating pearlitic transformation by divorced eutectoid transformation. Moreover, chromium element can form a relatively high gradient in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, which promotes carbide formation in the frontier of the undissolved carbide, i.e., chromium promotes divorced eutectoid transformation. - Highlights: • Ultrafine-grained GCr15 steel was obtained by warm rolling and annealing technology. • Reduction of grain size makes pearlite morphology from lamellar to granular. • Adding Cr does not change normal pearlitic phase transformation rule in UFG steel. • Cr carbide resists grain growth and facilitates pearlitic transformation by DET

  12. Effect of chromium toxicity on germination and early seedling growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-07-19

    Jul 19, 2010 ... germination and early seedling growth of melon (Cucumis melo L.). Chromium ... chromium on seed germination and seedling growth- biomass in early ..... such critical regulatory mechanisms are likely to operate in seeds at ...

  13. Stabilization of chromium salt in ordinary portland cement

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) samples containing the chromium salt have been investigated using differential microcalorimetry, conductometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic analysis. The effect of chromium on OPC hydration was evaluated by continuous observing of early hydration.

  14. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites.

  15. Chromium: a review of environmental and occupational toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencko, V

    1985-01-01

    The following topics are covered in this brief review on the environmental and occupational toxicology of chromium: occurrence, production and uses of chromium and chromium compounds; experimental toxicology; chromium toxicity for man; hygienic and ecologic aspects of chromium contamination of the environment. The review provides a conclusive evidence which suggests that chromium, especially its hexavalent form, is both toxic and carcinogenic, but its trivalent form is physiologically essential in the metabolism of insulin. It is also emphasized that among the major sources of environmental chromium today are the cement industry and the increasingly widespread use of chromium compounds added as an anticorrosion admixture to a variety of cooling systems, e.g. in large power plants, which may greatly contribute to the overall pollution of outdoor air at the sites. 108 references.

  16. Surface Chemistry and Spectroscopy of Chromium in Inorganic Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the surface chemistry and spectroscopy of chromium in inorganic oxides. Characterization of the molecular structures of chromium; Mechanics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions; Mobility and reactivity on oxidic surfaces.

  17. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents .... Chromium (Cleseari and Green, 1995) included the oxidation of .... like uranium in its cells might also match with its tendency.

  18. Wrought Cr--W--V bainitic/ferritic steel compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klueh, Ronald L.; Maziasz, Philip J.; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Santella, Michael L.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh; Jawad, Maan H.

    2006-07-11

    A high-strength, high-toughness steel alloy includes, generally, about 2.5% to about 4% chromium, about 1.5% to about 3.5% tungsten, about 0.1% to about 0.5% vanadium, and about 0.05% to 0.25% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy is heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled to produce an austenite transformation product.

  19. Wire-Arc-Sprayed Aluminum Protects Steel Against Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Frank R.; Poorman, Richard; Sanders, Heather L.; Mckechnie, Timothy N.; Bonds, James W., Jr.; Daniel, Ronald L., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Aluminum coatings wire-arc sprayed onto steel substrates found effective in protecting substrates against corrosion. Coatings also satisfy stringent requirements for adhesion and flexibility, both at room temperature and at temperatures as low as liquid hydrogen. Developed as alternatives to corrosion-inhibiting primers and paints required by law to be phased out because they contain and emit such toxic substances as chromium and volatile organic compounds.

  20. Spectrophotometric determination of chromium in geological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathore, D.P.S.; Tarafder, P.K.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the determination of chromium is presented, based on the oxidation of hydroxylamine hydrochloride to nitrous acid by chromium(VI) in acetic acid medium followed by diazotization of the nitrite produced with p-aminophenylmercaptoacetic acid and subsequent coupling of the diazonium salt with N-(1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine di-hydrochloride in acidic medium to form a stable blueish azo dye. The method is suitable for the determination of chromium(VI) from 0.04 to 1.2 mg l -1 in a 1.0-cm cuvette. The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity are 3.65x10 4 l mol -1 cm -1 and 0.0014μg cm -2 , respectively. (author). 17 refs.; 3 figs

  1. Hexavalent Chromium IV-Free Primer Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldredge, Michael J.; Buck, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Primer materials provide corrosion protection for metal parts as well as an increased adhesion between metallic substrates and thermal protection systems (TPSs). Current primers for use in cryogenic applications contain hexavalent chromium. This hexavalent chromium provides excellent corrosion protection even in a cryogenic environment, but it is a carcinogen that requires special equipment and waste control procedures to use. The hazardous nature of hexavalent chromium makes it an obsolescence risk in the future. This study included two phases of evaluation. Thirteen primers were initially identified as candidates and twelve of those primers were tested in phase 1. Four of the best performing candidates from phase 1 continued into phase 2 testing. Phase 1 testing consisted mostly of liquid constituent and physical property testing. Cryoflex and salt fog testing were included in phase 1 because of their importance to the overall success of a candidate material. Phase 2 consisted of physical, thermal, and mechanical properties for nominally processed and fabricated specimens.

  2. Steel alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  3. Chromium Stable Isotope Fractionation - An Indicator of Hexavalent Chromium Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, A.; Johnson, T. M.; Bullen, T. D.

    2001-12-01

    Chromium is a common anthropogenic contaminant in surface water and ground water, and is also of interest in oceanography. It is redox-active; the two common valences in natural waters are Cr(VI), which is highly soluble and toxic, and Cr(III), which is relatively insoluble. Redox reactions thus control Cr mobility in aqueous solutions, and reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) is the most important reaction controlling attenuation of Cr in groundwater. Our results show that Cr(VI) reduction favors the lighter isotopes and leads to enrichment of heavier isotopes in the remaining Cr(VI). Cr isotope measurements thus show great promise as indicators of Cr(VI) reduction. We report here the first measurements of the magnitude of Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction and variations in δ 53Cr values obtained from three contaminated sites. Experiments were conducted to measure Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by suspensions of magnetite and unamended sediments from a local pond, Urbana, IL and San Francisco Estuary near Martinez, CA. Suspensions were incubated anaerobically with constant shaking, and complete Cr(VI) reduction occurred within a few days. Cr(VI) from intermediate time points in the experiments was purified via ion exchange and 53Cr/52Cr ratios were measured via TIMS with a double isotope spike. The instantaneous per mil fractionation, ɛ , was calculated assuming a Rayleigh fractionation model. The ɛ for Cr(VI) reduction on magnetite surfaces yielded a fractionation of -3.5 ‰ . The ɛ values for the pond and estuary sediments were -3.5 ‰ and -3.3 ‰ respectively. The size of this Cr isotope fractionation is encouraging, as current precision is 0.2 \\permil. δ 53Cr values in dissolved Cr(VI) from three contaminated sites range from 1.1 ‰ to 5.8 ‰ , suggesting that Cr(VI) reduction has occurred and has induced isotopic fractionation in these settings. δ 53Cr values measured from Cr(VI) in plating baths show little or no

  4. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe–22.7Cr–2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition......, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride...... precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic...

  5. Changes in grain boundary composition induced by neutron irradiation of austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, K.; Nakata, K.; Fukuya, K.; Kodama, M.

    1992-01-01

    The radiation induced segregation of solutes to the grain boundary in austenitic stainless steels were studied. Type 304 and type 316 steel samples neutron irradiated at 561K up to 9.2x10 25 n/m 2 were obtained and minute compositional profiles across grain boundaries were examined using an analytical scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a field emission electron gun. Chromium was slightly enriched at grain boundaries at the lowest irradiation dose but decreased with increasing fluence. Higher fluence irradiation resulted in depletion in chromium and molybdenum, and enrichment in nickel, silicon and phosphorus. These changes in grain boundary chemistry were limited within about 5nm of the boundary. Significant depletion of chromium and enrichment of impurities on the grain boundary occurred at fluences roughly coincidental with that of SCC susceptibility change obtained from another project

  6. Determination of chromium combined with DNA, RNA and proteins in chromium-rich brewer's yeast by NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, W.J.; Qian, Q.F.; Hou, X.L.; Feng, W.Y.; Chai, Z.F.

    2000-01-01

    The content of chromium in the DNA, RNA and protein fractions separated from chromium-rich and normal brewer's yeast was determined by neutron activation analysis (NAA). Our results show that the extracted relative amounts and concentrations of DNA, RNA and proteins have no significant difference for two types of yeast, but the chromium content in DNA, RNA and proteins fractions extracted from the chromium-rich yeast are substantially higher than those from the normal. In addition, the concentration of chromium in DNA is much higher than that in RNA and proteins. It is evident that the inorganic chromium compounds can enter the yeast cell during the yeast cultivation in the chromium-containing culture medium and are converted into organic chromium species, which are combined with DNA, RNA and proteins. (author)

  7. Mitigation of Hexavalent Chromium in Storm Water Resulting from Demolition of Large Concrete Structure at the East Tennessee Technology Park - 12286

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britto, Ronnie; Brown, Bridget; Hale, Timothy B.; Hensley, Janice L.; Johnson, Robert T.; Patel, Madhu [Tetra Tech, Inc. (United States); Emery, Jerry A. [Energy Solutions, Inc. (United States); Gaston, Clyde [LATA-SHARP Remediation Services - LSRS (United States); Queen, David C. [U.S. DOE-ORO (United States)

    2012-07-01

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding was provided to supplement the environmental management program at several DOE sites, including the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Demolition of the ETTP K-33 Building, the largest building to be demolished to date in Oak Ridge, was awarded to LSRS in FY-2010 under the ARRA program. The K-33 building was an 82 foot tall 2-story structure covering approximately 32 acres. Once this massive building was brought down to the ground, the debris was segregated and consolidated into piles of concrete rubble and steel across the remaining pad. The process of demolishing the building, tracking across concrete debris with heavy equipment, and stockpiling the concrete rubble caused it to become pulverized. During and after storm events, hexavalent chromium leached from the residual cement present in the large quantities of concrete. Storm water control measures were present to preclude migration of contaminants off-site, but these control measures were not designed to control hexavalent chromium dissolved in storm water from reaching nearby receiving water. The following was implemented to mitigate hexavalent chromium in storm water: - Steel wool was distributed around K-33 site catch basins and in water pools as an initial step in addressing hexavalent chromium. - Since the piles of concrete were too massive and unsafe to tarp, they were placed into windrows in an effort to reduce total surface area. - A Hach colorimetric field meter was acquired by the K-33 project to provide realtime results of hexavalent chromium in site surface water. - Three hexavalent chromium treatment systems were installed at three separate catch basins that receive integrated storm water flow from the K-33 site. Sodium bisulfite is being used as a reducing agent for the immobilization of hexavalent chromium while also assisting in lowering pH. Concentrations initially were 310 - 474 ppb of hexavalent chromium in

  8. Recovery of Proteins and Chromium Complexes from Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gutti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Chromium – Containing Leather Waste (CCLW constitutes an environmental pollution problem to leather industries disposing the waste by landfill. The waste mainly consists of collagen and chromium III complexes. This work is a design of reactors to recover gelatin, polypeptides and chromium from CCLW. The results of the experiment shows that 68% of protein, based on dry weight of leather scraps, could be recovered. Three reactors with a total volume of 18 m3 was designed to handle 10,431 kg of waste generated from the tanning industries.

  9. 75 FR 67100 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ... Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Institution of a five-year review concerning the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan. SUMMARY... order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead to continuation or recurrence...

  10. Native Chromium Resistant Staphylococci Species from a Fly Ash ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty-six chromium-resistant Staphylococci species belonging to S. epidermidis, S. aureus, S. saprophyticus and S. arlettae were previously isolated from a chromium-polluted Fly ash (FA) dumping site in South Africa. However the genetic mechanisms responsible for chromium resistance were not known. Polymerase chain ...

  11. Quantitative determination of chromium in some vegetables in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium has been known to be a micronutrient for mammals for more than four decades. Deficiency in the body results to diabetes, infertility and cardiovascular diseases. However, progress in elucidating the role of chromium has proceeded slowly. Recent studies have shown a potential role of chromium in maintaining ...

  12. Assessment of the level of chromium species in the discharged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the level of chromium species in the discharged effluents of selected tanneries in the Amhara Region; Haik and Debre Berhan tanneries. The level of total chromium, and hexavalent chromium in the discharged effluent of the studied tanneries were determined using the ICP-OES, and ...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.2327 Section 73.2327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens shall conform in identify and specifications to the...

  14. 21 CFR 73.1327 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.1327 Section 73.1327... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1327 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium oxide greens is principally chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3). (2) Color additive...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3111 - Chromium oxide greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium oxide greens. 73.3111 Section 73.3111... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3111 Chromium oxide greens. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive chromium oxide greens (chromic oxide) (CAS Reg. No. 1308-38-9...

  16. 21 CFR 73.1326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.1326 Section 73.1326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive chromium hydroxide green is principally hydrated chromic sesquioxide (Cr2O3·XH2O...

  17. 21 CFR 73.2326 - Chromium hydroxide green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium hydroxide green. 73.2326 Section 73.2326... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2326 Chromium hydroxide green. (a) Identity and specifications.The color additive chromium hydroxide green shall conform in identity and specifications to the...

  18. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  19. Hexavalent and trivalent chromium in leather: What should be done?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Angelo

    2015-11-01

    Trivalent chromium compounds are used for leather tanning, and chromium may be released during use of leather goods. In certain instances, small amounts of hexavalent chromium can be formed and released. Both trivalent and hexavalent chromium can elicit allergic skin reaction in chromium sensitised subjects, the latter being significantly more potent. Induction of sensitisation only occurs after exposure to hexavalent chromium. A minority of subjects are sensitised to chromium, and in a fraction of these subjects allergic skin reaction have been described after wearing leather shoes or, less frequently, other leather goods. The evidence that in all these cases the reaction is related to hexavalent chromium is not always strong. The content of hexavalent chromium in leather is regulated in European Union, but rate of release rather than content is relevant for allergic skin reaction. The role of trivalent chromium appear much less relevant if at all. Modern tanning procedure do not pose significant risk due to either hexavalent or trivalent chromium. Dismissing bad quality and worn-off leather goods is relevant in reducing or eliminating the skin reaction. It should also be pointed out that shoe components or substances other than chromium in leather may cause allergic/irritative skin reactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 21 CFR 73.1015 - Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. 73.1015 Section 73... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1015 Chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide. (a) Identity. The color additive chromium-cobalt-aluminum oxide is a blue-green pigment obtained by calcining a...

  1. Structure and radiation induced swelling of steels and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parshin, A.M.

    1983-01-01

    Regularities of vacancy void formation and radiation induced swelling of austenitic chromium-nickel steels and alloyse ferritic steels as well as titanium α-alloys under radiation by light and heavy ions and neutrons are considered. Possible methods for preparation of alloys with increased resistance to radiation swelling are described. Accounting for investigations into ferritic steels and α-alloys of titanium the basic way of weakening vacancy smelling is development of continuous homogeneous decomposition of solid solution using alloying with vividly expressed incubation period at a certain volumetric dilatation as well as decompositions of the type of ordering, K-state, lamination of solid solutions, etc. Additional alloying of solid solutions is also shown to be necessary for increasing recrystallization temperature of cold-deformed steel

  2. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 2205 duplex stainless steel composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladayo OLANIRAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Composites of duplex stainless steel were produced by oxide dispersion strengthening with comparatively improved mechanical properties by hot press sintering of partially stabilized Zirconia (PSZ, 3% yttria, mole fraction dispersion in 2205 duplex stainless steels. Ceramic oxide was added as reinforcement, while chromium (Cr and Nickel (Ni were incorporated to maintain the austenitic/ferritic phase balance of the duplex stainless steel. The powders and sintered were characterized in detail using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The microstructural evolution and phase formation during oxide dispersion strengthening of duplex stainless steel composites were investigated. The influence of composition variation of the reinforcements on the microstructural and corrosion behaviour in simulated mine water of the composites were investigated. In this manuscript, it was established that composition has great influence on the structure/properties relationship of the composites developed.

  3. Liquid Phase Sintering of Highly Alloyed Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Troels

    1996-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering of stainless steel is usually applied to improve corrosion resistance by obtaining a material without an open pore system. The dense structure normally also give a higher strength when compared to conventional sintered steel. Liquid phase sintrering based on addition...... of boride to AISI 316L type steels have previously been studied, but were found to be sensitive to intergranular corrosion due to formation of intermetallic phases rich in chromium and molybdenum. In order to improve this system further, new investigations have focused on the use of higher alloyed stainless...... steel as base material. The stainless base powders were added different amounts and types of boride and sintered in hydrogen at different temperatures and times in a laboratory furnace. During sintering the outlet gas was analyzed and subsequently related to the obtained microstructure. Thermodynamic...

  4. Short term creep small punch testing of P91 and P92 steels,

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dymáček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, - (2011), s. 179-182 ISSN 1013-9826. [Materials Structure & Micromechanics of Fracture 6. Brno, 28.6.2010-30.6,2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200410801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : creep * small punch test * chromium steel Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy

  5. Male-mediated spontaneous abortion among spouses of stainless steel welders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjollund, N H; Bonde, J P; Jensen, T K

    2000-01-01

    Male-mediated spontaneous abortion has never been documented for humans. The welding of stainless steel is associated with the pulmonary absorption of hexavalent chromium, which has genotoxic effects on germ cells in rodents. Clinical and early subclinical spontaneous abortions were examined among...

  6. Enhanced Wear Properties of Steel : A Combination of Ion Implantation Metallurgy and Laser Metallurgy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, H. de; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1988-01-01

    Laser surface melting of a chromium steel results in tensile stresses, which have deleterious effects on its wear behaviour. Implantations at 360 K with neon and nitrogen have been carried out in order to convert these stresses into compressive ones. Herewith an additional increase in hardness has

  7. High temperature oxidation in boiler environment of chromized steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia, F. F.; Kurniawan, T.; Asmara, Y. P.; Ani, M. H. B.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.

    2017-10-01

    The demand for increasing efficiency has led to the development and construction of higher operating temperature power plant. This condition may lead to more severe thickness losses in boiler tubes due to excessive corrosion process. Hence, the research to improve the corrosion resistance of the current operated material is needed so that it can be applied for higher temperature application. In this research, the effect of chromizing process on the oxidation behaviour of T91 steel was investigated under steam condition. In order to deposit chromium, mixture of chromium (Cr) powder as master alloy, halide salt (NH4Cl) powder as activator and alumina (Al2O3) powder as inert filler were inserted into alumina retort together with the steel sample and heated inside furnace at 1050°C for ten hours under argon gas environment. Furthermore, for the oxidation process, steels were exposed at 700°C at different oxidation time (6h-24h) under steam condition. From FESEM/EDX analysis, it was found that oxidation rate of pack cemented steel was lower than the un-packed steel. These results show that Cr from chromizing process was able to become reservoir for the formation of Cr2O3 in high temperature steam oxidation, and its existence can be used for a longer oxidation time.

  8. Effect of notch and alloying on steel properties during extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinokur, B.B.; Pilyushenko, U.L.; Kasatkin, O.G.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on change of strength and plastic characteristics during extension of notched steel samples of 15 compositions containing often-used alloying elements in various amounts and combinations. The notch causes increase of strength and decrease of plastic properties of structural steels during extension. The most pronounced change of properties takes place for the notched sample with expansion angle close to 180 deg. Reduction of notch expansion angle below 150 deg causes slower decrease of the rate of property change. Nickel alloying and vanadium, titanium microalloying assist the improvement of steel plasticity despite the increase of strength properties. Introduction of these elements in steel compensate partially for the negative notch effect. Alloying by silicon, molybdenum and tungsten results in steel strengthening and chromium alloying causes some loss of strength. Manse, chromium, silicon, molybdenum and tungsten cause decrease of plasticity, which intensifies the negative notch effect. When determining concentration ranges of carbon and alloying elements within the limits of quality composition it is necessary to consider both technology and possibility of sufficient change of properties especially in the case of stress concentrator presence in structures

  9. Radiation stability of chromium low alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakin, V.P.; Kazakov, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation effect on the behaviour of mechanical properties and structure of chromium low alloys such as VKh-2K, KhP-3, VKhM in the wide range of temperatures and neutron fluences is studied. Radiation stability of the alloys is shown to be limited by low-temperature radiation embrittlement (LTRE), caused by radiation hardening as a result of formation of radiation-induced defects such as dislocation loops and vacancy voids in the structure. The methods for prevention LTRE of chromium alloys are suggested. 8 refs.; 8 figs

  10. Protective claddings for high strength chromium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J. F.

    1971-01-01

    The application of a Cr-Y-Hf-Th alloy as a protective cladding for a high strength chromium alloy was investigated for its effectiveness in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of a core alloy. Cladding was accomplished by a combination of hot gas pressure bonding and roll cladding techniques. Based on bend DBTT, the cladding alloy was effective in inhibiting nitrogen embrittlement of the chromium core alloy for up to 720 ks (200hours) in air at 1422 K (2100 F). A significant increase in the bend DBTT occurred with longer time exposures at 1422 K or short time exposures at 1589 K (2400 F).

  11. Binder-free carbon nanotube electrode for electrochemical removal of chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haitao; Na, Chongzheng

    2014-11-26

    Electrochemical treatment of chromium-containing wastewater has the advantage of simultaneously reducing hexavalent chromium (CrVI) and reversibly adsorbing the trivalent product (CrIII), thereby minimizing the generation of waste for disposal and providing an opportunity for resource reuse. The application of electrochemical treatment of chromium is often limited by the available electrochemical surface area (ESA) of conventional electrodes with flat surfaces. Here, we report the preparation and evaluation of carbon nanotube (CNT) electrodes consisting of vertically aligned CNT arrays directly grown on stainless steel mesh (SSM). We show that the 3-D organization of CNT arrays increases ESA up to 13 times compared to SSM. The increase of ESA is correlated with the length of CNTs, consistent with a mechanism of roughness-induced ESA enhancement. The increase of ESA directly benefits CrVI reduction by proportionally accelerating reduction without compromising the electrode's ability to adsorb CrIII. Our results suggest that the rational design of electrodes with hierarchical structures represents a feasible approach to improve the performance of electrochemical treatment of contaminated water.

  12. An in vitro comparison of nickel and chromium release from brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Soares Santos Haddad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at comparing amounts of nickel (Ni and chromium (Cr released from brackets from different manufacturers in simulated oral environments. 280 brackets were equally divided into 7 groups according to manufacturer. 6 groups of brackets were stainless steel, and 1 group of brackets was made of a cobalt-chromium alloy with low Ni content (0.5%. International standard ISO 10271/2001 was applied to provide test methods. Each bracket was immersed in 0.5 ml of synthetic saliva (SS or artificial plaque fluid (PF over a period of 28 days at 37ºC. Solutions were replaced every 7 days, and were analyzed by spectrometry. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied. Amounts of Ni release in SS (µg L-1 per week varied between groups from "bellow detection limits" to 694, and from 49 to 5,948.5 in PF. The group of brackets made of cobalt-chromium alloy, with the least nickel content, did not release the least amounts of Ni. Amounts of Cr detected in SS and in PF (µg L-1 per week were from 1 to 10.4 and from 50.5 to 8,225, respectively. It was therefore concluded that brackets from different manufacturers present different corrosion behavior. Further studies are necessary to determine clinical implications of the findings.

  13. Determination of ferrite formation coefficient of tin in an austenitic stainless steel by the diffusion couple method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchive, Daniel; Treheux, Daniel; Guiraldenq, Pierre

    1976-01-01

    The ferritic action of tin for a 18-10 stainless steel has been measured by two different methods: the first is based on the diffusion couple method and the graphical representation of compositions in a diagram α/α + γ/γ corresponding to ferrite and austenitic elements of the steel. In the second method, ferrite formation is analyzed in small ingots prepared with different chromium and tin concentrations. Ferrite coefficient of tin, compared to chromium is 0.25 with diffusion couples and this value is in good agreement with the classical method [fr

  14. Segregation effects in welded stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhter, J.I.; Shoaid, K.A.; Ahmed, M.; Malik, A.Q.

    1987-01-01

    Welding of steels causes changes in the microstructure and chemical composition which could adversely affect the mechanical and corrosion properties. The report describes the experimental results of an investigation of segregation effects in welded austenitic stainless steels of AISI type 304, 304L, 316 and 316L using the techniques of scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis. Considerable enhancement of chromium and carbon has been observed in certain well-defined zones on the parent metal and on composition, particularly in the parent metal, in attributed to the formation of (M 23 C 6 ) precipitates. The formation of geometrically well-defined segregation zones is explained on the basis of the time-temperature-precipitation curve of (M 23 C 6 ). (author)

  15. Development status und future possibilities for martensitic creep resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J. [Technical Univ. Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In the last four decades new stronger modified 9%Cr martensitic creep resistant steels have been introduced in power plants, which has enabled increases in maximum achievable steam conditions from the previous 250 bar and 540-560 C up to the values of 300 bar and 600-620 C currently being introduced all over the world. In order to further increase the steam parameters of steel based power plants up to a target value of 650 C/325 bar it is necessary to double the creep strength of the martensitic steels. At the same time the resistance against steam oxidation must be improved by an increase of the chromium content in the steels from 9% to 12%. However, so far all attempts to make stronger 12%Cr steels have led to breakdowns in long-term creep strength. Significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of microstructure stability of the martensitic 9-12%Cr steels: Observed microstructure instabilities in 11-12%Cr steels are explained by Z-phase precipitation, which dissolves fine MN nitrides. Improved understanding of effects of B and N on long-term creep properties has formed the basis of a series of new stronger 9%Cr test alloys with improved creep strength. In parallel 9%Cr test steels with low C content show very promising behavior in long-term tests. However, the 9%Cr steels must be surface coated to protect against steam oxidation at high temperature applications above 620%C. A possibility to use fine Z-phases for strengthening of the martensitic steels has been identified, and this opens a new pathway for development of stable strong 12%Cr steels. There are still good prospects for the realization of a 325 bar / 650 C steam power plant all based on steel. (orig.)

  16. Hegelian Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  17. Effect of carbon and silicon on nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium and iron-chromium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khyakkinen, V.I.; Bezobrazov, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The study is aimed at specifying the role of carbon and silicon in high-chromium melts nitridation processes. It is shown that in high-chromium melts of the Cr-Fe-C system the nitrogen solubility is reduced with the growth of carbon content and in the chromium concentration range of 70-100% at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa it is described by the lg[%N] Cr-Fe-C =lg[%N] cr-fe -0.098[%C] equation. While decreasing the temperature the nitrogen solubility in alloys is increased. Silicon essentially decreases the nitrogen solubility in liquid chromium. For the 0-10% silicon concentration range the relation between the equilibrium content of nitrogen and silicon at 1873 K and P N 2 =0.1 MPa is described by the straight line equation [%N] Cr-Si =6.1-0.338 [%Si

  18. Chromium allergy and dermatitis: prevalence and main findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    The history of chromium as an allergen goes back more than a century, and includesan interventional success with national legislation that led to significant changes inthe epidemiology of chromium allergy in construction workers. The 2015 EU Leather Regulation once again put a focus on chromium...... allergy, emphasizing that the investigation of chromium allergy is still far from complete. Our review article on chromium focuses on the allergen’s chemical properties, its potential exposure sources, and the allergen’s interaction with the skin, and also provides an overview of the regulations...

  19. Chromium Tolerance and Bioremoval by Cyanobacteria Isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two cyanobacterial species Nostoc calcicola HH-12 and Chroococcus minutus HH-11 isolated from a textile mill oxidation pond were examined individually and as consortium for their chromium(VI) tolerance and bioremoval from aqueous solutions. Both species were tolerant to the metal and showed significant increase ...

  20. Thermodynamic Properties of Chromium Adsorption by Sediments ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of Chromium from aqueous solution using river Watari sediment as an adsorbent was modeled. The influence of initial pH, solution temperature, adsorbent and adsorbate concentrations on the adsorption efficiency was investigated using batch equilibrium assays. From the results obtained for the adsorption ...

  1. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  2. Origin of hexavalent chromium in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazakis, N.; Kantiranis, N.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium constitutes a serious deterioration factor for the groundwater quality of several regions around the world. High concentrations of this contaminant have been also reported in the groundwater of the Sarigkiol hydrological basin (near Kozani city, NW Greece). Specific interest w...

  3. Chromium fractionation and speciation in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catarinie Diniz; Techy, João Gabriel; Ganzarolli, Edgard Moreira; Quináia, Sueli Pércio

    2012-05-01

    It is common for leather industries to dump chromium-contaminated effluent into rivers and other bodies of water. Thus, it is crucial to know the impacts caused by this practice to the environment. A study on chromium partitioning and speciation, with determination at trace levels, was carried out in a potentially contaminated creek. Chromium fractionation and speciation was performed using a flow-injection preconcentration system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. High levels of this element were found in the particulate material (449-9320 mg kg(-1)), which indicates its compatibility with this fraction. The concentration of Cr(iii) in the water samples collected ranged from 5.2-105.2 μg L(-1). Cr(vi) was always below of the DL (0.3 μg L(-1)). Chromium accumulation observed in the sediment (873-1691 mg kg(-1)) may confirm contamination due to the long term release of contaminated effluents in the creek.

  4. Chromium removal from aqueous media by superparamagnetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1. Introduction. Industrial wastewater often contains substantial amount ... sion, it is imperative that industries reduce chromium in their effluents to this ..... in standard Gibb's free energy ( Go), enthalpy ( Ho), ... ideal gas constant and T is temperature. Table 3 dis ... sequence of increase in access to functional groups afforded ...

  5. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marek, T.; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U.

    2000-01-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  6. Defect structure of electrodeposited chromium layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marek, T. E-mail: marek@para.chem.elte.hu; Suevegh, K.; Vertes, A.; El-Sharif, M.; McDougall, J.; Chisolm, C.U

    2000-06-01

    Positron annihilation spectroscopy was applied to study the effects of pre-treatment and composition of substrates on the quality and defect structure of electrodeposited thick chromium coatings. The results show that both parameters are important, and a scenario is proposed why the mechanically polished substrate gives more defective film than the electro polished one.

  7. Nickel-chromium-silicon brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Angelo J.; Gourley, Bruce R.

    1976-01-01

    A brazing filler metal containing, by weight percent, 23-35% chromium, 9-12% silicon, a maximum of 0.15% carbon, and the remainder nickel. The maximum amount of elements other than those noted above is 1.00%.

  8. Stabilization of chromium: an alternative to make safe leathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Ying; Liu, Xiaoling; Huang, Li; Chen, Wuyong

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the original causes for hexavalent chromium presence in the leather were first evaluated by ageing of chromium(III) solutions and chrome tanned hide powder (50 degrees C, UV lightening at 340 nm, 0-36 h). The results showed that the trivalent chromium at instable coordination state was easy to convert into hexavalent chromium in high pH environment, and the probability of the oxidation increased in this order: multi-coordinate chromium, mono-coordinate chromium, and free chromium. For this reason, the process for stabilizing chromium in the leather was designed with the specific material, which was mostly consisted of the reducers and the chelating agents. After treated with the developed process, these leathers were aged (50 degrees C, UV irradiance as 0.68 W/m(2) at 340 nm, 0-72 h) to estimate chromium(VI) presence. Hexavalent chromium was not found in these treated leathers even if the leathers were aged for 72 h. Moreover, the physical and mechanical properties for the leathers varied little after treating. In a word, an inherent safe and effective process was proved to avoid the formation of hexavalent chromium in the leather. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Chromium is an essential element in the human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarado Gamez, A.; Blanco Saenz, R.; Mora Morales, E.

    2002-01-01

    The Chromium is an essential element for human and animals, because it a preponderant function in the insulin metabolism as a glucose tolerance factor (GTF). The deficiency of chromium engenders a deterioration in the glucose metabolism due to bad efficiency of insulin. Because the importance of this element an exhaustive reference review was made and this presents some studies realized in laboratory animals and in human beings where it is prove with resuits the effect of chromium over the improvement of patients with non-insulin dependant diabetes. Three substances are presented as chromium active biological forms: a material rich in chromium known as glucose tolerance factor, chromium picolinate and a substance of low molecular weight LMWCr in its forms of apo and holo that contains chromium and it links the insulin receptor and improves its activity. Also this paper presents information about the condition of diabetes in Costa Rica. (Author) [es

  10. Release of nickel and chromium ions in the saliva of patients with fixed orthodontic appliance: An in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Anoop; Tikku, Tripti; Khanna, Rohit; Maurya, Rana Pratap; Verma, Geeta; Murthy, R C

    2015-01-01

    Various components of fixed orthodontic appliances are continuously interacting with saliva and other fluids in the mouth releasing various metal ions including nickel and chromium that can cause damaging effects if their concentration exceeds above the toxic dose. To determine and compare the level of nickel and chromium in the saliva of patients undergoing fixed orthodontic treatment at different time periods. The sample of saliva of 13 patients was taken at different time periods that is: Group 1 (before appliance placement), Group II, III, and IV (after 1-week, 1-month, and 3 months of appliance placement respectively). The fixed appliance comprised of brackets, bands, buccal tubes, lingual sheath, transpalatal arch and wires composed of Ni-Ti and stainless steel. The level of ions was determined using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectro-photometry. The data thus obtained were statistically analyzed using SPSS Statistical Analysis Software (Version 15.0). Level of nickel and chromium in saliva was highest in Group II and lowest in Groups I for both the ions. On comparison among different Groups, it was statistically significant for all the groups (<0.001) except between Group III and Group IV. The release of nickel and chromium was maximum at 1-week and then the level gradually declined. These values were well below the toxic dose of these ions. The results should be viewed with caution in subjects with Ni hypersensitivity.

  11. The CCT diagrams of ultra low carbon bainitic steels and their impact toughness properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The CCT diagrams of ULCB N i steels, HN3MV, HN3MVCu having 5.1% Ni and 3.5% Ni and Cu bearing steels; HN3M1.5Cu, HSLA 100 have been determined. The reduced carbon concentration in steel, in order to prevent the formation of cementite, allowed for using nickel, manganese, chromium and molybdenum to enhance hardenability and refinement of the bainitic microstructures by lowering B S temperature. Copper and microadditions of vanadium and niobium are successfully used for precipitation strengthening of steel both in thermomechanically or heat treated conditions. Very good fracture toughness at low temperatures and high yield strength properties of HN3MVCu and HN3MV steels allowed for fulfillment of the requirements for steel plates for pressure vessels and cryogenic applications. (author)

  12. Determination of small amounts of aluminum in iron and steel by x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Minao; Sato, Shoki; Narita, Masanao

    1981-01-01

    The accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis for determining aluminum in steel is generally poor when the aluminum content is below 0.1%. In this study, it is confirmed that the existence of inhomogeneous acid-insoluble aluminum causes the poor accuracy of X-ray fluorescence analysis. The accuracy can be improved by adding granular ferro-zirconium to molten steel when sampling. By using this method, the accuracy of determining aluminum was 0.0024% for low alloy steels and 0.0022% for stainless steels as the standard deviation obtained for a series of differences between an analytical result and a standard value. Corrections for overlapping of the chromium spectrum, and for absorption and enhancement effects of co-existent elements are not necessary for the analysis of low alloy steels, whereas these corrections are necessary for the analysis of stainless steels. (author)

  13. Bioaccessibility, bioavailability and toxicity of commercially relevant iron- and chromium-based particles: in vitro studies with an inhalation perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedberg Yolanda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Production of ferrochromium alloys (FeCr, master alloys for stainless steel manufacture, involves casting and crushing processes where particles inevitably become airborne and potentially inhaled. The aim of this study was to assess potential health hazards induced by inhalation of different well-characterized iron- and chromium-based particles, i.e. ferrochromium (FeCr, ferrosiliconchromium (FeSiCr, stainless steel (316L, iron (Fe, chromium (Cr, and chromium(IIIoxide (Cr2O3, in different size fractions using in vitro methods. This was done by assessing the extent and speciation of released metals in synthetic biological medium and by analyzing particle reactivity and toxicity towards cultured human lung cells (A549. Results The amount of released metals normalized to the particle surface area increased with decreasing particle size for all alloy particles, whereas the opposite situation was valid for particles of the pure metals. These effects were evident in artificial lysosomal fluid (ALF of pH 4.5 containing complexing agents, but not in neutral or weakly alkaline biological media. Chromium, iron and nickel were released to very low extent from all alloy particles, and from particles of Cr due to the presence of a Cr(III-rich protective surface oxide. Released elements were neither proportional to the bulk nor to the surface composition after the investigated 168 hours of exposure. Due to a surface oxide with less protective properties, significantly more iron was released from pure iron particles compared with the alloys. Cr was predominantly released as Cr(III from all particles investigated and was strongly complexed by organic species of ALF. Cr2O3 particles showed hemolytic activity, but none of the alloy particles did. Fine-sized particles of stainless steel caused however DNA damage, measured with the comet assay after 4 h exposure. None of the particles revealed any significant cytotoxicity in terms of cell death

  14. Identification of sigma and chi phases in duplex stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca-Isern, Núria, E-mail: nullorca@ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Luque, Héctor, E-mail: hlopezlu7@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); López-Jiménez, Isabel, E-mail: ilopezji9@alumnes.ub.edu [Departament de Ciència dels Materials i Enginyeria Metallurgica, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti-Franqués 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Biezma, Maria Victoria, E-mail: maria.biezma@unican.es [Department of Earth, Materials Science and Engineering, University of Cantabria - UC, Gamazo, 1, 39004 Santander (Spain)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of this work is to find out the most suitable method for detecting and analyzing accurately the formation conditions of secondary phases, particularly Sigma-phase (σ-phase) and Chi-phase (χ-phase) in duplex stainless steels (UNS S32205 and UNS S32750). The microstructure was characterized after a solution annealing at 1080 °C followed by an isothermal heating at 830 °C for different time ranges, ranging from 1 min to 9 h, in order to enlighten the controversial point concerning the mechanism of χ-phase nucleation in relation with the σ-phase. Etched samples were observed using optical microscopy (MO), and scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with a backscattered electron detector (BSE) was used on unetched samples. Compositional microanalysis (EDS) was carried out for identifying the different phases present in the steels. Sigma phase was easily observed using different etching procedures, whereas χ-phase was only clearly detected with FESEM–BSE on unetched samples. The compositional analyses showed that the molybdenum content in χ-phase almost doubles the content of this element in σ-phase, and as a result the kinetics of nucleation and growth were also found to be remarkably faster when the alloy content in the steel is higher. In addition, chromium nitrides and carbides were also observed to precipitate as a result of the heat treatments and, in the case of the chromium nitrides, they act as a favorable site for the nucleation of σ-phase and χ-phase. - Highlights: • Microscopy was used on heat treated duplex steels for microstructure identification. • FESEM–BSE observation on unetched samples provided the best contrast between phases. • Analyses of carbides, nitrides, chi and sigma phases were possible by EDS and WDS. • Chromium nitrides act as favorable site for the nucleation of chi and sigma phases. • Secondary phases nucleation kinetics are faster in superduplex than in duplex steels.

  15. Design and performance of chromium mist generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirgar Aram

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium mist generator is an essential tool for conducting researches and making science-based recommendations to evaluate air pollution and its control systems. The purpose of this research was to design and construct a homogenous chromium mist generator and the study of some effective factors including sampling height and distances between samplers in side-by-side sampling on chromium mist sampling method. A mist generator was constructed, using a chromium electroplating bath in pilot scale. Concentration of CrO3 and sulfuric acid in plating solution was 125 g L-1 and 1.25 g L-1, respectively. In order to create permanent air sampling locations, a Plexiglas cylindrical chamber (75 cm height, 55 cm i.d was installed the bath overhead. Sixty holes were produced on the chamber in 3 rows (each 20. The distance between rows and holes was 15 and 7.5 cm, respectively. Homogeneity and effective factors were studied via side-by-side air sampling method. So, 48 clusters of samples were collected on polyvinyl chloride (PVC filters housed in sampling cassettes. Cassettes were located in 35, 50, and 65 cm above the solution surface with less than 7.5 and/or 7.5-15 cm distance between heads. All samples were analyzed according to the NIOSH method 7600. According to the ANOVA test, no significant differences were observed between different sampling locations in side-by-side sampling (P=0.82 and between sampling heights and different samplers distances (P=0.86 and 0.86, respectively. However, there were notable differences between means of coefficient of variations (CV in various heights and distances. It is concluded that the most chromium mist homogeneity could be obtained at height 50 cm from the bath solution surface and samplers distance of < 7.5 cm.

  16. Analysis of features of stainless steels in dissimilar welded joints in chloride inducted corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Stainless steels of femtic-austenitic microstructure that means the duplex Cr-Ni-Mo steels, in comparison with austenitic steel includes less expensive nickel and has much better mechanical properties with good formability and corrosion resistance, even in environments containing chloride ions. Similar share of high chromium ferrite and austenite, which is characterized by high ductility, determines that the duplex steels have good crack resistance at temperatures up to approximately -40°C. The steels containing approximately 22% Cr, 5% Ni, 3% Mo and 0.2% N crystallizes as a solid solution δ, partially transforming from the temperature of about 1200°C to 850°C into the phase α. The stable structure of considered steels, at temperatures above 850°C, is ferrite, and at lower temperatures the mixture of phase γ+α +σ. The two-phase structure α+γ the duplex steel obtains after hyperquenching at the temperature of stability of the mixture of α+γ phases, and the share of the phases depends on the hyper quenching attributes. Hyperquenching in water, with a temperature close to 1200°C, ensures the instance in the microstructure of the steel a large share of ferrite and a small share of the high chromium austenite. This causes the increase of strength properties and reducing the plasticity of the steel and its resistance ability to cracking and corrosion. Slower cooling from the mentioned temperature, for example in the air, enables the partial transformation of the a phase into the γ one (α → γ) and increasing the share of austenite in the steel structure. It leads to improvement of plasticity properties. In the paper are presented the results of investigations of heteronymous welded joints of duplex steel and austenitic one. The results include the relation between the chemical composition of steels and their weldability.

  17. Coolant compatibility studies. The effect of irradiation on tensile properties and stress corrosion cracking sensitivity of martensitic steels. MANET 4 - complementary studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nystrand, A.C.

    1994-02-01

    Tensile and stress corrosion cracking tests have been carried out on MANET-type (1.4914 and FV448) and reduced activation (LA12TaLC) high-chromium martensitic steels. The materials had previously been exposed up to 5000 h at ∼275 degrees C in the core, above the core and remote from the core of a high pressure water loop in the Studsvik R2 reactor. After the mechanical testing the materials were examined visually and metallographically. The steel samples exposed in the core section showed large increases in tensile yield strengths when tested at 250 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the radiation hardening was considerably smaller in the reduced activation steel compared to the commercial steels; this observation is consistent with published data on other high-chromium martensitic steels and is associated with the lower chromium content of the LA12TaLC steel (8.9%) compared with those of the commercial steels (10.6 and 11.3%). Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was not detected in any of the stressed steel samples after autoclave testing for times up to 1500 h at 250 degrees C in air-saturated high purity water. This apparent resistance to IASCC may be due to the high chromium martensitic steels not being sensitized by the irradiation in a comparable manner to that shown by the austenitic steels. However, additional studies are required to clarify some of the existing uncertainties with respect to IASCC of these martensitic steels

  18. Influence of sigma-phase formation on the localized corrosion behavior of a duplex stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhe, K.N.; Kain, V.; Madangopal, K.; Gadiyar, H.S.

    1996-01-01

    Because of their austenitic-ferritic microstructures, duplex stainless steels offer a good combination of mechanical and corrosion resistance properties. However, heat treatments can lower the mechanical strength of these stainless steels as well as render them susceptible to intergranular corrosion (IGC) and pitting corrosion. In this study, a low-carbon (0.02%) duplex stainless steel is subjected to various heat treatments at 450 to 950 C for 30 min to 10 h. The heat-treated samples than undergo ASTM IGC and pitting corrosion tests, and the results are correlated with the microstructures obtained after each heat treatment. In the absence of Cr 23 C 6 precipitation, σ-phase precipitates render this duplex stainless steel susceptible to IGC and pitting corrosion. Even submicroscopic σ-phase precipitates are deleterious for IGC resistance. Longer-duration heat treatments (at 750 to 850 C) induce chromium diffusion to replenish the chromium-depleted regions around the σ-phase precipitates and improve IGC resistance; pitting resistance, however, is not fully restored. Various mechanisms of σ-phase formation are discussed to show that regions adjacent to σ-phase are depleted of chromium and molybdenum. The effect of chemical composition (pitting resistance equivalent) on the pitting resistance of various stainless steels is also noted

  19. REM effect on nonmetallic inclusion composition and heat resistance in an austenitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farafonov, V.K.; Shtejnberg, M.M.; Kikhtin, M.V.; Cheremnykh, V.P.; Vojnov, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Studies were made to elucidate the effect of rare earths (lanthanum, neodymium, praseodymium, cerium) on the composition of non-metallic inclusions and heat resistance of an austenitic chromium-nickel steel. Common sulfide and oxide inclusions are shown to be substituted by rare earth sulfide and oxide inclusions at RE metal content in the steel up to 0.1%. Further increase of RE metal content results in increasing non-metallic inclusions containing RE metals, phosphorus and non-ferrous impurities. Creep rate changes insignificantly at RE metal content up to 0.1%, and then it sharply grows with the quantity of non-metallic inclusions in the steel

  20. Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of powdered stainless steel Kh13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radomysel'skij, I.D.; Napara-Volgina, S.G.; Orlova, L.N.; Apininskaya, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties are studied for compact powdered stainless steel, Grade Kh13, produced from prealloyed powder and a mixture of chromium and iron powders by hot vacuum pressing (HVP) following four schemes: HVP of unsintered billets; HVP of presintered billets; HVP of unsintered billets followed by diffusion annealing; HVP of sintered billets followed by diffusion annealing. Analysis of the structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Kh13 steel produced according to the four schemes confirmed that production of this steel by the HVP method without presintering of porous billets and diffusion annealing of compact stampings is possible only when prealloyed powder of particular composition is used as a starting material

  1. Parametrical limits of SCC-susceptibility of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic Cr-Ni steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starosvetskij, D.I.; Baru, R.L.; Bondarenko, A.I.; Bogoyavlenskij, V.L.; Timonin, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    Comparative investigations into corrosion cracking (CC) of austenitic (12Kh18N10T) and austenitic-ferritic (08Kh22N6T) chromium-nickel steels are performed for various chloride media in a wide range of chloride concentrations and temperatures. It is shown that the ratio between steels in terms of their CC-susceptibility is not definite and can undergo a reversal depending on parameters of medium, level and conditions of loading. Differences in mechanisms of corrosion cracking of austenitic and austenitic-ferritic steels are established

  2. Kinetics of steel heavy ingot formation in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukerman, V.Ya.; Marchenko, I.K.

    1986-01-01

    Formation kinetics of round section ingot of up to 0.67 m in diameter was analyzed in dies of semicontinuous-casting machines on casting of the most usable assortment steels: medium-carbon low-alloyed and chromium-nickel stainless steels. It is established that solidification coefficient decreases in direct proportion to ingot diameter. Value of different-thickness ingot skin at die outlet is in direct proportion to a casted steel overheating temperature, ingot diameter and inversely proportional to the number and diameter of holes in a ladder nozzle and square root of ingot drawing rate

  3. austenitic steel corrosion by oxygen-containing liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivollier, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    France is planning to construct the 4. generation of nuclear reactors. They will use liquid sodium as heat transfer fluid and will be made of 316L(N) austenitic steel as structural materials. To guarantee optimal operation on the long term, the behavior of this steel must be verified. This is why corrosion phenomena of 316L(N) steel by liquid sodium have to be well-understood. Literature points out that several corrosion phenomena are possible. Dissolved oxygen in sodium definitely influences each of the corrosion phenomenon. Therefore, the austenitic steel corrosion in oxygen-containing sodium is proposed in this study. Thermodynamics data point out that sodium chromite formation on 316L(N) steel is possible in sodium containing roughly 10 μg.g -1 of oxygen for temperature lower than 650 C (reactor operating conditions).The experimental study shows that sodium chromite is formed at 650 C in the sodium containing 200 μg.g -1 of oxygen. At the same concentration and at 550 C, sodium chromite is clearly observed only for long immersion time (≥ 5000 h). Results at 450 C are more difficult to interpret. Furthermore, the steel is depleted in chromium in all cases.The results suggest the sodium chromite is dissolved in the sodium at the same time it is formed. Modelling of sodium chromite formation - approached by chromium diffusion in steel (in grain and grain boundaries -, and dissolution - assessed by transport in liquid metal - show that simultaneous formation and dissolution of sodium chromite is a possible mechanism able to explain our results. (author) [fr

  4. Discussion on two special stainless steels used in nuclear fuel processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desestret, A.; Ferriol, J.; Vallier, G.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear fuel treatment may entail difficult corrosion problems for the metallurgist. A first case occurs when the nitric solution is concentrated (60 to 70% of HNO 3 ) at temperatures of 130 0 C. This is solved by use of a steel having a very high chromium content (25%), a high nickel content (20%), and a very low carbon content, which is now readily produced on an industrial scale. A second case happens when nitric solutions are made highly agressive, even when diluted at medium temperatures, by highly oxidising ions such as chromate or ceric ions. The stainless steel is then placed in transpassive conditions and subject to very rapid intergranular attack, even when free from precipitated chromium carbides. A steel of the Cr 17 / Ni 14 / Si 4 / C [fr

  5. Corrosion of an Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel in thermally-convective lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A thermal-convection loop of Fe-12 Cr-1 Mo VW steel circulated pure lithium between 500 and 350 0 C for 10,088 h. Periodic weighings of coupons at different temperatures around the loop revealed small weight losses and corrosion rates. Surface analysis showed a relatively thin corrosion layer with an underlying carbide-free zone and some depletion of chromium from the hottest specimen. While some mass transfer of chromium and nickel was detected, this mechanism did not strongly influence the weight loss process as it does with austenitic steels. Therefore, it appeared that reactions with carbon and nitrogen must be the dominant corrosion processes such that weight loss was maximized at the lowest temperature (350 0 C). Overall, the lithium-steel reactions in the temperature range of this experiment were relatively sluggish and the corrosion was not severe

  6. Discontinuous precipitation in a nickel-free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel on solution nitriding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Roghayeh; Akbari, Alireza; Grumsen, Flemming B.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-10-01

    Chromium-rich nitride precipitates in production of nickel-free austenitic stainless steel plates via pressurised solution nitriding of Fe-22.7Cr-2.4Mo ferritic stainless steel at 1473 K (1200 °C) under a nitrogen gas atmosphere was investigated. The microstructure, chemical and phase composition, morphology and crystallographic orientation between the resulted austenite and precipitates were investigated using optical microscopy, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD). On prolonged nitriding, Chromium-rich nitride precipitates were formed firstly close to the surface and later throughout the sample with austenitic structure. Chromium-rich nitride precipitates with a rod or strip-like morphology was developed by a discontinuous cellular precipitation mechanism. STEM-EDS analysis demonstrated partitioning of metallic elements between austenite and nitrides, with chromium contents of about 80 wt.% in the precipitates. XRD analysis indicated that the Chromium-rich nitride precipitates are hexagonal (Cr, Mo)2N. Based on the TEM studies, (Cr, Mo)2N precipitates presented a (1 1 1)γ//(0 0 2)(Cr, Mo)2N, ?γ//?(Cr, Mo)2N orientation relationship with respect to the austenite matrix. EBSD studies revealed that the austenite in the regions that have transformed into austenite and (Cr, Mo)2N have no orientation relation to the untransformed austenite.

  7. Chromium supplementation improved post-stroke brain infarction and hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Ying; Mao, Frank Chiahung; Liu, Chia-Hsin; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lai, Nai-Wei; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2016-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is common after acute stroke and is associated with a worse outcome of stroke. Thus, a better understanding of stress hyperglycemia is helpful to the prevention and therapeutic treatment of stroke. Chromium is an essential nutrient required for optimal insulin activity and normal carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Beyond its nutritional effects, dietary supplement of chromium causes beneficial outcomes against several diseases, in particular diabetes-associated complications. In this study, we investigated whether post-stroke hyperglycemia involved chromium dynamic mobilization in a rat model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia and whether dietary supplement of chromium improved post-stroke injury and alterations. Stroke rats developed brain infarction, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. Post-stroke hyperglycemia was accompanied by elevated secretion of counter-regulatory hormones including glucagon, corticosterone, and norepinephrine, decreased insulin signaling in skeletal muscles, and increased hepatic gluconeogenesis. Correlation studies revealed that counter-regulatory hormone secretion showed a positive correlation with chromium loss and blood glucose increased together with chromium loss. Daily chromium supplementation increased tissue chromium levels, attenuated brain infarction, improved hyperglycemia, and decreased plasma levels of glucagon and corticosterone in stroke rats. Our findings suggest that stroke rats show disturbance of tissue chromium homeostasis with a net loss through urinary excretion and chromium mobilization and loss might be an alternative mechanism responsible for post-stroke hyperglycemia.

  8. Regularities of transition of steel corrosion products into aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, V.I.; Gvozd', A.M.; Karpova, T.Ya.

    1981-01-01

    Effect of different factors on a degree of steel corrosion product transition to a water medium has been studied. Ratio of a specific masm qsub(c) of the corrosion products transferring to the water and a specific masm q of all the steel corrosion products produced under the given conditions was used as a criterium characterizing a degree of corrosion product transition from steel surfaces to water. The transition degree to water at a high temperature of different kind steel corrosion products differs relatively few (qsub(c)/q=0.5-0.7) in the water containing oxygen and different salts on increasing temperature, the corrosion process is characterized with continuous decrease of a relative amount of the corrosion products transferring to the medium. On the contrary, in the deaerated water the transition degree of perlite steel corrosion products to water remains constant in a wide temperature range (100-320 deg C). Besides chromium, nickel being a part of austenitic steel composition affects positively decrease of the transition degree of the corrosion products to water as well as q and qsub(c) reduction. The most difference in corrosion characteristics and the transition degree to water is observed when affecting colant steels in the low-temperature zone of the steam generator [ru

  9. Effects of nitrogen on corrosion of stainless steels in a liquid sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Tadashi; Mutoh, Isao

    1990-01-01

    The corrosion of ferritic stainless steels using sodium at 650degC in a maximum isothermal region contained in a non-isothermal sodium loop constructed of a Type 316 stainless steel has been examined. Also, previous results on corrosion of austenitic stainless steels in sodium at 700degC in the same loop have been reproduced. The selective dissolution and absorption of nickel, the selective dissolution of chromium, and the resultant increase in iron in the surface of stainless steels in the loop mainly determine the corrosion loss of the stainless steel specimens. The austenitic steels hardly decarburize, but denitride. The ferritic steels decarburize and denitride and the denitriding is more remarkable than the decarburizing. The vanadium and niobium, carbide and nitride formers, in the ferritic steels inhibit the decarburizing to some extent, but barely inhibit the denitriding. The nitrogen in the steels rapidly diffuses to the grain boundaries, and rapidly dissolves into sodium, which will lower surface energy of the steels to enhance the dissolution of other elements. The dissolved N in sodium would then be transported to the free surface of the sodium adjacent to the argon cover gas of sodium and easily be released into the cover gas. This mechanism would cause the rapid dissolution of nitrogen into sodium and the enhancement of the corrosion rate of the steels containing nitrogen. (orig.)

  10. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-01-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to ∼14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with ∼25% δ-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature

  11. Effect of Ultrasonic Nano-Crystal Surface Modification (UNSM) on the Passivation Behavior of Aged 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kim, Young-Sik

    2017-06-27

    Stainless steels have good corrosion resistance in many environments but welding or aging can decrease their resistance. This work focused on the effect of aging time and ultrasonic nano-crystal surface modification on the passivation behavior of 316L stainless steel. In the case of slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel, increasing the aging time drastically decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film, even though aging did not form chromium carbide and a chromium depletion zone. This behavior is due to the micro-galvanic corrosion between the matrix and carbon segregated area, and this shows the importance of carbon segregation in grain boundaries to the pitting corrosion resistance of stainless steel, in addition to the formation of the chromium depletion zone. UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano Crystal Surface Modification)-treatment to the slightly sensitized 316L stainless steel increased the pitting potential, decreased the passive current density, and increased the resistance of the passive film. However, in the case of heavily sensitized 316L stainless steel, UNSM-treatment decreased the pitting potential, increased the passive current density, and decreased the resistance of the passive film. This behavior is due to the dual effects of the UNSM-treatment. That is, the UNSM-treatment reduced the carbon segregation, regardless of whether the stainless steel 316L was slightly or heavily sensitized. However, since this treatment made mechanical flaws in the outer surface in the case of the heavily sensitized stainless steel, UNSM-treatment may eliminate chromium carbide, and this flaw can be a pitting initiation site, and therefore decrease the pitting corrosion resistance.

  12. Effects of ageing conditions on the precipitates evolution, chromium depletion and intergranular corrosion susceptibility of AISI 316L: experimental and modeling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahlaoui, H.; Makhlouf, K.; Sidhom, H.; Philibert, J

    2004-05-15

    Chromium carbides and intermetallic phases which form in industrial AISI 316L stainless steel during ageing for up to 80 000 h between 550 and 650 deg. C were identified by combining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin foil imaging and electron diffraction and used to establish the time-temperature-precipitation (TTP) diagram. Following the precipitation phenomena, the chemical changes in the grain boundary region were determined by energy-dispersive X-ray microprobe analysis using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). From the experimentally determined chromium profiles the chromium depleted zones were quantified. The interactions between carbide precipitation involving chromium depletion and intergranular corrosion (IGC) were clearly visible from superposition of TTP diagrams and time-temperature-sensitization (TTS) diagrams obtained from ASTM standardized tests. In addition, an experimental criterion to sensitization-desensitization phenomenon was established. Moreover, an analytical model has been developed in this study and successfully validated to predict the profiles of chromium depleted zones. This model coupled with the previously described criterion provides TTS diagrams in good agreement with experimental results.

  13. Studies of the corrosion and cracking behavior of steels in high temperature water by electrochemical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.F.; Bullerwell, J.; Steward, F.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrochemical methods were used to study the corrosion and cracking behavior of five Fe-Cr alloy steels and 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. A layer of magnetite film forms on the metal surface, which decreases the corrosion rate in high temperature water. Passivity can be achieved on A-106 B carbon steel with a small content of chromium, which cannot be passivated at room temperature. The formation rate and the stability of the passive film (magnetite film) increased with increasing Cr-content in the steels. A mechanistic model was developed to simulate the corrosion and cracking processes of steels in high temperature water. The crack growth rate on steels was calculated from the maximum current of the repassivation current curves according to the slip-oxidation model. The highest crack growth rate was found for 304L stainless steel in high temperature water. Of the four Fe-Cr alloys, the crack growth rate was lower on 0.236% Cr- and 0.33% Cr-steels than on 0.406% Cr-steel and 2.5% Cr-1% Mo steel. The crack growth rate on 0.33% Cr-steel was the smallest over the tested potential range. A higher temperature of the electrolyte led to a higher rate of electrochemical dissolution of steel and a higher susceptibility of steel to cracking, as shown by the positive increase of the electrochemical potential. An increase in Cr-content in the steel is predicted to reduce the corrosion rate of steel at high temperatures. However, this increase in Cr-content is predicted not to reduce the susceptibility of steel to cracking at high temperatures. (author)

  14. Production of basic chromium sulfate by using recovered chromium from ashes of thermally treated leather.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmer, Aline; Nunes, Keila Guerra Pacheco; Gutterres, Mariliz; Marcílio, Nilson Romeu

    2010-04-15

    Leather wastes tanned with chromium are generated during the production process of leather, hence the wastes from hand crafted goods and footwear industries are a serious environmental problem. The thermal treatment of leather wastes can be one of the treatment options because the wastes are rich in chromium and can be used as a raw material for sodium chromate production and further to obtain several chromium compounds. The objective of this study was to utilize the chromium from leather wastes via basic chromium sulfate production to be subsequently applied in a hide tanning. The obtained results have shown that this is the first successful attempt to achieve desired base properties of the product. The result was achieved when the following conditions were applied: a molar ratio between sodium sulfite and sodium dichromate equal to 6; reaction time equal to 5 min before addition of sulfuric acid; pH of sodium dichromate solution equal to 2. Summarizing, there is an opportunity to utilize the dangerous wastes and reused them in the production scheme by minimizing or annulling the environmental impact and to attend a sustainable process development concept. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Femtosecond laser surface structuring and oxidation of chromium thin coatings: Black chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsedi, L., E-mail: Kotsedi@tlabs.ac.za [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Mthunzi, P. [National Laser Centre, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, 0001 Pretoria (South Africa); Muller, T.F.G. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Eaton, S.M. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Julies, B. [University of the Western Cape, Physics Department, Bellville, 7535 Cape Town (South Africa); Manikandan, E. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa); Ramponi, R. [Physics Department, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci, 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Maaza, M. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences-Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, Muckleneuk Ridge, P.O. Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, Somerset West 7129, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape (South Africa)

    2014-12-01

    Highlights: • Oxidation of the chromium thin film to chromium oxide by femtosecond laser with a fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. • Solar absorber from chromium oxide that low percentage reflectance. • Femtosecond laser oxidation, with a de-focused laser. • Chromium oxide formation by femtosecond laser in normal ambient. - Abstract: In view of their potential applications as selective solar absorbers, chromium coatings on float glass substrates were nano/micro structured by femtosecond laser in air. Raman and X-rays diffraction investigations confirmed the formation of an ultra-porous α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer at the surface; higher is the input laser power, enhanced is the crystallinity of the α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The α-Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer with the Cr underneath it in addition to the photo-induced porosity acted as a classical ceramic–metal nano-composite making the reflectance to decrease significantly within the spectral range of 190–1100 nm. The average reflectance decreased from 70 to 2%.

  16. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  17. Radioisotope methods of investigations of phenomenons at phases border of steel - atmosphere in gaseous processes of thermochemical treatment of steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L'utse-Birk, A.; Bel'ski, V.; Vez'ranovski, Eh.; Valis', L.

    1979-01-01

    Radioisotope methods of investigations of the processes of thermochemical treatment of steels are valuable, and in some cases, the only means for analysis of complicated mechanisms of diffusion, absorption and chemical reactions, going on in some technological processes. New specific methods are stated for investigation of processes on the border between steel and gaseous atmosphere. Quantative method nas been developed for investigation of the kinetics of carbon transfere (labelled by carbon-14) from steel into gases. Hydrocarbons and their derivatives are adsorbed selectivelly and beta-activity of the compound is measured in the presence of liquid scintillators. Limiting detectable amount of carbon equals to 0.5μg. Application of labelled (by radioisotope iron-59) iron in steel has ensured a possibility to determine its participation in reactions with chromium and titanum coating atmospheres. Application of hydrocarbons labelled by carbon-14 in the composition of titanum coating atmosphere has permitted to determine, in comparison with investigation of carbon diffusion in steel, participation of two different carbon sources in the forming of the TiC layer on steel and has led to the optimization of processes, especially for low-carbon steels [ru

  18. Quaternized wood as sorbent for hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, K S; Lee, C K; Lee, C Y

    2001-01-01

    The potential of quaternized wood (QW) chips in removing hexavalent chromium from synthetic solution and chrome waste under both batch and continuous-flow conditions was investigated. Sorption was found to be dependent on pH, metal concentration, and temperature. QW chips provide higher sorption capacity and wider pH range compared with untreated wood chips. The equilibrium data could be fitted into the Langmuir isotherm model, and maximum sorption capacities were calculated to be 27.03 and 25.77 mg/g in synthetic chromate solution and chrome waste, respectively. The presence of sulfate in high concentration appeared to suppress the uptake of chromium by QW chips. Column studies showed that bed depth influenced the breakthrough time greatly whereas flow rate of influent had little effect on its sorption on the column.

  19. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Rhizopus Oryzae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EJIRO

    reduction data and the specific growth rate constant value was calculated as 0.082 and the ... Key words: Hexavalent chromium, Rhizopus Oryzae, leather tanning, Monod and Haldane models. ... composition; Glucose 1 g; K2HPO4 0.5 g; NaCl 0.5 g; MgCl2 1.0 g; ... ficantly, because of the inhibitor role of high concentration.

  20. CHROMIUM(II) AMIDES - SYNTHESIS AND STRUCTURES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EDEMA, JJH; GAMBAROTTA, S; MEETSMA, A; SPEK, AL; SMEETS, WJJ; CHIANG, MY

    1993-01-01

    A novel class of mono- and di-meric chromium(II) amides has been prepared and characterized. Reaction of [CrCl2(thf)2] (thf = tetrahydrofuran) with 2 equivalents of M(NR2) (R = C6H11, Pr(i), Ph, or phenothiazinyl; M = Li or Na) allowed the formation of the homoleptic amides [{Cr(mu-NR2)(NR2)}2] (R =

  1. Determination of chromium in biological matrices by neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClendon, L.T.

    1978-01-01

    Chromium is recognized to be an essential trace element in several biological systems. It exists in many biological materials in a variety of chemical forms and very low concentration levels which cause problems for many analytical techniques. Both instrumental and destructive neutron activation analysis were used to determine the chromium concentration in Orchard Leaves, SRM 1571, Brewers Yeast, SRM 1569, and Bovine Liver, SRM 1577. Some of the problems inherent with determining chromium in certain biological matrices and the data obtained here at the National Bureau of Standards using this technique are discussed. The results obtained from dissolution of brewers yeast in a closed system as described in the DNAA procedure are in good agreement with the INAA results. The same phenomenon existed in the determination of chromium in bovine liver. The radiochemical procedure described for chromium (DNAA) provides the analyst with a simple, rapid and selective technique for chromium determination in a variety of matrices. (T.G.)

  2. Environmental exposure to arsenic and chromium in an industrial area

    OpenAIRE

    Vimercati, Luigi; Gatti, Maria F; Gagliardi, Tommaso; Cuccaro, Francesco; De Maria, Luigi; Caputi, Antonio; Quarato, Marco; Baldassarre, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic and chromium are widespread environmental contaminants that affect global health due to their toxicity and carcinogenicity. To date, few studies have investigated exposure to arsenic and chromium in a population residing in a high-risk environmental area. The aim of this study is to evaluate the exposure to arsenic and chromium in the general population with no occupational exposure to these metals, resident in the industrial area of Taranto, Southern Italy, through biological monitor...

  3. Determination of tracer quantities of chromium in uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huart, A.

    1959-01-01

    A method is described for the photometric determination of chromium in uranium by absorbency at 540 mμ of the Cr(VI) diphenylcarbazide combination. After attack by nitric acid, the solution is made perchloric, and the chromium oxidised at the boiling point by permanganate. Excess oxidant is removed by hydrochloric acid. Study of operating conditions resulted in a method with an accuracy of ± 0,5 ppm for 0,5 to 15 ppm chromium in the metal. (author) [fr

  4. Analysis of molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron by polarographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zand, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    The application of direct current Tast polarograph, differential pulse polarography and phase-selective alternative current Tast polarography to the problem of determining molybdenum, chromium, vanadium and iron in various supporting electrolytes is reported. The effect of the supporting electrolyte on the wave/peak potential and sensitivity of the metal ion have been examined. The polarographic methods were applied for simultaneous determination of chromium (3)/chromium (6), vanadium (4), vanadium (5) and iron (2)/iron (3) in different supporting electrolytes

  5. 77 FR 263 - Certain Cut-To-Length Carbon-Quality Steel Plate From Italy and Japan: Revocation of Antidumping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-04

    ... physical description, and in which the chemistry quantities do not equal or exceed any one of the levels...- alloying levels of elements such as chromium, copper, niobium, titanium, vanadium, and molybdenum. Steel....3000, 7210.90.9000, 7211.13.0000, 7211.14.0030, 7211.14.0045, 7211.90.0000, 7212.40.1000, 7212.40.5000...

  6. Corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel bipolar plate with chromiumcarbide coating in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Huang

    Full Text Available Stainless steel with chromium carbide coating is an ideal candidate for bipolar plates. However, the coating still cannot resist the corrosion of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC environment. In this work, the corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel with chromium carbide is investigated in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment by combining electrochemical tests with morphology and microstructure analysis. SEM results reveal that the steel’s surface is completely coated by Cr and chromium carbide but there are pinholes in the coating. After the coated 316L stainless steel is polarized, the diffraction peak of Fe oxide is found. EIS results indicate that the capacitive resistance and the reaction resistance first slowly decrease (2–32 h and then increase. The potentiostatic transient curve declines sharply within 2000 s and then decreases slightly. The pinholes, which exist in the coating, result in pitting corrosion. The corrosion kinetics of the coated 316L stainless steel are modeled and accords the following equation: i0 = 7.6341t−0.5, with the corrosion rate controlled by ion migration in the pinholes. Keywords: PEMFC, Metal bipolar plate, Chromium carbide coating, Corrosion kinetics, Pitting corrosion

  7. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Conway, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments.

  8. Laboratory Automatic Titration of Chromium Plating and Electropolishing Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sopok, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    .... The analytical chemistry literature lacks an adequate automatic titration method for the monitoring of chromic acid in chromium plating solutions and the monitoring of phosphoric and sulfuric acids...

  9. Stabilization and solidification of chromium-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherne, C.A.; Thomson, B.M.

    1997-11-01

    Chromium-contaminated soil is a common environmental problem in the United States as a result of numerous industrial processes involving chromium. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is the species of most concern because of its toxicity and mobility in groundwater. One method of diminishing the environmental impact of chromium is to reduce it to a trivalent oxidation state [Cr(III)], in which it is relatively insoluble and nontoxic. This study investigated a stabilization and solidification process to minimize the chromium concentration in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) extract and to produce a solidified waste form with a compressive strength in the range of 150 to 300 pounds per square inch (psi). To minimize the chromium in the TCLP extract, the chromium had to be reduced to the trivalent oxidation state. The average used in this study was an alluvium contaminated with chromic and sulfuric acid solutions. The chromium concentration in the in the in situ soil was 1212 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) total chromium and 275 mg/kg Cr(VI). The effectiveness of iron, ferrous sulfate to reduce Cr(VI) was tested in batch experiments

  10. Study of austenitic stainless steel welded with low alloy steel filler metal. [tensile and impact strength tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, F. A.; Dyke, R. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The tensile and impact strength properties of 316L stainless steel plate welded with low alloy steel filler metal were determined. Tests were conducted at room temperature and -100 F on standard test specimens machined from as-welded panels of various chemical compositions. No significant differences were found as the result of variations in percentage chemical composition on the impact and tensile test results. The weldments containing lower chromium and nickel as the result of dilution of parent metal from the use of the low alloy steel filler metal corroded more severely in a marine environment. The use of a protective finish, i.e., a nitrile-based paint containing aluminum powder, prevented the corrosive attack.

  11. Some mechanical properties of borided AISI H13 and 304 steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taktak, Sukru

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, mechanical properties of borides formed on AISI H13 hot work tool and AISI 304 stainless steels have been investigated. Both steels have high chromium content and have a widespread use in the engineering application. Boriding treatment was carried out in slurry salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, and ferrosilicon at temperature range of 800-950 deg. C for 3, 5, and 7 h. X-ray diffraction analysis of boride layers on the surface of steels revealed various peaks of FeB, Fe 2 B, CrB, and Ni 3 B. Metallographic studies showed that the boride layer has a flat and smooth morphology in the 304 steel while H13 steel was a ragged morphology. The characterization of the boride layer is also carried out by means of the micro-hardness, surface roughness, adhesion, and fracture toughness studies

  12. Stress-controlled inelastic behavior of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kosei.

    1989-01-01

    Interest in the ferritic steels of higher chromium concentration has increased recently because of an economical combination of mechanical and corrosion properties at elevated temperatures. A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel, developed in the United States, has been expected as an alternative structural material for fast breeder reactor components, in which Type 304 stainless steel or 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel is currently used. For application of this material to the structural components, a lot of work has been done to develop evaluation methods for the deformation behavior and strength properties. The authors have studied the inelastic behavior and the creep-fatigue properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures, and proposed a constitutive equation and a creep-fatigue damage equation based on the overstress concept. In this paper, the applicability is discussed of the constitutive equation to stress-controlled inelastic behavior, such as creep strain hardening and stress cycling

  13. Cathode-sputtered Ti-Zr-N-C-O base hard coatings and stability of said coatings on hard metals and working steels. Kathodenzerstaeubte Hartstoffschichten auf Basis Ti-Zr-N-C-O und deren Stabilitaet auf Hartmetall und Gebrauchsstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, M.

    1986-02-26

    This paper deals with the examination of the metallurgical and thermal stability of the resistant material layers of titanium in connection with the substrate material influence. As substrate material were chosen: hard metal (81% WC, 12% TiC+TaC, 7% Co), high speed steel (DIN 1.3343), austenitic nickel chromium steel (X5 CrNi 18 9) and unalloyed tool steel (DIN 1.1545). The hard materials of titanium were deposited by means of cathode evaporation.

  14. Influence of alloying elements on the marine corrosion of low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dajoux, E.; Malard, S.; Lefevre, Y.; Kervadec, D.; Gil, O.

    2005-01-01

    The study of steel marine corrosion leads to the survey of the parameters having an influence on this phenomenon. These parameters may be dependent on the seawater environment or on steel characteristics. Thus it appears that an experimental procedure could be set up in order to simulate immersion conditions in natural seawater. The system allows fifteen different steels with compositions ranging from carbon steels to stainless steels to be tested during some 14 months in natural seawater with or without microbiological activity. Electrochemical and gravimetric measurements are performed on immersed steel samples. Microbiological analyses are carried out either on the metallic surface and on the liquid medium. Possible influences of alloying elements and bacteria are studied. After a two-month immersion, first results show an influence of the chromium content on the steel corrosion resistance and on marine bacteria behaviour. They also reveal that the bio-film formed onto the carbon steel and low alloy steels surfaces tends to slow down the generalized corrosion or to increase localized corrosion depending on the steel alloying elements content. (authors)

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Dissimilar Friction Stir Spot Welding Between St37 Steel and 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadi, Ali; Shamanian, Morteza; Karimzadeh, Fathallah

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, St37 low-carbon steel and 304 stainless steel were welded successfully, with the thickness of 2 mm, by a friction stir spot welding process carried out at the tool dwell time of 6 s and two different tool rotational speeds of 630 and 1250 rpm. Metallographic examinations revealed four different zones including SZ and HAZ areas of St37 steel and SZ and TMAZ regions of 304 stainless steel in the weld nugget, except the base metals. X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy experiments were used to investigate the possible formation of such phases as chromium carbide. Based on these experiments, no chromium carbide precipitation was found. The recrystallization of the weld nugget in the 304 steel and the phase transformations of the weld regions in the St37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld joint. Hardness changes of joint were acceptable and approximately uniform, as compared to the resistance spot weld. In this research, it was also observed that the tensile/shear strength, as a crucial factor, was increased with the rise in the tool rotational speed. The bond length along the interface between metals, as an effective parameter to increase the tensile/shear strength, was also determined. At higher tool rotational speeds, the bond length was found to be improved, resulting in the tensile/shear strength of 6682 N. Finally, two fracture modes were specified through the fracture mode analysis of samples obtained from the tensile/shear test consisting of the shear fracture mode and the mixed shear/tensile fracture mode.

  16. Corrosion resistant steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  17. Hardness and Wear Resistance of TiC-Fe-Cr Locally Reinforcement Produced in Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olejnik E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase wear resistance cast steel casting the TiC-Fe-Cr type composite zones were fabricated. These zones were obtained by means of in situ synthesis of substrates of the reaction TiC with a moderator of a chemical composition of white cast iron with nickel of the Ni-Hard type 4. The synthesis was carried out directly in the mould cavity. The moderator was applied to control the reactive infiltration occurring during the TiC synthesis. The microstructure of composite zones was investigated by electron scanning microscopy, using the backscattered electron mode. The structure of composite zones was verified by the X-ray diffraction method. The hardness of composite zones, cast steel base alloy and the reference samples such as white chromium cast iron with 14 % Cr and 20 % Cr, manganese cast steel 18 % Mn was measured by Vickers test. The wear resistance of the composite zone and the reference samples examined by ball-on-disc wear test. Dimensionally stable composite zones were obtained containing submicron sizes TiC particles uniformly distributed in the matrix. The macro and microstructure of the composite zone ensured three times hardness increase in comparison to the cast steel base alloy and one and a half times increase in comparison to the white chromium cast iron 20 % Cr. Finally ball-on-disc wear rate of the composite zone was five times lower than chromium white cast iron containing 20 % Cr.

  18. Solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel filler metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-02-01

    Thermal analysis and interrupted solidification experiments on selected austenitic stainless steel filler metals provided an understanding of the solidification behavior of austenitic stainless steel welds. The sequences of phase separations found were for type 308 stainless steel filler metal, L + L + delta + L + delta + γ → γ + delta, and for type 310 stainless steel filler metal, L → L + γ → γ. In type 308 stainless steel filler metal, ferrite at room temperature was identified as either the untransformed primary delta-ferrite formed during the initial stages of solidification or the residual ferrite after Widmanstaetten austenite precipitation. Microprobe and scanning transmission electron microscope microanalyses revealed that solute extensively redistributes during the transformation of primary delta-ferrite to austenite, leading to enrichment and stabilization of ferrite by chromium. The type 310 stainless steel filler metal investigated solidifies by the primary crystallization of austenite, with the transformation going to completion at the solidus temperature. In our samples residual ferrite resulting from solute segregation was absent at the intercellular or interdendritic regions

  19. Impact of the nanostructuration on the corrosion resistance and hardness of irradiated 316 austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hug, E., E-mail: eric.hug@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Prasath Babu, R. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Monnet, I. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Etienne, A. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, Université et INSA de Rouen, Normandie Université, Saint-Etienne du Rouvray Cedex (France); Moisy, F. [Centre de recherches sur les Ions, les Matériaux et la Photonique CEA-CNRS, Normandie Université, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Pralong, V. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Matériaux, Normandie Université, CNRS UMR 6508, 6 Bd Maréchal Juin, 14050 Caen (France); Enikeev, N. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); Saint Petersburg State University, Laboratory of the Mechanics of Bulk Nanostructured Materials, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Abramova, M. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa (Russian Federation); and others

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Impacts of nanostructuration and irradiation on the properties of 316 stainless steels are reported. • Irradiation of nanostructured samples implies chromium depletion as than depicted in coarse grain specimens. • Hardness of nanocrystalline steels is only weakly affected by irradiation. • Corrosion resistance of the nanostructured and irradiated samples is less affected by the chromium depletion. - Abstract: The influence of grain size and irradiation defects on the mechanical behavior and the corrosion resistance of a 316 stainless steel have been investigated. Nanostructured samples were obtained by severe plastic deformation using high pressure torsion. Both coarse grain and nanostructured samples were irradiated with 10 MeV {sup 56}Fe{sup 5+} ions. Microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Surface mechanical properties were evaluated thanks to hardness measurements and the corrosion resistance was studied in chloride environment. Nanostructuration by high pressure torsion followed by annealing leads to enrichment in chromium at grain boundaries. However, irradiation of nanostructured samples implies a chromium depletion of the same order than depicted in coarse grain specimens but without metallurgical damage like segregated dislocation loops or clusters. Potentiodynamic polarization tests highlight a definitive deterioration of the corrosion resistance of coarse grain steel with irradiation. Downsizing the grain to a few hundred of nanometers enhances the corrosion resistance of irradiated samples, despite the fact that the hardness of nanocrystalline austenitic steel is only weakly affected by irradiation. These new experimental results are discussed in the basis of couplings between mechanical and electrical properties of the passivated layer thanks to impedance spectroscopy measurements, hardness properties of the surfaces and local microstructure evolutions.

  20. Ultra low nanowear in novel chromium/amorphous chromium carbide nanocomposite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yate, Luis; Martínez-de-Olcoz, Leyre; Esteve, Joan; Lousa, Arturo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we report the first observation of novel nanocomposite thin films consisting of nanocrystalline chromium embedded in an amorphous chromium carbide matrix (nc-Cr/a-CrC) with relatively high hardness (∼22,3 GPa) and ultra low nanowear. The films were deposited onto silicon substrates using a magnetic filtered cathodic arc deposition system at various negative bias voltages, from 50 to 450 V. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggested the co-existence of chromium and chromium carbide phases, while high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the presence of the nc-Cr/a-CrC structure. The friction coefficient measured with the ball-on disk technique and the nanowear results showed a strong correlation between the macro and nano-tribological properties of the samples. These novel nanocomposite films show promising properties as solid lubricant and wear resistant coatings with relatively high hardness, low friction coefficient and ultra low nanowear.

  1. COST EFFECTIVE CONTROL OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM AIR EMISSIONS FROM FUNCTIONAL CHROMIUM ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper will summrize thie pollution prevention (p2) method to control stack emissions from hard chromium plating operations performed by the USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory (NRMRL) over the last four years. During literature research and user surveys, it...

  2. Plasma nitriding of steels

    CERN Document Server

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  3. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-01-01

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving

  4. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serdar, Marijana [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Meral, Cagla [Middle East Technical University, Department of Civil Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Kunz, Martin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bjegovic, Dubravka [Department of Materials, Faculty of Civil Engineering, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Wenk, Hans-Rudolf [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM.

  5. SEM and TEM characterization of microstructure of stainless steel composites reinforced with TiB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulima, Iwona; Boczkal, Sonia; Jaworska, Lucyna

    2016-01-01

    Steel-8TiB 2 composites were produced by two new sintering techniques, i.e. Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and High Pressure-High Temperature (HP-HT) sintering. This study discusses the impact of these sintering methods on the microstructure of steel composites reinforced with TiB 2 particles. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), X-ray diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the microstructure evolution in steel matrix composites. The results of microscopic examinations revealed a close relationship between the composite microstructure and the methods and conditions of sintering. Substantial differences were observed in the grain size of materials sintered by HP-HT and SPS. It has been demonstrated that the composites sintered by HP-HT tend to form a chromium-iron-nickel phase in the steel matrix. In contrast, the microstructure of the composites sintered by SPS is characterized by the presence of complex borides and chromium-iron phase. - Highlights: •The steel-8TiB 2 composites were fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) and High Pressure-High Temperature (HP-HT). •Sintering techniques has an important effect on changes in the microstructure of steel-8TiB 2 composites. •New phases of different size and morphology were identified.

  6. Spatial distribution of crystalline corrosion products formed during corrosion of stainless steel in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serdar, Marijana; Meral, Cagla; Kunz, Martin; Bjegovic, Dubravka; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy and spatial distribution of nano-crystalline corrosion products that form in the steel/concrete interface were characterized using synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction (μ-XRD). Two types of low-nickel high-chromium reinforcing steels embedded into mortar and exposed to NaCl solution were investigated. Corrosion in the samples was confirmed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). μ-XRD revealed that goethite (α-FeOOH) and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) are the main iron oxide–hydroxides formed during the chloride-induced corrosion of stainless steel in concrete. Goethite is formed closer to the surface of the steel due to the presence of chromium in the steel, while akaganeite is formed further away from the surface due to the presence of chloride ions. Detailed microstructural analysis is shown and discussed on one sample of each type of steel. - Highlights: • Synchrotron micro-diffraction used to map the distribution of crystalline phases. • Goethite and akaganeite are the main corrosion products during chloride induced corrosion in mortar. • Layers of goethite and akaganeite are negatively correlated. • EDS showed Cr present in corrosion products identified by SEM

  7. Computer simulation of sensitization in stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, R W

    1983-12-20

    Stainless steel containers are prime candidates for the containment of nuclear waste in tuff rock. The thermal history of a container involves exposure to temperatures of 500 to 600/sup 0/C when it is welded and possibly filled with molten waste glass, followed by hundreds of years exposure in the 100 to 300/sup 0/C range. The problems of short- and long-term sensitization in stainless steels have been addressed by two computer programs. The TTS program uses classical nucleation and growth theory plus experimental input to predict the onset of precipitation or sensitization under complex thermal histories. The FEMGB program uses quadratic finite-element methods to analyze diffusion processes and chromium depletion during precipitate growth. The results of studies using both programs indicate that sensitization should not be a problem in any of the austenitic stainless steels considered. However, more precise information on the process thermal cycles, especially during welding of the container, is needed. Contributions from dislocation pipe diffusion could promote long-term low-temperature sensitization.

  8. Chromium in urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golabek, Tomasz; Socha, Katarzyna; Kudelski, Jacek; Darewicz, Barbara; Markiewicz-Zukowska, Renata; Chlosta, Piotr; Borawska, Maria

    2017-12-23

    Many epidemiological and experimental studies report a strong role of chemical carcinogens in the etiology of bladder cancer. However, the involvement of heavy metals in tumourigenesis of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder has been poorly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the relationship between chromium (Cr) and bladder cancer. Chromium concentration in two 36-sample series of bladder cancer tissue and sera from patients with this neoplasm were matched with those of a control group. The amount of trace elements in every tissue sample was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. This was correlated with tumour stage. While the median chromium concentration levels reached statistically higher values in the bladder cancer tissue, compared with the non-cancer tissue (99.632ng/g and 33.144ng/g, respectively; p<0.001), the median Cr levels in the sera of the patients with this carcinoma showed no statistical difference when compared to those of the control group (0.511μg/l and 0.710μg/l, respectively; p=0.408). The median levels of Cr in the bladder tissue, depending on the stage of the tumour, compared with the tissue without the neoplasm, observed the same relationship for both non-muscle invasive and muscle-invasive tumours (p<0.001 and p<0.01, respectively). This study shows that patients with urothelial carcinoma of the bladder had higher tissue Cr levels than people without tumour, while no difference was found in the Cr serum levels between the two groups of patients under investigation.

  9. Ultracold chromium: a dipolar quantum gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfau, T.; Stuhler, J.; Griesmaier, A.; Fattori, M.; Koch, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our recent achievement of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a gas of chromium atoms. Peculiar electronic and magnetic properties of chromium require the implementation of novel cooling strategies. We observe up to ∼ 10 5 condensed 52 Cr atoms after forced evaporation within a crossed optical dipole trap. Due to its large magnetic moment (6μ B ), the dipole-dipole interaction strength in chromium is comparable with the one of the van der Waals interaction. We prove the anisotropic nature of the dipolar interaction by releasing the condensate from a cigar shaped trap and observe, in time of flight measurements, the change of the aspect-ratio for different in-trap orientations of the atomic dipoles. We also report on the recent observation of 14 Feshbach resonances in elastic collisions between polarized ultra-cold 52 Cr atoms. This is the first Ballistic expansion of a dipolar quantum gas: The anisotropic interaction leads to a different expansion dynamics for the case of the magnetic dipoles aligned with the symmetry axis of the cigar shaped trap as compared with the dipoles oriented perpendicular to the axis of the cigar. The straight lines correspond to the theoretical expectation according to mean field theory without free parameters. observation of collisional Feshbach resonances in an atomic species with more than one valence electron. Moreover, such resonances constitute an important tool towards the realization of a purely dipolar interacting gas because they can be used to change strength and sign of the van der Waals interaction. (author)

  10. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of hexavalent chromium-induced lung cancer: an updated perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, A M; Ferreira, L M R; Alpoim, M C

    2012-03-01

    For over a century, chromium (Cr) has found widespread industrial and commercial use, namely as a pigment, in the production of stainless steel and in chrome plating. The adverse health effects to the skin and respiratory tract of prolonged exposure to Cr have been known or suspected for a long time, but it was much more recently that the toxicity of this element was unequivocally attributed to its hexavalent state. Based on the combined results of extensive epidemiological studies, animal carcinogenicity studies and several types of other relevant data, authoritative regulatory agencies have found sufficient evidence to classify hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds as encountered in the chromate production, chromate pigment production and chromium plating industries as carcinogenic to humans. Crucial for the development of novel strategies to prevent, detect and/or treat Cr(VI)-induced cancers is a detailed knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying these pathologies. Unfortunately, in spite of a considerable research effort, crucial facets of these mechanisms remain essentially unknown. This review is intended to provide a concise, integrated and critical perspective of the current state of knowledge concerning multiple aspects of Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. It will present recent theories of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis and will include aspects not traditionally covered in other reviews, such as the possible involvement of the energy metabolism in this process. A brief discussion on the models that have been used in the studies of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenicity will also be included, due to the impact of this parameter on the relevance of the results obtained.

  11. Release of nickel and chromium ions from orthodontic wires following the use of teeth whitening mouthwashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AmirHossein Mirhashemi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corrosion resistance is an important requirement for orthodontic appliances. Nickel and chromium may be released from orthodontic wires and can cause allergic reactions and cytotoxicity when patients use various mouthwashes to whiten their teeth. Our study aimed to assess the release of nickel and chromium ions from nickel titanium (NiTi and stainless steel (SS orthodontic wires following the use of four common mouthwashes available on the market. Methods This in vitro, experimental study was conducted on 120 orthodontic appliances for one maxillary quadrant including five brackets, one band and half of the required length of SS, and NiTi wires. The samples were immersed in Oral B, Oral B 3D White Luxe, Listerine, and Listerine Advance White for 1, 6, 24, and 168 h. The samples immersed in distilled water served as the control group. Atomic absorption spectroscopy served to quantify the amount of released ions. Results Nickel ions were released from both wires at all time-points; the highest amount was in Listerine and the lowest in Oral B mouthwashes. The remaining two solutions were in-between this range. The process of release of chromium from the SS wire was the same as that of nickel. However, the release trend in NiTi wires was not uniform. Conclusions Listerine caused the highest release of ions. Listerine Advance White, Oral B 3D White Luxe, and distilled water were the same in terms of ion release. Oral B showed the lowest amount of ion release.

  12. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  13. Bioremediation of chromium in tannery effluent by microbial consortia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chromium is the most toxic and common among the heavy metal pollutants of industrial effluents. In the present work the chromium remediation ability of Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in consortia and in their immobilized forms was studied and their efficiencies were compared.

  14. The commensurate spin excitation in chromium: A polarised neutron investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pynn, R.; Stirling, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    A polarised neutron experiment with neutron energy analysis has been performed with a single-Q sample of chromium in a large magnetic field. The 4-meV ''commensurate'' mode is found to involve spin fluctuations parallel to the ordered chromium moments. 8 refs., 3 figs

  15. 76 FR 8773 - Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 731-TA-1090 (Review)] Superalloy Degassed Chromium From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade Commission. ACTION: Termination of five-year... revocation of the antidumping duty order on superalloy degassed chromium from Japan would be likely to lead...

  16. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  17. Biosorption of chromium by mangrove-derived Aplanochytrium sp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbial dried biomass of Thraustochytrids is used as bioadsorbent for the removal of the chromium in aqueous solution. In this investigation, three species of Thraustochydrids namely Aplanochytrium sp., Thraustochytrium sp. and Schizochytrium sp. were tested for the efficiency of chromium accumulation by culturing ...

  18. Optimization of chromium biosorption in aqueous solution by marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Optimization of a chromium biosorption process was performed by varying three independent variables pH (0.5 to 3.5), initial chromium ion concentration (10 to 30 mg/L), and Yarrowia lipolytica dosage (2 to 4 g/L) using a Doehlert experimental design (DD) involving response surface methodology (RSM). For the maximum ...

  19. Serum chromium concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A highly refined diet that contains too few micronutrients has been recognized as the dominant factor in the rising incidence of diabetes and other insulin related conditions. Among the missing micronutrients, chromium has the greatest impact on insulin response. The objective of this study was to determine serum chromium ...

  20. Increased chromium uptake in polymorphonuclear leukocytes from burned patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Illner, H.; Dineen, P.

    1984-01-01

    Following thermal injury neutrophil function is severely impaired and thought to be hypometabolic; however, the host is considered to be hypermetabolic. To further investigate the metabolism and the function of neutrophils following thermal injury, neutrophil migration and chromium uptake were studied using radio-labelled neutrophils. Random and directed migration were found to be significantly reduced compared to control values. Neutrophil lysozyme content was also reduced in these burn cells while serum lysozyme from the same patients was significantly elevated over control values. These data suggest lysozyme is released by the neutrophil into the circulatory system. The influx of chromium in cells from burned patients was much greater than the influx in normal cells used in studies for chemotaxis. Influx of chromium over time and over varying concentrations of chromium was linear in cells from burned patients and normals. Cells from burned patients, however, took up more chromium than normals. Influx velocity of chromium was also determined and found to be greater in burn cells than normal cells. Since it has been shown that chromium influx is an energy-dependent reaction it is suggested that cellular energy stores are being depleted by the influx of chromium. Whether this is a response to an intracellular deficit or uncoupling of metabolic pathways is not known at this time